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Sample records for hard sphere density

  1. Density Fluctuations of Hard-Sphere Fluids in Narrow Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygârd, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Hyltegren, Kristin; Chodankar, Shirish; Perret, Edith; Buitenhuis, Johan; van der Veen, J. Friso; Kjellander, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Spatial confinement induces microscopic ordering of fluids, which in turn alters many of their dynamic and thermodynamic properties. However, the isothermal compressibility has hitherto been largely overlooked in the literature, despite its obvious connection to the underlying microscopic structure and density fluctuations in confined geometries. Here, we address this issue by probing density profiles and structure factors of hard-sphere fluids in various narrow slits, using x-ray scattering from colloid-filled nanofluidic containers and integral-equation-based statistical mechanics at the level of pair distributions for inhomogeneous fluids. Most importantly, we demonstrate that density fluctuations and isothermal compressibilities in confined fluids can be obtained experimentally from the long-wavelength limit of the structure factor, providing a formally exact and experimentally accessible connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic, thermodynamic properties. Our approach will thus, for example, allow direct experimental verification of theoretically predicted enhanced density fluctuations in liquids near solvophobic interfaces.

  2. Simulation of the consistent Boltzmann equation for hard spheres and its extension to higher densities

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, F.J.; Garcia, A.L.; Alder, B.J.

    1994-10-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo method is modified with a post-collision displacement in order to obtain the hard sphere equation of state. This leads to consistent thermodynamic and transport properties in the low density regime. At higher densities, when the enhanced collision rate according to kinetic theory is introduced, the exact hard sphere equation of state is recovered. and the transport coefficients are comparable to those of the Enskog theory. The computational advantages of this scheme over hard sphere molecular dynamics are that it is significantly faster at low and moderate densities and that it is readily parallelizable.

  3. Communication: inferring the equation of state of a metastable hard-sphere fluid from the equation of state of a hard-sphere mixture at high densities.

    PubMed

    Santos, Andrés; Yuste, Santos B; de Haro, Mariano López

    2011-11-14

    A possible approximate route to obtain the equation of state of the monodisperse hard-sphere system in the metastable fluid region from the knowledge of the equation of state of a hard-sphere mixture at high densities is discussed. The proposal is illustrated by using recent Monte Carlo simulation data for the pressure of a binary mixture. It is further shown to exhibit high internal consistency.

  4. Freezing of the Hard Spheres: Re-Examination of the Weighted-Density-Functional Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Masayuki

    1995-11-01

    Freezing of the hard spheres is re-examined using the modifiedweighted-density approximation (MWDA) of Denton and Ashcroft and thegeneralized effective-liquid approximation (GELA) of Lutsko andBaus. It is found that one owes part of success of these theories tothe use of the Percus-Yevick (PY) direct correlation function and thecorresponding equation of state of uniform fluids as the input data inthese theories. In fact, if one uses virtually \\lq\\lqexact” inputdata in place of the PY ones, the free energies of the solid phase aresomewhat lowered and predicted freezing properties worsen. It isargued that this unfavorable feature of the MWDA and the GELA becomesmuch more serious when these theories are applied to the referencehard spheres in the thermodynamic perturbation approach to freezing ofsystems with long-ranged potentials.

  5. Shells of charge: a density functional theory for charged hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Roland; Gillespie, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    A functional for the electrostatic excess free-energy for charged, hard sphere fluids is proposed. The functional is derived from two complementary, but equivalent, interpretations of the mean spherical approximation (MSA). The first combines fundamental measure theory (FMT) from hard-core interactions with the idea that MSA can be interpreted in terms of the interaction spherical shells of charge. This formulation gives the free-energy density as a function of weighted densities. When all the ions have the same size, the functional adopts an FMT-like form. The second in effect ‘functionalizes’ the derivation of MSA; that is, it generalizes the MSA as a functional-based version of MSA (fMSA). This formulation defines the free-energy density as a function of a position-dependent MSA screening parameter and the weighted densities of the FMT approach. This FMT/fMSA functional is shown to give accurate density profiles, as compared to Monte Carlo simulations, under a wide range of ion concentrations, size asymmetries, and valences.

  6. Free Energy Calculations of Crystalline Hard Sphere Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawardana, K. G.S.H.; Song, Xueyu

    2014-12-22

    Recently developed fundamental measure density functional theory (FMT) is used to study binary hard sphere (HS) complexes in crystalline phases. By comparing the excess free energy, pressure and phase diagram, we show that the fundamental measure functional yields good agreements to the available simulation results of AB, AB2 and AB13 crystals. Additionally, we use this functional to study the HS models of five binary crystals, Cu5Zr(C15b), Cu51Zr14(β), Cu10Zr7(φ), CuZr(B2) and CuZr2 (C11b), which are observed in the Cu-Zr system. The FMT functional gives well behaved minimum for most of the hard sphere crystal complexes in the two dimensional Gaussian space, namely a crystalline phase. However, the current version of FMT functional (white Bear) fails to give a stable minimum for the structure Cu10Zr7(φ). We argue that the observed solid phases for the HS models of the Cu-Zr system are true thermodynamic stable phases and can be used as a reference system in perturbation calculations.

  7. Free Energy Calculations of Crystalline Hard Sphere Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    DOE PAGES

    Gunawardana, K. G.S.H.; Song, Xueyu

    2014-12-22

    Recently developed fundamental measure density functional theory (FMT) is used to study binary hard sphere (HS) complexes in crystalline phases. By comparing the excess free energy, pressure and phase diagram, we show that the fundamental measure functional yields good agreements to the available simulation results of AB, AB2 and AB13 crystals. Additionally, we use this functional to study the HS models of five binary crystals, Cu5Zr(C15b), Cu51Zr14(β), Cu10Zr7(φ), CuZr(B2) and CuZr2 (C11b), which are observed in the Cu-Zr system. The FMT functional gives well behaved minimum for most of the hard sphere crystal complexes in the two dimensional Gaussian space,more » namely a crystalline phase. However, the current version of FMT functional (white Bear) fails to give a stable minimum for the structure Cu10Zr7(φ). We argue that the observed solid phases for the HS models of the Cu-Zr system are true thermodynamic stable phases and can be used as a reference system in perturbation calculations.« less

  8. Communication: Dynamical density functional theory for dense suspensions of colloidal hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopper, Daniel; Roth, Roland; Hansen-Goos, Hendrik

    2015-11-01

    We study structural relaxation of colloidal hard spheres undergoing Brownian motion using dynamical density functional theory. Contrary to the partial linearization route [D. Stopper et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 022151 (2015)] which amounts to using different free energy functionals for the self and distinct part of the van Hove function G(r, t), we put forward a unified description employing a single functional for both components. To this end, interactions within the self part are removed via the zero-dimensional limit of the functional with a quenched self component. In addition, we make use of a theoretical result for the long-time mobility in hard-sphere suspensions, which we adapt to the inhomogeneous fluid. Our results for G(r, t) are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations even in the dense liquid phase. In particular, our theory accurately yields the crossover from free diffusion at short times to the slower long-time diffusion in a crowded environment.

  9. Free energies, vacancy concentrations, and density distribution anisotropies in hard-sphere crystals: A combined density functional and simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oettel, M.; Görig, S.; Härtel, A.; Löwen, H.; Radu, M.; Schilling, T.

    2010-11-01

    We perform a comparative study of the free energies and the density distributions in hard-sphere crystals using Monte Carlo simulations and density functional theory (employing Fundamental Measure functionals). Using a recently introduced technique [T. Schilling and F. Schmid, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 231102 (2009)10.1063/1.3274951] we obtain crystal free energies to a high precision. The free energies from fundamental measure theory are in good agreement with the simulation results and demonstrate the applicability of these functionals to the treatment of other problems involving crystallization. The agreement between fundamental measure theory and simulations on the level of the free energies is also reflected in the density distributions around single lattice sites. Overall, the peak widths and anisotropy signs for different lattice directions agree, however, it is found that fundamental measure theory gives slightly narrower peaks with more anisotropy than seen in the simulations. Among the three types of fundamental measure functionals studied, only the White Bear II functional [H. Hansen-Goos and R. Roth, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18, 8413 (2006)10.1088/0953-8984/18/37/002] exhibits sensible results for the equilibrium vacancy concentration and a physical behavior of the chemical potential in crystals constrained by a fixed vacancy concentration.

  10. Fundamental measure density functional theory studies on the freezing of binary hard-sphere and Lennard-Jones mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Warshavsky, Vadim B.; Song, Xueyu

    2008-07-18

    Free energies and correlation functions of liquid and solid hard-sphere (HS) mixtures are calculated using the fundamental measure density functional theory. Using the thermodynamic perturbation theory the free energies of solid and liquid Lennard-Jones (LJ) mixtures are obtained from correlation functions of HS systems within a single theoretical approach. The resulting azeotrope- and spindle-type solid-liquid phase diagrams of HS and LJ binary mixtures are in good agreement with the corresponding ones from computer simulations.

  11. Equilibrium equation of state of a hard sphere binary mixture at very large densities using replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, Gerardo; Berthier, Ludovic

    2011-02-07

    We use replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations to measure the equilibrium equation of state of the disordered fluid state for a binary hard sphere mixture up to very large densities where standard Monte Carlo simulations do not easily reach thermal equilibrium. For the moderate system sizes we use (up to N = 100), we find no sign of a pressure discontinuity near the location of dynamic glass singularities extrapolated using either algebraic or simple exponential divergences, suggesting they do not correspond to genuine thermodynamic glass transitions. Several scenarios are proposed for the fate of the fluid state in the thermodynamic limit.

  12. Segregation of Fluidized Binary Hard-Sphere Systems Under Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soon-Chul

    We have derived an analytic expression for the contact value of the local density of binary hard-sphere systems under gravity. We have obtained the crossover conditions for the Brazil-nut type segregation of binary hard-sphere mixtures and binary hard-sphere chain mixtures from the segregation criterion, where the segregation occurs when the density (or the pressure) of the small spheres at the bottom is higher than that of the large spheres, or vice versa. For the binary hard-sphere chain mixtures, the crossover condition for the segregation depends on the number of monomers composed of hard-sphere chains as well as the mass and the diameter of each species. The fundamental-measure theories (FMTs) and local density approximation (LDA) are employed to examine the crossover condition for the segregation of the gravity-induced hard-sphere mixtures. The calculated results show that the LDA does not explain the density oscillation near the bottom, whereas the modified fundamental-measure theory (MFMT) compares with molecular dynamics simulations.

  13. The equation of state of flexible chains of tangent hard spheres at high-density region from simulation and thermodynamic perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Farzad; Feyzi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-14

    Radial and triplet correlation functions of the reference hard sphere system are determined at several solid densities by canonical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. These customized data are used to extend the second order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) to the solid phase of flexible hard chain systems. In order to test the accuracy of the TPT equation of state (EOS) for hard chains, MC simulations are carried out for systems of chain length 4 to 15. Several simulations are performed in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble to obtain the high-density EOS of hard chains in the fluid and solid phases. To determine solid-fluid equilibrium (SFE), Helmholtz free energies of solid crystals at a reference density are determined in a series of canonical MC simulations. As the chain length increases, asymptotic behaviors are observed in the coexistence pressure and densities of fluid and solid phases. It is found that the accuracy of TPT for EOS and SFE in systems of hard chains greatly improves by extending it to second order.

  14. Local structure in hard-sphere chain-molecule fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasti, Sambid; Taylor, Mark

    2012-04-01

    The conformation of a polymer chain in solvent is coupled to the local structure of the solvent environment. For hard-sphere systems, a monomeric solvent acts to compress a flexible hard-sphere-solute chain and, for a dense system, the local solvent structure is imprinted onto the chain. Here we use Monte Carlo simulation, including bond-rebridging moves, to study the size and conformation of a hard sphere chain in a hard-sphere solvent as a function of both solvent density and solvent diameter. We also study the structure of a hard-sphere-chain solute in a hard-sphere-chain solvent. In the case of a 5-mer chain in 5-mer solvent we show that the effects of solvent can be mapped to a set of two-body solvation potentials. Following our previous work on hard-sphere chains in monomeric solvent [1], we explore the application of these short chain potentials to the study of longer chain-molecule fluids. [4pt] [1] M.P. Taylor and S. Ichida, J. Polym. Sci. B: Polym. Phys. 45, 3319 (2007).

  15. Local structure in hard-sphere chain-molecule fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasti, Sambid; Taylor, Mark

    2011-10-01

    The conformation of a polymer chain in solvent is coupled to the local structure of the solvent environment. For hard-sphere systems, a monomeric solvent acts to compress a flexible hard-sphere-solute chain and, for a dense system, the local solvent structure is imprinted onto the chain. Here we use Monte Carlo simulation, including bond-rebridging moves, to study the size and conformation of a hard sphere chain in a hard-sphere solvent as a function of both solvent density and solvent diameter. We also study the structure of a hard-sphere-chain solute in a hard-sphere-chain solvent. In the case of a 5-mer chain in 5-mer solvent we show that the effects of solvent can be mapped to a set of two-body solvation potentials. Following our previous work on hard-sphere chains in monomeric solvent [1], we explore the application of these short chain potentials to the study of longer chain-molecule fluids. [4pt] [1] M.P. Taylor and S. Ichida, J. Polym. Sci. B: Polym. Phys. 45, 3319 (2007).

  16. van der Waals-Tonks-type equations of state for hard-disk and hard-sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian Zhi

    2002-09-01

    Using the known virial coefficients of hard-disk and hard-sphere fluids, we develop van der Waals-Tonks-type equations of state for hard-disk and hard-sphere fluids. In the low-density fluid regime, these equations of state are in good agreement with the simulation results and the existing equations of state.

  17. Equilibrium Phase Behavior of Polydisperse Hard Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasolo, Moreno; Sollich, Peter

    2003-08-01

    We calculate the phase behavior of hard spheres with size polydispersity, using accurate free energies for the fluid and solid phases. Cloud and shadow curves are found exactly by the moment free energy method, but we also compute the complete phase diagram, taking full account of fractionation. In contrast to earlier, simplified treatments we find no point of equal concentration between fluid and solid or reentrant melting at higher densities. Rather, the fluid cloud curve continues to the largest polydispersity that we study (14%); from the equilibrium phase behavior a terminal polydispersity can thus be defined only for the solid, where we find it to be around 7%. At sufficiently large polydispersity, fractionation into several solid phases can occur, consistent with previous approximate calculations; we find, in addition, that coexistence of several solids with a fluid phase is also possible.

  18. Topological lifetimes of polydisperse colloidal hard spheres at a wall.

    PubMed

    Dullens, Roel P A; Kegel, Willem K

    2005-01-01

    Confocal scanning laser microscopy was used to study the behavior of dense suspensions of model colloidal hard spheres at a single wall. Due to the slight polydispersity, our system shows a reentrant melting transition at high densities involving a hexatic structure [Phys. Rev. Lett 92, 195702 (2004)

  19. Stability of solid phases in the dipolar hard sphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, D.; Weis, J.-J.

    2011-12-01

    Free energy differences between solid phases of dipolar hard spheres are estimated by Monte Carlo simulation using a nonequilibrium work method. These calculations allow one to determine which of the considered phases has the minimum free energy. The phase diagram which we obtain is confirmed by simulations in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble over a wide region of the density and temperature domain.

  20. Statistical mechanics and hydrodynamics of self-propelled hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Benjamin; Baskaran, Aparna

    2017-03-01

    Starting from a microscopic model of self-propelled hard spheres we use tools of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and the kinetic theory of hard spheres to derive a Smoluchowski equation for interacting Active Brownian particles. We illustrate the utility of the statistical mechanics framework developed with two applications. First, we derive the steady state pressure of the hard sphere active fluid in terms of the microscopic parameters and second, we identify the critical density for the onset of motility-induced phase separation in this system. We show that both these quantities agree well with overdamped simulations of active Brownian particles with excluded volume interactions given by steeply repulsive potentials. The results presented here can be used to incorporate excluded volume effects in diverse models of self-propelled particles.

  1. Fundamental measure theory for hard-sphere mixtures: a review.

    PubMed

    Roth, Roland

    2010-02-17

    Hard-sphere systems are one of the fundamental model systems of statistical physics and represent an important reference system for molecular or colloidal systems with soft repulsive or attractive interactions in addition to hard-core repulsion at short distances. Density functional theory for classical systems, as one of the core theoretical approaches of statistical physics of fluids and solids, has to be able to treat such an important system successfully and accurately. Fundamental measure theory is up to date the most successful and most accurate density functional theory for hard-sphere mixtures. Since its introduction fundamental measure theory has been applied to many problems, tested against computer simulations, and further developed in many respects. The literature on fundamental measure theory is already large and is growing fast. This review aims to provide a starting point for readers new to fundamental measure theory and an overview of important developments.

  2. Thermodynamic properties of non-conformal soft-sphere fluids with effective hard-sphere diameters.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-López, Tonalli; del Río, Fernando

    2012-01-28

    In this work we study a set of soft-sphere systems characterised by a well-defined variation of their softness. These systems represent an extension of the repulsive Lennard-Jones potential widely used in statistical mechanics of fluids. This type of soft spheres is of interest because they represent quite accurately the effective intermolecular repulsion in fluid substances and also because they exhibit interesting properties. The thermodynamics of the soft-sphere fluids is obtained via an effective hard-sphere diameter approach that leads to a compact and accurate equation of state. The virial coefficients of soft spheres are shown to follow quite simple relationships that are incorporated into the equation of state. The approach followed exhibits the rescaling of the density that produces a unique equation for all systems and temperatures. The scaling is carried through to the level of the structure of the fluids.

  3. A fundamental measure theory for the sticky hard sphere fluid.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik; Wettlaufer, J S

    2011-01-07

    We construct a density functional theory (DFT) for the sticky hard sphere (SHS) fluid which, like Rosenfeld's fundamental measure theory (FMT) for the hard sphere fluid [Y. Rosenfeld, Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 980 (1989)], is based on a set of weighted densities and an exact result from scaled particle theory (SPT). It is demonstrated that the excess free energy density of the inhomogeneous SHS fluid Φ(SHS) is uniquely defined when (a) it is solely a function of the weighted densities from Kierlik and Rosinberg's version of FMT [E. Kierlik and M. L. Rosinberg, Phys. Rev. A 42, 3382 (1990)], (b) it satisfies the SPT differential equation, and (c) it yields any given direct correlation function (DCF) from the class of generalized Percus-Yevick closures introduced by Gazzillo and Giacometti [J. Chem. Phys. 120, 4742 (2004)]. The resulting DFT is shown to be in very good agreement with simulation data. In particular, this FMT yields the correct contact value of the density profiles with no adjustable parameters. Rather than requiring higher order DCFs, such as perturbative DFTs, our SHS FMT produces them. Interestingly, although equivalent to Kierlik and Rosinberg's FMT in the case of hard spheres, the set of weighted densities used for Rosenfeld's original FMT is insufficient for constructing a DFT which yields the SHS DCF.

  4. Transport coefficients of hard-sphere mixtures. III. Diameter ratio 0.4 and mass ratio 0.03 at high fluid density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erpenbeck, Jerome J.

    1993-07-01

    The equation of state and the transport coefficients of shear viscosity, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusion, and mutal diffusion are estimated for a binary, equimolar mixture of hard spheres having a diameter ratio of 0.4 and a mass ratio of 0.03 at volumes in the range 1.7V0 to 3V0 (V0=1/2 √2 Ntsumaxaσ3a, where xa are the mole fractions, σa are the diameters, and N is the number of particles), complementing and, in some cases, improving earlier low-density results through Monte Carlo, molecular-dynamics calculations using the Green-Kubo formulas. Calculations are reported for 108 to 2048 particles, so that both finite-system and, in the case of the transport coefficients, long-time tail corrections can be applied to obtain accurate estimates of the pressure and the transport coefficients in the thermodynamic limit. Corrections of both types are found to be increasingly important at higher densities, for which the pressure is observed to become nonlinear in 1/N over the range covered. The Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland (MCSL) equation is found to account for the pressure with considerable accuracy for V>=1.7V0 the difference between the observed (infinite-system) pressure and the MCSL prediction increases monotonically with density, reaching 0.4% at V=1.7V0. For volumes below 2V0 the pressure in excess of the MCSL prediction is found to ``soften'' slightly in its dependence on the density. The pressure is also compared with the known virial series (B2 and B3) and the difference is fitted to a rational polynomial from which estimates for B4 and B5 are derived. The transport coefficients are compared with the predictions of the revised Enskog theory, evaluated using the MCSL equation of state. The shear viscosity coefficient is found to lie within about 5% of the theory over much of the range of densities, exceeding the Enskog prediction at both high and low densities and rising sharply at the highest densities. The thermal conductivity drops to about 94

  5. Voronoi neighbor statistics of hard-disks and hard-spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V. Senthil; Kumaran, V.

    2005-08-01

    The neighbor distribution in hard-sphere and hard-disk fluids is analyzed using Voronoi tessellation. The statistical measures analyzed are the nth neighbor coordination number (Cn), the nth neighbor distance distribution [fn(r )], and the distribution of the number of Voronoi faces (Pn). These statistics are sensitive indicators of microstructure, and they distinguish thermodynamic and annealed structures. A sharp rise in the hexagon population marks the onset of hard-disk freezing transition, and Cn decreases sharply to the hexagonal lattice values. In hard-disk random structures the pentagon and heptagon populations remain significant even at high volume fraction. In dense hard-sphere (three-dimensional) structures at the freezing transition, C1 is close to 14, instead of the value of 12 expected for a face-centered-cubic lattice. This is found to be because of a topological instability, where a slight perturbation of the positions in the centers of a pair of particles transforms a vertex in the Voronoi polyhedron into a Voronoi surface. We demonstrate that the pair distribution function and the equation-of-state obtained from Voronoi tessellation are equal to those obtained from thermodynamic calculations. In hard-sphere random structures, the dodecahedron population decreases with increasing density. To demonstrate the utility of the neighbor analysis, we estimate the effective hard-sphere diameter of the Lennard-Jones fluid by identifying the diameter of the spheres in the hard-sphere fluid which has C1 equal to that for the Lennard-Jones fluid. The estimates are within 2% deviation from the theoretical results of Barker-Henderson and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen.

  6. Scaling for hard-sphere colloidal glasses near jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zargar, Rojman; DeGiuli, Eric; Bonn, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Hard-sphere colloids are model systems in which to study the glass transition and universal properties of amorphous solids. Using covariance matrix analysis to determine the vibrational modes, we experimentally measure here the scaling behavior of the density of states, shear modulus, and mean-squared displacement (MSD) in a hard-sphere colloidal glass. Scaling the frequency with the boson-peak frequency, we find that the density of states at different volume fractions all collapse on a single master curve, which obeys a power law in terms of the scaled frequency. Below the boson peak, the exponent is consistent with theoretical results obtained by real-space and phase-space approaches to understanding amorphous solids. We find that the shear modulus and the MSD are nearly inversely proportional, and show a singular power-law dependence on the distance from random close packing. Our results are in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  7. Haptic search for hard and soft spheres.

    PubMed

    van Polanen, Vonne; Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M; Kappers, Astrid M L

    2012-01-01

    In this study the saliency of hardness and softness were investigated in an active haptic search task. Two experiments were performed to explore these properties in different contexts. In Experiment 1, blindfolded participants had to grasp a bundle of spheres and determine the presence of a hard target among soft distractors or vice versa. If the difference in compliance between target and distractors was small, reaction times increased with the number of items for both features; a serial strategy was found to be used. When the difference in compliance was large, the reaction times were independent of the number of items, indicating a parallel strategy. In Experiment 2, blindfolded participants pressed their hand on a display filled with hard and soft items. In the search for a soft target, increasing reaction times with the number of items were found, but the location of target and distractors appeared to have a large influence on the search difficulty. In the search for a hard target, reaction times did not depend on the number of items. In sum, this showed that both hardness and softness are salient features.

  8. Second virial coefficients of dipolar hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Philipse, Albert P; Kuipers, Bonny W M

    2010-08-18

    An asymptotic formula is reported for the second virial coefficient B(2) of a dipolar hard-sphere (DHS) fluid, in zero external field, for strongly coupled dipolar interactions. This simple formula, together with the one for the weak-coupling B(2), provides an accurate prediction of the second virial coefficient for a wide range of dipole moments, including those that are experimentally accessible in magnetite ferrofluids. The weak-coupling B(2) also yields an estimate of the magnetic moment minimally needed for isotropic gas-liquid phase-separation, if any, in the DHS fluid.

  9. Packing of hard spheres in cylinders and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mughal, Adil; Weaire, Denis; Hutzler, Stefan; Chan, Ho Kei

    2014-03-01

    We study the optimal packing of hard spheres in an infinitely long cylinder. Our simulations have yielded dozens of periodic, mechanically stable, structures as the ratio of the cylinder (D) to sphere (d) diameter is varied. Up to D/d =2.715 the densest structures are composed entirely of spheres which are in contact with the cylinder. The density reaches a maximum at discrete values of D/d when a maximum number of contacts are established. These maximal contact packings are of the classic ``phyllotactic'' type, familiar in biology. However, between these points we observe another type of packing, termed line-slip. An analytic understanding of these rigid structures follows by recourse to a yet simpler problem: the packing of disks on a cylinder. We show that maximal contact packings correspond to the perfect wrapping of a honeycomb arrangement of disks around a cylindrical tube. While line-slip packings are inhomogeneous deformations of the honeycomb lattice modified to wrap around the cylinder. Beyond D/d =2.715 the structures are more complex, since they incorporate internal spheres. We review some relevant experiments with hard spheres, small bubbles and discuss similar structures found in nature. We discuss the chirality of these packings and potential applications in photonics.

  10. Chemical potential of a test hard sphere of variable size in a hard-sphere fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, David M.; Santos, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    The Labík and Smith Monte Carlo simulation technique to implement the Widom particle insertion method is applied using Molecular Dynamics (MD) instead to calculate numerically the insertion probability, P0(η ,σ0) , of tracer hard-sphere (HS) particles of different diameters, σ0, in a host HS fluid of diameter σ and packing fraction, η , up to 0.5. It is shown analytically that the only polynomial representation of -ln ⁡P0 (η ,σ0) consistent with the limits σ0→0 and σ0→∞ has necessarily a cubic form, c0(η ) +c1(η ) σ0 /σ +c2(η ) (σ0/σ ) 2 +c3(η ) (σ0/σ ) 3 . Our MD data for -ln ⁡P0 (η ,σ0) are fitted to such a cubic polynomial and the functions c0(η ) and c1(η ) are found to be statistically indistinguishable from their exact solution forms. Similarly, c2(η ) and c3(η ) agree very well with the Boublík-Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland and Boublík-Carnahan-Starling-Kolafa formulas. The cubic polynomial is extrapolated (high density) or interpolated (low density) to obtain the chemical potential of the host fluid, or σ0→σ , as β μex =c0+c1+c2+c3 . Excellent agreement between the Carnahan-Starling and Carnahan-Starling-Kolafa theories with our MD data is evident.

  11. Hard sphere study of condensation entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2008-06-01

    A simple procedure is devised to calculate the Ben-Naim standard condensation entropy by treating neat liquids as hard sphere fluids. The calculated values are close to the experimental ones for nonpolar liquids, but not for polar aprotic ones and for H-bonded liquids. For the latter the calculated entropy values become close to the experimental ones if the molecular van der Waals diameters are used instead of the effective ones. This implies that the magnitude of the orientational entropy loss due to H-bond formation is quantitatively similar to that of the configurational entropy gain for the decrease in excluded volume due to the bunching up effect caused by H-bonds.

  12. Assembly of body-centered cubic crystals in hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Xu, W-S; Sun, Z-Y; An, L-J

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the crystallization of monodisperse hard spheres confined by two square patterned substrates (possessing the basic character of the body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal structure) at varying substrate separations via molecular dynamics simulation. Through slowly increasing the density of the system, we find that crystallization under the influence of square patterned substrates can set in at lower densities compared with the homogeneous crystallization. As the substrate separation decreases, the density, where crystallization occurs (i.e., pressure drops), becomes small. Moreover, two distinct regimes are identified in the plane of bcc particle fraction and density for the separation range investigated. For large substrate separations, the bcc particle fraction displays a local maximum as the density is increased, and the resulting formed crystals have a polycrystalline structure. However, and more importantly, another situation emerges for small substrate separations: the capillary effects (stemming from the presence of two substrates) overwhelm the bulk driving forces (stemming from the spontaneous thermal fluctuations in the bulk) during the densification, eventually resulting in the formation of a defect-free bcc crystal (unstable with respect to the bulk hard-sphere crystals) by using two square patterned substrates.

  13. Developments in the hard sphere model for self-diffusion and shear viscosity. II. Applications based on methane as a model hard sphere fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easteal, A. J.; Woolf, L. A.

    1984-05-01

    The ratios D/ DE (where D is diffusion coefficient and DE is the Enskog dense fluid diffusion coefficient) for smooth hard spheres, and η/η E (η being shear viscosity and η E the Enskog dense fluid viscosity) for methane, are used in conjunction with equivalent hard spheres diameters (σ ϱ) derived from liquid densities on solid-liquid coexistenxe curves to examine (a) application of the smooth hard spheres (SHS) model to self-diffusion in the liquefied rare gases; (b) application of the Chandler rough hard spheres (RHS) model to diffusion and viscosity of the complex molecular liquids carbon tetrachloride, benzene, acetonitrile, carbon disulphide, 1,2-dichloroethane, mesitylene, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and deuteromethanol. Predictions of the SHS model are satisfactory for the liquefied rare gases provided that σ ϱ values are corrected to allow for less dense liquid packing, at temperatures approaching the triple points, than for hard spheres. Translational- rotational coupling factors for diffusion ( AD) and in some cases viscosity ( Aη) for the complex molecular liquids show all four kinds of temperature ( T) and density (ϱ) dependence: (i) independent of T and ϱ (CS 2); (ii) temperature-dependent, density-independent (CH 3CN, CH 2OD); (iii) density-dependent, temperature-independent (CCl 4); (iv) density and temperature- dependent (benzene).

  14. Thermodynamic properties of lattice hard-sphere models.

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulos, A Z

    2005-09-08

    Thermodynamic properties of several lattice hard-sphere models were obtained from grand canonical histogram- reweighting Monte Carlo simulations. Sphere centers occupy positions on a simple cubic lattice of unit spacing and exclude neighboring sites up to a distance sigma. The nearestneighbor exclusion model, sigma = radical2, was previously found to have a second-order transition. Models with integer values of sigma = 1 or 2 do not have any transitions. Models with sigma = radical3 and sigma = 3 have weak first-order fluid-solid transitions while those with sigma = 2 radical2, 2 radical3, and 3 radical2 have strong fluid-solid transitions. Pressure, chemical potential, and density are reported for all models and compared to the results for the continuum, theoretical predictions, and prior simulations when available.

  15. Dynamics of hard sphere colloidal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. X.; Chaikin, Paul M.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.

    1994-01-01

    Our objective is to perform on homogeneous, fully equilibrated dispersions the full set of experiments characterizing the transition from fluid to solid and the properties of the crystalline and glassy solid. These include measurements quantifying the nucleation and growth of crystallites, the structure of the initial fluid and the fully crystalline solid, and Brownian motion of particles within the crystal, and the elasticity of the crystal and the glass. Experiments are being built and tested for ideal microgravity environment. Here we describe the ground based effort, which exploits a fluidized bed to create a homogeneous, steady dispersion for the studies. The differences between the microgravity environment and the fluidized bed is gauged by the Peclet number Pe, which measures the rate of convection/sedimentation relative to Brownian motion. We have designed our experiment to accomplish three types of measurements on hard sphere suspensions in a fluidized bed: the static scattering intensity as a function of angle to determine the structure factor, the temporal autocorrelation function at all scattering angles to probe the dynamics, and the amplitude of the response to an oscillatory forcing to deduce the low frequency viscoelasticity. Thus the scattering instrument and the colloidal dispersion were chosen such as that the important features of each physical property lie within the detectable range for each measurement.

  16. Tunable long range forces mediated by self-propelled colloidal hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ran; Cohen Stuart, Martien A; Bolhuis, Peter G

    2015-01-09

    Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we systematically study the effective interaction between two parallel hard walls in a 2D suspension of self-propelled (active) colloidal hard spheres, and we find that the effective force between two hard walls can be tuned from a long range repulsion into a long range attraction by changing the density of active particles. At relatively high densities, the active hard spheres can form a dynamic crystalline bridge, which induces a strong oscillating long range dynamic wetting repulsion between the walls. With decreasing density, the dynamic bridge gradually breaks, and an intriguing long range dynamic depletion attraction arises. A similar effect occurs in a quasi-2D suspension of self-propelled colloidal hard spheres by changing the height of the confinement. Our results open up new possibilities to manipulate the motion and assembly of microscopic objects by using active matter.

  17. Tunable Long Range Forces Mediated by Self-Propelled Colloidal Hard Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Ran; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we systematically study the effective interaction between two parallel hard walls in a 2D suspension of self-propelled (active) colloidal hard spheres, and we find that the effective force between two hard walls can be tuned from a long range repulsion into a long range attraction by changing the density of active particles. At relatively high densities, the active hard spheres can form a dynamic crystalline bridge, which induces a strong oscillating long range dynamic wetting repulsion between the walls. With decreasing density, the dynamic bridge gradually breaks, and an intriguing long range dynamic depletion attraction arises. A similar effect occurs in a quasi-2D suspension of self-propelled colloidal hard spheres by changing the height of the confinement. Our results open up new possibilities to manipulate the motion and assembly of microscopic objects by using active matter.

  18. Multiple reentrant glass transitions in confined hard-sphere glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Suvendu; Lang, Simon; Gross, Markus; Oettel, Martin; Raabe, Dierk; Franosch, Thomas; Varnik, Fathollah

    2014-07-01

    Glass-forming liquids exhibit a rich phenomenology upon confinement. This is often related to the effects arising from wall-fluid interactions. Here we focus on the interesting limit where the separation of the confining walls becomes of the order of a few particle diameters. For a moderately polydisperse, densely packed hard-sphere fluid confined between two smooth hard walls, we show via event-driven molecular dynamics simulations the emergence of a multiple reentrant glass transition scenario upon a variation of the wall separation. Using thermodynamic relations, this reentrant phenomenon is shown to persist also under constant chemical potential. This allows straightforward experimental investigation and opens the way to a variety of applications in micro- and nanotechnology, where channel dimensions are comparable to the size of the contained particles. The results are in line with theoretical predictions obtained by a combination of density functional theory and the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition.

  19. One-dimensional Kac model of dense amorphous hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, H.; Ikeda, A.

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a new model of hard spheres under confinement for the study of the glass and jamming transitions. The model is a one-dimensional chain of the d-dimensional boxes each of which contains the same number of hard spheres, and the particles in the boxes of the ends of the chain are quenched at their equilibrium positions. We focus on the infinite-dimensional limit (d \\to ∞) of the model and analytically compute the glass transition densities using the replica liquid theory. From the chain length dependence of the transition densities, we extract the characteristic length scales at the glass transition. The divergence of the lengths are characterized by the two exponents, -1/4 for the dynamical transition and -1 for the ideal glass transition, which are consistent with those of the p-spin mean-field spin glass model. We also show that the model is useful for the study of the growing length scale at the jamming transition.

  20. Dendritic Growth of Hard-Sphere Crystals. Experiment 34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Meyer, W. V.; Rogers, R.

    1998-01-01

    Recent observations of the disorder-order transition for colloidal hard spheres under microgravity revealed dendritic crystallites roughly 1-2 mm in size for samples in the coexistence region of the phase diagram. Order-of-magnitude estimates rationalize the absence of large or dendritic crystals under normal gravity and their stability to annealing in microgravity. A linear stability analysis of the Ackerson and Schaetzel model for crystallization of hard spheres establishes the domain of instability for diffusion-limited growth at small supersaturations. The relationship between hard-sphere and molecular crystal growth is established and exploited to relate the predicted linear instability to the well-developed dendrites observed.

  1. Shear Yielding and Shear Jamming of Dense Hard Sphere Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbani, Pierfrancesco; Zamponi, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the response of dense hard sphere glasses to a shear strain in a wide range of pressures ranging from the glass transition to the infinite-pressure jamming point. The phase diagram in the density-shear strain plane is calculated analytically using the mean-field infinite-dimensional solution. We find that just above the glass transition, the glass generically yields at a finite shear strain. The yielding transition in the mean-field picture is a spinodal point in presence of disorder. At higher densities, instead, we find that the glass generically jams at a finite shear strain: the jamming transition prevents yielding. The shear yielding and shear jamming lines merge in a critical point, close to which the system yields at extremely large shear stress. Around this point, highly nontrivial yielding dynamics, characterized by system-spanning disordered fractures, is expected.

  2. Phase equilibria in polydisperse nonadditive hard-sphere systems.

    PubMed

    Paricaud, Patrice

    2008-08-01

    Colloidal particles naturally exhibit a size polydispersity that can greatly influence their phase behavior in solution. Nonadditive hard-sphere (NAHS) mixtures are simple and well-suited model systems to represent phase transitions in colloid systems. Here, we propose an analytical equation of state (EOS) for NAHS fluid mixtures, which can be straightforwardly applied to polydisperse systems. For positive values of the nonadditivity parameter Delta the model gives accurate predictions of the simulated fluid-fluid coexistence curves and compressibility factors. NPT Monte Carlo simulations of the mixing properties of the NAHS symmetric binary mixture with Delta>0 are reported. It is shown that the enthalpy of mixing is largely positive and overcomes the positive entropy of mixing when the pressure is increased, leading to a fluid-fluid phase transition with a lower critical solution pressure. Phase equilibria in polydisperse systems are predicted with the model by using the density moment formalism [P. Sollich, Adv. Chem. Phys. 116, 265 (2001)]. We present predictions of the cloud and shadow curves for polydisperse NAHS systems composed of monodisperse spheres and polydisperse colloid particles. A fixed nonadditivity parameter Delta > 0 is assumed between the monodisperse and polydisperse spheres, and a Schulz distribution is used to represent the size polydispersity. Polydispersity is found to increase the extent of the immiscibility region. The predicted cloud and shadow curves depend dramatically on the upper cutoff diameter sigmac of the Schulz distribution, and three-phase equilibria can occur for large values of sigmac.

  3. Avalanche mediated devitrification in a glass of pseudo hard-spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales-Pelaez, P.; Montero de Hijes, P.; Sanz, E.; Valeriani, C.

    2016-09-01

    By means of molecular dynamics we analyse several aspects of the avalanche-mediated mechanism for glass crystallization recently reported for hard sphere glasses (Sanz et al 2014 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. 111 75). To investigate the role of inter-particle interaction softness on the devitrification path we use a continuous version of the hard-sphere potential: the pseudo-hard sphere potential (Jover et al 2012 J. Chem. Phys. 137 144505). We observe the same crystallization mechanism as in hard spheres. However, pseudo-hard sphere glasses crystallise earlier for a given density because the development of avalanches is eased by the small degree of overlapping allowed. We analyse the impact of density on the devitrification mechanism. When increasing the density, the avalanche mechanism becomes more evident and crystallisation is retarded due to a decrease of the avalanche emergence likelihood. To conclude, the observed avalanche-mediated mechanism and its density dependence do not substantially change with the employed simulation ensemble (constant volume versus constant pressure).

  4. The cage effect in systems of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Megen, W.; Schöpe, H. J.

    2017-03-01

    The cage effect is generally invoked when discussing the delay in the decay of time correlation functions of dense fluids. In an attempt to examine the role of caging more closely, we consider the spread of the displacement distributions of Brownian particles. These distributions are necessarily biased by the presence of neighbouring particles. Accommodation of this bias by those neighbours conserves the displacement distribution locally and presents a collective mechanism for exploring configuration space that is more efficient than the intrinsic Brownian motion. Caging of some particles incurs, through the impost of global conservation of the displacement distribution, a delayed, non-local collective process. This non-locality compromises the efficiency with which configuration space is explored. Both collective mechanisms incur delay or stretching of time correlation functions, in particular the particle number and flux densities. This paper identifies and distinguishes these mechanisms in existing data from experiments and computer simulations on systems of particles with hard sphere interactions.

  5. Structural precursor to freezing in the hard-disk and hard-sphere systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truskett, Thomas M.; Torquato, Salvatore; Sastry, Srikanth; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Stillinger, Frank H.

    1998-09-01

    We show that the simplest model fluids in two and three dimensions, namely, the hard-disk and hard-sphere fluids, exhibit a structural precursor to the freezing transition, which manifests itself as a shoulder in the second peak of the radial distribution function. This feature is not present in the radial distribution function of the low-density fluid. Close examination of the two-dimensional fluid configurations in the vicinity of the freezing transition reveals that the shoulder corresponds to the formation of a distinct structural motif, identifiable as a four-particle hexagonally close-packed arrangement. As the dense fluid approaches the freezing transition, the ordered arrangements form large embryonic domains, commensurate with those seen in the crystal at the melting point. Contrary to the notion that the split second peak is a signature of the amorphous solid, our results support the idea that it is a precursor to the development of long-range order.

  6. Investigating hard sphere interactions through spin echo scattering angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, Adam

    Spin Echo Scattering Angle Measurement (SESAME) allows neutron scattering instruments to perform real space measurements on large micron scale samples by encoding the scattering angle into the neutron's spin state via Larmor precession. I have built a SESAME instrument at the Low Energy Neutron Source. I have also assisted in the construction of a modular SESAME instrument on the ASTERIX beamline at Los Alamos National lab. The ability to tune these instruments has been proved mathematically and optimized and automated experimentally. Practical limits of the SESAME technique with respect to polarization analyzers, neutron spectra, Larmor elements, and data analysis were investigated. The SESAME technique was used to examine the interaction of hard spheres under depletion. Poly(methyl methacrylate) spheres suspended in decalin had previously been studied as a hard sphere solution. The interparticle correlations between the spheres were found to match the Percus-Yevick closure, as had been previously seen in dynamical light scattering experiments. To expand beyond pure hard spheres, 900kDa polystyrene was added to the solution in concentrations of less than 1% by mass. The steric effects of the polystyrene were expected to produce a short-range, attractive, "sticky" potential. Experiment showed, however, that the "sticky" potential was not a stable state and that the spheres would eventually form long range aggregates.

  7. Exact second virial coefficient for dipolar hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Virga, Epifanio G

    2013-11-20

    The second virial coefficient B2 for a fluid of dipolar hard spheres has been given several approximate forms valid in the limits of weak and strong interactions. They have been formulated as asymptotic expressions in a dimensionless interaction parameter λ. In this paper, B2 is determined exactly for all values of λ in both the three-dimensional case, where spheres may access the whole space and their dipole moments may be oriented in all directions, and in the quasi-two-dimensional case, where spheres have their centres bound to glide on a plane, while their dipole moments are still freely orientable in space.

  8. Slip and flow of hard-sphere colloidal glasses.

    PubMed

    Ballesta, P; Besseling, R; Isa, L; Petekidis, G; Poon, W C K

    2008-12-19

    We study the flow of concentrated hard-sphere colloidal suspensions along smooth, nonstick walls using cone-plate rheometry and simultaneous confocal microscopy. In the glass regime, the global flow shows a transition from Herschel-Bulkley behavior at large shear rate to a characteristic Bingham slip response at small rates, absent for ergodic colloidal fluids. Imaging reveals both the "solid" microstructure during full slip and the local nature of the "slip to shear" transition. Both the local and global flow are described by a phenomenological model, and the associated Bingham slip parameters exhibit characteristic scaling with size and concentration of the hard spheres.

  9. Thermodynamic stability in elastic systems: Hard spheres embedded in a finite spherical elastic solid.

    PubMed

    Solano-Altamirano, J M; Goldman, Saul

    2015-12-01

    We determined the total system elastic Helmholtz free energy, under the constraints of constant temperature and volume, for systems comprised of one or more perfectly bonded hard spherical inclusions (i.e. "hard spheres") embedded in a finite spherical elastic solid. Dirichlet boundary conditions were applied both at the surface(s) of the hard spheres, and at the outer surface of the elastic solid. The boundary conditions at the surface of the spheres were used to describe the rigid displacements of the spheres, relative to their initial location(s) in the unstressed initial state. These displacements, together with the initial positions, provided the final shape of the strained elastic solid. The boundary conditions at the outer surface of the elastic medium were used to ensure constancy of the system volume. We determined the strain and stress tensors numerically, using a method that combines the Neuber-Papkovich spherical harmonic decomposition, the Schwartz alternating method, and Least-squares for determining the spherical harmonic expansion coefficients. The total system elastic Helmholtz free energy was determined by numerically integrating the elastic Helmholtz free energy density over the volume of the elastic solid, either by a quadrature, or a Monte Carlo method, or both. Depending on the initial position of the hard sphere(s) (or equivalently, the shape of the un-deformed stress-free elastic solid), and the displacements, either stationary or non-stationary Helmholtz free energy minima were found. The non-stationary minima, which involved the hard spheres nearly in contact with one another, corresponded to lower Helmholtz free energies, than did the stationary minima, for which the hard spheres were further away from one another.

  10. Effect of H[subscript 2]O on the density of silicate melts at high pressures: Static experiments and the application of a modified hard-sphere model of equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Zhicheng; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2012-04-20

    Density of ultramafic silicate melts was determined using the sink/float technique at high pressures. Seven melt compositions were studied, among which three were dry compositions with different Mg's (molar MgO/(MgO + FeO) x 100) and the other four were hydrous compositions synthesized by adding 2-7 wt.% H{sub 2}O to the anhydrous ones. Experimental conditions range from 9 to 15 GPa and from 2173 to 2473 K. The sinking and floatation of density markers were observed for all melt compositions. Melt density data were analyzed by applying the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and a newly developed equation of state for silicate melts based on the model of hard sphere mixtures. The presence of water can significantly reduce the density of melts due to its small molecular mass. On the other hand, water makes hydrous silicate melts more compressible than anhydrous melts and therefore the effect of H{sub 2}O on melt density is less significant at high pressures. The density of hydrous melts was then calculated as a function of H{sub 2}O content at the conditions of the bottom of the upper mantle, and was compared with the density of the dominant upper mantle minerals. Results show that the conditions for a negatively buoyant melt that coexists with a pyrolite mantle atop the 410 km discontinuity are marginally satisfied if H{sub 2}O is the only volatile component to facilitate melting, but such conditions will be satisfied by a broader range of conditions when other heavier volatile elements (C, K, etc.) are also present.

  11. Phase diagram of highly asymmetric binary hard-sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, M; van Roij, R; Evans, R

    1999-05-01

    We study the phase behavior and structure of highly asymmetric binary hard-sphere mixtures. By first integrating out the degrees of freedom of the small spheres in the partition function we derive a formal expression for the effective Hamiltonian of the large spheres. Then using an explicit pairwise (depletion) potential approximation to this effective Hamiltonian in computer simulations, we determine fluid-solid coexistence for size ratios q=0.033, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 1.0. The resulting two-phase region becomes very broad in packing fractions of the large spheres as q becomes very small. We find a stable, isostructural solid-solid transition for q< or =0.05 and a fluid-fluid transition for q< or =0.10. However, the latter remains metastable with respect to the fluid-solid transition for all size ratios we investigate. In the limit q-->0 the phase diagram mimics that of the sticky-sphere system. As expected, the radial distribution function g(r) and the structure factor S(k) of the effective one-component system show no sharp signature of the onset of the freezing transition and we find that at most points on the fluid-solid boundary the value of S(k) at its first peak is much lower than the value given by the Hansen-Verlet freezing criterion. Direct simulations of the true binary mixture of hard spheres were performed for q > or =0.05 in order to test the predictions from the effective Hamiltonian. For those packing fractions of the small spheres where direct simulations are possible, we find remarkably good agreement between the phase boundaries calculated from the two approaches-even up to the symmetric limit q=1 and for very high packings of the large spheres, where the solid-solid transition occurs. In both limits one might expect that an approximation which neglects higher-body terms should fail, but our results support the notion that the main features of the phase equilibria of asymmetric binary hard-sphere mixtures are accounted for by the effective

  12. Rowlinson’s concept of an effective hard sphere diameter

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Attention is drawn to John Rowlinson’s idea that the repulsive portion of the intermolecular interaction may be replaced by a temperature-dependent hard sphere diameter. It is this approximation that made the development of perturbation theory possible for realistic fluids whose intermolecular interactions have a steep, but finite, repulsion at short separations. PMID:20953320

  13. Probing the evolution and morphology of hard carbon spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Pol, Vilas G.; Wen, Jianguo; Lau, Kah Chun; Callear, Samantha; Bowron, Daniel T.; Lin, Chi-Kai; Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian; Curtiss, Larry A.; David, William; Miller, Dean J.; Thackeray, Michael M.

    2014-03-01

    Monodispersed hard carbon spheres can be synthesized quickly and reproducibly by autogenic reactions of hydrocarbon precursors, notably polyethylene (including plastic waste), at high temperature and pressure. The carbon microparticles formed by this reaction have a unique spherical architecture, with a dominant internal nanometer layered motif, and they exhibit diamond-like hardness and electrochemical properties similar to graphite. In the present study, in-situ monitoring by X-ray diffraction along with electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, neutron pair-distribution function analysis, and computational modeling has been used to elucidate the morphology and evolution of the carbon spheres that form from the autogenic reaction of polyethylene at high temperature and pressure. A mechanism is proposed on how polyethylene evolves from a linear chain-based material to a layered carbon motif. Heating the spheres to 2400-2800 °C under inert conditions increases their graphitic character, particularly at the surface, which enhances their electrochemical and tribological properties.

  14. Dynamic equivalences in the hard-sphere dynamic universality class.

    PubMed

    López-Flores, Leticia; Ruíz-Estrada, Honorina; Chávez-Páez, Martín; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2013-10-01

    We perform systematic simulation experiments on model systems with soft-sphere repulsive interactions to test the predicted dynamic equivalence between soft-sphere liquids with similar static structure. For this we compare the simulated dynamics (mean squared displacement, intermediate scattering function, α-relaxation time, etc.) of different soft-sphere systems, between them and with the hard-sphere liquid. We then show that the referred dynamic equivalence does not depend on the (Newtonian or Brownian) nature of the microscopic laws of motion of the constituent particles, and hence, applies independently to colloidal and to atomic simple liquids. Finally, we verify another more recently proposed dynamic equivalence, this time between the long-time dynamics of an atomic liquid and its corresponding Brownian fluid (i.e., the Brownian system with the same interaction potential).

  15. Clustering and gelation of hard spheres induced by the Pickering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortini, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    A mixture of hard-sphere particles and model emulsion droplets is studied with a Brownian dynamics simulation. We find that the addition of nonwetting emulsion droplets to a suspension of pure hard spheres can lead to both gas-liquid and fluid-solid phase separations. Furthermore, we find a stable fluid of hard-sphere clusters. The stability is due to the saturation of the attraction that occurs when the surface of the droplets is completely covered with colloidal particles. At larger emulsion droplet densities a percolation transition is observed. The resulting networks of colloidal particles show dynamical and mechanical properties typical of a colloidal gel. The results of the model are in good qualitative agreement with recent experimental findings [E. Koos and N. Willenbacher, ScienceSCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1199243 331, 897 (2011)] in a mixture of colloidal particles and two immiscible fluids.

  16. Clustering and gelation of hard spheres induced by the Pickering effect.

    PubMed

    Fortini, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    A mixture of hard-sphere particles and model emulsion droplets is studied with a Brownian dynamics simulation. We find that the addition of nonwetting emulsion droplets to a suspension of pure hard spheres can lead to both gas-liquid and fluid-solid phase separations. Furthermore, we find a stable fluid of hard-sphere clusters. The stability is due to the saturation of the attraction that occurs when the surface of the droplets is completely covered with colloidal particles. At larger emulsion droplet densities a percolation transition is observed. The resulting networks of colloidal particles show dynamical and mechanical properties typical of a colloidal gel. The results of the model are in good qualitative agreement with recent experimental findings [E. Koos and N. Willenbacher, Science 331, 897 (2011)] in a mixture of colloidal particles and two immiscible fluids.

  17. Self-assembly in colloidal hard-sphere systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filion, L. C.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we examine the phase behaviour and nucleation in a variety of hard-sphere systems. In Chapter 1 we present a short introduction and describe some of the simulation techniques used in this thesis. One of the main difficulties in predicting the phase behaviour in colloidal, atomic and nanoparticle systems is in determining the stable crystalline phases. To address this problem, in Chapters 2 and 4 we present two different methods for predicting possible crystal phases. In Chapter 2, we apply a genetic algorithm to binary hard-sphere mixtures and use it to predict the best-packed structures for this system. In Chapter 4 we present a novel method based on Monte Carlo simulations to predict possible crystalline structures for a variety of models. When the possible phases are known, full free-energy calculations can be used to predict the phase diagrams. This is the focus of Chapters 3 and 5. In Chapter 3, we examine the phase behaviour for binary hard-sphere mixtures with size ratios of the large and small spheres between 0.74 and 0.85. Between size ratios 0.76 and 0.84 we find regions where the binary Laves phases are stable, in addition to monodisperse face-centered-cubic (FCC) crystals of the large and small spheres and a binary liquid. For size ratios 0.74 and 0.85 we find only the monodisperse FCC crystals and the binary liquid. In Chapter 5 we examine the phase behaviour of binary hard-sphere mixtures with size ratios between 0.3 and 0.42. In this range, we find an interstitial solid solution (ISS) to be stable, as well as FCC crystals of the small and large spheres, and a binary fluid. The ISS phase consists of an FCC crystal of the large particles with some of the octahedral holes filled by smaller particles. We show that this filling fraction can be tuned from 0 to 100%. Additionally, we examine the diffusive properties of the small particles in the ISS for size ratio 0.3. In contrast to most systems, we find a region where the diffusion

  18. Bond-orientational analysis of hard-disk and hard-sphere structures.

    PubMed

    Senthil Kumar, V; Kumaran, V

    2006-05-28

    We report the bond-orientational analysis results for the thermodynamic, random, and homogeneously sheared inelastic structures of hard-disks and hard-spheres. The thermodynamic structures show a sharp rise in the order across the freezing transition. The random structures show the absence of crystallization. The homogeneously sheared structures get ordered at a packing fraction higher than the thermodynamic freezing packing fraction, due to the suppression of crystal nucleation. On shear ordering, strings of close-packed hard-disks in two dimensions and close-packed layers of hard-spheres in three dimensions, oriented along the velocity direction, slide past each other. Such a flow creates a considerable amount of fourfold order in two dimensions and body-centered-tetragonal (bct) structure in three dimensions. These transitions are the flow analogs of the martensitic transformations occurring in metals due to the stresses induced by a rapid quench. In hard-disk structures, using the bond-orientational analysis we show the presence of fourfold order. In sheared inelastic hard-sphere structures, even though the global bond-orientational analysis shows that the system is highly ordered, a third-order rotational invariant analysis shows that only about 40% of the spheres have face-centered-cubic (fcc) order, even in the dense and near-elastic limits, clearly indicating the coexistence of multiple crystalline orders. When layers of close-packed spheres slide past each other, in addition to the bct structure, the hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) structure is formed due to the random stacking faults. Using the Honeycutt-Andersen pair analysis and an analysis based on the 14-faceted polyhedra having six quadrilateral and eight hexagonal faces, we show the presence of bct and hcp signatures in shear ordered inelastic hard-spheres. Thus, our analysis shows that the dense sheared inelastic hard-spheres have a mixture of fcc, bct, and hcp structures.

  19. Topological lifetimes of polydisperse colloidal hard spheres at a wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullens, Roel P. A.; Kegel, Willem K.

    2005-01-01

    Confocal scanning laser microscopy was used to study the behavior of dense suspensions of model colloidal hard spheres at a single wall. Due to the slight polydispersity, our system shows a reentrant melting transition at high densities involving a hexatic structure [R. P. A. Dullens and W. K. Kegel, Phys. Rev. Lett 92, 195702 (2004)]. The reentrant melting transition is accompanied by an increase in the mean-squared displacement. The correlation between structure and dynamics was quantitatively analyzed on a single-particle level. In particular, the topological lifetime, being the average time that a particle spends having the same coordination number, is determined for all coordination numbers and as a function of volume fraction. The defective (non-sixfold-coordinated) particles exhibit shorter lifetimes than sixfold-coordinated particles, indicating that the mobility of the system is larger at or close to defective particles. The lifetime itself is a strong function of volume fraction. In particular, the global behavior of the mean-squared displacement is proportional to the hopping frequency (the inverse of the lifetime), showing that particles changing their coordination number contribute most to the local mobility.

  20. Velocity and energy distributions in microcanonical ensembles of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalas, Enrico; Gabriel, Adrian T.; Martin, Edgar; Germano, Guido

    2015-08-01

    In a microcanonical ensemble (constant N V E , hard reflecting walls) and in a molecular dynamics ensemble (constant N V E PG , periodic boundary conditions) with a number N of smooth elastic hard spheres in a d -dimensional volume V having a total energy E , a total momentum P , and an overall center of mass position G , the individual velocity components, velocity moduli, and energies have transformed beta distributions with different arguments and shape parameters depending on d , N , E , the boundary conditions, and possible symmetries in the initial conditions. This can be shown marginalizing the joint distribution of individual energies, which is a symmetric Dirichlet distribution. In the thermodynamic limit the beta distributions converge to gamma distributions with different arguments and shape or scale parameters, corresponding respectively to the Gaussian, i.e., Maxwell-Boltzmann, Maxwell, and Boltzmann or Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution. These analytical results agree with molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations with different numbers of hard disks or spheres and hard reflecting walls or periodic boundary conditions. The agreement is perfect with our Monte Carlo algorithm, which acts only on velocities independently of positions with the collision versor sampled uniformly on a unit half sphere in d dimensions, while slight deviations appear with our molecular dynamics simulations for the smallest values of N .

  1. Adsorption of a Hard Sphere Fluid in a Disordered Polymerized Matrix: Application of the Replica Ornstein-Zernike Equations

    PubMed

    Pizio; Trokhymchuk; Henderson; Labik

    1997-07-01

    A model of hard spheres adsorbed in disordered porous media is studied using the associative replica Ornstein-Zernike (ROZ) equations. Extending previous studies of adsorption in a hard sphere matrices, we investigate a polymerized matrix. We consider an associating fluid of hard spheres with two intracore attractive sites per particle; consequently chains consisting of overlapping hard spheres can be formed due to the chemical association. This is the generalization of the model with sites on the surface of Wertheim that has been studied in the bulk by Chang and Sandler. The matrix structure is obtained in the polymer Percus-Yevick approximation. We solve the ROZ equations in the associative hypernetted chain approximation. The pair distribution functions, the fluid compressibility, the equation of state and chemical potential of the adsorbed fluid are obtained and discussed. It is shown that the adsorption of a hard sphere fluid in a matrix at given density, but consisting of longer chains of overlapping hard spheres, is higher than the adsorption of this fluid in a hard sphere matrix.

  2. Estimation of critical exponents from cluster coefficients and the application of this estimation to hard spheres

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, E.; Baram, A.

