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Sample records for hard superconducting nitrides

  1. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; ...

    2015-09-03

    Transition–metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock–salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10–20 GPa. Here, we report high–pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN through an ion–exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form withmore » crystallite sizes of 50 – 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ–MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ–MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo–N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.« less

  2. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-03

    Transition–metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock–salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10–20 GPa. Here, we report high–pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN through an ion–exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form with crystallite sizes of 50 – 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ–MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ–MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo–N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.

  3. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-01-01

    Transition–metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock–salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10–20 GPa. Here, we report high–pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN through an ion–exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form with crystallite sizes of 50 – 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ–MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ–MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo–N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements. PMID:26333418

  4. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-03

    Transition-metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock-salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10-20 GPa. Here, we report high-pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ-MoN and cubic γ-MoN through an ion-exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form with crystallite sizes of 50 - 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ-MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ-MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo-N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ-MoN and cubic γ-MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.

  5. Super-Hard Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Philip; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2005-03-01

    We present the magnetic response of Type-II superconductivity in the extreme pinning limit, where screening currents within an order of magnitude of the Ginzburg-Landau depairing critical current density develop upon the application of a magnetic field. We show that this ``super-hard'' limit is well approximated in highly disordered, cold drawn, Nb wire whose magnetization response is characterized by a cascade of Meissner-like phases, each terminated by a catastrophic collapse of the magnetization. Direct magneto-optic measurements of the flux penetration depth in the virgin magnetization branch are in excellent agreement with the exponential model in which Jc(B)=Jco(-B/Bo), where Jco˜5x10^6 A/cm^2 for Nb. The implications for the fundamental limiting hardness of a superconductor will be discussed.

  6. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOEpatents

    Murduck, James M.; Lepetre, Yves J.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Ketterson, John B.

    1989-01-01

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources.

  7. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOEpatents

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-07-04

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

  8. Superconductivity in the ferromagnetic semiconductor samarium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, E.-M.; Granville, S.; Engel, A.; Chong, S. V.; Governale, M.; Zülicke, U.; Moghaddam, A. G.; Trodahl, H. J.; Natali, F.; Vézian, S.; Ruck, B. J.

    2016-07-01

    Conventional wisdom expects that making semiconductors ferromagnetic requires doping with magnetic ions and that superconductivity cannot coexist with magnetism. However, recent concerted efforts exploring new classes of materials have established that intrinsic ferromagnetic semiconductors exist and that certain types of strongly correlated metals can be ferromagnetic and superconducting at the same time. Here we show that the trifecta of semiconducting behavior, ferromagnetism, and superconductivity can be achieved in a single material. Samarium nitride (SmN) is a well-characterized intrinsic ferromagnetic semiconductor, hosting strongly spin-ordered 4 f electrons below a Curie temperature of 27 K. We have now observed that it also hosts a superconducting phase below 4 K when doped to electron concentrations above 1021cm-3 . The large exchange splitting of the conduction band in SmN favors equal-spin triplet pairing with p -wave symmetry. Significantly, superconductivity is enhanced in superlattices of gadolinium nitride (GdN) and SmN. An analysis of the robustness of such a superconducting phase against disorder leads to the conclusion that the 4 f bands are crucial for superconductivity, making SmN a heavy-fermion-type superconductor.

  9. Tuning of superconducting niobium nitride terahertz metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingbo; Jin, Biaobing; Xue, Yuhua; Zhang, Caihong; Dai, Hao; Zhang, Labao; Cao, Chunhai; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2011-06-20

    Superconducting planar terahertz (THz) metamaterials (MMs), with unit cells of different sizes, are fabricated on 200 nm-thick niobium nitride (NbN) films deposited on MgO substrates. They are characterized using THz time domain spectroscopy over a temperature range from 8.1 K to 300 K, crossing the critical temperature of NbN films. As the gap frequency (f(g) = 2Δ0/h, where Δ0 is the energy gap at 0 K and h is the Plank constant) of NbN is 1.18 THz, the experimentally observed THz spectra span a frequency range from below f(g) to above it. We have found that, as the resonance frequency approaches f(g), the relative tuning range of MMs is quite wide (30%). We attribute this observation to the large change of kinetic inductance of superconducting film.

  10. Discovery of Superconductivity in Hard Hexagonal ε-NbN.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yongtao; Qi, Xintong; Zhang, Cheng; Ma, Shuailing; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ying; Chen, Ting; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Zhiqiang; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Li, Qiang; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2016-02-29

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond with a critical temperature (TC) near 4 K, great interest has been attracted in hard superconductors such as transition-metal nitrides and carbides. Here we report the new discovery of superconductivity in polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Direct magnetization and electrical resistivity measurements demonstrate that the superconductivity in bulk polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN is below ∼11.6 K, which is significantly higher than that for boron-doped diamond. The nature of superconductivity in hexagonal ε-NbN and the physical mechanism for the relatively lower TC have been addressed by the weaker bonding in the Nb-N network, the co-planarity of Nb-N layer as well as its relatively weaker electron-phonon coupling, as compared with the cubic δ-NbN counterpart. Moreover, the newly discovered ε-NbN superconductor remains stable at pressures up to ∼20 GPa and is significantly harder than cubic δ-NbN; it is as hard as sapphire, ultra-incompressible and has a high shear rigidity of 201 GPa to rival hard/superhard material γ-B (∼227 GPa). This exploration opens a new class of highly desirable materials combining the outstanding mechanical/elastic properties with superconductivity, which may be particularly attractive for its technological and engineering applications in extreme environments.

  11. Discovery of superconductivity in hard hexagonal ε-NbN

    DOE PAGES

    Zou, Yongtao; Li, Qiang; Qi, Xintong; ...

    2016-02-29

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond with a critical temperature (TC) near 4 K, great interest has been attracted in hard superconductors such as transition-metal nitrides and carbides. Here we report the new discovery of superconductivity in polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Direct magnetization and electrical resistivity measurements demonstrate that the superconductivity in bulk polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN is below ~11.6 K, which is significantly higher than that for boron-doped diamond. The nature of superconductivity in hexagonal ε-NbN and the physical mechanism for the relatively lower TC have been addressed by the weaker bondingmore » in the Nb-N network, the co-planarity of Nb-N layer as well as its relatively weaker electron-phonon coupling, as compared with the cubic δ-NbN counterpart. Moreover, the newly discovered ε-NbN superconductor remains stable at pressures up to ~20 GPa and is significantly harder than cubic δ-NbN; it is as hard as sapphire, ultra-incompressible and has a high shear rigidity of 201 GPa to rival hard/superhard material γ-B (~227 GPa). Furthermore, this exploration opens a new class of highly desirable materials combining the outstanding mechanical/elastic properties with superconductivity, which may be particularly attractive for its technological and engineering applications in extreme environments.« less

  12. Discovery of superconductivity in hard hexagonal ε-NbN

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yongtao; Li, Qiang; Qi, Xintong; Zhang, Cheng; Ma, Shuailing; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ying; Chen, Ting; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Zhiqiang; Welch, David; Pinwen Zhu; Cui, Tian; Li, Bingbing; Li, Baosheng

    2016-02-29

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond with a critical temperature (TC) near 4 K, great interest has been attracted in hard superconductors such as transition-metal nitrides and carbides. Here we report the new discovery of superconductivity in polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Direct magnetization and electrical resistivity measurements demonstrate that the superconductivity in bulk polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN is below ~11.6 K, which is significantly higher than that for boron-doped diamond. The nature of superconductivity in hexagonal ε-NbN and the physical mechanism for the relatively lower TC have been addressed by the weaker bonding in the Nb-N network, the co-planarity of Nb-N layer as well as its relatively weaker electron-phonon coupling, as compared with the cubic δ-NbN counterpart. Moreover, the newly discovered ε-NbN superconductor remains stable at pressures up to ~20 GPa and is significantly harder than cubic δ-NbN; it is as hard as sapphire, ultra-incompressible and has a high shear rigidity of 201 GPa to rival hard/superhard material γ-B (~227 GPa). Furthermore, this exploration opens a new class of highly desirable materials combining the outstanding mechanical/elastic properties with superconductivity, which may be particularly attractive for its technological and engineering applications in extreme environments.

  13. Discovery of Superconductivity in Hard Hexagonal ε-NbN

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yongtao; Qi, Xintong; Zhang, Cheng; Ma, Shuailing; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ying; Chen, Ting; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Zhiqiang; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Li, Qiang; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond with a critical temperature (TC) near 4 K, great interest has been attracted in hard superconductors such as transition-metal nitrides and carbides. Here we report the new discovery of superconductivity in polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Direct magnetization and electrical resistivity measurements demonstrate that the superconductivity in bulk polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN is below ∼11.6 K, which is significantly higher than that for boron-doped diamond. The nature of superconductivity in hexagonal ε-NbN and the physical mechanism for the relatively lower TC have been addressed by the weaker bonding in the Nb-N network, the co-planarity of Nb-N layer as well as its relatively weaker electron-phonon coupling, as compared with the cubic δ-NbN counterpart. Moreover, the newly discovered ε-NbN superconductor remains stable at pressures up to ∼20 GPa and is significantly harder than cubic δ-NbN; it is as hard as sapphire, ultra-incompressible and has a high shear rigidity of 201 GPa to rival hard/superhard material γ-B (∼227 GPa). This exploration opens a new class of highly desirable materials combining the outstanding mechanical/elastic properties with superconductivity, which may be particularly attractive for its technological and engineering applications in extreme environments. PMID:26923318

  14. Discovery of Superconductivity in Hard Hexagonal ε-NbN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yongtao; Qi, Xintong; Zhang, Cheng; Ma, Shuailing; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ying; Chen, Ting; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Zhiqiang; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Li, Qiang; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2016-02-01

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond with a critical temperature (TC) near 4 K, great interest has been attracted in hard superconductors such as transition-metal nitrides and carbides. Here we report the new discovery of superconductivity in polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Direct magnetization and electrical resistivity measurements demonstrate that the superconductivity in bulk polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN is below ∼11.6 K, which is significantly higher than that for boron-doped diamond. The nature of superconductivity in hexagonal ε-NbN and the physical mechanism for the relatively lower TC have been addressed by the weaker bonding in the Nb-N network, the co-planarity of Nb-N layer as well as its relatively weaker electron-phonon coupling, as compared with the cubic δ-NbN counterpart. Moreover, the newly discovered ε-NbN superconductor remains stable at pressures up to ∼20 GPa and is significantly harder than cubic δ-NbN it is as hard as sapphire, ultra-incompressible and has a high shear rigidity of 201 GPa to rival hard/superhard material γ-B (∼227 GPa). This exploration opens a new class of highly desirable materials combining the outstanding mechanical/elastic properties with superconductivity, which may be particularly attractive for its technological and engineering applications in extreme environments.

  15. Nitrogen concentration driving the hardness of rhenium nitrides

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhonglong; Bao, Kuo; Li, Da; Duan, Defang; Tian, Fubo; Jin, Xilian; Chen, Changbo; Huang, Xiaoli; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2014-01-01

    The structures and properties of rhenium nitrides are studied with density function based first principle method. New candidate ground states or high-pressure phases at Re:N ratios of 3:2, 1:3, and 1:4 are identified via a series of evolutionary structure searches. We find that the 3D polyhedral stacking with strong covalent N-N and Re-N bonding could stabilize Re nitrides to form nitrogen rich phases, meanwhile, remarkably improve the mechanical performance than that of sub-nitrides, as Re3N, Re2N, and Re3N2. By evaluating the trends of the crystal configuration, electronic structure, elastic properties, and hardness as a function of the N concentration, we proves that the N content is the key factor affecting the metallicity and hardness of Re nitrides. PMID:24762713

  16. Hard and low friction nitride coatings and methods for forming the same

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali; Urgen, Mustafa; Cakir, Ali Fuat; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Kazmanli, Kursat; Keles, Ozgul

    2007-05-01

    An improved coating material possessing super-hard and low friction properties and a method for forming the same. The improved coating material includes the use of a noble metal or soft metal homogeneously distributed within a hard nitride material. The addition of small amounts of such metals into nitrides such as molybdenum nitride, titanium nitride, and chromium nitride results in as much as increasing of the hardness of the material as well as decreasing the friction coefficient and increasing the oxidation resistance.

  17. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Haller, Eugene E.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Hansen, William L.

    1992-01-01

    Novel crystalline .alpha. (silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and .beta. (silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate.

  18. Hard Superconducting Gap in InSb Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gül, Önder; Zhang, Hao; de Vries, Folkert K; van Veen, Jasper; Zuo, Kun; Mourik, Vincent; Conesa-Boj, Sonia; Nowak, Michał P; van Woerkom, David J; Quintero-Pérez, Marina; Cassidy, Maja C; Geresdi, Attila; Koelling, Sebastian; Car, Diana; Plissard, Sébastien R; Bakkers, Erik P A M; Kouwenhoven, Leo P

    2017-04-12

    Topological superconductivity is a state of matter that can host Majorana modes, the building blocks of a topological quantum computer. Many experimental platforms predicted to show such a topological state rely on proximity-induced superconductivity. However, accessing the topological properties requires an induced hard superconducting gap, which is challenging to achieve for most material systems. We have systematically studied how the interface between an InSb semiconductor nanowire and a NbTiN superconductor affects the induced superconducting properties. Step by step, we improve the homogeneity of the interface while ensuring a barrier-free electrical contact to the superconductor and obtain a hard gap in the InSb nanowire. The magnetic field stability of NbTiN allows the InSb nanowire to maintain a hard gap and a supercurrent in the presence of magnetic fields (∼0.5 T), a requirement for topological superconductivity in one-dimensional systems. Our study provides a guideline to induce superconductivity in various experimental platforms such as semiconductor nanowires, two-dimensional electron gases, and topological insulators and holds relevance for topological superconductivity and quantum computation.

  19. Low-loss terahertz metamaterial from superconducting niobium nitride films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C H; Wu, J B; Jin, B B; Ji, Z M; Kang, L; Xu, W W; Chen, J; Tonouchi, M; Wu, P H

    2012-01-02

    This paper reports a type of low Ohmic loss terahertz (THz) metamaterials made from low-temperature superconducting niobium nitride (NbN) films. Its resonance properties are studied by THz time domain spectroscopy. Our experiments show that its unloaded quality factor reaches as high as 178 at 8 K with the resonance frequency at around 0.58 THz, which is about 24 times that of gold metamaterial at the same temperature. The unloaded quality factor keeps at a high level, above 90, even when the resonance frequency increases to 1.02 THz, which is close to the gap frequency of NbN film. All these experimental observations fit well into the framework of Bardeen-Copper-Schrieffer theory and equivalent circuit model. These new metamaterials offer an efficient way to the design and implementation of high performance THz electronic devices.

  20. Submicron cubic boron nitride as hard as diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guoduan; Kou, Zili E-mail: yanxz@hpstar.ac.cn; Lei, Li; Peng, Fang; Wang, Qiming; Wang, Kaixue; Wang, Pei; Li, Liang; Li, Yong; Wang, Yonghua; Yan, Xiaozhi E-mail: yanxz@hpstar.ac.cn; Li, Wentao; Bi, Yan; Leng, Yang; He, Duanwei

    2015-03-23

    Here, we report the sintering of aggregated submicron cubic boron nitride (sm-cBN) at a pressure of 8 GPa. The sintered cBN compacts exhibit hardness values comparable to that of single crystal diamond, fracture toughness about 5-fold that of cBN single crystal, in combination with a high oxidization temperature. Thus, another way has been demonstrated to improve the mechanical properties of cBN besides reducing the grain size to nano scale. In contrast to other ultrahard compacts with similar hardness, the sm-cBN aggregates are better placed for potential industrial application, as their relative low pressure manufacturing perhaps be easier and cheaper.

  1. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Haller, E.E.; Cohen, M.L.; Hansen, W.L.

    1992-05-05

    Novel crystalline [alpha](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and [beta](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate. 1 figure.

  2. NMR Chemical Shifts in Hard Carbon Nitride Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Y.; Yoon, Y.; Pfrommer, B.G.; Pfrommer, B.G.; Louie, S.G.; Louie, S.G.; Mauri, F.

    1998-04-01

    We show that NMR chemical shift spectroscopy could help to identify the crystalline phases of hard carbon nitride compounds. To this purpose we compute the NMR chemical shifts of defect zinc-blende, cubic, {alpha}{minus} , {beta}{minus} , and graphitic C{sub 3}N{sub 4} with a newly developed {ital ab initio} method. The C shifts can be used to identify the CN bonds and to characterize C hybridization. The N shifts distinguish the {alpha}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} from the {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} phases, and indicate the presence of the graphitic phase. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Laser nitriding for niobium superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Senthilraja Singaravelu, John Klopf, Gwyn Williams, Michael Kelley

    2010-10-01

    Particle accelerators are a key tool for scientific research ranging from fundamental studies of matter to analytical studies at light sources. Cost-forperformance is critical, both in terms of initial capital outlay and ongoing operating expense, especially for electricity. It depends on the niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities at the heart of most of these machines. Presently Nb SRF cavities operate near 1.9 K, well (and expensively) below the 4.2 K atmospheric boiling point of liquid He. Transforming the 40 nm thick active interior surface layer from Nb to delta NbN (Tc = 17 K instead of 9.2 K) appears to be a promising approach. Traditional furnace nitriding appears to have not been successful for this. Further, exposing a complete SRF cavity to the time-temperature history required for nitriding risks mechanical distortion. Gas laser nitriding instead has been applied successfully to other metals [P.Schaaf, Prog. Mat. Sci. 47 (2002) 1]. The beam dimensions and thermal diffusion length permit modeling in one dimension to predict the time course of the surface temperature for a range of per-pulse energy densities. As with the earlier work, we chose conditions just sufficient for boiling as a reference point. We used a Spectra Physics HIPPO nanosecond laser (l = 1064 nm, Emax= 0.392 mJ, beam spot@ 34 microns, PRF =15 – 30 kHz) to obtain an incident fluence of 1.73 - 2.15 J/cm2 for each laser pulse at the target. The target was a 50 mm diameter SRF-grade Nb disk maintained in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 550 – 625 torr and rotated at a constant speed of 9 rpm. The materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The SEM images show a sharp transition with fluence from a smooth, undulating topography to significant roughening, interpreted here as the onset of ablation. EPMA measurements of N/Nb atom ratio as a function of depth found a constant

  4. Operation of a titanium nitride superconducting microresonator detector in the nonlinear regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, L. J.; Day, P. K.; Eom, B. H.; Leduc, H. G.; Llombart, N.; McKenney, C. M.; Noroozian, O.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2013-03-01

    If driven sufficiently strongly, superconducting microresonators exhibit nonlinear behavior including response bifurcation. This behavior can arise from a variety of physical mechanisms including heating effects, grain boundaries or weak links, vortex penetration, or through the intrinsic nonlinearity of the kinetic inductance. Although microresonators used for photon detection are usually driven fairly hard in order to optimize their sensitivity, most experiments to date have not explored detector performance beyond the onset of bifurcation. Here, we present measurements of a lumped-element superconducting microresonator designed for use as a far-infrared detector and operated deep into the nonlinear regime. The 1 GHz resonator was fabricated from a 22 nm thick titanium nitride film with a critical temperature of 2 K and a normal-state resistivity of 100 μΩ cm. We measured the response of the device when illuminated with 6.4 pW optical loading using microwave readout powers that ranged from the low-power, linear regime to 18 dB beyond the onset of bifurcation. Over this entire range, the nonlinear behavior is well described by a nonlinear kinetic inductance. The best noise-equivalent power of 2×10-16 W/Hz1/2 at 10 Hz was measured at the highest readout power, and represents a ˜10 fold improvement compared with operating below the onset of bifurcation.