    2007-01-01

    For a large class of repulsive interaction models, the Mayer cluster integrals can be transformed into a tridiagonal real symmetric matrix Rmn, whose elements converge to two constants with 1/n2 correction. We find exact expressions in terms of these correction terms for the two critical exponents describing the density near the two singular termination points of the fluid phase. We apply the method to the hard-spheres model and find that the metastable fluid phase terminates at ρt = 0.751[5]. The density near the transition is given by ρt-ρ ∼ (zt − z)σ′, where the critical exponent is predicted to be σ′ = 0.0877[25]. Interestingly, the termination density is close to the observed glass transition; thus, the above critical behavior is expected to be associated with the onset of glassy behavior in hard spheres. PMID:17389362

  3. Tunable long range forces mediated by self-propelled colloidal hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Ran; Cohen Stuart, Martien; Bolhuis, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Most colloidal interactions can be tuned by changing properties of the medium. Here we show that activating colloidal particles with random self-propulsion can induce giant effective interactions between large objects immersed in such a suspension. Using Brownian dynamics simulations we find that the effective force between two hard walls in a 2D suspension of self-propelled (active) colloidal hard spheres can be tuned from a long range repulsion into a long range attraction by changing the active particle density. At relatively high densities, the active hard spheres can form a dynamic crystalline bridge, which induces a strong oscillating long range dynamic wetting repulsion between the walls. With decreasing density, the dynamic bridge gradually breaks, and an intriguing long range dynamic depletion attraction arises. A similar effect occurs in a quasi-2D suspension of self-propelled colloidal hard spheres by changing the height of the confinement. Our results open up new possibilities to manipulate the motion and assembly of microscopic objects by using active matter.

  4. Replica exchange Monte Carlo applied to hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, Gerardo

    2009-10-14

    In this work a replica exchange Monte Carlo scheme which considers an extended isobaric-isothermal ensemble with respect to pressure is applied to study hard spheres (HSs). The idea behind the proposal is expanding volume instead of increasing temperature to let crowded systems characterized by dominant repulsive interactions to unblock, and so, to produce sampling from disjoint configurations. The method produces, in a single parallel run, the complete HS equation of state. Thus, the first order fluid-solid transition is captured. The obtained results well agree with previous calculations. This approach seems particularly useful to treat purely entropy-driven systems such as hard body and nonadditive hard mixtures, where temperature plays a trivial role.

  5. Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment: Significant and Quantitative Findings Made

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2000-01-01

    Direct examination of atomic interactions is difficult. One powerful approach to visualizing atomic interactions is to study near-index-matched colloidal dispersions of microscopic plastic spheres, which can be probed by visible light. Such spheres interact through hydrodynamic and Brownian forces, but they feel no direct force before an infinite repulsion at contact. Through the microgravity flight of the Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PHaSE), researchers have sought a more complete understanding of the entropically driven disorder-order transition in hard-sphere colloidal dispersions. The experiment was conceived by Professors Paul M. Chaikin and William B. Russel of Princeton University. Microgravity was required because, on Earth, index-matched colloidal dispersions often cannot be density matched, resulting in significant settling over the crystallization period. This settling makes them a poor model of the equilibrium atomic system, where the effect of gravity is truly negligible. For this purpose, a customized light-scattering instrument was designed, built, and flown by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field on the space shuttle (shuttle missions STS 83 and STS 94). This instrument performed both static and dynamic light scattering, with sample oscillation for determining rheological properties. Scattered light from a 532- nm laser was recorded either by a 10-bit charge-coupled discharge (CCD) camera from a concentric screen covering angles of 0 to 60 or by sensitive avalanche photodiode detectors, which convert the photons into binary data from which two correlators compute autocorrelation functions. The sample cell was driven by a direct-current servomotor to allow sinusoidal oscillation for the measurement of rheological properties. Significant microgravity research findings include the observation of beautiful dendritic crystals, the crystallization of a "glassy phase" sample in microgravity that did not crystallize for over 1 year in 1g

  6. Force distribution affects vibrational properties in hard-sphere glasses.

    PubMed

    DeGiuli, Eric; Lerner, Edan; Brito, Carolina; Wyart, Matthieu

    2014-12-02

    We theoretically and numerically study the elastic properties of hard-sphere glasses and provide a real-space description of their mechanical stability. In contrast to repulsive particles at zero temperature, we argue that the presence of certain pairs of particles interacting with a small force f soften elastic properties. This softening affects the exponents characterizing elasticity at high pressure, leading to experimentally testable predictions. Denoting P(f) ~ f(θ(e)), the force distribution of such pairs and ϕ(c) the packing fraction at which pressure diverges, we predict that (i) the density of states has a low-frequency peak at a scale ω*, rising up to it as D(ω) ~ ω(2+a), and decaying above ω* as D(ω) ~ ω(-a) where a = (1 - θ(e))/(3 + θ(e)) and ω is the frequency, (ii) shear modulus and mean-squared displacement are inversely proportional with ⟨δR²⟩ ~ 1/μ ~ (ϕ(c) - ϕ)(κ), where κ = 2 - 2/(3 + θ(e)), and (iii) continuum elasticity breaks down on a scale ℓ(c) ~ 1/√(δz) ~ (ϕ(c) - ϕ)(-b), where b = (1 + θ(e))/(6 + 2θ(e)) and δz = z - 2d, where z is the coordination and d the spatial dimension. We numerically test (i) and provide data supporting that θ(e) ≈ 0.41 in our bidisperse system, independently of system preparation in two and three dimensions, leading to κ ≈ 1.41, a ≈ 0.17, and b ≈ 0.21. Our results for the mean-square displacement are consistent with a recent exact replica computation for d = ∞, whereas some observations differ, as rationalized by the present approach.

  7. The generalized effective liquid approximation for the freezing of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baus, M.

    1990-12-01

    The generalized effective liquid approximation (GELA) to the density functional theory of classical nonuniform systems reproduces all the formal properties of the free energy and requires only the direct correlation function of the uniform system as input. In the case of the freezing of hard spheres very accurate free energies, pressures and fluid-solid coexistence data can be obtained from the GELA. The theory predicts, besides the equilibrium FCC solid, metastable BCC and SC phases also.

  8. Transport properties of the Fermi hard-sphere system

    SciTech Connect

    Mecca, Angela; Lovato, Alessandro; Benhar, Omar; Polls, Artur

    2016-03-01

    The transport properties of neutron star matter play an important role in many astrophysical processes. We report the results of a calculation of the shear viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of the hard-sphere fermion system of degeneracy ν = 2, that can be regarded as a model of pure neutron matter. Our approach is based on the effective interaction obtained from the formalism of correlated basis functions and the cluster expansion technique. The resulting transport coefficients show a strong sensitivity to the quasiparticle effective mass, reflecting the effect of second-order contributions to the self-energy that are not taken into account in nuclear matter studies available in the literature.

  9. High-order virial coefficients and equation of state for hard sphere and hard disk systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiawen; Yu, Yang-Xin

    2009-11-07

    A very simple and accurate approach is proposed to predict the high-order virial coefficients of hard spheres and hard disks. In the approach, the nth virial coefficient B(n) is expressed as the sum of n(D-1) and a remainder, where D is the spatial dimension of the system. When n > or = 3, the remainders of the virials can be accurately expressed with Padé-type functions of n. The maximum deviations of predicted B(5)-B(10) for the two systems are only 0.0209%-0.0044% and 0.0390%-0.0525%, respectively, which are much better than the numerous existing approaches. The virial equation based on the predicted virials diverges when packing fraction eta = 1. With the predicted virials, the compressibility factors of hard sphere system can be predicted very accurately in the whole stable fluid region, and those in the metastable fluid region can also be well predicted up to eta = 0.545. The compressibility factors of hard disk fluid can be predicted very accurately up to eta = 0.63. The simulated B(7) and B(10) for hard spheres are found to be inconsistent with the other known virials and therefore they are modified as 53.2467 and 105.042, respectively.

  10. A study of the pair and triplet structures of the quantum hard-sphere Yukawa fluid.

    PubMed

    Sesé, Luis M

    2009-02-21

    The pair and triplet structures of the quantum hard-sphere Yukawa fluid, evaluated for equilateral and isosceles correlations in both the r and the k spaces for a range of conditions and with a particular focus on a region where the onset of increasing number fluctuations takes place (for densities 0.4densities as a result of the increasing fluctuations. An attempt at obtaining improved isothermal compressibilities by using a simplified grand-canonical correction to the canonical pair radial functions is also discussed in detail. The results for triplets in k space are based on triplet direct correlation function calculations and are restricted to the higher-density region of the interval studied. Complementary results report an assessment of the performances of the Kirkwood superposition and the Jackson-Feenberg convolution. Comparisons with results also obtained in this work for the bare quantum and the classical hard-sphere fluids are made, allowing one to draw conclusions on the interplay between the inclusion of Yukawa attractions and the quantum diffraction effects in hard-sphere fluids.

  11. Thermal diffusion behavior of hard-sphere suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Hui; Buitenhuis, Johan; Dhont, Jan K. G.; Wiegand, Simone

    2006-11-01

    We studied the thermal diffusion behavior of octadecyl coated silica particles (Rh=27nm) in toluene between 15.0 and 50.0°C in a volume fraction range of 1%-30% by means of thermal diffusion forced Rayleigh scattering. The colloidal particles behave like hard spheres at high temperatures and as sticky spheres at low temperatures. With increasing temperature, the obtained Soret coefficient ST of the silica particles changed sign from negative to positive, which implies that the colloidal particles move to the warm side at low temperatures, whereas they move to the cold side at high temperatures. Additionally, we observed also a sign change of the Soret coefficient from positive to negative with increasing volume fraction. This is the first colloidal system for which a sign change with temperature and volume fraction has been observed. The concentration dependence of the thermal diffusion coefficient of the colloidal spheres is related to the colloid-colloid interactions, and will be compared with an existing theoretical description for interacting spherical particles. To characterize the particle-particle interaction parameters, we performed static and dynamic light scattering experiments. The temperature dependence of the thermal diffusion coefficient is predominantly determined by single colloidal particle properties, which are related to colloid-solvent molecule interactions.

  12. The entropies of the hard sphere alkali halide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, John W.; Beyerlein, Adolph L.

    1982-08-01

    An asymptotic expansion for the entropy of hard-sphere alkali halide crystals with N small and large particle pairs is obtained: SN/NkB ≃τ→13 ln(σls2e)/(λlλs) +3 ln(τ1/3-1)+3 ln ɛ-C-Dɛ-Eɛ2+ṡṡṡ, where kB is the Boltzman constant, e is the natural number, τ is the ratio of the system volume to its high compression limiting volume, λl and λs are the mean thermal de Broglie wavelengths [λ=(h2/2πmkBT)1/2, m being the mass] of the large and small particles, respectively, σls is the hard-sphere collision diameter of nearest neighbor large and small particles; C, D, E, etc. are well-defined parameters dependent on the small to large particle radius ratio and the lattice structure, and ɛ=[(τ1/3-1)+(1-σls/σls')], where σls' is the average distance between nearest neighbor large and small particles in the high compression limit. If the small to large particle radius ratio is less than √2-1 for the ''NaCl'' lattice and less than √3-1 for the ''CsCl'' lattice σls<σls'. For greater small to large particle radius ratios σls=σls'. The result differs from the asymptotic expansion for a crystal of N uniform spheres obtained by Salsburg, Stillinger, and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 49, 4857 (1968)] in that it contains the additional logarithmic term 3 ln ɛ and a smallness parameter ɛ that differs from τ1/3-1, used by the earlier workers. Estimates of the leading parameter C were made using the modified cell cluster expansion. The predicted entropies of the alkali metal fluoride salts approach the experimental values at temperatures approaching the melting point which is consistent with the contention that the hard sphere contribution to the entropy dominates other contributions at high temperatures. The predicted difference between the entropies of the two alkali halide lattices is also consistent with the experimental data at higher temperatures.

  13. Phase diagrams of hard spheres with algebraic attractive interactions.

    PubMed

    Camp, Philip J

    2003-01-01

    The phase diagrams of systems made up of hard spheres interacting with attractive potentials of the form -1/r(3+sigma) are calculated using Monte Carlo simulations, second-order thermodynamic perturbation theory, and an augmented van der Waals theory. In simulations of the systems with sigma=0.1, 1, and 3, fluid-solid coexistence results are obtained using the Gibbs-Duhem integration technique; simulation data for the vapor-liquid coexistence envelopes and critical points are taken from previously published work [P. J. Camp and G. N. Patey, J. Chem. Phys. 114, 399 (2001)]. It is shown that the agreement between the theoretical and simulated phase diagrams improves as the range of the potential is increased, reflecting the decreasing role of short-range correlations in determining the bulk thermodynamics. In the extreme case of sigma=0.1 both theories are in excellent agreement with simulations. Phase diagrams for systems with sigma=4, 5, and 6 are computed using second-order thermodynamic perturbation theory. The results indicate that the vapor-liquid transition becomes metastable with respect to freezing when sigma > or approximately equal to 5, in broad agreement with results for the hard-sphere attractive Yukawa system which is commonly used to model colloidal particles, globular proteins, and nanoparticles.

  14. Solid-fluid equilibrium of fused-hard-sphere systems: Free-volume theories and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Shawn Christian

    Historically, the theoretical investigation of solid-fluid phase equilibrium has largely focused on the freezing of hard spheres. Only relatively recently have theories begun to address the phase equilibria of systems of nonspherical molecules. This thesis details the application of various theoretical methods to predict the solid-fluid phase equilibria of systems of nonspherical molecules. The general approach is to first calculate the properties of systems of fused-hard-sphere molecules, and then model real systems by extending the fused-hard-sphere results using generalized van der Waals theory and perturbation theory to describe the effects of longer range interactions. Results of original research are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of the theories, often by direct comparison with Monte Carlo simulation results and, where applicable, by comparison with experiment. We use a simple cell theory to calculate the free energy of the heteronuclear hard-dumbbell solid and an analytic equation of state to calculate the free energy of the fluid. Decreasing the ratio of the diameters of the spheres composing the dumbbell is found to increase the pressure at freezing. We have also calculated the distribution of free volumes in the solid phase of two-dimensional hard dumbbells. This information allows us to characterize a fluctuating cell theory as well as new statistical geometry relations for fused-hard-sphere systems presented in this thesis. Finally, we use simple cell theory results for hard dumbbells in a generalized van der Waals theory to calculate the solid-liquid phase transition for a system of dipolar hard dumbbells. Our model is chosen to approximate a methyl chloride molecule. Thermodynamic perturbation theory is used to include dipolar effects in the fluid equation of state, and static-lattice sums are used to approximate dipolar effects in the solid phase. We find that the presence of a dipole moment stabilizes a non-closepacking crystal

  15. Compact Collision Kernels for Hard Sphere and Coulomb Cross Sections; Fokker-Planck Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yongbin; Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2008-12-31

    A compact collision kernel is derived for both hard sphere and Coulomb cross sections. The difference between hard sphere interaction and Coulomb interaction is characterized by a parameter {eta}. With this compact collision kernel, the calculation of Fokker-Planck coefficients can be done for both the Coulomb and hard sphere interactions. The results for arbitrary order Fokker-Planck coefficients are greatly simplified. An alternate form for the Coulomb logarithm is derived with concern to the temperature relaxation in a binary plasma.

  16. Structural and mechanical features of the order-disorder transition in experimental hard-sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanifpour, M.; Francois, N.; Robins, V.; Kingston, A.; Vaez Allaei, S. M.; Saadatfar, M.

    2015-06-01

    Here we present an experimental and numerical investigation on the grain-scale geometrical and mechanical properties of partially crystallized structures made of macroscopic frictional grains. Crystallization is inevitable in arrangements of monosized hard spheres with packing densities exceeding Bernal's limiting density ϕBernal≈0.64 . We study packings of monosized hard spheres whose density spans over a wide range (0.59 <ϕ <0.72 ) . These experiments harness x-ray computed tomography, three-dimensional image analysis, and numerical simulations to access precisely the geometry and the 3D structure of internal forces within the sphere packings. We show that clear geometrical transitions coincide with modifications of the mechanical backbone of the packing both at the grain and global scale. Notably, two transitions are identified at ϕBernal≈0.64 and ϕc≈0.68 . These results provide insights on how geometrical and mechanical features at the grain scale conspire to yield partially crystallized structures that are mechanically stable.

  17. Nature of the breakdown in the Stokes-Einstein relationship in a hard sphere fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanat K.; Szamel, Grzegorz; Douglas, Jack F.

    2006-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of high density hard sphere fluids clearly show a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein equation (SE). This result has been conjectured to be due to the presence of mobile particles, i.e., ones which have the propensity to "hop" distances that are integer multiples of the interparticle distance. We conclusively show that the sedentary particles, i.e., ones complementary to the "hoppers," obey the SE relationship to a good approximation, even though the fluid as a whole violates the SE equation at high densities. These results support the notion that the unusual diffusive behavior of supercooled liquids is dominated by the hopping particles.

  18. Entropy of hard spheres in the close-packing limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noya, Eva G.; Almarza, Noé G.

    2015-05-01

    The Helmholtz free energies of the face-centred cubic (FCC) and hexagonal close packed (HCP) hard-sphere solids in the close-packing limit have been evaluated using two different approaches based on the Einstein crystal method. Different system sizes and orientations of the crystal with respect to the simulation box have been investigated, both methods giving free energies that are consistent within statistical uncertainty. Our results show that for a given orientation of the crystal and system size, the FCC crystal is always slightly more stable than the HCP, the free-energy difference remaining practically constant with the number of particles up to the thermodynamic limit. In agreement with previous calculations, it is found that the free-energy difference between the HCP and FCC crystals at close packing in the thermodynamic limit is 0.001 164(8) NkBT.

  19. Detecting Phase Boundaries in Hard-Sphere Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Rogers, Richard B.; Gray, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    A special image-data-processing technique has been developed for use in experiments that involve observation, via optical microscopes equipped with electronic cameras, of moving boundaries between the colloidal-solid and colloidal-liquid phases of colloidal suspensions of monodisperse hard spheres. During an experiment, it is necessary to adjust the position of a microscope to keep the phase boundary within view. A boundary typically moves at a speed of the order of microns per hour. Because an experiment can last days or even weeks, it is impractical to require human intervention to keep the phase boundary in view. The present image-data-processing technique yields results within a computation time short enough to enable generation of automated-microscope-positioning commands to track the moving phase boundary

  20. Second virial coefficient for the dipolar hard sphere fluid.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Douglas

    2011-07-28

    The dipolar hard sphere fluid is a useful model for a polar fluid. Some years ago, the second virial coefficient, B(2), of this fluid was obtained as a series expansion in the inverse temperature or (dipole strength) by Keesom. Little work on this problem seems to have been done since that time. Using a result of Chan and Henderson for the spherical average of the Boltzmann factor of this fluid, more complete results are obtained for B(2). The more complete results are more negative than the Keesom series, as one would expect, but his expansion is remarkably accurate. This method can be used to obtain the second virial coefficient of the dipolar Lennard-Jones (Stockmayer) or dipolar Yukawa fluids.

  1. Phase transition induced by a shock wave in hard-sphere and hard-disk systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nanrong; Sugiyama, Masaru; Ruggeri, Tommaso

    2008-08-07

    Dynamic phase transition induced by a shock wave in hard-sphere and hard-disk systems is studied on the basis of the system of Euler equations with caloric and thermal equations of state. First, Rankine-Hugoniot conditions are analyzed. The quantitative classification of Hugoniot types in terms of the thermodynamic quantities of the unperturbed state (the state before a shock wave) and the shock strength is made. Especially Hugoniot in typical two possible cases (P-1 and P-2) of the phase transition is analyzed in detail. In the case P-1 the phase transition occurs between a metastable liquid state and a stable solid state, and in the case P-2 the phase transition occurs through coexistence states, when the shock strength changes. Second, the admissibility of the two cases is discussed from a viewpoint of the recent mathematical theory of shock waves, and a rule with the use of the maximum entropy production rate is proposed as the rule for selecting the most probable one among the possible cases, that is, the most suitable constitutive equation that predicts the most probable shock wave. According to the rule, the constitutive equation in the case P-2 is the most promising one in the dynamic phase transition. It is emphasized that hard-sphere and hard-disk systems are suitable reference systems for studying shock wave phenomena including the shock-induced phase transition in more realistic condensed matters.

  2. Simple effective rule to estimate the jamming packing fraction of polydisperse hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Santos, Andrés; Yuste, Santos B; López de Haro, Mariano; Odriozola, Gerardo; Ogarko, Vitaliy

    2014-04-01

    A recent proposal in which the equation of state of a polydisperse hard-sphere mixture is mapped onto that of the one-component fluid is extrapolated beyond the freezing point to estimate the jamming packing fraction ϕJ of the polydisperse system as a simple function of M1M3/M22, where Mk is the kth moment of the size distribution. An analysis of experimental and simulation data of ϕJ for a large number of different mixtures shows a remarkable general agreement with the theoretical estimate. To give extra support to the procedure, simulation data for seventeen mixtures in the high-density region are used to infer the equation of state of the pure hard-sphere system in the metastable region. An excellent collapse of the inferred curves up to the glass transition and a significant narrowing of the different out-of-equilibrium glass branches all the way to jamming are observed. Thus, the present approach provides an extremely simple criterion to unify in a common framework and to give coherence to data coming from very different polydisperse hard-sphere mixtures.

  3. Hard-sphere kinetic models for inert and reactive mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polewczak, Jacek

    2016-10-01

    I consider stochastic variants of a simple reacting sphere (SRS) kinetic model (Xystris and Dahler 1978 J. Chem. Phys. 68 387-401, Qin and Dahler 1995 J. Chem. Phys. 103 725-50, Dahler and Qin 2003 J. Chem. Phys. 118 8396-404) for dense reacting mixtures. In contrast to the line-of-center models of chemical reactive models, in the SRS kinetic model, the microscopic reversibility (detailed balance) can be easily shown to be satisfied, and thus all mathematical aspects of the model can be fully justified. In the SRS model, the molecules behave as if they were single mass points with two internal states. Collisions may alter the internal states of the molecules, and this occurs when the kinetic energy associated with the reactive motion exceeds the activation energy. Reactive and non-reactive collision events are considered to be hard sphere-like. I consider a four component mixture A, B, A *, B *, in which the chemical reactions are of the type A+B\\rightleftharpoons {{A}\\ast}+{{B}\\ast} , with A * and B * being distinct species from A and B. This work extends the joined works with George Stell to the kinetic models of dense inert and reactive mixtures. The idea of introducing smearing-type effect in the collisional process results in a new class of stochastic kinetic models for both inert and reactive mixtures. In this paper the important new mathematical properties of such systems of kinetic equations are proven. The new results for stochastic revised Enskog system for inert mixtures are also provided.

  4. Phase equilibria and plate-fluid interfacial tensions for associating hard sphere fluids confined in slit pores.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dong; Li, Xiao-Sen

    2006-08-28

    The excess Helmholtz free energy functional for associating hard sphere fluid is formulated by using a modified fundamental measure theory [Y. X. Yu and J. Z. Wu, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 10156 (2002)]. Within the framework of density functional theory, the thermodynamic properties including phase equilibria for both molecules and monomers, equilibrium plate-fluid interfacial tensions and isotherms of excess adsorption, average molecule density, average monomer density, and plate-fluid interfacial tension for four-site associating hard sphere fluids confined in slit pores are investigated. The phase equilibria inside the hard slit pores and attractive slit pores are determined according to the requirement that temperature, chemical potential, and grand potential in coexistence phases should be equal and the plate-fluid interfacial tensions at equilibrium states are predicted consequently. The influences of association energy, fluid-solid interaction, and pore width on phase equilibria and equilibrium plate-fluid interfacial tensions are discussed.

  5. Simple and accurate theory for strong shock waves in a dense hard-sphere fluid.

    PubMed

    Montanero, J M; López de Haro, M; Santos, A; Garzó, V

    1999-12-01

    Following an earlier work by Holian et al. [Phys. Rev. E 47, R24 (1993)] for a dilute gas, we present a theory for strong shock waves in a hard-sphere fluid described by the Enskog equation. The idea is to use the Navier-Stokes hydrodynamic equations but taking the temperature in the direction of shock propagation rather than the actual temperature in the computation of the transport coefficients. In general, for finite densities, this theory agrees much better with Monte Carlo simulations than the Navier-Stokes and (linear) Burnett theories, in contrast to the well-known superiority of the Burnett theory for dilute gases.

  6. A continuum hard-sphere model of protein adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, Craig; Clarke, Thomas; Hickman, James J.

    2013-07-01

    Protein adsorption plays a significant role in biological phenomena such as cell-surface interactions and the coagulation of blood. Two-dimensional random sequential adsorption (RSA) models are widely used to model the adsorption of proteins on solid surfaces. Continuum equations have been developed so that the results of RSA simulations can be used to predict the kinetics of adsorption. Recently, Brownian dynamics simulations have become popular for modeling protein adsorption. In this work a continuum model was developed to allow the results from a Brownian dynamics simulation to be used as the boundary condition in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Brownian dynamics simulations were used to model the diffusive transport of hard-sphere particles in a liquid and the adsorption of the particles onto a solid surface. The configuration of the adsorbed particles was analyzed to quantify the chemical potential near the surface, which was found to be a function of the distance from the surface and the fractional surface coverage. The near-surface chemical potential was used to derive a continuum model of adsorption that incorporates the results from the Brownian dynamics simulations. The equations of the continuum model were discretized and coupled to a CFD simulation of diffusive transport to the surface. The kinetics of adsorption predicted by the continuum model closely matched the results from the Brownian dynamics simulation. This new model allows the results from mesoscale simulations to be incorporated into micro- or macro-scale CFD transport simulations of protein adsorption in practical devices.

  7. Avalanches mediate crystallization in a hard-sphere glass.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Eduardo; Valeriani, Chantal; Zaccarelli, Emanuela; Poon, Wilson C K; Cates, Michael E; Pusey, Peter N

    2014-01-07

    By molecular-dynamics simulations, we have studied the devitrification (or crystallization) of aged hard-sphere glasses. First, we find that the dynamics of the particles are intermittent: Quiescent periods, when the particles simply "rattle" in their nearest-neighbor cages, are interrupted by abrupt "avalanches," where a subset of particles undergo large rearrangements. Second, we find that crystallization is associated with these avalanches but that the connection is not straightforward. The amount of crystal in the system increases during an avalanche, but most of the particles that become crystalline are different from those involved in the avalanche. Third, the occurrence of the avalanches is a largely stochastic process. Randomizing the velocities of the particles at any time during the simulation leads to a different subsequent series of avalanches. The spatial distribution of avalanching particles appears random, although correlations are found among avalanche initiation events. By contrast, we find that crystallization tends to take place in regions that already show incipient local order.

  8. Jamming transition and inherent structures of hard spheres and disks.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Misaki; Kuroiwa, Takeshi; Ikeda, Atsushi; Miyazaki, Kunimasa

    2012-11-16

    Recent studies show that volume fractions φ(J) at the jamming transition of frictionless hard spheres and disks are not uniquely determined but exist over a continuous range. Motivated by this observation, we numerically investigate the dependence of φ(J) on the initial configurations of the parent fluid equilibrated at a volume fraction φ(eq), before compressing to generate a jammed packing. We find that φ(J) remains constant when φ(eq) is small but sharply increases as φ(eq) exceeds the dynamic transition point which the mode-coupling theory predicts. We carefully analyze configurational properties of both jammed packings and parent fluids and find that, while all jammed packings remain isostatic, the increase of φ(J) is accompanied with subtle but distinct changes of local orders, a static length scale, and an exponent of the finite-size scaling. These results are consistent with the scenario of the random first-order transition theory of the glass transition.

  9. Molecular-dynamics calculations of the velocity autocorrelation function: Hard-sphere results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erpenbeck, Jerome J.; Wood, Wiilliam W.

    1985-07-01

    The velocity autocorrelation function for the hard-sphere fluid is computed for ten values of the volume ranging from 25 to 1.6 times the close-packed volume V0 for systems of from 108 to 4000 hard spheres, using a Monte Carlo, molecular-dynamics technique. The results are compared with the theoretical predictions of the mode-coupling theory, modified to take into account the finite size of the system and the periodic boundary conditions. The data are found to be in good agreement with the theory, evaluated using Enskog values for the transport coefficients, for values of the time greater than roughly 15 to 30 mean free times (depending on density), for volumes as small as 2V0. The higher-density results do not agree with the theory, unless the actual transport coefficients (evaluated using molecular dynamics) are used in the theory. The latter version of the theory, however, fails to fit the data at lower densities, except at very long times. To answer the recent critique by Fox, the data are further compared with the theory over time intervals for which the molecular-dynamics trajectories retain some measure of accuracy. The agreement between the data and the theory is largely unaffected, except at a volume 1.8V0 for which there is a marginally significant difference at very long times only.

  10. Characterization of maximally random jammed sphere packings. II. Correlation functions and density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klatt, Michael A.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    In the first paper of this series, we introduced Voronoi correlation functions to characterize the structure of maximally random jammed (MRJ) sphere packings across length scales. In the present paper, we determine a variety of different correlation functions that arise in rigorous expressions for the effective physical properties of MRJ sphere packings and compare them to the corresponding statistical descriptors for overlapping spheres and equilibrium hard-sphere systems. Such structural descriptors arise in rigorous bounds and formulas for effective transport properties, diffusion and reactions constants, elastic moduli, and electromagnetic characteristics. First, we calculate the two-point, surface-void, and surface-surface correlation functions, for which we derive explicit analytical formulas for finite hard-sphere packings. We show analytically how the contact Dirac delta function contribution to the pair correlation function g2(r ) for MRJ packings translates into distinct functional behaviors of these two-point correlation functions that do not arise in the other two models examined here. Then we show how the spectral density distinguishes the MRJ packings from the other disordered systems in that the spectral density vanishes in the limit of infinite wavelengths; i.e., these packings are hyperuniform, which means that density fluctuations on large length scales are anomalously suppressed. Moreover, for all model systems, we study and compute exclusion probabilities and pore size distributions, as well as local density fluctuations. We conjecture that for general disordered hard-sphere packings, a central limit theorem holds for the number of points within an spherical observation window. Our analysis links problems of interest in material science, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. In the third paper of this series, we will evaluate bounds and estimates of a host of different physical properties of the MRJ sphere packings that are based on the

  11. PREPARATION OF HIGH-DENSITY THORIUM OXIDE SPHERES

    DOEpatents

    McNees, R.A. Jr.; Taylor, A.J.

    1963-12-31

    A method of preparing high-density thorium oxide spheres for use in pellet beds in nuclear reactors is presented. Sinterable thorium oxide is first converted to free-flowing granules by means such as compression into a compact and comminution of the compact. The granules are then compressed into cubes having a density of 5.0 to 5.3 grams per cubic centimeter. The cubes are tumbled to form spheres by attrition, and the spheres are then fired at 1250 to 1350 deg C. The fired spheres are then polished and fired at a temperature above 1650 deg C to obtain high density. Spherical pellets produced by this method are highly resistant to mechanical attrition hy water. (AEC)

  12. Hard, soft, and sticky spheres for dynamical studies of disordered colloidal packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratale, Matthew Daniel

    This thesis describes experiments which explore the role of interparticle interactions as a means to alter, and control, the properties of dense colloidal packings. The first set of experiments studied phonon modes in two-dimensional colloidal crystals composed of soft microgel particles with hard polystyrene particle dopants distributed randomly on the triangular lattice. By mixing hard and soft spheres we obtain close-packed lattices of spheres with random bond strength disorder, textit{i.e.,} the effective springs coupling nearest-neighbors are either very stiff, very soft, or of intermediate stiffness. Video microscopy, particle tracking, and covariance matrix techniques are employed to derive the phonon modes of the corresponding ``shadow'' crystals, thereby enabling us to study how bond strength disorder affects vibrational properties. Hard and soft particles participate equally in low frequency phonon modes, and the samples exhibit Debye-like density of states behavior characteristic of crystals at low frequency. For mid- and high-frequency phonons, the relative participation of hard versus soft particles in each mode is found to vary systematically with dopant concentration. The second set of experiments investigated depletion interaction potentials between micron-size colloidal particles induced by nanometer-scale micelles composed of the surfactant hexaethylene glycol monododecyl ether (C12E6). The strength and range of the depletion interaction is revealed to arise from variations in shape anisotropy of the rod-like surfactant micelles. This shape anisotropy increases with increasing sample temperature. By fitting the colloidal interaction potentials to theoretical models, we extract the rod-like micelle length and shape anisotropy as a function of temperature. This work introduces micelle shape anisotropy as a means to control interparticle interactions in colloidal suspensions, and shows how interparticle depletion potentials of micron-scale objects

  13. Thermodynamic pressures for hard spheres and closed-virial equation-of-state.

    PubMed

    Bannerman, Marcus N; Lue, Leo; Woodcock, Leslie V

    2010-02-28

    Hard-sphere molecular dynamics (MD) simulation results, with six-figure accuracy in the thermodynamic equilibrium pressure, are reported and used to test a closed-virial equation-of-state. This latest equation, with no adjustable parameters except known virial coefficients, is comparable in accuracy both to Padé approximants, and to numerical parameterizations of MD data. There is no evidence of nonconvergence at stable fluid densities. The virial pressure begins to deviate significantly from the thermodynamic fluid pressure at or near the freezing density, suggesting that the passage from stable fluid to metastable fluid is associated with a higher-order phase transition; an observation consistent with some previous experimental results. Revised parameters for the crystal equation-of-state [R. J. Speedy, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 10, 4387 (1998)] are also reported.

  14. Radial distribution functions of non-additive hard sphere mixtures via Percus' test particle route.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Paul; Schmidt, Matthias

    2011-08-17

    Using fundamental density functional theory we calculate the partial radial distribution functions, g(ij)(r), of a binary non-additive hard sphere mixture using either Percus' test particle approach or inversion of the analytic structure factor obtained via the Ornstein-Zernike route. We find good agreement between the theoretical results and Monte Carlo simulation data for both positive and moderate negative non-additivities. We investigate the asymptotic, [Formula: see text], decay of the g(ij)(r) and show that this agrees with the analytic analysis of the contributions to the partial structure factors in the plane of complex wavevectors. We find the test particle density profiles to be free of unphysical artefacts, contrary to earlier reports.

  15. Transport coefficients of a granular gas of inelastic rough hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Gilberto M; Santos, Andrés; Garzó, Vicente

    2014-08-01

    The Boltzmann equation for inelastic and rough hard spheres is considered as a model of a dilute granular gas. In this model, the collisions are characterized by constant coefficients of normal and tangential restitution, and hence the translational and rotational degrees of freedom are coupled. A normal solution to the Boltzmann equation is obtained by means of the Chapman-Enskog method for states near the homogeneous cooling state. The analysis is carried out to first order in the spatial gradients of the number density, the flow velocity, and the granular temperature. The constitutive equations for the momentum and heat fluxes and for the cooling rate are derived, and the associated transport coefficients are expressed in terms of the solutions of linear integral equations. For practical purposes, a first Sonine approximation is used to obtain explicit expressions of the transport coefficients as nonlinear functions of both coefficients of restitution and the moment of inertia. Known results for purely smooth inelastic spheres and perfectly elastic and rough spheres are recovered in the appropriate limits.

  16. Geometry explains the large difference in the elastic properties of fcc and hcp crystals of hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Sushko, Nazar; van der Schoot, Paul

    2005-12-01

    As is well known, hard-sphere crystals of the fcc and hcp type differ very little in their thermodynamic properties. Nonetheless, recent computer simulations by Pronk and Frenkel indicate that the elastic response to mechanical deformation of these two types of crystal are quite different [S. Pronk and D. Frenkel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 255501 (2003)]. By invoking a geometrical argument put forward by Martin some time ago [R. M. Martin, Phys. Rev. B 6, 4546 (1972)], we suggest that this is largely due to the different symmetries of the fcc and hcp crystal structures. Indeed, we find that elastic constants of the fcc hard-sphere crystal can be mapped onto the equivalent ones of the hcp crystal to very high accuracy, as a comparison with the computer simulation data of Pronk and Frenkel shows. The same procedure applied to density functional theoretical predictions for the elastic properties of the fcc hard-sphere crystal also produces remarkably accurate predictions for those of the hcp hard-sphere crystal.

  17. Hard-sphere solids near close packing: testing theories for crystallization

    PubMed

    Groh; Mulder

    2000-04-01

    The freezing transition of hard spheres has been well described by various versions of density-functional theory (DFT). These theories should possess the close-packed crystal as a special limit, which represents an extreme testing ground for the quality of such liquid-state based theories. We therefore study the predictions of DFT for the structure and thermodynamics of the hard-sphere crystal in this limit. We examine the Ramakrishnan-Yussouff (RY) approximation and two variants of the fundamental-measure theory (FMT) developed by Rosenfeld and co-workers. We allow for general shapes of the density peaks, going beyond the common Gaussian approximation. In all cases we find that upon approaching close packing, the peak width vanishes proportionally to the free distance a between the particles and the free energy depends logarithmically on a. However, different peak shapes and next-to-leading contributions to the free energy result from the different approximate functionals. For the RY theory, within the Gaussian approximation, we establish that the crystalline solutions form a closed loop with a stable and an unstable branch both connected to the close-packing point at a=0, consistent with the absence of a liquid-solid spinodal. That version of FMT that has previously been applied to freezing, predicts asymptotically steplike density profiles confined to the cells of self-consistent cell theory. But a recently suggested improved version which employs tensor weighted densities yields wider and almost Gaussian peaks that are shown to be in very good agreement with computer simulations.

  18. Extension of the BMCSL equation of state for hard spheres to the metastable disordered region: Application to the SAFT approach.

    PubMed

    Paricaud, P

    2015-07-28

    A simple modification of the Boublík-Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland equation of state is proposed for an application to the metastable disordered region. The new model has a positive pole at the jamming limit and can accurately describe the molecular simulation data of pure hard in the stable fluid region and along the metastable branch. The new model has also been applied to binary mixtures hard spheres, and an excellent description of the fluid and metastable branches can be obtained by adjusting the jamming packing fraction. The new model for hard sphere mixtures can be used as the repulsive term of equations of state for real fluids. In this case, the modified equations of state give very similar predictions of thermodynamic properties as the original models, and one can remove the multiple liquid density roots observed for some versions of the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT) at low temperature without any modification of the dispersion term.

  19. Extension of the BMCSL equation of state for hard spheres to the metastable disordered region: Application to the SAFT approach

    SciTech Connect

    Paricaud, P.

    2015-07-28

    A simple modification of the Boublík-Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland equation of state is proposed for an application to the metastable disordered region. The new model has a positive pole at the jamming limit and can accurately describe the molecular simulation data of pure hard in the stable fluid region and along the metastable branch. The new model has also been applied to binary mixtures hard spheres, and an excellent description of the fluid and metastable branches can be obtained by adjusting the jamming packing fraction. The new model for hard sphere mixtures can be used as the repulsive term of equations of state for real fluids. In this case, the modified equations of state give very similar predictions of thermodynamic properties as the original models, and one can remove the multiple liquid density roots observed for some versions of the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT) at low temperature without any modification of the dispersion term.

  20. Stochastic Hard-Sphere Dynamics for Hydrodynamics of Non-Ideal Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A; Alder, B J; Garcia, A L

    2008-02-26

    A novel stochastic fluid model is proposed with a nonideal structure factor consistent with compressibility, and adjustable transport coefficients. This stochastic hard-sphere dynamics (SHSD) algorithm is a modification of the direct simulation Monte Carlo algorithm and has several computational advantages over event-driven hard-sphere molecular dynamics. Surprisingly, SHSD results in an equation of state and a pair correlation function identical to that of a deterministic Hamiltonian system of penetrable spheres interacting with linear core pair potentials. The fluctuating hydrodynamic behavior of the SHSD fluid is verified for the Brownian motion of a nanoparticle suspended in a compressible solvent.

  1. Variational Monte Carlo study of soliton excitations in hard-sphere Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, R.; Giorgini, S.

    2015-10-01

    By using a full many-body approach, we calculate the excitation energy, the effective mass, and the density profile of soliton states in a three-dimensional Bose gas of hard spheres at zero temperature. The many-body wave function used to describe the soliton contains a one-body term, derived from the solution of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, and a two-body Jastrow term, which accounts for the repulsive correlations between atoms. We optimize the parameters in the many-body wave function via a variational Monte Carlo procedure, calculating the grand-canonical energy and the canonical momentum of the system in a moving reference frame where the soliton is stationary. As the density of the gas is increased, significant deviations from the mean-field predictions are found for the excitation energy and the density profile of both dark and gray solitons. In particular, the soliton effective mass m* and the mass m Δ N of missing particles in the region of the density depression are smaller than the result from the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, their ratio, however, being well reproduced by this theory up to large values of the gas parameter. We also calculate the profile of the condensate density around the soliton notch, finding good agreement with the prediction of the local-density approximation.

  2. Jamming II: Edwards’ statistical mechanics of random packings of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Song, Chaoming; Jin, Yuliang; Makse, Hernán A.

    2011-02-01

    The problem of finding the most efficient way to pack spheres has an illustrious history, dating back to the crystalline arrays conjectured by Kepler and the random geometries explored by Bernal in the 1960s. This problem finds applications spanning from the mathematician’s pencil, the processing of granular materials, the jamming and glass transitions, all the way to fruit packing in every grocery. There are presently numerous experiments showing that the loosest way to pack spheres gives a density of ∼55% (named random loose packing, RLP) while filling all the loose voids results in a maximum density of ∼63%-64% (named random close packing, RCP). While those values seem robustly true, to this date there is no well-accepted physical explanation or theoretical prediction for them. Here we develop a common framework for understanding the random packings of monodisperse hard spheres whose limits can be interpreted as the experimentally observed RLP and RCP. The reason for these limits arises from a statistical picture of jammed states in which the RCP can be interpreted as the ground state of the ensemble of jammed matter with zero compactivity, while the RLP arises in the infinite compactivity limit. We combine an extended statistical mechanics approach ‘a la Edwards’ (where the role traditionally played by the energy and temperature in thermal systems is substituted by the volume and compactivity) with a constraint on mechanical stability imposed by the isostatic condition. We show how such approaches can bring results that can be compared to experiments and allow for an exploitation of the statistical mechanics framework. The key result is the use of a relation between the local Voronoi volumes of the constituent grains (denoted the volume function) and the number of neighbors in contact that permits us to simply combine the two approaches to develop a theory of volume fluctuations in jammed matter. Ultimately, our results lead to a phase diagram that

  3. The early crystal nucleation process in hard spheres shows synchronised ordering and densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, Joshua T.; Anwar, Muhammad; Dorosz, Sven; Schilling, Tanja

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the early part of the crystal nucleation process in the hard sphere fluid using data produced by computer simulation. We find that hexagonal order manifests continuously in the overcompressed liquid, beginning approximately one diffusion time before the appearance of the first "solid-like" particle of the nucleating cluster, and that a collective influx of particles towards the nucleation site occurs simultaneously to the ordering process: the density increases leading to nucleation are generated by the same individual particle displacements as the increases in order. We rule out the presence of qualitative differences in the early nucleation process between medium and low overcompressions and also provide evidence against any separation of translational and orientational order on the relevant lengthscales.

  4. Probing the equilibrium dynamics of colloidal hard spheres above the mode-coupling glass transition.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, G; El Masri, D; Pierno, M; Berthier, L; Cipelletti, L; Petekidis, G; Schofield, A B

    2009-02-27

    We use dynamic light scattering and computer simulations to study equilibrium dynamics and dynamic heterogeneity in concentrated suspensions of colloidal hard spheres. Our study covers an unprecedented density range and spans seven decades in structural relaxation time, tau(alpha0, including equilibrium measurements above phi(c), the location of the glass transition deduced from fitting our data to mode-coupling theory. Instead of falling out of equilibrium, the system remains ergodic above phi(c) and enters a new dynamical regime where tau(alpha) increases with a functional form that was not anticipated by previous experiments, while the amplitude of dynamic heterogeneity grows slower than a power law with tau(alpha), as found in molecular glass formers close to the glass transition.

  5. Packing of crystalline structures of binary hard spheres: An analytical approach and application to amorphization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwers, H. J. H.

    2007-10-01

    The geometrical stability of the three lattices of the cubic crystal system, viz. face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and simple cubic (sc), consisting of bimodal discrete hard spheres, and the transition to amorphous packing is studied. First, the random close packing (rcp) fraction of binary mixtures of amorphously packed spheres is recapitulated. Next, the packing of a binary mixture of hard spheres in randomly disordered cubic structures is analyzed, resulting in original analytical expressions for the unit cell volume and the packing fraction, and which are also valid for the other five crystal systems. The bimodal fcc lattice parameter appears to be in close agreement with empirical hard sphere data from literature, and this parameter could be used to distinguish the size mismatch effect from all other effects in distorted binary lattices of materials. Here, as a first model application, bimodal amorphous and crystalline fcc/bcc packing fractions are combined, yielding the optimum packing configuration, which depends on mixture composition and diameter ratio only. Maps of the closest packing mode are established and applied to colloidal mixtures of polydisperse spheres and to binary alloys of bcc, fcc, and hcp metals. The extensive comparison between the analytical expressions derived here and the published numerical and empirical data yields good agreement. Hence, it is seen that basic space-filling theories on “simple” noninteracting hard spheres are a valuable tool for the study of crystalline materials.

  6. Packing of crystalline structures of binary hard spheres: an analytical approach and application to amorphization.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, H J H

    2007-10-01

    The geometrical stability of the three lattices of the cubic crystal system, viz. face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and simple cubic (sc), consisting of bimodal discrete hard spheres, and the transition to amorphous packing is studied. First, the random close packing (rcp) fraction of binary mixtures of amorphously packed spheres is recapitulated. Next, the packing of a binary mixture of hard spheres in randomly disordered cubic structures is analyzed, resulting in original analytical expressions for the unit cell volume and the packing fraction, and which are also valid for the other five crystal systems. The bimodal fcc lattice parameter appears to be in close agreement with empirical hard sphere data from literature, and this parameter could be used to distinguish the size mismatch effect from all other effects in distorted binary lattices of materials. Here, as a first model application, bimodal amorphous and crystalline fcc/bcc packing fractions are combined, yielding the optimum packing configuration, which depends on mixture composition and diameter ratio only. Maps of the closest packing mode are established and applied to colloidal mixtures of polydisperse spheres and to binary alloys of bcc, fcc, and hcp metals. The extensive comparison between the analytical expressions derived here and the published numerical and empirical data yields good agreement. Hence, it is seen that basic space-filling theories on "simple" noninteracting hard spheres are a valuable tool for the study of crystalline materials.

  7. A Thermodynamically-Consistent Non-Ideal Stochastic Hard-Sphere Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A; Alder, B J; Garcia, A L

    2009-08-03

    A grid-free variant of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is proposed, named the Isotropic DSMC (I-DSMC) method, that is suitable for simulating collision-dominated dense fluid flows. The I-DSMC algorithm eliminates all grid artifacts from the traditional DSMC algorithm and is Galilean invariant and microscopically isotropic. The stochastic collision rules in I-DSMC are modified to introduce a non-ideal structure factor that gives consistent compressibility, as first proposed in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101:075902 (2008)]. The resulting Stochastic Hard Sphere Dynamics (SHSD) fluid is empirically shown to be thermodynamically identical to a deterministic Hamiltonian system of penetrable spheres interacting with a linear core pair potential, well-described by the hypernetted chain (HNC) approximation. We develop a kinetic theory for the SHSD fluid to obtain estimates for the transport coefficients that are in excellent agreement with particle simulations over a wide range of densities and collision rates. The fluctuating hydrodynamic behavior of the SHSD fluid is verified by comparing its dynamic structure factor against theory based on the Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes equations. We also study the Brownian motion of a nano-particle suspended in an SHSD fluid and find a long-time power-law tail in its velocity autocorrelation function consistent with hydrodynamic theory and molecular dynamics calculations.

  8. Ratio of effective temperature to pressure controls the mobility of sheared hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Haxton, Thomas K

    2012-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate fluctuations and responses for steadily sheared hard spheres over a wide range of packing fractions φ and shear strain rates γ[over ̇], using two different methods to dissipate energy. To a good approximation, shear stress and density fluctuations are related to their associated response functions by a single effective temperature T(eff) that is equal to or larger than the kinetic temperature T(kin). We find a crossover in the relationship between the relaxation time τ and the the nondimensionalized effective temperature T(eff)/pσ(3), where p is the pressure and σ is the sphere diameter. In the solid response regime, the behavior at a fixed packing fraction satisfies τ ̇γ∝exp(-cpσ(3)/T(eff)), where c depends weakly on φ, suggesting that the average local yield strain is controlled by the effective temperature in a way that is consistent with shear transformation zone theory. In the fluid response regime, the relaxation time depends on T(eff)/pσ(3) as it depends on T(kin)/pσ(3) in equilibrium. This regime includes both near-equilibrium conditions where T(eff)≃T(kin) and far-from-equilibrium conditions where T(eff)≠T(kin). We discuss the implications of our results for systems with soft repulsive interactions.

  9. Relaxation rates in the Maxwellian collision model and its variable hard sphere surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2015-08-01

    The variable hard sphere and related models have proven to be accurate and computationally convenient replacements for the inverse power law model of classical kinetic theory in direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. We attempt to provide theoretical support for this remarkable success by comparing the relaxation rates in the linearized Boltzmann equation for the Maxwellian collision model with those of its variable hard sphere surrogate. The comparison demonstrates that the linearized collision operator with variable hard sphere interactions can accurately approximate the linearized collision operator with Maxwellian inverse power law interactions under well-defined and broadly applicable conditions. Extensions of the analysis to the general inverse power law model and to more realistic intermolecular potentials are briefly discussed.

  10. Stochastic interactions of two Brownian hard spheres in the presence of depletants.

    PubMed

    Karzar-Jeddi, Mehdi; Tuinier, Remco; Taniguchi, Takashi; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    2014-06-07

    A quantitative analysis is presented for the stochastic interactions of a pair of Brownian hard spheres in non-adsorbing polymer solutions. The hard spheres are hypothetically trapped by optical tweezers and allowed for random motion near the trapped positions. The investigation focuses on the long-time correlated Brownian motion. The mobility tensor altered by the polymer depletion effect is computed by the boundary integral method, and the corresponding random displacement is determined by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. From our computations it follows that the presence of depletion layers around the hard spheres has a significant effect on the hydrodynamic interactions and particle dynamics as compared to pure solvent and uniform polymer solution cases. The probability distribution functions of random walks of the two interacting hard spheres that are trapped clearly shift due to the polymer depletion effect. The results show that the reduction of the viscosity in the depletion layers around the spheres and the entropic force due to the overlapping of depletion zones have a significant influence on the correlated Brownian interactions.

  11. Stochastic interactions of two Brownian hard spheres in the presence of depletants

    SciTech Connect

    Karzar-Jeddi, Mehdi; Fan, Tai-Hsi; Tuinier, Remco; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2014-06-07

    A quantitative analysis is presented for the stochastic interactions of a pair of Brownian hard spheres in non-adsorbing polymer solutions. The hard spheres are hypothetically trapped by optical tweezers and allowed for random motion near the trapped positions. The investigation focuses on the long-time correlated Brownian motion. The mobility tensor altered by the polymer depletion effect is computed by the boundary integral method, and the corresponding random displacement is determined by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. From our computations it follows that the presence of depletion layers around the hard spheres has a significant effect on the hydrodynamic interactions and particle dynamics as compared to pure solvent and uniform polymer solution cases. The probability distribution functions of random walks of the two interacting hard spheres that are trapped clearly shift due to the polymer depletion effect. The results show that the reduction of the viscosity in the depletion layers around the spheres and the entropic force due to the overlapping of depletion zones have a significant influence on the correlated Brownian interactions.

  12. Molecular-scale hydrophobic interactions between hard-sphere reference solutes are attractive and endothermic

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Holleran, Sinead A.; Ashbaugh, Henry S.; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    2013-01-01

    The osmotic second virial coefficients, B2, for atomic-sized hard spheres in water are attractive (B2 < 0) and become more attractive with increasing temperature (ΔB2/ΔT < 0) in the temperature range 300 K ≤ T ≤ 360 K. Thus, these hydrophobic interactions are attractive and endothermic at moderate temperatures. Hydrophobic interactions between atomic-sized hard spheres in water are more attractive than predicted by the available statistical mechanical theory. These results constitute an initial step toward detailed molecular theory of additional intermolecular interaction features, specifically, attractive interactions associated with hydrophobic solutes. PMID:24297918

  13. Relaxation rates in the Maxwellian collision model and its variable hard sphere surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The variable hard sphere and related models have proven to be accurate and computationally convenient replacements for the inverse power law model of classical kinetic theory in DSMC calculations. We provide theoretical support for this success by comparing the relaxation rates in the linearized Boltzmann equation for the Maxwellian model with those of its variable hard sphere surrogate. We demonstrate that the linearized collision operators for these two models agree closely under well defined and broadly applicable conditions and show some implications of this agreement for time dependent solutions of the linearized Boltzmann equation.

  14. Statistical mechanics of two hard spheres in a spherical pore, exact analytic results in D dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Ignacio; Szybisz, Leszek

    2010-03-01

    This work is devoted to the exact statistical mechanics treatment of simple inhomogeneous few-body systems. The system of two hard spheres (HSs) confined in a hard spherical pore is systematically analyzed in terms of its dimensionality D. The canonical partition function and the one- and two-body distribution functions are analytically evaluated and a scheme of iterative construction of the D +1 system properties is presented. We analyze in detail both the effect of high confinement, when particles become caged, and the low density limit. Other confinement situations are also studied analytically and several relations between the two HSs in a spherical pore, two sticked HSs in a spherical pore, and two HSs on a spherical surface partition functions are traced. These relations make meaningful the limiting caging and low density behavior. Turning to the system of two HSs in a spherical pore, we also analytically evaluate the pressure tensor. The thermodynamic properties of the system are discussed. To accomplish this statement we purposely focus in the overall characteristics of the inhomogeneous fluid system, instead of concentrate in the peculiarities of a few-body system. Hence, we analyze the equation of state, the pressure at the wall, and the fluid-substrate surface tension. The consequences of new results about the spherically confined system of two HSs in D dimension on the confined many HS system are investigated. New constant coefficients involved in the low density limit properties of the open and closed systems of many HS in a spherical pore are obtained for arbitrary D. The complementary system of many HS which surrounds a HS (a cavity inside of a bulk HS system) is also discussed.

  15. Self-diffusion coefficients and shear viscosity of inverse power fluids: from hard- to soft-spheres.

    PubMed

    Heyes, D M; Brańka, A C

    2008-07-21

    Molecular dynamics computer simulation has been used to compute the self-diffusion coefficient, D, and shear viscosity, eta(s), of soft-sphere fluids, in which the particles interact through the soft-sphere or inverse power pair potential, phi(r) = epsilon(sigma/r)(n), where n measures the steepness or stiffness of the potential, and epsilon and sigma are a characteristic energy and distance, respectively. The simulations were carried out on monodisperse systems for a range of n values from the hard-sphere (n --> infinity) limit down to n = 4, and up to densities in excess of the fluid-solid co-existence value. A new analytical procedure is proposed which reproduces the transport coefficients at high densities, and can be used to extrapolate the data to densities higher than accurately accessible by simulation or experiment, and tending to the glass transition. This formula, DX(c-1) proportional, variant A/X + B, where c is an adjustable parameter, and X is either the packing fraction or the pressure, is a development of one proposed by Dymond. In the expression, -A/B is the value of X at the ideal glass transition (i.e., where D and eta(s)(-1) --> 0). Estimated values are presented for the packing fraction and the pressure at the glass transition for n values between the hard and soft particle limits. The above expression is also shown to reproduce the high density viscosity data of supercritical argon, krypton and nitrogen. Fits to the soft-sphere simulation transport coefficients close to solid-fluid co-existence are also made using the analytic form, ln(D) = alpha(X)X, and n-dependence of the alpha(X) is presented (X is either the packing fraction or the pressure).

  16. Fluid spheres of uniform density in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce de Leon, J.

    1986-01-01

    A number of exact solutions for spherically symmetric nonstatic fluids of uniform density, surrounded by empty space, are derived and investigated. Solutions that represent expanding and contracting spheres, which tend asymptotically to static configurations described by the Schwarzschild interior solution ( rho = const), are obtained In some cases the motion of contraction or expansion is reversed, while in other cases there is no bouncing at all. Oscillating solutions are presented.

  17. Flow heterogeneity and correlations in a sheared hard sphere glass: Insight from computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Suvendu; Gross, Markus; Raabe, Dierk; Varnik, Fathollah

    2013-02-01

    Understanding the origin of flow heterogeneity in glassy systems is of high interest both due to its importance from theoretical standpoint as well as due to its occurrence in a large number of practical situations such as the flow of the so-called soft-glassy materials (foams, colloidal suspensions, granular media, etc). Detailed experimental investigations do indeed confirm that the flow of driven amorphous solids is not homogeneous, even if the macroscopic stress is constant across the system. We study this issue via large scale event driven molecular dynamics simulations of a hard sphere glass. We observe significant fluctuations of the velocity profile with a time scale of the order of a few hundreds percent strain. Furthermore, there appears to be a correlation between the fluctuations of the local volume fraction and the fluctuations of the local shear rate. The time scales of the fluctuations of density and shear rate are practically identical. These observations motivate an interpretation of our results via the shear concentration coupling (SCC) theory. A detailed comparison, however, reveals serious inconsistencies. In particular, the amplitude of the fluctuations of the shear rate seems to be decoupled from that of density, a feature which is rather unexpected within the SCC picture. An alternative interpretation of our observations is also discussed invoking dynamic heterogeneity.

  18. Note: equation of state and the freezing point in the hard-sphere model.

    PubMed

    Robles, Miguel; López de Haro, Mariano; Santos, Andrés

    2014-04-07

    The merits of different analytical equations of state for the hard-sphere system with respect to the recently computed high-accuracy value of the freezing-point packing fraction are assessed. It is found that the Carnahan-Starling-Kolafa and the branch-point approximant equations of state yield the best performance.

  19. Simulating asymmetric colloidal mixture with adhesive hard sphere model.

    PubMed

    Jamnik, A

    2008-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulation and Percus-Yevick (PY) theory are used to investigate the structural properties of a two-component system of the Baxter adhesive fluids with the size asymmetry of the particles of both components mimicking an asymmetric binary colloidal mixture. The radial distribution functions for all possible species pairs, g(11)(r), g(22)(r), and g(12)(r), exhibit discontinuities at the interparticle distances corresponding to certain combinations of n and m values (n and m being integers) in the sum nsigma(1)+msigma(2) (sigma(1) and sigma(2) being the hard-core diameters of individual components) as a consequence of the impulse character of 1-1, 2-2, and 1-2 attractive interactions. In contrast to the PY theory, which predicts the delta function peaks in the shape of g(ij)(r) only at the distances which are the multiple of the molecular sizes corresponding to different linear structures of successively connected particles, the simulation results reveal additional peaks at intermediate distances originating from the formation of rigid clusters of various geometries.

  20. Disorder and excess modes in hard-sphere colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zargar, R.; Russo, J.; Schall, P.; Tanaka, H.; Bonn, D.

    2014-11-01

    The anomalous thermodynamic properties of glasses remain incompletely understood, notably the anomalous peak in the heat capacity at low temperatures; it is believed to be due to an excess of low-frequency vibrational modes and a manifestation of the structural disorder in these systems. We study the thermodynamics and vibrational dynamics of colloidal glasses and (defected) crystals. The experimental determination of the vibrational density of states allows us to directly observe a strong enhancement of low-frequency modes. Using a novel method (Zargar R. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 (2013) 258301) to determine the free energy, we also determine the entropy and the specific heat experimentally. It follows that the emergence of the excess modes and high values of the specific heat are directly related and are specific to the glass: even for solids containing a very large amount of defects, both the low-frequency density of states and the specific heat are significantly smaller than for the glass.