  5. The influence of laser re-melting on microstructure and hardness of gas-nitrided steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panfil, Dominika; Wach, Piotr; Kulka, Michał; Michalski, Jerzy

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, modification of nitrided layer by laser re-melting was presented. The nitriding process has many advantageous properties. Controlled gas nitriding was carried out on 42CrMo4 steel. As a consequence of this process, ɛ+γ' compound zone and diffusion zone were produced at the surface. Next, the nitrided layer was laser remelted using TRUMPF TLF 2600 Turbo CO2 laser. Laser tracks were arranged as single tracks with the use of various laser beam powers (P), ranging from 0.39 to 1.04 kW. The effects of laser beam power on the microstructure, dimensions of laser tracks and hardness profiles were analyzed. Laser treatment caused the decomposition of continuous compound zone at the surface and an increase in hardness of previously nitrided layer because of the appearance of martensite in re-melted and heat-affected zones

  6. Effects of gaseous nitriding AISI4140 alloy steel on corrosion and hardness properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamil Moli, L.; Wahab, N.; Gopinathan, M.; Karmegam, K.; Maniyarasi, M.

    2016-10-01

    Corrosion is one of the major problems in the industry especially on machinery since it weakens the structure of the machinery part and causes the mechanical failure. This will stop the production and increase the maintenance cost. In this study, the corrosion behaviour of gas nitriding on a screw press machine shaft made from AISI 4140 steel was investigated. Pitting corrosion was identified as a major cause of the shaft failure and this study was conducted to improve the corrosion resistance on the AISI 4140 alloy steel shaft by gas nitriding as a surface hardening treatment. Gas nitriding was performed with composition of 15% ammonia and 85% nitrogen at temperatures of 525 °C, 550 °C and 575 °C and with the soaking time of 30, 45 and 60 minutes, respectively. The samples were prepared as rectangular sized of 30mm x 12mm x 3mm for immersion testing. The results showed that corrosion rate of untreated samples was 77% higher compared to the nitrided samples. It was also found that hardness of the nitrided samples was higher than untreated sample. All in all, it can be concluded that gaseous nitriding can significantly improve the surface hardness and the corrosion resistance of the shaft made of AISI 4140 alloy steel, hence reduces the pitting that is the root cause of failure.

  7. The phase diagram and hardness of carbon nitrides

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Huafeng; Oganov, Artem R.; Zhu, Qiang; Qian, Guang-Rui

    2015-01-01

    Novel superhard materials, especially those with superior thermal and chemical stability, are needed to replace diamond. Carbon nitrides (C-N), which are likely to possess these characteristics and have even been expected to be harder than diamond, are excellent candidates. Here we report three new superhard and thermodynamically stable carbon nitride phases. Based on a systematic evolutionary structure searches, we report a complete phase diagram of the C-N system at 0–300 GPa and analyze the hardest metastable structures. Surprisingly, we find that at zero pressure, the earlier proposed graphitic-C3N4 structure () is dynamically unstable, and we find the lowest-energy structure based on s-triazine unit and s-heptazine unit. PMID:25943072

  8. The phase diagram and hardness of carbon nitrides.

    PubMed

    Dong, Huafeng; Oganov, Artem R; Zhu, Qiang; Qian, Guang-Rui

    2015-05-06

    Novel superhard materials, especially those with superior thermal and chemical stability, are needed to replace diamond. Carbon nitrides (C-N), which are likely to possess these characteristics and have even been expected to be harder than diamond, are excellent candidates. Here we report three new superhard and thermodynamically stable carbon nitride phases. Based on a systematic evolutionary structure searches, we report a complete phase diagram of the C-N system at 0-300 GPa and analyze the hardest metastable structures. Surprisingly, we find that at zero pressure, the earlier proposed graphitic-C3N4 structure () is dynamically unstable, and we find the lowest-energy structure based on s-triazine unit and s-heptazine unit.

  9. The phase diagram and hardness of carbon nitrides

    DOE PAGES

    Dong, Huafeng; Oganov, Artem R.; Zhu, Qiang; ...

    2015-05-06

    Novel superhard materials, especially those with superior thermal and chemical stability, are needed to replace diamond. Carbon nitrides (C-N), which are likely to possess these characteristics and have even been expected to be harder than diamond, are excellent candidates. Here we report three new superhard and thermodynamically stable carbon nitride phases. Based on a systematic evolutionary structure searches, we report a complete phase diagram of the C-N system at 0–300 GPa and analyze the hardest metastable structures. Surprisingly, we find that at zero pressure, the earlier proposed graphitic-C3N4 structure (P6-bar m2) is dynamically unstable, and we find the lowest-energy structuremore » based on s-triazine unit and s-heptazine unit.« less

  10. The phase diagram and hardness of carbon nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Huafeng; Oganov, Artem R.; Zhu, Qiang; Zhu, Qiang; Qian, Guang-Rui

    2015-05-06

    Novel superhard materials, especially those with superior thermal and chemical stability, are needed to replace diamond. Carbon nitrides (C-N), which are likely to possess these characteristics and have even been expected to be harder than diamond, are excellent candidates. Here we report three new superhard and thermodynamically stable carbon nitride phases. Based on a systematic evolutionary structure searches, we report a complete phase diagram of the C-N system at 0–300 GPa and analyze the hardest metastable structures. Surprisingly, we find that at zero pressure, the earlier proposed graphitic-C3N4 structure (P6-bar m2) is dynamically unstable, and we find the lowest-energy structure based on s-triazine unit and s-heptazine unit.

  11. Method of nitriding niobium to form a superconducting surface

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, Michael J.; Klopf, John Michael; Singaravelu, Senthilaraja

    2014-08-19

    A method of forming a delta niobium nitride .delta.-NbN layer on the surface of a niobium object including cleaning the surface of the niobium object; providing a treatment chamber; placing the niobium object in the treatment chamber; evacuating the chamber; passing pure nitrogen into the treatment chamber; focusing a laser spot on the niobium object; delivering laser fluences at the laser spot until the surface of the niobium object reaches above its boiling temperature; and rastering the laser spot over the surface of the niobium object.

  12. Superconducting tantalum nitride-based normal metal-insulator-superconductor tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, S.; Maasilta, I. J.

    2014-03-24

    We report the development of superconducting tantalum nitride (TaN{sub x}) normal metal-insulator-superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions. For the insulating barrier, we used both AlO{sub x} and TaO{sub x} (Cu-AlO{sub x}-Al-TaN{sub x} and Cu-TaO{sub x}-TaN{sub x}), with both devices exhibiting temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics which follow the simple one-particle tunneling model. The superconducting gap follows a BCS type temperature dependence, rendering these devices suitable for sensitive thermometry and bolometry from the superconducting transition temperature T{sub C} of the TaN{sub x} film at ∼5 K down to ∼0.5 K. Numerical simulations were also performed to predict how junction parameters should be tuned to achieve electronic cooling at temperatures above 1 K.

  13. Elasticity and hardness of nano-polycrystalline boron nitrides: The apparent Hall-Petch effect

    SciTech Connect

    Nagakubo, A.; Ogi, H. Hirao, M.; Sumiya, H.

    2014-08-25

    Nano-polycrystalline boron nitride (BN) is expected to replace diamond as a superhard and superstiff material. Although its hardening was reported, its elasticity remains unclear and the as-measured hardness could be significantly different from the true value due to the elastic recovery. In this study, we measured the longitudinal-wave elastic constant of nano-polycrystalline BNs using picosecond ultrasound spectroscopy and confirmed the elastic softening for small-grain BNs. We also measured Vickers and Knoop hardness for the same specimens and clarified the relationship between hardness and stiffness. The Vickers hardness significantly increased as the grain size decreased, while the Knoop hardness remained nearly unchanged. We attribute the apparent increase in Vickers hardness to the elastic recovery and propose a model to support this insight.

  14. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bueno, J. Baselmans, J. J. A; Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G.; Visser, P. J. de; Klapwijk, T. M.; Driessen, E. F. C.; Doyle, S.

    2014-11-10

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations.

  15. Mechanical properties, anisotropy and hardness of group IVA ternary spinel nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ying-Chun; Chen, Min

    2013-10-01

    In this work, new ternary cubic spinel structures are designed by the substitutional method. The structures, elasticity properties, intrinsic hardness and Debye temperature of the cubic ternary spinel nitrides are studied by first principles based on the density-functional theory. The results show that γ-CSn2N4, γ-SiC2N4, γ-GeC2N4 and γ-SnC2N4 are not mechanically stable. The elastic constants Cij of these cubic spinel structures are obtained using the stress-strain method. Derived elastic constants, such as bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson coefficient and brittle/ductile behaviour are estimated using Voigt-Reuss-Hill theories. The B/G value, the Poisson's ratio and anisotropic factor are calculated for eight ternary stable crystals. Based on the microscopic hardness model, we further estimate the Vickers hardness of all the stable crystals. From the calculated hardness of the stable group IVA ternary spinel nitrides by Gao's and Jiang's methods, it is observed that the stable group IVA ternary spinel nitrides are not superhard materials except for γ-CSi2N4. Furthermore, the Debye temperature for the eight stable crystals is also estimated.

  16. Stoichiometry and thickness dependence of superconducting properties of niobium nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Beebe, Melissa R. Beringer, Douglas B.; Burton, Matthew C.; Yang, Kaida; Lukaszew, R. Alejandra

    2016-03-15

    The current technology used in linear particle accelerators is based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities fabricated from bulk niobium (Nb), which have smaller surface resistance and therefore dissipate less energy than traditional nonsuperconducting copper cavities. Using bulk Nb for the cavities has several advantages, which are discussed elsewhere; however, such SRF cavities have a material-dependent accelerating gradient limit. In order to overcome this fundamental limit, a multilayered coating has been proposed using layers of insulating and superconducting material applied to the interior surface of the cavity. The key to this multilayered model is to use superconducting thin films to exploit the potential field enhancement when these films are thinner than their London penetration depth. Such field enhancement has been demonstrated in MgB{sub 2} thin films; here, the authors consider films of another type-II superconductor, niobium nitride (NbN). The authors present their work correlating stoichiometry and superconducting properties in NbN thin films and discuss the thickness dependence of their superconducting properties, which is important for their potential use in the proposed multilayer structure. While there are some previous studies on the relationship between stoichiometry and critical temperature T{sub C}, the authors are the first to report on the correlation between stoichiometry and the lower critical field H{sub C1}.

  17. Superconducting energy scales and anomalous dissipative conductivity in thin films of molybdenum nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmendinger, Julian; Pracht, Uwe S.; Daschke, Lena; Proslier, Thomas; Klug, Jeffrey A.; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2016-08-01

    We report investigations of molybdenum nitride (MoN) thin films with different thickness and disorder and with superconducting transition temperature 9.89 K ≥Tc≥2.78 K . Using terahertz frequency-domain spectroscopy we explore the normal and superconducting charge carrier dynamics for frequencies covering the range from 3 to 38 cm-1 (0.1 to 1.1 THz). The superconducting energy scales, i.e., the critical temperature Tc, the pairing energy Δ , and the superfluid stiffness J , and the superfluid density ns can be well described within the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory for conventional superconductors. At the same time, we find an anomalously large dissipative conductivity, which cannot be explained by thermally excited quasiparticles, but rather by a temperature-dependent normal-conducting fraction, persisting deep into the superconducting state. Our results on this disordered system constrain the regime, where discernible effects stemming from the disorder-induced superconductor-insulator transition possibly become relevant, to MoN films with a transition temperature lower than at least 2.78 K.

  18. Toughness enhancement in zirconium-tungsten-nitride nanocrystalline hard coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, P.; Srivastava, S.; Chandra, R.; Ramana, C. V.

    2016-07-01

    An approach is presented to increase the toughness (KIC) while retaining high hardness (H) of Zr-W-N nanocrystalline coatings using energetic ions bombardment. Tuning KIC and H values was made possible by a careful control over the substrate bias, i.e., the kinetic energy (Uk˜9-99 J/cm3) of the bombarding ions, while keeping the deposition temperature relatively low (200 oC). Structural and mechanical characterization revealed a maximum wear resistance (H/Er˜0.23) and fracture toughness (KIC˜2.25 MPa √{ m } ) of ZrWN coatings at Uk˜72 J/cm3. A direct Uk-microstructure-KIC-H relationship suggests that tailoring mechanical properties for a given application is possible by tuning Uk and, hence, ZrWN-coatings' microstructure.

  19. Plasma nitriding of titanium alloy: Effect of roughness, hardness, biocompatibility, and bonding with bone cement.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Morshed; Riahinezhad, Shahram; Li, Yanling; Vaughan, Melville B; Sultana, Fariha; Morris, Tracy L; Phinney, Lucas; Hossain, Khalid

    2016-11-25

    Titanium (Ti) alloys have been widely used in orthopedics and orthodontic surgeries as implants because of their beneficial chemical, mechanical, and biological properties. Improvement of these properties of a Ti alloy, Ti-6Al-4V Eli, is possible by the use of plasma nitriding treatment on the Ti alloy. The novelty of this study is the evaluation of a DC glow discharge nitrogen plasma treatment method on the surface, mechanical and biological properties of Ti alloy. Specifically, this study measured the chemical states, roughness, hardness, and biocompatibility of plasma nitride treated Ti-6Al-4V Eli as well as determined the effect of plasma treatment on the fracture strength between the Ti alloy and bone clement. This study hypothesized that DC glow discharge nitrogen plasma treatment may alter the surface chemical and mechanical states of the Ti alloy that may influence the fracture strength of implant/cement interfaces under static load. This study found that plasma nitride treatment on Ti alloy does not have effect on the roughness and biocompatibility (P value > 0.5), but significantly effect on the hardness and fracture strength of Ti-bone cement interfaces compared to those values of untreated Ti samples (P value < 0.5). Therefore, the DC glow discharge nitrogen plasma treated Ti alloy can potentially be used for orthopedic applications.

  20. Optical reflectivity and hardness improvement of hafnium nitride films via tantalum alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhiqing; Huang, Haihua; Zhang, Sam; Wang, Xiaoyi; Gao, Jing; Zhao, Lei; Zheng, Weitao; Hu, Chaoquan

    2016-12-01

    It is found that incorporation of tantalum in a hafnium nitride film induces a tunable optical reflectivity and improves the hardness. The underlying mechanism can be illustrated by a combination of experiments and first-principles calculations. It is shown that the evolution of optical reflectivity and the increase in hardness arise from the formation of Hf1-xTaxN solid solutions and the resulting changes in the electronic structure. The increase in infrared reflectance originates from the increase in concentration of free electrons (n) because Ta (d3s2) has one more valence electron than Hf (d2s2). The sharp blue-shift in cutoff wavelength is attributed to the increase in n and the appearance of t2g → eg interband absorption. These results suggest that alloying of a second transition metal renders an effective avenue to improve simultaneously the optical and mechanical properties of transition metal nitride films. This opens up a door in preparing high-reflectance yet hard films.

  1. Nitrogen implantation effects on the chemical bonding and hardness of boron and boron nitride coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S; Felter, T; Hayes, J; Jankowski, A F; Patterson, R; Poker, D; Stamler, T

    1999-02-08

    Boron nitride (BN) coatings are deposited by the reactive sputtering of fully dense, boron (B) targets utilizing an argon-nitrogen (Ar-N{sub 2}) reactive gas mixture. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure analysis reveals features of chemical bonding in the B 1s photoabsorption spectrum. Hardness is measured at the film surface using nanoindentation. The BN coatings prepared at low, sputter gas pressure with substrate heating are found to have bonding characteristic of a defected hexagonal phase. The coatings are subjected to post-deposition nitrogen (N{sup +} and N{sub 2}{sup +}) implantation at different energies and current densities. The changes in film hardness attributed to the implantation can be correlated to changes observed in the B 1s NEXAFS spectra.

  2. A study on the ESD damage of a silicon oxy-nitride hard mask on the chromium surface of PSM blank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Songbae; Kim, Heebom; Shin, Inkyun; Jeon, Chanuk

    2013-09-01

    A thin silicon oxy-nitride hard mask on the PSM blank is needed for the feature patterning with the size smaller than 70 nm. It is a good material for hard mask. However, the electrical property of silicon oxy-nitride with the thickness smaller than 10 nm causes the chromium surface damage during the mask processes. From the measurement of the surface damage, we figure out that the chromium surface damage is originated from the charging and the dielectric breakdown phenomena. In our present work, two types of silicon oxy-nitride film with the thicknesses of 5 nm and 12 nm are tested for verifying optimal mask fabrication processes. We find that the occurrence of ESD damage is related to the thickness of silicon oxy-nitride hard mask and mask fabrication process conditions. The optimal fabrication process condition for silicon oxy-nitride thin film hard mask, in which break-down never occurs, is discussed.

  3. Hexagonal-structured ε-NbN: ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yongtao; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xuefei; Qi, Xintong; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2015-06-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂P = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions.

  4. Hexagonal-structured epsilon-NbN. Ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    DOE PAGES

    Zou, Y.; Wang, X.; Chen, T.; ...

    2015-06-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂Pmore » = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions.« less

  5. Hexagonal-structured epsilon-NbN. Ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Y.; Wang, X.; Chen, T.; Li, X.; Qi, X; Welch, D.; Zhu, P.; Liu, B.; Cui, T.; Li, B.

    2015-06-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂P = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions.

  6. Identifying capacitive and inductive loss in lumped element superconducting hybrid titanium nitride/aluminum resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissers, Michael R.; Weides, Martin P.; Kline, Jeffrey S.; Sandberg, Martin; Pappas, David P.

    2012-07-01

    We present a method to systematically locate and extract capacitive and inductive losses in superconducting resonators at microwave frequencies by use of mixed-material, lumped element devices. In these devices, ultra-low loss titanium nitride was progressively replaced with aluminum in the inter-digitated capacitor and meandered inductor elements. By measuring the power dependent loss at 50 mK as the Al/TiN fraction in each element is increased, we find that at low electric field, i.e., in the single photon limit, the loss is two level system in nature and is correlated with the amount of Al capacitance rather than the Al inductance. In the high electric field limit, the remaining loss is linearly related to the product of the Al area times its inductance and is likely due to quasiparticles generated by stray IR radiation. At elevated temperature, additional loss is correlated with the amount of Al in the inductance, with a power independent TiN-Al interface loss term that exponentially decreases as the temperature is reduced. The TiN-Al interface loss is vanishingly small at the 50 mK base temperature.

  7. Ultra-thin superconducting film coated silicon nitride nanowire resonators for low-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Abhilash; Zhelev, Nikolay; de Alba, Roberto; Parpia, Jeevak

    We demonstrate fabrication of high stress silicon nitride nanowire resonators with a thickness and width of less than 50 nm intended to be used as probes for the study of superfluid 3He. The resonators are fabricated as doubly-clamped wires/beams using a combination of electron-beam lithography and wet/dry etching techniques. We demonstrate the ability to suspend (over a trench of depth ~8 µm) wires with a cross section as small as 30 nm, covered with a 20 nm superconducting film, and having lengths up to 50 µm. Room temperature resonance measurements were carried out by driving the devices using a piezo stage and detecting the motion using an optical interferometer. The results show that metalizing nano-mechanical resonators not only affects their resonant frequencies but significantly reduce their quality factor (Q). The devices are parametrically pumped by modulating the system at twice its fundamental resonant frequency, which results in observed amplification of the signal. The wires show self-oscillation with increasing modulation strength. The fabricated nanowire resonators are intended to be immersed in the superfluid 3He. By tracking the resonant frequency and the Q of the various modes of the wire versus temperature, we aim to probe the superfluid gap structure.