  1. The microstructures of cold dense systems as informed by hard sphere models and optimal packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Adam Bayne

    Sphere packings, or arrangements of "billiard balls" of various sizes that never overlap, are especially informative and broadly applicable models. In particular, a hard sphere model describes the important foundational case where potential energy due to attractive and repulsive forces is not present, meaning that entropy dominates the system's free energy. Sphere packings have been widely employed in chemistry, materials science, physics and biology to model a vast range of materials including concrete, rocket fuel, proteins, liquids and solid metals, to name but a few. Despite their richness and broad applicability, many questions about fundamental sphere packings remain unanswered. For example, what are the densest packings of identical three-dimensional spheres within certain defined containers? What are the densest packings of binary spheres (spheres of two different sizes) in three-dimensional Euclidean space R3 ? The answers to these two questions are important in condensed matter physics and solid-state chemistry. The former is important to the theory of nucleation in supercooled liquids and the latter in terms of studying the structure and stability of atomic and molecular alloys. The answers to both questions are useful when studying the targeted self-assembly of colloidal nanostructures. In this dissertation, putatively optimal answers to both of these questions are provided, and the applications of these findings are discussed. The methods developed to provide these answers, novel algorithms combining sequential linear and nonlinear programming techniques with targeted stochastic searches of conguration space, are also discussed. In addition, connections between the realizability of pair correlation functions and optimal sphere packings are studied, and mathematical proofs are presented concerning the characteristics of both locally and globally maximally dense structures in arbitrary dimension d. Finally, surprising and unexpected findings are

  2. Demixing transition, structure, and depletion forces in binary mixtures of hard-spheres: the role of bridge functions.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Erik; Estrada-Álvarez, César D; Pérez-Ángel, Gabriel; Méndez-Alcaraz, José Miguel; González-Mozuelos, Pedro; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2013-09-14

    Asymmetric binary mixtures of hard-spheres exhibit several interesting thermodynamic phenomena, such as multiple kinds of glassy states. When the degrees of freedom of the small spheres are integrated out from the description, their effects are incorporated into an effective pair interaction between large spheres known as the depletion potential. The latter has been widely used to study both the phase behavior and dynamic arrest of the big particles. Depletion forces can be accounted for by a contraction of the description in the multicomponent Ornstein-Zernike equation [R. Castañeda-Priego, A. Rodríguez-López, and J. M. Méndez-Alcaraz, Phys. Rev. E 73, 051404 (2006)]. Within this theoretical scheme, an approximation for the difference between the effective and bare bridge functions is needed. In the limit of infinite dilution, this difference is irrelevant and the typical Asakura-Osawa depletion potential is recovered. At higher particle concentrations, however, this difference becomes important, especially where the shell of first neighbors is formed, and, as shown here, cannot be simply neglected. In this work, we use a variant of the Verlet expression for the bridge functions to highlight their importance in the calculation of the depletion potential at high densities and close to the spinodal decomposition. We demonstrate that the modified Verlet closure predicts demixing in binary mixtures of hard spheres for different size ratios and compare its predictions with both liquid state and density functional theories, computer simulations, and experiments. We also show that it provides accurate correlation functions even near the thermodynamic instability; this is explicitly corroborated with results of molecular dynamics simulations of the whole mixture. Particularly, our findings point toward a possible universal behavior of the depletion potential around the spinodal line.

  3. Imaging grain boundary grooves in hard-sphere colloidal bicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, Eric; Redston, Emily; Persson Gulda, Maria; Weitz, David A.; Spaepen, Frans

    2016-10-01

    Colloidal particles were sedimented onto patterned glass slides to grow three-dimensional bicrystals with a controlled structure. Three types of symmetric tilt grain boundaries between close-packed face-centered-cubic crystals were produced: Σ 5 (100 ),Σ 17 (100 ) , and Σ 3 (110 ) . The structure of the crystals and their defects were visualized by confocal microscopy, and characterized by simple geometric measurements, including image difference, thresholding, and reprojection. This provided a quick and straightforward way to detect the regions in which the atoms are mobile. This atomic mobility was higher at the grain boundaries and close to the solid-liquid interface. This method was compared to the more conventional analysis based on the calculation of the local order parameter of the individual particles to identify the interface. This was used in turn to identify the presence of grooves at the grain-boundary-liquid triple junction for every type of grain boundary, except for the twin [Σ 3 (110 )] , for which no groove could be detected. Images of these grooves were processed, and the angle linking the grain boundary energy to the solid-liquid interfacial energy was measured. The resulting values of the grain boundary energy were compared to estimates based on the density deficit in the boundary.

  4. Predicting side-chain conformations of methionine using a hard-sphere model with stereochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virrueta, A.; Gaines, J.; O'Hern, C. S.; Regan, L.

    2015-03-01

    Current research in the O'Hern and Regan laboratories focuses on the development of hard-sphere models with stereochemical constraints for protein structure prediction as an alternative to molecular dynamics methods that utilize knowledge-based corrections in their force-fields. Beginning with simple hydrophobic dipeptides like valine, leucine, and isoleucine, we have shown that our model is able to reproduce the side-chain dihedral angle distributions derived from sets of high-resolution protein crystal structures. However, methionine remains an exception - our model yields a chi-3 side-chain dihedral angle distribution that is relatively uniform from 60 to 300 degrees, while the observed distribution displays peaks at 60, 180, and 300 degrees. Our goal is to resolve this discrepancy by considering clashes with neighboring residues, and averaging the reduced distribution of allowable methionine structures taken from a set of crystallized proteins. We will also re-evaluate the electron density maps from which these protein structures are derived to ensure that the methionines and their local environments are correctly modeled. This work will ultimately serve as a tool for computing side-chain entropy and protein stability. A. V. is supported by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and a Ford Foundation Fellowship. J. G. is supported by NIH training Grant NIH-5T15LM007056-28.

  5. Hard-sphere mixture excess free energy at infinite size ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Tukur, N.M.; Hamad, E.Z.; Mansoori, G.A.

    1999-02-01

    This article presents the exact limiting value of the derivative of the excess Helmholtz energy, A{sup E}, with respect to molecular size at constant temperature, density and composition for a binary mixture of hard spheres with an infinite size ratio ({sigma}{sub 11}/{sigma}{sub 22}{r_arrow}{infinity}); i.e., lim{sub {sigma}{sub 22}{r_arrow}0}[({partial_derivative}A{sub hs}{sup E}/RT)/{partial_derivative}{sigma}{sub 22}]{sub T,{rho},x,{sigma}{sub 11}}=({pi}/2){rho}x{sub 1}x{sub 2}{sigma}{sub 11}{sup 2}/(1{minus}({pi}/6){rho}x{sub 1}{sigma}{sub 11}{sup 3}). This limiting value is compared with the Mansoori{endash}Carnahan{endash}Starling{endash}Leland (MCSL) and also used to test the limits of some commonly used models in estimating the excess free energy of solvents in mixtures or polymer solutions. The models evaluated include the van Laar, Wilson, Edmond{endash}Ogston, Flory{endash}Huggins, Lacome{endash}Sanchez, Scott{endash}Magat, and Chen {ital et al.} It is shown that while the MCSL equation of state produces the same limiting value as the exact value reported here the other mixture models deviate from the exact value. This expression may be utilized to correct the mixture theories at their infinite size ratio limits. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Fractionation effects in phase equilibria of polydisperse hard-sphere colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasolo, Moreno; Sollich, Peter

    2004-10-01

    The equilibrium phase behavior of hard spheres with size polydispersity is studied theoretically. We solve numerically the exact phase equilibrium equations that result from accurate free energy expressions for the fluid and solid phases, while accounting fully for size fractionation between coexisting phases. Fluids up to the largest polydispersities that we can study (around 14%) can phase separate by splitting off a solid with a much narrower size distribution. This shows that experimentally observed terminal polydispersities above which phase separation no longer occurs must be due to nonequilibrium effects. We find no evidence of reentrant melting; instead, sufficiently compressed solids phase separate into two or more solid phases. Under appropriate conditions, coexistence of multiple solids with a fluid phase is also predicted. The solids have smaller polydispersities than the parent phase as expected, while the reverse is true for the fluid phase, which contains predominantly smaller particles but also residual amounts of the larger ones. The properties of the coexisting phases are studied in detail; mean diameter, polydispersity, and volume fraction of the phases all reveal marked fractionation. We also propose a method for constructing quantities that optimally distinguish between the coexisting phases, using principal component analysis in the space of density distributions. We conclude by comparing our predictions to Monte Carlo simulations at imposed chemical potential distribution, and find excellent agreement.

  7. Importance of many-body correlations in glass transition: An example from polydisperse hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leocmach, Mathieu; Russo, John; Tanaka, Hajime

    2013-03-01

    Most of the liquid-state theories, including glass-transition theories, are constructed on the basis of two-body density correlations. However, we have recently shown that many-body correlations, in particular, bond orientational correlations, play a key role in both the glass transition and the crystallization transition. Here we show, with numerical simulations of supercooled polydisperse hard spheres systems, that the length-scale associated with any two-point spatial correlation function does not increase toward the glass transition. A growing length-scale is instead revealed by considering many-body correlation functions, such as correlators of orientational order, which follows the length-scale of the dynamic heterogeneities. Despite the growing of crystal-like bond orientational order, we reveal that the stability against crystallization with increasing polydispersity is due to an increasing population of icosahedral arrangements of particles. Our results suggest that, for this type of systems, many-body correlations are a manifestation of the link between the vitrification and the crystallization phenomena. Whether a system is vitrified or crystallized can be controlled by the degree of frustration against crystallization, polydispersity in this case.

  8. Absence of Scaling for the Intermediate Scattering Function of a Hard-Sphere Suspension: Static and Dynamic X-Ray Scattering from Concentrated Polystyrene Latex Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lurio, L. B.; Lumma, D.; Sandy, A. R.; Borthwick, M. A.; Falus, P.; Mochrie, S. G. J.; Pelletier, J. F.; Sutton, M.; Regan, Lynne; Malik, A.

    2000-01-24

    X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle scattering measurements are presented of the dynamics and structure of concentrated suspensions of charge-stabilized polystyrene latex spheres dispersed in glycerol, for volume fractions from 3% to 52% . The static structures of the suspensions show essentially hard-sphere behavior, and the short-time dynamics shows good agreement with predictions for the wave-vector-dependent collective diffusion coefficient. However, the intermediate scattering function is found to violate a scaling behavior found previously for a sterically stabilized hard-sphere suspension [P. N. Segre and P. N. Pusey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 771 (1996)]. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  9. Thermodynamics and simulation of hard-sphere fluid and solid: Kinetic Monte Carlo method versus standard Metropolis scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper aims at a comparison of techniques based on the kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) and the conventional Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) methods as applied to the hard-sphere (HS) fluid and solid. In the case of the kMC, an alternative representation of the chemical potential is explored [E. A. Ustinov and D. D. Do, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 366, 216 (2012)], which does not require any external procedure like the Widom test particle insertion method. A direct evaluation of the chemical potential of the fluid and solid without thermodynamic integration is achieved by molecular simulation in an elongated box with an external potential imposed on the system in order to reduce the particle density in the vicinity of the box ends. The existence of rarefied zones allows one to determine the chemical potential of the crystalline phase and substantially increases its accuracy for the disordered dense phase in the central zone of the simulation box. This method is applicable to both the Metropolis MC and the kMC, but in the latter case, the chemical potential is determined with higher accuracy at the same conditions and the number of MC steps. Thermodynamic functions of the disordered fluid and crystalline face-centered cubic (FCC) phase for the hard-sphere system have been evaluated with the kinetic MC and the standard MC coupled with the Widom procedure over a wide range of density. The melting transition parameters have been determined by the point of intersection of the pressure-chemical potential curves for the disordered HS fluid and FCC crystal using the Gibbs-Duhem equation as a constraint. A detailed thermodynamic analysis of the hard-sphere fluid has provided a rigorous verification of the approach, which can be extended to more complex systems.

  10. Thermodynamics and simulation of hard-sphere fluid and solid: Kinetic Monte Carlo method versus standard Metropolis scheme.

    PubMed

    Ustinov, E A

    2017-01-21

    The paper aims at a comparison of techniques based on the kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) and the conventional Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) methods as applied to the hard-sphere (HS) fluid and solid. In the case of the kMC, an alternative representation of the chemical potential is explored [E. A. Ustinov and D. D. Do, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 366, 216 (2012)], which does not require any external procedure like the Widom test particle insertion method. A direct evaluation of the chemical potential of the fluid and solid without thermodynamic integration is achieved by molecular simulation in an elongated box with an external potential imposed on the system in order to reduce the particle density in the vicinity of the box ends. The existence of rarefied zones allows one to determine the chemical potential of the crystalline phase and substantially increases its accuracy for the disordered dense phase in the central zone of the simulation box. This method is applicable to both the Metropolis MC and the kMC, but in the latter case, the chemical potential is determined with higher accuracy at the same conditions and the number of MC steps. Thermodynamic functions of the disordered fluid and crystalline face-centered cubic (FCC) phase for the hard-sphere system have been evaluated with the kinetic MC and the standard MC coupled with the Widom procedure over a wide range of density. The melting transition parameters have been determined by the point of intersection of the pressure-chemical potential curves for the disordered HS fluid and FCC crystal using the Gibbs-Duhem equation as a constraint. A detailed thermodynamic analysis of the hard-sphere fluid has provided a rigorous verification of the approach, which can be extended to more complex systems.

  11. Communication: radial distribution functions in a two-dimensional binary colloidal hard sphere system.

    PubMed

    Thorneywork, Alice L; Roth, Roland; Aarts, Dirk G A L; Dullens, Roel P A

    2014-04-28

    Two-dimensional hard disks are a fundamentally important many-body model system in classical statistical mechanics. Despite their significance, a comprehensive experimental data set for two-dimensional single component and binary hard disks is lacking. Here, we present a direct comparison between the full set of radial distribution functions and the contact values of a two-dimensional binary colloidal hard sphere model system and those calculated using fundamental measure theory. We find excellent quantitative agreement between our experimental data and theoretical predictions for both single component and binary hard disk systems. Our results provide a unique and fully quantitative mapping between experiments and theory, which is crucial in establishing the fundamental link between structure and dynamics in simple liquids and glass forming systems.

  12. Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PhaSE) or "Making Jello in Space"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Jerri S.; Doherty, Michael P.

    1998-01-01

    The Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PHaSE) is a highly successful experiment that flew aboard two shuttle missions to study the transitions involved in the formation of jellolike colloidal crystals in a microgravity environment. A colloidal suspension, or colloid, consists of fine particles, often having complex interactions, suspended in a liquid. Paint, ink, and milk are examples of colloids found in everyday life. In low Earth orbit, the effective force of gravity is thousands of times less than at the Earth's surface. This provides researchers a way to conduct experiments that cannot be adequately performed in an Earth-gravity environment. In microgravity, colloidal particles freely interact without the complications of settling that occur in normal gravity on Earth. If the particle interactions within these colloidal suspensions could be predicted and accurately modeled, they could provide the key to understanding fundamental problems in condensed matter physics and could help make possible the development of wonderful new "designer" materials. Industries that make semiconductors, electro-optics, ceramics, and composites are just a few that may benefit from this knowledge. Atomic interactions determine the physical properties (e.g., weight, color, and hardness) of ordinary matter. PHaSE uses colloidal suspensions of microscopic solid plastic spheres to model the behavior of atomic interactions. When uniformly sized hard spheres suspended in a fluid reach a certain concentration (volume fraction), the particle-fluid mixture changes from a disordered fluid state, in which the spheres are randomly organized, to an ordered "crystalline" state, in which they are structured periodically. The thermal energy of the spheres causes them to form ordered arrays, analogous to crystals. Seven of the eight PHaSE samples ranged in volume fraction from 0.483 to 0.624 to cover the range of interest, while one sample, having a concentration of 0.019, was included for

  13. Model energy landscapes of low-temperature fluids: Dipolar hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2007-07-01

    An analytical model of non-Gaussian energy landscape of low-temperature fluids is developed based on the thermodynamics of the fluid of dipolar hard spheres. The entire excitation profile of the liquid, from the high-temperature liquid to the point of ideal-glass transition, has been obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. The fluid of dipolar hard spheres loses stability close to the point of ideal-glass transition transforming via a first-order transition into a columnar liquid phase of dipolar chains locally arranged in a body-centered-tetragonal order. Significant non-Gaussianity of the energy landscape is responsible for narrowing of the distribution of potential energies and energies of inherent structures with decreasing temperature. We suggest that the proposed functionality of the enumeration function is widely applicable to both polar and nonpolar low-temperature liquids.

  14. Communication: Virial coefficients and demixing in highly asymmetric binary additive hard-sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    López de Haro, Mariano; Tejero, Carlos F; Santos, Andrés

    2013-04-28

    The problem of demixing in a binary fluid mixture of highly asymmetric additive hard spheres is revisited. A comparison is presented between the results derived previously using truncated virial expansions for three finite size ratios with those that one obtains with the same approach in the extreme case in which one of the components consists of point particles. Since this latter system is known not to exhibit fluid-fluid segregation, the similarity observed for the behavior of the critical constants arising in the truncated series in all instances, while not being conclusive, may cast serious doubts as to the actual existence of a demixing fluid-fluid transition in disparate-sized binary additive hard-sphere mixtures.

  15. The structural origin of the hard-sphere glass transition in granular packing

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Chengjie; Li, Jindong; Cao, Yixin; Kou, Binquan; Xiao, Xianghui; Fezzaa, Kamel; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yujie

    2015-09-28

    Glass transition is accompanied by a rapid growth of the structural relaxation time and a concomitant decrease of configurational entropy. It remains unclear whether the transition has a thermodynamic origin, and whether the dynamic arrest is associated with the growth of a certain static order. Using granular packing as a model hard-sphere glass, we show the glass transition as a thermodynamic phase transition with a ‘hidden’ polytetrahedral order. This polytetrahedral order is spatially correlated with the slow dynamics. It is geometrically frustrated and has a peculiar fractal dimension. Additionally, as the packing fraction increases, its growth follows an entropy-driven nucleation process, similar to that of the random first-order transition theory. In conclusion, our study essentially identifies a long-sought-after structural glass order in hard-sphere glasses.

  16. Chemical-potential route: a hidden Percus-Yevick equation of state for hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Santos, Andrés

    2012-09-21

    The chemical potential of a hard-sphere fluid can be expressed in terms of the contact value of the radial distribution function of a solute particle with a diameter varying from zero to that of the solvent particles. Exploiting the explicit knowledge of such a contact value within the Percus-Yevick theory, and using standard thermodynamic relations, a hitherto unknown Percus-Yevick equation of state, p/ρk(B)T = -(9/η) ln(1-η)-(16-31η)/2(1-η)(2), is unveiled. This equation of state turns out to be better than the one obtained from the conventional virial route. Interpolations between the chemical-potential and compressibility routes are shown to be more accurate than the widely used Carnahan-Starling equation of state. The extension to polydisperse hard-sphere systems is also presented.

  17. The Dynamics of Disorder-Order Transition in Hard Sphere Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaikin, Paul M.; Zhu, Jixiang; Cheng, Zhengdong; Phan, See-Eng; Russel, William B.; Lant, Christian T.; Doherty, Michael P.; Meyer, William V.; Rogers, Richard; Cannell, D. S.; Ottewill, R. H.

    1998-01-01

    The Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment (PHaSE) seeks a complete understanding of the entropically driven disorder-order transition in hard sphere colloidal dispersions. The light scattering instrument designed for flight collects Bragg and low angle light scattering in the forward direction via a CCD camera and performs conventional static and dynamic light scattering at 10-160 deg. through fiber optic cables. Here we report on the kinetics of nucleation and growth extracted from time-resolved Bragg images and measurements of the elastic modulus of crystalline phases obtained by monitoring resonant responses to sinusoidal forcing through dynamic light scattering. Preliminary analysis of the former indicates a significant difference from measurements on the ground, while the latter confirms nicely laboratory experiments with the same instrument and predictions from computer simulations.

  18. Parallelized event chain algorithm for dense hard sphere and polymer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kampmann, Tobias A. Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

    2015-01-15

    We combine parallelization and cluster Monte Carlo for hard sphere systems and present a parallelized event chain algorithm for the hard disk system in two dimensions. For parallelization we use a spatial partitioning approach into simulation cells. We find that it is crucial for correctness to ensure detailed balance on the level of Monte Carlo sweeps by drawing the starting sphere of event chains within each simulation cell with replacement. We analyze the performance gains for the parallelized event chain and find a criterion for an optimal degree of parallelization. Because of the cluster nature of event chain moves massive parallelization will not be optimal. Finally, we discuss first applications of the event chain algorithm to dense polymer systems, i.e., bundle-forming solutions of attractive semiflexible polymers.

  19. Clusters in sedimentation equilibrium for an experimental hard-sphere-plus-dipolar Brownian colloidal system

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Hugh D.; Yethiraj, Anand

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we use structure and dynamics in sedimentation equilibrium, in the presence of gravity, to examine, via confocal microscopy, a Brownian colloidal system in the presence of an external electric field. The zero field equation of state (EOS) is hard sphere without any re-scaling of particle size, and the hydrodynamic corrections to the long-time self-diffusion coefficient are quantitatively consistent with the expected value for hard spheres. Care is taken to ensure that both the dimensionless gravitational energy, which is equivalent to a Peclet number Peg, and dipolar strength Λ are of order unity. In the presence of an external electric field, anisotropic chain-chain clusters form; this cluster formation manifests itself with the appearance of a plateau in the diffusion coefficient when the dimensionless dipolar strength Λ ~ 1. The structure and dynamics of this chain-chain cluster state is examined for a monodisperse system for two particle sizes. PMID:26323363

  20. The structural origin of the hard-sphere glass transition in granular packing

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, Chengjie; Li, Jindong; Cao, Yixin; ...

    2015-09-28

    Glass transition is accompanied by a rapid growth of the structural relaxation time and a concomitant decrease of configurational entropy. It remains unclear whether the transition has a thermodynamic origin, and whether the dynamic arrest is associated with the growth of a certain static order. Using granular packing as a model hard-sphere glass, we show the glass transition as a thermodynamic phase transition with a ‘hidden’ polytetrahedral order. This polytetrahedral order is spatially correlated with the slow dynamics. It is geometrically frustrated and has a peculiar fractal dimension. Additionally, as the packing fraction increases, its growth follows an entropy-driven nucleationmore » process, similar to that of the random first-order transition theory. In conclusion, our study essentially identifies a long-sought-after structural glass order in hard-sphere glasses.« less

  1. Local shear viscosity of strongly inhomogeneous dense fluids: from the hard-sphere to the Lennard-Jones fluids.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Hai; Galliero, Guillaume

    2013-12-04

    This work aims at providing a tractable approach to model the local shear viscosity of strongly inhomogeneous dense fluids composed of spherical molecules, in which the density variations occur on molecular distance. The proposed scheme, which relies on the local density average model, has been applied to the quasi-hard-sphere, the Week-Chandler-Andersen and the Lennard-Jones fluids. A weight function has been developed to deal with the hard-sphere fluid given the specificities of momentum exchange. To extend the approach to the smoothly repulsive potential, we have taken into account that the non-local contributions to the viscosity due to the interactions of particles separated by a given distance are temperature dependent. Then, using a simple perturbation scheme, the approach is extended to the Lennard-Jones fluids. It is shown that the viscosity profiles of inhomogeneous dense fluids deduced from this approach are consistent with those directly computed by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

  2. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: Virial series for the line-thermodynamic properties of hard spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-12-28

    This work is devoted to analyze the relation between the thermodynamic properties of a confined fluid and the shape of its confining vessel. Recently, new insights in this topic were found through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids that revealed the dependence on the vessel shape of the low density behavior of the system. Here, the statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of fluids confined in wedges or by edges is revisited, focusing on their cluster integrals. In particular, the well known hard sphere fluid, which was not studied in this framework so far, is analyzed under confinement and its thermodynamic properties are analytically studied up to order two in the density. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the confinement produced by a corrugated wall. These results rely on the obtained analytic expression for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere system as a function of the opening dihedral angle 0 < β < 2π. It enables a unified approach to both wedges and edges.

  3. Scaled Particle Theory for Multicomponent Hard Sphere Fluids Confined in Random Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Zhao, S L; Holovko, M; Chen, X S; Dong, W

    2016-06-23

    The formulation of scaled particle theory (SPT) is presented for a quite general model of fluids confined in a random porous media, i.e., a multicomponent hard sphere (HS) fluid in a multicomponent hard sphere or a multicomponent overlapping hard sphere (OHS) matrix. The analytical expressions for pressure, Helmholtz free energy, and chemical potential are derived. The thermodynamic consistency of the proposed theory is established. Moreover, we show that there is an isomorphism between the SPT for a multicomponent system and that for a one-component system. Results from grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulations are also presented for a binary HS mixture in a one-component HS or a one-component OHS matrix. The accuracy of various variants derived from the basic SPT formulation is appraised against the simulation results. Scaled particle theory, initially formulated for a bulk HS fluid, has not only provided an analytical tool for calculating thermodynamic properties of HS fluid but also helped to gain very useful insight for elaborating other theoretical approaches such as the fundamental measure theory (FMT). We expect that the general SPT for multicomponent systems developed in this work can contribute to the study of confined fluids in a similar way.

  4. Static structural signatures of nearly jammed disordered and ordered hard-sphere packings: Direct correlation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Steven; Stillinger, Frank H.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    The nonequilibrium process by which hard-particle systems may be compressed into disordered, jammed states has received much attention because of its wide utility in describing a broad class of amorphous materials. While dynamical signatures are known to precede jamming, the task of identifying static structural signatures indicating the onset of jamming have proven more elusive. The observation that compressing hard-particle packings towards jamming is accompanied by an anomalous suppression of density fluctuations (termed "hyperuniformity") has paved the way for the analysis of jamming as an "inverted critical point" in which the direct correlation function c (r ) , rather than the total correlation function h (r ) , diverges. We expand on the notion that c (r ) provides both universal and protocol-specific information as packings approach jamming. By considering the degree and position of singularities (discontinuities in the n th derivative) as well as how they are changed by the convolutions found in the Ornstein-Zernike equation, we establish quantitative statements about the structure of c (r ) with regards to singularities it inherits from h (r ) . These relations provide a concrete means of identifying features that must be expressed in c (r ) if one hopes to reproduce various details in the pair correlation function accurately and provide stringent tests on the associated numerics. We also analyze the evolution of systems of three-dimensional monodisperse hard spheres of diameter D as they approach ordered and disordered jammed configurations. For the latter, we use the Lubachevsky-Stillinger (LS) molecular dynamics and Torquato-Jiao (TJ) sequential linear programming algorithms, which both generate disordered packings, but can show perceptible structural differences. We identify a short-ranged scaling c (r )∝-1 /r as r →0 that accompanies the formation of the delta function at c (D ) that indicates the formation of contacts in all cases, and show

  5. Static structural signatures of nearly jammed disordered and ordered hard-sphere packings: Direct correlation function.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Steven; Stillinger, Frank H; Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    The nonequilibrium process by which hard-particle systems may be compressed into disordered, jammed states has received much attention because of its wide utility in describing a broad class of amorphous materials. While dynamical signatures are known to precede jamming, the task of identifying static structural signatures indicating the onset of jamming have proven more elusive. The observation that compressing hard-particle packings towards jamming is accompanied by an anomalous suppression of density fluctuations (termed "hyperuniformity") has paved the way for the analysis of jamming as an "inverted critical point" in which the direct correlation function c(r), rather than the total correlation function h(r), diverges. We expand on the notion that c(r) provides both universal and protocol-specific information as packings approach jamming. By considering the degree and position of singularities (discontinuities in the nth derivative) as well as how they are changed by the convolutions found in the Ornstein-Zernike equation, we establish quantitative statements about the structure of c(r) with regards to singularities it inherits from h(r). These relations provide a concrete means of identifying features that must be expressed in c(r) if one hopes to reproduce various details in the pair correlation function accurately and provide stringent tests on the associated numerics. We also analyze the evolution of systems of three-dimensional monodisperse hard spheres of diameter D as they approach ordered and disordered jammed configurations. For the latter, we use the Lubachevsky-Stillinger (LS) molecular dynamics and Torquato-Jiao (TJ) sequential linear programming algorithms, which both generate disordered packings, but can show perceptible structural differences. We identify a short-ranged scaling c(r)∝-1/r as r→0 that accompanies the formation of the delta function at c(D) that indicates the formation of contacts in all cases, and show that this scaling

  6. Lars Onsager Prize: The mean field solution for Hard Sphere Jamming and a new scenario for the low temperature landscape of glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, Giorgio

    In a hard spheres systems particles cannot overlap. Increasing the density we reach a point where most of the particles are blocked and the density cannot be increased any more: this is the jamming point. The jamming point separates the phase, where all the constraint can be satisfied, from an unsatifiable phase, where spheres do have to overlap. A scaling theory of the behavior around the jamming critical point has been formulated and a few critical exponents have been introduced. The exponents are apparently super-universal, as far as they do seem to be independent from the space dimensions. The mean field version of the model (i.e. the infinite dimensions limit) has been solved analytically using broken replica symmetry techniques and the computed critical exponents have been found in a remarkable agreement with three-dimensional and two-dimensional numerical results and experiments. The theory predicts in hard spheres (in glasses) a new transition (the Gardener transition) from the replica symmetric phase to the replica broken phase at high density (at low temperature), in agreement with simulations on hard sphere systems. I will briefly discuss the possible consequences of this new picture on the very low temperature behavior of glasses in the quantum regime.

  7. Radial distribution function for hard spheres in fractal dimensions: A heuristic approximation.

    PubMed

    Santos, Andrés; de Haro, Mariano López

    2016-06-01

    Analytic approximations for the radial distribution function, the structure factor, and the equation of state of hard-core fluids in fractal dimension d (1≤d≤3) are developed as heuristic interpolations from the knowledge of the exact and Percus-Yevick results for the hard-rod and hard-sphere fluids, respectively. In order to assess their value, such approximate results are compared with those of recent Monte Carlo simulations and numerical solutions of the Percus-Yevick equation for a fractal dimension [M. Heinen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 097801 (2015)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.115.097801], a good agreement being observed.

  8. Elastically cooperative activated barrier hopping theory of relaxation in viscous fluids. I. General formulation and application to hard sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2014-05-21

    We generalize the force-level nonlinear Langevin equation theory of single particle hopping to include collective effects associated with long range elastic distortion of the liquid. The activated alpha relaxation event is of a mixed spatial character, involving two distinct, but inter-related, local and collective barriers. There are no divergences at volume fractions below jamming or temperatures above zero Kelvin. The ideas are first developed and implemented analytically and numerically in the context of hard sphere fluids. In an intermediate volume fraction crossover regime, the local cage process is dominant in a manner consistent with an apparent Arrhenius behavior. The super-Arrhenius collective barrier is more strongly dependent on volume fraction, dominates the highly viscous regime, and is well described by a nonsingular law below jamming. The increase of the collective barrier is determined by the amplitude of thermal density fluctuations, dynamic shear modulus or transient localization length, and a growing microscopic jump length. Alpha relaxation time calculations are in good agreement with recent experiments and simulations on dense fluids and suspensions of hard spheres. Comparisons of the theory with elastic models and entropy crisis ideas are explored. The present work provides a foundation for constructing a quasi-universal, fit-parameter-free theory for relaxation in thermal molecular liquids over 14 orders of magnitude in time.

  9. Long-range weight functions in fundamental measure theory of the non-uniform hard-sphere fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik

    2016-06-01

    We introduce long-range weight functions to the framework of fundamental measure theory (FMT) of the non-uniform, single-component hard-sphere fluid. While the range of the usual weight functions is equal to the hard-sphere radius R, the modified weight functions have range 3R. Based on the augmented FMT, we calculate the radial distribution function g(r) up to second order in the density within Percus’ test particle theory. Consistency of the compressibility and virial routes on this level allows us to determine the free parameter γ of the theory. As a side result, we obtain a value for the fourth virial coefficient B 4 which deviates by only 0.01% from the exact result. The augmented FMT is tested for the dense fluid by comparing results for g(r) calculated via the test particle route to existing results from molecular dynamics simulations. The agreement at large distances (r  >  6R) is significantly improved when the FMT with long-range weight functions is used. In order to improve agreement close to contact (r  =  2R) we construct a free energy which is based on the accurate Carnahan-Starling equation of state, rather than the Percus-Yevick compressibility equation underlying standard FMT.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation and equation of state for flexible charged hard-sphere chain fluids: Polyampholyte and polyelectrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Hao; Adidharma, Hertanto

    2014-11-07

    The thermodynamic modeling of flexible charged hard-sphere chains representing polyampholyte or polyelectrolyte molecules in solution is considered. The excess Helmholtz energy and osmotic coefficients of solutions containing short polyampholyte and the osmotic coefficients of solutions containing short polyelectrolytes are determined by performing canonical and isobaric-isothermal Monte Carlo simulations. A new equation of state based on the thermodynamic perturbation theory is also proposed for flexible charged hard-sphere chains. For the modeling of such chains, the use of solely the structure information of monomer fluid for calculating the chain contribution is found to be insufficient and more detailed structure information must therefore be considered. Two approaches, i.e., the dimer and dimer-monomer approaches, are explored to obtain the contribution of the chain formation to the Helmholtz energy. By comparing with the simulation results, the equation of state with either the dimer or dimer-monomer approach accurately predicts the excess Helmholtz energy and osmotic coefficients of polyampholyte and polyelectrolyte solutions except at very low density. It also well captures the effect of temperature on the thermodynamic properties of these solutions.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation and equation of state for flexible charged hard-sphere chain fluids: polyampholyte and polyelectrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Adidharma, Hertanto

    2014-11-07

    The thermodynamic modeling of flexible charged hard-sphere chains representing polyampholyte or polyelectrolyte molecules in solution is considered. The excess Helmholtz energy and osmotic coefficients of solutions containing short polyampholyte and the osmotic coefficients of solutions containing short polyelectrolytes are determined by performing canonical and isobaric-isothermal Monte Carlo simulations. A new equation of state based on the thermodynamic perturbation theory is also proposed for flexible charged hard-sphere chains. For the modeling of such chains, the use of solely the structure information of monomer fluid for calculating the chain contribution is found to be insufficient and more detailed structure information must therefore be considered. Two approaches, i.e., the dimer and dimer-monomer approaches, are explored to obtain the contribution of the chain formation to the Helmholtz energy. By comparing with the simulation results, the equation of state with either the dimer or dimer-monomer approach accurately predicts the excess Helmholtz energy and osmotic coefficients of polyampholyte and polyelectrolyte solutions except at very low density. It also well captures the effect of temperature on the thermodynamic properties of these solutions.

  12. The Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment on MSL-1: Required Measurements and Instrument Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Lant, Christian T.; Ling, Jerri S.

    1998-01-01

    The Physics of HArd Spheres Experiment (PHaSE), one of NASA Lewis Research Center's first major light scattering experiments for microgravity research on complex fluids, flew on board the Space Shuttle's Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL-1) in 1997. Using colloidal systems of various concentrations of micron-sized plastic spheres in a refractive index-matching fluid as test samples, illuminated by laser light during and after crystallization, investigations were conducted to measure the nucleation and growth rate of colloidal crystals as well as the structure, rheology, and dynamics of the equilibrium crystal. Together, these measurements support an enhanced understanding of the nature of the liquid-to-solid transition. Achievement of the science objectives required an accurate experimental determination of eight fundamental properties for the hard sphere colloidal samples. The instrument design met almost all of the original measurement requirements, but with compromise on the number of samples on which data were taken. The instrument performs 2-D Bragg and low angle scattering from 0.4 deg. to 60 deg., dynamic and single-channel static scattering from 10 deg. to 170 deg., rheology using fiber optics, and white light imaging of the sample. As a result, PHaSE provided a timely microgravity demonstration of critical light scattering measurement techniques and hardware concepts, while generating data already showing promise of interesting new scientific findings in the field of condensed matter physics.

  13. Efficiency of rejection-free dynamic Monte Carlo methods for homogeneous spin models, hard disk systems, and hard sphere systems.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Yukawa, Satoshi; Novotny, M A; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2006-08-01

    We construct asymptotic arguments for the relative efficiency of rejection-free Monte Carlo (MC) methods compared to the standard MC method. We find that the efficiency is proportional to exp(constbeta) in the Ising, sqrt[beta] in the classical XY, and beta in the classical Heisenberg spin systems with inverse temperature beta, regardless of the dimension. The efficiency in hard particle systems is also obtained, and found to be proportional to (rho(cp)-rho)(-d) with the closest packing density rho(cp), density rho, and dimension d of the systems. We construct and implement a rejection-free Monte Carlo method for the hard-disk system. The RFMC has a greater computational efficiency at high densities, and the density dependence of the efficiency is as predicted by our arguments.

  14. Fusion of Hard and Soft Information in Nonparametric Density Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-10

    Fusion of Hard and Soft Information in Nonparametric Density Estimation∗ Johannes O. Royset Roger J-B Wets Department of Operations Research...univariate density estimation in situations when the sample ( hard information) is supplemented by “soft” information about the random phenomenon. These... hard and soft information, and give rates of convergence. Numerical examples illustrate the value of soft information, the ability to generate a

  15. An Automatic Phase-Change Detection Technique for Colloidal Hard Sphere Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth; Rogers, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions of monodisperse spheres are used as physical models of thermodynamic phase transitions and as precursors to photonic band gap materials. However, current image analysis techniques are not able to distinguish between densely packed phases within conventional microscope images, which are mainly characterized by degrees of randomness or order with similar grayscale value properties. Current techniques for identifying the phase boundaries involve manually identifying the phase transitions, which is very tedious and time consuming. We have developed an intelligent machine vision technique that automatically identifies colloidal phase boundaries. The algorithm utilizes intelligent image processing techniques that accurately identify and track phase changes vertically or horizontally for a sequence of colloidal hard sphere suspension images. This technique is readily adaptable to any imaging application where regions of interest are distinguished from the background by differing patterns of motion over time.

  16. Stabilizing the hexagonal close packed structure of hard spheres with polymers: Phase diagram, structure, and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Edison, John R; Dasgupta, Tonnishtha; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2016-08-07

    We study the phase behaviour of a binary mixture of colloidal hard spheres and freely jointed chains of beads using Monte Carlo simulations. Recently Panagiotopoulos and co-workers predicted [Nat. Commun. 5, 4472 (2014)] that the hexagonal close packed (HCP) structure of hard spheres can be stabilized in such a mixture due to the interplay between polymer and the void structure in the crystal phase. Their predictions were based on estimates of the free-energy penalty for adding a single hard polymer chain in the HCP and the competing face centered cubic (FCC) phase. Here we calculate the phase diagram using free-energy calculations of the full binary mixture and find a broad fluid-solid coexistence region and a metastable gas-liquid coexistence region. For the colloid-monomer size ratio considered in this work, we find that the HCP phase is only stable in a small window at relatively high polymer reservoir packing fractions, where the coexisting HCP phase is nearly close packed. Additionally we investigate the structure and dynamic behaviour of these mixtures.

  17. Two- and three-phase equilibria of polydisperse Yukawa hard-sphere fluids confined in random porous media: high temperature approximation and scaled particle theory.

    PubMed

    Hvozd, Taras V; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V

    2017-02-15

    We have studied the phase behavior of polydisperse Yukawa hard-sphere fluid confined in random porous media using extension and combination of high temperature approximation and scaled particle theory. The porous media are represented by the matrix of randomly placed hard-sphere obstacles. Due to the confinement, polydispersity effects are substantially enhanced. At an intermediate degree of fluid polydispersity and low density of the matrix, we observe two-phase coexistence with two critical points, and cloud and shadow curves forming closed loops of ellipsoidal shape. With the increase of the matrix density and the constant degree of polydispersity, these two critical points merge and disappear, and at lower temperatures the system fractionates into three coexisting phases. A similar phase behavior was observed in the absence of the porous media caused, however, by the increase of the polydispersity.

  18. The role of bond tangency and bond gap in hard sphere crystallization of chains.

    PubMed

    Karayiannis, Nikos Ch; Foteinopoulou, Katerina; Laso, Manuel

    2015-03-07

    We report results from Monte Carlo simulations on dense packings of linear, freely-jointed chains of hard spheres of uniform size. In contrast to our past studies where bonded spheres along the chain backbone were tangent, in the present work a finite tolerance in the bond is allowed. Bond lengths are allowed to fluctuate in the interval [σ, σ + dl], where σ is the sphere diameter. We find that bond tolerance affects the phase behaviour of hard-sphere chains, especially in the close vicinity of the melting transition. First, a critical dl(crit) exists marking the threshold for crystallization, whose value decreases with increasing volume fraction. Second, bond gaps enhance the onset of phase transition by accelerating crystal nucleation and growth. Finally, bond tolerance has an effect on crystal morphologies: in the tangent limit the majority of structures correspond to stack-faulted random hexagonal close packing (rhcp). However, as bond tolerance increases a wealth of diverse structures can be observed: from single fcc (or hcp) crystallites to random hcp/fcc stackings with multiple directions. By extending the simulations over trillions of MC steps (10(12)) we are able to observe crystal-crystal transitions and perfection even for entangled polymer chains in accordance to the Ostwald's rule of stages in crystal polymorphism. Through simple geometric arguments we explain how the presence of rigid or flexible constraints affects crystallization in general atomic and particulate systems. Based on the present results, it can be concluded that proper tuning of bond gaps and of the connectivity network can be a controlling factor for the phase behaviour of model, polymer-based colloidal and granular systems.

  19. Temperature Dependence of the Pairwise Association of Hard Spheres in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    It is shown that the Gibbs energy change associated with the formation of the contact-minimum configuration of two hard spheres in water becomes more negative on increasing the temperature, at 1 atm, by extending the geometric approach previously developed [G. Graziano, Chem. Phys. Lett. 499, 79 (2010)].. This is because the decrease in water accessible surface area accompanying the association leads to a gain in translational entropy of water molecules. The process is exothermic, due to the release of some water molecules from the hydration shell to the bulk. This water reorganization is characterized by a complete enthalpy-entropy compensation and does not affect the Gibbs energy change.

  20. Event-chain Monte Carlo algorithms for hard-sphere systems.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Etienne P; Krauth, Werner; Wilson, David B

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we present the event-chain algorithms, which are fast Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods for hard spheres and related systems. In a single move of these rejection-free methods, an arbitrarily long chain of particles is displaced, and long-range coherent motion can be induced. Numerical simulations show that event-chain algorithms clearly outperform the conventional Metropolis method. Irreversible versions of the algorithms, which violate detailed balance, improve the speed of the method even further. We also compare our method with a recent implementations of the molecular-dynamics algorithm.

  1. Packing fraction of crystalline structures of binary hard spheres: a general equation and application to amorphization.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, H J H

    2008-07-01

    In a previous paper analytical equations were derived for the packing fraction of crystalline structures consisting of bimodal randomly placed hard spheres [H. J. H. Brouwers, Phys. Rev. E 76, 041304 (2007)]. The bimodal packing fraction was derived for the three crystalline cubic systems: viz., face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, and simple cubic. These three equations appeared also to be applicable to all 14 Bravais lattices. Here it is demonstrated, accounting for the number of distorted bonds in the building blocks and using graph theory, that one general packing equation can be derived, valid again for all lattices. This expression is validated and applied to the process of amorphization.

  2. Dynamic broadening of the crystal-fluid interface of colloidal hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Dullens, Roel P A; Aarts, Dirk G A L; Kegel, Willem K

    2006-12-01

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of the crystal-fluid interface of colloidal hard spheres in real space by confocal microscopy. Tuning the buoyancy of the particles allows us to study the interface close to and away from equilibrium. We find that the interface broadens from 8-9 particle diameters close to equilibrium to 15 particle diameters away from equilibrium. Furthermore, the interfacial velocity, i.e., the velocity by which the interface moves upwards, increases significantly. The increasing gravitational drive leads to supersaturation of the fluid above the crystal surface. This dramatically affects crystal nucleation and growth, resulting in the observed dynamic broadening of the crystal-fluid interface.

  3. Isotropic-nematic phase equilibria of hard-sphere chain fluids-Pure components and binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Oyarzún, Bernardo; van Westen, Thijs; Vlugt, Thijs J H

    2015-02-14

    The isotropic-nematic phase equilibria of linear hard-sphere chains and binary mixtures of them are obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the infinite dilution solubility of hard spheres in the coexisting isotropic and nematic phases is determined. Phase equilibria calculations are performed in an expanded formulation of the Gibbs ensemble. This method allows us to carry out an extensive simulation study on the phase equilibria of pure linear chains with a length of 7 to 20 beads (7-mer to 20-mer), and binary mixtures of an 8-mer with a 14-, a 16-, and a 19-mer. The effect of molecular flexibility on the isotropic-nematic phase equilibria is assessed on the 8-mer+19-mer mixture by allowing one and two fully flexible beads at the end of the longest molecule. Results for binary mixtures are compared with the theoretical predictions of van Westen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 034504 (2014)]. Excellent agreement between theory and simulations is observed. The infinite dilution solubility of hard spheres in the hard-sphere fluids is obtained by the Widom test-particle insertion method. As in our previous work, on pure linear hard-sphere chains [B. Oyarzún, T. van Westen, and T. J. H. Vlugt, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204905 (2013)], a linear relationship between relative infinite dilution solubility (relative to that of hard spheres in a hard-sphere fluid) and packing fraction is found. It is observed that binary mixtures greatly increase the solubility difference between coexisting isotropic and nematic phases compared to pure components.

  4. Isotropic-nematic phase equilibria of hard-sphere chain fluids—Pure components and binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyarzún, Bernardo; van Westen, Thijs; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.

    2015-02-01

    The isotropic-nematic phase equilibria of linear hard-sphere chains and binary mixtures of them are obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the infinite dilution solubility of hard spheres in the coexisting isotropic and nematic phases is determined. Phase equilibria calculations are performed in an expanded formulation of the Gibbs ensemble. This method allows us to carry out an extensive simulation study on the phase equilibria of pure linear chains with a length of 7 to 20 beads (7-mer to 20-mer), and binary mixtures of an 8-mer with a 14-, a 16-, and a 19-mer. The effect of molecular flexibility on the isotropic-nematic phase equilibria is assessed on the 8-mer+19-mer mixture by allowing one and two fully flexible beads at the end of the longest molecule. Results for binary mixtures are compared with the theoretical predictions of van Westen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 034504 (2014)]. Excellent agreement between theory and simulations is observed. The infinite dilution solubility of hard spheres in the hard-sphere fluids is obtained by the Widom test-particle insertion method. As in our previous work, on pure linear hard-sphere chains [B. Oyarzún, T. van Westen, and T. J. H. Vlugt, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204905 (2013)], a linear relationship between relative infinite dilution solubility (relative to that of hard spheres in a hard-sphere fluid) and packing fraction is found. It is observed that binary mixtures greatly increase the solubility difference between coexisting isotropic and nematic phases compared to pure components.

  5. The van Hove distribution function for brownian hard spheres: dynamical test particle theory and computer simulations for bulk dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Paul; Fortini, Andrea; Archer, Andrew J; Schmidt, Matthias

    2010-12-14

    We describe a test particle approach based on dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) for studying the correlated time evolution of the particles that constitute a fluid. Our theory provides a means of calculating the van Hove distribution function by treating its self and distinct parts as the two components of a binary fluid mixture, with the "self " component having only one particle, the "distinct" component consisting of all the other particles, and using DDFT to calculate the time evolution of the density profiles for the two components. We apply this approach to a bulk fluid of Brownian hard spheres and compare to results for the van Hove function and the intermediate scattering function from Brownian dynamics computer simulations. We find good agreement at low and intermediate densities using the very simple Ramakrishnan-Yussouff [Phys. Rev. B 19, 2775 (1979)] approximation for the excess free energy functional. Since the DDFT is based on the equilibrium Helmholtz free energy functional, we can probe a free energy landscape that underlies the dynamics. Within the mean-field approximation we find that as the particle density increases, this landscape develops a minimum, while an exact treatment of a model confined situation shows that for an ergodic fluid this landscape should be monotonic. We discuss possible implications for slow, glassy, and arrested dynamics at high densities.

  6. Transport coefficients for relativistic gas mixtures of hard-sphere particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Gilberto M.; Moratto, Valdemar

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, we calculate the transport coefficients for a relativistic binary mixture of diluted gases of hard-sphere particles. The gas mixture under consideration is studied within the relativistic Boltzmann equation in the presence of a gravitational field described by the isotropic Schwarzschild metric. We obtain the linear constitutive equations for the thermodynamic fluxes. The driving forces for the fluxes of particles and heat will appear with terms proportional to the gradient of gravitational potential. We discuss the consequences of the gravitational dependence on the driving forces. We obtain general integral expressions for the transport coefficients and evaluate them by assuming a hard-sphere interaction amongst the particles when they collide and not very disparate masses and diameters of the particles of each species. The obtained results are expressed in terms of their temperature dependence through the relativistic parameter which gives the ratio of the rest energy of the particles and the thermal energy of the gas mixture. Plots are given to analyze the behavior of the transport coefficients with respect to the temperature when small variations in masses and diameters of the particles of the species are present. We also analyze for each coefficient the corresponding limits to a single gas so the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic limiting cases are recovered as well. Furthermore, we show that the transport coefficients have a dependence on the gravitational field.

  7. Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment: Scattering, Rheology and Microscopy Study of Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Z.-D.; Zhu, J.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Meyer, W. V.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment has two incarnations: the first as a scattering and rheology experiment on STS-83 and STS-94 and the second as a microscopy experiment to be performed in the future on LMM on the space station. Here we describe some of the quantitative and qualitative results from previous flights on the dynamics of crystallization in microgravity and especially the observed interaction of growing crystallites in the coexistance regime. To clarify rheological measurements we also present ground based experiments on the low shear rate viscosity and diffusion coefficient of several hard sphere experiments at high volume fraction. We also show how these experiments will be performed with confocal microscopy and laser tweezers in our lab and as preparation for the phAse II experiments on LMM. One of the main aims of the microscopy study will be the control of colloidal samples using an array of applied fields with an eye toward colloidal architectures. Temperature gradients, electric field gradients, laser tweezers and a variety of switchable imposed surface patterns are used toward this control.

  8. Free energy barriers for homogeneous crystal nucleation in a eutectic system of binary hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Ganagalla, Srinivasa Rao; Punnathanam, Sudeep N

    2013-05-07

    In this study, the free energy barriers for homogeneous crystal nucleation in a system that exhibits a eutectic point are computed using Monte Carlo simulations. The system studied is a binary hard sphere mixture with a diameter ratio of 0.85 between the smaller and larger hard spheres. The simulations of crystal nucleation are performed for the entire range of fluid compositions. The free energy barrier is found to be the highest near the eutectic point and is nearly five times that for the pure fluid, which slows down the nucleation rate by a factor of 10(-31). These free energy barriers are some of highest ever computed using simulations. For most of the conditions studied, the composition of the critical nucleus corresponds to either one of the two thermodynamically stable solid phases. However, near the eutectic point, the nucleation barrier is lowest for the formation of the metastable random hexagonal closed packed (rhcp) solid phase with composition lying in the two-phase region of the phase diagram. The fluid to solid phase transition is hypothesized to proceed via formation of a metastable rhcp phase followed by a phase separation into respective stable fcc solid phases.

  9. Anisotropic interfacial free energies of the hard-sphere crystal-melt interfaces.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yan; Houk, Andrew; Song, Xueyu

    2005-04-14

    We present a reliable method to define the interfacial particles for determining the crystal-melt interface position, which is the key step for the crystal-melt interfacial free energy calculations using capillary wave approach. Using this method, we have calculated the free energies gamma of the fcc crystal-melt interfaces for the hard-sphere system as a function of crystal orientations by examining the height fluctuations of the interface using Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the average interfacial free energy gamma(0) = 0.62 +/- 0.02k(B)T/sigma(2) and the anisotropy of the interfacial free energies are weak, gamma(100) = 0.64 +/- 0.02, gamma(110) = 0.62 +/- 0.02, gamma(111) = 0.61 +/- 0.02k(B)T/sigma(2). The results are in good agreement with previous simulation results based on the calculations of the reversible work required to create the interfaces (Davidchack and Laird, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2000, 85, 4571). In addition, our results indicate gamma(100) > gamma(110) > gamma(111) for the hard-sphere system, similar to the results of the Lennard-Jones system.

  10. Simulation of nucleation in almost hard-sphere colloids: the discrepancy between experiment and simulation persists.

    PubMed

    Filion, L; Ni, R; Frenkel, D; Dijkstra, M

    2011-04-07

    In this paper we examine the phase behavior of the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) potential with βε = 40. Crystal nucleation in this model system was recently studied by Kawasaki and Tanaka [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 14036 (2010)], who argued that the computed nucleation rates agree well with experiment, a finding that contradicted earlier simulation results. Here we report an extensive numerical study of crystallization in the WCA model, using three totally different techniques (Brownian dynamics, umbrella sampling, and forward flux sampling). We find that all simulations yield essentially the same nucleation rates. However, these rates differ significantly from the values reported by Kawasaki and Tanaka and hence we argue that the huge discrepancy in nucleation rates between simulation and experiment persists. When we map the WCA model onto a hard-sphere system, we find good agreement between the present simulation results and those that had been obtained for hard spheres [L. Filion, M. Hermes, R. Ni, and M. Dijkstra, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 244115 (2010); S. Auer and D. Frenkel, Nature 409, 1020 (2001)].

  11. Integral equation theory for hard spheres confined on a cylindrical surface: anisotropic packing entropically driven.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Takafumi; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Gumbs, Godfrey

    2005-09-22

    The structure of two-dimensional (2D) hard-sphere fluids on a cylindrical surface is investigated by means of the Ornstein-Zernike integral equation with the Percus-Yevick and the hypernetted-chain approximation. The 2D cylindrical coordinate breaks the spherical symmetry. Hence, the pair-correlation function is reformulated as a two-variable function to account for the packing along and around the cylinder. Detailed pair-correlation function calculations based on the two integral equation theories are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. In general, the Percus-Yevick theory is more accurate than the hypernetted-chain theory, but exceptions are observed for smaller cylinders. Moreover, analysis of the angular-dependent contact values shows that particles are preferentially packed anisotropically. The origin of such an anisotropic packing is driven by the entropic effect because the energy of all the possible system configurations of a dense hard-sphere fluid is the same. In addition, the anisotropic packing observed in our model studies serves as a basis for linking the close packing with the morphology of an ordered structure for particles adsorbed onto a cylindrical nanotube.

  12. Thermodynamic and structural properties of finely discretized on-lattice hard-sphere fluids: Virial coefficients, free energies, and direct correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Siderius, Daniel W; Gelb, Lev D

    2009-08-28

    Using both molecular simulation and theory, we examine fluid-phase thermodynamic and structural properties of on-lattice hard-sphere fluids. Our purpose in this work is to provide reference data for on-lattice density functional theories [D. W. Siderius and L. D. Gelb, Langmuir 25, 1296 (2009)] and related perturbation theories. In this model, hard spheres are located at sites on a finely discretized cubic lattice where the spacing between lattice sites is between one-tenth and one-third the hard-sphere diameter. We calculate exactly the second, third, and fourth virial coefficients as functions of the lattice spacing. Via Monte Carlo simulation, we measure the excess chemical potential as a function of density for several lattice spacings. These results are then parametrized with a convenient functional form and can immediately be used in on-lattice density functional theories. Of particular interest is to identify those lattice spacings that yield properties similar to those of the off-lattice fluid. We find that the properties of the on-lattice fluid are strongly dependent on lattice spacing, generally approaching those of the off-lattice fluid with increasing lattice resolution, but not smoothly. These observations are consistent with results for larger lattice spacings [A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 104504 (2005)]. Certain lattice spacings are found to yield fluid properties in particularly good agreement with the off-lattice fluid. We also find that the agreement of many different on- and off-lattice hard-sphere fluid properties is predicted quite well by that of the virial coefficients, suggesting that they may be used to identify favorable lattice spacings. The direct correlation function at a few lattice spacings and a single density is obtained from simulation. The on-lattice fluid is structurally anisotropic, exhibiting spherical asymmetry in correlation functions. Interestingly, the anisotropies are properly captured in the Percus

  13. The mean spherical model for a Lorentz-Berthelot mixture of sticky hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutschka, Christian; Kahl, Gerhard

    1998-06-01

    We have analyzed the Percus-Yevick (PY) and the mean spherical model (MSM) equation for an N-component system of sticky hard spheres. The PY approximation leads to a set of N(N+1)/2 coupled quadratic equations for the unknown coefficients. While for this closure, the pair distribution functions have to be calculated numerically, we can proceed in the MSM one step further if we assume a Lorentz-Berthelot-type rule for the interactions: then the structure functions can be calculated analytically. We show that under these conditions in the limit N→∞ (stochastic limit) the analyticity of the solution is preserved. General expressions both for the discrete and continuous (polydisperse) case are presented.

  14. Growth of defect-free colloidal hard-sphere crystals using colloidal epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Tonnishtha; Edison, John R.; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-02-01

    Using event-driven Brownian dynamics simulations, we investigate the epitaxial growth of hard-sphere crystals with a face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure on the three densest cross-sectional planes of the fcc: (i) fcc (100), (ii) fcc (111), and (iii) fcc (110). We observe that for high settling velocities, large fcc crystals with very few extended defects grow on the fcc (100) template. Our results show good agreement with the experiments of Jensen et al. [Soft Matter 9, 320 (2013)], who observed such large fcc crystals upon centrifugation on an fcc (100) template. We also compare the quality of the fcc crystal formed on the fcc (111) and fcc (110) templates with that of the fcc (100) template and conclude that the latter yields the best crystal. We also briefly discuss the dynamical behavior of stacking faults that occur in the sediments.

  15. Virial coefficients, thermodynamic properties, and fluid-fluid transition of nonadditive hard-sphere mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Andrés; López de Haro, Mariano; Yuste, Santos B.

    2010-05-01

    Different theoretical approaches for the thermodynamic properties and the equation of state for multicomponent mixtures of nonadditive hard spheres in d dimensions are presented in a unified way. These include the theory by Hamad, our previous formulation, the original MIX1 theory, a recently proposed modified MIX1 theory, as well as a nonlinear extension of the MIX1 theory proposed in this paper. Explicit expressions for the compressibility factor, Helmholtz free energy, and second, third, and fourth virial coefficients are provided. A comparison is carried out with recent Monte Carlo data for the virial coefficients of asymmetric mixtures and with available simulation data for the compressibility factor, the critical consolute point, and the liquid-liquid coexistence curves. The merits and limitations of each theory are pointed out.

  16. Correlation between dynamical and structural heterogeneities in colloidal hard-sphere suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golde, Sebastian; Palberg, Thomas; Schöpe, Hans Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Dynamical and structural heterogeneities have long been thought to play a key role in a unified picture of solidification in view of the two competitive processes of crystallization and vitrification. Here, we study these heterogeneities by means of a combination of dynamic and static light-scattering techniques applied to the simplest model system exhibiting crystallization and vitrification: the colloidal hard-sphere system. Our method enables us to quantify and correlate the temporal evolution of the amount of ordered clusters (precursors) and the amount of slow particles. Our analysis shows that their temporal evolutions are closely related and that there is an intimate link between structural and dynamic heterogeneities, crystal nucleation and the non-crystallization transition.