  8. Localization and pair breaking parameter in superconducting molybdenum nitride thin films.

    PubMed

    Tsuneoka, Takuya; Makise, Kazumasa; Maeda, Sho; Shinozaki, Bunju; Ichikawa, Fusao

    2017-01-11

    We have investigated the superconductor-insulator transition in molybdenum nitride films prepared by deposition onto MgO substrates. It is indicated that the T c depression from [Formula: see text] for thick films with increase of the normal state sheet resistance [Formula: see text] was well explained by the Finkel'stein formula from the localization theory. Present analysis suggests that the superconducting-insulator transition occurs at a critical sheet resistance [Formula: see text]. It is found that the [Formula: see text] above [Formula: see text] shows different characteristics of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] in the regions [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively, where [Formula: see text] is the classical residual resistance and A is a constant. The excess conductance [Formula: see text] due to thermal fluctuation has been analyzed by the sum of the Aslamazov-Larkin and Maki-Thompson correction terms with use of the pair breaking parameter [Formula: see text] in the latter term. The sum agrees well with the data, although the experimental results of the [Formula: see text] dependence of [Formula: see text], that is, [Formula: see text] shows the disagreement with a linear relation [Formula: see text] derived from the localization theory.

  9. Improvement in nano-hardness and corrosion resistance of low carbon steel by plasma nitriding with negative DC bias voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Mohamed Mounes; Saoula, Nadia; Tadjine, Rabah; Hadj-Larbi, Fayçal; Keffous, Aissa; Kechouane, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we study the effect of plasma nitriding on nano-hardness and corrosion resistance of low carbon steel samples. The plasma was generated through a radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma source. The substrate temperature increased (by the self-induced heating mechanism) with the treatment time for increasing negative bias voltages. X-rays diffraction analysis revealed the formation of nitride phases (ɛ-Fe2-3N and γ'-Fe4N) in the compound layer of the treated samples. A phase transition occurred from 3.5 kV to 4.0 kV and was accompanied by an increase in the volume fraction of the γ'-Fe4N phase and a decrease in that of the ɛ-Fe2-3N phase. Auger electron spectroscopy revealed a deep diffusion of the implanted nitrogen beyond 320 nm. The nano-hardness increased by ~400% for the nitrogen-implanted samples compared to the untreated state, the nitride phases are believed to participate to the hardening. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements revealed that the plasma nitriding has improved the corrosion resistance behavior of the material. When compared to the untreated state, the sample processed at 4.0 kV exhibits a shift of +500 mV and a reduction to 3% in its corrosion current. These results were obtained for relatively low bias voltages and short treatment time (2 h).

  10. Localization and pair breaking parameter in superconducting molybdenum nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuneoka, Takuya; Makise, Kazumasa; Maeda, Sho; Shinozaki, Bunju; Ichikawa, Fusao

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the superconductor-insulator transition in molybdenum nitride films prepared by deposition onto MgO substrates. It is indicated that the T c depression from ≈ 6.6 \\text{K} for thick films with increase of the normal state sheet resistance R\\text{sq}\\text{N} was well explained by the Finkel’stein formula from the localization theory. Present analysis suggests that the superconducting-insulator transition occurs at a critical sheet resistance {{R}\\text{c}}≈ 2 \\text{k} Ω . It is found that the {{R}\\text{sq}}(T) above {{R}\\text{c}} shows different characteristics of {{R}\\text{sq}}(T)={{R}\\text{sq,0}}-A\\ln T and {{R}\\text{sq}}(T)\\propto \\exp ≤ft[{≤ft({{T}0}/T\\right)}1/2}\\right] in the regions {{R}\\text{c}}\\text{sq}\\text{N}<{{R}\\text{Q}}=h/4{{e}2}≈ 6.45 \\text{k} Ω and R\\text{sq}\\text{N}>{{R}\\text{Q}} , respectively, where {{R}\\text{sq,0}} is the classical residual resistance and A is a constant. The excess conductance {{σ\\prime}{}(T) due to thermal fluctuation has been analyzed by the sum of the Aslamazov-Larkin and Maki-Thompson correction terms with use of the pair breaking parameter δ in the latter term. The sum agrees well with the data, although the experimental results of the R\\text{sq}\\text{N} dependence of δ , that is, δ \\propto {{≤ft(R\\text{sq}\\text{N}\\right)}≈ 1.7} shows the disagreement with a linear relation δ \\propto ≤ft(R\\text{sq}\\text{N}\\right) derived from the localization theory.

  11. Structure property relationships of nitride superlattice hard coatings prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Nitin

    Today, more than 40% of all cutting tools used in machining applications are covered with coatings. Coatings improve wear resistance, increase tool life, enable use at higher speed, and broaden the application range. Superlattices, where thin layers (typically <10 nm) of two different materials (e.g. TiN and AlN) are deposited in an alternating fashion, are widely used commercially. Importantly, the hardness value of a superlattice (e.g. TiN/AlN) can significantly exceed the rule of mixture value. Superlattice coatings built from crystallographically dissimilar materials are not widely studied but hold promise for improvements in performance by allowing for both hardness and toughness to be simultaneously optimized. This is what this thesis is concerned with: a structure-property comparison of isostructural superlattices with corresponding non-isostructural superlattices. In order to grow both isostructural and non-isostructural superlattices from the same set of materials, it is necessary to grow monolithic films in different phases. Towards this end, the synthesis of different phases of AlN, (Ti,Al)N, TaN, and TiN was investigated. Films were grown by pulsed laser deposition in two different chambers that had different base pressures to study the effect of background gases on the phases and orientations of the films. Growth of AlN and (Ti,Al)N films is strongly affected in a chamber that had a base pressure of 10-6 Torr, but the films adopt their stable nitride structures in a chamber with the lower base pressure of 10-8 Torr. TaN adopts either the cubic rock salt structure or its stable hexagonal structure, depending on the growth temperature, while TiN grows as rock salt in all conditions. Single crystal epitaxial superlattices were then grown with different compositions, periodicities, and crystallographic orientations to compare the effect of chemistry, nanostructure, and crystallographic texture on hardness. Finally, the structure-property relationships of

  12. Hexagonal-structured ε-NbN: ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yongtao; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xuefei; Qi, Xintong; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2015-01-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂P = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions. PMID:26028439

  13. High-Resolution Hard X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Spectrometers Based on Superconducting Absorbers Coupled to Superconducting Transition Edge Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    van den Berg, M.; Chow, D.; Loshak, A.; Cunningham, M.F.; Barbee, T.W.; Matthias, F.; Labov, S.E.

    2000-09-21

    We are developing detectors based on bulk superconducting absorbers coupled to superconducting transition edge sensors (TES) for high-resolution spectroscopy of hard X-rays and soft gamma-rays. We have achieved an energy resolution of 70 eV FWHM at 60 keV using a 1 x 1 x 0.25 mm{sup 3} Sn absorber coupled to a Mo/Cu multilayer TES with a transition temperature of 100 mK. The response of the detector is compared with a simple model using only material properties data and characteristics derived from IV-measurements. We have also manufactured detectors using superconducting absorbers with a higher stopping power, such as Pb and Ta. We present our first measurements of these detectors, including the thermalization characteristics of the bulk superconducting absorbers. The differences in performance between the detectors are discussed and an outline of the future direction of our detector development efforts is given.

  14. Revisiting the Phillips ionicity of conductors and the quantitative determination of the hardness of carbides and nitrides of transition metals using the LDA + U technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Li, J. C.; Jiang, Q.

    2010-10-01

    The Phillips ionicity is modified, simulated and calculated for conductors. The results show that the percentage of metallic bonding in multiplex chemical bonds of transition metal (TM) carbides and nitrides is large; this affects the Phillips ionicity. The redefinition of Phillips ionicity has been applied to estimate the hardness of TM carbides and nitrides; the values obtained are in agreement with experimental and theoretical evidence. In addition, materials with the zinc blende structure are harder than those with rock salt structure.

  15. Quantum and thermal phase slips in superconducting niobium nitride (NbN) ultrathin crystalline nanowire: application to single photon detection.

    PubMed

    Delacour, Cécile; Pannetier, Bernard; Villegier, Jean-Claude; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2012-07-11

    We present low-temperature electronic transport properties of superconducting nanowires obtained by nanolithography of 4-nm-thick niobium nitride (NbN) films epitaxially grown on sapphire substrate. Below 6 K, clear evidence of phase slippages is observed in the transport measurements. Upon lowering the temperature, we observe the signatures of a crossover between a thermal and a quantum behavior in the phase slip regimes. We find that phase slips are stable even at the lowest temperatures and that no hotspot is formed. The photoresponse of these nanowires is measured as a function of the light irradiation wavelength and temperature and exhibits a behavior comparable with previous results obtained on thicker films.

  16. Bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated using 15N, 13C, and 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, W. J.; Hoatson, G. L.; Holloway, B. C.; Vold, R. L.; Reilly, A. C.

    2003-11-01

    The nitrogen bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) films is examined with 15N, 13C, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Films were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering, in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests revealed an elastic recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa, and an elastic modulus of 47 GPa. The NMR results show that nitrogen bonding in this material is consistent with sp2 hybridized nitrogen incorporated in an aromatic carbon environment. The data also indicate that the a-CNx prepared for this study has very low hydrogen content and is hydrophilic. Specifically, analysis of 15N and 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning and 1H NMR experiments suggests that water preferentially protonates nitrogen sites.

  17. In situ controlled growth of titanium nitride in amorphous silicon nitride: a general route toward bulk nitride nanocomposites with very high hardness.

    PubMed

    Bechelany, Mirna Chaker; Proust, Vanessa; Gervais, Christel; Ghisleni, Rudy; Bernard, Samuel; Miele, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    Bulk nanocomposites possessing very high hardness in which TiN nanocrystallites are homogeneously embedded in an amorphous Si3N4 matrix are produced from perhydropolysilazane and tetrakisdimethylaminotitanium. That is, a low-molecular-weight TiN molecule is mixed in controlled molar ratio with a polymeric Si3N4 precursor; further processing, including ammonolysis, warm pressing, and controlled nanocrystal growth, yields nanocomposites with the desired properties.

  18. Superconductivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    SUPERCONDUCTIVITY HIGH-POWER APPLICATIONS Electric power generation/transmission Energy storage Acoustic projectors Weapon launchers Catapult Ship propulsion • • • Stabilized...temperature superconductive shields could be substantially enhanced by use of high-Tc materials. 27 28 NRAC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SHIP PROPULSION APPLICATIONS...motor shown in the photograph. As a next step in the evolution of electric-drive ship propulsion technology, DTRC has proposed to scale up the design

  19. Novel superconducting skutterudite-type phosphorus nitride at high pressure from first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Raza, Zamaan; Errea, Ion; Oganov, Artem R; Saitta, A Marco

    2014-07-30

    State of the art variable composition structure prediction based on density functional theory demonstrates that two new stoichiometries of PN, PN3 and PN2, become viable at high pressure. PN3 has a skutterudite-like Immm structure and is metastable with positive phonon frequencies at pressures between 10 and 100 GPa. PN3 is metallic and is the first reported nitrogen-based skutterudite. Its metallicity arises from nitrogen p-states which delocalise across N4 rings characteristic of skutterudites, and it becomes a good electron-phonon superconductor at 10 GPa, with a Tc of around 18 K. The superconductivity arises from strongly enhanced electron-phonon coupling at lower pressures, originating primarily from soft collective P-N phonon modes. The PN2 phase is an insulator with P2/m symmetry and is stable at pressures in excess of 200 GPa.

  20. Novel superconducting skutterudite-type phosphorus nitride at high pressure from first-principles calculations

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Zamaan; Errea, Ion; Oganov, Artem R.; Saitta, A. Marco

    2014-01-01

    State of the art variable composition structure prediction based on density functional theory demonstrates that two new stoichiometries of PN, PN3 and PN2, become viable at high pressure. PN3 has a skutterudite-like Immm structure and is metastable with positive phonon frequencies at pressures between 10 and 100 GPa. PN3 is metallic and is the first reported nitrogen-based skutterudite. Its metallicity arises from nitrogen p-states which delocalise across N4 rings characteristic of skutterudites, and it becomes a good electron-phonon superconductor at 10 GPa, with a Tc of around 18 K. The superconductivity arises from strongly enhanced electron-phonon coupling at lower pressures, originating primarily from soft collective P-N phonon modes. The PN2 phase is an insulator with P2/m symmetry and is stable at pressures in excess of 200 GPa. PMID:25074347

  1. Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Yung K.

    Many potential high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) military applications have been demonstrated by low-temperature superconductivity systems; they encompass high efficiency electric drives for naval vessels, airborne electric generators, energy storage systems for directed-energy weapons, electromechanical launchers, magnetic and electromagnetic shields, and cavity resonators for microwave and mm-wave generation. Further HST applications in militarily relevant fields include EM sensors, IR focal plane arrays, SQUIDs, magnetic gradiometers, high-power sonar sources, and superconducting antennas and inertial navigation systems. The development of SQUID sensors will furnish novel magnetic anomaly detection methods for ASW.

  2. Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using an environmental cell with silicon nitride membrane windows

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemi, Eika; Watanabe, Yoshio; Oji, Hiroshi; Cui, Yi-Tao; Son, Jin-Young

    2015-06-21

    We applied hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) to a sample under ambient pressure conditions using an environmental cell with an approximately 24 nm-thick SiN{sub x} membrane window. As a model chemical substance, europium (II) iodide (EuI{sub 2}) sealed in the cell with argon gas was investigated with HAXPES to identify the chemical species present inside the cell. The optical and morphological properties of the sample within the cell were measured with optical and fluorescent microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence, and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. We confirmed the effectiveness of the gas barrier properties of the cell with the SiN{sub x} window and demonstrated its applicability to various other optical and electron measurements as well as HAXPES.

  3. Reactive magnetron cosputtering of hard and conductive ternary nitride thin films: Ti-Zr-N and Ti-Ta-N

    SciTech Connect

    Abadias, G.; Koutsokeras, L. E.; Dub, S. N.; Tolmachova, G. N.; Debelle, A.; Sauvage, T.; Villechaise, P.

    2010-07-15

    Ternary transition metal nitride thin films, with thickness up to 300 nm, were deposited by dc reactive magnetron cosputtering in Ar-N{sub 2} plasma discharges at 300 deg. C on Si substrates. Two systems were comparatively studied, Ti-Zr-N and Ti-Ta-N, as representative of isostructural and nonisostructural prototypes, with the aim of characterizing their structural, mechanical, and electrical properties. While phase-separated TiN-ZrN and TiN-TaN are the bulk equilibrium states, Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}N and Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N solid solutions with the Na-Cl (B1-type) structure could be stabilized in a large compositional range (up to x=1 and y=0.75, respectively). Substituting Ti atoms by either Zr or Ta atoms led to significant changes in film texture, microstructure, grain size, and surface morphology, as evidenced by x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, and scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. The ternary Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N films exhibited superior mechanical properties to Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}N films as well as binary compounds, with hardness as high as 42 GPa for y=0.69. All films were metallic, the lowest electrical resistivity {rho}{approx}65 {mu}{Omega} cm being obtained for pure ZrN, while for Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N films a minimum was observed at y{approx}0.3. The evolution of the different film properties is discussed based on microstructrural investigations.

  4. Superconductivity:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchetti, N.

    In this paper a short historical account of the discovery of superconductivity and of its gradual development is given. The physical interpretation of its various aspects took about forty years (from 1911 to 1957) to reach a successful description of this phenomenon in terms of a microscopic theory At the very end it seemed that more or less everything could be reasonably interpreted even if modifications and refinements of the original theory were necessary. In 1986 the situation changed abruptly when a cautious but revolutionary paper appeared showing that superconductivity was found in certain ceramic oxides at temperatures above those up to then known. A rush of frantic experimental activity started world-wide and in less than one year it was shown that superconductivity is a much more widespread phenomenon than deemed before and can be found at temperatures well above the liquid air boiling point. The complexity and the number of the substances (mainly ceramic oxides) involved call for a sort of modern alchemy if compounds with the best superconducting properties are to be manufactured. We don't use the word alchemy in a deprecatory sense but just to emphasise that till now nobody can say why these compounds are what they are: superconductors.

  5. Superconductivity of metal nitride chloride β-MNCl (M = Zr, Hf) with rare-earth metal RE (RE = Eu, Yb) doped by intercalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Tanaka, Masashi; Onimaru, Takahiro; Takabatake, Toshiro; Isikawa, Yosikazu; Yamanaka, Shoji

    2013-04-01

    Electrons were doped into the β-form layered metal nitride chloride MNCl (M = Zr, Hf) by intercalation of rare-earth metals RE (RE = Eu, Yb) using liquid ammonia solutions. The intercalated compounds REx(NH3)yMNCl show superconductivity with transition temperatures Tc of ˜13 and 24.3 K for M = Zr and Hf, respectively, quite similar to the alkali metal intercalated analogs. The paramagnetic characteristics for Eu2+ and Yb3+ can coexist with superconductivity. The magnetic resistance measured on the uniaxially oriented Eu0.08(NH3)yHfNCl with the magnetic field parallel to the ab plane (‖ ab) and the c axis (‖ c) shows a strong anisotropic effect on the upper critical field Hc2; a large anisotropic parameter \\gamma ={H}_{{c}2}^{\\parallel a b}/{H}_{{c}2}^{\\parallel c}\\sim 4 suggests a pseudo-two-dimensional superconductivity. The Tc of Eu0.13(THF)yHfNCl is shifted toward a higher value of 25.8 K upon expansion of the interlayer spacing from 11.9 to 17.5 Å by co-intercalation of voluminous organic molecules such as tetrahydrofuran.

  6. An ultra-compact hard X-ray superconducting light source for biotechnology and industrial use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, David B.; Garren, Al; Green, Mike; Kolonko, Jim; Lee, Kevin

    1998-04-01

    We describe the design of a 1.5-GeV ultra-compact storage ring that uses 7-T superconducting magnets. The aim of this source is to provide intense 10-30 keV X-rays of moderate brilliance for commercial application. The first prototype is being designed for the UCLA Science and Technology Research Building (STRB) in Westwood, California.

  7. The Structure and Bonding State for Fullerene-Like Carbon Nitride Films with High Hardness Formed by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, Tomoyuki; Niwa, Osamu; Umemura, Shigeru; Hirono, Shigeru

    2012-12-01

    We studied pure carbon films and carbon nitride (CN) films by using electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) sputtering. The main feature of this method is high density ion irradiation during deposition, which enables the pure carbon films to have fullerene-like (FL) structures without nitrogen incorporation. Furthermore, without substrate heating, the ECR sputtered CN films exhibited an enhanced FL microstructure and hardness comparable to that of diamond at intermediate nitrogen concentration. This microstructure consisted of bent and cross-linked graphene sheets where layered areas remarkably decreased due to increased sp3 bonding. Under high nitrogen concentration conditions, the CN films demonstrated extremely low hardness because nitrile bonding not only decreased the covalent-bonded two-dimensional hexagonal network but also annihilated the bonding there. By evaluating lattice images obtained by transmission electron microscopy and the bonding state measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we classified the ECR sputtered CN films and offered phase diagram and structure zone diagram.

  8. Uranium hohlraum with an ultrathin uranium-nitride coating layer for low hard x-ray emission and high radiation temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang; Ding, Yongkun; Xing, Pifeng; Li, Sanwei; Kuang, Longyu; Li, Zhichao; Yi, Taimin; Ren, Guoli; Wu, Zeqing; Jing, Longfei; Zhang, Wenhai; Zhan, Xiayu; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Baibin; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Li, Yongsheng; Liu, Jie; Huo, Wenyi; Lan, Ke

    2015-11-01

    An ultrathin layer of uranium nitrides (UN) has been coated on the inner surface of depleted uranium hohlraum (DUH), which has been proven by our experiment to prevent the oxidization of uranium (U) effectively. Comparative experiments between the novel depleted uranium hohlraum and pure golden (Au) hohlraum are implemented on an SGIII-prototype laser facility. Under a laser intensity of 6 × 1014 W cm-2, we observe that the hard x-ray (hν \\gt 1.8 keV) fraction of the uranium hohlraum decreases by 61% and the peak intensity of the total x-ray flux (0.1 keV˜5.0 keV) increases by 5%. Radiation hydrodynamic code LARED is used to interpret the above observations. Our result for the first time indicates the advantages of the UN-coated DUH in generating a uniform x-ray source with a quasi-Planckian spectrum, which should have important applications in high energy density physics.

  9. Surface properties of metal-nitride and metal-carbide films deposited on Nb for radio-frequency superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwin, E. L.; King, F. K.; Kirby, R. E.; Aita, O.

    1987-02-01

    Various effects occur which can prevent attainment of the high Q's and/or the high gradient fields necessary for the operation of radio-frequency (rf) superconducting cavities. One of these effects, multipactor, both causes the cavity to detune during filling due to resonant secondary electron emission at the cavity walls, and lowers the quality factor (Q) by dissipative processes. TiN deposited onto the high-field regions of room-temperature Al cavities has been used at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center to successfully reduce multipactor in the past. We have therefore studied TiN and its companion materials, NbN, NbC, and TiC, all on Nb substrates under several realistic conditions: (1) as-deposited, (2) exposed to air, and (3) electron bombarded. The studied films (up to 14-nm thickness) were sputter deposited onto sputter-cleaned Nb substrates. Results indicate that all the materials tested gave substantially the same results. The maximum secondary electron yields for as-deposited films were reduced to nearly the preoxidized values after electron bombardment (2-3×1017 electrons cm-2 in the case of NbN and NbC). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that the oxides (e.g., TiO2 in the case of TiN films) formed during air exposure were slightly reduced (converted to lower oxides) by the electron-beam exposure. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) showed a slight reduction in the surface O concentration following beam exposure. These results suggest that the chemical nature of top surface layers is responsible for the substantial changes in secondary electron yield observed upon electron-beam exposures and that AES does not reflect this change strongly because of the difficulty in extracting chemical (versus elemental) information from AES. The results indicate that any of these films would be poor choices if simply deposited and exposed to air, but, in fact, the in situ electron bombardment which occurs during cavity operation serves to reduce the

  10. Tests of the radiation hardness of VLSI Integrated Circuits and Silicon Strip Detectors for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) under neutron, proton, and gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, H.J.; Milner, C.; Sommer, W.F. ); Carteglia, N.; DeWitt, J.; Dorfan, D.; Hubbard, B.; Leslie, J.; O'Shaughnessy, K.F.; Pitzl, D.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E. . Inst. for Particle Physics); Ellison, J.A. ); Ferguson, P. ); Giubellino

    1990-01-01

    As part of a program to develop a silicon strip central tracking detector system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) we are studying the effects of radiation damage in silicon detectors and their associated front-end readout electronics. We report on the results of neutron and proton irradiations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and {gamma}-ray irradiations at UC Santa Cruz (UCSC). Individual components on single-sided AC-coupled silicon strip detectors and on test structures were tested. Circuits fabricated in a radiation hard CMOS process and individual transistors fabricated using dielectric isolation bipolar technology were also studied. Results indicate that a silicon strip tracking detector system should have a lifetime of at least one decade at the SSC. 17 refs., 17 figs.

  11. Superconducting Memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peotta, Sebastiano; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2014-09-01

    In his original work, Josephson predicted that a phase-dependent conductance should be present in superconducting tunnel junctions, an effect difficult to detect, mainly because it is hard to single it out from the usual nondissipative Josephson current. We propose a solution for this problem that consists of using different superconducting materials to realize the two junctions of a superconducting interferometer. According to the Ambegaokar-Baratoff relation the two junctions have different conductances if the critical currents are equal, thus the Josephson current can be suppressed by fixing the magnetic flux in the loop at half of a flux quantum without canceling the phase-dependent conductance. Our proposal can be used to study the phase-dependent conductance, an effect present in principle in all superconducting weak links. From the standpoint of nonlinear circuit theory, such a device is in fact an ideal memristor with possible applications to memories and neuromorphic computing in the framework of ultrafast and low-energy-consumption superconducting digital circuits.

  12. Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Of Boron Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes synthesis, properties, and applications of boron nitride. Especially in thin-film form. Boron nitride films useful as masks in x-ray lithography; as layers for passivation of high-speed microelectronic circuits; insulating films; hard, wear-resistant, protective films for optical components; lubricants; and radiation detectors. Present status of single-crystal growth of boron nitride indicates promising candidate for use in high-temperature semiconductor electronics.

  13. Effect of Plasma Nitriding on the Performance of WC-Co Cutting Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzaoglu, Ebru; Yilmaz, Safak; Gulmez, Turgut

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the effect of nitriding process parameters on the cutting performance of WC-Co tools. The cutting performance was measured by CNC machining of GG25 cast iron parts. The hardness and phase composition of nitrided layer were determined for different plasma nitriding temperatures and times. The hardness of the nitrided layer increased at all plasma nitrided conditions investigated. However, the machining performance of the cutting inserts varied in the range between a 60% increase and a 40% decrease after plasma nitriding. The maximum number of machined parts was seen when the insert was nitrided at 600 °C-4 h and at 500 °C-4 h.

  14. Low pressure growth of cubic boron nitride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for forming thin films of cubic boron nitride on substrates at low pressures and temperatures. A substrate is first coated with polycrystalline diamond to provide a uniform surface upon which cubic boron nitride can be deposited by chemical vapor deposition. The cubic boron nitride film is useful as a substitute for diamond coatings for a variety of applications in which diamond is not suitable. any tetragonal or hexagonal boron nitride. The cubic boron nitride produced in accordance with the preceding example is particularly well-suited for use as a coating for ultra hard tool bits and abrasives, especially those intended to use in cutting or otherwise fabricating iron.

  15. Nonlinear terahertz superconducting plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jingbo; Zhang, Caihong; Liang, Lanju; Jin, Biaobing; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Wang, Huabing; Chen, Jian; Tonouchi, Masayoshi; Wu, Peiheng

    2014-10-01

    Nonlinear terahertz (THz) transmission through subwavelength hole array in superconducting niobium nitride (NbN) film is experimentally investigated using intense THz pulses. The good agreement between the measurement and numerical simulations indicates that the field strength dependent transmission mainly arises from the nonlinear properties of the superconducting film. Under weak THz pulses, the transmission peak can be tuned over a frequency range of 145 GHz which is attributed to the high kinetic inductance of 50 nm-thick NbN film. Utilizing the THz pump-THz probe spectroscopy, we study the dynamic process of transmission spectra and demonstrate that the transition time of such superconducting plasmonic device is within 5 ps.

  16. Low-compressibility and hard material carbon nitride imide C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH): First principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Haiyan; Wei Qun; Zheng Baobing; Guo Ping

    2011-03-15

    First principles calculations are performed to investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH). Our calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data and previous theoretical values. Orthorhombic C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) phase is found to be mechanically stable at an ambient pressure. Based on the calculated bulk modulus and shear modulus of polycrystalline aggregate, C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) can be regarded as a potential candidate of ultra-incompressible and hard material. Furthermore, the elastic anisotropy and Debye temperatures are also discussed by investigating the elastic constants and moduli. Density of states and electronic localization function analysis show that the strong C-N covalent bond in CN{sub 4} tetrahedron is the main driving force for the high bulk and shear moduli as well as small Poisson's ratio of C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH). -- Graphical abstract: Contours of electronic localization function (ELF) of C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) on the: (0 0 1) plane (a), (1 0 0) plane (b), an ELF of Si{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) on the: (0 0 1) plane (c) and (1 0 0) plane (d). Display Omitted Research highlights: The structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) have been studied. C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) is a potential low compressible and hard material. Both C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) and Si{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) are found to have insulating feature with large band gaps. The strong covalent C-N bonding in CN{sub 4} tetrahedrons play a key role in the incompressibility and hardness of C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH). The chemical bonding in these two solids is a complex mixture of covalent and ionic characters.

  17. Synthesis, Hardness, and Electronic Properties of Stoichiometric VN and CrN

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Shanmin; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; ...

    2015-11-09

    Here, we report synthesis of single-crystal VN and CrN through high-pressure ionexchange reaction routes. The final products are stoichiometric and have crystallite sizes in the range of 50-120 mu m. We also prepared VN and TiN crystals using high-pressure sintering of nitride powders. On the basis of single-crystal indentation testing, the determined asymptotic Vickers hardness for TiN, VN, and CrN is 18 (1), 10 (1), and 16 (1) GPa, respectively. Moreover, the relatively low hardness in VN indicates that the metallic bonding prevails due to the overfilled metallic a bonds, although the cation-anion covalent hybridization in this compound is muchmore » stronger than that in TiN and CrN. All three nitrides are intrinsically excellent metals at ambient pressure. In particular, VN exhibits superconducting transition at T-c approximate to 7.8 K, which is slightly lower than the reported values for nitrogen-deficient or crystallinedisordered samples due to unsuppressed "spin fluctuation" in the well-crystallized stoichiometric VN. The magnetostructural transition in CrN correlates with a metal metal transition at T-N = 240(5) K and is accompanied by a similar to 40% drop in electrical resistivity. Additionally, more detailed electronic properties are presented with new insights into these nitrides.« less

  18. Synthesis, Hardness, and Electronic Properties of Stoichiometric VN and CrN

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shanmin; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wang, Liping; Leinenweber, Kurt; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-11-09

    Here, we report synthesis of single-crystal VN and CrN through high-pressure ionexchange reaction routes. The final products are stoichiometric and have crystallite sizes in the range of 50-120 mu m. We also prepared VN and TiN crystals using high-pressure sintering of nitride powders. On the basis of single-crystal indentation testing, the determined asymptotic Vickers hardness for TiN, VN, and CrN is 18 (1), 10 (1), and 16 (1) GPa, respectively. Moreover, the relatively low hardness in VN indicates that the metallic bonding prevails due to the overfilled metallic a bonds, although the cation-anion covalent hybridization in this compound is much stronger than that in TiN and CrN. All three nitrides are intrinsically excellent metals at ambient pressure. In particular, VN exhibits superconducting transition at T-c approximate to 7.8 K, which is slightly lower than the reported values for nitrogen-deficient or crystallinedisordered samples due to unsuppressed "spin fluctuation" in the well-crystallized stoichiometric VN. The magnetostructural transition in CrN correlates with a metal metal transition at T-N = 240(5) K and is accompanied by a similar to 40% drop in electrical resistivity. Additionally, more detailed electronic properties are presented with new insights into these nitrides.

  19. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  20. Transport properties of ZrN superconducting films

    SciTech Connect

    Cassinese, A.; Iavarone, M.; Vaglio, R.; Grimsditch, M.; Uran, S.

    2000-12-01

    Superconductivity in nitrides presents intriguing aspects related to the role of optical phonons. In the present paper we report on high-quality superconducting zirconium nitride film preparation and characterization (including Raman scattering) as well as on both dc and microwave frequency transport properties. The high-temperature dc resistivity shows no evidence of saturation effects, possibly due to the low electron-phonon coupling. Surface impedance data can be well fitted by the standard BCS expressions. The data provide further evidence of the ''conventional'' nature of superconductivity in these compounds.

  1. Crystalline boron nitride aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Rousseas, Michael; Goldstein, Anna P.; Mickelson, William; Worsley, Marcus A.; Woo, Leta

    2017-04-04

    This disclosure provides methods and materials related to boron nitride aerogels. In one aspect, a material comprises an aerogel comprising boron nitride. The boron nitride has an ordered crystalline structure. The ordered crystalline structure may include atomic layers of hexagonal boron nitride lying on top of one another, with atoms contained in a first layer being superimposed on atoms contained in a second layer.

  2. Phase Transformations During the Low-Temperature Nitriding of AISI 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Gu, Tan; Qiu, Shaoyu; Wang, Jun; Xiong, Ji; Fan, Hongyuan

    2015-02-01

    Liquid nitriding of type AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel was conducted at 723 K (450 °C), using one type of novel low-temperature liquid chemical thermo-treatment. The transformation of the nitrided surface microstructure was systematically studied. Experimental results revealed that a nitrided layer formed on the sample surface with the thickness ranging from 3 to 28 μm, depending on nitriding time. After the 2205 duplex stainless steel was subjected to liquid nitriding 723 K (450 °C) for less than 8 hours, the pre-existing ferrite region on the surface transformed into the expanded austenite (S phase) by the infusion of nitrogen atoms, most of which stay in the interstitial sites. Generally, the dominant phase of the nitrided layer was the expanded austenite. When the nitriding time prolonged up to 16 hours, some pre-existing ferrite in expanded austenite was decomposed and ɛ-nitride precipitated subsequently. When the treatment time went up to 40 hours, large amount of ɛ-nitride and CrN precipitates were observed in the pre-existing ferritic region in the expanded austenite. Furthermore, many nitrides precipitated from the pre-austenite region. Acicular nitride was identified by transmission electron microscopy. The thickness of the nitrided layer increased with increasing nitriding time. The growth of the nitrided layer is mainly due to nitrogen diffusion in accordance with the expected parabolic rate law. Liquid nitriding effectively increased the surface hardness of 2205 duplex stainless steel by a factor of 3.

  3. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sankar, Sambasivan [Chicago, IL; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Barnett, Scott A [Evanston, IL; Kim, Ilwon [Skokie, IL; Kroeger, Donald M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-03-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metals and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layer. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may have superconducting properties.

  4. Superconducting thermal neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, V.; Pietropaolo, A.; Celentano, G.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Scherillo, A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Vannozzi, A.

    2016-09-01

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium nitride (NbN) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle is well described by a hot spot mechanism: upon the occurrence of the nuclear reactions n + 10B → α + 7Li + 2.8 MeV, the energy released by the secondary particles into the strip induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T below 11K and current-biased below the critical current IC, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed and compared to those of a borated Nb superconducting strip.

  5. Boron nitride composites

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2017-02-21

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and one or more borate binders; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes: a matrix material including hexagonal boron nitride and amorphous boron nitride; and a plurality of cubic boron nitride particles dispersed in the matrix material.

  6. Investigation into nitrided spur gears

    SciTech Connect

    Yilbas, B.S.; Coban, A.; Nickel, J.; Sunar, M.; Sami, M.; Abdul Aleem, B.J.

    1996-12-01

    The cold forging method has been widely used in industry to produce machine parts. In general, gears are produced by shaping or hobbing. One of the shaping techniques is precision forging, which has several advantages over hobbing. In the present study, cold forging of spur gears from Ti-6Al-4V material is introduced. To improve the surface properties of the resulting gears, plasma nitriding was carried out. Nuclear reaction analysis was carried out to obtain the nitrogen concentration, while the micro-PIXE technique was used to determine the elemental distribution in the matrix after forging and nitriding processes. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction were used to investigate the metallurgical changes and formation of nitride components in the surface region. Microhardness and friction tests were carried out to measure the hardness depth profile and friction coefficient at the surface. Finally, scoring failure tests were conducted to determine the rotational speed at which the gears failed. Three distinct regions were obtained in the nitride region, and at the initial stages of the scoring tests, failure in surface roughness was observed in the vicinity of the tip of the gear tooth. This occurred at a particular rotational speed and work input.

  7. Powdered Hexagonal Boron Nitride Reducing Nanoscale Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chkhartishvili, L.; Matcharashvili, T.; Esiava, R.; Tsagareishvili, O.; Gabunia, D.; Margiev, B.; Gachechiladze, A.

    2013-05-01

    A morphology model is suggested for nano-powdered hexagonal boron nitride that can serve as an effective solid additive to liquid lubricants. It allows to estimate the specific surface, that is a hard-to-measure parameter, based on average size of powder particles. The model can be used also to control nanoscale wear processes.

  8. Manufacture of sintered silicon nitrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwai, T.

    1985-01-01

    Sintered silicon nitrides are manufactured by sintering Si3N powder containing 2 to 15% in wt of a powder mixture composed of nitride powder of lanthanide or Y 100 parts and AIN powder less than 100 parts at 1500 to 1900 deg. temperature under a pressure of less than 200 Kg/sq. cm. The sintered Si3N has high mechanical strength in high temperature. Thus, Si3N4 93.0, Y 5.0 and AlN 2.0% in weight were wet mixed in acetone in N atom, molded and sintered at 1750 deg. and 1000 Kg/sq. cm. to give a sintered body having high hardness.

  9. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, David A.; Bingert, John F.; Peterson, Dean E.; Sheinberg, Haskell

    1995-01-01

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity.

  10. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, D.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Peterson, D.E.; Sheinberg, H.

    1995-07-18

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity. 2 figs.

  11. High Strength and Retained Ductility Achieved in a Nitrided Strip Cast Nb-Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Kelvin Y.; Shrestha, Sachin L.; Felfer, Peter J.; Cairney, Julie M.; Killmore, Chris R.; Carpenter, Kristin R.; Kaul, Harold R.; Ringer, Simon P.

    2013-02-01

    The current study investigates the strengthening of an Nb-microallyed CASTRIP® steel at 798 K (525 °C) by nitriding in a KNO3 salt bath. Nitriding up to 1 hour dramatically increased the yield strength of the steel by ~35 pct (from 475 to 645 MPa) with no sacrifice of ductility (~16 pct). Further nitriding led to brittle fracture. Hardness profiles of the nitrided steels through the thickness reveal hard surfaces and a relatively softer core. The hardening of the shell in the nitrided steels is thought to be the combined effect of solid solution strengthening from nitrogen and dispersion strengthening from clusters and precipitates. The retained ductility is attributed to the hard-shell-soft-core structure through nitriding.

  12. Recent developments in nitride chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Niewa, R.; DiSalvo, F.J.

    1998-10-01

    The chemistry of ternary nitrides is reviewed with special focus on developments of the last two years (1996 and 1997). In particular, structures and properties of ternary and higher transition metal nitrides, main group nitrides, subnitrides, and nitride halides are compared, and a section on thermodynamics of ternary nitrides is included. Finally, methods for the preparation of gallium nitride single crystals are summarized.

  13. Superconducting transistor

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  14. Stable xenon nitride at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Feng; Wang, Yanchao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yunwei; Ma, Yanming

    2015-09-01

    Nitrides in many ways are fascinating since they often appear as superconductors, high-energy density, and hard materials. Though there exist a large variety of nitrides, noble gas nitrides are missing in nature. Pursuit of noble gas nitrides has therefore become the subject of topical interests, but remains as a great challenge since molecular nitrogen (N2, a major form of nitrogen) and noble gases are both inert systems and do not interact at normal conditions. We show through a first-principles swarm-structure search that high pressure enables a direct interaction of N2 and xenon (Xe) above 146 GPa. The resultant Xe nitride has a peculiar stoichiometry of XeN6, possessing a high-energy density of approximately 2.4 kJg -1, rivaling that of the modern explosives. Structurally, XeN6 is intriguing with the appearance of chaired N6 hexagons and unusually high 12-coordination of Xe bonded with N. Our work opens up the possibility of achieving Xe nitride with superior high-energy density whose formation is long sought as impossible.