  17. Equation of state of sticky-hard-sphere fluids in the chemical-potential route.

    PubMed

    Rohrmann, René D; Santos, Andrés

    2014-04-01

    The coupling-parameter method, whereby an extra particle is progressively coupled to the rest of the particles, is applied to the sticky-hard-sphere fluid to obtain its equation of state in the so-called chemical-potential route (μ route). As a consistency test, the results for one-dimensional sticky particles are shown to be exact. Results corresponding to the three-dimensional case (Baxter's model) are derived within the Percus-Yevick approximation by using different prescriptions for the dependence of the interaction potential of the extra particle on the coupling parameter. The critical point and the coexistence curve of the gas-liquid phase transition are obtained in the μ route and compared with predictions from other thermodynamics routes and from computer simulations. The results show that the μ route yields a general better description than the virial, energy, compressibility, and zero-separation routes.

  18. Quantitative analysis of the correlations in the Boltzmann-Grad limit for hard spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Pulvirenti, M.

    2014-12-09

    In this contribution I consider the problem of the validity of the Boltzmann equation for a system of hard spheres in the Boltzmann-Grad limit. I briefly review the results available nowadays with a particular emphasis on the celebrated Lanford’s validity theorem. Finally I present some recent results, obtained in collaboration with S. Simonella, concerning a quantitative analysis of the propagation of chaos. More precisely we introduce a quantity (the correlation error) measuring how close a j-particle rescaled correlation function at time t (sufficiently small) is far from the full statistical independence. Roughly speaking, a correlation error of order k, measures (in the context of the BBKGY hierarchy) the event in which k tagged particles form a recolliding group.

  19. Perturbation theory for multicomponent fluids based on structural properties of hard-sphere chain mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hlushak, Stepan

    2015-09-28

    An analytical expression for the Laplace transform of the radial distribution function of a mixture of hard-sphere chains of arbitrary segment size and chain length is used to rigorously formulate the first-order Barker-Henderson perturbation theory for the contribution of the segment-segment dispersive interactions into thermodynamics of the Lennard-Jones chain mixtures. Based on this approximation, a simple variant of the statistical associating fluid theory is proposed and used to predict properties of several mixtures of chains of different lengths and segment sizes. The theory treats the dispersive interactions more rigorously than the conventional theories and provides means for more accurate description of dispersive interactions in the mixtures of highly asymmetric components.

  20. Growth of defect-free colloidal hard-sphere crystals using colloidal epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Tonnishtha; Edison, John R; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-02-21

    Using event-driven Brownian dynamics simulations, we investigate the epitaxial growth of hard-sphere crystals with a face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure on the three densest cross-sectional planes of the fcc: (i) fcc (100), (ii) fcc (111), and (iii) fcc (110). We observe that for high settling velocities, large fcc crystals with very few extended defects grow on the fcc (100) template. Our results show good agreement with the experiments of Jensen et al. [Soft Matter 9, 320 (2013)], who observed such large fcc crystals upon centrifugation on an fcc (100) template. We also compare the quality of the fcc crystal formed on the fcc (111) and fcc (110) templates with that of the fcc (100) template and conclude that the latter yields the best crystal. We also briefly discuss the dynamical behavior of stacking faults that occur in the sediments.

  1. Ferromagnetism in the upper branch of the Feshbach resonance and the hard-sphere Fermi gas

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Soon-Yong; Randeria, Mohit; Trivedi, Nandini

    2011-01-01

    We address the question of ferromagnetism in repulsive Fermi gas, a problem of fundamental interest, using quantum Monte Carlo simulations that include backflow corrections. We investigate a two-component Fermi gas on the upper branch of a Feshbach resonance and contrast it with the hard-sphere gas. We find that, in both cases, the Fermi liquid becomes unstable to ferromagnetism at a kFa smaller than the mean field result, where kF is the Fermi wavevector and a is the scattering length. Even though the total energies E(kFa) are similar in the two cases, their pair correlations and kinetic energies are completely different, reflecting the underlying potentials. We discuss the extent to which our calculations shed light on recent experiments.

  2. Hybrid Molecular Dynamics-Monte Carlo Simulations for the properties of a dense and dilute hard-sphere gas in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedea, S. V.; Frijns, A. J. H.; van Steenhoven, A. A.; Markvoort, A. J.; Hilbers, P. A. J.

    2005-05-01

    We present a hybrid method to study the properties of hard-sphere gas molecules confined between two hard walls of a microchannel. The coupling between Molecular Dynamics(MD) and Monte Carlo(MC) simulations is introduced in order to combine the advantages of the MD and MC simulations, by performing MD near the boundaries for the accuracy of the interactions with the wall, and MC in the bulk because of the low computational cost. The effect of different gas densities, starting from a rarefied gas (reduced density η=πna3/6=0.001, where n=number density, a=molecular diameter) to a dense hard-sphere gas (η=0.25), is investigated. We characterize the influence of different η's and size of molecules on the equilibrium properties of the gas in a microchannel. The effect of the particle size on the simulation results, which is very small in case of a dilute gas, is increasing with η. Comparisons between MD, MC and hybrid MD-MC simulation results are done, and comparisons between MD, MC, and hybrid MD-MC computational costs are outlined.

  3. Fundamental measure density functional theory for hard spherocylinders in static and time-dependent aligning fields.

    PubMed

    Härtel, A; Löwen, H

    2010-03-17

    The recently developed fundamental measure density functional theory (Hansen-Goos and Mecke 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 018302) for an inhomogeneous anisotropic hard body fluid is used as a basic ingredient in treating the Brownian dynamics of hard spherocylinders. After discussing the relevance of a free parameter in the fundamental measure density functional for the isotropic-nematic transition in equilibrium, we discuss the equilibrium phase behaviour of hard spherocylinders in a static external potential which couples only to the orientations. For external potentials favouring rod orientations along the poles of the unit sphere, there is a well-known paranematic-nematic transition which ceases to exist above a threshold of the strength V(0) of the external potential. However, when orientations along the equator are more favoured, in the plane of the potential energy V(0) and density, there is a phase transition from paranematic to nematic for any strength, which becomes second order above a critical threshold of V(0). The full equilibrium phase diagram in the V(0)-density plane is computed for a fixed rod aspect ratio of 5. For the equatorial cases, strength V(0) is then oscillating in time and dynamical density functional theory is used to compute the evolution of the orientational distribution. A subtle resonance for increasing oscillation frequencies is detected if the oscillating V(0) crosses the paranematic-nematic phase transition.

  4. Qualitative Observations Concerning Packing Densities for Liquids, Solutions, and Random Assemblies of Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duer, W. C.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Discusses comparisons of packing densities derived from known molar volume data of liquids and solutions. Suggests further studies for using assemblies of spheres as models for simple liquids and solutions. (MLH)

  5. Coordinated HArd Sphere Model (CHASM): A Simplified Model for Silicate and Oxide Liquids at Mantle Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, A. S.; Asimow, P. D.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Recent first-principles theoretical calculations (Stixrude 2009) and experimental shock-wave investigations (Mosenfelder 2009) indicate that melting perovskite requires significantly less energy than previously thought, supporting the idea of a deep-mantle magma ocean early in Earth's history. The modern-day solid Earth is thus likely the result of crystallization from an early predominantly molten state, a process that is primarily controlled by the poorly understood behavior of silicate melts at extreme pressures and temperatures. Probing liquid thermodynamics at mantle conditions is difficult for both theory and experiment, and further challenges are posed by the large relevant compositional space including at least MgO, SiO2, and FeO. First-principles molecular dynamics has been used with great success to determine the high P-T properties of a small set of fixed composition silicate-oxide liquids including MgO (Karki 2006), SiO2 (Karki 2007), Mg2SiO4 (de Koker 2008), MgSiO3 (Stixrude 2005), and Fe2SiO4 (Ramo 2012). While extremely powerful, this approach has limitations including high computational cost, lower bounds on temperature due to relaxation constraints, as well as restrictions to length scales and time scales that are many orders of magnitude smaller than those relevant to the Earth or experimental methods. As a compliment to accurate first-principles calculations, we have developed the Coordinated HArd Sphere Model (CHASM). We extend the standard hard sphere mixture model, recently applied to silicate liquids by Jing (2011), by accounting for the range of oxygen coordination states available to liquid cations. Utilizing approximate analytic expressions for the hard sphere model, the method can predict complex liquid structure and thermodynamics while remaining computationally efficient. Requiring only minutes on standard desktop computers rather than months on supercomputers, the CHASM approach is well-suited to providing an approximate thermodynamic

  6. Combined temperature and density series for fluid-phase properties. I. Square-well spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J. Richard; Schultz, Andrew J.; Kofke, David A.

    2015-09-21

    Cluster integrals are evaluated for the coefficients of the combined temperature- and density-expansion of pressure: Z = 1 + B{sub 2}(β) η + B{sub 3}(β) η{sup 2} + B{sub 4}(β) η{sup 3} + ⋯, where Z is the compressibility factor, η is the packing fraction, and the B{sub i}(β) coefficients are expanded as a power series in reciprocal temperature, β, about β = 0. The methodology is demonstrated for square-well spheres with λ = [1.2-2.0], where λ is the well diameter relative to the hard core. For this model, the B{sub i} coefficients can be expressed in closed form as a function of β, and we develop appropriate expressions for i = 2-6; these expressions facilitate derivation of the coefficients of the β series. Expanding the B{sub i} coefficients in β provides a correspondence between the power series in density (typically called the virial series) and the power series in β (typically called thermodynamic perturbation theory, TPT). The coefficients of the β series result in expressions for the Helmholtz energy that can be compared to recent computations of TPT coefficients to fourth order in β. These comparisons show good agreement at first order in β, suggesting that the virial series converges for this term. Discrepancies for higher-order terms suggest that convergence of the density series depends on the order in β. With selection of an appropriate approximant, the treatment of Helmholtz energy that is second order in β appears to be stable and convergent at least to the critical density, but higher-order coefficients are needed to determine how far this behavior extends into the liquid.

  7. Combined temperature and density series for fluid-phase properties. I. Square-well spheres.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J Richard; Schultz, Andrew J; Kofke, David A

    2015-09-21

    Cluster integrals are evaluated for the coefficients of the combined temperature- and density-expansion of pressure: Z = 1 + B2(β) η + B3(β) η(2) + B4(β) η(3) + ⋯, where Z is the compressibility factor, η is the packing fraction, and the B(i)(β) coefficients are expanded as a power series in reciprocal temperature, β, about β = 0. The methodology is demonstrated for square-well spheres with λ = [1.2-2.0], where λ is the well diameter relative to the hard core. For this model, the B(i) coefficients can be expressed in closed form as a function of β, and we develop appropriate expressions for i = 2-6; these expressions facilitate derivation of the coefficients of the β series. Expanding the B(i) coefficients in β provides a correspondence between the power series in density (typically called the virial series) and the power series in β (typically called thermodynamic perturbation theory, TPT). The coefficients of the β series result in expressions for the Helmholtz energy that can be compared to recent computations of TPT coefficients to fourth order in β. These comparisons show good agreement at first order in β, suggesting that the virial series converges for this term. Discrepancies for higher-order terms suggest that convergence of the density series depends on the order in β. With selection of an appropriate approximant, the treatment of Helmholtz energy that is second order in β appears to be stable and convergent at least to the critical density, but higher-order coefficients are needed to determine how far this behavior extends into the liquid.

  8. Combined temperature and density series for fluid-phase properties. I. Square-well spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J. Richard; Schultz, Andrew J.; Kofke, David A.

    2015-09-01

    Cluster integrals are evaluated for the coefficients of the combined temperature- and density-expansion of pressure: Z = 1 + B2(β) η + B3(β) η2 + B4(β) η3 + ⋯, where Z is the compressibility factor, η is the packing fraction, and the Bi(β) coefficients are expanded as a power series in reciprocal temperature, β, about β = 0. The methodology is demonstrated for square-well spheres with λ = [1.2-2.0], where λ is the well diameter relative to the hard core. For this model, the Bi coefficients can be expressed in closed form as a function of β, and we develop appropriate expressions for i = 2-6; these expressions facilitate derivation of the coefficients of the β series. Expanding the Bi coefficients in β provides a correspondence between the power series in density (typically called the virial series) and the power series in β (typically called thermodynamic perturbation theory, TPT). The coefficients of the β series result in expressions for the Helmholtz energy that can be compared to recent computations of TPT coefficients to fourth order in β. These comparisons show good agreement at first order in β, suggesting that the virial series converges for this term. Discrepancies for higher-order terms suggest that convergence of the density series depends on the order in β. With selection of an appropriate approximant, the treatment of Helmholtz energy that is second order in β appears to be stable and convergent at least to the critical density, but higher-order coefficients are needed to determine how far this behavior extends into the liquid.

  9. Jammed lattice sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav; Marcotte, Étienne; Torquato, Salvatore

    2013-12-01

    We generate and study an ensemble of isostatic jammed hard-sphere lattices. These lattices are obtained by compression of a periodic system with an adaptive unit cell containing a single sphere until the point of mechanical stability. We present detailed numerical data about the densities, pair correlations, force distributions, and structure factors of such lattices. We show that this model retains many of the crucial structural features of the classical hard-sphere model and propose it as a model for the jamming and glass transitions that enables exploration of much higher dimensions than are usually accessible.

  10. Preparation of PHSA-PMMA stabilizer for model hard sphere systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, Andrew; Russel, William; van Kats, Carlos; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2006-03-01

    Sterically-stabilized colloidal particles are an excellent model hard-sphere system used by many groups. One of the original stabilizers used for such systems was developed and patented by ICI more than 30 years ago. It consists of a `comb-like' stabilizer of a poly(12-hydroxystearic acid) which is soluble in aliphatic hydrocarbons. These pendant PHSA chains are grafted to an insoluble poly(methyl methacrylate) backbone that strongly adsorbs to polymer particles and thus provides a means of anchoring stabilizer to particle surfaces. Unfortunately, the PHSA-g-PMMA stabilizer is not commercially available. Furthermore, the three-step procedure (Antl, et al. 1986) is generally regarded by non-chemists as technique intensive and time-consuming. We have systematically studied the PHSA-PMMA stabilizer synthesis with the goal of taking the mystery out of the protocol and making the entire synthesis reproducible. Several important details, not published in the literature, will be discussed, along with the analytical results from mass spectroscopy, proton NMR, acid titration and gel permeation chromatography, all of which were used to characterize the polymer and its precursors.

  11. Cavity averages for hard spheres in the presence of polydispersity and incomplete data.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Michael; Maggs, A C

    2015-09-01

    We develop a cavity-based method which allows to extract thermodynamic properties from position information in hard-sphere/disk systems. So far, there are available-volume and free-volume methods. We add a third one, which we call available volume after take-out, and which is shown to be mathematically equivalent to the others. In applications, where data sets are finite, all three methods show limitations, and they do this in different parameter ranges. We illustrate the principal equivalence and the limitations on data from molecular dynamics: In particular, we test robustness against missing data. We have in mind experimental limitations where there is a small polydispersity, say 4% in the particle radii, but individual radii cannot be determined. We observe that, depending on the used method, the errors in such a situation are easily 100% for the pressure and 10kT for the chemical potentials. Our work is meant as guideline to the experimentalists for choosing the right one of the three methods, in order to keep the outcome of experimental data analysis meaningful.

  12. A Continuous Time Random Walk Description of Monodisperse, Hard-Sphere Colloids below the Ordering Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechman, Jeremy; Pierce, Flint

    2012-02-01

    Diffusive transport is a ubiquitous process that is typically understood in terms of a classical random walk of non-interacting particles. Here we present the results for a model of hard-sphere colloids in a Newtonian incompressible solvent at various volume fractions below the ordering transition (˜50%). We numerically simulate the colloidal systems via Fast Lubrication Dynamics -- a Brownian Dynamics approach with corrected mean-field hydrodynamic interactions. Colloid-colloid interactions are also included so that we effectively solve a system of interacting Langevin equations. The results of the simulations are analyzed in terms of the diffusion coefficient as a function of time with the early and late time diffusion coefficients comparing well with experimental results. An interpretation of the full time dependent behavior of the diffusion coefficient and mean-squared displacement is given in terms of a continuous time random walk. Therefore, the deterministic, continuum diffusion equation which arises from the discrete, interacting random walkers is presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. A Fokker-Planck model of hard sphere gases based on H-theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorji, M. Hossein; Torillhon, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    It has been shown recently that the Fokker-Planck kinetic model can be employed as an approximation of the Boltzmann equation for rarefied gas flow simulations [4, 5, 10]. Similar to the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC), the Fokker-Planck solution algorithm is based on the particle Monte-Carlo representation of the distribution function. Yet opposed to DSMC, here the particles evolve along independent stochastic paths where no collisions need to be resolved. This leads to significant computational advantages over DSMC, considering small Knudsen numbers [10]. The original Fokker-Planck model (FP) for rarefied gas flow simulations was devised according to the Maxwell type pseudo-molecules [4, 5]. In this paper a consistent Fokker-Planck equation is derived based on the Boltzmann collision integrals and maximum entropy distribution. Therefore the resulting model fulfills the H-theorem and leads to correct relaxation of velocity moments up to heat fluxes consistent with hard sphere interactions. For assessment of the model, simulations are performed for Mach 5 flow around a vertical plate using both Fokker-Planck and DSMC simulations. Compared to the original FP model, significant improvements are achieved at high Mach flows.

  14. Assembly of vorticity-aligned hard-sphere colloidal strings in a simple shear flow.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiang; Xu, Xinliang; Rice, Stuart A; Dinner, Aaron R; Cohen, Itai

    2012-01-03

    Colloidal suspensions self-assemble into equilibrium structures ranging from face- and body-centered cubic crystals to binary ionic crystals, and even kagome lattices. When driven out of equilibrium by hydrodynamic interactions, even more diverse structures can be accessed. However, mechanisms underlying out-of-equilibrium assembly are much less understood, though such processes are clearly relevant in many natural and industrial systems. Even in the simple case of hard-sphere colloidal particles under shear, there are conflicting predictions about whether particles link up into string-like structures along the shear flow direction. Here, using confocal microscopy, we measure the shear-induced suspension structure. Surprisingly, rather than flow-aligned strings, we observe log-rolling strings of particles normal to the plane of shear. By employing Stokesian dynamics simulations, we address the mechanism leading to this out-of-equilibrium structure and show that it emerges from a delicate balance between hydrodynamic and interparticle interactions. These results demonstrate a method for assembling large-scale particle structures using shear flows.

  15. Shock-induced phase transition in systems of hard spheres with internal degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Shigeru; Mentrelli, Andrea; Zhao, Nanrong; Ruggeri, Tommaso; Sugiyama, Masaru

    2010-06-01

    Shock waves and shock-induced phase transitions are theoretically and numerically studied on the basis of the system of Euler equations with caloric and thermal equations of state for a system of hard spheres with internal degrees of freedom. First, by choosing the unperturbed state (the state before the shock wave) in the liquid phase, the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions are studied and their solutions are classified on the basis of the phase of the perturbed state (the state after the shock wave), being a shock-induced phase transition possible under certain conditions. With this regard, the important role of the internal degrees of freedom is shown explicitly. Second, the admissibility (stability) of shock waves is studied by means of the results obtained by Liu in the theory of hyperbolic systems. It is shown that another type of instability of a shock wave can exist even though the perturbed state is thermodynamically stable. Numerical calculations have been performed in order to confirm the theoretical results in the case of admissible shocks and to obtain the actual evolution of the wave profiles in the case of inadmissible shocks (shock splitting phenomena).

  16. Wave packet autocorrelation functions for quantum hard-disk and hard-sphere billiards in the high-energy, diffraction regime.

    PubMed

    Goussev, Arseni; Dorfman, J R

    2006-07-01

    We consider the time evolution of a wave packet representing a quantum particle moving in a geometrically open billiard that consists of a number of fixed hard-disk or hard-sphere scatterers. Using the technique of multiple collision expansions we provide a first-principle analytical calculation of the time-dependent autocorrelation function for the wave packet in the high-energy diffraction regime, in which the particle's de Broglie wavelength, while being small compared to the size of the scatterers, is large enough to prevent the formation of geometric shadow over distances of the order of the particle's free flight path. The hard-disk or hard-sphere scattering system must be sufficiently dilute in order for this high-energy diffraction regime to be achievable. Apart from the overall exponential decay, the autocorrelation function exhibits a generally complicated sequence of relatively strong peaks corresponding to partial revivals of the wave packet. Both the exponential decay (or escape) rate and the revival peak structure are predominantly determined by the underlying classical dynamics. A relation between the escape rate, and the Lyapunov exponents and Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of the counterpart classical system, previously known for hard-disk billiards, is strengthened by generalization to three spatial dimensions. The results of the quantum mechanical calculation of the time-dependent autocorrelation function agree with predictions of the semiclassical periodic orbit theory.

  17. Free energy of dipolar hard spheres: The virial expansion under the presence of an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfimova, Ekaterina A.; Karavaeva, Tatyana E.; Ivanov, Alexey O.

    2014-12-01

    A method for calculation of the free energy of dipolar hard spheres under the presence of an applied magnetic field is presented. The method is based on the virial expansion in terms of density as well as the dipolar coupling constant λ, and it uses diagram technique. The formulas and the diagrams, needed to calculate the second B2 and third B3 virial coefficients, are derived up to the order of ˜λ3, and compared to the zero-field case. The formula for B2 is the same as in the zero-field case; the formula for B3, however, is different in an applied field, and a derivation is presented. This is a surprising result which is not emphasized in standard texts, but which has been noticed before in the virial expansion for flexible molecules (Caracciolo et al., 2006; Caracciolo et al., 2008). To verify the correctness of the obtained formulas, B2 and B3 were calculated within the accuracy of λ2, which were applied to initial magnetic susceptibility. The obtained expression fully coincides with the well-known theories (Morozov and Lebedev, 1990; Huke and Lücke, 2000; Ivanov and Kuznetsova, 2001), which used different methods to calculate the initial magnetic susceptibility.

  18. Water based on a molecular model behaves like a hard-sphere solvent for a nonpolar solute when the reference interaction site model and related theories are employed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tomohiko; Oshima, Hiraku; Harano, Yuichi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    For neutral hard-sphere solutes, we compare the reduced density profile of water around a solute g(r), solvation free energy μ, energy U, and entropy S under the isochoric condition predicted by the two theories: dielectrically consistent reference interaction site model (DRISM) and angle-dependent integral equation (ADIE) theories. A molecular model for water pertinent to each theory is adopted. The hypernetted-chain (HNC) closure is employed in the ADIE theory, and the HNC and Kovalenko-Hirata (K-H) closures are tested in the DRISM theory. We also calculate g(r), U, S, and μ of the same solute in a hard-sphere solvent whose molecular diameter and number density are set at those of water, in which case the radial-symmetric integral equation (RSIE) theory is employed. The dependences of μ, U, and S on the excluded volume and solvent-accessible surface area are analyzed using the morphometric approach (MA). The results from the ADIE theory are in by far better agreement with those from computer simulations available for g(r), U, and μ. For the DRISM theory, g(r) in the vicinity of the solute is quite high and becomes progressively higher as the solute diameter d U increases. By contrast, for the ADIE theory, it is much lower and becomes further lower as d U increases. Due to unphysically positive U and significantly larger |S|, μ from the DRISM theory becomes too high. It is interesting that μ, U, and S from the K-H closure are worse than those from the HNC closure. Overall, the results from the DRISM theory with a molecular model for water are quite similar to those from the RSIE theory with the hard-sphere solvent. Based on the results of the MA analysis, we comparatively discuss the different theoretical methods for cases where they are applied to studies on the solvation of a protein.

  19. Water based on a molecular model behaves like a hard-sphere solvent for a nonpolar solute when the reference interaction site model and related theories are employed.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomohiko; Oshima, Hiraku; Harano, Yuichi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    For neutral hard-sphere solutes, we compare the reduced density profile of water around a solute g(r), solvation free energy μ, energy U, and entropy S under the isochoric condition predicted by the two theories: dielectrically consistent reference interaction site model (DRISM) and angle-dependent integral equation (ADIE) theories. A molecular model for water pertinent to each theory is adopted. The hypernetted-chain (HNC) closure is employed in the ADIE theory, and the HNC and Kovalenko-Hirata (K-H) closures are tested in the DRISM theory. We also calculate g(r), U, S, and μ of the same solute in a hard-sphere solvent whose molecular diameter and number density are set at those of water, in which case the radial-symmetric integral equation (RSIE) theory is employed. The dependences of μ, U, and S on the excluded volume and solvent-accessible surface area are analyzed using the morphometric approach (MA). The results from the ADIE theory are in by far better agreement with those from computer simulations available for g(r), U, and μ. For the DRISM theory, g(r) in the vicinity of the solute is quite high and becomes progressively higher as the solute diameter d U increases. By contrast, for the ADIE theory, it is much lower and becomes further lower as d U increases. Due to unphysically positive U and significantly larger |S|, μ from the DRISM theory becomes too high. It is interesting that μ, U, and S from the K-H closure are worse than those from the HNC closure. Overall, the results from the DRISM theory with a molecular model for water are quite similar to those from the RSIE theory with the hard-sphere solvent. Based on the results of the MA analysis, we comparatively discuss the different theoretical methods for cases where they are applied to studies on the solvation of a protein.

  20. Fabrication of thin-wall hollow nickel spheres and low density syntactic foams

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, R.B.; Sanders, T.H. Jr.; Cochran, J.K.

    1991-12-31

    A process has been developed to fabricate thin-wall hollow spheres from conventional oxide powders at room temperature. The polymer- bonded powder shells are fired in air to sinter the walls, leaving the shells either impervious or porous. Alternatively, the oxide shells can be preferentially reduced to produce thin-wall hollow metal spheres which can be bonded together to produce an ultra light weight closed-cell foam. Processing and properties of this class of low density structures will be discussed.

  1. Monodisperse TiO2 Spheres with High Charge Density and Their Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hongbo; Wu, Suli; Su, Xin; Zhang, Shufen

    2017-01-03

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) spheres are potential candidates to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals owing to their high refractive index and low absorption in the visible and near-infrared regions. Here, TiO2 spheres with both high surface charge density and uniform size, which are necessary for the self-assembly of TiO2 spheres, have been prepared by means of sol-gel methods in ethanol in the presence of thioglycolic acid as ligand. Thioglycolic acid, which contains two functional groups, not only acts as coordinating ligand for stabilizing and controlling the growth of TiO2 spheres but also endows the resulting TiO2 spheres with high charge density as based on ζ-potential analysis when the pH of the TiO2 aqueous dispersion was 6.5 or higher. The SEM images illustrate that the diameter of the prepared TiO2 spheres can be tuned from 100 to 300 nm by simply controlling the concentration of H2 O. FTIR spectra confirm that thioglycolic acid bonded to the surface of TiO2 spheres through carboxylic groups. As anticipated, the obtained TiO2 spheres could self-assemble to form a 3D opal photonic crystal structure by means of a simple gravity sedimentation method. Then the TiO2 spheres in the 3D opal photonic crystal structure were able to transform into a pure anatase phase by annealing at different temperatures.

  2. Hardness of FeB4: density functional theory investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Lu, Mingchun; Du, Yonghui; Gao, Lili; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Hanyu

    2014-05-07

    A recent experimental study reported the successful synthesis of an orthorhombic FeB4 with a high hardness of 62(5) GPa [H. Gou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 157002 (2013)], which has reignited extensive interests on whether transition-metal borides compounds will become superhard materials. However, it is contradicted with some theoretical studies suggesting transition-metal boron compounds are unlikely to become superhard materials. Here, we examined structural and electronic properties of FeB4 using density functional theory. The electronic calculations show the good metallicity and covalent Fe-B bonding. Meanwhile, we extensively investigated stress-strain relations of FeB4 under various tensile and shear loading directions. The calculated weakest tensile and shear stresses are 40 GPa and 25 GPa, respectively. Further simulations (e.g., electron localization function and bond length along the weakest loading direction) on FeB4 show the weak Fe-B bonding is responsible for this low hardness. Moreover, these results are consistent with the value of Vickers hardness (11.7-32.3 GPa) by employing different empirical hardness models and below the superhardness threshold of 40 GPa. Our current results suggest FeB4 is a hard material and unlikely to become superhard (>40 GPa).

  3. On two-parameter equations of state and the limitations of a hard sphere Peng-Robinson equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmens, A.; Jeremiah, Dawn E.

    Simple two-parameter equations of state are exceptionally effective for calculations on systems of small, uncomplicated molecules. They are therefore extremely useful for vapour-liquid equilibrium calculations in cryogenic and light hydrocarbon process design. In a search for further improvement three two-parameter equations of state with a co-volume repulsion term and three with a hard sphere repulsion term have been investigated. Their characteristic constants at the critical point have been compared. The procedure for fitting the two parameters to empirical data in the subcritical region was analysed. A perturbed hard sphere equation with a Peng-Robinson attraction term was shown to be unsuitable for application over a wide range of p, T conditions. A similar equation with a Redlich-Kwong attraction term gives good service in the cryogenic range.

  4. Essential roles of protein-solvent many-body correlation in solvent-entropy effect on protein folding and denaturation: Comparison between hard-sphere solvent and water

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2015-04-14

    In earlier works, we showed that the entropic effect originating from the translational displacement of water molecules plays the pivotal role in protein folding and denaturation. The two different solvent models, hard-sphere solvent and model water, were employed in theoretical methods wherein the entropic effect was treated as an essential factor. However, there were similarities and differences in the results obtained from the two solvent models. In the present work, to unveil the physical origins of the similarities and differences, we simultaneously consider structural transition, cold denaturation, and pressure denaturation for the same protein by employing the two solvent models and considering three different thermodynamic states for each solvent model. The solvent-entropy change upon protein folding/unfolding is decomposed into the protein-solvent pair (PA) and many-body (MB) correlation components using the integral equation theories. Each component is further decomposed into the excluded-volume (EV) and solvent-accessible surface (SAS) terms by applying the morphometric approach. The four physically insightful constituents, (PA, EV), (PA, SAS), (MB, EV), and (MB, SAS), are thus obtained. Moreover, (MB, SAS) is discussed by dividing it into two factors. This all-inclusive investigation leads to the following results: (1) the protein-water many-body correlation always plays critical roles in a variety of folding/unfolding processes; (2) the hard-sphere solvent model fails when it does not correctly reproduce the protein-water many-body correlation; (3) the hard-sphere solvent model becomes problematic when the dependence of the many-body correlation on the solvent number density and temperature is essential: it is not quite suited to studies on cold and pressure denaturating of a protein; (4) when the temperature and solvent number density are limited to the ambient values, the hard-sphere solvent model is usually successful; and (5) even at the ambient

  5. Essential roles of protein-solvent many-body correlation in solvent-entropy effect on protein folding and denaturation: comparison between hard-sphere solvent and water.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2015-04-14

    In earlier works, we showed that the entropic effect originating from the translational displacement of water molecules plays the pivotal role in protein folding and denaturation. The two different solvent models, hard-sphere solvent and model water, were employed in theoretical methods wherein the entropic effect was treated as an essential factor. However, there were similarities and differences in the results obtained from the two solvent models. In the present work, to unveil the physical origins of the similarities and differences, we simultaneously consider structural transition, cold denaturation, and pressure denaturation for the same protein by employing the two solvent models and considering three different thermodynamic states for each solvent model. The solvent-entropy change upon protein folding/unfolding is decomposed into the protein-solvent pair (PA) and many-body (MB) correlation components using the integral equation theories. Each component is further decomposed into the excluded-volume (EV) and solvent-accessible surface (SAS) terms by applying the morphometric approach. The four physically insightful constituents, (PA, EV), (PA, SAS), (MB, EV), and (MB, SAS), are thus obtained. Moreover, (MB, SAS) is discussed by dividing it into two factors. This all-inclusive investigation leads to the following results: (1) the protein-water many-body correlation always plays critical roles in a variety of folding/unfolding processes; (2) the hard-sphere solvent model fails when it does not correctly reproduce the protein-water many-body correlation; (3) the hard-sphere solvent model becomes problematic when the dependence of the many-body correlation on the solvent number density and temperature is essential: it is not quite suited to studies on cold and pressure denaturating of a protein; (4) when the temperature and solvent number density are limited to the ambient values, the hard-sphere solvent model is usually successful; and (5) even at the ambient

  6. Essential roles of protein-solvent many-body correlation in solvent-entropy effect on protein folding and denaturation: Comparison between hard-sphere solvent and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    In earlier works, we showed that the entropic effect originating from the translational displacement of water molecules plays the pivotal role in protein folding and denaturation. The two different solvent models, hard-sphere solvent and model water, were employed in theoretical methods wherein the entropic effect was treated as an essential factor. However, there were similarities and differences in the results obtained from the two solvent models. In the present work, to unveil the physical origins of the similarities and differences, we simultaneously consider structural transition, cold denaturation, and pressure denaturation for the same protein by employing the two solvent models and considering three different thermodynamic states for each solvent model. The solvent-entropy change upon protein folding/unfolding is decomposed into the protein-solvent pair (PA) and many-body (MB) correlation components using the integral equation theories. Each component is further decomposed into the excluded-volume (EV) and solvent-accessible surface (SAS) terms by applying the morphometric approach. The four physically insightful constituents, (PA, EV), (PA, SAS), (MB, EV), and (MB, SAS), are thus obtained. Moreover, (MB, SAS) is discussed by dividing it into two factors. This all-inclusive investigation leads to the following results: (1) the protein-water many-body correlation always plays critical roles in a variety of folding/unfolding processes; (2) the hard-sphere solvent model fails when it does not correctly reproduce the protein-water many-body correlation; (3) the hard-sphere solvent model becomes problematic when the dependence of the many-body correlation on the solvent number density and temperature is essential: it is not quite suited to studies on cold and pressure denaturating of a protein; (4) when the temperature and solvent number density are limited to the ambient values, the hard-sphere solvent model is usually successful; and (5) even at the ambient

  7. Phase coexistence in a polydisperse charged hard-sphere fluid: polymer mean spherical approximation.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V; Kahl, Gerhard; Cummings, Peter T

    2005-09-22

    We have reconsidered the phase behavior of a polydisperse mixture of charged hard spheres (CHSs) introducing the concept of minimal size neutral clusters. We thus take into account ionic association effects observed in charged systems close to the phase boundary where the properties of the system are dominated by the presence of neutral clusters while the amount of free ions or charged clusters is negligible. With this concept we clearly pass beyond the simple level of the mean spherical approximation (MSA) that we have presented in our recent study of a polydisperse mixture of CHS [Yu. V. Kalyuzhnyi, G. Kahl, and P. T. Cummings, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 10133 (2004)]. Restricting ourselves to a 1:1 and possibly size-asymmetric model we treat the resulting polydisperse mixture of neutral, polar dimers within the framework of the polymer MSA, i.e., a concept that--similar as the MSA--readily can be generalized from the case of a mixture with a finite number of components to the polydisperse case: again, the model belongs to the class of truncatable free-energy models so that we can map the formally infinitely many coexistence equations onto a finite set of coupled, nonlinear equations in the generalized moments of the distribution function that characterizes the system. This allows us to determine the full phase diagram (in terms of binodals as well as cloud and shadow curves), we can study fractionation effects on the level of the distribution functions of the coexisting daughter phases, and we propose estimates on how the location of the critical point might vary in a polydisperse mixture with an increasing size asymmetry and polydispersity.

  8. Density Functional Theory for General Hard-Core Lattice Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente, Luis; Cuesta, José A.

    2004-09-01

    We put forward a general procedure to obtain an approximate free-energy density functional for any hard-core lattice gas, regardless of the shape of the particles, the underlying lattice, or the dimension of the system. The procedure is conceptually very simple and recovers effortlessly previous results for some particular systems. Also, the obtained density functionals belong to the class of fundamental measure functionals and, therefore, are always consistent through dimensional reduction. We discuss possible extensions of this method to account for attractive lattice models.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of the solid-liquid transition in hard spheres and colloid-polymer mixtures.

    PubMed

    Zykova-Timan, T; Horbach, J; Binder, K

    2010-07-07

    Monte Carlo simulations at constant pressure are performed to study coexistence and interfacial properties of the liquid-solid transition in hard spheres and in colloid-polymer mixtures. The latter system is described as a one-component Asakura-Oosawa (AO) model where the polymer's degrees of freedom are incorporated via an attractive part in the effective potential for the colloid-colloid interactions. For the considered AO model, the polymer reservoir packing fraction is eta(p) (r)=0.1 and the colloid-polymer size ratio is q[triple bond]sigma(p)/sigma=0.15 (with sigma(p) and sigma as the diameter of polymers and colloids, respectively). Inhomogeneous solid-liquid systems are prepared by placing the solid fcc phase in the middle of a rectangular simulation box, creating two interfaces with the adjoined bulk liquid. By analyzing the growth of the crystalline region at various pressures and for different system sizes, the coexistence pressure p(co) is obtained, yielding p(co)=11.576 k(B)T/sigma(3) for the hard-sphere system and p(co)=8.00 k(B)T/sigma(3) for the AO model (with k(B) as the Boltzmann constant and T as the temperature). Several order parameters are introduced to distinguish between solid and liquid phases and to describe the interfacial properties. From the capillary-wave broadening of the solid-liquid interface, the interfacial stiffness is obtained for the (100) crystalline plane, giving the values gamma approximately 0.49 k(B)T/sigma(2) for the hard-sphere system and gamma approximately 0.95 k(B)T/sigma(2) for the AO model.

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of the solid-liquid transition in hard spheres and colloid-polymer mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykova-Timan, T.; Horbach, J.; Binder, K.

    2010-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulations at constant pressure are performed to study coexistence and interfacial properties of the liquid-solid transition in hard spheres and in colloid-polymer mixtures. The latter system is described as a one-component Asakura-Oosawa (AO) model where the polymer's degrees of freedom are incorporated via an attractive part in the effective potential for the colloid-colloid interactions. For the considered AO model, the polymer reservoir packing fraction is ηpr=0.1 and the colloid-polymer size ratio is q ≡σp/σ=0.15 (with σp and σ as the diameter of polymers and colloids, respectively). Inhomogeneous solid-liquid systems are prepared by placing the solid fcc phase in the middle of a rectangular simulation box, creating two interfaces with the adjoined bulk liquid. By analyzing the growth of the crystalline region at various pressures and for different system sizes, the coexistence pressure pco is obtained, yielding pco=11.576 kBT/σ3 for the hard-sphere system and pco=8.00 kBT/σ3 for the AO model (with kB as the Boltzmann constant and T as the temperature). Several order parameters are introduced to distinguish between solid and liquid phases and to describe the interfacial properties. From the capillary-wave broadening of the solid-liquid interface, the interfacial stiffness is obtained for the (100) crystalline plane, giving the values γ˜≈0.49 kBT/σ2 for the hard-sphere system and γ˜≈0.95 kBT/σ2 for the AO model.

  11. Rheology and Structure of Concentrated Suspensions of Hard Spheres. Shear Induced Particle Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, P.; Snabre, P.

    1995-10-01

    The apparent shear viscosity, in the non-Brownian limit, for a homogeneous suspension of monodispersed hard spheres in systems ranging from dilute to concentrated was previously established. From an estimation of the viscous dissipation. We use the inter-particle distance dependence of the shear viscosity for determining the components of a local stress tensor associated with the transient network of particles for the volume fraction above the percolation threshold. For this purpose, we develop a model based on lubrication forces between colliding particles for coupling the particle stress tensor to the stress tensor of the suspension considered as an effective medium. In the case of non-uniform flows with low shear rate regions, it is necessary to introduce a non-local stress tensor since the stress can be directly transmitted by the network of particles over a correlation length larger than the particle diameter. This approach shows ... A partir d'une estimation de la dissipation visqueuse, nous avons précedemment évalué la viscosité apparente de cisaillement des suspensions homogènes de sphères dures monodisperses et non Browniennes dans les systèmes dilués ou concentrés. Nos utilisons la dépendance de la viscosité de cisaillement avec la distance moyenne entre les particules pour déterminer les composantes d'un tenseur local de contraintes associé à l'amas transitoire de particlues au dessus de la fraction volumique critique de percolation. Nous developpons pour cela un modèle basé sur les forces de lubrification s'exerçant au cours des collisions entre les particules afin de coupler le tenseur local de contraintes associé aux particules et le tenseur des contraintes dans la suspension assimilée à un milieu effectif. Dans le cas des écoulements non uniformes présentant des zones de faible cisaillement, il est nécessaire de considérer un tenseur non local des contraintes car les forces peuvent alors se transmettre directement à travers l

  12. Disordered strictly jammed binary sphere packings attain an anomalously large range of densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Adam B.; Stillinger, Frank H.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2013-08-01

    Previous attempts to simulate disordered binary sphere packings have been limited in producing mechanically stable, isostatic packings across a broad spectrum of packing fractions. Here we report that disordered strictly jammed binary packings (packings that remain mechanically stable under general shear deformations and compressions) can be produced with an anomalously large range of average packing fractions 0.634≤ϕ≤0.829 for small to large sphere radius ratios α restricted to α≥0.100. Surprisingly, this range of average packing fractions is obtained for packings containing a subset of spheres (called the backbone) that are exactly strictly jammed, exactly isostatic, and also generated from random initial conditions. Additionally, the average packing fractions of these packings at certain α and small sphere relative number concentrations x approach those of the corresponding densest known ordered packings. These findings suggest for entropic reasons that these high-density disordered packings should be good glass formers and that they may be easy to prepare experimentally. We also identify an unusual feature of the packing fraction of jammed backbones (packings with rattlers excluded). The backbone packing fraction is about 0.624 over the majority of the α-x plane, even when large numbers of small spheres are present in the backbone. Over the (relatively small) area of the α-x plane where the backbone is not roughly constant, we find that backbone packing fractions range from about 0.606 to 0.829, with the volume of rattler spheres comprising between 1.6% and 26.9% of total sphere volume. To generate isostatic strictly jammed packings, we use an implementation of the Torquato-Jiao sequential linear programming algorithm [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.82.061302 82, 061302 (2010)], which is an efficient producer of inherent structures (mechanically stable configurations at the local maxima in the density landscape). The identification and

  13. Influence of confinement by smooth and rough walls on particle dynamics in dense hard-sphere suspensions.

    PubMed

    Eral, H B; van den Ende, D; Mugele, F; Duits, M H G

    2009-12-01

    We used video microscopy and particle tracking to study the dynamics of confined hard-sphere suspensions. Our fluids consisted of 1.1-microm-diameter silica spheres suspended at volume fractions of 0.33-0.42 in water-dimethyl sulfoxide. Suspensions were confined in a quasiparallel geometry between two glass surfaces: a millimeter-sized rough sphere and a smooth flat wall. First, as the separation distance (H) is decreased from 18 to 1 particle diameter, a transition takes place from a subdiffusive behavior (as in bulk) at large H, to completely caged particle dynamics at small H. These changes are accompanied by a strong decrease in the amplitude of the mean-square displacement (MSD) in the horizontal plane parallel to the confining surfaces. In contrast, the global volume fraction essentially remains constant when H is decreased. Second, measuring the MSD as a function of distance from the confining walls, we found that the MSD is not spatially uniform but smaller close to the walls. This effect is the strongest near the smooth wall where layering takes place. Although confinement also induces local variations in volume fraction, the spatial variations in MSD can be attributed only partially to this effect. The changes in MSD are predominantly a direct effect of the confining surfaces. Hence, both the wall roughness and the separation distance (H) influence the dynamics in confined geometries.

  14. A method for treating the passage of a charged hard sphere ion as it passes through a sharp dielectric boundary.

    PubMed

    Boda, Dezso; Henderson, Douglas; Eisenberg, Bob; Gillespie, Dirk

    2011-08-14

    In the implicit solvent models of electrolytes (such as the primitive model (PM)), the ions are modeled as point charges in the centers of spheres (hard spheres in the case of the PM). The surfaces of the spheres are not polarizable which makes these models appropriate to use in computer simulations of electrolyte systems where these ions do not leave their host dielectrics. The same assumption makes them inappropriate in simulations where these ions cross dielectric boundaries because the interaction energy of the point charge with the polarization charge induced on the dielectric boundary diverges. In this paper, we propose a procedure to treat the passage of such ions through dielectric interfaces with an interpolation method. Inspired by the "bubble ion" model (in which the ion's surface is polarizable), we define a space-dependent effective dielectric coefficient, ε(eff)(r), for the ion that overlaps with the dielectric boundary. Then, we replace the "bubble ion" with a point charge that has an effective charge q/ε(eff)(r) and remove the portion of the dielectric boundary where the ion overlaps with it. We implement the interpolation procedure using the induced charge computation method [D. Boda, D. Gillespie, W. Nonner, D. Henderson, and B. Eisenberg, Phys. Rev. E 69, 046702 (2004)]. We analyze the various energy terms using a spherical ion passing through an infinite flat dielectric boundary as an example.

  15. Apparent viscosity and particle pressure of a concentrated suspension of non-Brownian hard spheres near the jamming transition.

    PubMed

    Mills, P; Snabre, P

    2009-11-01

    We consider the steady shear flow of a homogeneous and dense assembly of hard spheres suspended in a Newtonian viscous fluid. In a first part, a mean-field approach based on geometric arguments is used to determine the viscous dissipation in a dense isotropic suspension of smooth hard spheres and the hydrodynamic contribution to the suspension viscosity. In a second part, we consider the coexistence of transient solid clusters coupled to regions with free flowing particles near the jamming transition. The fraction of particles in transient clusters is derived through the Landau-Ginzburg concepts for first-order phase transition with an order parameter corresponding to the proportion of "solid" contacts. A state equation for the fraction of particle-accessible volume is introduced to derive the average normal stresses and a constitutive law that relates the total shear stress to the shear rate. The analytical expression of the average normal stresses well accounts for numerical or experimental evaluation of the particle pressure and non-equilibrium osmotic pressure in a dense sheared suspension. Both the friction level between particles and the suspension dilatancy are shown to determine the singularity of the apparent shear viscosity and the flow stability near the jamming transition. The model further predicts a Newtonian behavior for a concentrated suspension of neutrally buoyant particles and no shear thinning behavior in relation with the shear liquefaction of transient solid clusters.

  16. Uniform electron gases. III. Low-density gases on three-dimensional spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Agboola, Davids; Knol, Anneke L.; Gill, Peter M. W. Loos, Pierre-François

    2015-08-28

    By combining variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and complete-basis-set limit Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations, we have obtained near-exact correlation energies for low-density same-spin electrons on a three-dimensional sphere (3-sphere), i.e., the surface of a four-dimensional ball. In the VMC calculations, we compare the efficacies of two types of one-electron basis functions for these strongly correlated systems and analyze the energy convergence with respect to the quality of the Jastrow factor. The HF calculations employ spherical Gaussian functions (SGFs) which are the curved-space analogs of Cartesian Gaussian functions. At low densities, the electrons become relatively localized into Wigner crystals, and the natural SGF centers are found by solving the Thomson problem (i.e., the minimum-energy arrangement of n point charges) on the 3-sphere for various values of n. We have found 11 special values of n whose Thomson sites are equivalent. Three of these are the vertices of four-dimensional Platonic solids — the hyper-tetrahedron (n = 5), the hyper-octahedron (n = 8), and the 24-cell (n = 24) — and a fourth is a highly symmetric structure (n = 13) which has not previously been reported. By calculating the harmonic frequencies of the electrons around their equilibrium positions, we also find the first-order vibrational corrections to the Thomson energy.

  17. Uniform electron gases. III. Low-density gases on three-dimensional spheres.

    PubMed

    Agboola, Davids; Knol, Anneke L; Gill, Peter M W; Loos, Pierre-François

    2015-08-28

    By combining variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and complete-basis-set limit Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations, we have obtained near-exact correlation energies for low-density same-spin electrons on a three-dimensional sphere (3-sphere), i.e., the surface of a four-dimensional ball. In the VMC calculations, we compare the efficacies of two types of one-electron basis functions for these strongly correlated systems and analyze the energy convergence with respect to the quality of the Jastrow factor. The HF calculations employ spherical Gaussian functions (SGFs) which are the curved-space analogs of Cartesian Gaussian functions. At low densities, the electrons become relatively localized into Wigner crystals, and the natural SGF centers are found by solving the Thomson problem (i.e., the minimum-energy arrangement of n point charges) on the 3-sphere for various values of n. We have found 11 special values of n whose Thomson sites are equivalent. Three of these are the vertices of four-dimensional Platonic solids - the hyper-tetrahedron (n = 5), the hyper-octahedron (n = 8), and the 24-cell (n = 24) - and a fourth is a highly symmetric structure (n = 13) which has not previously been reported. By calculating the harmonic frequencies of the electrons around their equilibrium positions, we also find the first-order vibrational corrections to the Thomson energy.

  18. Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM): A fast approximate model for oxide and silicate melts at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, A. S.; Asimow, P. D.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent first-principles calculations (e.g. Stixrude, 2009; de Koker, 2013), shock-wave experiments (Mosenfelder, 2009), and diamond-anvil cell investigations (Sanloup, 2013) indicate that silicate melts undergo complex structural evolution at high pressure. The observed increase in cation-coordination (e.g. Karki, 2006; 2007) induces higher compressibilities and lower adiabatic thermal gradients in melts as compared with their solid counterparts. These properties are crucial for understanding the evolution of impact-generated magma oceans, which are dominated by the poorly understood behavior of silicates at mantle pressures and temperatures (e.g. Stixrude et al. 2009). Probing these conditions is difficult for both theory and experiment, especially given the large compositional space (MgO-SiO2-FeO-Al2O3-etc). We develop a new model to understand and predict the behavior of oxide and silicate melts at extreme P-T conditions (Wolf et al., 2015). The Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM) extends the Hard Sphere mixture model, accounting for the range of coordination states for each cation in the liquid. Using approximate analytic expressions for the hard sphere model, this fast statistical method compliments classical and first-principles methods, providing accurate thermodynamic and structural property predictions for melts. This framework is applied to the MgO system, where model parameters are trained on a collection of crystal polymorphs, producing realistic predictions of coordination evolution and the equation of state of MgO melt over a wide P-T range. Typical Mg-coordination numbers are predicted to evolve continuously from 5.25 (0 GPa) to 8.5 (250 GPa), comparing favorably with first-principles Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. We begin extending the model to a simplified mantle chemistry using empirical potentials (generally accurate over moderate pressure ranges, <~30 GPa), yielding predictions rooted in statistical representations of melt structure

  19. Dynamics of Disorder-Order Transitions in Hard Sphere Colloidal Dispersions in micro-g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. X.; Li, M.; Phan, S. E.; Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, Paul M.; Rogers, Rick; Meyers, W.

    1996-01-01

    We performed a series of experiments on 0.518 millimeter PMMA spheres suspended in an index matching mixture of decalin and tetralin the microgravity environment provided by the Shuttle Columbia on mission STS-73. The samples ranged in concentration from 0.49 to 0.62. volume fraction (phi) of spheres, which covers the range in which liquid, coexistence, solid and glass phases are expected from Earth bound experiments. Light scattering was used to probe the static structure, and the particle dynamics. Digital and 35 mm photos provided information on the morphology of the crystals. In general, the crystallites grew considerably larger (roughly an order of magnitude larger) than the same samples with identical treatment in 1 g. The dynamic light scattering shows the typical short time diffusion and long time caging effects found in 1 g. The surprises that were encountered in microgravity include the preponderance of random hexagonal close packed (RHCP) structures and the complete absence of the expected face centered cubic (FCC) structure, existence of large dendritic crystals floating in the coexistence samples (where liquid and solid phases coexist) and the rapid crystallization of samples which exist only in glass phase under the influence of one g. These results suggest that colloidal crystal growth is profoundly effected by gravity in yet unrecognized ways. We suspect that the RCHP structure is related to the nonequilibrium growth that is evident from the presence of dendrites. An analysis of the dendritic growth instabilities is presented within the framework of the Ackerson-Schatzel equation.

  20. Following the Evolution of Hard Sphere Glasses in Infinite Dimensions under External Perturbations: Compression and Shear Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainone, Corrado; Urbani, Pierfrancesco; Yoshino, Hajime; Zamponi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We consider the adiabatic evolution of glassy states under external perturbations. The formalism we use is very general. Here we use it for infinite-dimensional hard spheres where an exact analysis is possible. We consider perturbations of the boundary, i.e., compression or (volume preserving) shear strain, and we compute the response of glassy states to such perturbations: pressure and shear stress. We find that both quantities overshoot before the glass state becomes unstable at a spinodal point where it melts into a liquid (or yields). We also estimate the yield stress of the glass. Finally, we study the stability of the glass basins towards breaking into sub-basins, corresponding to a Gardner transition. We find that close to the dynamical transition, glasses undergo a Gardner transition after an infinitesimal perturbation.

  1. Finite-size effects in the microscopic structure of a hard-sphere fluid in a narrow cylindrical pore.

    PubMed

    Román, F L; White, J A; González, A; Velasco, S

    2006-04-21

    We examine the microscopic structure of a hard-sphere fluid confined to a small cylindrical pore by means of Monte Carlo simulation. In order to analyze finite-size effects, the simulations are carried out in the framework of different statistical mechanics ensembles. We find that the size effects are specially relevant in the canonical ensemble where noticeable differences are found with the results in the grand canonical ensemble (GCE) and the isothermal isobaric ensemble (IIE) which, in most situations, remain very close to the infinite system results. A customary series expansion in terms of fluctuations of either the number of particles (GCE) or the inverse volume (IIE) allows us to connect with the results of the canonical ensemble.

  2. Revisiting the Ramachandran plot: hard-sphere repulsion, electrostatics, and H-bonding in the alpha-helix.

    PubMed

    Ho, Bosco K; Thomas, Annick; Brasseur, Robert

    2003-11-01

    What determines the shape of the allowed regions in the Ramachandran plot? Although Ramachandran explained these regions in terms of 1-4 hard-sphere repulsions, there are discrepancies with the data where, in particular, the alphaR, alphaL, and beta-strand regions are diagonal. The alphaR-region also varies along the alpha-helix where it is constrained at the center and the amino terminus but diffuse at the carboxyl terminus. By analyzing a high-resolution database of protein structures, we find that certain 1-4 hard-sphere repulsions in the standard steric map of Ramachandran do not affect the statistical distributions. By ignoring these steric clashes (NH(i+1) and O(i-1)C), we identify a revised set of steric clashes (CbetaO, O(i-1)N(i+1), CbetaN(i+1), O(i-1)Cbeta, and O(i-1)O) that produce a better match with the data. We also find that the strictly forbidden region in the Ramachandran plot is excluded by multiple steric clashes, whereas the outlier region is excluded by only one significant steric clash. However, steric clashes alone do not account for the diagonal regions. Using electrostatics to analyze the conformational dependence of specific interatomic interactions, we find that the diagonal shape of the alphaR and alphaL-regions also depends on the optimization of the NH(i+1) and O(i-1)C interactions, and the diagonal beta-strand region is due to the alignment of the CO and NH dipoles. Finally, we reproduce the variation of the Ramachandran plot along the alpha-helix in a simple model that uses only H-bonding constraints. This allows us to rationalize the difference between the amino terminus and the carboxyl terminus of the alpha-helix in terms of backbone entropy.

  3. Influence of polydispersity on the critical parameters of an effective-potential model for asymmetric hard-sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    Largo, Julio; Wilding, Nigel B

    2006-03-01

    We report a Monte Carlo simulation study of the properties of highly asymmetric binary hard-sphere mixtures. This system is treated within an effective fluid approximation in which the large particles interact through a depletion potential [R. Roth, Phys. Rev. E 62 5360 (2000)] designed to capture the effects of a virtual sea of small particles. We generalize this depletion potential to include the effects of explicit size dispersity in the large particles and consider the case in which the particle diameters are distributed according to a Schulz form having a degree of polydispersity 14%. The resulting alteration (with respect to the monodisperse limit) of the metastable fluid-fluid critical point parameters is determined for two values of the ratio of the diameters of the small and large particles: q(triple bond)sigma(s)/(-)sigma(b)=0.1 and q=0.05. We find that the inclusion of polydispersity moves the critical point to lower reservoir volume fractions of the small particles and high volume fractions of the large ones. The estimated critical point parameters are found to be in good agreement with those predicted by a generalized corresponding states argument which provides a link to the known critical adhesion parameter of the adhesive hard-sphere model. Finite-size scaling estimates of the cluster percolation line in the one phase fluid region indicate that inclusion of polydispersity moves the critical point deeper into the percolating regime. This suggests that phase separation is more likely to be preempted by dynamical arrest in polydisperse systems.

  4. Confining a fluid membrane vesicle of toroidal topology in an adhesive hard sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2017-03-01

    We discuss how the equilibrium shapes of a confined toroidal fluid membrane vesicle change when an adhesion between membrane and confining sphere is taken into account. The case without adhesion was studied in Ref. [1]. Different types of solution were found and assembled in a phase diagram as a function of area and reduced volume of the membrane. Depending on the degree of confinement the vesicle is either free, in contact along a circle (contact-circle solutions) or on a surface (contact-area solutions). All solutions without adhesion are up-down symmetric. When the container is adhesive, the phase diagram is altered and new kinds of solution without up-down symmetry are found. For increasing values of adhesion the region of contact-circle solutions shrinks until it vanishes completely from the phase diagram.

  5. Beyond Kaiser bias: mildly non-linear two-point statistics of densities in distant spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, C.; Codis, S.; Kim, J.; Pichon, C.; Bernardeau, F.; Pogosyan, D.; Park, C.; L'Huillier, B.

    2017-04-01

    We present simple parameter-free analytic bias functions for the two-point correlation of densities in spheres at large separation. These bias functions generalize the so-called Kaiser bias to the mildly non-linear regime for arbitrary density contrasts and grow as b(ρ) - b(1) ∝ (1 - ρ-13/21)ρ1 + n/3 with b(1) = -4/21 - n/3 for a power-law initial spectrum with index n. We carry out the derivation in the context of large-deviation statistics while relying on the spherical collapse model. We use a logarithmic transformation that provides a saddle-point approximation that is valid for the whole range of densities and show its accuracy against the 30 Gpc cube state-of-the-art Horizon Run 4 simulation. Special configurations of two concentric spheres that allow us to identify peaks are employed to obtain the conditional bias and a proxy for the BBKS extremum correlation functions. These analytic bias functions should be used jointly with extended perturbation theory to predict two-point clustering statistics as they capture the non-linear regime of structure formation at the per cent level down to scales of about 10 Mpc h-1 at redshift 0. Conversely, the joint statistics also provide us with optimal dark matter two-point correlation estimates that can be applied either universally to all spheres or to a restricted set of biased (over- or underdense) pairs. Based on a simple fiducial survey, we show that the variance of this estimator is reduced by five times relative to the traditional sample estimator for the two-point function. Extracting more information from correlations of different types of objects should prove essential in the context of upcoming surveys like Euclid, DESI and WFIRST.

  6. Nanopatterned ferroelectrics for ultrahigh density rad-hard nonvolatile memories.

    SciTech Connect

    Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Stevens, Jeffrey; Scrymgeour, David; Gin, Aaron V.; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew

    2010-09-01

    Radiation hard nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM) is a crucial component for DOE and DOD surveillance and defense applications. NVRAMs based upon ferroelectric materials (also known as FERAMs) are proven to work in radiation-rich environments and inherently require less power than many other NVRAM technologies. However, fabrication and integration challenges have led to state-of-the-art FERAMs still being fabricated using a 130nm process while competing phase-change memory (PRAM) has been demonstrated with a 20nm process. Use of block copolymer lithography is a promising approach to patterning at the sub-32nm scale, but is currently limited to self-assembly directly on Si or SiO{sub 2} layers. Successful integration of ferroelectrics with discrete and addressable features of {approx}15-20nm would represent a 100-fold improvement in areal memory density and would enable more highly integrated electronic devices required for systems advances. Towards this end, we have developed a technique that allows us to carry out block copolymer self-assembly directly on a huge variety of different materials and have investigated the fabrication, integration, and characterization of electroceramic materials - primarily focused on solution-derived ferroelectrics - with discrete features of {approx}20nm and below. Significant challenges remain before such techniques will be capable of fabricating fully integrated NVRAM devices, but the tools developed for this effort are already finding broader use. This report introduces the nanopatterned NVRAM device concept as a mechanism for motivating the subsequent studies, but the bulk of the document will focus on the platform and technology development.