  15. Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Minghui; Allen, Amy J.; Nguyen, Minh T.; Ralston, Walter T.; MacLeod, Michelle J.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2013-09-15

    Transition metal nitrides (TMN) have many desirable characteristics such as high hardness and good thermal stability under reducing conditions. This work reports an initial survey of the chemical stability of mesoporous TMNs (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in water at 80 °C at neutral, acidic and alkaline pH. The mesoporous TMNs had specific surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g with average pore sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. The high surface areas of these materials enhance the rate of corrosion per unit mass over that of a bulk material, making detection of corrosion much easier. The products were characterized by Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Several nitrides have corrosion rates that are, within error, not distinguishable from zero (±1 Å/day). Of the nitrides examined, CrN appears to be the most corrosion resistant under acidic conditions. None of the nitrides studied are corrosion resistant under alkaline conditions. - Graphical abstract: Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in acidic and alkaline solutions at 80 °C for 2 weeks. Display Omitted - highlights: • Corrosion rates of mesoporous transition metal nitrides in aqueous solution is reported. • The mesoporous TMNs had surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g. • CrN is the most corrosion resistant under the conditions studied.

  16. Tunable superconducting microstrip resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamyan, A. A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Danilov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a simple yet versatile design for a tunable superconducting microstrip resonator. Niobium nitride is employed as the superconducting material and aluminum oxide, produced by atomic layer deposition, as the dielectric layer. We show that the high quality of the dielectric material allows to reach the internal quality factors in the order of Qi˜104 in the single photon regime. Qi rapidly increases with the number of photons in the resonator N and exceeds 105 for N ˜10 -50 . A straightforward modification of the basic microstrip design allows to pass a current bias through the strip and to control its kinetic inductance. We achieve a frequency tuning δf =62 MHz around f0=2.4 GHz for a fundamental mode and δf =164 MHz for a third harmonic. This translates into a tuning parameter Qiδf /f0=150 . The presented design can be incorporated into essentially any superconducting circuitry operating at temperatures below 2.5 K.

  17. Titanium Nitride Cermets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1952-07-01

    7696i ’-Brewer, L., et al. Thermodynamic and Physical Properties of Nitrides. Carbides, Sulfides, i1licides, and Phosphides, Chemistry and Metallurgy of...12 Referen eCs 0 . ...................... • • • 14 WADC TR 52-155 iv LIST OF TABLES I Properties of Titanium Nitride Bodies...15 II Properties of Titanium Nitride-Nickel Bodies............16 III Properties of Titanium Nitride Cermets with Nickel,..... 17 Cobalt, and

  18. Superconductivity in diamond.

    PubMed

    Ekimov, E A; Sidorov, V A; Bauer, E D; Mel'nik, N N; Curro, N J; Thompson, J D; Stishov, S M

    2004-04-01

    Diamond is an electrical insulator well known for its exceptional hardness. It also conducts heat even more effectively than copper, and can withstand very high electric fields. With these physical properties, diamond is attractive for electronic applications, particularly when charge carriers are introduced (by chemical doping) into the system. Boron has one less electron than carbon and, because of its small atomic radius, boron is relatively easily incorporated into diamond; as boron acts as a charge acceptor, the resulting diamond is effectively hole-doped. Here we report the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond synthesized at high pressure (nearly 100,000 atmospheres) and temperature (2,500-2,800 K). Electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and field-dependent resistance measurements show that boron-doped diamond is a bulk, type-II superconductor below the superconducting transition temperature T(c) approximately 4 K; superconductivity survives in a magnetic field up to Hc2(0) > or = 3.5 T. The discovery of superconductivity in diamond-structured carbon suggests that Si and Ge, which also form in the diamond structure, may similarly exhibit superconductivity under the appropriate conditions.

  19. Preparation of uranium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Potter, Ralph A.; Tennery, Victor J.

    1976-01-01

    A process for preparing actinide-nitrides from massive actinide metal which is suitable for sintering into low density fuel shapes by partially hydriding the massive metal and simultaneously dehydriding and nitriding the dehydrided portion. The process is repeated until all of the massive metal is converted to a nitride.

  20. Application of hard coatings to substrates at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sproul, William D.

    1993-01-01

    BIRL, the industrial research laboratory of Northwestern University, has conducted unique and innovative research, under sponsorship from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), in the application of hard, wear resistant coatings to bearing steels using the high-rate reactive sputtering (HRRS) process that was pioneered by Dr. William Sproul, the principal investigator on this program. Prior to this program, Dr. Sproul had demonstrated that it is possible to apply hard coatings such as titanium nitride (TiN) to alloy steels at low temperatures via the HRRS process without changing the metallurgical properties of the steel. The NASA MSFC program at BIRL had the specific objectives to: apply TiN to 440C stainless steel without changing the metallurgical properties of the steel; prepare rolling contact fatigue (RCF) test samples coated with binary hard coatings of TiN, zirconium nitride (ZrN), hafnium nitride (HfN), chromium nitride (CrN), and molybdenum nitride (MoN), and metal coatings of copper (Cu) and gold (Au); and develop new alloyed hard coatings of titanium aluminum nitride (Ti(0.5)Al(0.5)N), titanium zirconium nitride (Ti(0.5)Zr(0.5)N), and titanium aluminum vanadium nitride.

  1. Studies on optical emission spectroscopy of nitriding plasma and characterization of nitrided steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manash Kumar

    Plasma in nature is abundant and appears quite beautiful in colour as can be seen in glow of sun and auroras. Plasma produced in laboratories is also quite interesting as a correspondence of the naturally occurring plasmas from a glow discharge to a tokamak. However, plasmas tuned to special conditions have been successfully utilized for material processing, of which, plasma nitriding is one and foremost. The work of the thesis focuses on the setting up of a plasma nitriding system with various diagnostics applied to plasma and plasma treated stainless steels. Emission spectroscopy and probe diagnostics are applied to study the optical and plasma properties whereas austenitic stainless steels are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and hardness test in order to demonstrate the application of the process. The optical and plasma properties during nitriding are motivating, as these properties will lead to conditions for the formation of surface layer. The formation of iron and chromium nitrides is another important asset of the plasma nitriding process, which is tested by XRD technique, while the surface hardness is tested by hardness test. Optical properties are found from optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in terms of emission intensities and wavelengths. Langmuir probe (LP) is used for finding variations of plasma parameters with respect to process parameters and to make a comparison of plasma parameters with those of optical and discharge parameters. A correlation between OES and material characterization properties is sought in order to make a clear understanding of the process. In Chapter 1, introduction to plasma, the possible applications with relevance to plasma nitriding and spectroscopy are described. Plasma nitriding (termed in the title as nitriding plasma for convenience) has emerged as a powerful tool in modifying surface properties of a material without affecting the bulk properties. The various advantages over a conventional gas nitriding

  2. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-07-22

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  3. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-03-08

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  4. Surface and Interface Properties of Early Transition Metal Nitride Systems: A DFT-FLAPW study using the LDA and sX-LDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampfl, Catherine; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2001-03-01

    Early transition metal nitrides exhibit exceptional physical properties, e.g., hardness, brittleness, high melting point, and in some, superconductivity. And when grown as nanolayered superlattices, superhardness can result. Thus, they are important materials for technological applications. We have performed density-functional theory (DFT) calculations using the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method(E. Wimmer, H. Krakauer, M. Weinert, and A. J. Freeman, Phys. Rev. B 24) (1981) 864. within the local density approximation (LDA), and the screened-exchange (sX)-LDA in order to investigate the bulk, surface, and interface properties of several nitride systems. From the DFT-sX-LDA calculations we find that the relatively unexplored refractory III-V nitrides, ScN, YN, and LaN are not metallic or semi-metallic, but are semi-conductors with indirect band gaps(C. Stampfl, W. Mannstadt, R. Asahi, and A. J. Freeman, to be published.). We also investigated various terminations of ScN(001), and stoichiometric Al(001), TiN(001), VN(001) surfaces and interfaces of VN/Ti(001), AlN/VN(001) and AlN/TiN(001). Trends in the electronic and atomic structures will be reported as well as the associated energetics. Supported by the NSF (through the NU MRC).

  5. Quantum electromechanics on silicon nitride nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, J. M.; Kalaee, M.; Pitanti, A.; Norte, R.; Heinzle, L.; Davanço, M.; Srinivasan, K.; Painter, O.

    2016-08-01

    Radiation pressure has recently been used to effectively couple the quantum motion of mechanical elements to the fields of optical or microwave light. Integration of all three degrees of freedom--mechanical, optical and microwave--would enable a quantum interconnect between microwave and optical quantum systems. We present a platform based on silicon nitride nanomembranes for integrating superconducting microwave circuits with planar acoustic and optical devices such as phononic and photonic crystals. Using planar capacitors with vacuum gaps of 60 nm and spiral inductor coils of micron pitch we realize microwave resonant circuits with large electromechanical coupling to planar acoustic structures of nanoscale dimensions and femtoFarad motional capacitance. Using this enhanced coupling, we demonstrate microwave backaction cooling of the 4.48 MHz mechanical resonance of a nanobeam to an occupancy as low as 0.32. These results indicate the viability of silicon nitride nanomembranes as an all-in-one substrate for quantum electro-opto-mechanical experiments.

  6. Superconducting Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    After working with Lewis Research Center and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Superconducting Technologies, Inc. (STI) adapted NASA requirements and refined its own standard production recipe. STI uses high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials in its basic products: high quality thin films, circuits and components. Applications include microwave circuits for radar to reduce interference.

  7. Superconducting structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-04-01

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  8. Superconducting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2005-09-13

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  9. Mechanical and tribological behavior of silicon nitride and silicon carbon nitride coatings for total joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, M; Tkachenko, S; Schmidt, S; Berlind, T; Jacobson, S; Hultman, L; Engqvist, H; Persson, C

    2013-09-01

    Total joint replacements currently have relatively high success rates at 10-15 years; however, increasing ageing and an active population places higher demands on the longevity of the implants. A wear resistant configuration with wear particles that resorb in vivo can potentially increase the lifetime of an implant. In this study, silicon nitride (SixNy) and silicon carbon nitride (SixCyNz) coatings were produced for this purpose using reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS). The coatings are intended for hard bearing surfaces on implants. Hardness and elastic modulus of the coatings were evaluated by nanoindentation, cohesive, and adhesive properties were assessed by micro-scratching and the tribological performance was investigated in a ball-on-disc setup run in a serum solution. The majority of the SixNy coatings showed a hardness close to that of sintered silicon nitride (~18 GPa), and an elastic modulus close to that of cobalt chromium (~200 GPa). Furthermore, all except one of the SixNy coatings offered a wear resistance similar to that of bulk silicon nitride and significantly higher than that of cobalt chromium. In contrast, the SixCyNz coatings did not show as high level of wear resistance.

  10. Making Superconducting Welds between Superconducting Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I.; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2008-01-01

    A technique for making superconducting joints between wires made of dissimilar superconducting metals has been devised. The technique is especially suitable for fabrication of superconducting circuits needed to support persistent electric currents in electromagnets in diverse cryogenic applications. Examples of such electromagnets include those in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Sometimes, it is desirable to fabricate different parts of a persistent-current-supporting superconducting loop from different metals. For example, a sensory coil in a SQUID might be made of Pb, a Pb/Sn alloy, or a Cu wire plated with Pb/Sn, while the connections to the sensory coil might be made via Nb or Nb/Ti wires. Conventional wire-bonding techniques, including resistance spot welding and pressed contact, are not workable because of large differences between the hardnesses and melting temperatures of the different metals. The present technique is not subject to this limitation. The present technique involves the use (1) of a cheap, miniature, easy-to-operate, capacitor-discharging welding apparatus that has an Nb or Nb/Ti tip and operates with a continuous local flow of gaseous helium and (2) preparation of a joint in a special spark-discharge welding geometry. In a typical application, a piece of Nb foil about 25 m thick is rolled to form a tube, into which is inserted a wire that one seeks to weld to the tube (see figure). The tube can be slightly crimped for mechanical stability. Then a spark weld is made by use of the aforementioned apparatus with energy and time settings chosen to melt a small section of the niobium foil. The energy setting corresponds to the setting of a voltage to which the capacitor is charged. In an experiment, the technique was used to weld an Nb foil to a copper wire coated with a Pb/Sn soft solder, which is superconducting. The joint was evaluated as

  11. Operational Merits of Maritime Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, R.; Bosklopper, J. J.; van der Meij, K. H.

    The perspective of superconductivity to transfer currents without loss is very appealing in high power applications. In the maritime sector many machines and systems exist in the roughly 1-100 MW range and the losses are well over 50%, which calls for dramatic efficiency improvements. This paper reports on three studies that aimed at the perspectives of superconductivity in the maritime sector. It is important to realize that the introduction of superconductivity comprises two technology transitions namely firstly electrification i.e. the transition from mechanical drives to electric drives and secondly the transition from normal to superconductive electrical machinery. It is concluded that superconductivity does reduce losses, but its impact on the total energy chain is of little significance compared to the investments and the risk of introducing a very promising but as yet not proven technology in the harsh maritime environment. The main reason of the little impact is that the largest losses are imposed on the system by the fossil fueled generators as prime movers that generate the electricity through mechanical torque. Unless electric power is supplied by an efficient and reliable technology that does not involve mechanical torque with the present losses both normal as well as superconductive electrification of the propulsion will hardly improve energy efficiency or may even reduce it. One exception may be the application of degaussing coils. Still appealing merits of superconductivity do exist, but they are rather related to the behavior of superconductive machines and strong magnetic fields and consequently reduction in volume and mass of machinery or (sometimes radically) better performance. The merits are rather convenience, design flexibility as well as novel applications and capabilities which together yield more adequate systems. These may yield lower operational costs in the long run, but at present the added value of superconductivity rather seems more

  12. Methods of forming boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  13. Method for preparing actinide nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, G.H.; Cleveland, J.M.; Heiple, C.R.

    1975-12-01

    Actinide nitrides, and particularly plutonium and uranium nitrides, are prepared by reacting an ammonia solution of an actinide compound with an ammonia solution of a reactant or reductant metal, to form finely divided actinide nitride precipitate which may then be appropriately separated from the solution. The actinide nitride precipitate is particularly suitable for forming nuclear fuels.

  14. Elastic properties of indium nitrides grown on sapphire substrates determined by nano-indentation: In comparison with other nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonenaga, Ichiro; Ohkubo, Yasushi; Deura, Momoko; Kutsukake, Kentaro; Tokumoto, Yuki; Ohno, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Akihiko; Wang, Xin Qiang

    2015-07-01

    The hardness of wurtzite indium nitride (α-InN) films of 0.5 to 4 μm in thickness was measured by the nano-indentation method at room temperature. After investigation of crystalline quality by x-ray diffraction, the hardness and Young's modulus were determined to be 8.8 ± 0.4 and 184 ± 5 GPa, respectively, for the In (0001)- and N ( 000 1 ¯ ) -growth faces of InN films. The bulk and shear moduli were then derived to be 99 ± 3 and 77 ± 2 GPa, respectively. The Poisson's ratio was evaluated to be 0.17 ± 0.03. The results were examined comprehensively in comparison with previously reported data of InN as well as those of other nitrides of aluminum nitride and gallium nitride. The underlying physical process determining the moduli and hardness was examined in terms of atomic bonding and dislocation energy of the nitrides and wurtzite zinc oxide.

  15. Atomic layer deposition of thin superconducting films and multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proslier, Thomas; Klug, Jeffrey; Groll, Nikolas; Altin, Serdar; Becker, Nicholas

    2012-02-01

    We report the use of atomic layer deposition (ALD) to synthesize thin superconducting films and multilayer superconductor-insulator (S-I) heterostructures including: nitrides, carbides, and silicides, nitrides of molybdenum and titanium, and Nb1-xTixN/AlN-based S-I heterostructures. The atomic-scale thickness control afforded by ALD enables the study of superconductivity and associated phenomena in homogeneous layers in the ultra-thin film limit. Two-dimensional superconductivity in such films is of interest from a fundamental point of view, as a new effect has recently been discovered at ultra-low temperature in thin superconducting films made by ALD: the super-insulating transition. Furthermore, the ALD technique applied to superconducting films opens the way for a variety of applications, including improving the performance and decreasing the cost of high energy particle accelerators, superconducting wires for energy storage, and bolometers for radiation detection. In this respect, we will present results on the ALD growth processes, the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings.

  16. Validity of "sputtering and re-condensation" model in active screen cage plasma nitriding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, A.; Khan, A. W.; Jan, F.; Abrar, M.; Khalid, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2013-05-01

    The validity of "sputtering and re-condensation" model in active screen plasma nitriding for nitrogen mass transfer mechanism is investigated. The dominant species including NH, Fe-I, N2+, N-I and N2 along with Hα and Hβ lines are observed in the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) analysis. Active screen cage and dc plasma nitriding of AISI 316 stainless steel as function of treatment time is also investigated. The structure and phases composition of the nitrided layer is studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Surface morphology is studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and hardness profile is obtained by Vicker's microhardness tester. Increasing trend in microhardness is observed in both cases but the increase in active screen plasma nitriding is about 3 times greater than that achieved by dc plasma nitriding. On the basis of metallurgical and OES observations the use of "sputtering and re-condensation" model in active screen plasma nitriding is tested.

  17. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Willen, E.; Dahl, P.; Herrera, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a self-consistent description of a magnetic field in the aperture of a superconducting magnet and details how this field can be calculated in a magnet with cos theta current distribution in the coils. A description of an apparatus that can be used to measure the field uniformity in the aperture has been given. Finally, a detailed description of the magnet being developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider is given. When this machine is built, it will be by far the largest application of superconductivity to date and promises to make possible the experimental discoveries needed to understand the basic laws of nature governing the world in which we live.

  18. Heat treatment of nitrided layer formed on X37CrMoV5-1 hot working tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciski, A.; Wach, P.; Tacikowski, J.; Babul, T.; Šuchmann, P.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the technology consisting of combination of the nitriding process with subsequent austenitizing at temperature above eutectoid temperature of the Fe-C system and further rapid cooling. Such treatment will cause formation of the martensite in the area of the primarily nitrided layer and the additional precipitation hardening by tempering of heat treated steel. The article shows that the heat treatment process of nitrided layer formed on X37CrMoV5-1 steel leads to strengthening of surface layer, the substrate and the core of nitrided part. Heat treatment of nitrided steel with the tempering in inert (nitrogen) or active (ammonia) atmosphere can increase the thickness of the layer formed by short-term nitriding process. After the nitriding process of X37CrMoV5-1 steel the nitrided layer had a thickness of about 160 μm, while a subsurface layer of iron nitrides had a thickness of 7 μm. After subsequent quenching and tempering processes, the nitrided layer undergoes additional diffusion and its thickness is increased to about 220 μm (inert atmosphere) or 280 μm (active atmosphere). If the tempering process is carried out in an inert atmosphere, the primarily formed layer of iron nitrides disappears. Tempering in an active atmosphere leads to forming of white layer with a thickness of 7 μm. Basic properties of nitrided layers formed in such way, like the hardness and the wear resistance, are presented.