  7. Coating nonfunctionalized silica spheres with a high density of discrete silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, Stephen C.; Muscat, Anthony J.

    2016-03-01

    Reducing AgNO_3 by glucose at basic pH coated the surface of silica spheres were coated with a high density of hemispherical silver nanoparticles by direct reduction. The average diameter of the nanoparticles was 3.2 ± 1 nm. A much lower silver concentration than is a standard favored heterogeneous nucleation of silver on the silica surface at the expense of homogeneous nucleation in solution. The slow growth rate of the nuclei promoted the formation of discrete silver particles rather than a continuous shell. Based on scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the surface coverage of silver seed particles was as high as 25 % at 10 °C without prior functionalization of the silica. The particles were composed of metallic silver based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. There was a sharp increase in the silver surface coverage and a decrease in the particle size when the temperature was raised from 5 to 10 °C and the amount of silica was decreased from 0.2 to 0.025 V/V%. The size was controlled by the diffusion barrier through the ion shell surrounding the silica spheres and by maintaining reaction conditions where the particles on the surface compete for silver.

  8. Effects of thermal treatment on energy density and hardness of torrefied wood pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Jianghong; Wang, Jingsong; Bi, Xiaotao T.; Lim, C. Jim; Sokhansanj, Shahab; Peng, Hanchao; Jia, Dening

    2014-09-27

    Here, three types of wood pellets samples, including two types of commercial pellets and one type of lab-made control pellets were torrefied in a fixed bed unit to study the effect of thermal pretreatment on the quality of wood pellets. The quality of wood pellets was mainly characterized by the pellet density, bulk density, higher heating value, Meyer hardness, saturated moisture uptake, volumetric energy density, and energy yield. Results showed that torrefaction significantly decreased the pellet density, hardness, volumetric energy density, and energy yield. The higher heating value increased and the saturated moisture content decreased after torrefaction. In view of the lower density, lower hardness, lower volumetric energy density, and energy yield of torrefied pellets, it is recommended that biomass should be torrefied and then compressed to make strong pellets of high hydrophobicity and volumetric energy density.

  9. Effects of thermal treatment on energy density and hardness of torrefied wood pellets

    DOE PAGES

    Peng, Jianghong; Wang, Jingsong; Bi, Xiaotao T.; ...

    2014-09-27

    Here, three types of wood pellets samples, including two types of commercial pellets and one type of lab-made control pellets were torrefied in a fixed bed unit to study the effect of thermal pretreatment on the quality of wood pellets. The quality of wood pellets was mainly characterized by the pellet density, bulk density, higher heating value, Meyer hardness, saturated moisture uptake, volumetric energy density, and energy yield. Results showed that torrefaction significantly decreased the pellet density, hardness, volumetric energy density, and energy yield. The higher heating value increased and the saturated moisture content decreased after torrefaction. In view ofmore » the lower density, lower hardness, lower volumetric energy density, and energy yield of torrefied pellets, it is recommended that biomass should be torrefied and then compressed to make strong pellets of high hydrophobicity and volumetric energy density.« less

  10. Fluidization of a vertically vibrated two-dimensional hard sphere packing: a granular meltdown.

    PubMed

    Götzendorfer, Andreas; Tai, Chi-Hwang; Kruelle, Christof A; Rehberg, Ingo; Hsiau, Shu-San

    2006-07-01

    We report measurements of the fluidization process in vertically vibrated two-dimensional granular packings. An initially close packed granular bed is exposed to sinusoidal container oscillations with gradually increasing amplitude. At first the particles close to the free surface become mobile. When a critical value of the forcing strength is reached the remaining crystal suddenly breaks up and the bed fluidizes completely. This transition leads to discontinuous changes in the density distribution and in the root mean square displacement of the individual particles. Likewise the vertical center of mass coordinate increases by leaps and bounds at the transition. It turns out that the maximum container velocity v0 is the crucial driving parameter determining the state of a fully fluidized system. For particles of various sizes the transition to full fluidization occurs at the same value of v 2 0/gd, where d is the particle diameter and g is the gravitational acceleration. A discontinuous fluidization transition is only observed when the particles are highly elastic.

  11. Solid-fluid and solid-solid equilibrium in hard sphere united atom models of n-alkanes: rotator phase stability.

    PubMed

    Cao, M; Monson, P A

    2009-10-22

    We present a study of the phase behavior for models of n-alkanes with chain lengths up to C(21) based on hard sphere united atom models of methyl and methylene groups, with fixed bond lengths and C-C-C bond angles. We extend earlier work on such models of shorter alkanes by allowing for gauche conformations in the chains. We focus particularly on the orientational order about the chain axes in the solid phase near the melting point, and our model shows how the loss of this orientational order leads to the formation of rotator phases. We have made extensive calculations of the thermodynamic properties of the models as well as order parameters for tracking the degree of orientational order around the chain axis. Depending on the chain length and whether the carbon number is even or odd, the model exhibits both a rotator phase and a more orientationally ordered solid phase in addition to the fluid phase. Our results indicate that the transition between the two solid phases is first-order with a small density change. The results are qualitatively similar to those seen experimentally and show that rotator phases can appear in models of alkanes without explicit treatment of attractive forces or explicit treatment of the hydrogen atoms in the chains.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of a piston driven shock wave in a hard sphere gas. Final Contractor ReportPh.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Myeung-Jouh; Greber, Isaac

    1995-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to study the piston driven shock wave at Mach 1.5, 3, and 10. A shock tube, whose shape is a circular cylinder, is filled with hard sphere molecules having a Maxwellian thermal velocity distribution and zero mean velocity. The piston moves and a shock wave is generated. All collisions are specular, including those between the molecules and the computational boundaries, so that the shock development is entirely causal, with no imposed statistics. The structure of the generated shock is examined in detail, and the wave speed; profiles of density, velocity, and temperature; and shock thickness are determined. The results are compared with published results of other methods, especially the direct simulation Monte-Carlo method. Property profiles are similar to those generated by direct simulation Monte-Carlo method. The shock wave thicknesses are smaller than the direct simulation Monte-Carlo results, but larger than those of the other methods. Simulation of a shock wave, which is one-dimensional, is a severe test of the molecular dynamics method, which is always three-dimensional. A major challenge of the thesis is to examine the capability of the molecular dynamics methods by choosing a difficult task.

  13. The isotropic-nematic and nematic-nematic phase transition of binary mixtures of tangent hard-sphere chain fluids: an analytical equation of state.

    PubMed

    van Westen, Thijs; Vlugt, Thijs J H; Gross, Joachim

    2014-01-21

    An analytical equation of state (EoS) is derived to describe the isotropic (I) and nematic (N) phase of linear- and partially flexible tangent hard-sphere chain fluids and their mixtures. The EoS is based on an extension of Onsager's second virial theory that was developed in our previous work [T. van Westen, B. Oyarzún, T. J. H. Vlugt, and J. Gross, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 034505 (2013)]. Higher virial coefficients are calculated using a Vega-Lago rescaling procedure, which is hereby generalized to mixtures. The EoS is used to study (1) the effect of length bidispersity on the I-N and N-N phase behavior of binary linear tangent hard-sphere chain fluid mixtures, (2) the effect of partial molecular flexibility on the binary phase diagram, and (3) the solubility of hard-sphere solutes in I- and N tangent hard-sphere chain fluids. By changing the length bidispersity, two types of phase diagrams were found. The first type is characterized by an I-N region at low pressure and a N-N demixed region at higher pressure that starts from an I-N-N triphase equilibrium. The second type does not show the I-N-N equilibrium. Instead, the N-N region starts from a lower critical point at a pressure above the I-N region. The results for the I-N region are in excellent agreement with the results from molecular simulations. It is shown that the N-N demixing is driven both by orientational and configurational/excluded volume entropy. By making the chains partially flexible, it is shown that the driving force resulting from the configurational entropy is reduced (due to a less anisotropic pair-excluded volume), resulting in a shift of the N-N demixed region to higher pressure. Compared to linear chains, no topological differences in the phase diagram were found. We show that the solubility of hard-sphere solutes decreases across the I-N phase transition. Furthermore, it is shown that by using a liquid crystal mixture as the solvent, the solubility difference can by maximized by tuning the

  14. PREFACE: Classical density functional theory methods in soft and hard matter Classical density functional theory methods in soft and hard matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haataja, Mikko; Gránásy, László; Löwen, Hartmut

    2010-08-01

    evolving microstructures in spatially extended system with atomic scale spatial resolution over diffusive time scales, DFT provides both its theoretical underpinning and (hopefully) the means to construct microscopically more quantitative density functionals for use in engineering materials. Outstanding issues within the PFC and DFT approaches, discussed next, will provide further opportunities for interactions between the PFC and DFT communities. 3. Important open issues and exciting avenues for further research In the following we summarize some of the exciting topics for future research, which were discussed during the CECAM workshop. They concern both fundamental problems and applications, all within the framework of DFT and PFC. Addressing these issues will provide a framework for future work in these two overlapping fields. (a) How to construct a reliable density functional (DF) for soft repulsions? Most of the recent developments in classical density functional theory were focussed on hard-sphere-like interactions in the framework of fundamental-measure-theory (FMT) [30-33]. While this approach can be extended to additive and nonadditive mixtures [34, 35] and to non-spherical hard objects [36, 37], it is much more difficult to include soft-core interactions, such as inverse-power-law pair-potentials. There have been attempts to include those, mainly using the Ramakrishnan-Yussouff [38] or the weighted-density [39-41] approximation, or other modifications (see e.g., [42, 43]), but the accuracy of these functionals are inferior to that of FMT for hard spheres. Clearly the FMT of Rosenfeld needs an extension for the hard-core Coulomb system. A complementary approach is to start from a density functional for hard orientable objects [36] and to integrate out the orientational degrees of freedom. This would lead to a softened effective repulsion between spherical objects. We mention finally that in the extreme limit of ultrasoft pair potentials, which are penetrable, the

  15. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Prediction and Refinement of High-Order Virial Coefficients for a Hard-Sphere System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jia-Wen; Yu, Yang-Xin

    2009-08-01

    The nth virial coefficient for a hard-sphere system is expressed as the sum of n2 and a remainder. When n >= 3, the remainders of the virials can be accurately expressed with Pade-type functions of n. The maximum deviations are only 0.039-0.053%, which are much better than the existing approaches. By using the predicted virials, the compressibility factors of the hard-sphere system can be predicted very accurately in the whole stable fluid region, and those in the metastable fluid region can also be well predicted up to a packing fraction of 0.545. The simulated B7 and B10 are found to be inconsistent with the other known virials, and thus they are refined to be 53.2467 and 105.042, respectively.

  16. An equation of state for the isotropic phase of linear, partially flexible and fully flexible tangent hard-sphere chain fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Westen, Thijs; Oyarzún, Bernardo; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; Gross, Joachim

    2014-04-01

    A new equation of state is developed that accurately describes the isotropic phase behaviour of linear, partially flexible and fully flexible tangent hard-sphere chain fluids and their mixtures. The equation of state is based on the equation of state of Liu and Hu [H. Liu and Y. Hu, Fluid Phase Equilibr. 122, 75 (1996)] for fully flexible chain fluids. The effect of molecular flexibility is described by a pure-component parameter that is introduced in the theory at the level of the cavity correlation function of next-to-nearest neighbour segments in a chain molecule. The equation of state contains a total of three adjustable model constants. The extension to partially flexible- and linear chain fluids is based on a refitting of the first model constant to numerical data of the second virial coefficient of partially flexible and linear tangent hard-sphere chain fluids. The numerical data were obtained from an analytical approximation for the pair-excluded volume. The other two parameters were adjusted to molecular simulation data for the pressure of linear tangent hard-sphere chain fluids. For both, pure component systems and mixtures of chains of variable flexibility, the pressure and second virial coefficient obtained from the equation of state, are in excellent agreement with the results from Monte Carlo simulations. A significant improvement to TPT1, TPT2, generalised Flory-dimer theory and scaled particle theory is observed.

  17. Crystallization of Hard Sphere Colloids in Microgravity: Results of the Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition, CDOT on USML-2. Experiment 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Chaikin, P. M.; Li, Min; Russel, W. B.; Ottewill, R. H.; Rogers, R.; Meyer, W. V.

    1998-01-01

    Classical hard spheres have long served as a paradigm for our understanding of the structure of liquids, crystals, and glasses and the transitions between these phases. Ground-based experiments have demonstrated that suspensions of uniform polymer colloids are near-ideal physical realizations of hard spheres. However, gravity appears to play a significant and unexpected role in the formation and structure of these colloidal crystals. In the microgravity environment of the Space Shuttle, crystals grow purely via random stacking of hexagonal close-packed planes, lacking any of the face-centered cubic (FCC) component evident in crystals grown in 1 g beyond melting and allowed some time to settle. Gravity also masks 33-539 the natural growth instabilities of the hard sphere crystals which exhibit striking dendritic arms when grown in microgravity. Finally, high volume fraction "glass" samples which fail to crystallize after more than a year in 1 g begin nucleation after several days and fully crystallize in less than 2 weeks on the Space Shuttle.

  18. Hardness and density distributions of pharmaceutical tablets measured by terahertz pulsed imaging.

    PubMed

    May, Robert K; Su, Ke; Han, Lianghao; Zhong, Shuncong; Elliott, James A; Gladden, Lynn F; Evans, Mike; Shen, Yaochun; Zeitler, J Axel

    2013-07-01

    We present terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI) as a novel tool to quantify the hardness and surface density distribution of pharmaceutical tablets. Good agreement between the surface refractive index (SRI) measured by TPI and the crushing force measured from diametral compression tests was found using a set of tablets that were compacted at various compression forces. We also found a strong correlation between TPI results and tablet bulk density, and how these relate to tablet hardness. Numerical simulations of tablet surface density distribution by finite element analysis exhibit excellent agreement with the TPI measured SRI maps. These results show that TPI has an advantage over traditional diametral compression and is more suitable for nondestructive hardness and density distribution monitoring and control of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes.

  19. Intercomparison of density and temperature profiles obtained by lidar, ionizatoin gauges, falling spheres, datasondes and radiosondes during the DYANA campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubken, F.-J.; Hillert, W.; Lehmacher, G.; Von Zahn, U.; Bittner, M.; Offermann, D.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Hauchecorne, A.; Mourier, M.; Czechowsky, P.

    1994-01-01

    During the course of the DYnamics Adapted Network for the Atmosphere (DYANA) campaign in early 1990, various techniques to measure densities and temperatures from the ground up to the lower thermosphere were employed. Some of these measurements were performed near simultaneously (maximum allowed time difference: 1 h) and at the same location, and therefore offered the unique chance of intercomparison of different techniques. In this study, we will report on intercomparisons of data from ground-based instruments (Rayleigh- and sodium-lidar), balloon-borne methods (datasondes and radiosondes) and rocket-borne techniques (falling spheres and ionization gauges). The main result is that there is good agreement between the various measurements when considering the error bars. Only occasionally did we notice small but systematic differences (e.g. for the datasondes above 65 km). The most extensive intercomparison was possible between the Rayleigh lidar and the falling sphere technique, both employed in Biscarrosse (44 deg N, 1 deg W). Concerning densities, excellent agreement was found below 63 km: the mean of the deviations is less than 1% and the root mean square (RMS) is approximately 3%. Systematic differences of the order of 5% were noticed around 67 km and above 80 km. The former can be accounted for by an instrumental effect of the falling sphere (Ma = 1 transition; Ma = Mach number), whereas the latter is tentatively explained by the presence of Mie scatterers in the upper mesosphere. Concerning temperatures, the agreement is excellent between 35 and 65 km: the mean of the deviations is less than +/- 3 K and the variability is +/- 5 K. The two systematic density differences mentioned above also affect the temperatures: between 65 and 80 km, the Rayleigh lidar temperatures are systematically lower than the falling sphere values by approximately 5 K.

  20. Computational modeling of the side chain dihedral angle distributions of methionine using hard-sphere repulsive and short-range attractive interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virrueta, Alejandro; O'Hern, Corey; Regan, Lynne

    Methionine (Met) is a versatile amino acid found frequently both in protein cores and at protein-protein interfaces. Thus, a complete description of the structure of Met is tantamount to a fundamental understanding of protein structure and design. In previous work, we showed that our hard-sphere dipeptide model is able to recapitulate the side chain dihedral angle distributions observed in high-resolution protein crystal structures for the 8 amino acids we have studied to date: Val, Thr, Ser, Leu, Ile, Cys, Tyr, and Phe. Using the same approach, we can predict the observed Met side chain dihedral angle distributions P (χ1) and P (χ2) , but not P (χ3) . In this manuscript, we investigate the possible origins of the discrepancy and identify the minimal additions to the hard-sphere dipeptide model necessary to quantitatively predict P (χ3) of Met. We find that applying a Lennard-Jones potential with weak attraction between hydrogen atoms is sufficient to achieve predictions that match the observed χ3 side chain dihedral angle probability distributions for Met, Nle, and Mse without negatively affecting our results for the 8 previously studied amino acids. A. V. is supported by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and a Ford Foundation Fellowship.

  1. Comparison of I-131 radioimmunotherapy tumor dosimetry: unit density sphere model versus patient-specific Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Howard, David M; Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Wilderman, Scott J; Dewaraja, Yuni K

    2011-10-01

    High computational requirements restrict the use of Monte Carlo algorithms for dose estimation in a clinical setting, despite the fact that they are considered more accurate than traditional methods. The goal of this study was to compare mean tumor absorbed dose estimates using the unit density sphere model incorporated in OLINDA with previously reported dose estimates from Monte Carlo simulations using the dose planning method (DPMMC) particle transport algorithm. The dataset (57 tumors, 19 lymphoma patients who underwent SPECT/CT imaging during I-131 radioimmunotherapy) included tumors of varying size, shape, and contrast. OLINDA calculations were first carried out using the baseline tumor volume and residence time from SPECT/CT imaging during 6 days post-tracer and 8 days post-therapy. Next, the OLINDA calculation was split over multiple time periods and summed to get the total dose, which accounted for the changes in tumor size. Results from the second calculation were compared with results determined by coupling SPECT/CT images with DPM Monte Carlo algorithms. Results from the OLINDA calculation accounting for changes in tumor size were almost always higher (median 22%, range -1%-68%) than the results from OLINDA using the baseline tumor volume because of tumor shrinkage. There was good agreement (median -5%, range -13%-2%) between the OLINDA results and the self-dose component from Monte Carlo calculations, indicating that tumor shape effects are a minor source of error when using the sphere model. However, because the sphere model ignores cross-irradiation, the OLINDA calculation significantly underestimated (median 14%, range 2%-31%) the total tumor absorbed dose compared with Monte Carlo. These results show that when the quantity of interest is the mean tumor absorbed dose, the unit density sphere model is a practical alternative to Monte Carlo for some applications. For applications requiring higher accuracy, computer-intensive Monte Carlo calculation is

  2. Hardness of FeB{sub 4}: Density functional theory investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Miao; Du, Yonghui; Gao, Lili; Lu, Mingchun; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Hanyu

    2014-05-07

    A recent experimental study reported the successful synthesis of an orthorhombic FeB{sub 4} with a high hardness of 62(5) GPa [H. Gou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 157002 (2013)], which has reignited extensive interests on whether transition-metal borides compounds will become superhard materials. However, it is contradicted with some theoretical studies suggesting transition-metal boron compounds are unlikely to become superhard materials. Here, we examined structural and electronic properties of FeB{sub 4} using density functional theory. The electronic calculations show the good metallicity and covalent Fe–B bonding. Meanwhile, we extensively investigated stress-strain relations of FeB{sub 4} under various tensile and shear loading directions. The calculated weakest tensile and shear stresses are 40 GPa and 25 GPa, respectively. Further simulations (e.g., electron localization function and bond length along the weakest loading direction) on FeB{sub 4} show the weak Fe–B bonding is responsible for this low hardness. Moreover, these results are consistent with the value of Vickers hardness (11.7–32.3 GPa) by employing different empirical hardness models and below the superhardness threshold of 40 GPa. Our current results suggest FeB{sub 4} is a hard material and unlikely to become superhard (>40 GPa)

  3. Effective densities of hard coals as a function of their genetic characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Dobronravov, V.F.

    1985-01-01

    A quantitative analysis has been made of the change in the effective densities of hard coals as a function of the stage of metamorphism, petrographic composition, and degree of reduction. In the sintering and in the leaning components, this index changes along a curve with a minimum at the medium states of metamorphism. The influence of the petrographic composition is a maximum in the region of fat coals and is the range of 0.04-0.07 g/cm/sup 3/. The influence of the degree of reduction is small and decreases with a rise in rank. A formula is proposed for calculating the effective densities of hard coals from their genetic parameters.

  4. High-density ferroelectric recording using a hard disk drive-type data storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Tomonori; Hiranaga, Yoshiomi; Cho, Yasuo

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric probe data storage has been proposed as a novel data storage method in which bits are recorded based on the polarization directions of individual domains. These bits are subsequently read by scanning nonlinear dielectric microscopy. The domain walls of typical ferroelectric materials are quite thin: often only several times the lattice constant, which is advantageous for high-density data storage. In this work, high-density read/write (R/W) demonstrations were conducted using a hard disk drive-type test system, and the writing of bit arrays with a recording density of 3.4 Tbit/in.2 was achieved. Additionally, a series of writing and reading operations was successfully demonstrated at a density of 1 Tbit/in.2. Favorable characteristics of ferroelectric recording media for use with the proposed method are discussed in the latter part of this paper.

  5. Melting upon cooling and freezing upon heating: fluid-solid phase diagram for Švejk-Hašek model of dimerizing hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V; Jamnik, Andrej; Cummings, Peter T

    2017-02-08

    A simple model of dimerizing hard spheres with highly nontrivial fluid-solid phase behavior is proposed and studied using the recently proposed resummed thermodynamic perturbation theory for central force (RTPT-CF) associating potentials. The phase diagram has the fluid branch of the fluid-solid coexistence curve located at temperatures lower than those of the solid branch. This unusual behavior is related to the strong dependence of the system excluded volume on the temperature, which for the model at hand decreases with increasing temperature. This effect can be also seen for a wide family of fluid models with an effective interaction that combines short range attraction and repulsion at a larger distance. We expect that for sufficiently high repulsive barrier, such systems may show similar phase behavior.

  6. A comparison of measured and predicted sphere shock shapes in hypersonic flows with density ratios from 4 to 19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1975-01-01

    Measured shock shapes are presented for sphere and hemisphere models in helium, air, CF4, C2F6, and CO2 test gases, corresponding to normal-shock density ratios (primary factor governing shock detachment distance of blunt bodies at hypersonic speeds) from 4 to 19. These shock shapes were obtained in three facilities capable of generating the high density ratios experienced during planetary entry at hypersonic conditions; namely, the 6-inch expansion tube, with hypersonic CF4 tunnel, and pilot CF4 Mach 6 tunnel (with CF4 replaced by C2F6). Measured results are compared with several inviscid perfect-gas shock shape predictions, in which an effective ratio of specific heats is used as input, and with real-gas predictions which include effects of a laminar viscous layer and thermochemical nonequilibrium.

  7. Density functional study of the electric double layer formed by a high density electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Douglas; Lamperski, Stanisław; Jin, Zhehui; Wu, Jianzhong

    2011-11-10

    We use a classical density functional theory (DFT) to study the electric double layer formed by charged hard spheres near a planar charged surface. The DFT predictions are found to be in good agreement with recent computer simulation results. We study the capacitance of the charged hard-sphere system at a range of densities and surface charges and find that the capacitance exhibits a local minimum at low ionic densities and small electrode charge. Although this charging behavior is typical for an aqueous electrolyte solution, the local minimum gradually turns into a maximum as the density of the hard spheres increases. Charged hard spheres at high density provide a reasonable first approximation for ionic liquids. In agreement with experiment, the capacitance of this model ionic liquid double layer has a maximum at small electrode charge density.

  8. Encircling the dark: constraining dark energy via cosmic density in spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codis, S.; Pichon, C.; Bernardeau, F.; Uhlemann, C.; Prunet, S.

    2016-08-01

    The recently published analytic probability density function for the mildly non-linear cosmic density field within spherical cells is used to build a simple but accurate maximum likelihood estimate for the redshift evolution of the variance of the density, which, as expected, is shown to have smaller relative error than the sample variance. This estimator provides a competitive probe for the equation of state of dark energy, reaching a few per cent accuracy on wp and wa for a Euclid-like survey. The corresponding likelihood function can take into account the configuration of the cells via their relative separations. A code to compute one-cell-density probability density functions for arbitrary initial power spectrum, top-hat smoothing and various spherical-collapse dynamics is made available online, so as to provide straightforward means of testing the effect of alternative dark energy models and initial power spectra on the low-redshift matter distribution.

  9. The column density distribution of hard X-ray radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panessa, F.; Bassani, L.; Landi, R.; Bazzano, A.; Dallacasa, D.; La Franca, F.; Malizia, A.; Venturi, T.; Ubertini, P.

    2016-09-01

    In order to investigate the role of absorption in active galactic nuclei (AGN) with jets, we have studied the column density distribution of a hard X-ray selected sample of radio galaxies, derived from the INTEGRAL/Imager on Board the Integral Satellite (IBIS) and Swift/The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) AGN catalogues (˜7-10 per cent of the total AGN population). The 64 radio galaxies have a typical FR II radio morphology and are characterized by high 20-100 keV luminosities (from 1042 to 1046 erg s-1) and high Eddington ratios (log LBol/LEdd typically larger than ˜0.01). The observed fraction of absorbed AGN (NH > 1022 cm-2) is around 40 per cent among the total sample, and ˜75 per cent among type 2 AGN. The majority of obscured AGN are narrow-line objects, while unobscured AGN are broad-line objects, obeying to the zeroth-order predictions of unified models. A significant anti-correlation between the radio core dominance parameter and the X-ray column density is found. The observed fraction of Compton thick AGN is ˜2-3 per cent, in comparison with the 5-7 per cent found in radio-quiet hard X-ray selected AGN. We have estimated the absorption and Compton thick fractions in a hard X-ray sample containing both radio galaxies and non-radio galaxies and therefore affected by the same selection biases. No statistical significant difference was found in the absorption properties of radio galaxies and non-radio galaxies sample. In particular, the Compton thick objects are likely missing in both samples and the fraction of obscured radio galaxies appears to decrease with luminosity as observed in hard X-ray non-radio galaxies.

  10. Unit-Sphere Anisotropic Multiaxial Stochastic-Strength Model Probability Density Distribution for the Orientation of Critical Flaws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel

    2013-01-01

    Models that predict the failure probability of monolithic glass and ceramic components under multiaxial loading have been developed by authors such as Batdorf, Evans, and Matsuo. These "unit-sphere" failure models assume that the strength-controlling flaws are randomly oriented, noninteracting planar microcracks of specified geometry but of variable size. This report develops a formulation to describe the probability density distribution of the orientation of critical strength-controlling flaws that results from an applied load. This distribution is a function of the multiaxial stress state, the shear sensitivity of the flaws, the Weibull modulus, and the strength anisotropy. Examples are provided showing the predicted response on the unit sphere for various stress states for isotropic and transversely isotropic (anisotropic) materials--including the most probable orientation of critical flaws for offset uniaxial loads with strength anisotropy. The author anticipates that this information could be used to determine anisotropic stiffness degradation or anisotropic damage evolution for individual brittle (or quasi-brittle) composite material constituents within finite element or micromechanics-based software

  11. KEY COMPARISON: Final report on CIPM key comparison CCM.D-K1: density measurements of a silicon sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Kenichi; Bettin, Horst; Peuto, Anna; Chang, Kyung-Ho; Richard, Philippe; Jacques, Claude; Matilla Vicente, Carmen; Becerra, Luis Omar

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the results on a CIPM key comparison of solid density measurements, which was carried out through July 2001 to May 2003. This CIPM key comparison, designated as CCM.D-K1, was coordinated by the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ, Japan), Swiss Federal Office of Metrology and Accreditation (METAS, Switzerland) and National Research Council Canada (NRC, Canada). These three national metrology institutes (NMIs) formed a pilot group to determine the technical protocol for this key comparison. A total of eight NMIs, namely NMIJ, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Germany), Istituto di Metrologia 'G Colonnetti' (IMGC, Italy), Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS, Korea), METAS, NRC, Centro Español de Metrologia (CEM, Spain) and National Center of Metrology (CENAM, Mexico), participated in this key comparison. A 1 kg single-crystal silicon sphere, prepared by NMIJ, was circulated to each of the NMIs as a travelling standard. Each NMI determined the mass, volume and density of the travelling standard with respect to the mass standard and solid density standard of each NMI by mass measurement and hydrostatic weighing. The reference value of the density was determined with a relative expanded uncertainty of 2.9 × 10-7. When the degrees of equivalence were evaluated by differences from the reference value, the differences for the mass, volume and density were almost equal to or less than expanded uncertainties of the differences, showing a good equivalence of the capabilities for the solid density measurement at the participating NMIs. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  12. Expansion-free evolving spheres must have inhomogeneous energy density distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Le Denmat, G.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-04-15

    In a recent paper a systematic study on shearing expansion-free spherically symmetric distributions was presented. As a particular case of such systems, the Skripkin model was mentioned, which corresponds to a nondissipative perfect fluid with a constant energy density. Here we show that such a model is inconsistent with junction conditions. It is shown that in general for any nondissipative fluid distribution, the expansion-free condition requires the energy density to be inhomogeneous. As an example we consider the case of dust, which allows for a complete integration.

  13. Size and Fiber Density Controlled Synthesis of Fibrous Nanosilica Spheres (KCC-1)

    PubMed Central

    Bayal, Nisha; Singh, Baljeet; Singh, Rustam; Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    We report a facile protocol for the synthesis of fibrous nano-silica (KCC-1) with controllable size and fiber density. In this work, we have shown that the particle size, fiber density, surface area and pore volume of KCC-1 can be effectively controlled and tuned by changing various reaction parameters, such as the concentrations of urea, CTAB, 1-pentanol, reaction time, temperature, solvent ratio, and even outside stirring time. For the first time, we were able to control the particle size ranging from as small as 170 nm to as large as 1120 nm. We were also able to control the fiber density from low to medium to very dense, which consequently allowed the tuning of the pore volume. We were able to achieve a pore volume of 2.18 cm3/g, which is the highest reported for such a fibrous material. Notably we were even able to increase the surface area up to 1244 m2/g, nearly double the previously reported surface area of KCC-1. Thus, one can now synthesize KCC-1 with various degrees of size, surface area, pore volume, and fiber density. PMID:27118152

  14. An analytical approximation for the orientation-dependent excluded volume of tangent hard sphere chains of arbitrary chain length and flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Westen, Thijs; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; Gross, Joachim

    2012-07-01

    Onsager-like theories are commonly used to describe the phase behavior of nematic (only orientationally ordered) liquid crystals. A key ingredient in such theories is the orientation-dependent excluded volume of two molecules. Although for hard convex molecular models this is generally known in analytical form, for more realistic molecular models that incorporate intramolecular flexibility, one has to rely on approximations or on computationally expensive Monte Carlo techniques. In this work, we provide a general correlation for the excluded volume of tangent hard-sphere chains of arbitrary chain length and flexibility. The flexibility is introduced by means of the rod-coil model. The resulting correlation is of simple analytical form and accurately covers a wide range of pure component excluded volume data obtained from Monte Carlo simulations of two-chain molecules. The extension to mixtures follows naturally by applying simple combining rules for the parameters involved. The results for mixtures are also in good agreement with data from Monte Carlo simulations. We have expressed the excluded volume as a second order power series in sin (γ), where γ is the angle between the molecular axes. Such a representation is appealing since the solution of the Onsager Helmholtz energy functional usually involves an expansion of the excluded volume in Legendre coefficients. Both for pure components and mixtures, the correlation reduces to an exact expression in the limit of completely linear chains. The expression for mixtures, as derived in this work, is thereby an exact extension of the pure component result of Williamson and Jackson [Mol. Phys. 86, 819-836 (1995)], 10.1080/00268979500102391.

  15. Accurate prediction of hard-sphere virial coefficients B6 to B12 from a compressibility-based equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik

    2016-04-01

    We derive an analytical equation of state for the hard-sphere fluid that is within 0.01% of computer simulations for the whole range of the stable fluid phase. In contrast, the commonly used Carnahan-Starling equation of state deviates by up to 0.3% from simulations. The derivation uses the functional form of the isothermal compressibility from the Percus-Yevick closure of the Ornstein-Zernike relation as a starting point. Two additional degrees of freedom are introduced, which are constrained by requiring the equation of state to (i) recover the exact fourth virial coefficient B4 and (ii) involve only integer coefficients on the level of the ideal gas, while providing best possible agreement with the numerical result for B5. Virial coefficients B6 to B10 obtained from the equation of state are within 0.5% of numerical computations, and coefficients B11 and B12 are within the error of numerical results. We conjecture that even higher virial coefficients are reliably predicted.

  16. Accurate prediction of hard-sphere virial coefficients B6 to B12 from a compressibility-based equation of state.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik

    2016-04-28

    We derive an analytical equation of state for the hard-sphere fluid that is within 0.01% of computer simulations for the whole range of the stable fluid phase. In contrast, the commonly used Carnahan-Starling equation of state deviates by up to 0.3% from simulations. The derivation uses the functional form of the isothermal compressibility from the Percus-Yevick closure of the Ornstein-Zernike relation as a starting point. Two additional degrees of freedom are introduced, which are constrained by requiring the equation of state to (i) recover the exact fourth virial coefficient B4 and (ii) involve only integer coefficients on the level of the ideal gas, while providing best possible agreement with the numerical result for B5. Virial coefficients B6 to B10 obtained from the equation of state are within 0.5% of numerical computations, and coefficients B11 and B12 are within the error of numerical results. We conjecture that even higher virial coefficients are reliably predicted.

  17. Fluids in Contact with a Hard Surface: Universality of the Bridge Functions for the Density Profile.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-27

    partial DD 4A~ 1473 gOriI oF INov es iOs sorre Unclassified / 01 02.LP.01 4.66 01 SECUFNITY ct.ASSIVICATION or THIS% Pikee (EI.. t e.#I* l~~~~~ ~- INC .I IV...I I"II I.. . + -I >- . UNCLASSIFIED sZCUPM"T C7- -t’ FICAT1000 OF THIS PACZ(W- D~IA vt. Abstract (Cont.) derivative of the free energy with respect...WITH A HARD SURFACE: UNIVERSALITY OF THE BRIDGE FUNCTIONS FOR THE DENSITY PROFILE by Y. Rosenfeld Nuclear Research Centre-Negev. P.O. Box 9901 Beer-Sheva

  18. Compressibility and hardness of Co-based bulk metallic glass: A combined experimental and density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianfeng; Li Ran; Xu Tao; Li Yan; Liu Zengqian; Huang Lu; Hua Nengbin; Zhang Tao; Xiao Ruijuan; Li Gong; Li Yanchun

    2011-10-10

    An incompressible Co{sub 54}Ta{sub 11}B{sub 35} bulk metallic glass (BMG) was investigated using in situ high-pressure synchrotron diffraction and nanoindendation. The elastic constants were deduced from the experiments based on the isotropic model. The Vickers hardness was measured to be 17.1 GPa. The elastic moduli and hardness are the highest values known in BMGs. The theoretically calculated elastic properties by density-functional study were well consistent with experimental measurements. The analysis of charge density and bonding character indicates the covalent character of Co-B and B-B bonds, underlying the unusually high elastic modulus and hardness in this material.

  19. High density tungsten-nickel-iron-cobalt alloys having improved hardness and method for making same

    SciTech Connect

    Penrice, T.W.; Bost, J.

    1988-08-09

    This patent describes the process of making high density alloy containing about 85 to 98 weight percent tungsten and the balance of the alloy being essentially a binder of nickel, iron and cobalt, and wherein the cobalt is present in an amount within the range of about 5 to 47.5 weight percent of the binder, comprising: blending powders of the tungsten, nickel, iron and cobalt into a homogeneous composition, compacting the homogeneous composition into a shaped article, heating the shaped article to a temperature and for a time sufficient to sinter the article, subjecting the sintered article to a temperature sufficient to enable the intermetallic phase formed at the matrix to tungsten interface to diffuse into the gamma austenitic phase whereby the alpha tungsten/gamma austenite boundaries are essentially free of such intermetallic phase, quenching the article, and swaging the article to a reduction in area of about 5 to 40 percent, the article having improved mechanical properties, including improved tensile strength and hardness while maintaining suitable ductility for subsequent working thereof.

  20. THE FIRST HARD X-RAY POWER SPECTRAL DENSITY FUNCTIONS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2013-06-10

    We present results of our power spectral density (PSD) analysis of 30 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using the 58 month light curves from Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) in the 14-150 keV band. PSDs were fit using a Monte Carlo based algorithm to take into account windowing effects and measurement error. All but one source were found to be fit very well using an unbroken power law with a slope of {approx} - 1, consistent at low frequencies with previous studies in the 2-10 keV band, with no evidence of a break in the PSD. For five of the highest signal-to-noise ratio sources, we tested the energy dependence of the PSD and found no significant difference in the PSD at different energies. Unlike previous studies of X-ray variability in AGNs, we do not find any significant correlations between the hard X-ray variability and different properties of the AGN including luminosity and black hole mass. The lack of break frequencies and correlations seem to indicate that AGNs are similar to the high state of Galactic black holes.

  1. Applications of Robust, Radiation Hard AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices in Space Exploration and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K.

    2011-05-04

    This slide show presents: space exploration applications; high energy density physics applications; UV LED and photodiode radiation hardness; UV LED and photodiode space qualification; UV LED AC charge management; and UV LED satellite payload instruments. A UV LED satellite will be launched 2nd half 2012.

  2. Phase diagram of hard snowman-shaped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, Matthew; Milinković, Kristina; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2012-07-01

    We present the phase diagram of hard snowman-shaped particles calculated using Monte Carlo simulations and free energy calculations. The snowman particles consist of two hard spheres rigidly attached at their surfaces. We find a rich phase behavior with isotropic, plastic crystal, and aperiodic crystal phases. The crystalline phases found to be stable for a given sphere diameter ratio correspond mostly to the close packed structures predicted for equimolar binary hard-sphere mixtures of the same diameter ratio. However, our results also show several crystal-crystal phase transitions, with structures with a higher degree of degeneracy found to be stable at lower densities, while those with the best packing are found to be stable at higher densities.

  3. Chromospheric magnetic field and density structure measurements using hard X-rays in a flaring coronal loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, E. P.; Hannah, I. G.; MacKinnon, A. L.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: A novel method of using hard X-rays as a diagnostic for chromospheric density and magnetic structures is developed to infer sub-arcsecond vertical variation of magnetic flux tube size and neutral gas density. Methods: Using Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) X-ray data and the newly developed X-ray visibilities forward fitting technique we find the FWHM and centroid positions of hard X-ray sources with sub-arcsecond resolution (~0.2'') for a solar limb flare. We show that the height variations of the chromospheric density and the magnetic flux densities can be found with an unprecedented vertical resolution of ~150 km by mapping 18-250 keV X-ray emission of energetic electrons propagating in the loop at chromospheric heights of 400-1500 km. Results: Our observations suggest that the density of the neutral gas is in good agreement with hydrostatic models with a scale height of around 140 ± 30 km. FWHM sizes of the X-ray sources decrease with energy suggesting the expansion (fanning out) of magnetic flux tubes in the chromosphere with height. The magnetic scale height B(z)(dB/dz)-1 is found to be of the order of 300 km and a strong horizontal magnetic field is associated with noticeable flux tube expansion at a height of ~900 km.

  4. Characterization of maximally random jammed sphere packings: Voronoi correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Michael A; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-11-01

    We characterize the structure of maximally random jammed (MRJ) sphere packings by computing the Minkowski functionals (volume, surface area, and integrated mean curvature) of their associated Voronoi cells. The probability distribution functions of these functionals of Voronoi cells in MRJ sphere packings are qualitatively similar to those of an equilibrium hard-sphere liquid and partly even to the uncorrelated Poisson point process, implying that such local statistics are relatively structurally insensitive. This is not surprising because the Minkowski functionals of a single Voronoi cell incorporate only local information and are insensitive to global structural information. To improve upon this, we introduce descriptors that incorporate nonlocal information via the correlation functions of the Minkowski functionals of two cells at a given distance as well as certain cell-cell probability density functions. We evaluate these higher-order functions for our MRJ packings as well as equilibrium hard spheres and the Poisson point process. It is shown that these Minkowski correlation and density functions contain visibly more information than the corresponding standard pair-correlation functions. We find strong anticorrelations in the Voronoi volumes for the hyperuniform MRJ packings, consistent with previous findings for other pair correlations [A. Donev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 090604 (2005)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.090604], indicating that large-scale volume fluctuations are suppressed by accompanying large Voronoi cells with small cells, and vice versa. In contrast to the aforementioned local Voronoi statistics, the correlation functions of the Voronoi cells qualitatively distinguish the structure of MRJ sphere packings (prototypical glasses) from that of not only the Poisson point process but also the correlated equilibrium hard-sphere liquids. Moreover, while we did not find any perfect icosahedra (the locally densest possible structure in which a

  5. Nitrogen-doped carbon spheres: A new high-energy-density and long-life pseudo-capacitive electrode material for electrochemical flow capacitor.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shujin; Wang, Miao; Xu, Xingtao; Li, Yandong; Li, Yanjiang; Lu, Ting; Pan, Likun

    2017-04-01

    One of the most challenging issues in developing electrochemical flow capacitor (EFC) technology is the design and synthesis of active electrode materials with high energy density and long cycle life. However, in practical cases, the energy density and cycle ability obtained currently cannot meet the practical need. In this work, we propose a new active material, nitrogen-doped carbon spheres (NCSs), as flowable electrodes for EFC application. The NCSs were prepared via one-pot hydrothermal synthesis in the presence of resorcinol/formaldehyde as carbon precursors and melamine as nitrogen precursor, followed by carbonization in nitrogen flow at various temperatures. The results of EFC experiments demonstrate that NCSs obtained at 800°C exhibit a high energy density of 13.5Whkg(-1) and an excellent cycle ability, indicating the superiority of NCSs for EFC application.

  6. Low-dislocation-density epitatial layers grown by defect filtering by self-assembled layers of spheres

    DOEpatents

    Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming

    2013-04-23

    A method for growing low-dislocation-density material atop a layer of the material with an initially higher dislocation density using a monolayer of spheroidal particles to bend and redirect or directly block vertically propagating threading dislocations, thereby enabling growth and coalescence to form a very-low-dislocation-density surface of the material, and the structures made by this method.

  7. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  8. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  9. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  10. Halogen bonding from a hard and soft acids and bases perspective: investigation by using density functional theory reactivity indices.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Balazs; Nagels, Nick; Herrebout, Wouter A; De Proft, Frank

    2013-01-07

    Halogen bonds between the trifluoromethyl halides CF(3)Cl, CF(3)Br and CF(3)I, and dimethyl ether, dimethyl sulfide, trimethylamine and trimethyl phosphine were investigated using Pearson's hard and soft acids and bases (HSAB) concept with conceptual DFT reactivity indices, the Ziegler-Rauk-type energy-decomposition analysis, the natural orbital for chemical valence (NOCV) framework and the non-covalent interaction (NCI) index. It is found that the relative importance of electrostatic and orbital (charge transfer) interactions varies as a function of both the donor and acceptor molecules. Hard and soft interactions were distinguished and characterised by atomic charges, electrophilicity and local softness indices. Dual-descriptor plots indicate an orbital σ hole on the halogen similar to the electrostatic σ hole manifested in the molecular electrostatic potential. The predicted high halogen-bond-acceptor affinity of N-heterocyclic carbenes was evidenced in the highest complexation energy for the hitherto unknown CF(3) I·NHC complex. The dominant NOCV orbital represents an electron-density deformation according to a n→σ*-type interaction. The characteristic signal found in the reduced density gradient versus electron-density diagram corresponds to the non-covalent interaction between contact atoms in the NCI plots, which is the manifestation of halogen bonding within the NCI theory. The unexpected C-X bond strengthening observed in several cases was rationalised within the molecular orbital framework.

  11. AlGaN UV LED and Photodiodes Radiation Hardness and Space Qualifications and Their Applications in Space Science and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K. X.

    2011-05-31

    This presentation provides an overview of robust, radiation hard AlGaN optoelectronic devices and their applications in space exploration & high energy density physics. Particularly, deep UV LED and deep UV photodiodes are discussed with regard to their applications, radiation hardness and space qualification. AC charge management of UV LED satellite payload instruments, which were to be launched in late 2012, is covered.

  12. Influence of energy density of different light sources on Knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin cement.

    PubMed

    Piva, Evandro; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Consani, Simonides; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Powers, John Michael

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin-based luting cement irradiated with different light sources as well energy density through a ceramic sample. Three light-curing unit (LCUs) were tested: tungsten halogen light (HAL), light-emitting diode (LED) and xenon plasma-arc (PAC) lamp. Disc-shaped specimens were fabricated from a resin-based cement (Enforce). Three energy doses were used by modifying the irradiance (I) of each LCU and the irradiation time (T): 24 Jcm(-2) (I/2x2T), 24 Jcm(-2) (IxT) and 48 Jcm(-2) (Ix2T). Energy doses were applied through a 2.0-mm-thick ceramic sample (Duceram Plus). Three groups underwent direct irradiation over the resin cement with the different LCUs and a chemically-activated group served as a control. Thirteen groups were tested (n=10). Knoop hardness number (KHN) means were obtained from cross-sectional areas. Two-way ANOVA and the Holm-Sidak method were used for statistical comparisons of activation mode and energy doses (alpha=5%). Application of 48 J.cm(-2) energy dose through the ceramic using LED (50.5+/-2.8) and HAL (50.9+/-3.7) produced significantly higher KHN means (p<0.05) than the control (44.7+/-3.8). LED showed statistically similar performance to HAL. Only HAL showed a relationship between the increase of LCU energy dose and hardness increase.

  13. Related physicochemical properties to microstructure of hard and soft wheat grains with different kernel thickness and specific density.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinian; Wang, Jun; Xie, Weizhong; Lu, Daxin; Ding, Weimin

    2013-10-01

    Physicochemical properties of wheat grains with largest kernel thickness always was lowest than the other sections, examination of microstructure of wheat grains can help us understand this phenomena. Two varieties of wheat, soft white winter wheat Yangmai 11 and hard white winter wheat Zhengmai 9023, were fractionated into five sections by kernel thickness. Then the fractionated wheat grains in 2.7-3.0 mm section were separated into three fractions by kernel specific density sequentially. Microstructure of the fractured surface were evaluated at different scale level to two varieties wheat with different kernel thickness and specific density by using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Compactness and size of endosperm cell tended to decrease with decreasing wheat kernel thickness and specific density. Protein matrix tended to increase with decreasing wheat kernel thickness and specific density. Size of starch granules and proportion for different type starch granules also varied with different wheat kernel thickness and specific density. Those microstructure properties of the fractured surface, formation of endosperm cells, protein matrix and starch granules were close related to rheological properties and pasting properties of wheat grains.

  14. Pair structure of the hard-sphere Yukawa fluid: An improved analytic method versus simulations, Rogers-Young scheme, and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinen, Marco; Holmqvist, Peter; Banchio, Adolfo J.; Nägele, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the equilibrium pair structure in fluids of nonoverlapping spheres interacting by a repulsive Yukawa-like pair potential, with special focus on suspensions of charged colloidal particles. The accuracy of several integral equation schemes for the static structure factor, S(q), and radial distribution function, g(r), is investigated in comparison to computer simulation results and static light scattering data on charge-stabilized silica spheres. In particular, we show that an improved version of the so-called penetrating-background corrected rescaled mean spherical approximation (PB-RMSA) by Snook and Hayter [Langmuir 8, 2880 (1992)], referred to as the modified PB-RMSA (MPB-RMSA), gives pair structure functions which are in general in very good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations and results from the accurate but nonanalytical and therefore computationally more expensive Rogers-Young integral equation scheme. The MPB-RMSA preserves the analytic simplicity of the standard rescaled mean spherical (RMSA) solution. The combination of high accuracy and fast evaluation makes the MPB-RMSA ideally suited for extensive parameter scans and experimental data evaluation, and for providing the static input to dynamic theories. We discuss the results of extensive parameter scans probing the concentration scaling of the pair structure of strongly correlated Yukawa particles, and we determine the liquid-solid coexistence line using the Hansen-Verlet freezing rule.

  15. Pair structure of the hard-sphere Yukawa fluid: an improved analytic method versus simulations, Rogers-Young scheme, and experiment.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Marco; Holmqvist, Peter; Banchio, Adolfo J; Nägele, Gerhard

    2011-01-28

    We present a comprehensive study of the equilibrium pair structure in fluids of nonoverlapping spheres interacting by a repulsive Yukawa-like pair potential, with special focus on suspensions of charged colloidal particles. The accuracy of several integral equation schemes for the static structure factor, S(q), and radial distribution function, g(r), is investigated in comparison to computer simulation results and static light scattering data on charge-stabilized silica spheres. In particular, we show that an improved version of the so-called penetrating-background corrected rescaled mean spherical approximation (PB-RMSA) by Snook and Hayter [Langmuir 8, 2880 (1992)], referred to as the modified PB-RMSA (MPB-RMSA), gives pair structure functions which are in general in very good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations and results from the accurate but nonanalytical and therefore computationally more expensive Rogers-Young integral equation scheme. The MPB-RMSA preserves the analytic simplicity of the standard rescaled mean spherical (RMSA) solution. The combination of high accuracy and fast evaluation makes the MPB-RMSA ideally suited for extensive parameter scans and experimental data evaluation, and for providing the static input to dynamic theories. We discuss the results of extensive parameter scans probing the concentration scaling of the pair structure of strongly correlated Yukawa particles, and we determine the liquid-solid coexistence line using the Hansen-Verlet freezing rule.

  16. Dynamic hardness of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xuecheng

    Dynamic hardness (Pd) of 22 different pure metals and alloys having a wide range of elastic modulus, static hardness, and crystal structure were measured in a gas pulse system. The indentation contact diameter with an indenting sphere and the radius (r2) of curvature of the indentation were determined by the curve fitting of the indentation profile data. r 2 measured by the profilometer was compared with that calculated from Hertz equation in both dynamic and static conditions. The results indicated that the curvature change due to elastic recovery after unloading is approximately proportional to the parameters predicted by Hertz equation. However, r 2 is less than the radius of indenting sphere in many cases which is contradictory to Hertz analysis. This discrepancy is believed due to the difference between Hertzian and actual stress distributions underneath the indentation. Factors which influence indentation elastic recovery were also discussed. It was found that Tabor dynamic hardness formula always gives a lower value than that directly from dynamic hardness definition DeltaE/V because of errors mainly from Tabor's rebound equation and the assumption that dynamic hardness at the beginning of rebound process (Pr) is equal to kinetic energy change of an impact sphere over the formed crater volume (Pd) in the derivation process for Tabor's dynamic hardness formula. Experimental results also suggested that dynamic to static hardness ratio of a material is primarily determined by its crystal structure and static hardness. The effects of strain rate and temperature rise on this ratio were discussed. A vacuum rotating arm apparatus was built to measure Pd at 70, 127, and 381 mum sphere sizes, these results exhibited that Pd is highly depended on the sphere size due to the strain rate effects. P d was also used to substitute for static hardness to correlate with abrasion and erosion resistance of metals and alloys. The particle size effects observed in erosion were

  17. Confined disordered strictly jammed binary sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Torquato, S.

    2015-12-01

    Disordered jammed packings under confinement have received considerably less attention than their bulk counterparts and yet arise in a variety of practical situations. In this work, we study binary sphere packings that are confined between two parallel hard planes and generalize the Torquato-Jiao (TJ) sequential linear programming algorithm [Phys. Rev. E 82, 061302 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.061302] to obtain putative maximally random jammed (MRJ) packings that are exactly isostatic with high fidelity over a large range of plane separation distances H , small to large sphere radius ratio α , and small sphere relative concentration x . We find that packing characteristics can be substantially different from their bulk analogs, which is due to what we term "confinement frustration." Rattlers in confined packings are generally more prevalent than those in their bulk counterparts. We observe that packing fraction, rattler fraction, and degree of disorder of MRJ packings generally increase with H , though exceptions exist. Discontinuities in the packing characteristics as H varies in the vicinity of certain values of H are due to associated discontinuous transitions between different jammed states. When the plane separation distance is on the order of two large-sphere diameters or less, the packings exhibit salient two-dimensional features; when the plane separation distance exceeds about 30 large-sphere diameters, the packings approach three-dimensional bulk packings. As the size contrast increases (as α decreases), the rattler fraction dramatically increases due to what we call "size-disparity" frustration. We find that at intermediate α and when x is about 0.5 (50-50 mixture), the disorder of packings is maximized, as measured by an order metric ψ that is based on the number density fluctuations in the direction perpendicular to the hard walls. We also apply the local volume-fraction variance στ2(R ) to characterize confined packings and find that these

  18. Numerical simulation of a sphere moving down an incline with identical spheres placed equally apart

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ling, Chi-Hai; Jan, Chyan-Deng; Chen, Cheng-lung; Shen, Hsieh Wen

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical study of an elastic sphere moving down an incline with a string of identical spheres placed equally apart. Two momentum equations and a moment equation formulated for the moving sphere are solved numerically for the instantaneous velocity of the moving sphere on an incline with different angles of inclination. Input parameters for numerical simulation include the properties of the sphere (the radius, density, Poison's ratio, and Young's Modulus of elasticity), the coefficient of friction between the spheres, and a damping coefficient of the spheres during collision.

  19. The importance of precision radar tracking data for the determination of density and winds from the high-altitude inflatable sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidlin, F. J.; Michel, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of inflatable sphere measurements obtained during the Energy Budget and MAP/WINE campaigns led to questions concerning the precision of the MPS-36 radar used for tracking the spheres; the compatibility of the sphere program with the MPS-36 radar tracking data; and the oversmoothing of derived parameters at high altitudes. Simulations, with winds having sinusoidal vertical wavelengths, were done with the sphere program (HIROBIN) to determine the resolving capability of various filters. It is concluded that given a precision radar and a perfectly performing sphere, the HIROBIN filters can be adjusted to provide small-scale perturbation information to 70 km (i.e., sinusoidal wavelengths of 2 km). It is recommended that the HIROBIN program be modified to enable it to use a variable length filter, that adjusts to fall velocity and accelerations to provide wind data with small perturbations.

  20. Beyond packing of hard spheres: The effects of core softness, non-additivity, intermediate-range repulsion, and many-body interactions on the glass-forming ability of bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kai; Fan, Meng; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark D.; O’Hern, Corey S.

    2015-11-14

    When a liquid is cooled well below its melting temperature at a rate that exceeds the critical cooling rate R{sub c}, the crystalline state is bypassed and a metastable, amorphous glassy state forms instead. R{sub c} (or the corresponding critical casting thickness d{sub c}) characterizes the glass-forming ability (GFA) of each material. While silica is an excellent glass-former with small R{sub c} < 10{sup −2} K/s, pure metals and most alloys are typically poor glass-formers with large R{sub c} > 10{sup 10} K/s. Only in the past thirty years have bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) been identified with R{sub c} approaching that for silica. Recent simulations have shown that simple, hard-sphere models are able to identify the atomic size ratio and number fraction regime where BMGs exist with critical cooling rates more than 13 orders of magnitude smaller than those for pure metals. However, there are a number of other features of interatomic potentials beyond hard-core interactions. How do these other features affect the glass-forming ability of BMGs? In this manuscript, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine how variations in the softness and non-additivity of the repulsive core and form of the interatomic pair potential at intermediate distances affect the GFA of binary alloys. These variations in the interatomic pair potential allow us to introduce geometric frustration and change the crystal phases that compete with glass formation. We also investigate the effect of tuning the strength of the many-body interactions from zero to the full embedded atom model on the GFA for pure metals. We then employ the full embedded atom model for binary BMGs and show that hard-core interactions play the dominant role in setting the GFA of alloys, while other features of the interatomic potential only change the GFA by one to two orders of magnitude. Despite their perturbative effect, understanding the detailed form of the intermetallic potential is important for

  1. The detection of QTLs in barley associated with endosperm hardness, grain density, grain size and malting quality using rapid phenotyping tools.

    PubMed

    Walker, Cassandra K; Ford, Rebecca; Muñoz-Amatriaín, María; Panozzo, Joe F

    2013-10-01

    Using a barley mapping population, 'Vlamingh' × 'Buloke' (V × B), whole grain analyses were undertaken for physical seed traits and malting quality. Grain density and size were predicted by digital image analysis (DIA), while malt extract and protein content were predicted using near infrared (NIR) analysis. Validation of DIA and NIR algorithms confirmed that data for QTL analysis was highly correlated (R (2) > 0.82), with high RPD values (the ratio of the standard error of prediction to the standard deviation, 2.31-9.06). Endosperm hardness was measured on this mapping population using the single kernel characterisation system. Grain density and endosperm hardness were significantly inter-correlated in all three environments (r > 0.22, P < 0.001); however, other grain components were found to interact with the traits. QTL for these traits were also found on different genomic regions, for example, grain density QTLs were found on chromosomes 2H and 6H, whereas endosperm hardness QTLs were found on 1H, 5H, and 7H. In this study, the majority of the genomic regions associated with grain texture were also coincident with QTLs for grain size, yield, flowering date and/or plant development genes. This study highlights the complexity of genomic regions associated with the variation of endosperm hardness and grain density, and their relationships with grain size traits, agronomic-related traits, and plant development loci.

  2. Improved association in a classical density functional theory for water

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, Eric J.; Schulte, Jeff B.; Roundy, David

    2014-03-28

    We present a modification to our recently published statistical associating fluid theory-based classical density functional theory for water. We have recently developed and tested a functional for the averaged radial distribution function at contact of the hard-sphere fluid that is dramatically more accurate at interfaces than earlier approximations. We now incorporate this improved functional into the association term of our free energy functional for water, improving its description of hydrogen bonding. We examine the effect of this improvement by studying two hard solutes (a hard hydrophobic rod and a hard sphere) and a Lennard-Jones approximation of a krypton atom solute. The improved functional leads to a moderate change in the density profile and a large decrease in the number of hydrogen bonds broken in the vicinity of the hard solutes. We find an improvement of the partial radial distribution for a krypton atom in water when compared with experiment.

  3. Excited state property of hardly photodissociable heme-CO adduct studied by time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Takehiro; Pal, Biswajit; Kitagawa, Teizo

    2005-11-10

    While most of CO-bound hemes are easily photodissociated with a quantum yield of nearly unity, we occasionally encounter a CO-heme which appears hardly photodissociable under the ordinary measurement conditions of resonance Raman spectra using CW laser excitation and a spinning cell. This study aims to understand such hemes theoretically, that is, the excited-state properties of the five-coordinate heme-CO adduct (5cH) as well as the 6c heme-CO adduct (6cH) with a weak axial ligand. Using a hybrid density functional theory, we scrutinized the properties of the ground and excited spin states of the computational models of a 5cH and a water-ligated 6cH (6cH-H(2)O) and compared these properties with those of a photodissociable imidazole-ligated 6cH (6cH-Im). Jahn-Teller softening for the Fe-C-O bending potential in the a(1)-e excited state was suggested. The excited-state properties of 6cH-Im and 5cH were further studied with time-dependent DFT theory. The reaction products of 6cH-Im and 5cH were assumed to be quintet and triplet states, respectively. According to the time-dependent DFT calculations, the Q excited state of 6cH-Im, which is initially a pure pi-pi state, crosses the Fe-CO dissociative state (2A') without large elongation of the Fe-CO bond. In contrast, the Q state of the 5cH does not cross the Fe-CO dissociative state but results in the formation of the excited spin state with a bent Fe-C-O. Consequently, photoisomerization from linear to bent Fe-C-O in the 5cH is a likely mechanism for apparent nonphotodissociation.