  19. Hard error generation by neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, J.S.; Gover, J.E.; Wrobel, T.F.; Hass, K.J.; Nasby, R.D.; Simpson, R.L.; Posey, L.D.; Boos, R.E.; Block, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    We have observed that neutron-induced fission of uranium contaminants present in alumina ceramic package lids results in the release of fission fragments that can cause hard errors in metal nitride-oxidenonvolatile RAMs (MNOS NVRAMs). Hard error generation requires the simultaneous presence of (1) a fission fragment with a linear energy transfer (LET) greater than 20 MeV/mg/cm/sup 2/ moving at an angle of 30/sup 0/ or less from the electric field in the high-field, gate region of the memory transistor and (2) a WRITE or ERASE voltage on the oxide-nitride transistor gate. In reactor experiments, we observe these hard errors when a ceramic lid is used on both MNOS NVRAMs and polysilicon-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (SNOS) capacitors, but hard errors are not observed when a gold-plated kovar lid is used on the package containing these die. We have mapped the tracks of the fission fragments released from the ceramic lids with a mica track detector and used a Monte Carlo model of fission fragment transport through the ceramic lid to measure the concentration of uranium present in the lids. Our concentration measurements are in excellent agreement with others' measurements of uranium concentration in ceramic lids. Our Monte Carlo analyses also agree closely with our measurements of hard error probability in MNOS NVRAMs. 15 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. PREFACE: Superconducting materials Superconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charfi Kaddour, Samia; Singleton, John; Haddad, Sonia

    2011-11-01

    The discovery of superconductivity in 1911 was a great milestone in condensed matter physics. This discovery has resulted in an enormous amount of research activity. Collaboration among chemists and physicists, as well as experimentalists and theoreticians has given rise to very rich physics with significant potential applications ranging from electric power transmission to quantum information. Several superconducting materials have been synthesized. Crucial progress was made in 1987 with the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in copper-based compounds (cuprates) which have revealed new fascinating properties. Innovative theoretical tools have been developed to understand the striking features of cuprates which have remained for three decades the 'blue-eyed boy' for researchers in superconductor physics. The history of superconducting materials has been notably marked by the discovery of other compounds, particularly organic superconductors which despite their low critical temperature continue to attract great interest regarding their exotic properties. Last but not least, the recent observation of superconductivity in iron-based materials (pnictides) has renewed hope in reaching room temperature superconductivity. However, despite intense worldwide studies, several features related to this phenomenon remain unveiled. One of the fundamental key questions is the mechanism by which superconductivity takes place. Superconductors continue to hide their 'secret garden'. The new trends in the physics of superconductivity have been one of the two basic topics of the International Conference on Conducting Materials (ICoCoM2010) held in Sousse,Tunisia on 3-7 November 2010 and organized by the Tunisian Physical Society. The conference was a nice opportunity to bring together participants from multidisciplinary domains in the physics of superconductivity. This special section contains papers submitted by participants who gave an oral contribution at ICoCoM2010

  1. Synthesis of aluminium nitride/boron nitride composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, T.D. . Polymer Science Program and Dept. of Chemistry); Gonsalves, K.E. . Polymer Science Program and Dept. of Chemistry Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT . Dept. of Chemistry); Strutt, P.R. . Dept. of Metallurgy)

    1993-04-01

    Aluminum nitride/boron nitride composite was synthesized by using boric acid, urea, and aluminum chloride (or aluminum lactate) as the starting compounds. The starting materials were dissolved in water and mixed homogeneously. Ammonolysis of this aqueous solution resulted in the formation of a precomposite gel, which converted into the aluminum nitride/boron nitride composite on further heat treatment. Characterization of both the precomposite and the composite powders included powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of the composite revealed that the aluminum nitride phase had a hexagonal structure, and the boron nitride phase a turbostratic structure.

  2. Chemical profiling of silicon nitride structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    X ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to study structural and chemical inhomogeneities in several electronic materials and device structures of relevance to radiation hard electronics. The systems studied include metal nitride oxide semiconductor (MNOS) structures, silicon oxynitride (SiO(x)N(y)) formed by the thermal nitridation of SiO2, and semiconductor on insulator (SOI) structures. Studies of MNOS structures suggest that the effect of H2 annealing is to make the Si3N4/SiO2 interface less abrupt by causing interdiffusion of silanol and silamine groups with subsequent oxynitride formation. Another effect of the annealing appears to be to relieve the strain at the SiO2/Si interface.

  3. Ultrahard nanotwinned cubic boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yongjun; Xu, Bo; Yu, Dongli; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Jiang, Yingbing; Hu, Wentao; Tang, Chengchun; Gao, Yufei; Luo, Kun; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wang, Li-Min; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan

    2013-01-17

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) is a well known superhard material that has a wide range of industrial applications. Nanostructuring of cBN is an effective way to improve its hardness by virtue of the Hall-Petch effect--the tendency for hardness to increase with decreasing grain size. Polycrystalline cBN materials are often synthesized by using the martensitic transformation of a graphite-like BN precursor, in which high pressures and temperatures lead to puckering of the BN layers. Such approaches have led to synthetic polycrystalline cBN having grain sizes as small as ∼14 nm (refs 1, 2, 4, 5). Here we report the formation of cBN with a nanostructure dominated by fine twin domains of average thickness ∼3.8 nm. This nanotwinned cBN was synthesized from specially prepared BN precursor nanoparticles possessing onion-like nested structures with intrinsically puckered BN layers and numerous stacking faults. The resulting nanotwinned cBN bulk samples are optically transparent with a striking combination of physical properties: an extremely high Vickers hardness (exceeding 100 GPa, the optimal hardness of synthetic diamond), a high oxidization temperature (∼1,294 °C) and a large fracture toughness (>12 MPa m(1/2), well beyond the toughness of commercial cemented tungsten carbide, ∼10 MPa m(1/2)). We show that hardening of cBN is continuous with decreasing twin thickness down to the smallest sizes investigated, contrasting with the expected reverse Hall-Petch effect below a critical grain size or the twin thickness of ∼10-15 nm found in metals and alloys.

  4. Gallium nitride optoelectronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    The growth of bulk gallium nitride crystals was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride. Gallium nitride single crystals up to 2.5 x 0.5 cm in size were produced. The crystals are suitable as substrates for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride. The epitaxial growth of gallium nitride on sapphire substrates with main faces of (0001) and (1T02) orientations was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride in a gas flow system. The grown layers had electron concentrations in the range of 1 to 3 x 10 to the 19th power/cu cm and Hall mobilities in the range of 50 to 100 sq cm/v/sec at room temperature.

  5. Magnetic levitation for hard superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kordyuk, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    An approach for calculating the interaction between a hard superconductor and a permanent magnet in the field-cooled case is proposed. The exact solutions were obtained for the point magnetic dipole over a flat ideally hard superconductor. We have shown that such an approach is adaptable to a wide practical range of melt-textured high-temperature superconductors{close_quote} systems with magnetic levitation. In this case, the energy losses can be calculated from the alternating magnetic field distribution on the superconducting sample surface. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Boron nitride composites

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  7. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  8. Boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W [Newport News, VA; Jordan, Kevin [Newport News, VA; Park, Cheol [Yorktown, VA

    2012-06-06

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  9. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  10. Effect of Loading Rate Upon Conventional Ceramic Microindentation Hardness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    silicate crown glass. In this modification of the tradi- tional Vickers hardness test, both load and displacement were monitored during the indentation...loads up to 30 N. Alumina, two aluminum nitrides, and two zirconias had a dynamic hardness from 9 % to 19 % greater than the static hardness at loads up...M. Hooper, Indentation Creep in Zirconia Ceramics Between 290 K and 1073 K, in Mechanics of Creep, Brittle Materials, A. Cooks and A. Ponter, eds

  11. Fractal superconductivity near localization threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Feigel'man, M.V.; Ioffe, L.B.; Kravtsov, V.E.; Cuevas, E.

    2010-07-15

    spectral weight. The insulating state is realized due to the presence of local pairing gap but without superconducting correlations; it is characterized by a hard insulating gap in the density of single electrons and by purely activated low-temperature resistivity ln R(T) {approx} 1/T. Based on these results we propose a new 'pseudo-spin' scenario of superconductor-insulator transition and argue that it is realized in a particular class of disordered superconducting films. We conclude by the discussion of the experimental predictions of the theory and the theoretical issues that remain unsolved.

  12. Study of Martensite Ageing with Plasma Ion Nitriding of Steel C300 Using Design of an Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezicioglu, Yavuz; Inal, Osman Tugay

    2014-09-01

    Double treatment of maraging steel C300 (nitriding + ageing) is studied using experimental design with a full 32 factorial matrix. After this treatment maximum surface hardness is 1270 HV and for the core it is 553 HV.

  13. Ion-nitriding of the AISI M2 high speed tool steel and comparison of its mechanical properties with nitrided steels

    SciTech Connect

    Cimen, O.; Alnipak, B.

    1995-12-31

    In the past it was shown that plasma diffusion treatment of steels has several advantages over conventional processes such as gas or salt bath nitriding and nitrocarburizing. Plasma diffusion treatment allows close control of the process so that surface layers with defined microstructures and properties can be obtained. The amount of {gamma}{prime} and {epsilon} phase present can be easily controlled. In this paper, variation of surfaces hardness properties of AISI M2 high speed tool speed after ion nitriding treatments were investigated. The mechanical and electro-chemical advantages of the ion nitrided structures were compared with the other methods.

  14. Hydrogen Effect on Nanomechanical Properties of the Nitrided Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnoush, Afrooz; Asgari, Masoud; Johnsen, Roy; Hoel, Rune

    2013-02-01

    In situ electrochemical nanoindentation is used to examine the effect of electrochemically charged hydrogen on mechanical properties of the nitride layer on low-alloy 2.25Cr-1Mo martensitic structural steel. By application of this method, we were able to trace the changes in the mechanical properties due to the absorption of atomic hydrogen to different depths within the compound and diffusion layers. The results clearly show that the hydrogen charging of the nitriding layer can soften the layer and reduce the hardness within both the compound and the diffusion layers. The effect is completely reversible and by removal of the hydrogen, the hardness recovers to its original value. The reduction in hardness of the nitride layer does not correlate to the nitrogen concentration, but it seems to be influenced by the microstructure and residual stress within the compound and diffusion layers. Findings show that nitriding can be a promising way to control the hydrogen embrittlement of the tempered martensitic steels.

  15. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram; Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-01

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  16. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-24

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  17. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOINJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.; BURRILL, A.; CALAGA, R.; CHANG, X.; GROVER, R.; GUPTA, R.; HAHN, H.; HAMMONS, L.; KAYRAN, D.; KEWISCH, J.; LAMBIASE, R.; LITVINENKO, V.; MCINTYRE, G.; NAIK, D.; PATE, D.; PHILLIPS, D.; POZDEYEV, E.; RAO, T.; SMEDLEY, J.; THAN, R.; TODD, R.; WEISS, D.; WU, Q.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ET AL.

    2007-08-26

    One of the frontiers in FEL science is that of high power. In order to reach power in the megawatt range, one requires a current of the order of one ampere with a reasonably good emittance. The superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photocathode is the most natural candidate to provide this performance. The development of a 1/2 cell superconducting photoinjector designed to operate at up to a current of 0.5 amperes and beam energy of 2 MeV and its photocathode system are the subjects covered in this paper. The main issues are the photocathode and its insertion mechanism, the power coupling and High Order Mode damping. This technology is being developed at BNL for DOE nuclear physics applications such as electron cooling at high energy and electron ion colliders..

  18. Color superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczek, F.

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  19. Superconducting Graphene Nanodevices in Ballistic Transport Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-An; Wang, Joel I.-Jan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Pablo Jarillo-Herrero's Group Team

    2013-03-01

    Superconductivity carried by Dirac fermions can be realized through induced superconductivity in grapheme. Observation of novel phenomena anticipated by theories requires graphene devices with low disorder whereas the carrier transport is ballistic. Current fabrication procedures to make graphene devices with low disorder like suspension or ultra-flat substrates all call for certain kinds of annealing to remove organic residues derived from the fabrication process. Applying these methods to superconducting devices can be challenging since the transparency at the graphene/superconductor interface will be destroyed. Here we present a method to do dry transfer of patterned hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) flakes onto graphene. The ultra flatness and lack of dangling bond in the boron nitride substrate reduces the disorder in graphene, and the top layer hBN can protect the graphene from contamination in the nanofabrication procedures and yield the geometry desired for different experimental exploration. National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044, Japan

  20. Superconducting magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  1. Nitride quantum light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, T.; Oliver, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    Prototype nitride quantum light sources, particularly single-photon emitters, have been successfully demonstrated, despite the challenges inherent in this complex materials system. The large band offsets available between different nitride alloys have allowed device operation at easily accessible temperatures. A wide range of approaches has been explored: not only self-assembled quantum dot growth but also lithographic methods for site-controlled nanostructure formation. All these approaches face common challenges, particularly strong background signals which contaminate the single-photon stream and excessive spectral diffusion of the quantum dot emission wavelength. If these challenges can be successfully overcome, then ongoing rapid progress in the conventional III-V semiconductors provides a roadmap for future progress in the nitrides.

  2. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, O.; Hertz, D.; Lebrun, J.P.; Michel, H.

    1995-12-31

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors.

  3. Cubic nitride templates

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi; Mueller, Alexander H; Luo, Hongmei

    2013-04-30

    A polymer-assisted deposition process for deposition of epitaxial cubic metal nitride films and the like is presented. The process includes solutions of one or more metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for the one or more metal precursor. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere to yield metal nitride films and the like. Such films can be used as templates for the development of high quality cubic GaN based electronic devices.

  4. Hard gap in epitaxial semiconductor-superconductor nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chang, W; Albrecht, S M; Jespersen, T S; Kuemmeth, F; Krogstrup, P; Nygård, J; Marcus, C M

    2015-03-01

    Many present and future applications of superconductivity would benefit from electrostatic control of carrier density and tunnelling rates, the hallmark of semiconductor devices. One particularly exciting application is the realization of topological superconductivity as a basis for quantum information processing. Proposals in this direction based on the proximity effect in semiconductor nanowires are appealing because the key ingredients are currently in hand. However, previous instances of proximitized semiconductors show significant tunnelling conductance below the superconducting gap, suggesting a continuum of subgap states--a situation that nullifies topological protection. Here, we report a hard superconducting gap induced by the proximity effect in a semiconductor, using epitaxial InAs-Al semiconductor-superconductor nanowires. The hard gap, together with favourable material properties and gate-tunability, makes this new hybrid system attractive for a number of applications, as well as fundamental studies of mesoscopic superconductivity.

  5. Measurement and analysis of forces in grinding of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Jahanmir, S.; Hwang, T.; Whitenton, E.P.; Job, L.S.; Evans, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    Using an instrumented surface grinder, the two components of grinding forces (normal and tangential) were measured for different types of silicon nitride ceramics. The influences of grinding parameters, such as down feed and table speed, and grinding fluids on forces were determined. In addition to these measurements, the specific grinding energy defined as the energy per unit volume of removed material was calculated. This parameter and the measured forces were then analyzed to determine possible correlations with mechanical properties of the silicon nitrides. It was found that, in general, the grinding forces and the specific grinding energy increase with the hardness. Both the grinding forces and the specific grinding energy were influenced by the grinding fluid and the grinding parameters. The implication of these results on the mechanisms of material removal in grinding of silicon nitride and the possible tribological effects are discussed.

  6. Tribological and microstructural characteristics of ion-nitrided steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1983-01-01

    Three steels AISI 4140, AISI 4340 and AISI 304 stainless steel were ion nitrided in a plasma consisting of a 75:25 mixture of H2:N2, sometimes with a trace of CH4. Their surface topography was characterized by SEM and two distinct compound phases were identified: the gamma and the epsilon. The core-case hardness profiles were also established. The low Cr alloy steels have an extended diffusion zone in contrast to the 304 stainless steels which have a sharp interface. The depth of ion-nitriding is increased as the Cr content is decreased. Friction tests reveal that the gamma surface phase has a lower coefficient of friction than the epsilon phase. The lowest coefficient of friction is achieved when both the rider and the specimen surface are ion nitrided.

  7. Lattice dynamics and electron/phonon interactions in epitaxial transition-metal nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Antonio Rodolph Bighetti

    Transition metal (TM) nitrides, due to their unique combination of remarkable physical properties and simple NaCl structure, are presently utilized in a broad range of applications and as model systems in the investigation of complex phenomena. Group-IVB nitrides TiN, ZrN, and HfN have transport properties which include superconductivity and high electrical conductivity; consequentially, they have become technologically important as electrodes and contacts in the semiconducting and superconducting industries. The Group-VB nitride VN, which exhibits enhanced ductility, is a fundamental component in superhard and tough nanostructured hard coatings. In this thesis, I investigate the lattice dynamics responsible for controlling superconductivity and electrical conductivities in Group-IVB nitrides and elasticity and structural stability of the NaCl-structure Group-VB nitride VN. Our group has already synthesized high-quality epitaxial TiN, HfN, and CeN layers on MgO(001) substrates. By irradiating the growth surface with high ion fluxes at energies below the bulk lattice-atom displacement threshold, dense epitaxial single crystal TM nitride films with extremely smooth surfaces have been grown using ultra-high vacuum magnetically-unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition. Using this approach, I completed the Group-IVB nitride series by growing epitaxial ZrN/MgO(001) films and then grew Group-VB nitride VN films epitaxially on MgO(001), MgO(011), and MgO(111). The combination of high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD) reciprocal lattice maps (RLMs), high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HR-XTEM), and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) show that single-crystal stoichiometric ZrN films grown at 450 °C are epitaxially oriented cube-on-cube with respect to their MgO(001) substrates, (001) ZrN||(001)MgO and [100]ZrN||[100]MgO. The layers are essentially fully relaxed with a lattice parameter of 0.4575 nm. X-ray reflectivity results reveal that

  8. Quantum electromechanics on silicon nitride nanomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Fink, J. M.; Kalaee, M.; Pitanti, A.; Norte, R.; Heinzle, L.; Davanço, M.; Srinivasan, K.; Painter, O.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation pressure has recently been used to effectively couple the quantum motion of mechanical elements to the fields of optical or microwave light. Integration of all three degrees of freedom—mechanical, optical and microwave—would enable a quantum interconnect between microwave and optical quantum systems. We present a platform based on silicon nitride nanomembranes for integrating superconducting microwave circuits with planar acoustic and optical devices such as phononic and photonic crystals. Using planar capacitors with vacuum gaps of 60 nm and spiral inductor coils of micron pitch we realize microwave resonant circuits with large electromechanical coupling to planar acoustic structures of nanoscale dimensions and femtoFarad motional capacitance. Using this enhanced coupling, we demonstrate microwave backaction cooling of the 4.48 MHz mechanical resonance of a nanobeam to an occupancy as low as 0.32. These results indicate the viability of silicon nitride nanomembranes as an all-in-one substrate for quantum electro-opto-mechanical experiments. PMID:27484751

  9. Nitriding of restored crankshafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponukalin, V. V.; Aleksandrov, V. N.

    1984-02-01

    The following technology is recommended for restoration of steel crankshafts: facing with an Sv-08 electrode wire under an AN-348A flux with chromium and niobium introduced into the melt in accordance with the method used at automotive-repair plants and subsequent gas nitriding at (570±10)°C for 12 h.

  10. Plasma Nitriding Behavior of Fe-C-M (M = Al, Cr, Mn, Si) Ternary Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomio, Yusaku; Kitsuya, Shigeki; Oh-ishi, Keilchiro; Hono, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Goro; Furuhara, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Change in surface hardness and nitrides precipitated in Fe-0.6C binary and Fe-0.6 mass pct C-1 mass pct M (M = Al, Cr, Mn, Si) ternary martensitic alloys during plasma nitriding were investigated. Surface hardness was hardly increased in the Fe-0.6C binary alloy and slightly increased in Fe-0.6C-1Mn and Fe-0.6C-1Si alloys. On the other hand, it was largely increased in Fe-0.6C-1Al and Fe-0.6C-1Cr alloys. In all the Fe-0.6C-1M alloys except for the Si-added alloy, fine platelet alloy nitrides precipitated inside martensite laths. In the Fe-0.6C-1Si alloy, Si-enriched film was observed mainly at a grain boundary and an interface between cementite and matrix. Crystal structure of nitrides observed in the martensitic alloys was similar to those in Fe-M binary ferritic alloys reported previously. However, there was a difference in hardening behavior between ferrite and martensite due to a high density of dislocations acting as a nucleation site of the nitrides and partitioning of an alloying element between martensite and cementite changing the driving force of precipitation of the nitrides.

  11. Structural and electrical properties of ultrathin niobium nitride films grown by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linzen, S.; Ziegler, M.; Astafiev, O. V.; Schmelz, M.; Hübner, U.; Diegel, M.; Il’ichev, E.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2017-03-01

    We studied and optimised the properties of ultrathin superconducting niobium nitride films fabricated with a plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process. By adjusting process parameters, the chemical embedding of undesired oxygen into the films was minimised and a film structure consisting of mainly polycrystalline niobium nitride with a small fraction of amorphous niobium oxide and niobium oxo-nitrides were formed. For this composition a critical temperature of 13.8 K and critical current densities of 7 × 106 A cm–2 at 4.2 K were measured on 40 nm thick films. A fundamental correlation between these superconducting properties and the crystal lattice size of the cubic δ-niobium-nitride grains were found. Moreover, the film thickness variation between 40 and 2 nm exhibits a pronounced change of the electrical conductivity at room temperature and reveals a superconductor–insulator-transition in the vicinity of 3 nm film thickness at low temperatures. The thicker films with resistances up to 5 kΩ per square in the normal state turn to the superconducting one at low temperatures. The perfect thickness control and film homogeneity of the PEALD growth make such films extremely promising candidates for developing novel devices on the coherent quantum phase slip effect.

  12. Space applications of superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. B.; Vorreiter, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Some potential applications of superconductivity in space are summarized, e.g., the use of high field magnets for cosmic ray analysis or energy storage and generation, space applications of digital superconducting devices, such as the Josephson switch and, in the future, a superconducting computer. Other superconducting instrumentation which could be used in space includes: low frequency superconducting sensors, microwave and infrared detectors, instruments for gravitational studies, and high-Q cavities for use as stabilizing elements in clocks and oscillators.

  13. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  14. Bulk Cubic Gallium Nitride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-09

    microcrysta. form at bottom of «he reaction vessel. The objective of the second step is the solvothermal transport of the gallium nitride residing in the...system using pressure pumps can be used to gain precise control of the pressure. High pressure is typically used for the solvothermal transport. The...takes place in the reaction vessel during heating is a solvothermal reaction that is conducted at or above the critical point of the solvent The

  15. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, Prakash C.; Seydel, Edgar R.; Raj, Rishi

    1988-03-22

    The invention relates to producing relatively flaw free silicon nitride ceramic shapes requiring little or no machining by superplastic forging This invention herein was made in part under Department of Energy Grant DE-AC01-84ER80167, creating certain rights in the United States Government. The invention was also made in part under New York State Science and Technology Grant SB1R 1985-10.

  16. Boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chopra, N G; Luyken, R J; Cherrey, K; Crespi, V H; Cohen, M L; Louie, S G; Zettl, A

    1995-08-18

    The successful synthesis of pure boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is reported here. Multi-walled tubes with inner diameters on the order of 1 to 3 nanometers and with lengths up to 200 nanometers were produced in a carbon-free plasma discharge between a BN-packed tungsten rod and a cooled copper electrode. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy on individual tubes yielded B:N ratios of approximately 1, which is consistent with theoretical predictions of stable BN tube structures.

  17. Gallium nitride electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Siddharth; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-07-01

    In the past two decades, there has been increasing research and industrial activity in the area of gallium nitride (GaN) electronics, stimulated first by the successful demonstration of GaN LEDs. While the promise of wide band gap semiconductors for power electronics was recognized many years before this by one of the contributors to this issue (J Baliga), the success in the area of LEDs acted as a catalyst. It set the field of GaN electronics in motion, and today the technology is improving the performance of several applications including RF cell phone base stations and military radar. GaN could also play a very important role in reducing worldwide energy consumption by enabling high efficiency compact power converters operating at high voltages and lower frequencies. While GaN electronics is a rapidly evolving area with active research worldwide, this special issue provides an opportunity to capture some of the great advances that have been made in the last 15 years. The issue begins with a section on epitaxy and processing, followed by an overview of high-frequency HEMTs, which have been the most commercially successful application of III-nitride electronics to date. This is followed by review and research articles on power-switching transistors, which are currently of great interest to the III-nitride community. A section of this issue is devoted to the reliability of III-nitride devices, an area that is of increasing significance as the research focus has moved from not just high performance but also production-worthiness and long-term usage of these devices. Finally, a group of papers on new and relatively less studied ideas for III-nitride electronics, such as interband tunneling, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and high-temperature electronics is included. These areas point to new areas of research and technological innovation going beyond the state of the art into the future. We hope that the breadth and quality of articles in this issue will make it

  18. Superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Satti, John A.

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  19. Electrochemical nitridation of metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.

    2015-06-30

    Electrochemical nitridation of metals and the produced metals are disclosed. An exemplary method of electrochemical nitridation of metals comprises providing an electrochemical solution at low temperature. The method also comprises providing a three-electrode potentiostat system. The method also comprises stabilizing the three-electrode potentiostat system at open circuit potential. The method also comprises applying a cathodic potential to a metal.

  20. Surface hardening of titanium alloys by gas phase nitridation under kinetic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lizhi

    This work describes a nitriding process for titanium and its alloys, which will improve the wear and corrosion resistance by forming a single phase Ti (N) solid solution that has the same lattice properties as the substrate, but not forming any nitrides on the surface. By kinetically controlling the chemical potential of nitrogen as diffusional interstitials, a large solubility can be achieved, which results in a super-hard surface. The nitrogen pressure, heat treatment temperature, and heat treatment time were investigated to form a desired diffusion profile without the formation of surface nitride compounds. This process can improve the wear resistance without the cost of reduced corrosion and fatigue resistance. A thermodynamic calculation has shown that the partial pressure of nitrogen acquired to avoiding the formation of nitrides is extremely low. A kinetic calculation, however, has indicated that a much higher nitrogen partial pressure can be afforded to nitride titanium alloys without forming nitrides. This kinetic calculation considers the impingement rate at the gas-solid interface, the sticking coefficient, and the interstitial diffusion coefficient. The conception of nitridation under kinetic control is verified in a laboratory-scale system, the design and construction of which is part of this work. Nitridation under well-defined and reproducible conditions was achieved by using a long fused silica tube as the reactor and sealing it with a hydrogen/oxygen torch. To clean the gas atmosphere in the tube prior to nitridation, titanium foil was integrated into the system as a getter material. After the titanium getter has cleaned the atmosphere from undesired impurities, the titanium or titanium alloy specimen was nitrided by exposing it to a well-controlled but very low nitrogen partial pressure, generated by a metal nitride/metal powder pack. With the Cr2N/Cr powder pack, for example, nitrogen pressure from 10-4 Pa to 10-1 Pa can be achieved by adjusting

  1. Superconducting properties of long TiN wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, A. Yu.; Postolova, S. V.; Nasimov, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    The low-temperature transport properties of titanium nitride wires with the width comparable with or much larger than the superconducting coherence length are studied experimentally. It is shown that the reduction of the width of wires does not affect the transport properties at the temperatures above the superconducting transition temperature and electron transport in this temperature range is determined by quantum contributions to the conductivity from weak localization and electron-electron interaction. It is established that the reduction of the width of wires does not change the superconducting transition temperature but completely suppresses the topological Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. It is found that the threshold magnetic field increases with a decrease in the width of wires.

  2. Sulfide Stress Cracking and Electrochemical Corrosion of Precipitation Hardening Steel After Plasma Oxy-Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda-Gutiérrez, E. E.; Díaz-Guillén, J. C.; Díaz-Guillén, J. A.; González, M. A.; García-Vázquez, F.; Muñóz, R.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a duplex plasma nitriding followed by an oxidizing stage process (which is also referred as oxy-nitriding) on the corrosion behavior of a 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel. The formation of both, expanded martensite (b.c.t. α'N-phase) and chromium oxide (type Cr2O3) in the subsurface of oxy-nitrided samples at specific controlled conditions, leads in a noticeable increasing in the time-to-rupture during the sulfide stress cracking test, in comparison with an untreated reference sample. Oxy-nitriding improves the corrosion performance of the alloy when it is immersed in solutions saturated by sour gas, which extends the application potential of this type of steel in the oil and gas extraction and processing industry. The presence of the oxy-nitrided layer inhibits the corrosion process that occurs in the near-surface region, where hydrogen is liberated after the formation of iron sulfides, which finally produces a fragile fracture by micro-crack propagation; the obtained results suggest that oxy-nitriding slows this process, thus delaying the rupture of the specimen. Moreover, oxy-nitriding produces a hard, sour gas-resistant surface, but do not significantly affect the original chloride ion solution resistance of the material.

  3. Sulfide Stress Cracking and Electrochemical Corrosion of Precipitation Hardening Steel After Plasma Oxy-Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda-Gutiérrez, E. E.; Díaz-Guillén, J. C.; Díaz-Guillén, J. A.; González, M. A.; García-Vázquez, F.; Muñóz, R.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a duplex plasma nitriding followed by an oxidizing stage process (which is also referred as oxy-nitriding) on the corrosion behavior of a 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel. The formation of both, expanded martensite (b.c.t. α'N-phase) and chromium oxide (type Cr2O3) in the subsurface of oxy-nitrided samples at specific controlled conditions, leads in a noticeable increasing in the time-to-rupture during the sulfide stress cracking test, in comparison with an untreated reference sample. Oxy-nitriding improves the corrosion performance of the alloy when it is immersed in solutions saturated by sour gas, which extends the application potential of this type of steel in the oil and gas extraction and processing industry. The presence of the oxy-nitrided layer inhibits the corrosion process that occurs in the near-surface region, where hydrogen is liberated after the formation of iron sulfides, which finally produces a fragile fracture by micro-crack propagation; the obtained results suggest that oxy-nitriding slows this process, thus delaying the rupture of the specimen. Moreover, oxy-nitriding produces a hard, sour gas-resistant surface, but do not significantly affect the original chloride ion solution resistance of the material.

  4. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  5. An investigation of nitride precipitates in archaeological iron artefacts from Poland.

    PubMed

    Kedzierski, Z; Stepiński, J; Zielińska-Lipiec, A

    2010-03-01

    The paper describes the investigations of nitride precipitates in a spearhead and a sword found in the territory of Poland, in cremation graveyards of the Przeworsk Culture, dated to the Roman Period. Three different techniques of the examination of nitride precipitates were employed: optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer) and transmission electron microscope. Two types of precipitates have been observed, and their plate-like shape was demonstrated. The large precipitate has been confirmed to be gamma'-Fe(4)N, whereas the small one has been identified as alpha''-Fe(16)N(2). The origin of nitride precipitates in archaeological iron artefacts from Poland is probably a result of the manufacturing process or cremation as part of burial rites. An examination of available iron artefacts indicates that nitride precipitates (have only limited effect on mechanical properties) influence the hardness of metal only to a very limited degree.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of actinide nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Jaques, Brian; Butt, Darryl P.; Marx, Brian M.; Hamdy, A.S.; Osterberg, Daniel; Balfour, Gordon

    2007-07-01

    A carbothermic reduction of the metal oxides in a hydrogen/nitrogen mixed gas stream prior to nitriding in a nitrogen gas stream was used to synthesize uranium nitride at 1500 deg. C, cerium nitride at 1400 deg. C, and dysprosium nitride at 1500 deg. C. Cerium nitride and dysprosium nitride were also synthesized via hydriding and nitriding the metal shavings at 900 deg. C and 1500 deg. C, respectively. Also, a novel ball-milling synthesis route was used to produce cerium nitride and dysprosium nitride from the metal shavings at room temperature. Dysprosium nitride was also produced by reacting the metal shavings in a high purity nitrogen gas stream at 1300 deg. C. All materials were characterized by phase analysis via X-ray diffraction. Only the high purity materials were further analyzed via chemical analysis to characterize the trace oxygen concentration. (authors)

  7. High Kinetic Energy Penetrator Shielding and High Wear Resistance Materials Fabricated with Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTS) and BNNT Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), boron nitride nanoparticles (BNNPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphites, or combinations, are incorporated into matrices of polymer, ceramic or metals. Fibers, yarns, and woven or nonwoven mats of BNNTs are used as toughening layers in penetration resistant materials to maximize energy absorption and/or high hardness layers to rebound or deform penetrators. They can be also used as reinforcing inclusions combining with other polymer matrices to create composite layers like typical reinforcing fibers such as Kevlar.RTM., Spectra.RTM., ceramics and metals. Enhanced wear resistance and usage time are achieved by adding boron nitride nanomaterials, increasing hardness and toughness. Such materials can be used in high temperature environments since the oxidation temperature of BNNTs exceeds 800.degree. C. in air. Boron nitride based composites are useful as strong structural materials for anti-micrometeorite layers for spacecraft and space suits, ultra strong tethers, protective gear, vehicles, helmets, shields and safety suits/helmets for industry.

  8. Hard error generation by neutron-induced fission fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, J.S.; Gover, J.E.; Wrobel, T.F.; Hass, K.J.; Nasby, R.D.; Simpson, R.L.; Posey, L.D.; Boos, R.E.; Block, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    The authors observed that neutron-induced fission of uranium contaminants present in alumina ceramic package lids results in the release of fission fragments that can cause hard errors in metal-nitride-oxide nonvolatile RAMs (MNOS NVRAMs). Hard error generation requires the simultaneous presence of (1) a fission fragment with a linear energy transfer (LET) greater than 20 MeV/mg/cm/sup **2/ moving at an angle of 30 degrees or less from the electric field in the high-field, gate region of the memory transistor, and (2) a WRITE or ERASE voltage on the oxide-nitride transistor gate. In reactor experiments, they observe these hard errors when a ceramic lid is used on both MNOS NVRAMs and polysilicon-nitride-oxide (SNOS) capacitors, but hard errors are not observed when a gold-plated kovar lid is used on the package containing these die. They mapped the tracks of the fission fragments released from the ceramic lids with a mica track detector and used a Monte Carlo model of fission fragment transport through the ceramic lid to measure the concentration of uranium present in the lids. The authors' concentration measurements are in excellent agreement with other's measurement of uranium concentration in ceramic lids. The authors' Monte Carlo analyses also agree closely with their measurements of hard error probability in MNOS NVRAMs.

  9. Effects of the Treating Time on Microstructure and Erosion Corrosion Behavior of Salt-Bath-Nitrided 17-4PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuanhua; Li, Mingxing; Fan, Hongyuan; Zeng, Dezhi; Xiong, Ji

    2013-08-01

    The effects of salt-bath nitriding time on the microstructure, microhardness, and erosion-corrosion behavior of nitrided 17-4PH stainless steel at 703 K (430 °C) were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and erosion-corrosion testing. The experimental results revealed that the microstructure and phase constituents of the nitrided surface alloy are highly process condition dependent. When 17-4PH stainless steel was subjected to complex salt-bathing nitriding, the main phase of the nitrided layer was expanded martensite ( α`), expanded austenite (S), CrN, Fe4N, and Fe2N. The thickness of nitrided layers increased with the treating time. The salt-bath nitriding improves effectively the surface hardness. The maximum values measured from the treated surface are observed to be 1100 HV0.1 for 40 hours approximately, which is about 3.5 times as hard as the untreated material (309 HV0.1). Low-temperature nitriding can improve the erosion-corrosion resistance against two-phase flow. The sample nitrided for 4 hours has the best corrosion resistance.

  10. Aluminum nitride grating couplers.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Siddhartha; Doerr, Christopher R; Piazza, Gianluca

    2012-06-10

    Grating couplers in sputtered aluminum nitride, a piezoelectric material with low loss in the C band, are demonstrated. Gratings and a waveguide micromachined on a silicon wafer with 600 nm minimum feature size were defined in a single lithography step without partial etching. Silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) was used for cladding layers. Peak coupling efficiency of -6.6 dB and a 1 dB bandwidth of 60 nm have been measured. This demonstration of wire waveguides and wideband grating couplers in a material that also has piezoelectric and elasto-optic properties will enable new functions for integrated photonics and optomechanics.

  11. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  12. Gallium nitride nanotube lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Hurtado, Antonio; ...

    2015-01-01

    Lasing is demonstrated from gallium nitride nanotubes fabricated using a two-step top-down technique. By optically pumping, we observed characteristics of lasing: a clear threshold, a narrow spectral, and guided emission from the nanotubes. In addition, annular lasing emission from the GaN nanotube is also observed, indicating that cross-sectional shape control can be employed to manipulate the properties of nanolasers. The nanotube lasers could be of interest for optical nanofluidic applications or application benefitting from a hollow beam shape.

  13. Method for producing edge geometry superconducting tunnel junctions utilizing an NbN/MgO/NbN thin film structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian D. (Inventor); Leduc, Henry G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for fabricating an edge geometry superconducting tunnel junction device is discussed. The device is comprised of two niobium nitride superconducting electrodes and a magnesium oxide tunnel barrier sandwiched between the two electrodes. The NbN electrodes are preferably sputter-deposited, with the first NbN electrode deposited on an insulating substrate maintained at about 250 C to 500 C for improved quality of the electrode.

  14. High upper critical field in disordered niobium nitride superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R. Thanikai Arasu, A. V.; Amaladass, E. P.; Janawadkar, M. P.

    2014-10-28

    Superconducting Niobium Nitride thin films have been deposited on glass, aluminum nitride buffered glass, and oxidized silicon substrates by reactive DC magnetron sputtering at ambient substrate temperatures. The crystal structure of these thin films has been determined to be cubic fcc B1 structure by Glancing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction analysis. The superconducting transition temperatures of the thin films were measured to be greater than 11.6 K with a maximum of 13.4 K. The negative temperature coefficient of resistance observed in these thin films indicates the presence of disorder. Magneto-resistance measurements have been carried out on these thin films patterned into standard four probe geometry upto a maximum magnetic field of 12 T for two films and upto 15 T for the other two films. The dependence of transition temperature on the applied field is analyzed to estimate the upper critical field. The upper critical field for most of the films was estimated to exceed 35 T, while one of the most disordered films had an estimated upper critical field greater than 70 T.

  15. Experimental and numerical study on plasma nitriding of AISI P20 mold steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayebpashaee, N.; Vafaeenezhad, H.; Kheirandish, Sh.; Soltanieh, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, plasma nitriding was used to fabricate a hard protective layer on AISI P20 steel, at three process temperatures (450°C, 500°C, and 550°C) and over a range of time periods (2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 h), and at a fixed gas N2:H2 ratio of 75vol%:25vol%. The morphology of samples was studied using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and the formed phase of each sample was determined by X-ray diffraction. The elemental depth profile was measured by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, and glow dispersive spectroscopy. The hardness profile of the samples was identified, and the microhardness profile from the surface to the sample center was recorded. The results show that ɛ-nitride is the dominant species after carrying out plasma nitriding in all strategies and that the plasma nitriding process improves the hardness up to more than three times. It is found that as the time and temperature of the process increase, the hardness and hardness depth of the diffusion zone considerably increase. Furthermore, artificial neural networks were used to predict the effects of operational parameters on the mechanical properties of plastic mold steel. The plasma temperature, running time of imposition, and target distance to the sample surface were all used as network inputs; Vickers hardness measurements were given as the output of the model. The model accurately reproduced the experimental outcomes under different operational conditions; therefore, it can be used in the effective simulation of the plasma nitriding process in AISI P20 steel.