  4. Free Volume of the Hard Spheres Gas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shutler, P. M. E.; Martinez, J. C.; Springham, S. V.

    2007-01-01

    The Enskog factor [chi] plays a central role in the theory of dense gases, quantifying how the finite size of molecules causes many physical quantities, such as the equation of state, the mean free path, and the diffusion coefficient, to deviate from those of an ideal gas. We suggest an intuitive but rigorous derivation of this fact by showing how…

  5. Transport coefficients and mechanical response in hard-disk colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo-Kai; Li, Jian; Chen, Kang; Tian, Wen-De; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the transport properties and mechanical response of glassy hard disks using nonlinear Langevin equation theory. We derive expressions for the elastic shear modulus and viscosity in two dimensions on the basis of thermal-activated barrier-hopping dynamics and mechanically accelerated motion. Dense hard disks exhibit phenomena such as softening elasticity, shear-thinning of viscosity, and yielding upon deformation, which are qualitatively similar to dense hard-sphere colloidal suspensions in three dimensions. These phenomena can be ascribed to stress-induced “landscape tilting”. Quantitative comparisons of these phenomena between hard disks and hard spheres are presented. Interestingly, we find that the density dependence of yield stress in hard disks is much more significant than in hard spheres. Our work provides a foundation for further generalizing the nonlinear Langevin equation theory to address slow dynamics and rheological behavior in binary or polydisperse mixtures of hard or soft disks. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821500) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21374073 and, 21574096).

  6. Condensation transition in polydisperse hard rods.

    PubMed

    Evans, M R; Majumdar, S N; Pagonabarraga, I; Trizac, E

    2010-01-07

    We study a mass transport model, where spherical particles diffusing on a ring can stochastically exchange volume v, with the constraint of a fixed total volume V= sum(i=1) (N)v(i), N being the total number of particles. The particles, referred to as p-spheres, have a linear size that behaves as v(i) (1/p) and our model thus represents a gas of polydisperse hard rods with variable diameters v(i) (1/p). We show that our model admits a factorized steady state distribution which provides the size distribution that minimizes the free energy of a polydisperse hard-rod system, under the constraints of fixed N and V. Complementary approaches (explicit construction of the steady state distribution on the one hand; density functional theory on the other hand) completely and consistently specify the behavior of the system. A real space condensation transition is shown to take place for p>1; beyond a critical density a macroscopic aggregate is formed and coexists with a critical fluid phase. Our work establishes the bridge between stochastic mass transport approaches and the optimal polydispersity of hard sphere fluids studied in previous articles.

  7. Ground-state energy, density profiles, and momentum distribution of attractively interacting 1D Fermi gases with hard-wall boundaries: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenney, J. R.; Shill, C. R.; Porter, W. J.; Drut, J. E.

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the realization of hard-wall boundary conditions in experiments with ultracold atoms, we investigate the ground-state properties of spin-1/2 fermions with attractive interactions in a one-dimensional box. We use lattice Monte Carlo methods to determine essential quantities like the energy, which we compute as a function of coupling strength and particle number in the regime from few to many particles. Many-fermion systems bound by hard walls display non-trivial density profiles characterized by so-called Friedel oscillations (which are similar to those observed in harmonic traps). In non-interacting systems, the characteristic length scale of the oscillations is set by {(2{k}{{F}})}-1, where {k}{{F}} is the Fermi momentum, while repulsive interactions tend to generate Wigner-crystal oscillations of period {(4{k}{{F}})}-1. Based on the non-interacting result, we find a remarkably simple parametrization of the density profiles of the attractively interacting case, which we generalize to the one-body density matrix. While the total momentum is not a conserved quantity in the presence of hard walls, the magnitude of the momentum does provide a good quantum number. We are therefore able to provide a detailed characterization of the (quasi-)momentum distribution, which displays rather robust discontinuity at the Fermi surface. In addition, we determine the spatially varying on-site density-density correlation, which in turn yields Tan’s contact density and, upon integration, Tan’s contact. As is well known, the latter fully determines the short-range correlations and plays a crucial role in a multitude of equilibrium and non-equilibrium sum rules.

  8. SPHERES Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andres; Benavides, Jose Victor; Ormsby, Steve L.; GuarnerosLuna, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) are bowling-ball sized satellites that provide a test bed for development and research into multi-body formation flying, multi-spacecraft control algorithms, and free-flying physical and material science investigations. Up to three self-contained free-flying satellites can fly within the cabin of the International Space Station (ISS), performing flight formations, testing of control algorithms or as a platform for investigations requiring this unique free-flying test environment. Each satellite is a self-contained unit with power, propulsion, computers, navigation equipment, and provides physical and electrical connections (via standardized expansion ports) for Principal Investigator (PI) provided hardware and sensors.

  9. Bending and Gaussian rigidities of confined soft spheres from second-order virial series.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    We use virial series to study the equilibrium properties of confined soft-spheres fluids interacting through the inverse-power potentials. The confinement is induced by hard walls with planar, spherical, and cylindrical shapes. We evaluate analytically the coefficients of order two in density of the wall-fluid surface tension γ and analyze the curvature contributions to the free energy. Emphasis is in bending and Gaussian rigidities, which are found analytically at order two in density. Their contribution to γ(R) and the accuracy of different truncation procedures to the low curvature expansion are discussed. Finally, several universal relations that apply to low-density fluids are analyzed.

  10. Bending and Gaussian rigidities of confined soft spheres from second-order virial series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    We use virial series to study the equilibrium properties of confined soft-spheres fluids interacting through the inverse-power potentials. The confinement is induced by hard walls with planar, spherical, and cylindrical shapes. We evaluate analytically the coefficients of order two in density of the wall-fluid surface tension γ and analyze the curvature contributions to the free energy. Emphasis is in bending and Gaussian rigidities, which are found analytically at order two in density. Their contribution to γ (R ) and the accuracy of different truncation procedures to the low curvature expansion are discussed. Finally, several universal relations that apply to low-density fluids are analyzed.

  11. Dietary boron does not affect tooth strength, micro-hardness, and density, but affects tooth mineral composition and alveolar bone mineral density in rabbits fed a high-energy diet.

    PubMed

    Hakki, Sema S; SiddikMalkoc; Dundar, Niyazi; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Hakki, Erdogan E; Hamurcu, Mehmet; Baspinar, Nuri; Basoglu, Abdullah; Nielsen, Forrest H; Götz, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether dietary boron (B) affects the strength, density and mineral composition of teeth and mineral density of alveolar bone in rabbits with apparent obesity induced by a high-energy diet. Sixty female, 8-month-old, New Zealand rabbits were randomly assigned for 7 months into five groups as follows: (1) control 1, fed alfalfa hay only (5.91 MJ/kg and 57.5 mg B/kg); (2) control 2, high energy diet (11.76 MJ and 3.88 mg B/kg); (3) B10, high energy diet + 10 mg B gavage/kg body weight/96 h; (4) B30, high energy diet + 30 mg B gavage/kg body weight/96 h; (5) B50, high energy diet + 50 mg B gavage/kg body weight/96 h. Maxillary incisor teeth of the rabbits were evaluated for compression strength, mineral composition, and micro-hardness. Enamel, dentin, cementum and pulp tissue were examined histologically. Mineral densities of the incisor teeth and surrounding alveolar bone were determined by using micro-CT. When compared to controls, the different boron treatments did not significantly affect compression strength, and micro-hardness of the teeth, although the B content of teeth increased in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to control 1, B50 teeth had decreased phosphorus (P) concentrations. Histological examination revealed that teeth structure (shape and thickness of the enamel, dentin, cementum and pulp) was similar in the B-treated and control rabbits. Micro CT evaluation revealed greater alveolar bone mineral density in B10 and B30 groups than in controls. Alveolar bone density of the B50 group was not different than the controls. Although the B treatments did not affect teeth structure, strength, mineral density and micro-hardness, increasing B intake altered the mineral composition of teeth, and, in moderate amounts, had beneficial effects on surrounding alveolar bone.

  12. Sticky surface: sphere-sphere adhesion dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Sarthok; Younger, John G.; Bortz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a multi-scale model to study the attachment of spherical particles with a rigid core, coated with binding ligands and suspended in the surrounding, quiescent fluid medium. This class of fluid-immersed adhesion is widespread in many natural and engineering settings, particularly in microbial surface adhesion. Our theory highlights how the micro-scale binding kinetics of these ligands, as well as the attractive / repulsive surface potential in an ionic medium affects the eventual macro-scale size distribution of the particle aggregates (flocs). The bridge between the micro-macro model is made via an aggregation kernel. Results suggest that the presence of elastic ligands on the particle surface lead to the formation of larger floc aggregates via efficient inter-floc collisions (i.e., non-zero sticking probability, g). Strong electrolytic composition of the surrounding fluid favors large floc formation as well. The kernel for the Brownian diffusion for hard spheres is recovered in the limit of perfect binding effectiveness (g → 1) and in a neutral solution with no dissolved salts. PMID:25159830

  13. Electrostatic-Induced Assembly of Graphene-Encapsulated Carbon@Nickel-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxide Core-Shell Spheres Hybrid Structure for High-Energy and High-Power-Density Asymmetric Supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuxing; Hui, Kwan San; Hui, Kwun Nam; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2017-01-18

    Achieving high energy density while retaining high power density is difficult in electrical double-layer capacitors and in pseudocapacitors considering the origin of different charge storage mechanisms. Rational structural design became an appealing strategy in circumventing these trade-offs between energy and power densities. A hybrid structure consists of chemically converted graphene-encapsulated carbon@nickel-aluminum layered double hydroxide core-shell spheres as spacers among graphene layers (G-CLS) used as an advanced electrode to achieve high energy density while retaining high power density for high-performance supercapacitors. The merits of the proposed architecture are as follows: (1) CLS act as spacers to avoid the close restacking of graphene; (2) highly conductive carbon sphere and graphene preserve the mechanical integrity and improve the electrical conductivity of LDHs hybrid. Thus, the proposed hybrid structure can simultaneously achieve high electrical double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance resulting in the overall highly active electrode. The G-CLS electrode exhibited high specific capacitance (1710.5 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1)) under three-electrode tests. An ASC fabricated using the G-CLS as positive electrode and reduced graphite oxide as negative electrode demonstrated remarkable electrochemical performance. The ASC device operated at 1.4 V and delivered a high energy density of 35.5 Wh kg(-1) at a 670.7 W kg(-1) power density at 1 A g(-1) with an excellent rate capability as well as a robust long-term cycling stability of up to 10 000 cycles.

  14. An optimization procedure for spatial and density resolution in hard X-ray micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurner, P.; Beckmann, F.; Müller, B.

    2004-10-01

    The quality of the X-ray tomogram not only depends on the spatial resolution but also on the density resolution or contrast. Based on the theory of [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 206 (1983) 541] it is concluded that the density resolution can be substantially improved by merging of pixels, referred to as binning, prior to reconstruction. We demonstrate that the quality of a given 3D-data set, i.e. the tomogram of stained biological cells seeded on a polymer multifilament yarn in phosphate buffered saline, can be optimized with respect to the product of spatial and density resolution - the image quality factor. This procedure improves or even enables the visualization and quantification of selected constituents in the tomogram.

  15. Prediction of a structural transition in the hard disk fluid.

    PubMed

    Piasecki, Jarosław; Szymczak, Piotr; Kozak, John J

    2010-10-28

    Starting from the second equilibrium equation in the BBGKY hierarchy under the Kirkwood superposition closure, we implement a new method for studying the asymptotic decay of correlations in the hard disk fluid in the high density regime. From our analysis and complementary numerical studies, we find that exponentially damped oscillations can occur only up to a packing fraction η(∗)∼0.718, a value that is in substantial agreement with the packing fraction, η∼0.723, believed to characterize the transition from the ordered solid phase to a dense fluid phase, as inferred from Mak's Monte Carlo simulations [Phys. Rev. E 73, 065104 (2006)]. Next, we show that the same method of analysis predicts that the exponential damping of oscillations in the hard sphere fluid becomes impossible when λ=4nπσ(3)[1+H(1)]≥34.81, where H(1) is the contact value of the correlation function, n is the number density, and σ is the sphere diameter in exact agreement with the condition, λ≥34.8, which is first reported in a numerical study of the Kirkwood equation by Kirkwood et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 18, 1040 (1950)]. Finally, we show that our method confirms the absence of any structural transition in hard rods for the entire range of densities below close packing.

  16. Towards composite spheres as building blocks for structured molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lloyd L.; Pellicane, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    In order to design a flexible molecular model that mimics the chemical moieties of a polyatomic molecule, we propose the ‘composite-sphere’ model that can assemble the essential elements to produce the structure of the target molecule. This is likened to the polymerization process where monomers assemble to form the polymer. The assemblage is built into the pair interaction potentials which can ‘react’ (figuratively) with selective pieces into various bonds. In addition, we preserve the spherical symmetries of the individual pair potentials so that the isotropic Ornstein-Zernike equation (OZ) for multi-component mixtures can be used as a theoretical framework. We first test our approach on generating a dumbbell molecule. An equimolar binary mixture of hard spheres and square-well spheres are allowed to react to form a dimer. As the bond length shrinks to zero, we create a site-site model of a Janus-like molecule with a repulsive moiety and an attractive moiety. We employ the zero-separation (ZSEP) closure to solve the OZ equations. The structure and thermodynamic properties are calculated at three isotherms and at several densities and the results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The close agreement achieved demonstrates that the ZSEP closure is a reliable theory for this composite-sphere fluid model. Contribution to the George Stell Memorial Issue.

  17. Specific surface area of overlapping spheres in the presence of obstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, D. R.

    2013-02-01

    This study considers the random placement of uniform sized spheres, which may overlap, in the presence of another set of randomly placed (hard) spheres, which do not overlap. The overlapping spheres do not intersect the hard spheres. It is shown that the specific surface area of the collection of overlapping spheres is affected by the hard spheres, such that there is a minimum in the specific surface area as a function of the relative size of the two sets of spheres. The occurrence of the minimum is explained in terms of the break-up of pore connectivity. The configuration can be considered to be a simple model of the structure of a porous composite material. In particular, the overlapping particles represent voids while the hard particles represent fillers. Example materials are pervious concrete, metallurgical coke, ice cream, and polymer composites. We also show how the material properties of such composites are affected by the void structure.

  18. Specific surface area of overlapping spheres in the presence of obstructions.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, D R

    2013-02-21

    This study considers the random placement of uniform sized spheres, which may overlap, in the presence of another set of randomly placed (hard) spheres, which do not overlap. The overlapping spheres do not intersect the hard spheres. It is shown that the specific surface area of the collection of overlapping spheres is affected by the hard spheres, such that there is a minimum in the specific surface area as a function of the relative size of the two sets of spheres. The occurrence of the minimum is explained in terms of the break-up of pore connectivity. The configuration can be considered to be a simple model of the structure of a porous composite material. In particular, the overlapping particles represent voids while the hard particles represent fillers. Example materials are pervious concrete, metallurgical coke, ice cream, and polymer composites. We also show how the material properties of such composites are affected by the void structure.

  19. Phase diagram of elastic spheres.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulou, L; Ziherl, P

    2017-02-15

    Experiments show that polymeric nanoparticles often self-assemble into several non-close-packed lattices in addition to the face-centered cubic lattice. Here, we explore theoretically the possibility that the observed phase sequences may be associated with the softness of the particles, which are modeled as elastic spheres interacting upon contact. The spheres are described by two finite-deformation theories of elasticity, the modified Saint-Venant-Kirchhoff model and the neo-Hookean model. We determine the range of indentations where the repulsion between the spheres is pairwise additive and agrees with the Hertz theory. By computing the elastic energies of nine trial crystal lattices at densities far beyond the Hertzian range, we construct the phase diagram and find the face- and body-centered cubic lattices as well as the A15 lattice and the simple hexagonal lattice, with the last two being stable at large densities where the spheres are completely faceted. These results are qualitatively consistent with observations, suggesting that deformability may indeed be viewed as a generic property that determines the phase behavior in nanocolloidal suspensions.

  20. van der Waals-Tonks-type equations of state for hard-hypersphere fluids in four and five dimensions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Zhi

    2004-04-15

    Recently, we developed accurate van der Waals-Tonks-type equations of state for hard-disk and hard-sphere fluids by using the known virial coefficients. In this paper, we derive the van der Waals-Tonks-type equations of state. We further apply these equations of state to hard-hypersphere fluids in four and five dimensions. In the low-density fluid regime, these equations of state are in good agreement with the simulation results and existing equations of state.

  1. Understanding the Electronic Structure of IrO2 Using Hard-X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Density-Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahk, J. M.; Poll, C. G.; Oropeza, F. E.; Ablett, J. M.; Céolin, D.; Rueff, J.-P.; Agrestini, S.; Utsumi, Y.; Tsuei, K. D.; Liao, Y. F.; Borgatti, F.; Panaccione, G.; Regoutz, A.; Egdell, R. G.; Morgan, B. J.; Scanlon, D. O.; Payne, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    The electronic structure of IrO2 has been investigated using hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density-functional theory. Excellent agreement is observed between theory and experiment. We show that the electronic structure of IrO2 involves crystal field splitting of the iridium 5d orbitals in a distorted octahedral field. The behavior of IrO2 closely follows the theoretical predictions of Goodenough for conductive rutile-structured oxides [J. B. Goodenough, J. Solid State Chem. 3, 490 (1971)]. Strong satellites associated with the core lines are ascribed to final state screening effects. A simple plasmon model for the satellites applicable to many other metallic oxides appears to be not valid for IrO2.

  2. Inhomogeneous model colloid-polymer mixtures: adsorption at a hard wall.

    PubMed

    Brader, J M; Dijkstra, M; Evans, R

    2001-04-01

    We study the equilibrium properties of inhomogeneous model colloid-polymer mixtures. By integrating out the degrees of freedom of the ideal polymer coils, we derive a formal expression for the effective one-component Hamiltonian of the (hard sphere) colloids that is valid for arbitrary external potentials acting on both the colloids and the polymers. We show how one can recover information about the distribution of polymer in the mixture given knowledge of the colloid correlation functions calculated using the effective one-component Hamiltonian. This result is then used to furnish the connection between the free-volume and perturbation theory approaches to determining the bulk phase equilibria. For the special case of a planar hard wall the effective Hamiltonian takes an explicit form, consisting of zero-, one-, and two-body, but no higher-body, contributions provided the size ratio q=sigma(p)/sigma(c)<0.1547, where sigma(c) and sigma(p) denote the diameters of colloid and polymer respectively. We employ a simple density functional theory to calculate colloid density profiles from this effective Hamiltonian for q=0.1. The resulting profiles are found to agree well with those from Monte Carlo simulations for the same Hamiltonian. Adding very small amounts of polymer gives rise to strong depletion effects at the hard wall which lead to pronounced enhancement of the colloid density profile (close to the wall) over what is found for hard spheres at a hard wall.

  3. Transfer-matrix study of a hard-square lattice gas with two kinds of particles and density anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tiago J.; Stilck, Jürgen F.

    2015-09-01

    Using transfer matrix and finite-size scaling methods, we study the thermodynamic behavior of a lattice gas with two kinds of particles on the square lattice. Only excluded volume interactions are considered, so that the model is athermal. Large particles exclude the site they occupy and its four first neighbors, while small particles exclude only their site. Two thermodynamic phases are found: a disordered phase where large particles occupy both sublattices with the same probability and an ordered phase where one of the two sublattices is preferentially occupied by them. The transition between these phases is continuous at small concentrations of the small particles and discontinuous at larger concentrations, both transitions are separated by a tricritical point. Estimates of the central charge suggest that the critical line is in the Ising universality class, while the tricritical point has tricritical Ising (Blume-Emery-Griffiths) exponents. The isobaric curves of the total density as functions of the fugacity of small or large particles display a minimum in the disordered phase.

  4. Role of inner- and outer-sphere bonding in the sensitization of EuIII-luminescence deciphered by combined analysis of experimental electron density distribution function and photophysical data.

    PubMed

    Puntus, Lada N; Lyssenko, Konstantin A; Antipin, Mikhail Yu; Bünzli, Jean-Claude G

    2008-12-01

    A series of lanthanide adducts with different amounts of 1,10-phenanthroline, chloride ions, and water molecules in the inner and outer coordination spheres are investigated with the aim of relating the chemical bonding patternin the crystals to the luminescence properties of the Eu ion: [LnCl1Phen2(H2O)3]Cl2(H2O) (Ln ) Eu, 1Eu; Gd, 1Gd;Tb, 1Tb), [EuCl2Phen2(H2O)2]Cl1(H2O) (2), and [EuCl2Phen1(H2O)4]Cl1(H2O) (3). The influence of inner- versus outersphere ligands on the Ln-X bond lengths and angles in the structure is examined. A detailed topological analysis of the electron density function derived from the X-ray diffraction data for 1Gd is performed within the frame of the"atoms in molecule" theory for the first time for a lanthanide complex. The chemical bonding pattern is interpreted in terms of net atomic charges, bond energies, and electron transfers from the ligands to the metal ion. A noteworthy finding is that the energy of extended noncovalent interactions occurring in the second coordination sphere (H-bonding and pi-stacking interactions) is comparable to that of Ln-ligand bonds. The luminescence properties of the three Eu adducts are interpreted with the results of electron density distribution function topology. An intraligand charge transfer state is identified, and its contribution in the ligand-to-europium energy transfer process is analyzed.The outcome of this study is that specific interionic interactions which are usually not considered in theoretical calculations or in the interpretation of luminescence properties play an important role in the sensitization of the Eu luminescence.

  5. Hard convex lens-shaped particles: Densest-known packings and phase behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Cinacchi, Giorgio; Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-12-14

    By using theoretical methods and Monte Carlo simulations, this work investigates dense ordered packings and equilibrium phase behavior (from the low-density isotropic fluid regime to the high-density crystalline solid regime) of monodisperse systems of hard convex lens-shaped particles as defined by the volume common to two intersecting congruent spheres. We show that, while the overall similarity of their shape to that of hard oblate ellipsoids is reflected in a qualitatively similar phase diagram, differences are more pronounced in the high-density crystal phase up to the densest-known packings determined here. In contrast to those non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis crystals that are the densest-known packings of hard (oblate) ellipsoids, hard convex lens-shaped particles pack more densely in two types of degenerate crystalline structures: (i) non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis body-centered-orthorhombic-like crystals and (ii) (Bravais) lattice monoclinic crystals. By stacking at will, regularly or irregularly, laminae of these two crystals, infinitely degenerate, generally non-periodic in the stacking direction, dense packings can be constructed that are consistent with recent organizing principles. While deferring the assessment of which of these dense ordered structures is thermodynamically stable in the high-density crystalline solid regime, the degeneracy of their densest-known packings strongly suggests that colloidal convex lens-shaped particles could be better glass formers than colloidal spheres because of the additional rotational degrees of freedom.

  6. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres, conversions with them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  7. Density functional theory calculations on the active site of biotin synthase: mechanism of S transfer from the Fe(2)S(2) cluster and the role of 1st and 2nd sphere residues.

    PubMed

    Rana, Atanu; Dey, Subal; Agrawal, Amita; Dey, Abhishek

    2015-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed on the active site of biotin synthase (BS) to investigate the sulfur transfer from the Fe(2)S(2) cluster to dethiobiotin (DTB). The active site is modeled to include both the 1st and 2nd sphere residues. Molecular orbital theory considerations and calculation on smaller models indicate that only an S atom (not S²⁻) transfer from an oxidized Fe(2)S(2) cluster leads to the formation of biotin from the DTB using two adenosyl radicals generated from S-adenosyl-L-methionine. The calculations on larger protein active site model indicate that a 9-monothiobiotin bound reduced cluster should be an intermediate during the S atom insertion from the Fe(2)S(2) cluster consistent with experimental data. The Arg260 bound to Fe1, being a weaker donor than cysteine bound to Fe(2), determines the geometry and the electronic structure of this intermediate. The formation of this intermediate containing the C9-S bond is estimated to have a ΔG(≠) of 17.1 kcal/mol while its decay by the formation of the 2nd C6-S bond is calculated to have a ΔG(≠) of 29.8 kcal/mol, i.e. the 2nd C-S bond formation is calculated to be the rate determining step in the cycle and it leads to the decay of the Fe(2)S(2) cluster. Significant configuration interaction (CI), present in these transition states, helps lower the barrier of these reactions by ~30-25 kcal/mol relative to a hypothetical outer-sphere reaction. The conserved Phe285 residue near the Fe(2)S(2) active site determines the stereo selectivity at the C6 center of this radical coupling reaction. Reaction mechanism of BS investigated using DFT calculations. Strong CI and the Phe285 residue control the kinetic rate and stereochemistry of the product.

  8. High-density properties of integral-equation theories of fluids: Universal analytic structure and details for the one-component plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Yaakov

    1986-03-01

    We study the analytic properties of the hypernetted-chain (HNC) and soft-mean-spherical (SMSA) theories in the asymptotic high-density limit (AHDL). The scaling properties of the inverse power potentials lead to the introduction of the SMSA-Ewald functions, which correspond to the ``overlap-volume'' functions for hard spheres. The HNC and SMSA theories for soft interactions, as well as the Percus-Yevick theory for hard spheres, feature the same AHDL analytic structure of the pair correlation functions, which is dictated by the hard-sphere Ewald functions. The general discussion is supplemented by detailed results for the one-component plasma. Implications to the analysis of the density-functional theory, of dense matter, near its exact Thomas-Fermi limit are pointed out.

  9. Ordering of hard particles between hard walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowska, A.; Teixeira, P. I. C.; Ehrentraut, H.; Cleaver, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    The structure of a fluid of hard Gaussian overlap particles of elongation κ = 5, confined between two hard walls, has been calculated from density-functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations. By using the exact expression for the excluded volume kernel (Velasco E and Mederos L 1998 J. Chem. Phys. 109 2361) and solving the appropriate Euler-Lagrange equation entirely numerically, we have been able to extend our theoretical predictions into the nematic phase, which had up till now remained relatively unexplored due to the high computational cost. Simulation reveals a rich adsorption behaviour with increasing bulk density, which is described semi-quantitatively by the theory without any adjustable parameters.

  10. DISE: directed sphere exclusion.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Alberto; Lee, Man-Ling

    2003-01-01

    The Sphere Exclusion algorithm is a well-known algorithm used to select diverse subsets from chemical-compound libraries or collections. It can be applied with any given distance measure between two structures. It is popular because of the intuitive geometrical interpretation of the method and its good performance on large data sets. This paper describes Directed Sphere Exclusion (DISE), a modification of the Sphere Exclusion algorithm, which retains all positive properties of the Sphere Exclusion algorithm but generates a more even distribution of the selected compounds in the chemical space. In addition, the computational requirement is significantly reduced, thus it can be applied to very large data sets.

  11. SPHERES Smartphone Workbench

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Smart SPHERES space robot (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) equipped with an Android smartphone performs a video survey inside of the International Space S...

  12. Active swarms on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sknepnek, Rastko; Henkes, Silke

    2015-02-01

    We show that coupling to curvature nontrivially affects collective motion in active systems, leading to motion patterns not observed in flat space. Using numerical simulations, we study a model of self-propelled particles with polar alignment and soft repulsion confined to move on the surface of a sphere. We observe a variety of motion patterns with the main hallmarks being polar vortex and circulating band states arising due to the incompatibility between spherical topology and uniform motion—a consequence of the "hairy ball" theorem. We provide a detailed analysis of density, velocity, pressure, and stress profiles in the circulating band state. In addition, we present analytical results for a simplified model of collective motion on the sphere showing that frustration due to curvature leads to stable elastic distortions storing energy in the band.

  13. Balls and Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an art lesson that allows students to set up and collect sphere canvases. Spheres move art away from a rectangular canvas into a dimension that requires new planning and painting. From balls to many other spherical canvases that bounce, roll, float and fly, art experiences are envisioned by students. Even if adults recognize…

  14. Comparison of Three Efficient Approximate Exact-Exchange Algorithms: The Chain-of-Spheres Algorithm, Pair-Atomic Resolution-of-the-Identity Method, and Auxiliary Density Matrix Method.

    PubMed

    Rebolini, Elisa; Izsák, Róbert; Reine, Simen Sommerfelt; Helgaker, Trygve; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo

    2016-08-09

    We compare the performance of three approximate methods for speeding up evaluation of the exchange contribution in Hartree-Fock and hybrid Kohn-Sham calculations: the chain-of-spheres algorithm (COSX; Neese , F. Chem. Phys. 2008 , 356 , 98 - 109 ), the pair-atomic resolution-of-identity method (PARI-K; Merlot , P. J. Comput. Chem. 2013 , 34 , 1486 - 1496 ), and the auxiliary density matrix method (ADMM; Guidon , M. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2010 , 6 , 2348 - 2364 ). Both the efficiency relative to that of a conventional linear-scaling algorithm and the accuracy of total, atomization, and orbital energies are compared for a subset containing 25 of the 200 molecules in the Rx200 set using double-, triple-, and quadruple-ζ basis sets. The accuracy of relative energies is further compared for small alkane conformers (ACONF test set) and Diels-Alder reactions (DARC test set). Overall, we find that the COSX method provides good accuracy for orbital energies as well as total and relative energies, and the method delivers a satisfactory speedup. The PARI-K and in particular ADMM algorithms require further development and optimization to fully exploit their indisputable potential.

  15. SPHERES National Lab Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jose

    2014-01-01

    SPHERES is a facility of the ISS National Laboratory with three IVA nano-satellites designed and delivered by MIT to research estimation, control, and autonomy algorithms. Since Fall 2010, The SPHERES system is now operationally supported and managed by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). A SPHERES Program Office was established and is located at NASA Ames Research Center. The SPHERES Program Office coordinates all SPHERES related research and STEM activities on-board the International Space Station (ISS), as well as, current and future payload development. By working aboard ISS under crew supervision, it provides a risk tolerant Test-bed Environment for Distributed Satellite Free-flying Control Algorithms. If anything goes wrong, reset and try again! NASA has made the capability available to other U.S. government agencies, schools, commercial companies and students to expand the pool of ideas for how to test and use these bowling ball-sized droids. For many of the researchers, SPHERES offers the only opportunity to do affordable on-orbit characterization of their technology in the microgravity environment. Future utilization of SPHERES as a facility will grow its capabilities as a platform for science, technology development, and education.

  16. Rubber rolling over a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koiller, J.; Ehlers, K.

    2007-04-01

    “Rubber” coated bodies rolling over a surface satisfy a no-twist condition in addition to the no slip condition satisfied by “marble” coated bodies [1]. Rubber rolling has an interesting differential geometric appeal because the geodesic curvatures of the curves on the surfaces at corresponding points are equal. The associated distribution in the 5 dimensional configuration space has 2 3 5 growth (these distributions were first studied by Cartan; he showed that the maximal symmetries occurs for rubber rolling of spheres with 3:1 diameters ratio and materialize the exceptional group G 2). The 2 3 5 nonholonomic geometries are classified in a companion paper [2] via Cartan’s equivalence method [3]. Rubber rolling of a convex body over a sphere defines a generalized Chaplygin system [4 8] with SO(3) symmetry group, total space Q = SO(3) × S 2 and base S 2, that can be reduced to an almost Hamiltonian system in T* S 2 with a non-closed 2-form ωNH. In this paper we present some basic results on the sphere-sphere problem: a dynamically asymmetric but balanced sphere of radius b (unequal moments of inertia I j but with center of gravity at the geometric center), rubber rolling over another sphere of radius a. In this example ωNH is conformally symplectic [9]: the reduced system becomes Hamiltonian after a coordinate dependent change of time. In particular there is an invariant measure, whose density is the determinant of the reduced Legendre transform, to the power p = 1/2( b/a - 1). Using sphero-conical coordinates we verify the result by Borisov and Mamaev [10] that the system is integrable for p = -1/2 (ball over a plane). They have found another integrable case [11] corresponding to p = -3/2 (rolling ball with twice the radius of a fixed internal ball). Strikingly, a different set of sphero-conical coordinates separates the Hamiltonian in this case. No other integrable cases with different I j are known.

  17. The effect of size ratio on the sphere structure factor in colloidal sphere-plate mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinacchi, G.; Doshi, N.; Prescott, S. W.; Cosgrove, T.; Grillo, I.; Lindner, P.; Phipps, J. S.; Gittins, D.; van Duijneveldt, J. S.

    2012-11-01

    Binary mixtures of colloidal particles of sufficiently different sizes or shapes tend to demix at high concentration. Already at low concentration, excluded volume interactions between the two species give rise to structuring effects. Here, a new theoretical description is proposed of the structure of colloidal sphere-plate mixtures, based on a density expansion of the work needed to insert a pair of spheres and a single sphere in a sea of them, in the presence or not of plates. The theory is first validated using computer simulations. The predictions are then compared to experimental observations using silica spheres and gibbsite platelets. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to determine the change of the structure factor of spheres on addition of platelets, under solvent contrast conditions where the platelets were invisible. Theory and experiment agreed very well for a platelet/sphere diameter ratio D/d = 2.2 and reasonably well for D/d = 5. The sphere structure factor increases at low scattering vector Q in the presence of platelets; a weak reduction of the sphere structure factor was predicted at larger Q, and for the system with D/d = 2.2 was indeed observed experimentally. At fixed particle volume fraction, an increase in diameter ratio leads to a large change in structure factor. Systems with a larger diameter ratio also phase separate at lower concentrations.

  18. Experiment SPHERE status 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaulov, S. B.; Besshapov, S. P.; Kabanova, N. V.; Sysoeva, T. I.; Antonov, R. A.; Anyuhina, A. M.; Bronvech, E. A.; Chernov, D. V.; Galkin, V. I.; Tkaczyk, W.; Finger, M.; Sonsky, M.

    2009-12-01

    The expedition carried out in March, 2008 to Lake Baikal became an important stage in the development of the SPHERE experiment. During the expedition the SPHERE-2 installation was hoisted, for the first time, on a tethered balloon, APA, to a height of 700 m over the lake surface covered with ice and snow. A series of test measurements were made. Preliminary results of the data processing are presented. The next plan of the SPHERE experiment is to begin a set of statistics for constructing the CR spectrum in the energy range 10-10 eV.

  19. Electromagnetically revolving sphere viscometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoda, Maiko; Sakai, Keiji

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method of low viscosity measurement, in which the rolling of a probe sphere on the flat solid bottom of a sample cell is driven remotely and the revolution speed of the probe in a sample liquid gives the viscosity measurements. The principle of this method is based on the electromagnetically spinning technique that we developed, and the method is effective especially for viscosity measurements at levels below 100 mPa·s with an accuracy higher than 1%. The probe motion is similar to that in the well-known rolling sphere (ball) method. However, our system enables a steady and continuous measurement of viscosity, which is problematic using the conventional method. We also discuss the limits of the measurable viscosity range common to rolling-sphere-type viscometers by considering the accelerating motion of a probe sphere due to gravity, and we demonstrate the performance of our methods.

  20. ISS Update: Smart SPHERES

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries conducts a phone interview with Mark Micire, SPHERES Engineering Manager at Ames Research Center. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include ...

  1. Affine Sphere Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate spacetimes whose light cones could be anisotropic. We prove the equivalence of the structures: (a) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the mean Cartan torsion vanishes, (b) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the indicatrix (observer space) at each point is a convex hyperbolic affine sphere centered on the zero section, and (c) pair given by a spacetime volume and a sharp convex cone distribution. The equivalence suggests to describe (affine sphere) spacetimes with this structure, so that no algebraic-metrical concept enters the definition. As a result, this work shows how the metric features of spacetime emerge from elementary concepts such as measure and order. Non-relativistic spacetimes are obtained replacing proper spheres with improper spheres, so the distinction does not call for group theoretical elements. In physical terms, in affine sphere spacetimes the light cone distribution and the spacetime measure determine the motion of massive and massless particles (hence the dispersion relation). Furthermore, it is shown that, more generally, for Lorentz-Finsler theories non-differentiable at the cone, the lightlike geodesics and the transport of the particle momentum over them are well defined, though the curve parametrization could be undefined. Causality theory is also well behaved. Several results for affine sphere spacetimes are presented. Some results in Finsler geometry, for instance in the characterization of Randers spaces, are also included.

  2. Chinese Armillary Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    The armillary sphere was perhaps the most important type of astronomical instrument in ancient China. It was first invented by Luoxia Hong in the first century BC. After Han times, the structure of the armillary sphere became increasingly sophisticated by including more and more rings representing various celestial movements as recognized by the Chinese astronomers. By the eighth century, the Chinese armillary sphere consisted of three concentric sets of rings revolving on the south-north polar axis. The relative position of the rings could be adjusted to reflect the precession of the equinoxes and the regression of the Moon's nodes along the ecliptic. To counterbalance the defect caused by too many rings, Guo Shoujing from the late thirteenth century constructed the Simplified Instruments which reorganized the rings of the armillary sphere into separate instruments for measuring equatorial coordinates and horizontal coordinates. The armillary sphere was still preserved because it was a good illustration of celestial movements. A fifteenth-century replica of Guo Shoujing's armillary sphere still exists today.

  3. Density functional theory for carbon dioxide crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yiwen; Mi, Jianguo Zhong, Chongli

    2014-05-28

    We present a density functional approach to describe the solid−liquid phase transition, interfacial and crystal structure, and properties of polyatomic CO{sub 2}. Unlike previous phase field crystal model or density functional theory, which are derived from the second order direct correlation function, the present density functional approach is based on the fundamental measure theory for hard-sphere repulsion in solid. More importantly, the contributions of enthalpic interactions due to the dispersive attractions and of entropic interactions arising from the molecular architecture are integrated in the density functional model. Using the theoretical model, the predicted liquid and solid densities of CO{sub 2} at equilibrium triple point are in good agreement with the experimental values. Based on the structure of crystal-liquid interfaces in different planes, the corresponding interfacial tensions are predicted. Their respective accuracies need to be tested.

  4. The behavior of fluids near solutes: A density functional theory and computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Govardhan; Yethiraj, Arun

    2004-09-01

    The density distribution of solvent near a solute particle is studied using density functional theory and Monte Carlo simulation. The fluid atoms interact with each other via a hard sphere plus Yukawa potential, and interact with the solute via a hard sphere potential. For small solute sizes, the solvent displays liquidlike ordering near the particle. When the solute become larger, a drying transition is observed at state points near the coexistence conditions of the solvent. These predictions are similar to those of a recent theory for the hydrophobic effect by Lum, Chandler, and Weeks [J. Phys. Chem. 103, 4570 (1999)], although a comparison with simulations shows that the theory of this work is quantitatively more accurate. The connection between density functional methods and the LCW approach is also established.

  5. Hard x-ray photoemission and density functional theory study of the internal electric field in SrTiO3/LaAlO3 oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slooten, E.; Zhong, Zhicheng; Molegraaf, H. J. A.; Eerkes, P. D.; de Jong, S.; Massee, F.; van Heumen, E.; Kruize, M. K.; Wenderich, S.; Kleibeuker, J. E.; Gorgoi, M.; Hilgenkamp, H.; Brinkman, A.; Huijben, M.; Rijnders, G.; Blank, D. H. A.; Koster, G.; Kelly, P. J.; Golden, M. S.

    2013-02-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the electronic structure of the archetypal oxide heterointerface system LaAlO3 on SrTiO3 is presented. High-resolution, hard x-ray photoemission is used to uncover the occupation of Ti 3d states and the relative energetic alignment—and hence internal electric fields—within the LaAlO3 layer. First, the Ti 2p core-level spectra clearly show occupation of Ti 3d states already for two unit cells of LaAlO3. Second, the LaAlO3 core levels were seen to shift to lower binding energy as the LaAlO3 overlayer thickness, n, was increased, agreeing with the expectations from the canonical electron transfer model for the emergence of conductivity at the interface. However, not only is the energy offset of only ˜300 meV between n=2 (insulating interface) and n=6 (metallic interface) an order of magnitude smaller than the simple expectation, but it is also clearly not the sum of a series of unit-cell-by-unit-cell shifts within the LaAlO3 block. Both of these facts argue against the simple charge-transfer picture involving a cumulative shift of the LaAlO3 valence bands above the SrTiO3 conduction bands, resulting in charge transfer only for n≥4. We discuss effects which could frustrate this elegant and simple charge-transfer model, concluding that although it cannot be ruled out, photodoping by the x-ray beam is unlikely to be the cause of the observed behavior. Turning to the theoretical data, our density functional simulations show that the presence of oxygen vacancies at the LaAlO3 surface at the 25% level reverses the direction of the internal field in the LaAlO3. Therefore, taking the experimental and theoretical results together, a consistent picture emerges for real-life samples in which nature does not wait until n=4 and already for n=2 mechanisms other than internal-electric-field-driven electron transfer from idealized LaAlO3 to near-interfacial states in the SrTiO3 substrate are active in heading off the

  6. Anomalous Sinking of Spheres due to Local Fluidization of Apparently Fixed Powder Beds.

    PubMed

    Oshitani, Jun; Sasaki, Toshiki; Tsuji, Takuya; Higashida, Kyohei; Chan, Derek Y C

    2016-02-12

    The sinking of an intruder sphere into a powder bed in the apparently fixed bed regime exhibits complex behavior in the sinking rate and the final depth when the sphere density is close to the powder bed density. Evidence is adduced that the intruder sphere locally fluidizes the apparently fixed powder bed, allowing the formation of voids and percolation bubbles that facilitates spheres to sink slower but deeper than expected. By adjusting the air injection rate and the sphere-to-powder bed density ratio, this phenomenon provides the basis of a sensitive large particle separation mechanism.

  7. Geometry of entanglement in the Bloch sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Michel; Liss, Rotem; Mor, Tal

    2017-03-01

    Entanglement is an important concept in quantum information, quantum communication, and quantum computing. We provide a geometrical analysis of entanglement and separability for all the rank 2 quantum mixed states: complete analysis for the bipartite states and partial analysis for the multipartite states. For each rank 2 mixed state, we define its unique Bloch sphere, that is spanned by the eigenstates of its density matrix. We characterize those Bloch spheres into exactly five classes of entanglement and separability, give examples for each class, and prove that those are the only classes.

  8. The Moyal sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Michał; Sitarz, Andrzej; Wulkenhaar, Raimar

    2016-11-01

    We construct a family of constant curvature metrics on the Moyal plane and compute the Gauss-Bonnet term for each of them. They arise from the conformal rescaling of the metric in the orthonormal frame approach. We find a particular solution, which corresponds to the Fubini-Study metric and which equips the Moyal algebra with the geometry of a noncommutative sphere.

  9. Complex Ordering of Soft Spheres in Block Polymer Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangwoo; Zhang, Jingwen; Bates, Frank S.

    2014-03-01

    Hard sphere systems, such as low-z metallic elements and colloids, generally form densely packed crystalline states with BCC, FCC and HCP symmetry. In contrast, a certain self-assembling soft materials including block polymers, surfactants, and dendrimers have the capacity to order into more open crystalline structures. Recently, we have identified five discrete sphere-packing symmetries in poly(styrene- b-isoprene- b-styrene- b-ethylene oxide) (SISO) tetrablock terpolymers: BCC, Frank-Kasper σ-phase, dodecagonal quasicrystal (DQC), Pm 3 n(A15), and non-close-packed hexagonal (sHEX). Some of these packing symmetries have been documented in certain heavy metals and organic dendrimers, and interestingly Landau theory anticipated a similar set of non-close-packed symmetries more than three decades ago. This talk will draw analogies between the ordering of spheres in soft and hard materials. Present address: Rensselaser polytechnic institute, 110 8th st., Tory, NY 12180.

  10. Storing Chemicals in Packed Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.

    1986-01-01

    Reactants released by crushing or puncturing. Agglomerated gas-filled spheres hexagonally close packed and sintered or glued together into rods strung together at ends. Rods fed into crushing machine to release material in spheres as needed.

  11. Oil capture from a water surface by a falling sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, Linda; McLaughlin, Clare; Witelski, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    When a spherical particle is dropped from rest into an oil lens that floats on top of a water surface, a portion of the oil adheres to the sphere. Once the sphere comes to rest at the subsurface, the oil forms a pendant drop that remains attached in equilibrium to the sphere effectively removing oil from the water surface. Best fit solutions of the Laplace equation to experimental profiles are used to investigate the parameter dependence of the radius of curvature and the filling and contact angles at the three-phase contact line of the pendant drop for spheres with different wetting properties, densities and radii. The volume of oil captured by a sphere increases with a sphere's mass and diameter. However, lighter and smaller spheres capture more oil relative to their own volume than do heavier and larger spheres (scaling with the sphere mass ~M - 0 . 544) and are thus more efficient at removing oil from a water surface. The authors wish to acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation Grant Nos. DMS-0707755 and DMS-0968252.

  12. Approximate hard-sphere method for densely packed granular flows.

    PubMed

    Guttenberg, Nicholas

    2011-05-01

    The simulation of granular media is usually done either with event-driven codes that treat collisions as instantaneous but have difficulty with very dense packings, or with molecular dynamics (MD) methods that approximate rigid grains using a stiff viscoelastic spring. There is a little-known method that combines several collision events into a single timestep to retain the instantaneous collisions of event-driven dynamics, but also be able to handle dense packings. However, it is poorly characterized as to its regime of validity and failure modes. We present a modification of this method to reduce the introduction of overlap error, and test it using the problem of two-dimensional (2D) granular Couette flow, a densely packed system that has been well characterized by previous work. We find that this method can successfully replicate the results of previous work up to the point of jamming, and that it can do so a factor of 10 faster than comparable MD methods.

  13. Approximate hard-sphere method for densely packed granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttenberg, Nicholas

    2011-05-01

    The simulation of granular media is usually done either with event-driven codes that treat collisions as instantaneous but have difficulty with very dense packings, or with molecular dynamics (MD) methods that approximate rigid grains using a stiff viscoelastic spring. There is a little-known method that combines several collision events into a single timestep to retain the instantaneous collisions of event-driven dynamics, but also be able to handle dense packings. However, it is poorly characterized as to its regime of validity and failure modes. We present a modification of this method to reduce the introduction of overlap error, and test it using the problem of two-dimensional (2D) granular Couette flow, a densely packed system that has been well characterized by previous work. We find that this method can successfully replicate the results of previous work up to the point of jamming, and that it can do so a factor of 10 faster than comparable MD methods.

  14. Discontinuous Shear Thickening of Frictional Hard-Sphere Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Ryohei; Mari, Romain; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Denn, Morton M.

    2013-11-01

    Discontinuous shear thickening (DST) observed in many dense athermal suspensions has proven difficult to understand and to reproduce by numerical simulation. By introducing a numerical scheme including both relevant hydrodynamic interactions and granularlike contacts, we show that contact friction is essential for having DST. Above a critical volume fraction, we observe the existence of two states: a low viscosity, contactless (hence, frictionless) state, and a high viscosity frictional shear jammed state. These two states are separated by a critical shear stress, associated with a critical shear rate where DST occurs. The shear jammed state is reminiscent of the jamming phase of granular matter. Continuous shear thickening is seen as a lower volume fraction vestige of the jamming transition.

  15. Graphitized hollow carbon spheres and yolk-structured carbon spheres fabricated by metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xufan; Chi, Miaofang; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; ...

    2016-01-18

    Hard-sphere-templating method has been widely used to synthesize hollow carbon spheres (HCSs), in which the spheres were firstly coated with a carbon precursor, followed by carbonization and core removal. The obtained HCSs are generally amorphous or weakly graphitized (with the help of graphitization catalysts). In this work, we report on the fabrication of graphitized HCSs and yolk–shell Au@HCS nanostructures using a modified templating method, in which smooth, uniform graphene layers were grown on SiO2 spheres or Au@SiO2 nanoparticles via metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane. Furthermore, our work not only provides a new method to fabricate high-quality, graphitized HCSsmore » but also demonstrates a reliable approach to grow quality graphene on oxide surfaces using CVD without the presence of metal catalysts.« less

  16. Graphitized hollow carbon spheres and yolk-structured carbon spheres fabricated by metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xufan; Chi, Miaofang; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Liu, Rui; Chuang, Yen -Jun; Dai, Sheng; Pan, Zhengwei

    2016-01-18

    Hard-sphere-templating method has been widely used to synthesize hollow carbon spheres (HCSs), in which the spheres were firstly coated with a carbon precursor, followed by carbonization and core removal. The obtained HCSs are generally amorphous or weakly graphitized (with the help of graphitization catalysts). In this work, we report on the fabrication of graphitized HCSs and yolk–shell Au@HCS nanostructures using a modified templating method, in which smooth, uniform graphene layers were grown on SiO2 spheres or Au@SiO2 nanoparticles via metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane. Furthermore, our work not only provides a new method to fabricate high-quality, graphitized HCSs but also demonstrates a reliable approach to grow quality graphene on oxide surfaces using CVD without the presence of metal catalysts.

  17. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Painter, J.; Hansen, C.

    1996-10-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the M.

  18. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  19. Weighted energy problem on the unit sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilogliadov, Mykhailo

    2016-12-01

    We consider the minimal energy problem on the unit sphere S^2 in the Euclidean space R^3 immersed in an external field Q, where the charges are assumed to interact via Newtonian potential 1/ r, r being the Euclidean distance. The problem is solved by finding the support of the extremal measure, and obtaining an explicit expression for the equilibrium density. We then apply our results to an external field generated by a point charge, and to a quadratic external field.

  20. Study of the Unequal Spheres Packing Problem:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. P.; Ng, Ka-Lok

    We employ the Monte Carlo method to study a constrained optimization problem — packing hard spheres with unequal radii (r2 > r1) into a 3D bounded region and discuss its connection with the Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment planning. Selection of the best fit solution is based on the Boltzmann factor, e-ΔE/T, which allows us to search for the global optimal solution. As an illustration we determined the least number (≤15) of packed spheres that will occupy the largest volume for three different hypothetical tumor sizes (4115, 10 000 and 36 000 voxels). For the bounded regions and the sizes of the packed spheres that we studied here, the optimal volume packing ratio ranges from 41.3 to 48.7%. From our study, using a lower r2/r1 ratio is more desirable due to the ≤15 radiation shots constraint. The optimal volume packing ratio can be obtained within a relative short CPU computing time and could provide a good starting point for the radiosurgery treatment planning.

  1. Theoretical study of miscibility and glass-forming trends in mixtures of polystyrene spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, W.-H.; Stroud, D.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical study of glass-forming trends and miscibility in mixtures of polystyrene spheres (polyballs) of different diameters, suspended in an aqueous solution, is presented. The polyballs are assumed to be charged and to interact via a Debye-Hueckel screened Coulomb potential. The Helmholtz free energy is calculated from a variational principle based on the Gibbs-Bogoliubov inequality, in which a mixture of hard spheres of different diameters is chosen as the reference system. It is found that when the charges of the two types of polyballs are sufficiently different, the variationally determined ratio of hard-sphere diameters differs substantially, leading to packing difficulties characteristic of glass formation. The experimentally observed range of glass formation corresponds to a ratio of hard-sphere diameters of 0.8 or less. Calculations of the free energy as a function of concentration indicate that the liquid polyball mixture is stable against the phase separation, even for widely different polyball charges.

  2. Hollow silica spheres: synthesis and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; D'Acunzi, Maria; Kappl, Michael; Auernhammer, Günter K; Vollmer, Doris; van Kats, Carlos M; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2009-03-03

    Core-shell polystyrene-silica spheres with diameters of 800 nm and 1.9 microm were synthesized by soap-free emulsion and dispersion polymerization of the polystyrene core, respectively. The polystyrene spheres were used as templates for the synthesis of silica shells of tunable thickness employing the Stöber method [Graf et al. Langmuir 2003, 19, 6693]. The polystyrene template was removed by thermal decomposition at 500 degrees C, resulting in smooth silica shells of well-defined thickness (15-70 nm). The elastic response of these hollow spheres was probed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A point load was applied to the particle surface through a sharp AFM tip, and successively increased until the shell broke. In agreement with the predictions of shell theory, for small deformations the deformation increased linearly with applied force. The Young's modulus (18 +/- 6 GPa) was about 4 times smaller than that of fused silica [Adachi and Sakka J. Mater. Sci. 1990, 25, 4732] but identical to that of bulk silica spheres (800 nm) synthesized by the Stöber method, indicating that it yields silica of lower density. The minimum force needed to irreversibly deform (buckle) the shell increased quadratically with shell thickness.

  3. Freezing of parallel hard cubes with rounded edges.

    PubMed

    Marechal, Matthieu; Zimmermann, Urs; Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-04-14

    The freezing transition in a classical three-dimensional system of rounded hard cubes with fixed, equal orientations is studied by computer simulation and fundamental-measure density functional theory. By switching the rounding parameter s from zero to one, one can smoothly interpolate between cubes with sharp edges and hard spheres. The equilibrium phase diagram of rounded parallel hard cubes is computed as a function of their volume fraction and the rounding parameter s. The second order freezing transition known for oriented cubes at s = 0 is found to be persistent up to s = 0.65. The fluid freezes into a simple-cubic crystal which exhibits a large vacancy concentration. Upon a further increase of s, the continuous freezing is replaced by a first-order transition into either a sheared simple cubic lattice or a deformed face-centered cubic lattice with two possible unit cells: body-centered orthorhombic or base-centered monoclinic. In principle, a system of parallel cubes could be realized in experiments on colloids using advanced synthesis techniques and a combination of external fields.

  4. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Hansen, C.; Painter, J.; de Verdiere, G.C.

    1995-05-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel divide-and-conquer algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the T3D.

  5. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-07-26

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  6. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    1986-01-01

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  7. Is Random Close Packing of Spheres Well Defined?

    SciTech Connect

    Torquato, S.; Truskett, T. M.; Debenedetti, P. G.

    2000-03-06

    Despite its long history, there are many fundamental issues concerning random packings of spheres that remain elusive, including a precise definition of random close packing (RCP). We argue that the current picture of RCP cannot be made mathematically precise and support this conclusion via a molecular dynamics study of hard spheres using the Lubachevsky-Stillinger compression algorithm. We suggest that this impasse can be broken by introducing the new concept of a maximally random jammed state, which can be made precise. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  8. First Density Correction to the Transport Coefficients for a Square Well Gas: Temperature Dependence and Bound State Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Gregory Ellis

    The temperature dependence of transport properties of a moderately dense square well gas is studied in order to understand the effects of attractive forces (particularly bound states). The quantum cluster expansions of the Green -Kubo time correlation functions for the thermal conductivity, shear viscosity, and self-diffusion coefficients are given, and exact expressions to zeroth (Boltzmann level) and first order in the density are obtained. Specializing to Boltzmann statistics and the classical square well potential allows calculations of the kinetic potential parts of the first density correction; the important contributions to the remaining triple collision parts are discussed. Good agreement with molecular dynamics results is found; quantitative difference from real fluids are observed, however. Possible reasons for the discrepancies are discussed. A brief description of the ultility and limitations of the hard sphere model is given for comparison. The dynamics structure factor is calculated for a dense fluid of hard spheres and compared with recent neutron scattering data for Krypton.

  9. Theory of excluded volume equation of state: higher approximations and new generation of equations of state for entire density range.

    PubMed

    Rusanov, Anatoly I

    2004-07-22

    A novel theory of an equation of state based on excluded volume and formulated in two preceding papers for gases and gaseous mixtures is extended to the entire density range by considering higher (beginning from the third) approximations of the theory. The algorithm of constructing higher approximations is elaborated. Equations of state are deduced using the requirement of maximum simplicity and contain a single free parameter to be chosen by reason of convenience or simplicity or to be used as a fitting parameter with respect to the computer simulation database. In this way, precise equations of state are derived for the hard-sphere fluid in the entire density range. On the side, the theory reproduces most known earlier equations of state for hard spheres and determines their place in the hierarchy of approximations. Equations of state for van der Waals fluids are also presented, and their critical parameters are estimated.

  10. Interactions between uniformly magnetized spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Boyd F.; Riffe, D. M.; Ji, Jeong-Young; Booth, William A.

    2017-02-01

    We use simple symmetry arguments suitable for undergraduate students to demonstrate that the magnetic energy, forces, and torques between two uniformly magnetized spheres are identical to those between two point magnetic dipoles. These arguments exploit the equivalence of the field outside of a uniformly magnetized sphere with that of a point magnetic dipole, and pertain to spheres of arbitrary sizes, positions, and magnetizations. The point dipole/sphere equivalence for magnetic interactions may be useful in teaching and research, where dipolar approximations for uniformly magnetized spheres can now be considered to be exact. The work was originally motivated by interest in the interactions between collections of small neodymium magnetic spheres used as desk toys.

  11. Coherent states on spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Brian C.; Mitchell, Jeffrey J.

    2002-03-01

    We describe a family of coherent states and an associated resolution of the identity for a quantum particle whose classical configuration space is the d-dimensional sphere Sd. The coherent states are labeled by points in the associated phase space T*(Sd). These coherent states are not of Perelomov type but rather are constructed as the eigenvectors of suitably defined annihilation operators. We describe as well the Segal-Bargmann representation for the system, the associated unitary Segal-Bargmann transform, and a natural inversion formula. Although many of these results are in principle special cases of the results of Hall and Stenzel, we give here a substantially different description based on ideas of Thiemann and of Kowalski and Rembieliński. All of these results can be generalized to a system whose configuration space is an arbitrary compact symmetric space. We focus on the sphere case in order to carry out the calculations in a self-contained and explicit way.

  12. Magnetic spheres in microwave cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare Rameshti, Babak; Cao, Yunshan; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2015-06-01

    We apply Mie scattering theory to study the interaction of magnetic spheres with microwaves in cavities beyond the magnetostatic and rotating wave approximations. We demonstrate that both strong and ultrastrong coupling can be realized for stand alone magnetic spheres made from yttrium iron garnet (YIG), acting as an efficient microwave antenna. The eigenmodes of YIG spheres with radii of the order mm display distinct higher angular momentum character that has been observed in experiments.

  13. Determination of meteor flux distribution over the celestial sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V. V.; Belkovich, O. I.; Filimonova, T. K.; Sidorov, V. V.

    1992-01-01

    A new method of determination of meteor flux density distribution over the celestial sphere is discussed. The flux density was derived from observations by radar together with measurements of angles of arrival of radio waves reflected from meteor trails. The role of small meteor showers over the sporadic background is shown.

  14. Interaction and charge transfer between dielectric spheres: Exact and approximate analytical solutions.

    PubMed

    Lindén, Fredrik; Cederquist, Henrik; Zettergren, Henning

    2016-11-21

    We present exact analytical solutions for charge transfer reactions between two arbitrarily charged hard dielectric spheres. These solutions, and the corresponding exact ones for sphere-sphere interaction energies, include sums that describe polarization effects to infinite orders in the inverse of the distance between the sphere centers. In addition, we show that these exact solutions may be approximated by much simpler analytical expressions that are useful for many practical applications. This is exemplified through calculations of Langevin type cross sections for forming a compound system of two colliding spheres and through calculations of electron transfer cross sections. We find that it is important to account for dielectric properties and finite sphere sizes in such calculations, which for example may be useful for describing the evolution, growth, and dynamics of nanometer sized dielectric objects such as molecular clusters or dust grains in different environments including astrophysical ones.

  15. Panoramic stereo sphere vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weijia; Zhang, Baofeng; Röning, Juha; Zong, Xiaoning; Yi, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Conventional stereo vision systems have a small field of view (FOV) which limits their usefulness for certain applications. While panorama vision is able to "see" in all directions of the observation space, scene depth information is missed because of the mapping from 3D reference coordinates to 2D panoramic image. In this paper, we present an innovative vision system which builds by a special combined fish-eye lenses module, and is capable of producing 3D coordinate information from the whole global observation space and acquiring no blind area 360°×360° panoramic image simultaneously just using single vision equipment with one time static shooting. It is called Panoramic Stereo Sphere Vision (PSSV). We proposed the geometric model, mathematic model and parameters calibration method in this paper. Specifically, video surveillance, robotic autonomous navigation, virtual reality, driving assistance, multiple maneuvering target tracking, automatic mapping of environments and attitude estimation are some of the applications which will benefit from PSSV.

  16. Nitrogen-doped hierarchically porous carbon spheres as efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for an oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, You-Lin; Shi, Cheng-Xiang; Xu, Xue-Yan; Sun, Ping-Chuan; Chen, Tie-Hong

    2015-06-01

    Using hierarchically mesoporous silica spheres as a hard template and methyl violet as carbon and nitrogen source, nitrogen-doped hierarchically porous carbon spheres (N-HCS) are successfully prepared via a nanocasting method. The nitrogen-doped carbon spheres obtained after carbonization at 1000 °C (N-HCS-1000) exhibit a hierarchically micro-meso-macroporous structure with a relatively high surface area (BET) of 1413 m2 g-1 and a notably large pore volume of 2.96 cm3 g-1. In an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media, the N-HCS-1000 material exhibits excellent activity with high current density, and its onset potential is notably close to that of the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The efficient catalytic activity of this catalyst could be attributed to the high electrical conductivity of the nitrogen-doped carbon matrix as well as the hierarchically porous framework. This catalyst also exhibits better methanol crossover resistance and higher stability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  17. Super-Hard Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Philip; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2005-03-01

    We present the magnetic response of Type-II superconductivity in the extreme pinning limit, where screening currents within an order of magnitude of the Ginzburg-Landau depairing critical current density develop upon the application of a magnetic field. We show that this ``super-hard'' limit is well approximated in highly disordered, cold drawn, Nb wire whose magnetization response is characterized by a cascade of Meissner-like phases, each terminated by a catastrophic collapse of the magnetization. Direct magneto-optic measurements of the flux penetration depth in the virgin magnetization branch are in excellent agreement with the exponential model in which Jc(B)=Jco(-B/Bo), where Jco˜5x10^6 A/cm^2 for Nb. The implications for the fundamental limiting hardness of a superconductor will be discussed.

  18. Electrochemical properties of the double layer of an ionic liquid using a dimer model electrolyte and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Douglas; Wu, Jianzhong

    2012-03-01

    Most theoretical studies of the properties of an electrolyte, including an ionic liquid, treat the electrolyte as a mixture of charged hard spheres in a solvent modeled as a dielectric continuum. However, ionic liquids generally consist of nonspherical ions that are not dissolved in a solvent. A simple extension of the primitivel model of electrolytes is to represent an ionic liquid as a mixture of charged hard spheres (negative monovalent ions in our case) and nonspherical ions consisting of a dimer of two touching hard spheres, one of which is charged (monovalent and positive in our case) and the other is neutral. This simple model has been used previously by Federov et al. and by ourselves. Here, we use the classical density functional theory to study the interfacial properties of the model ionic liquid over a range of electrode charges and two electrolyte concentrations. For simplicity, all of the spheres have the same diameter. In contrast to the simulations of Federov and Kornyshev, we find that a plot of the differential capacitance of the dimer electrolyte versus the surface potential typically exhibits only a single hump. Also, differing from the studies of Lamperski et al. for a spherical electrolyte, which showed a decline of the maximal differential capacitance as the ionic concentration decreases, the maximum of the differential capacitance of the dimer electrolyte increases slightly with decreasing ionic concentration. Our theoretical results show other unexpected effects of the geometry of ionic species on the electrochemical properties of the electric double layer of an ionic liquid.

  19. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Fox, Ethan E; Morrissey, Timothy G; Vuono, Daniel J

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Frictional effects contribute to fracture initiation. (2) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in the Starphire than spheres with a higher elastic modulus. (3) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Starphire SLS for impact kinetic energies < 150 mJ. Fracture sometimes initiated or kinetic energies between {approx} 150-1100 mJ; however, it tended to occur when lower elastic modulus spheres were impacting it. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 1100 mJ. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic or impact conditions than it is under quasi-static indentation conditions. (5) Among the five used sphere materials, silicon nitride was the closest match to 'rock' in terms of both density and (probably) elastic modulus.

  20. Laser range profile of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Profile information about a three-dimensional target can be obtained by laser range profile (LRP). A mathematical LRP model from rough sphere is presented. LRP includes laser one-dimensional range profile and laser two-dimensional range profile. A target coordinate system and an imaging coordinate system are established, the mathematical model of the range profile is derived in the imaging coordinate system. The mathematical model obtained has nothing to do with the incidence direction of laser. It is shown that the laser range profile of the sphere is independent of the incidence direction of laser. This is determined by the symmetry of the sphere. The laser range profile can reflect the shape and material properties of the target. Simulations results of LRP about some spheres are given. Laser range profile of sphere, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profile of sphere, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retro-reflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. Laser range profiles of different pulse width of sphere are given in this paper. The influences of geometric parameters, pulse width on the range profiles are analyzed.

  1. Accurate bulk density determination of irregularly shaped translucent and opaque aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, M. P.; Jones, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a volumetric method for accurate determination of bulk density of aerogels, calculated from extrapolated weight of the dry pure solid and volume estimates based on the Archimedes' principle of volume displacement, using packed 100 μm-sized monodispersed glass spheres as a "quasi-fluid" media. Hard particle packing theory is invoked to demonstrate the reproducibility of the apparent density of the quasi-fluid. Accuracy rivaling that of the refractive index method is demonstrated for both translucent and opaque aerogels with different absorptive properties, as well as for aerogels with regular and irregular shapes.

  2. Second virial coefficient at the critical point in a fluid of colloidal spheres plus depletants.

    PubMed

    Tuinier, Remco; Feenstra, Maartje S

    2014-11-11

    Vliegenthart-Lekkerkerker (VL) criterion B2 = -6vc for second virial coefficient B2 at the critical (colloidal) gas-liquid point is considered for a mixture of spheres with volume vc plus depletants. For the onset of fluid-phase instability, the VL criterion holds for a wide range of shapes of direct attractive forces between hard-core spheres (Vliegenthart, G. A.; Lekkerkerker, H. N. W. J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 112, 5364). In the case of long-ranged attractions imposed indirectly via depletants, it is found that the VL relation fails. Instead, B2/vc at the critical point depends strongly on the sphere/depletant size ratio. By making the hard spheres sticky, we find that B2 moves gradually toward the VL criterion upon increasing the stickiness.

  3. Microwave-Assisted Solvothermal Synthesis of VO2 Hollow Spheres and Their Conversion into V2O5 Hollow Spheres with Improved Lithium Storage Capability.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Zhong, Li; Li, Ming; Luo, Yuanyuan; Li, Guanghai

    2016-01-22

    Monodispersed hierarchically structured V2O5 hollow spheres were successfully obtained from orthorhombic VO2 hollow spheres, which are in turn synthesized by a simple template-free microwave-assisted solvothermal method. The structural evolution of VO2 hollow spheres has been studied and explained by a chemically induced self-transformation process. The reaction time and water content in the reaction solution have a great influence on the morphology and phase structure of the resulting products in the solvothermal reaction. The diameter of the VO2 hollow spheres can be regulated simply by changing vanadium ion content in the reaction solution. The VO2 hollow spheres can be transformed into V2O5 hollow spheres with nearly no morphological change by annealing in air. The nanorods composed of V2O5 hollow spheres have an average length of about 70 nm and width of about 19 nm. When used as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries, the V2O5 hollow spheres display a diameter-dependent electrochemical performance, and the 440 nm hollow spheres show the highest specific discharge capacity of 377.5 mAhg(-1) at a current density of 50 mAg(-1) , and are better than the corresponding solid spheres and nanorod assemblies.

  4. The Finite Deformation Dynamic Sphere Test Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Versino, Daniele; Brock, Jerry Steven

    2016-09-02

    In this manuscript we describe test cases for the dynamic sphere problem in presence of finite deformations. The spherical shell in exam is made of a homogeneous, isotropic or transverse isotropic material and elastic and elastic-plastic material behaviors are considered. Twenty cases, (a) to (t), are thus defined combining material types and boundary conditions. The inner surface radius, the outer surface radius and the material's density are kept constant for all the considered test cases and their values are ri = 10mm, ro = 20mm and p = 1000Kg/m3 respectively.

  5. Mechanical Properties and Uniformity of Nanocrystalline Diamond Coating Deposited Around a Sphere by MPCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongyun; Gou, Li

    2015-12-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond coatings were deposited by MPCVD on the spheres used for a ball bearing. The nanocrystalline coatings with a grain size of 50 nm were confirmed by the surface morphology and composition analysis. The hardness of the coating is 20-40 GPa tested by nanoindentation, which is higher than that of tungsten carbide and silicon nitride substrates. The coating around the sphere observed from the Micro CT images is uniform with a thickness of 12 μm.

  6. High-Sensitivity Measurement of Density by Magnetic Levitation.

    PubMed

    Nemiroski, Alex; Kumar, A A; Soh, Siowling; Harburg, Daniel V; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents methods that use Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure very small differences in density of solid diamagnetic objects suspended in a paramagnetic medium. Previous work in this field has shown that, while it is a convenient method, standard MagLev (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are parallel) cannot resolve differences in density <10(-4) g/cm(3) for macroscopic objects (>mm) because (i) objects close in density prevent each other from reaching an equilibrium height due to hard contact and excluded volume, and (ii) using weaker magnets or reducing the magnetic susceptibility of the medium destabilizes the magnetic trap. The present work investigates the use of weak magnetic gradients parallel to the faces of the magnets as a means of increasing the sensitivity of MagLev without destabilization. Configuring the MagLev device in a rotated state (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are perpendicular) relative to the standard configuration enables simple measurements along the axes with the highest sensitivity to changes in density. Manipulating the distance of separation between the magnets or the lengths of the magnets (along the axis of measurement) enables the sensitivity to be tuned. These modifications enable an improvement in the resolution up to 100-fold over the standard configuration, and measurements with resolution down to 10(-6) g/cm(3). Three examples of characterizing the small differences in density among samples of materials having ostensibly indistinguishable densities-Nylon spheres, PMMA spheres, and drug spheres-demonstrate the applicability of rotated Maglev to measuring the density of small (0.1-1 mm) objects with high sensitivity. This capability will be useful in materials science, separations, and quality control of manufactured objects.

  7. Science off the Sphere: Bistronauts

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  8. Density in a Bottle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roser, Charles E.; McCluskey, Catherine L.

    1998-01-01

    Explains how the Canadian soft drink Orbitz can be used for explorations of density in the classroom. The drink has colored spheres suspended throughout that have a density close to that of the liquid. Presents a hands-on activity that can be easily done in two parts. (DDR)

  9. Rebound and jet formation of a fluid-filled sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killian, Taylor W.; Klaus, Robert A.; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2012-12-01

    This study investigates the impact dynamics of hollow elastic spheres partially filled with fluid. Unlike an empty sphere, the internal fluid mitigates some of the rebound through an impulse driven exchange of energy wherein the fluid forms a jet inside the sphere. Surprisingly, this occurs on the second rebound or when the free surface is initially perturbed. Images gathered through experimentation show that the fluid reacts more quickly to the impact than the sphere, which decouples the two masses (fluid and sphere), imparts energy to the fluid, and removes rebound energy from the sphere. The experimental results are analyzed in terms of acceleration, momentum and an energy method suggesting an optimal fill volume in the neighborhood of 30%. While the characteristics of the fluid (i.e., density, viscosity, etc.) affect the fluid motion (i.e., type and size of jet formation), the rebound characteristics remain similar for a given fluid volume independent of fluid type. Implications of this work are a potential use of similar passive damping systems in sports technology and marine engineering.

  10. Theory of activated dynamics and glass transition of hard colloids in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo-kai; Li, Hui-shu; Tian, Wen-de; Chen, Kang; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2014-03-07

    The microscopic nonlinear Langevin equation theory is applied to study the localization and activated hopping of two-dimensional hard disks in the deeply supercooled and glass states. Quantitative comparisons of dynamic characteristic length scales, barrier, and their dependence on the reduced packing fraction are presented between hard-disk and hard-sphere suspensions. The dynamic barrier of hard disks emerges at higher absolute and reduced packing fractions and correspondingly, the crossover size of the dynamic cage which correlates to the Lindemann length for melting is smaller. The localization lengths of both hard disks and spheres decrease exponentially with packing fraction. Larger localization length of hard disks than that of hard spheres is found at the same reduced packing fraction. The relaxation time of hard disks rises dramatically above the reduced packing fraction of 0.88, which leads to lower reduced packing fraction at the kinetic glass transition than that of hard spheres. The present work provides a foundation for the subsequent study of the glass transition of binary or polydisperse mixtures of hard disks, normally adopted in experiments and simulations to avoid crystallization, and further, the rheology and mechanical response of the two-dimensional glassy colloidal systems.

  11. Polar-solvation classical density-functional theory for electrolyte aqueous solutions near a wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warshavsky, Vadim; Marucho, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    A precise description of the structural and dielectric properties of liquid water is critical to understanding the physicochemical properties of solutes in electrolyte solutions. In this article, a mixture of ionic and dipolar hard spheres is considered to account for water crowding and polarization effects on ionic electrical double layers near a uniformly charged hard wall. As a unique feature, solvent hard spheres carrying a dipole at their centers were used to model water molecules at experimentally known concentration, molecule size, and dipolar moment. The equilibrium ionic and dipole density profiles of this electrolyte aqueous model were calculated using a polar-solvation classical density-functional theory (PSCDFT). These profiles were used to calculate the charge density distribution, water polarization, dielectric permittivity function, and mean electric potential profiles as well as differential capacitance, excess adsorptions, and wall-fluid surface tension. These results were compared with those corresponding to the pure dipolar model and unpolar primitive solvent model of electrolyte aqueous solutions to understand the role that water crowding and polarization effects play on the structural and thermodynamic properties of these systems. Overall, PSCDFT predictions are in agreement with available experimental data.

  12. Tuning the bridging attraction between large hard particles by the softness of small microgels.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junhua; Yuan, Guangcui; Han, Charles C

    2016-09-20

    In this study, the attraction between large hard polystyrene (PS) spheres is studied by using three types of small microgels as bridging agents. One is a purely soft poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel, the other two have a non-deformable PS hard core surrounded by a soft PNIPAM shell but are different in the core-shell ratio. The affinity for bridging the large PS spheres is provided and thus affected by the PNIPAM constituent in the microgels. The bridging effects caused by the microgels can be indirectly incorporated into their influence on the effective attraction interaction between the large hard spheres, since the size of the microgels is very small in comparison to the size of the PS hard spheres. At a given volume fraction of large PS spheres, they behave essentially as hard spheres in the absence of small microgels. By gradually adding the microgels, the large spheres are connected to each other through the bridging of small particles until the attraction strength reaches a maximum value, after which adding more small particles slowly decreases the effective attraction strength and eventually the large particles disperse individually when saturated adsorption is achieved. The aggregation and gelation behaviors triggered by these three types of small microgels are compared and discussed. A way to tune the strength and range of the short-range attractive potential via changing the softness of bridging microgels (which can be achieved either by using core-shell microgels or by changing the temperature) is proposed.

  13. Nematic ordering and defects on the surface of a sphere: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Martin A.

    2008-03-01

    We examine the ordering of hard rods on the surface of a sphere using computer simulations. As predicted by previous theories of thin nematic shells we observe four s =+1/2 defects. However, the predicted tetrahedral symmetry for the defects and the "baseball" director configuration is not observed. Instead the four defects are located, on average, on a great circle which splits the sphere into two hemispheres, each of which has a splay dominated director configuration. We argue that this result occurs as the bend elastic constant for hard rods is much larger than the splay elastic constant.

  14. DSMC Simulation and Experimental Validation of Shock Interaction in Hypersonic Low Density Flow

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) of shock interaction in hypersonic low density flow is developed. Three collision molecular models, including hard sphere (HS), variable hard sphere (VHS), and variable soft sphere (VSS), are employed in the DSMC study. The simulations of double-cone and Edney's type IV hypersonic shock interactions in low density flow are performed. Comparisons between DSMC and experimental data are conducted. Investigation of the double-cone hypersonic flow shows that three collision molecular models can predict the trend of pressure coefficient and the Stanton number. HS model shows the best agreement between DSMC simulation and experiment among three collision molecular models. Also, it shows that the agreement between DSMC and experiment is generally good for HS and VHS models in Edney's type IV shock interaction. However, it fails in the VSS model. Both double-cone and Edney's type IV shock interaction simulations show that the DSMC errors depend on the Knudsen number and the models employed for intermolecular interaction. With the increase in the Knudsen number, the DSMC error is decreased. The error is the smallest in HS compared with those in the VHS and VSS models. When the Knudsen number is in the level of 10−4, the DSMC errors, for pressure coefficient, the Stanton number, and the scale of interaction region, are controlled within 10%. PMID:24672360

  15. Project CONDOR: Middle atmosphere wind structure obtained with lightweight inflatable spheres near the equatorial electrojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidlin, F. J.

    1987-01-01

    Observed correlations between the atmospheric electric field and the neutral wind were studied using additional atmospheric measurements during Project CONDOR. Project CONDOR obtained measurements near the equatorial electrojet (12 S) during March 1983. Neutral atmosphere wind measurements were obtained using lightweight inflatable spheres and temperatures were obtained using a datasonde. The lightweight sphere technology, the wind structure, and temperature structure are described. Results show that the lightweight sphere gives higher vertical resolution of winds below 75 km compared with the standard sphere, but gives little or no improvement above 80 km, and no usable temperature and density data.

  16. Cavitation and radicals drive the sonochemical synthesis of functional polymer spheres

    DOE PAGES

    Narayanan, Badri; Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; ...

    2016-07-25

    Sonochemical synthesis can lead to a dramatic increase in the kinetics of formation of polymer spheres (templates for carbon spheres) compared to the modified Stober silica method applied to produce analogous polymer spheres. Reactive molecular dynamics simulations of the sonochemical process indicate a significantly enhanced rate of polymer sphere formation starting from resorcinol and formaldehyde precursors. The associated chemical reaction kinetics enhancement due to sonication is postulated to arise from the localized lowering of atomic densities, localized heating, and generation of radicals due to cavitation collapse in aqueous systems. This dramatic increase in reaction rates translates into enhanced nucleation andmore » growth of the polymer spheres. Finally, the results are of broad significance to understanding mechanisms of sonication induced synthesis as well as technologies utilizing polymers spheres.« less

  17. Cavitation and radicals drive the sonochemical synthesis of functional polymer spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, Badri; Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Pol, Vilas G.; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.

    2016-07-25

    Sonochemical synthesis can lead to a dramatic increase in the kinetics of formation of polymer spheres (templates for carbon spheres) compared to the modified Stober silica method applied to produce analogous polymer spheres. Reactive molecular dynamics simulations of the sonochemical process indicate a significantly enhanced rate of polymer sphere formation starting from resorcinol and formaldehyde precursors. The associated chemical reaction kinetics enhancement due to sonication is postulated to arise from the localized lowering of atomic densities, localized heating, and generation of radicals due to cavitation collapse in aqueous systems. This dramatic increase in reaction rates translates into enhanced nucleation and growth of the polymer spheres. Finally, the results are of broad significance to understanding mechanisms of sonication induced synthesis as well as technologies utilizing polymers spheres.

  18. Recent progress in hollow sphere-based electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Chen, Min; Wu, Limin

    2016-08-01

    Hollow spheres have drawn much attention in the area of energy storage and conversion, especially in high-performance supercapacitors owing to their well-defined morphologies, uniform size, low density and large surface area. And quite some significant breakthroughs have been made in advanced supercapacitor electrode materials with hollow sphere structures. In this review, we summarize and discuss the synthesis and application of hollow spheres with controllable structure and morphology as electrode materials for supercapacitors. First, we briefly introduce the fabrication strategies of hollow spheres for electrode materials. Then, we discuss in detail the recent advances in various hollow sphere-based electrode materials for supercapacitors, including single-shelled, yolk-shelled, urchin-like, double-shelled, multi-shelled, and mesoporous hollow structure-based symmetric and asymmetric supercapacitor devices. We conclude this review with some perspectives on the future research and development of the hollow sphere-based electrode materials.

  19. Theoretical study of the freezing of polystyrene sphere suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, W.-H.; Stroud, D.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical study of melting in aqueous suspensions of polystyrene spheres is presented. The Helmholtz free energies of the liquid and solid phase of the suspensions are calculated as functions of sphere number density and electrolyte concentrations. The results tend to show that the freezing curve of such suspensions is that of a conventional classical liquid with repulsive short-range interactions. The interactions can be treated satisfactorily within a slightly modified Debye-Hueckel approximation. The modifications include size correction and a correction for nonlinear screening. The results are confirmed by analogous calculations for the solid phase, and for the line along which liquid and solid free energies are equal.

  20. Thermoinertial bouncing of a relativistic collapsing sphere: A numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A.; Barreto, W.

    2006-01-15

    We present a numerical model of a collapsing radiating sphere, whose boundary surface undergoes bouncing due to a decreasing of its inertial mass density (and, as expected from the equivalence principle, also of the 'gravitational' force term) produced by the 'inertial' term of the transport equation. This model exhibits for the first time the consequences of such an effect, and shows that under physically reasonable conditions this decreasing of the gravitational term in the dynamic equation may be large enough as to revert the collapse and produce a bouncing of the boundary surface of the sphere.

  1. Ability of nonperturbative density-functional theories to stabilize arbitrary solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrlidis, Agathagelos; Brown, Robert A.

    1991-12-01

    The effects of solid structure and interatomic potential are investigated for density-functional theories based on the definition of a weighted or effective density for approximating the solid phase in terms of the uniform liquid. The introduction of solidlike structure to the modified-weighted-density-approximation (MWDA) theory of Denton and Ashcroft [Phys. Rev. A 39, 4701 (1989)] leads to loss of existence of the weighted density for a system of hard spheres. This behavior is more pronounced for loose crystalline structures, such as the diamond lattice. By contrast, the generalized-effective-liquid-approximation theory (GELA) of Lutsko and Baus [Phys. Rev. A 41, 6647 (1990)] always predicts single-valued weighted densities in the cases studied here. The thermodynamic mapping, which is the core of both of the MWDA and GELA approximations, is ineffective for Lennard-Jones fluids, according to a criterion for the relative stability of the solid phase evaluated using liquid-state information.

  2. Sphere forming method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngberg, C. L.; Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.; Finnerty, A. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is provided for forming small accurately spherical objects. Preformed largely spherical objects are supported at the opening of a conduit on the update of hot gas emitted from the opening, so the object is in a molten state. The conduit is suddenly jerked away at a downward incline, to allow the molten object to drop in free fall, so that surface tension forms a precise sphere. The conduit portion that has the opening, lies in a moderate vacuum chamber, and the falling sphere passes through the chamber and through a briefly opened valve into a tall drop tower that contains a lower pressure, to allow the sphere to cool without deformation caused by falling through air.

  3. Effect of the cluster integrals on three particles on the calculated electron density of a hydrogen plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintyre, R. G.; Bruce, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of the calculation of the cluster integrals on three particles is analyzed and evaluated for a hydrogen plasma where a pairwise-additive hard sphere-Coulomb potential is assumed. The Mayer cluster integral method was used to calculate the Helmholtz free energy which was then applied to the calculation of the electron number density through an iterative technique using a corrected Saha equation. It is seen that the three particle integrals provide a substantial correction to the calculations in the low energy-high density region of the hydrogen plasma.

  4. Abradable dual-density ceramic turbine seal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clingman, D. L.; Schechter, B.; Cross, K. R.; Cavanagh, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    A plasma sprayed dual density ceramic abradable seal system for direct application to the HPT seal shroud of small gas turbine engines. The system concept is based on the thermal barrier coating and depends upon an additional layer of modified density ceramic material adjacent to the gas flow path to provide the desired abradability. This is achieved by codeposition of inert fillers with yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to interrupt the continuity of the zirconia struture. The investigation of a variety of candidate fillers, with hardness values as low as 2 on Moh's scale, led to the conclusion that solid filler materials in combination with a YSZ matrix, regardless of their hardness values, have a propensity for compacting rather than shearing as originally expected. The observed compaction is accompanied by high energy dissipation in the rub interaction, usually resulting in the adhesive transfer of blade material to the stationary seal member. Two YSZ based coating systems which incorported hollow alumino silicate spheres as density reducing agents were surveyed over the entire range of compositions from 100 percent filler to 100 percent YSZ. Abradability and erosion characteristics were determined, hardness and permeability characterized, and engine experience acquired with several system configurations.

  5. Zinc coordination spheres in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Laitaoja, Mikko; Valjakka, Jarkko; Jänis, Janne

    2013-10-07

    Zinc metalloproteins are one of the most abundant and structurally diverse proteins in nature. In these proteins, the Zn(II) ion possesses a multifunctional role as it stabilizes the fold of small zinc fingers, catalyzes essential reactions in enzymes of all six classes, or assists in the formation of biological oligomers. Previously, a number of database surveys have been conducted on zinc proteins to gain broader insights into their rich coordination chemistry. However, many of these surveys suffer from severe flaws and misinterpretations or are otherwise limited. To provide a more comprehensive, up-to-date picture on zinc coordination environments in proteins, zinc containing protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were analyzed in detail. A statistical analysis in terms of zinc coordinating amino acids, metal-to-ligand bond lengths, coordination number, and structural classification was performed, revealing coordination spheres from classical tetrahedral cysteine/histidine binding sites to more complex binuclear sites with carboxylated lysine residues. According to the results, coordination spheres of hundreds of crystal structures in the PDB could be misinterpreted due to symmetry-related molecules or missing electron densities for ligands. The analysis also revealed increasing average metal-to-ligand bond length as a function of crystallographic resolution, which should be taken into account when interrogating metal ion binding sites. Moreover, one-third of the zinc ions present in crystal structures are artifacts, merely aiding crystal formation and packing with no biological significance. Our analysis provides solid evidence that a minimal stable zinc coordination sphere is made up by four ligands and adopts a tetrahedral coordination geometry.

  6. Combustion of a Polymer (PMMA) Sphere in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jiann C.; Hamins, Anthony; Donnelly, Michelle K.

    1999-01-01

    A series of low gravity, aircraft-based, experiments was conducted to investigate the combustion of supported thermoplastic polymer spheres under varying ambient conditions. The three types of thermoplastic investigated were polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polypropylene (PP). and polystyrene (PS). Spheres with diameters ranging from 2 mm to 6.35 mm were tested. The total initial pressure varied from 0.05 MPa to 0. 15 MPa whereas the ambient oxygen concentration varied from 19 % to 30 % (by volume). The ignition system consisted of a pair of retractable energized coils. Two CCD cameras recorded the burning histories of the spheres. The video sequences revealed a number of dynamic events including bubbling and sputtering, as well as soot shell formation and break-up during combustion of the spheres at reduced gravity. The ejection of combusting material from the burning spheres represents a fire hazard that must be considered at reduced gravity. The ejection process was found to be sensitive to polymer type. All average burning rates were measured to increase with initial sphere diameter and oxygen concentration, whereas the initial pressure had little effect. The three thermoplastic types exhibited different burning characteristics. For the same initial conditions, the burning rate of PP was slower than PMMA, whereas the burning rate of PS was comparable to PMMA. The transient diameter of the burning thermoplastic exhibited two distinct periods: an initial period (enduring approximately half of the total burn duration) when the diameter remained approximately constant, and a final period when the square of the diameter linearly decreased with time. A simple homogeneous two-phase model was developed to understand the changing diameter of the burning sphere. Its value is based on a competition between diameter reduction due to mass loss from burning and sputtering, and diameter expansion due to the processes of swelling (density decrease with heating) and bubble growth

  7. A fundamental measure density functional for fluid and crystal phases of the Asakura-Oosawa model.

    PubMed

    Mortazavifar, Mostafa; Oettel, Martin

    2016-06-22

    We investigate a density functional for the Asakura-Oosawa model of colloid-polymer mixtures, describing both fluid and crystal phases. It is derived by linearizing the two-component fundamental-measure hard sphere tensor functional in the second (polymer) component. We discuss the formulation of an effective density functional for colloids only. For small polymer-colloid size ratios the effective, polymer-induced potential between colloids is short-range attractive and of two-body form but we show that the effective density functional is not equivalent to standard mean-field approaches where attractions are taken into account by terms second order in the colloid density. We calculate numerically free energies and phase diagrams in good agreement with available simulations, furthermore we discuss the colloid and polymer distributions in the crystal and determine equilibrium vacancy concentrations. Numerical results reveal a fairly strong sensitivity to the specific type of underlying fundamental measure hard sphere functional which could aid further development of fundamental measure theory.

  8. Improved linings for integrating spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fergerson, P. O.; French, B. O.

    1970-01-01

    Sphere surface is covered with plain weave of glass fibers coated with polytetrafluoroethylene and one or two layers of magnesium oxide vapor. The resultant lining is suitable for measurement of radiation in the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared wavelengths, is not damage prone, and is easily cleaned.

  9. Evaluation of the sphere anemometer for atmospheric wind measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisselmann, Hendrik; Peinke, Joachim; Hoelling, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Our contribution will compare the sphere anemometer and two standard sensors for wind energy and meteorology based on data from a near-shore measurement campaign. We will introduce the characteristics of the sphere anemometer - a drag-based sensor for simultaneous wind speed and direction measurements, which makes use of the highly resolving light pointer principle to detect the velocity-dependent deflection of sphere mounted on a flexible tube. Sphere anemometer, cup anemometer and 3D sonic anemometer were installed at near-shore site in the German Wadden Sea. A comparison of the anemometers was carried out based on several month of high frequency data obtained from this campaign. The measured wind speed and direction data were analyzed to evaluate the capability of the sphere anemometer under real operating conditions, while the sensor characteristics obtained from previous wind tunnel experiments under turbulent conditions served as a reference to assess the durability and to identify challenges of the new anemometer. A characterization of the atmospheric wind conditions at the test site is performed based on the recorded wind data. Wind speed and wind direction averages and turbulence intensities are analyzed as well as power spectra and probability density functions. Supported by the German Ministry of Economics and Energy.

  10. ORSPHERE: CRITICAL, BARE, HEU(93.2)-METAL SPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-09-01

    In the early 1970’s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) in an attempt to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950’s (HEU-MET-FAST-001). The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. “The very accurate description of this sphere, as assembled, establishes it as an ideal benchmark for calculational methods and cross-section data files.” (Reference 1) While performing the ORSphere experiments care was taken to accurately document component dimensions (±0. 0001 in. for non-spherical parts), masses (±0.01 g), and material data The experiment was also set up to minimize the amount of structural material in the sphere proximity. A three part sphere was initially assembled with an average radius of 3.4665 in. and was then machined down to an average radius of 3.4420 in. (3.4425 in. nominal). These two spherical configurations were evaluated and judged to be acceptable benchmark experiments; however, the two experiments are highly correlated.

  11. High voltage spheres in an unmagnetized plasma - Fluid and PIC simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemann, H.; Ma, T.-Z.; Schunk, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    The basic physics involving the interaction of a high voltage sphere with a LEO-Plasma was investigated via computer experiments. Two approaches were used: the fluid description and the more general particle pushing method. Both techniques displayed qualitatively similar features. Thus, the initial time-dependent response of the plasma predicted by the fluid model, including the initial current surge and sheath formation, the formation of ion and electron density shells about the sphere with a double layer potential structure, and the subsequent propagation of the density shells away from the sphere. The PIC results also displayed an oscillatory character and slightly different time constants for the growth and decay mechanisms involved.

  12. Hard rectangles near curved hard walls: Tuning the sign of the Tolman length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitta, Christoph E.; Smallenburg, Frank; Wittkowski, Raphael; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-11-01

    Combining analytic calculations, computer simulations, and classical density functional theory we determine the interfacial tension of orientable two-dimensional hard rectangles near a curved hard wall. Both a circular cavity holding the particles and a hard circular obstacle surrounded by particles are considered. We focus on moderate bulk densities (corresponding to area fractions up to 50%) where the bulk phase is isotropic and vary the aspect ratio of the rectangles and the curvature of the wall. The Tolman length, which gives the leading curvature correction of the interfacial tension, is found to change sign at a finite density, which can be tuned via the aspect ratio of the rectangles.

  13. Science off the Sphere: Fun with Antibubbles

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit injects air bubbles inside a sphere of water to demonstrate physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership betwe...

  14. Strongly dipolar fluids at low densities compared to living polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, J. M.; Weis, J. J.; Telo da Gama, M. M.

    1999-04-01

    We carried out extensive canonical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the dipolar hard-sphere (DHS) fluid, with N=1024 particles at fixed reduced density ρ*=0.05, in order to investigate the chainlike structure that occurs at low densities, for sufficiently large reduced dipole moments μ*. The dissociation and recombination of chains during equilibrium runs suggest an analogy between the DHS's and a system of living polymers. This was checked quantitatively by comparing the results of the simulations with those of a theory for living polymers taking into account the indistinguishability of the particles in self-assembled chains. Quantitative agreement between theoretical and simulated mean chain lengths and number of monomers, was found for particular choices of the parameters used in the working definition of the MC chains.

  15. Mean-field avalanches in jammed spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, S.; Spigler, S.

    2017-02-01

    Disordered systems are characterized by the existence of many sample-dependent local-energy minima that cause a step-wise response when the system is perturbed. In this article we use an approach based on elementary probabilistic methods to compute the complete probability distribution of the jumps (static avalanches) in the response of mean-field systems described by replica symmetry breaking; we find a precise condition for having a power-law behavior in the distribution of avalanches caused by small perturbations, and we show that our predictions are in remarkable agreement both with previous results and with what is found in simulations of three-dimensional systems of soft spheres, either at jamming or at slightly higher densities.

  16. Mean-field avalanches in jammed spheres.

    PubMed

    Franz, S; Spigler, S

    2017-02-01

    Disordered systems are characterized by the existence of many sample-dependent local-energy minima that cause a step-wise response when the system is perturbed. In this article we use an approach based on elementary probabilistic methods to compute the complete probability distribution of the jumps (static avalanches) in the response of mean-field systems described by replica symmetry breaking; we find a precise condition for having a power-law behavior in the distribution of avalanches caused by small perturbations, and we show that our predictions are in remarkable agreement both with previous results and with what is found in simulations of three-dimensional systems of soft spheres, either at jamming or at slightly higher densities.

  17. Principal Fibrations from Noncommutative Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Giovanni; Suijlekom, Walter Van

    2005-11-01

    We construct noncommutative principal fibrations Sθ7→Sθ4 which are deformations of the classical SU(2) Hopf fibration over the four sphere. We realize the noncommutative vector bundles associated to the irreducible representations of SU(2) as modules of coequivariant maps and construct corresponding projections. The index of Dirac operators with coefficients in the associated bundles is computed with the Connes-Moscovici local index formula. "The algebra inclusion is an example of a not-trivial quantum principal bundle."

  18. Excluded volume effects in compressed polymer brushes: A density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Cangyi; Tang, Ping E-mail: fengqiu@fudan.edu.cn; Qiu, Feng E-mail: fengqiu@fudan.edu.cn; Shi, An-Chang

    2015-03-28

    A classical density functional theory (DFT) is applied to investigate the behavior of compressed polymer brushes composed of hard-sphere chains. The excluded volume interactions among the chain segments are explicitly treated. Two compression systems are used to study the behavior of brush-wall and brush-brush interactions. For the brush-brush systems, an obvious interpenetration zone has been observed. The extent of the interpenetration depends strongly on the grafting density. Furthermore, the repulsive force between the brush and wall or between the two brushes has been obtained as a function of the compression distance. Compared to the prediction of the analytic self-consistent field theory, such force increases more rapidly in the brush-wall compression with high polymer grafting densities or at higher compressions. In the brush-brush compression system, the interpenetration between the two compressed brushes creates a “softer” interaction. The influence of hard-sphere solvents on the behavior of compressed brushes is also discussed.

  19. Protocol Dependence in Jammed Particulate Media: Statistics of the Density Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampangiraj, Ashwin S.

    2011-03-01

    The density at which hard-sphere fluids jam into amorphous solids depends strongly on the compression protocol. Extremely fast quenching protocols bring each initial point in configuration space to the closest basin-maximum on the density landscape. In contrast, slower quench protocols allow the system to relax and explore configuration space. The protocol-dependence of the density, other structural quantities, and mechanical properties depends strongly on statistical features of the landscape. In this talk, I describe calculations of the the basin volumes associated with jammed hard sphere packings, and the critical quench rate Γ* above which the probabilities for obtaining jammed packings are determined by their basin volumes. Basin volumes are exponentially distributed; thus, for Γ >Γ* , so are jammed packing probabilities. We discuss the implications of this result on the statistical mechanics of jammed systems. This work was done in collaboration with Corey S O'Hern, Jerzy Blawdziewicz, Mark D. Shattuck. S. S. Ashwin and Corey O'Hern are supported by NSF grant no. CBET-0967262.

  20. Homogeneous sphere packings with triclinic symmetry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, W; Koch, E

    2002-11-01

    All homogeneous sphere packings with triclinic symmetry have been derived by studying the characteristic Wyckoff positions P -1 1a and P -1 2i of the two triclinic lattice complexes. These sphere packings belong to 30 different types. Only one type exists that has exclusively triclinic sphere packings and no higher-symmetry ones. The inherent symmetry of part of the sphere packings is triclinic for 18 types. Sphere packings of all but six of the 30 types may be realized as stackings of parallel planar nets.

  1. Configurational entropy of binary hard-disk glasses: nonexistence of an ideal glass transition.

    PubMed

    Donev, Aleksandar; Stillinger, Frank H; Torquato, Salvatore

    2007-09-28

    We study the thermodynamics of a binary hard-disk mixture in which the ratio of disk diameters is kappa=1.4. We use a recently developed molecular dynamics algorithm to calculate the free-volume entropy of glassy configurations and obtain the configurational entropy (degeneracy) of the supercompressed liquid as a function of density. We find that the configurational entropy of the glasses near the kinetic glass transition is very close to the mixing entropy, suggesting that the degeneracy is zero only for the phase-separated crystal. We explicitly construct an exponential number of jammed packings with densities spanning the spectrum from the accepted "amorphous" glassy state to the phase-separated crystal, thus showing that there is no ideal glass transition in binary hard-disk mixtures. This construction also demonstrates that the ideal glass, defined as having zero configurational entropy, is not amorphous, but instead is nothing more than a phase-separated crystal. This critique of the presumed existence of an ideal glass parallels our previous critique of the idea that there is a most-dense random (close) packing for hard spheres [Torquato et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 2064 (2000)]. We also perform free-energy calculations to determine the equilibrium phase behavior of the system. The calculations predict a first-order freezing transition at a density below the kinetic glass transition. However, this transition appears to be strongly kinetically suppressed and is not observed directly. New simulation techniques are needed in order to gain a more complete understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic behavior of the binary disk mixture and, in particular, of the demixing process during crystallization.

  2. Development of a Falling Sphere Technique for E-region Wind Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, B. K.; Fish, C. S.; Larsen, M. F.; Swenson, C.

    2009-12-01

    In this presentation we outline the development of a new falling sphere technique sensor for measuring the lower E-region neutral winds and density, which are critical for many of the electrodynamics and plasma physics studies that are carried out as part of the NASA suborbital rocket program. Currently, chemical releases are the primary technique for measuring winds in the lower E-region. Chemical release wind measurements provide detailed wind profiles with good accuracy and have a long flight history. However, they have a number of operational drawbacks, including the need for clear skies over a broad area for camera observations, limited viewing windows (e.g., only at nighttime in the case of trimethyl aluminum), and the need to follow strict handling procedures. Recent advances in low-cost commercial technology have made the falling sphere technique an attractive option to chemical release for E-region measurements. Falling sphere instruments (typically inflatable devices) have been used extensively to make wind measurements in the D-region. Similar measurements in the lower E-region require higher sensitivity accelerometers and a more careful design of the sphere (e.g., solid sphere structure for hypersonic speeds). This presentation demonstrates the design and laboratory testing and calibration of a next-generation solid falling sphere instrument for E-region measurements. Ultimately, the development of this new falling sphere instrument will enable the deployment of multiple falling spheres from one rocket for 3D volume determination of neutral wind measurements.

  3. Rotation-triggered path instabilities of rising spheres and cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathai, Varghese; Zhu, Xiaojue; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-11-01

    Path-instabilities are a common observation in the dynamics of buoyant particles in flows. However, the factors leading to the onset of oscillatory motion have remained difficult to predict even for simple bodies such as bubbles, spheres and cylinders. In literature, two quantities are considered to control the buoyancy-driven dynamics for isotropic bodies (spheres and cylinders); they are the particle's density relative to the fluid (Γ ≡ρp /ρf) and its Galileo number (Ga). In contrast to this picture, we show that buoyant spheres (as well as cylinders) can exhibit dramatically different modes of vibration and wake-shedding patterns under seemingly identical conditions (Γ and Ga fixed). These effects stem from the simplest of changes in the mass distribution of the particle (hollow to solid sphere), which changes its rotational inertia. We show that rotation can couple with the particle's translational motion and trigger distinctly different wake-induced oscillatory motions. The present findings also provide an explanation for the wide variation that is witnessed in the dynamics of buoyant isotropic bodies.

  4. Collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Bryk, Taras; Gorelli, Federico; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Santoro, Mario; Scopigno, Tullio

    2014-10-01

    Despite that the thermodynamic distinction between a liquid and the corresponding gas ceases to exist at the critical point, it has been recently shown that reminiscence of gaslike and liquidlike behavior can be identified in the supercritical fluid region, encoded in the behavior of hypersonic waves dispersion. By using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and calculations within the approach of generalized collective modes, we provide an accurate determination of the dispersion of longitudinal and transverse collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids. Specifically, we address the decreasing rigidity upon density reduction along an isothermal line, showing that the positive sound dispersion, an excess of sound velocity over the hydrodynamic limit typical for dense liquids, displays a nonmonotonic density dependence strictly correlated to that of thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity. This allows rationalizing recent observation parting the supercritical state based on the Widom line, i.e., the extension of the coexistence line. Remarkably, we show here that the extremals of transport properties such as thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity provide a robust definition for the boundary between liquidlike and gaslike regions, even in those systems without a liquid-gas binodal line. Finally, we discuss these findings in comparison with recent results for Lennard-Jones model fluid and with the notion of the "rigid-nonrigid" fluid separation lines.

  5. Collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryk, Taras; Gorelli, Federico; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Santoro, Mario; Scopigno, Tullio

    2014-10-01

    Despite that the thermodynamic distinction between a liquid and the corresponding gas ceases to exist at the critical point, it has been recently shown that reminiscence of gaslike and liquidlike behavior can be identified in the supercritical fluid region, encoded in the behavior of hypersonic waves dispersion. By using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and calculations within the approach of generalized collective modes, we provide an accurate determination of the dispersion of longitudinal and transverse collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids. Specifically, we address the decreasing rigidity upon density reduction along an isothermal line, showing that the positive sound dispersion, an excess of sound velocity over the hydrodynamic limit typical for dense liquids, displays a nonmonotonic density dependence strictly correlated to that of thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity. This allows rationalizing recent observation parting the supercritical state based on the Widom line, i.e., the extension of the coexistence line. Remarkably, we show here that the extremals of transport properties such as thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity provide a robust definition for the boundary between liquidlike and gaslike regions, even in those systems without a liquid-gas binodal line. Finally, we discuss these findings in comparison with recent results for Lennard-Jones model fluid and with the notion of the "rigid-nonrigid" fluid separation lines.

  6. Phase corrections in the optical interferometer for Si sphere volume measurements at NMIJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, B.; Ferroglio, L.; Fujii, K.; Kuramoto, N.; Mana, G.

    2011-04-01

    To determine the volume of solid density standards, manufactured as Si-crystal spheres, an optical interferometer is used to measure their diameter at the NMIJ. To support and complement these measurements, the effect of the Gouy phase has been studied analytically and numerically. In measurement, the sphere is placed between the end-mirrors of a Fizeau cavity and the distances between the cavity mirrors and the sphere are measured, as well as the cavity length. The present analysis outlines a model of the interferometer operation and quantifies the Gouy-phase correction in the diameter measurement.

  7. Floating behavior of hydrophobic glass spheres.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjie; Wang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yongmin; Zhou, Feng

    2009-08-15

    When a hydrophobic solid sphere is floating on water or salt solutions with different concentrations, it is at equilibrium under the impact of gravity, buoyancy force, and curvature force, the component of surface tension in the vertical direction. We have changed the diameters of the spheres and the concentrations of the two selected salts, NaCl and NaNO(3), to study the floating behaviors of these spheres and the contributions of surface tension and buoyancy force to their floatation. Generally speaking, the surface tension plays a more important role than the buoyancy force when the gravity is small, but the buoyancy force plays an identical or a more important role when the spheres are big enough. The wettability of the spheres significantly influences the height below the contact perimeter especially in salt solutions. The theoretical calculation meniscus slope angles at the sphere three-phase contact line are in agreement with experimental results.

  8. Sphere-Pac Evaluation for Transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Icenhour, A.S.

    2005-05-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) is sponsoring a project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with the objective of conducting the research and development necessary to evaluate the use of sphere-pac transmutation fuel. Sphere-pac fuels were studied extensively in the 1960s and 1970s. More recently, this fuel form is being studied internationally as a potential plutonium-burning fuel. For transmutation fuel, sphere-pac fuels have potential advantages over traditional pellet-type fuels. This report provides a review of development efforts related to the preparation of sphere-pac fuels and their irradiation tests. Based on the results of these tests, comparisons with pellet-type fuels are summarized, the advantages and disadvantages of using sphere-pac fuels are highlighted, and sphere-pac options for the AFCI are recommended. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory development activities are also outlined.

  9. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body. PMID:26189698

  10. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-07-20

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body.

  11. Mixtures of ions and amphiphilic molecules in slit-like pores: A density functional approach

    SciTech Connect

    Pizio, O.; Rżysko, W. Sokołowski, S.; Sokołowska, Z.

    2015-04-28

    We investigate microscopic structure and thermodynamic properties of a mixture that contains amphiphilic molecules and charged hard spheres confined in slit-like pores with uncharged hard walls. The model and the density functional approach are the same as described in details in our previous work [Pizio et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 174706 (2014)]. Our principal focus is in exploring the effects brought by the presence of ions on the structure of confined amphiphilic particles. We have found that for some cases of anisotropic interactions, the change of the structure of confined fluids occurs via the first-order transitions. Moreover, if anions and cations are attracted by different hemispheres of amphiphiles, a charge at the walls appears at the zero value of the wall electrostatic potential. For a given thermodynamic state, this charge is an oscillating function of the pore width.

  12. Mesoporous carbon spheres with controlled porosity for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dexian; Fu, Aiping; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Yiqian; Guo, Peizhi; Liu, Jingquan; Zhao, Xiu Song

    2015-07-01

    Mesoporous carbon (MC) spheres with hierarchical pores, controlled pore volume and high specific surface areas have been prepared by a mass-producible spray drying assisted template method using sodium alginate as carbon precursor and commercial colloidal silica particles as hard template. The resulting MC spheres, possessing hierarchical pores in the range of 3-30 nm, are employed as conductive matrices for the preparation of cathode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries. A high pressure induced one-step impregnation of elemental sulfur into the pore of the MC spheres has been exploited. The electrochemical performances of sulfur-impregnated MC spheres (S-MC) derived from MC spheres with different pore volume and specific surface area but with the same sulfur loading ratio of 60 wt% (S-MC-X-60) have been investigated in details. The S-MC-4-60 composite cathode material displayed a high initial discharge capacity of 1388 mAhg-1 and a good cycling stability of 857 mAhg-1 after 100 cycles at 0.2C, and shows also excellent rate capability of 864 mAhg-1 at 2C. More importantly, the sulfur loading content in MC-4 spheres can reach as high as 80%, and it still can deliver a capacity of 569 mAhg-1 after 100 cycles at 0.2C.

  13. Density functional theory for crystal-liquid interfaces of Lennard-Jones fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Mi, Jianguo; Zhong, Chongli

    2013-04-28

    A density functional approach is presented to describe the crystal-liquid interfaces and crystal nucleations of Lennard-Jones fluid. Within the theoretical framework, the modified fundamental measure theory is applied to describe the free energy functional of hard sphere repulsion, and the weighted density method based on first order mean spherical approximation is used to describe the free energy contribution arising from the attractive interaction. The liquid-solid equilibria, density profiles within crystal cells and at liquid-solid interfaces, interfacial tensions, nucleation free energy barriers, and critical cluster sizes are calculated for face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic nucleus. Some results are in good agreement with available simulation data, indicating that the present model is quantitatively reliable in describing nucleation thermodynamics of Lennard-Jones fluid.

  14. Microgravity and the Formation of Latex Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    This set of photographs illustrates the value of microgravity in the formation of latex spheres. The image at left shows irregular spheres produced on Earth, while the photograph at right shows uniform spheres produced during the STS-3 mission, March 22 - 30, 1982, in the Monodisperse Latex Reactor, developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and Lehigh University. The Marshall-managed MLR experiment demonstrated the feasibility of producing monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in space and their application to medicine and industry.

  15. Process for making hollow carbon spheres

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia C.; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N.; Knapp, Angela Michelle

    2013-04-16

    A hollow carbon sphere having a carbon shell and an inner core is disclosed. The hollow carbon sphere has a total volume that is equal to a volume of the carbon shell plus an inner free volume within the carbon shell. The inner free volume is at least 25% of the total volume. In some instances, a nominal diameter of the hollow carbon sphere is between 10 and 180 nanometers.

  16. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  17. Science off the Sphere: Earth in Infrared

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit views cities, agricultural areas and deserts using an infrared camera for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA...

  18. Dynamical interactions between two uniformly magnetized spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Boyd F.; Edwards, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Studies of the two-dimensional motion of a magnet sphere in the presence of a second, fixed sphere provide a convenient venue for exploring magnet-magnet interactions, inertia, friction, and rich nonlinear dynamical behavior. These studies exploit the equivalence of these magnetic interactions to the interactions between two equivalent point dipoles. We show that magnet-magnet friction plays a role when magnet spheres are in contact, table friction plays a role at large sphere separations, and eddy currents are always negligible. Web-based simulation and visualization software, called MagPhyx, is provided for education, exploration, and discovery.

  19. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1979-01-09

    Method is disclosed for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T [approx gt] 600 C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10[sup 3] [mu]m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants. 1 fig.

  20. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. [Livermore, CA

    1979-01-09

    Method for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T .gtorsim. 600.degree. C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10.sup.3 .mu.m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants.

  1. Magnetic torque on a rotating superconducting sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, L. B.

    1975-01-01

    The London theory of superconductivity is used to calculate the torque on a superconducting sphere rotating in a uniform applied magnetic field. The London theory is combined with classical electrodynamics for a calculation of the direct effect of excess charge on a rotating superconducting sphere. Classical electrodynamics, with the assumption of a perfect Meissner effect, is used to calculate the torque on a superconducting sphere rotating in an arbitrary magnetic induction; this macroscopic approach yields results which are correct to first order. Using the same approach, the torque due to a current loop encircling the rotating sphere is calculated.

  2. Small-world networks on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corso, Gilberto; Torres Cruz, Claudia P.

    2017-01-01

    The Small-World Network on a Sphere SWNS is a non-crossing network that has no hubs and presents the small-world property diam log N with diam being the maximal distance between any two vertices and N being the number of vertices. The SWNS is constructed using a partition of the sphere and the parallels are regular sections of the sphere with constant latitude. The number of cells on the parallels, however, increases exponentially from the pole to the equator of the sphere. We analytically compute the distribution of connectivity, the clustering coefficient and the SWNS distances. The resilience of the model against selective attacks is also discussed.

  3. Aperture correction for a sphere interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold Nicolaus, R.; Bönsch, Gerhard

    2009-12-01

    Considerations have been made to derive a correction for the diameter measurements of a sphere by means of a special sphere interferometer. This correction is caused by the finite diameter of the light source acting as the entrance 'pinhole' aperture in the light collimating system. The finite diameter has the effect that the wave which is incident on the sphere is a superposition of spherical waves which are slightly inclined with respect to each other. The resulting correction is essential for high accuracy dimensional measurements of silicon spheres to determine the Avogadro constant—a new determination of which is a contribution to a new definition of the kilogram.

  4. Chimera grid simulations of falling spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Thomas; Schauerhamer, Daniel

    2007-11-01

    Many applications involve modeling a system with moving objects larger than the grid, such as air pollution, combustion systems, accident simulations, chemical and agricultural processes. The chimera grid approach is an efficient approach to solve such problems. Simulations of one sphere falling under the influence of gravity and suction through an orifice will be presented. Additionally, we will demonstrate collisions between two moving spheres. In this simulation the setup is the same as in the one sphere case, but two spheres are placed side by side. Both are released to be acted upon by gravity, the suction, and each other.

  5. The Intrinsic Beauty of Polytropic Spheres in Reduced Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caimmi, Roberto

    The concept of reduced variables is revisited with regard to van der Waals' theory and an application is made to polytropic spheres, where the reduced radial coordinate is ${\\rm red}(r)=r/R=\\xi/\\Xi$, $R$ radius, and the reduced density is ${\\rm red}(\\rho)=\\rho/\\lambda=\\theta^n$, $\\lambda$ central density. Reduced density profiles are plotted for several polytropic indexes within the range, $0\\le n\\le5$, disclosing two noticeable features. First, any point of coordinates, $({\\rm red}(r),{\\rm red}(\\rho))$, $0\\le{\\rm red}(r)\\le1$, $0\\le{\\rm red}(\\rho)\\le1$, belongs to a reduced density profile of the kind considered. Second, sufficiently steep i.e. large $n$ reduced density profiles exhibit an oblique inflection point, where the threshold is found to be located at $n=n_{\\rm th}=0.888715$. Reduced pressure profiles, ${\\rm red}(P)=P/\\varpi=\\theta^{n+1}$, $\\varpi$ central pressure, Lane-Emden fucntions, $\\theta=(\\rho/\\lambda)^{1/n}$, and polytropic curves, ${\\rm red}(P)={\\rm red}(P)({\\rm red}(\\rho))$, are also plotted. The method can be extended to nonspherical polytropes with regard to a selected direction, ${\\rm red}(r)(\\mu)=r(\\mu)/R(\\mu)=\\xi(\\mu)/\\Xi(\\mu)$. The results can be extended to polytropic spheres made of collisionless particles, for polytropic index within a more restricted range, $1/2\\le n\\le5$.

  6. Molecular density functional theory for water with liquid-gas coexistence and correct pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levesque, Maximilien; Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr; Borgis, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The solvation of hydrophobic solutes in water is special because liquid and gas are almost at coexistence. In the common hypernetted chain approximation to integral equations, or equivalently in the homogenous reference fluid of molecular density functional theory, coexistence is not taken into account. Hydration structures and energies of nanometer-scale hydrophobic solutes are thus incorrect. In this article, we propose a bridge functional that corrects this thermodynamic inconsistency by introducing a metastable gas phase for the homogeneous solvent. We show how this can be done by a third order expansion of the functional around the bulk liquid density that imposes the right pressure and the correct second order derivatives. Although this theory is not limited to water, we apply it to study hydrophobic solvation in water at room temperature and pressure and compare the results to all-atom simulations. The solvation free energy of small molecular solutes like n-alkanes and hard sphere solutes whose radii range from angstroms to nanometers is now in quantitative agreement with reference all atom simulations. The macroscopic liquid-gas surface tension predicted by the theory is comparable to experiments. This theory gives an alternative to the empirical hard sphere bridge correction used so far by several authors.

  7. Molecular density functional theory for water with liquid-gas coexistence and correct pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume Levesque, Maximilien; Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr; Borgis, Daniel

    2015-04-21

    The solvation of hydrophobic solutes in water is special because liquid and gas are almost at coexistence. In the common hypernetted chain approximation to integral equations, or equivalently in the homogenous reference fluid of molecular density functional theory, coexistence is not taken into account. Hydration structures and energies of nanometer-scale hydrophobic solutes are thus incorrect. In this article, we propose a bridge functional that corrects this thermodynamic inconsistency by introducing a metastable gas phase for the homogeneous solvent. We show how this can be done by a third order expansion of the functional around the bulk liquid density that imposes the right pressure and the correct second order derivatives. Although this theory is not limited to water, we apply it to study hydrophobic solvation in water at room temperature and pressure and compare the results to all-atom simulations. The solvation free energy of small molecular solutes like n-alkanes and hard sphere solutes whose radii range from angstroms to nanometers is now in quantitative agreement with reference all atom simulations. The macroscopic liquid-gas surface tension predicted by the theory is comparable to experiments. This theory gives an alternative to the empirical hard sphere bridge correction used so far by several authors.

  8. Molecular density functional theory for water with liquid-gas coexistence and correct pressure.

    PubMed

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levesque, Maximilien; Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr; Borgis, Daniel

    2015-04-21

    The solvation of hydrophobic solutes in water is special because liquid and gas are almost at coexistence. In the common hypernetted chain approximation to integral equations, or equivalently in the homogenous reference fluid of molecular density functional theory, coexistence is not taken into account. Hydration structures and energies of nanometer-scale hydrophobic solutes are thus incorrect. In this article, we propose a bridge functional that corrects this thermodynamic inconsistency by introducing a metastable gas phase for the homogeneous solvent. We show how this can be done by a third order expansion of the functional around the bulk liquid density that imposes the right pressure and the correct second order derivatives. Although this theory is not limited to water, we apply it to study hydrophobic solvation in water at room temperature and pressure and compare the results to all-atom simulations. The solvation free energy of small molecular solutes like n-alkanes and hard sphere solutes whose radii range from angstroms to nanometers is now in quantitative agreement with reference all atom simulations. The macroscopic liquid-gas surface tension predicted by the theory is comparable to experiments. This theory gives an alternative to the empirical hard sphere bridge correction used so far by several authors.

  9. The Ewald sphere construction for radiation, scattering, and diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Yen Lee

    2017-04-01

    In most electrodynamics textbooks, the directional gain of an antenna is calculated using analytical integration, and the resulting expression is plotted as an afterthought. From a student's perspective, the analysis may be difficult, mysterious, or unrevealing. In this paper, we show that the Ewald sphere construction, a powerful tool for predicting crystallographic diffraction patterns, can also be used to help students gain direct geometrical insight into antenna radiation patterns. The radiation pattern from a sinusoidally varying current distribution can be obtained intuitively by sketching the reciprocal-space current density and examining how it behaves on an "Ewald" sphere centered at the origin. Furthermore, the nodes of the radiation pattern can be determined quantitatively by locating the intersections of the Ewald sphere with the nodes of the reciprocal-space current density. We illustrate this procedure with several examples, in the context of quantum mechanics, acoustics (sound), and electrodynamics (light). We provide an alternative formulation using the reciprocal-space polarization and magnetization, which treats loop antennas and coil antennas as easily as linear antennas. We make the connection to the original Ewald construction for scattering. We also show how the Ewald construction applies to diffraction through a planar aperture, within the Kirchhoff approximation.

  10. Can the Equivalent Sphere Model Approximate Organ Doses in Space?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2007-01-01

    For space radiation protection it is often useful to calculate dose or dose,equivalent in blood forming organs (BFO). It has been customary to use a 5cm equivalent sphere to. simulate the BFO dose. However, many previous studies have concluded that a 5cm sphere gives very different dose values from the exact BFO values. One study [1] . concludes that a 9 cm sphere is a reasonable approximation for BFO'doses in solar particle event environments. In this study we use a deterministic radiation transport [2] to investigate the reason behind these observations and to extend earlier studies. We take different space radiation environments, including seven galactic cosmic ray environments and six large solar particle events, and calculate the dose and dose equivalent in the skin, eyes and BFO using their thickness distribution functions from the CAM (Computerized Anatomical Man) model [3] The organ doses have been evaluated with a water or aluminum shielding of an areal density from 0 to 20 g/sq cm. We then compare with results from the equivalent sphere model and determine in which cases and at what radius parameters the equivalent sphere model is a reasonable approximation. Furthermore, we address why the equivalent sphere model is not a good approximation in some cases. For solar particle events, we find that the radius parameters for the organ dose equivalent increase significantly with the shielding thickness, and the model works marginally for BFO but is unacceptable for the eye or the skin. For galactic cosmic rays environments, the equivalent sphere model with an organ-specific constant radius parameter works well for the BFO dose equivalent, marginally well for the BFO dose and the dose equivalent of the eye or the skin, but is unacceptable for the dose of the eye or the skin. The ranges of the radius parameters are also being investigated, and the BFO radius parameters are found to be significantly, larger than 5 cm in all cases, consistent with the conclusion of

  11. Hardness Tester for Polyur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, D. L.; Buras, D. F.; Corbin, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Rubber-hardness tester modified for use on rigid polyurethane foam. Provides objective basis for evaluation of improvements in foam manufacturing and inspection. Typical acceptance criterion requires minimum hardness reading of 80 on modified tester. With adequate correlation tests, modified tester used to measure indirectly tensile and compressive strengths of foam.

  12. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  13. Electromagnetic energy within single-resonance chiral metamaterial spheres.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Tiago J; Pinheiro, Felipe A; Martinez, Alexandre S

    2013-06-01

    We derive an exact expression for the time-averaged electromagnetic (EM) energy inside a chiral dispersive sphere irradiated by a plane wave. The dispersion relations correspond to a chiral metamaterial consisting of uncoupled single-resonance helical resonators. Using a field decomposition scheme and a general expression for the EM energy density in bianisotropic media, we calculate the Lorenz-Mie solution for the internal fields in a medium that is simultaneously magnetic and chiral. We also obtain an explicit analytical relation between the internal EM energy and the absorption cross section. This result is applied to demonstrate that strong chirality leads to an off-resonance field enhancement within weakly absorbing spheres.

  14. Phase diagram of Hertzian spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pàmies, Josep C.; Cacciuto, Angelo; Frenkel, Daan

    2009-07-01

    We report the phase diagram of interpenetrating Hertzian spheres. The Hertz potential is purely repulsive, bounded at zero separation, and decreases monotonically as a power law with exponent 5/2, vanishing at the overlapping threshold. This simple functional describes the elastic interaction of weakly deformable bodies and, therefore, it is a reliable physical model of soft macromolecules, like star polymers and globular micelles. Using thermodynamic integration and extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we computed accurate free energies of the fluid phase and a large number of crystal structures. For this, we defined a general primitive unit cell that allows for the simulation of any lattice. We found multiple re-entrant melting and first-order transitions between crystals with cubic, trigonal, tetragonal, and hexagonal symmetries.

  15. Dynamical simulations of sedimenting spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C. )

    1993-02-01

    The sedimentation of monodisperse suspensions of rigid spheres has been studied by dynamical simulation; computational techniques are described and numerical results are reported. It has been found that there is a slow relaxation of the suspension microstructure during sedimentation, so that compared with the initial equilibrium distribution, there is an increased number of pairs of particles near contact; this leads to a 5%--10% increase in the average sedimentation velocity. Individual particle velocities fluctuate about the mean fall speed; these fluctuations are large and persist for long times. The resulting hydrodynamically induced dispersion of the particles can be characterized by strongly anisotropic diffusion coefficients; however, the dispersion process is non-Fickian at high solids concentrations.

  16. Phononic crystals of poroelastic spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alevizaki, A.; Sainidou, R.; Rembert, P.; Morvan, B.; Stefanou, N.

    2016-11-01

    An extension of the layer-multiple-scattering method to phononic crystals of poroelastic spheres immersed in a fluid medium is developed. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on specific examples of close-packed fcc crystals of submerged water-saturated meso- and macroporous silica microspheres. It is shown that, by varying the pore size and/or the porosity, the transmission, reflection, and absorption spectra of finite slabs of these crystals are significantly altered. Strong absorption, driven by the slow waves in the poroelastic material and enhanced by multiple scattering, leads to negligible transmittance over an extended frequency range, which might be useful for practical applications in broadband acoustic shielding. The results are analyzed by reference to relevant phononic dispersion diagrams in the viscous and inertial coupling limits, and a consistent interpretation of the underlying physics is provided.

  17. Structure of cylindrical electric double layers: A systematic study by Monte Carlo simulations and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Teena; Patra, Chandra N.; Ghosh, Swapan K.; Mukherjee, Tulsi

    2008-10-01

    We present a systematic study of the structure of cylindrical double layers to envisage the distribution of small ions around a cylindrical polyion through canonical Monte Carlo simulation and density functional theory. The polyion is modeled as an infinite, rigid, and impenetrable charged cylinder surrounded by charged hard spheres of equal diameter modeled for small ions of the electrolyte. The solvent is considered as dielectric continuum. The theory is partially perturbative where the hard sphere contribution to the total excess free energy is evaluated using weighted density approximation, and the ionic interactions are calculated using quadratic Taylor expansion with respect to a uniform fluid. The system is studied over a wide range of parameters, viz., ionic concentrations, valences, and ionic sizes as well as for varying axial charge densities of the polyion. The theoretical predictions are observed to be in good agreement with that of simulation results. Some interesting phenomena relating to the width of the diffuse layer, mean electrostatic potential, and charge inversion have been observed to be dependent on different parametric conditions.

  18. The "Magical" Sphere: Uncovering the Secret

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Bukleski, Miha

    2006-01-01

    A red sphere is seen at the bottom of a sealed glass tube filled with a colorless, transparent liquid. Holding the tube for a short period makes the sphere rise slowly from the bottom until it finally floats on the surface of the liquid. Instructions for preparing the demonstration are given, together with an explanation of the phenomenon. A…

  19. Efficient linear programming algorithm to generate the densest lattice sphere packings.

    PubMed

    Marcotte, Étienne; Torquato, Salvatore

    2013-06-01

    Finding the densest sphere packing in d-dimensional Euclidean space R(d) is an outstanding fundamental problem with relevance in many fields, including the ground states of molecular systems, colloidal crystal structures, coding theory, discrete geometry, number theory, and biological systems. Numerically generating the densest sphere packings becomes very challenging in high dimensions due to an exponentially increasing number of possible sphere contacts and sphere configurations, even for the restricted problem of finding the densest lattice sphere packings. In this paper we apply the Torquato-Jiao packing algorithm, which is a method based on solving a sequence of linear programs, to robustly reproduce the densest known lattice sphere packings for dimensions 2 through 19. We show that the TJ algorithm is appreciably more efficient at solving these problems than previously published methods. Indeed, in some dimensions, the former procedure can be as much as three orders of magnitude faster at finding the optimal solutions than earlier ones. We also study the suboptimal local density-maxima solutions (inherent structures or "extreme" lattices) to gain insight about the nature of the topography of the "density" landscape.

  20. Density and chain conformation profiles of square-well chains confined in a slit by density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhencheng; Cai, Jun; Liu, Honglai; Hu, Ying

    2005-11-01

    Density and chain conformation profiles of square-well chains between two parallel walls were studied by using density-functional theory. The free energy of square-well chains is separated into two contributions: the hard-sphere repulsion and the attraction. The Heaviside function is used as the weighting function for both of the two parts. The equation of state of Hu et al. is used to calculate the excess free energy of the repulsive part. The equation of state of statistical associating fluid theory for chain molecules with attractive potentials of variable range [A. Gil-Villegas et al. J. Chem. Phys. 106, 4168 (1997)] is used to calculate the excess free energy of the attractive part. Because the wall is inaccessible to a mass center of a longer chain, there exists a sharp fall in the distribution of end-to-end distance near the wall as the chain length increases. When the average density of the system is not too low, the prediction of this work is in good agreement with computer simulation results for the density profiles and the chain conformation over a wide range of chain length, temperature, and attraction strength of the walls. However, when the average density and the temperature are very low, the prediction deviates to a certain degree from the computer simulation results for molecules with long chain length. A more accurate functional approximation is needed.

  1. Magnetostriction of a sphere: stress development during magnetization and residual stresses due to the remanent field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Felix A.; Rickert, Wilhelm; Stahn, Oliver; Müller, Wolfgang H.

    2016-12-01

    Based on the principles of rational continuum mechanics and electrodynamics (see Truesdell and Toupin in Handbuch der Physik, Springer, Berlin, 1960 or Kovetz in Electromagnetic theory, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000), we present closed-form solutions for the mechanical displacements and stresses of two different magnets. Both magnets are initially of spherical shape. The first (hard) magnet is uniformly magnetized and deforms due to the field induced by the magnetization. In the second problem of a (soft) linear-magnetic sphere, the deformation is caused by an applied external field, giving rise to magnetization. Both problems can be used for modeling parts of general magnetization processes. We will address the similarities between both settings in context with the solutions for the stresses and displacements. In both problems, the volumetric uc(Lorentz) force density vanishes. However, a uc(Lorentz) surface traction is present. This traction is determined from the magnetic flux density. Since the obtained displacements and stresses are small in magnitude, we may use uc(Hooke's) law with a small-strain approximation, resulting in the uc(Lamé)-uc(Navier) equations of linear elasticity theory. If gravity is neglected and azimuthal symmetry is assumed, these equations can be solved in terms of a series. This has been done by uc(Hiramatsu) and uc(Oka) (Int J Rock Mech Min Sci Geomech Abstr 3(2):89-90, 1966) before. We make use of their series solution for the displacements and the stresses and expand the uc(Lorentz) tractions of the analyzed problems suitably in order to find the expansion coefficients. The resulting algebraic system yields finite numbers of nonvanishing coefficients. Finally, the resulting stresses, displacements, principal strains and the uc(Lorentz) tractions are illustrated and discussed.

  2. Magnetostriction of a sphere: stress development during magnetization and residual stresses due to the remanent field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Felix A.; Rickert, Wilhelm; Stahn, Oliver; Müller, Wolfgang H.

    2017-03-01

    Based on the principles of rational continuum mechanics and electrodynamics (see Truesdell and Toupin in Handbuch der Physik, Springer, Berlin, 1960 or Kovetz in Electromagnetic theory, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000), we present closed-form solutions for the mechanical displacements and stresses of two different magnets. Both magnets are initially of spherical shape. The first (hard) magnet is uniformly magnetized and deforms due to the field induced by the magnetization. In the second problem of a (soft) linear-magnetic sphere, the deformation is caused by an applied external field, giving rise to magnetization. Both problems can be used for modeling parts of general magnetization processes. We will address the similarities between both settings in context with the solutions for the stresses and displacements. In both problems, the volumetric Lorentz force density vanishes. However, a Lorentz surface traction is present. This traction is determined from the magnetic flux density. Since the obtained displacements and stresses are small in magnitude, we may use Hooke's law with a small-strain approximation, resulting in the Lamé- Navier equations of linear elasticity theory. If gravity is neglected and azimuthal symmetry is assumed, these equations can be solved in terms of a series. This has been done by Hiramatsu and Oka (Int J Rock Mech Min Sci Geomech Abstr 3(2):89-90, 1966) before. We make use of their series solution for the displacements and the stresses and expand the Lorentz tractions of the analyzed problems suitably in order to find the expansion coefficients. The resulting algebraic system yields finite numbers of nonvanishing coefficients. Finally, the resulting stresses, displacements, principal strains and the Lorentz tractions are illustrated and discussed.

  3. Feasibility of miniaturized instrumentation of the inflatable sphere for temperature, pressure and acceleration measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luers, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of instrumenting the inflatable passive sphere (presently used to provide upper atmosphere density measurements) with miniaturized thermistors, pressure transducers, and accelerometers was analyzed. Data from the sensors must be transmitted by an onboard telemetry system to a ground receiving station. To assure a sufficiently slow fall velocity for the sphere the additional mass of the sensor and telemetry hardware must be less than 100 grams. Other constraints that must be satisfied by the sensor and telemetry systems include the ability to withstand a 150 g launch acceleration, the ability to function in both high and low temperature and pressure environments and be sufficiently small to be packaged within the body of a 3.81 cm diameter dart. A differential transducer that will measure the difference between ambient and internal sphere pressures is recommended. The application of each type of measurement relative to its ability to monitor sphere malfunction and to provide additional meteorological data is considered.

  4. Experimental and theoretical study on the driving force and glass flow by laser-induced metal sphere migration in glass

    PubMed Central

    Hidai, Hirofumi; Wada, Jun; Iwamoto, Tatsuki; Matsusaka, Souta; Chiba, Akira; Kishi, Tetsuo; Morita, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Light is able to remotely move matter. Among various driving forces, laser-induced metal sphere migration in glass has been reported. The temperature on the laser-illuminated side of the sphere was higher than that on the non-illuminated side. This temperature gradient caused non-uniformity in the interfacial tension between the glass and the melted metal as the tension decreased with increasing temperature. In the present study, we investigated laser-induced metal sphere migration in different glasses using thermal flow calculations, considering the temperature dependence of the material parameters. In addition, the velocity of the glass flow generated by the metal sphere migration was measured and compared with thermal flow calculations. The migration velocity of the stainless steel sphere increased with increasing laser power density; the maximum velocity was 104 μm/s in borosilicate glass and 47 μm/s in silica glass. The sphere was heated to more than 2000 K. The temperature gradient of the interfacial tension between the stainless steel sphere and the glass was calculated to be −2.29 × 10−5 N/m/K for borosilicate glass and −2.06 × 10−5 N/m/K for silica glass. Glass flowed in the region 15–30 μm from the surface of the sphere, and the 80-μm sphere migrated in a narrow softened channel. PMID:27934897

  5. Experimental and theoretical study on the driving force and glass flow by laser-induced metal sphere migration in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidai, Hirofumi; Wada, Jun; Iwamoto, Tatsuki; Matsusaka, Souta; Chiba, Akira; Kishi, Tetsuo; Morita, Noboru

    2016-12-01

    Light is able to remotely move matter. Among various driving forces, laser-induced metal sphere migration in glass has been reported. The temperature on the laser-illuminated side of the sphere was higher than that on the non-illuminated side. This temperature gradient caused non-uniformity in the interfacial tension between the glass and the melted metal as the tension decreased with increasing temperature. In the present study, we investigated laser-induced metal sphere migration in different glasses using thermal flow calculations, considering the temperature dependence of the material parameters. In addition, the velocity of the glass flow generated by the metal sphere migration was measured and compared with thermal flow calculations. The migration velocity of the stainless steel sphere increased with increasing laser power density; the maximum velocity was 104 μm/s in borosilicate glass and 47 μm/s in silica glass. The sphere was heated to more than 2000 K. The temperature gradient of the interfacial tension between the stainless steel sphere and the glass was calculated to be -2.29 × 10-5 N/m/K for borosilicate glass and -2.06 × 10-5 N/m/K for silica glass. Glass flowed in the region 15-30 μm from the surface of the sphere, and the 80-μm sphere migrated in a narrow softened channel.

  6. Hard Constraints in Optimization Under Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Giesy, Daniel P.; Kenny, Sean P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology for the analysis and design of systems subject to parametric uncertainty where design requirements are specified via hard inequality constraints. Hard constraints are those that must be satisfied for all parameter realizations within a given uncertainty model. Uncertainty models given by norm-bounded perturbations from a nominal parameter value, i.e., hyper-spheres, and by sets of independently bounded uncertain variables, i.e., hyper-rectangles, are the focus of this paper. These models, which are also quite practical, allow for a rigorous mathematical treatment within the proposed framework. Hard constraint feasibility is determined by sizing the largest uncertainty set for which the design requirements are satisfied. Analytically verifiable assessments of robustness are attained by comparing this set with the actual uncertainty model. Strategies that enable the comparison of the robustness characteristics of competing design alternatives, the description and approximation of the robust design space, and the systematic search for designs with improved robustness are also proposed. Since the problem formulation is generic and the tools derived only require standard optimization algorithms for their implementation, this methodology is applicable to a broad range of engineering problems.

  7. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  8. Radiation from hard objects

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-02-01

    The inference of the diameter of hard objects is insensitive to radiation efficiency. Deductions of radiation efficiency from observations are very sensitive - possibly overly so. Inferences of the initial velocity and trajectory vary similarly, and hence are comparably sensitive.

  9. A strategy for sampling on a sphere applied to 3D selective RF pulse design.

    PubMed

    Wong, S T; Roos, M S

    1994-12-01

    Conventional constant angular velocity sampling of the surface of a sphere results in a higher sampling density near the two poles relative to the equatorial region. More samples, and hence longer sampling time, are required to achieve a given sampling density in the equatorial region when compared with uniform sampling. This paper presents a simple expression for a continuous sample path through a nearly uniform distribution of points on the surface of a sphere. Sampling of concentric spherical shells in k-space with the new strategy is used to design 3D selective inversion and spin-echo pulses. These new 3D selective pulses have been implemented and verified experimentally.

  10. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    DOE PAGES

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; ...

    2016-03-04

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space $M$ is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail $N$ = (2; 2) and $N$ = (0; 2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and $N$ = 2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads tomore » new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is K ahler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing K ahler class. For $N$ = (2; 2) theories in d = 2 and N = 2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the K ahler potential of $M$ follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Ultimately, along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.« less

  11. Anomalies, conformal manifolds, and spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gomis, Jaume; Hsin, Po-Shen; Komargodski, Zohar; Schwimmer, Adam; Seiberg, Nathan; Theisen, Stefan

    2016-03-04

    The two-point function of exactly marginal operators leads to a universal contribution to the trace anomaly in even dimensions. We study aspects of this trace anomaly, emphasizing its interpretation as a sigma model, whose target space $M$ is the space of conformal field theories (a.k.a. the conformal manifold). When the underlying quantum field theory is supersymmetric, this sigma model has to be appropriately supersymmetrized. As examples, we consider in some detail $N$ = (2; 2) and $N$ = (0; 2) supersymmetric theories in d = 2 and $N$ = 2 supersymmetric theories in d = 4. This reasoning leads to new information about the conformal manifolds of these theories, for example, we show that the manifold is K ahler-Hodge and we further argue that it has vanishing K ahler class. For $N$ = (2; 2) theories in d = 2 and N = 2 theories in d = 4 we also show that the relation between the sphere partition function and the K ahler potential of $M$ follows immediately from the appropriate sigma models that we construct. Ultimately, along the way we find several examples of potential trace anomalies that obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions, but can be ruled out by a more detailed analysis.

  12. Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Porous ZrO2 and hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized from a strong acid cation exchange resin. Spherical cation exchange beads, polystyrene based polymer, were used as a morphological-directing template. Aqueous ion exchange reaction was used to chemically bind (ZrO)(2+) ions to the polystyrene structure. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene at 600 C produces porous ZrO2 spheres with a surface area of 24 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 42 microns. Hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized by using the beads as a micro-reactor. A direct surface reaction - between titanium isopropoxide and the resin beads forms a hydrous TiO2 shell around the polystyrene core. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene core at 600 C produces hollow anatase spheres with a surface area of 42 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 38 microns. The formation of ceramic spheres was studied by XRD, SEM and B.E.T. nitrogen adsorption measurements.

  13. Radiation Hard AlGaN Detectors and Imager

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-01

    Radiation hardness of AlGaN photodiodes was tested using a 65 MeV proton beam with a total proton fluence of 3x10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2}. AlGaN Deep UV Photodiode have extremely high radiation hardness. These new devices have mission critical applications in high energy density physics (HEDP) and space explorations. These new devices satisfy radiation hardness requirements by NIF. NSTec is developing next generation AlGaN optoelectronics and imagers.

  14. Superelastic carbon spheres under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meifen; Guo, Junjie; Xu, Bingshe

    2013-03-01

    We report a superelastic deformation behavior of carbon spheres by the in situ Raman spectroscopy in a high-pressure diamond anvil cell. The carbon spheres produced by arc discharging in toluene have a mean diameter of 200 nm and an onion-like multilayer graphitic structure. We find that the elastic coefficients, during both the compression and decompression processes, remain a constant up to 10 GPa, indicating a superior high-pressure structural stability. Such superelastic behavior is related to the isotropic and concentric configuration of carbon spheres and provides additional insight into improving the microscopic mechanical properties of small-scale particles.

  15. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, B.W.; Willenborg, D.L.

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator is disclosed which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern. 8 figs.

  16. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, Berthold W. [Livermore, CA; Willenborg, David L. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern.

  17. Charged-current reactions in the supernova neutrino-sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rrapaj, Ermal; Holt, J. W.; Bartl, Alexander; Reddy, Sanjay; Schwenk, A.

    2015-03-01

    We calculate neutrino absorption rates due to charged-current reactions νe+n →e-+p and ν¯e+p →e++n in the outer regions of a newly born neutron star called the neutrino-sphere. To improve on recent work which has shown that nuclear mean fields enhance the νe cross section and suppress the ν¯e cross section, we employ realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions that fit measured scattering phase shifts. Using these interactions we calculate the momentum-, density-, and temperature-dependent nucleon self-energies in the Hartree-Fock approximation. A potential derived from chiral effective field theory and a pseudopotential constructed to reproduce nucleon-nucleon phase shifts at the mean-field level are used to study the equilibrium proton fraction and charged-current rates. We compare our results to earlier calculations obtained using phenomenological mean-field models and to those obtained in the virial expansion valid at low density and high temperature. In the virial regime our results are consistent with previous calculations, and at higher densities relevant for the neutrino-sphere, ρ ≳1012 g/cm 3, we find the difference between the νe and ν¯e absorption rates to be larger than predicted earlier. Our results may have implications for heavy-element nucleosynthesis in supernovae, and for supernova neutrino detection.

  18. Unification of dynamic density functional theory for colloidal fluids to include inertia and hydrodynamic interactions: derivation and numerical experiments.

    PubMed

    Goddard, B D; Nold, A; Savva, N; Yatsyshin, P; Kalliadasis, S

    2013-01-23

    Starting from the Kramers equation for the phase-space dynamics of the N-body probability distribution, we derive a dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) for colloidal fluids including the effects of inertia and hydrodynamic interactions (HI). We compare the resulting theory to extensive Langevin dynamics simulations for both hard rod systems and three-dimensional hard sphere systems with radially symmetric external potentials. As well as demonstrating the accuracy of the new DDFT, by comparing with previous DDFTs which neglect inertia, HI, or both, we also scrutinize the significance of including these effects. Close to local equilibrium we derive a continuum equation from the microscopic dynamics which is a generalized Navier-Stokes-like equation with additional non-local terms governing the effects of HI. For the overdamped limit we recover analogues of existing configuration-space DDFTs but with a novel diffusion tensor.

  19. Electric Double-Layer Structure in Primitive Model Electrolytes. Comparing Molecular Dynamics with Local-Density Approximations

    DOE PAGES

    Giera, Brian; Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Henson, Neil; ...

    2015-02-27

    We evaluate the accuracy of local-density approximations (LDAs) using explicit molecular dynamics simulations of binary electrolytes comprised of equisized ions in an implicit solvent. The Bikerman LDA, which considers ions to occupy a lattice, poorly captures excluded volume interactions between primitive model ions. Instead, LDAs based on the Carnahan–Starling (CS) hard-sphere equation of state capture simulated values of ideal and excess chemical potential profiles extremely well, as is the relationship between surface charge density and electrostatic potential. Excellent agreement between the EDL capacitances predicted by CS-LDAs and computed in molecular simulations is found even in systems where ion correlations drivemore » strong density and free charge oscillations within the EDL, despite the inability of LDAs to capture the oscillations in the detailed EDL profiles.« less

  20. Electric Double-Layer Structure in Primitive Model Electrolytes. Comparing Molecular Dynamics with Local-Density Approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Giera, Brian; Henson, Neil; Kober, Edward M.; Shell, M. Scott; Squires, Todd M.

    2015-02-27

    We evaluate the accuracy of local-density approximations (LDAs) using explicit molecular dynamics simulations of binary electrolytes comprised of equisized ions in an implicit solvent. The Bikerman LDA, which considers ions to occupy a lattice, poorly captures excluded volume interactions between primitive model ions. Instead, LDAs based on the Carnahan–Starling (CS) hard-sphere equation of state capture simulated values of ideal and excess chemical potential profiles extremely well, as is the relationship between surface charge density and electrostatic potential. Excellent agreement between the EDL capacitances predicted by CS-LDAs and computed in molecular simulations is found even in systems where ion correlations drive strong density and free charge oscillations within the EDL, despite the inability of LDAs to capture the oscillations in the detailed EDL profiles.

  1. Elastodynamic cloaking and field enhancement for soft spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diatta, Andre; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2016-11-01

    We propose a spherical cloak described by a non-singular asymmetric elasticity tensor {C} depending upon a small parameter η, that defines the softness of a region one would like to conceal from elastodynamic waves. By varying η, we generate a class of soft spheres dressed by elastodynamic cloaks, which are shown to considerably reduce the scattering of the soft spheres. Importantly, such cloaks also provide some wave protection except for a countable set of frequencies, for which some large elastic field enhancement can be observed within the soft spheres. Through an investigation of trapped modes in elasticity, we supply a good approximation of such Mie-type resonances by some transcendental equation. Our results, unlike previous studies that focused merely on the invisibility aspects, shed light on potential pitfalls of elastodynamic cloaks for earthquake protection designed via geometric transforms: a seismic cloak needs to be designed in such a way that its inner resonances differ from eigenfrequencies of the building one wishes to protect. In order to circumvent this downfall of field enhancement inside the cloaked area, we introduce a novel generation of cloaks, named here, mixed cloaks. Such mixed cloaks consist of a shell that detours incoming waves, hence creating an invisibility region, and of a perfectly matched layer (PML, located at the inner boundary of the cloaks) that absorbs residual wave energy in such a way that aforementioned resonances in the soft sphere are strongly attenuated. The designs of mixed cloaks with a non-singular elasticity tensor combined with an inner PML and non-vanishing density bring seismic cloaks one step closer to a practical implementation. Note in passing that the concept of mixed cloaks also applies in the case of singular cloaks and can be translated in other wave areas for a similar purpose (i.e. to smear down inner resonances within the invisibility region).

  2. Probing heterogeneous dynamics from spatial density correlation in glass-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Wei; Zhu, You-Liang; Sun, Zhao-Yan

    2016-12-01

    We numerically investigate the connection between spatial density correlation and dynamical heterogeneity in glass-forming liquids. We demonstrate that the cluster size defined by the spatial aggregation of densely packed particles (DPPs) can better capture the difference between the dynamics of the Lennard-Jones glass model and the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen truncation model than the commonly used pair correlation functions. More interestingly, we compare the mobility of DPPs and loosely packed particles, and we find that high local density correlates well with slow dynamics in systems with relatively hard repulsive interactions but links to mobile ones in the system with soft repulsive interactions at one relaxation time scale. Our results show clear evidence that the above model dependence behavior stems from the hopping motion of DPPs at the end of the caging stage due to the compressive nature of soft repulsive spheres, which activates the dynamics of DPPs in the α relaxation stage.

  3. Ordering of amphiphilic Janus particles at planar walls: a density functional study.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Gerald; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2011-04-21

    We investigate the structure formation of amphiphilic molecules at planar walls using density functional theory. The molecules are modeled as (hard) spheres composed of a hydrophilic and hydrophobic part. The orientation of the resulting Janus particles is described as a vector representing an internal degree of freedom. Our density functional approach involves fundamental measure theory combined with a mean-field approximation for the anisotropic interaction. Considering neutral, hydrophilic, and hydrophobic walls, we study the adsorption of the particles, focusing on the competition between the surface field and the interaction-induced ordering phenomena. Finally, we consider systems confined between two planar walls. It is shown that the anisotropic Janus interaction yields pronounced frustration effects at low temperatures.

  4. Electrical double layers and differential capacitance in molten salts from density functional theory

    DOE PAGES

    Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Halligan, Deaglan O.; Parks, Michael L.

    2014-08-05

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the structure of the electrical double layer and the differential capacitance of model molten salts. The DFT is shown to give good qualitative agreement with Monte Carlo simulations in the molten salt regime. The DFT is then applied to three common molten salts, KCl, LiCl, and LiKCl, modeled as charged hard spheres near a planar charged surface. The DFT predicts strong layering of the ions near the surface, with the oscillatory density profiles extending to larger distances for larger electrostatic interactions resulting from either lower temperature or lower dielectric constant. Inmore » conclusion, overall the differential capacitance is found to be bell-shaped, in agreement with recent theories and simulations for ionic liquids and molten salts, but contrary to the results of the classical Gouy-Chapman theory.« less

  5. Electrical double layers and differential capacitance in molten salts from density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Halligan, Deaglan O.; Parks, Michael L.

    2014-08-05

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the structure of the electrical double layer and the differential capacitance of model molten salts. The DFT is shown to give good qualitative agreement with Monte Carlo simulations in the molten salt regime. The DFT is then applied to three common molten salts, KCl, LiCl, and LiKCl, modeled as charged hard spheres near a planar charged surface. The DFT predicts strong layering of the ions near the surface, with the oscillatory density profiles extending to larger distances for larger electrostatic interactions resulting from either lower temperature or lower dielectric constant. In conclusion, overall the differential capacitance is found to be bell-shaped, in agreement with recent theories and simulations for ionic liquids and molten salts, but contrary to the results of the classical Gouy-Chapman theory.

  6. Separate spheres and indirect benefits

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Dan W

    2003-01-01

    On any plausible account of the basis for health care resource prioritization, the benefits and costs of different alternative resource uses are relevant considerations in the prioritization process. Consequentialists hold that the maximization of benefits with available resources is the only relevant consideration. Non-consequentialists do not reject the relevance of consequences of benefits and costs, but insist that other considerations, and in particular the distribution of benefits and costs, are morally important as well. Whatever one's particular account of morally justified standards for the prioritization of different health interventions, we must be able to measure those interventions' benefits and costs. There are many theoretical and practical difficulties in that measurement, such as how to weigh extending life against improving health and quality of life as well as how different quality of life improvements should be valued, but they are not my concern here. This paper addresses two related issues in assessing benefits and costs for health resource prioritization. First, should benefits be restricted only to health benefits, or include as well other non health benefits such as economic benefits to employers from reducing the lost work time due to illness of their employees? I shall call this the Separate Spheres problem. Second, should only the direct benefits, such as extending life or reducing disability, and direct costs, such as costs of medical personnel and supplies, of health interventions be counted, or should other indirect benefits and costs be counted as well? I shall call this the Indirect Benefits problem. These two issues can have great importance for a ranking of different health interventions by either a cost/benefit or cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) standard. PMID:12773217

  7. Science off the Sphere: Knitting Needles

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit uses knitting needles and water droplets to demonstrate physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between N...

  8. Science off the Sphere: Lenses and Vortices

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  9. StenniSphere reopens after Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    StenniSphere reopened Jan. 18, 2006, almost five months after Hurricane Katrina damaged the basement of the building that houses the visitor center. Thanks to the staff's careful preparations before the storm, no artifacts or exhibits were harmed.

  10. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  11. Science off the Sphere: Thin Film Physics

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  12. #4 Simulated Solar Sphere from Data - Interpolated

    NASA Video Gallery

    Rotating solar sphere made from a combination of imagery from the two STEREO spacecraft, together with simultaneous data from the Solar Dynamic Observatory.This movie is made from data taken on Jan...

  13. Elastic spheres can walk on water

    PubMed Central

    Belden, Jesse; Hurd, Randy C.; Jandron, Michael A.; Bower, Allan F.; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2016-01-01

    Incited by public fascination and engineering application, water-skipping of rigid stones and spheres has received considerable study. While these objects can be coaxed to ricochet, elastic spheres demonstrate superior water-skipping ability, but little is known about the effect of large material compliance on water impact physics. Here we show that upon water impact, very compliant spheres naturally assume a disk-like geometry and dynamic orientation that are favourable for water-skipping. Experiments and numerical modelling reveal that the initial spherical shape evolves as elastic waves propagate through the material. We find that the skipping dynamics are governed by the wave propagation speed and by the ratio of material shear modulus to hydrodynamic pressure. With these insights, we explain why softer spheres skip more easily than stiffer ones. Our results advance understanding of fluid-elastic body interaction during water impact, which could benefit inflatable craft modelling and, more playfully, design of elastic aquatic toys. PMID:26842860

  14. Broadband and wide-angle light harvesting by ultra-thin silicon solar cells with partially embedded dielectric spheres.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenhai; Shang, Aixue; Qin, Linling; Zhan, Yaohui; Zhang, Cheng; Gao, Pingqi; Ye, Jichun; Li, Xiaofeng

    2016-04-01

    We propose a design of crystalline silicon thin-film solar cells (c-Si TFSCs, 2 μm-thick) configured with partially embedded dielectric spheres on the light-injecting side. The intrinsic light trapping and photoconversion are simulated by the complete optoelectronic simulation. It shows that the embedding depth of the spheres provides an effective way to modulate and significantly enhance the optical absorption. Compared to the conventional planar and front sphere systems, the optimized partially embedded sphere design enables a broadband, wide-angle, and strong optical absorption and efficient carrier transportation. Optoelectronic simulation predicts that a 2 μm-thick c-Si TFSC with half-embedded spheres shows an increment of more than 10  mA/cm2 in short-circuit current density and an enhancement ratio of more than 56% in light-conversion efficiency, compared to the conventional planar counterparts.

  15. Strip-Pattern-Spheres Self-Assembled from Polypeptide-Based Polymer Mixtures: Structure and Defect Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xingyu; Guan, Zhou; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua

    2016-07-01

    We found that poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PBLG-b-PEG) rod-coil block copolymers and polystyrene (PS) homopolymers can cooperatively self-assemble into nano-spheres with striped patterns on their surfaces (strip-pattern-spheres) in aqueous solution. With assistance of dissipative particle dynamics simulation, it is discovered that the PS homopolymers form a spherical template core and the PBLG-b-PEG block copolymers assemble into striped patterns on the spherical surface. The hydrophobic PBLG rods are packed orderly in the strips, while the hydrophilic PEG blocks stabilize the strip-pattern-spheres in solution. Defects such as dislocations and disclinations can be observed in the striped patterns. Self-assembling temperature and sphere radius are found to affect defect densities in the striped patterns. A possible mechanism is proposed to illustrate how PBLG-b-PEG and PS cooperatively self-assemble into hierarchical spheres with striped patterns on surfaces.

  16. Laminar Flow past a Rotating Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongjoo; Choi, Haecheon

    2000-11-01

    In this study, laminar flow past a rotating sphere is numerically investigated to understand the effect of the streamwise rotation on the flow characteristics behind a sphere. The present numerical method is based on a newly developed immersed boundary method in a cylindrical coordinate. Numerical simulations are performed at Re =100, 250 and 300 in the range of 0 <= ω^* <= 1.0, where ω^* is the maximum circumferential speed at the sphere surface normalized by the free-stream velocity. At ω^*=0 (without rotation), the flow past a sphere experiences steady axisymmetry, steady plane-symmetry, and unsteady plane-symmetry, respectively, at Re =100, 250 and 300. When the rotational speed increases, the drag increases for all the Reynolds numbers investigated, whereas the lift shows a non-monotonic behavior depending on the Reynolds number. At Re =100, the flow past a sphere shows steady axisymmetry for all the rotational speeds considered and thus the lift is zero. On the other hand, at Re =250 and 300, the flow becomes unsteady with rotation. With increasing rotational speed, the lift first decreases and then increases, showing a local minimum of lift at a specific rotational speed. The three-dimensional vortical structures behind a sphere are significantly modified by the streamwise rotation. For example, the vortical structures at Re =300 are completely changed and phase locked with rotation at ω^*=0.6.

  17. Inverse Magnus effect on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooha; Park, Hyungmin; Choi, Haecheon; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the flow characteristics of rotating spheres in the subcritical Reynolds number (Re) regime by measuring the drag and lift forces on the sphere and the two-dimensional velocity in the wake. The experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel at Re = 0 . 6 ×105 - 2 . 6 ×105 and the spin ratio (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of 0 (no spin) - 0.5. The drag coefficient on a stationary sphere remains nearly constant at around 0.52. However, the magnitude of lift coefficient is nearly zero at Re < 2 . 0 ×105 , but rapidly increases to 0.3 and then remains constant with further increasing Reynolds number. On the other hand, with rotation, the lift coefficient shows negative values, called inverse Magnus effect, depending on the magnitudes of the Reynolds number and spin ratio. The velocity field measured from a particle image velocimetry (PIV) indicates that non-zero lift coefficient on a stationary sphere at Re > 2 . 0 ×105 results from the asymmetry of separation line, whereas the inverse Magnus effect for the rotating sphere results from the differences in the boundary-layer growth and separation along the upper and lower sphere surfaces. Supported by the WCU, Converging Research Center and Priority Research Centers Program, NRF, MEST, Korea.

  18. Surface modification and characterization of carbon spheres by grafting polyelectrolyte brushes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Modified carbon spheres (CSPBs) were obtained by grafting poly(diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride) (p-DMDAAC) on the surface of carbon spheres (CSs). It can be viewed as a kind of cation spherical polyelectrolyte brushes (CSPBs), which consist of carbon spheres as core and polyelectrolytes as shell. The method of synthesizing carbon spheres was hydrothermal reaction. Before the polyelectrolyte brushes were grafted, azo initiator [4,4′-Azobis(4-cyanovaleric acyl chloride)] was attached to the carbon spheres' surface through hydroxyl groups. CSPBs were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), conductivity meter, and system zeta potential. The results showed that compared with carbon spheres, the conductivity and zeta potential on CSPBs increased from 9.98 to 49.24 μS/cm and 11.6 to 42.5 mV, respectively, after the polyelectrolyte brushes were grafted. The colloidal stability in water was enhanced, and at the same time, the average diameter of the CSPBs was found to be 173 nm, and the average molecular weight and grafted density of the grafted polyelectrolyte brushes were 780,138 g/mol and 4.026 × 109/nm2, respectively. PMID:24948900

  19. Mimicking static anisotropic fluid spheres in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Ngampitipan, Tritos; Visser, Matt

    2016-11-01

    We argue that an arbitrary general relativistic static anisotropic fluid sphere, (static and spherically symmetric but with transverse pressure not equal to radial pressure), can nevertheless be successfully mimicked by suitable linear combinations of theoretically attractive and quite simple classical matter: a classical (charged) isotropic perfect fluid, a classical electromagnetic field and a classical (minimally coupled) scalar field. While the most general decomposition is not unique, a preferred minimal decomposition can be constructed that is unique. We show how the classical energy conditions for the anisotropic fluid sphere can be related to energy conditions for the isotropic perfect fluid, electromagnetic field, and scalar field components of the model. Furthermore, we show how this decomposition relates to the distribution of both electric charge density and scalar charge density throughout the model. The generalized TOV equation implies that the perfect fluid component in this model is automatically in internal equilibrium, with pressure forces, electric forces, and scalar forces balancing the gravitational pseudo-force. Consequently, we can build theoretically attractive matter models that can be used to mimic almost any static spherically symmetric spacetime.

  20. Model-Based Visual Self-localization Using Gaussian Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Aguirre, David; Asfour, Tamim; Bayro-Corrochano, Eduardo; Dillmann, Ruediger

    A novel model-based approach for global self-localization using active stereo vision and density Gaussian spheres is presented. The proposed object recognition components deliver noisy percept subgraphs, which are filtered and fused into an ego-centered reference frame. In subsequent stages, the required vision-to-model associations are extracted by selecting ego-percept subsets in order to prune and match the corresponding world-model subgraph. Ideally, these coupled subgraphs hold necessary information to obtain the model-to-world transformation, i.e., the pose of the robot. However, the estimation of the pose is not robust due to the uncertainties introduced when recovering Euclidean metric from images and during the mapping from the camera to the ego-center. The approach models the uncertainty of the percepts with a radial normal distribution. This formulation allows a closed-form solution which not only derives the maximal density position depicting the optimal ego-center but also ensures the solution even in situations where pure geometric spheres might not intersect.

  1. Random Packings Of Rod-Sphere Mixtures Simulated By Mechanical Contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrylyuk, Andriy V.; Wouterse, Alan; Philipse, Albert P.

    2009-06-01

    We study the random close packing of a binary mixture of spheres and rod-like particles (spherocylinders) by the mechanical contraction computer simulation. We investigate the universality in packing of near-spheres by monitoring the position and the value of the maximum in the mixture packing density as a function of the mixture composition and the rod aspect ratio. We find that independently of the mixture composition the particles pack more efficiently/densely as the rod aspect ratio is perturbed slightly from zero and the maximum density is always reached at one unique rod aspect ratio of about 0.45. The dependence of the value of the maximum packing fraction on the mixture composition (the relative rod volume fraction) is linear, exhibiting some ideality in packing of near-spheres. This counter-intuitive finding suggests that even for high rod concentrations in a rod-sphere mixture the packing is governed by local contacts between the neighboring particles, which is usually observed for dilute colloidal suspensions and granular gases, where there is no correlation between the particles. The plausible explanation for this intriguing behavior is that the correlations between the particles are completely lost in the range of distances of several particle diameters, which can be originated from the decoupling of the orientational and translational degrees of freedom of the nearly spherical rods. This gives rise to the universality and locality of random close packing of the rod-sphere mixtures.

  2. High-performance carbon nanotube-implanted mesoporous carbon spheres for supercapacitors with low series resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Bin; Chen, Xiaohua; Guo, Kaimin; Xu, Longshan; Chen, Chuansheng; Yan, Haimei; Chen, Jianghua

    2011-11-15

    Research highlights: {yields} CNTs-implanted porous carbon spheres are prepared by using gelatin as soft template. {yields} Homogeneously distributed CNTs form a well-develop network in carbon spheres. {yields} CNTs act as a reinforcing backbone assisting the formation of pore structure. {yields} CNTs improve electrical conductivity and specific capacitance of supercapacitor. -- Abstract: Carbon nanotube-implanted mesoporous carbon spheres were prepared by an easy polymerization-induced colloid aggregation method using gelatin as a soft template. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements reveal that the materials are mesoporous carbon spheres, with a diameter of {approx}0.5-1.0 {mu}m, a specific surface area of 284 m{sup 2}/g and average pore size of 3.9 nm. Using the carbon nanotube-implanted mesoporous carbon spheres as electrode material for supercapacitors in an aqueous electrolyte solution, a low equivalent series resistance of 0.83 {Omega} cm{sup 2} and a maximum specific capacitance of 189 F/g with a measured power density of 8.7 kW/kg at energy density of 6.6 Wh/kg are obtained.

  3. Budgeting in Hard Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrino, Frank M.

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with school board members and administrators produced a list of suggestions for balancing a budget in hard times. Among these are changing calendars and schedules to reduce heating and cooling costs; sharing personnel; rescheduling some extracurricular activities; and forming cooperative agreements with other districts. (MLF)

  4. Running in Hard Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    Roberta Stevens and Kent Oliver are campaigning hard for the presidency of the American Library Association (ALA). Stevens is outreach projects and partnerships officer at the Library of Congress. Oliver is executive director of the Stark County District Library in Canton, Ohio. They have debated, discussed, and posted web sites, Facebook pages,…

  5. CSI: Hard Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Acting on information from students who reported seeing a classmate looking at inappropriate material on a school computer, school officials used forensics software to plunge the depths of the PC's hard drive, searching for evidence of improper activity. Images were found in a deleted Internet Explorer cache as well as deleted file space.…

  6. Terminal energy distribution of blast waves from bursting spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, A. A.; Strehlow, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The calculation results for the total energy delivered to the surroundings by the burst of an idealized massless sphere containing an ideal gas are presented. The logic development of various formulas for sphere energy is also presented. For all types of sphere bursts the fraction of the total initial energy available in the sphere that is delivered to the surroundings is shown to lie between that delivered for the constant pressure addition of energy to a source region and that delivered by isentropic expansion of the sphere. The relative value of E sub/Q increases at fixed sphere pressure/surrounding pressure as sphere temperature increases because the velocity of sound increases.

  7. The Separate Spheres Model of Gendered Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrea L.; Borgida, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Research on role congruity theory and descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes has established that when men and women violate gender stereotypes by crossing spheres, with women pursuing career success and men contributing to domestic labor, they face backlash and economic penalties. Less is known, however, about the types of individuals who are most likely to engage in these forms of discrimination and the types of situations in which this is most likely to occur. We propose that psychological research will benefit from supplementing existing research approaches with an individual differences model of support for separate spheres for men and women. This model allows psychologists to examine individual differences in support for separate spheres as they interact with situational and contextual forces. The separate spheres ideology (SSI) has existed as a cultural idea for many years but has not been operationalized or modeled in social psychology. The Separate Spheres Model presents the SSI as a new psychological construct characterized by individual differences and a motivated system-justifying function, operationalizes the ideology with a new scale measure, and models the ideology as a predictor of some important gendered outcomes in society. As a first step toward developing the Separate Spheres Model, we develop a new measure of individuals’ endorsement of the SSI and demonstrate its reliability, convergent validity, and incremental predictive validity. We provide support for the novel hypotheses that the SSI predicts attitudes regarding workplace flexibility accommodations, income distribution within families between male and female partners, distribution of labor between work and family spheres, and discriminatory workplace behaviors. Finally, we provide experimental support for the hypothesis that the SSI is a motivated, system-justifying ideology. PMID:26800454

  8. The Separate Spheres Model of Gendered Inequality.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrea L; Borgida, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Research on role congruity theory and descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes has established that when men and women violate gender stereotypes by crossing spheres, with women pursuing career success and men contributing to domestic labor, they face backlash and economic penalties. Less is known, however, about the types of individuals who are most likely to engage in these forms of discrimination and the types of situations in which this is most likely to occur. We propose that psychological research will benefit from supplementing existing research approaches with an individual differences model of support for separate spheres for men and women. This model allows psychologists to examine individual differences in support for separate spheres as they interact with situational and contextual forces. The separate spheres ideology (SSI) has existed as a cultural idea for many years but has not been operationalized or modeled in social psychology. The Separate Spheres Model presents the SSI as a new psychological construct characterized by individual differences and a motivated system-justifying function, operationalizes the ideology with a new scale measure, and models the ideology as a predictor of some important gendered outcomes in society. As a first step toward developing the Separate Spheres Model, we develop a new measure of individuals' endorsement of the SSI and demonstrate its reliability, convergent validity, and incremental predictive validity. We provide support for the novel hypotheses that the SSI predicts attitudes regarding workplace flexibility accommodations, income distribution within families between male and female partners, distribution of labor between work and family spheres, and discriminatory workplace behaviors. Finally, we provide experimental support for the hypothesis that the SSI is a motivated, system-justifying ideology.

  9. Self‐Templated Synthesis of Ultrathin Nanosheets Constructed TiO2 Hollow Spheres with High Electrochemical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Huiqi; Hu, Linfeng; Wu, Feilong; Chen, Min

    2016-01-01

    TiO2 is well‐known nanomaterials and mostly used as solid nanoparticles, and normal hollow spheres for photocatalysts or electrode materials. In this study, a novel self‐templated method is presented to successfully fabricate high‐surface‐area ultrathin nanosheets constructed TiO2 hollow spheres through the solvothermal treatment of the titanate–silicone composite particles combined with calcination. The uniquely structured hollow spheres exhibit excellent rate capability and good cycle stability even at a high current density of ≈10 C for the anode material of Li‐ion battery. PMID:27980991

  10. Self-Templated Synthesis of Ultrathin Nanosheets Constructed TiO2 Hollow Spheres with High Electrochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huiqi; Hu, Linfeng; Wu, Feilong; Chen, Min; Wu, Limin

    2016-11-01

    TiO2 is well-known nanomaterials and mostly used as solid nanoparticles, and normal hollow spheres for photocatalysts or electrode materials. In this study, a novel self-templated method is presented to successfully fabricate high-surface-area ultrathin nanosheets constructed TiO2 hollow spheres through the solvothermal treatment of the titanate-silicone composite particles combined with calcination. The uniquely structured hollow spheres exhibit excellent rate capability and good cycle stability even at a high current density of ≈10 C for the anode material of Li-ion battery.

  11. Stability of orientationally disordered crystal structures of colloidal hard dumbbells.

    PubMed

    Marechal, Matthieu; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2008-06-01

    We study the stability of orientationally disordered crystal phases in a suspension of colloidal hard dumbbells using Monte Carlo simulations. For dumbbell bond length L/sigma<0.4 with L the separation of the two spheres of the dumbbell and sigma the diameter of the spheres, we determine the difference in Helmholtz free energy of a plastic crystal with a hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) and a face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure using thermodynamic integration and the lattice-switch Monte Carlo method. We find that the plastic crystal with the hcp structure is more stable than the one with the fcc structure for a large part of the stable plastic crystal regime. In addition, we study the stability of an orientationally disordered aperiodic crystal structure in which the spheres of the dumbbells are on a random-hexagonal-close-packed lattice, and the dumbbells are formed by taking random pairs of neighboring spheres. Using free-energy calculations, we determine the fluid-aperiodic crystal and periodic-aperiodic crystal coexistence regions for L/sigma>0.88 .

  12. Recent researches on the air resistance of spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachsbart, O

    1928-01-01

    The following conclusions on air resistance of spheres are drawn: 1) disturbances in front of the sphere and even single fine wires affect the critical Reynolds Number; 2) disturbances around the sphere increased the drag of the sphere without martially affecting the value of the Reynolds Number(sub crith); 3) great disturbances of the boundary layer of the sphere likewise change R.N.(sub crith); 4) turbulence of the approaching air stream lowers critical R.N.

  13. Water exit dynamics of buoyant spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Epps, Brenden P.; Munns, Randy H.

    2016-11-01

    Buoyant spheres released below the free surface can rise well above the surface in a phenomenon known as pop-up. Contrary to intuition, increasing the release depth sometimes results in a lower pop-up height. We present the pop-up height of rising buoyant spheres over a range of release depths (1-12.5 diameters) and Reynolds numbers (4 ×104 to 6 ×105 ). While the dynamics of rising buoyant spheres and bubbles has been thoroughly investigated for Reynolds numbers below 104, pop-up in these larger-Reynolds-number regimes has not been studied. Yet the underwater motions of the sphere for the Reynolds numbers we study are the key to understanding the pop-up height. Two major regimes are apparent: vertical and oscillatory. The vertical regime exhibits a nearly vertical underwater trajectory and results in the largest pop-up heights. The oscillatory regime exhibits an underwater trajectory with periodic lateral motions and results in lower pop-up heights; this periodic lateral motion is modulated by unsteady vortex shedding in the wake of the sphere. Despite these complex fluid structure interactions, the experiments presented herein yield extremely repeatable results.

  14. Robotics Programming Competition Spheres, Russian Part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovski, Andrei; Kukushkina, Natalia; Biryukova, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Spheres" such name was done to Russian part of the Zero Robotics project which is a student competition devoted to programming of SPHERES (SPHERES - Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites are the experimental robotics devices which are capable of rotation and translation in all directions, http://ssl.mit.edu/spheres/), which perform different operations on the board of International Space Station. Competition takes place online on http://zerorobotics.mit.edu. The main goal is to develop a program for SPHERES to solve an annual challenge. The end of the tournament is the real competition in microgravity on the board of ISS with a live broadcast. The Russian part of the tournament has only two years history but the problems, organization and specific are useful for the other educational projects especially for the international ones. We introduce the history of the competition, its scientific and educational goals in Russia and describe the participation of Russian teams in 2014 and 2015 tournaments. Also we discuss the organizational problems.

  15. The thermal conductivity of beds of spheres

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Shapiro, M.; Longest, A.W.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal conductivities (k) of beds of solid and hollow microspheres were measured using two radial heat flow techniques. One technique provided k-data at 300 K for beds with the void spaces between particles filled with argon, nitrogen, or helium from 5 kPa to 30 MPa. The other technique provided k-data with air at atmospheric pressure from 300 to 1000 K. The 300 K technique was used to study bed systems with high k-values that can be varied by changing the gas type and gas pressure. Such systems can be used to control the operating temperature of an irradiation capsule. The systems studied included beds of 500 ..mu..m dia solid Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, the same Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ spheres mixed with spheres of silica--alumina or with SiC shards, carbon spheres, and nickel spheres. Both techniques were used to determine the k-value of beds of hollow spheres with solid shells of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//center dot/7 w/o Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and partially stabilized ZrO/sub 2/. The hollow microspheres had diameters from 2100 to 3500 ..mu..m and wall thicknesses from 80 to 160 ..mu..m. 12 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Absorption and scattering by bispheres, quadspheres, and circular rings of spheres and their equivalent coated spheres.

    PubMed

    Heng, Ri-Liang; Sy, Ki Cheong; Pilon, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that the absorption and scattering cross sections and asymmetry factor of randomly oriented and optically soft bispheres, quadspheres, and circular rings of spheres, with either monodisperse or polydisperse monomers, can be approximated by an equivalent coated sphere with identical volume and average projected area. This approximation could also apply to the angle-dependent scattering matrix elements for monomer size parameter less than 0.1. However, it quickly deteriorated with increasing monomer number and/or size parameter. It was shown to be superior to previously proposed approximations considering a volume equivalent homogeneous sphere and a coated sphere with identical volume and surface area. These results provide a rapid and accurate way of predicting the radiation characteristics of bispheres, quadspheres, and rings of spheres representative of various unicellular and multicellular cyanobacteria considered for producing food supplements, biofuels, and fertilizers. They could also be used in inverse methods for retrieving the monomers' optical properties, morphology, and/or concentration.

  17. A range of spin-crossover temperature T1/2>300 K results from out-of-sphere anion exchange in a series of ferrous materials based on the 4-(4-imidazolylmethyl)-2-(2-imidazolylmethyl)imidazole (trim) ligand, [Fe(trim)2]X2 (X=F, Cl, Br, I): comparison of experimental results with those derived from density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Lemercier, Gilles; Bréfuel, Nicolas; Shova, Sergiu; Wolny, Juliusz A; Dahan, Françoise; Verelst, Marc; Paulsen, Hauke; Trautwein, Alfred X; Tuchagues, Jean-Pierre

    2006-09-25

    The synthesis and characterization of [FeII(trim)2]Cl2 (2), [FeII(trim)2]Br2MeOH (3), and [FeII(trim)2]I2MeOH (4), including the X-ray crystal structure determinations of 2 (50 and 293 K) and 4 (293 K), have been performed and their properties have been examined. In agreement with the magnetic susceptibility results, the Mössbauer data show the presence of high-spin (HS) to low-spin (LS) crossover with a range of T1/2 larger than 300 K (from approximately 20 K for [FeII(trim)2]F2 (1) to approximately 380 K for 4). All complexes in this series include the same [Fe(trim)2]2+ complex cation: the ligand field comprises a constant contribution from the trim ligands and a variable one originating from the out-of-sphere anions, which is transmitted to the metal center by the connecting imidazole rings and hydrogen bonds. The impressive variation in the intrinsic characteristics of the spin-crossover (SCO) phenomenon in this series is then interpreted as an inductive effect of the anions transmitted to the nitrogen donors through the hydrogen bonds. Based on this qualitative analysis, an increased inductive effect of the out-of-sphere anion corresponds to a decreased SCO temperature T1/2, in agreement with the experimental results. Electronic structure calculations with periodic boundary conditions have been performed that show the importance of intermolecular effects in tuning the ligand field, and thus in determining the transition temperature. Starting with the geometries obtained from the X-ray studies, the [FeII(trim)2]X2 complex molecules 1-4 have been investigated both for the single molecules and the crystal lattices with the local density approximation of density functional theory. The bulk geometries of the complex cations deduced from the X-ray studies and those calculated are in fair agreement for both approaches. However, the trend observed for the transition temperatures of 1-4 disagrees with the trend for the spin-state splittings ES (difference EHS

  18. Structure of finite sphere packings via exact enumeration: Implications for colloidal crystal nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoy, Robert S.; Harwayne-Gidansky, Jared; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2012-05-01

    We analyze the geometric structure and mechanical stability of a complete set of isostatic and hyperstatic sphere packings obtained via exact enumeration. The number of nonisomorphic isostatic packings grows exponentially with the number of spheres N, and their diversity of structure and symmetry increases with increasing N and decreases with increasing hyperstaticity H≡Nc-NISO, where Nc is the number of pair contacts and NISO=3N-6. Maximally contacting packings are in general neither the densest nor the most symmetric. Analyses of local structure show that the fraction f of nuclei with order compatible with the bulk (rhcp) crystal decreases sharply with increasing N due to a high propensity for stacking faults, five- and near-fivefold symmetric structures, and other motifs that preclude rhcp order. While f increases with increasing H, a significant fraction of hyperstatic nuclei for N as small as 11 retain non-rhcp structure. Classical theories of nucleation that consider only spherical nuclei, or only nuclei with the same ordering as the bulk crystal, cannot capture such effects. Our results provide an explanation for the failure of classical nucleation theory for hard-sphere systems of N≲10 particles; we argue that in this size regime, it is essential to consider nuclei of unconstrained geometry. Our results are also applicable to understanding kinetic arrest and jamming in systems that interact via hard-core-like repulsive and short-ranged attractive interactions.

  19. Facile synthesis and electrochemical performances of hollow graphene spheres as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The hollow graphene oxide spheres have been successfully fabricated from graphene oxide nanosheets utilizing a water-in-oil emulsion technique, which were prepared from natural flake graphite by oxidation and ultrasonic treatment. The hollow graphene oxide spheres were reduced to hollow graphene spheres at 500°C for 3 h under an atmosphere of Ar(95%)/H2(5%). The first reversible specific capacity of the hollow graphene spheres was as high as 903 mAh g-1 at a current density of 50 mAh g-1. Even at a high current density of 500 mAh g-1, the reversible specific capacity remained at 502 mAh g-1. After 60 cycles, the reversible capacity was still kept at 652 mAh g-1 at the current density of 50 mAh g-1. These results indicate that the prepared hollow graphene spheres possess excellent electrochemical performances for lithium storage. The high rate performance of hollow graphene spheres thanks to the hollow structure, thin and porous shells consisting of graphene sheets. PACS 81.05.ue; 61.48.Gh; 72.80.Vp PMID:25114657

  20. Unemployment: Hard-Core or Hard-Shell?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauer, Robert H.

    1972-01-01

    The term hard-core'' makes the unemployed culpable; the term hard shell'' shifts the burden to the employer, and the evidence from the suburban plant indicates that a substantial part of the problem must lie there. (DM)