  16. Frictional and structural characterization of ion-nitrided low and high chromium steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1985-01-01

    Low Cr steels AISI 41410, AISI 4340, and high Cr austenitic stainless steels AISI 304, AISI 316 were ion nitrided in a dc glow discharge plasma consisting of a 75 percent H2 - 25 percent N2 mixture. Surface compound layer phases were identified, and compound layer microhardness and diffusion zone microhardness profiles were established. Distinct differences in surface compound layer hardness and diffusion zone profiles were determined between the low and high Cr alloy steels. The high Cr stainless steels after ion nitriding displayed a hard compound layer and an abrupt diffusion zone. The compound layers of the high Cr stainless steels had a columnar structure which accounts for brittleness when layers are exposed to contact stresses. The ion nitrided surfaces of high and low Cr steels displayed a low coefficient of friction with respect to the untreated surfaces when examined in a pin and disk tribotester.

  17. Hardness and nitrogen bonding structure of AlxTi1-xN/CrN multilayer hard coating.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jong-Hyun; Yoon, Sang-Won; Chae, Keun-Hwa; Park, Jong-Keuk; Song, Jong-Han; Jayaram, Vickram; Lee, Kon-Bae; Seong, Tae-Yeon; Kwon, Hoon; Ahn, Jae-Pyoung

    2012-02-01

    AlxTi1-xN/CrN multilayer coatings were fabricated by magnetron sputtering and those hardness variations were studied by observing the crack propagation and measuring the chemical bonding state of nitrides by Ti addition. While AlN/CrN multilayer shown stair-like crack propagation, AlxTi1-xN/CrN multilayer illustrated straight crack propagation. Most interestingly, Ti addition induced more broken nitrogen bonds in the nitride multilayers, leading to the reduction of hardness. However, the hardness of Al0.25Ti0.75N/CrN multilayer, having high Ti contents, increased by the formation of many Ti-N bond again instead of Al-N bond. From these results, we found that linear crack propagation behavior was dominated by broken nitrogen bonds in the AlxTi1-xN/CrN multilayer coatings.

  18. Superconductivity in Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Jose R.; Antaya, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity is playing an increasingly important role in advanced medical technologies. Compact superconducting cyclotrons are emerging as powerful tools for external beam therapy with protons and carbon ions, and offer advantages of cost and size reduction in isotope production as well. Superconducting magnets in isocentric gantries reduce their size and weight to practical proportions. In diagnostic imaging, superconducting magnets have been crucial for the successful clinical implementation of magnetic resonance imaging. This article introduces each of those areas and describes the role which superconductivity is playing in them.

  19. NanoSQUIDs based on niobium nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, R.; Esposito, E.; Crescitelli, A.; Di Gennaro, E.; Granata, C.; Vettoliere, A.; Cristiano, R.; Lisitskiy, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present an experimental investigation of nanoSQUIDs based on niobium nitride films. Niobium nitride has a relatively high critical temperature and a large upper critical magnetic field, making it a good material for superconducting electronics working in high magnetic field. We have fabricated nanoSQUIDs using electron beam lithography lift-off technique and deposition of niobium nitride films by magnetron sputtering at room temperature. The characterization of nanoSQUIDs was performed at 4.2 K and it consists mainly of current-voltage (IV) characteristics and critical current as a function of external magnetic field (magnetic pattern). The fabricated nanoSQUIDs show a hysteretic IV characteristic and they present a multi-values magnetic pattern. We show that by reducing the critical current by ion etching it is possible to obtain nanoSQUIDs with a single value magnetic pattern suitable for magnetic particle measurements. Magnetic noise analysis has been performed and a white noise of 0.3 μΦ0 Hz-1/2 has been estimated.

  20. Protective link for superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  1. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  2. Caracterisation of Titanium Nitride Layers Deposited by Reactive Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Popescu, Mihaela; Uţu, Dragoş

    2011-01-01

    Forming and cutting tools are subjected to the intense wear solicitations. Usually, they are either subject to superficial heat treatments or are covered with various materials with high mechanical properties. In recent years, thermal spraying is used increasingly in engineering area because of the large range of materials that can be used for the coatings. Titanium nitride is a ceramic material with high hardness which is used to cover the cutting tools increasing their lifetime. The paper presents the results obtained after deposition of titanium nitride layers by reactive plasma spraying (RPS). As deposition material was used titanium powder and as substratum was used titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). Macroscopic and microscopic (scanning electron microscopy) images of the deposited layers and the X ray diffraction of the coatings are presented. Demonstration program with layers deposited with thickness between 68,5 and 81,4 μm has been achieved and presented.

  3. Structure and energetics of nanotwins in cubic boron nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shijian; Zhang, Ruifeng; Huang, Rong; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ma, Xiuliang; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, nanotwinned cubic boron nitrides (NT c-BN) have demonstrated extraordinary leaps in hardness. However, an understanding of the underlying mechanisms that enable nanotwins to give orders of magnitude increases in material hardness is still lacking. Here, using transmission electron microscopy, we report that the defect density of twin boundaries depends on nanotwin thickness, becoming defect-free, and hence more stable, as it decreases below 5 nm. Using ab initio density functional theory calculations, we reveal that the Shockley partials, which may dominate plastic deformation in c-BNs, show a high energetic barrier. We also report that the c-BN twin boundary has an asymmetrically charged electronic structure that would resist migration of the twin boundary under stress. These results provide important insight into possible nanotwin hardening mechanisms in c-BN, as well as how to design these nanostructured materials to reach their full potential in hardness and strength.

  4. Synthesis of ternary metal nitride nanoparticles using mesoporous carbon nitride as reactive template.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Anna; Müller, Jens Oliver; Antonietti, Markus; Thomas, Arne

    2008-12-23

    Mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride was used as both a nanoreactor and a reactant for the synthesis of ternary metal nitride nanoparticles. By infiltration of a mixture of two metal precursors into mesoporous carbon nitride, the pores act first as a nanoconfinement, generating amorphous mixed oxide nanoparticles. During heating and decomposition, the carbon nitride second acts as reactant or, more precisely, as a nitrogen source, which converts the preformed mixed oxide nanoparticles into the corresponding nitride (reactive templating). Using this approach, ternary metal nitride particles with diameters smaller 10 nm composed of aluminum gallium nitride (Al-Ga-N) and titanium vanadium nitride (Ti-V-N) were synthesized. Due to the confinement effect of the carbon nitride matrix, the composition of the resulting metal nitride can be easily adjusted by changing the concentration of the preceding precursor solution. Thus, ternary metal nitride nanoparticles with continuously adjustable metal composition can be produced.

  5. Method for producing refractory nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1989-01-24

    A process for making fine, uniform metal nitride powders that can be hot pressed or sintered. A metal salt is placed in a solvent with Melamine and warmed until a metal-Melamine compound forms. The solution is cooled and the metal-Melamine precipitate is calcined at a temperature below 700.degree. C. to form the metal nitrides and to avoid formation of the metal oxide.

  6. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  7. The hardness, adhesion, and wear resistance of coatings developed for cobalt-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.; Wilson, W.L.

    2000-05-01

    One potential approach for reducing the level of nuclear plant radiation exposure that results from activated cobalt wear debris is the use of a wear resistant coating. However, large differences in stiffness between a coating/substrate can result in high interfacial stresses that produce coating de-adhesion when a coated substrate is subjected to high stress wear contact. Scratch adhesion and indentation tests have been used to identify four promising coating processes [1,2]: (1) the use of a thin Cr-nitride coating with a hard and less-stiff interlayer, (2) the use of a thick, multilayered Cr-nitride coating with graded layers, (3) use of the duplex approach, or nitriding to harden the material subsurface followed by application of a multilayered Cr-nitride coating, and (4) application of nitriding alone. The processing, characterization, and adhesion of these coating systems are discussed. The wear resistance and performance has been evaluated using laboratory pin-on-disc, 4-ball, and high stress rolling contact tests. Based on the results of these tests, the best coating candidate from the high-stress rolling contact wear test was the thin duplex coating, which consists of ion nitriding followed deposition of a thin Cr-nitride coating, while the thin Cr-nitride coating exhibited the best results in the 4-ball wear test.

  8. Nano boron nitride flatland.

    PubMed

    Pakdel, Amir; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2014-02-07

    Recent years have witnessed many breakthroughs in research on two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, among which is hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), a layered material with a regular network of BN hexagons. This review provides an insight into the marvellous nano BN flatland, beginning with a concise introduction to BN and its low-dimensional nanostructures, followed by an overview of the past and current state of research on 2D BN nanostructures. A comprehensive review of the structural characteristics and synthetic routes of BN monolayers, multilayers, nanomeshes, nanowaves, nanoflakes, nanosheets and nanoribbons is presented. In addition, electronic, optical, thermal, mechanical, magnetic, piezoelectric, catalytic, ecological, biological and wetting properties, applications and research perspectives for these novel 2D nanomaterials are discussed.

  9. Hemocompatibility of titanium nitride.

    PubMed

    Dion, I; Baquey, C; Candelon, B; Monties, J R

    1992-10-01

    The left ventricular assist device is based on the principle of the Maillard-Wenkel rotative pump. The materials which make up the pump must present particular mechanical, tribological, thermal and chemical properties. Titanium nitride (TiN) because of its surface properties and graphite because of its bulk characteristics have been chosen. The present study evaluated the in vitro hemocompatibility of TiN coating deposited by the chemical vapor deposition process. Protein adsorption, platelet retention and hemolysis tests have been carried out. In spite of some disparities, the TiN behavior towards albumin and fibrinogen is interesting, compared with the one of a reference medical grade elastomer. The platelet retention test gives similar results as those achieved with the same elastomer. The hemolysis percentage is near to zero. TiN shows interesting characteristics, as far as mechanical and tribological problems are concerned, and presents very encouraging blood tolerability properties.

  10. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  11. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  12. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  13. High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (Web, free access)   The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.

  14. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  15. Low-Temperature Nitriding of Deformed Austenitic Stainless Steels with Various Nitrogen Contents Obtained by Prior High-Temperature Solution Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-08-01

    In the past decades, high nitrogen steels (HNS) have been regarded as substitutes for conventional austenitic stainless steels because of their superior mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the main limitation to their wider application is their expensive production process. As an alternative, high-temperature solution nitriding has been applied to produce HNS from three commercially available stainless steel grades (AISI 304L, AISI 316, and EN 1.4369). The nitrogen content in each steel alloy is varied and its influence on the mechanical properties and the stability of the austenite investigated. Both hardness and yield stress increase and the alloys remain ductile. In addition, strain-induced transformation of austenite to martensite is suppressed, which is beneficial for subsequent low-temperature nitriding of the surface of deformed alloys. The combination of high- and low-temperature nitriding results in improved properties of both bulk and surface.

  16. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  17. Superconducting optical modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunt, Patricia S.; Ference, Thomas G.; Puzey, Kenneth A.; Tanner, David B.; Tache, Nacira; Varhue, Walter J.

    2000-12-01

    An optical modulator based on the physical properties of high temperature superconductors has been fabricated and tested. The modulator was constructed form a film of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide (YBCO) grown on undoped silicon with a buffer layer of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia. Standard lithographic procedures were used to pattern the superconducting film into a micro bridge. Optical modulation was achieved by passing IR light through the composite structure normal to the micro bridge and switching the superconducting film in the bridge region between the superconducting and non-superconducting states. In the superconducting state, IR light reflects from the superconducting film surface. When a critical current is passed through the micro bridge, it causes the film in this region to switch to the non-superconducting state allowing IR light to pass through it. Superconducting materials have the potential to switch between these two states at speeds up to 1 picosecond using electrical current. Presently, fiber optic transmission capacity is limited by the rate at which optical data can be modulated. The superconducting modulator, when combined with other components, may have the potential to increase the transmission capacity of fiber optic lines.

  18. Nitride precipitation in salt-bath nitrided interstitial-free steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Oh, Chang-Seok; Lee, Min-Ku; Han, Sang-Won

    2010-10-15

    Nitride precipitation and its effect on microstrain in salt-bath nitrided interstitial-free steel were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and neutron diffraction. As the cooling rate after nitriding decreased, two nitrides, {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N and {alpha}{sup -}Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}, were identified in diffusion zone. Combined analyses using Rietveld whole-profile fitting and size-strain analysis revealed that the microstrain in the nitrided specimen increased due to nitrogen supersaturation and then decreased after nitride precipitation, whereas the effective particle size continuously decreased. It was found that microstrain is the dominant factor in peak broadening of the nitrided specimen.

  19. Kinetics Analysis of Higher Temperature Salt Bath Nitriding for Aisi 1045 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Mingyang; Chen, Yao; Chai, Yating; Hu, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Rapid salt bath nitriding was conducted at higher temperature above 600∘C instead of normally used 560∘C for AISI 1045 steel. Optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and micro-hardness tester were employed to characterize the microstructure, phase constituents and micro-hardness of the treated specimens. The results showed that salt bath nitriding at higher temperature could significantly increase the compound layer thickness and higher cross-sectional hardness can be obtained. Kinetics analysis illustrated that the nitrogen atoms diffusion coefficient was obviously increased with temperature, and the activation energy of nitrogen atom diffusion was decreased from 220kJṡmol-1 to 142kJṡmol-1.

  20. Advanced Manufacturing of Superconducting Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senti, Mark W.

    1996-01-01

    The development of specialized materials, processes, and robotics technology allows for the rapid prototype and manufacture of superconducting and normal magnets which can be used for magnetic suspension applications. Presented are highlights of the Direct Conductor Placement System (DCPS) which enables automatic design and assembly of 3-dimensional coils and conductor patterns using LTS and HTS conductors. The system enables engineers to place conductors in complex patterns with greater efficiency and accuracy, and without the need for hard tooling. It may also allow researchers to create new types of coils and patterns which were never practical before the development of DCPS. The DCPS includes a custom designed eight-axis robot, patented end effector, CoilCAD(trademark) design software, RoboWire(trademark) control software, and automatic inspection.

  1. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro; Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei; Yokoya, Takayoshi; Kambe, Takashi; Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L. T.; Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya

    2015-07-01

    'Aromatic hydrocarbon' implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (Kxpicene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (Tc's) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting Kxpicene phase with a Tc as high as 14 K, so we now know that Kxpicene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides Kxpicene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rbxpicene and Caxpicene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for Kxpicene and Rbxpicene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of Tc that is clearly observed in some phases of aromatic hydrocarbon superconductors, suggesting behavior not explained by the standard BCS picture of superconductivity. In this article, we describe the present status of this research field, and discuss its future prospects.

  2. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.

    1984-01-01

    The application of the ion beam technique to the nitriding of steels is described. It is indicated that the technique can be successfully applied to nitriding. Some of the structural changes obtained by this technique are similar to those obtained by ion nitriding. The main difference is the absence of the iron nitride diffraction lines. It is found that the dependence of the resultant microhardness on beam voltage for super nitralloy is different from that of 304 stainless steel.

  3. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the ion beam technique to the nitriding of steels is described. It is indicated that the technique can be successfully applied to nitriding. Some of the structural changes obtained by this technique are similar to those obtained by ion nitriding. The main difference is the absence of the iron nitride diffraction lines. It is found that the dependence of the resultant microhardness on beam voltage for super nitralloy is different from that of 304 stainless steel.

  4. Formation of cubic boron-nitride by the reactive sputter deposition of boron

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Hayes, J.P.; Makowiecki, D.W.; McKeman, M.A.

    1997-03-01

    Boron-nitride films are synthesized by RF magnetron sputtering boron targets where the deposition parameters of gas pressure, flow and composition are varied along with substrate temperature and applied bias. The films are analyzed using Auger electron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, nanoindentation, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. These techniques provide characterization of film composition, crystalline structure, hardness and chemical bonding, respectively. Reactive, rf-sputtering process parameters are established which lead to the growth of crystalline BN phases. The deposition of stable and adherent boron nitride coatings consisting of the cubic phase requires 400 `C substrate heating and the application of a 300 V negative bias.

  5. Carbon Nitride Thin Films Deposited by Cathodic Electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chuanbao; Fu, Jiyu; Zhu, Hesun

    Carbon nitride thin films were prepared by cathodic electrodeposition. The dicyandiamide compound dissovled in acetone was selected as the organic precursor. Single crystal silicon wafers and conductive glass (ITO) wafers were used as substrates. XPS measurements indicated that the films composed of carbon and nitrogen elements. The nitrogen content reached 41%. The polycrystalline β-C3N4 should exit in the prepared film from TED measurements. The nano hardness of the films on ITO substrates were as high as 13 GPa. The structure and properties were studies.

  6. Normal, superconducting and topological regimes of hybrid double quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Sherman, D; Yodh, J S; Albrecht, S M; Nygård, J; Krogstrup, P; Marcus, C M

    2017-03-01

    Epitaxial semiconductor-superconductor hybrid materials are an excellent basis for studying mesoscopic and topological superconductivity, as the semiconductor inherits a hard superconducting gap while retaining tunable carrier density. Here, we investigate double-quantum-dot structures made from InAs nanowires with a patterned epitaxial Al two-facet shell that proximitizes two gate-defined segments along the nanowire. We follow the evolution of mesoscopic superconductivity and charging energy in this system as a function of magnetic field and voltage-tuned barriers. Interdot coupling is varied from strong to weak using side gates, and the ground state is varied between normal, superconducting and topological regimes by applying a magnetic field. We identify the topological transition by tracking the spacing between successive co-tunnelling peaks as a function of axial magnetic field and show that the individual dots host weakly hybridized Majorana modes.

  7. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  8. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1988-04-12

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1989-01-01

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites.

  10. Superconducting properties of protactinium.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Spirlet, J C; Müller, W

    1979-07-13

    The superconducting transition temperature and upper critical magnetic field of protactinium were measured by alternating-current susceptibility techniques. Since the superconducting behavior of protactinium is affected by its 5f electron character, it is clear now that protactinium is a true actinide element.

  11. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    DOE PAGES

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  12. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  13. Superconducting gyroscope research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, J. B.; Karr, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    Four basic areas of research and development of superconducting gyroscopes are studied. Chapter 1 studies the analysis of a SQUID readout for a superconducting gyroscope. Chapter 2 studies the dependence of spin-up torque on channel and gas properties. Chapter 3 studies the theory of super fluid plug operation. And chapter 4 studies the gyro rotor and housing manufacture.

  14. Method of producing high T(subc) superconducting NBN films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita (Inventor); Lamb, James L. (Inventor); Thakoor, Anilkumar P. (Inventor); Khanna, Satish K. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Thin films of niobium nitride with high superconducting temperature (T sub c) of 15.7 K are deposited on substrates held at room temperature (approx 90 C) by heat sink throughout the sputtering process. Films deposited at P sub Ar 12.9 + or - 0.2 mTorr exhibit higher T sub c with increasing P sub N2,I with the highest T sub c achieved at P sub n2,I= 3.7 + or - 0.2 mTorr and total sputtering pressure P sub tot = 16.6 + or - 0.4. Further increase of N2 injection starts decreasing T sub c.

  15. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  16. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  17. Graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankowitz, Matthew; Xue, Jiamin; LeRoy, B. J.

    2014-07-01

    The field of graphene research has developed rapidly since its first isolation by mechanical exfoliation in 2004. Due to the relativistic Dirac nature of its charge carriers, graphene is both a promising material for next-generation electronic devices and a convenient low-energy testbed for intrinsically high-energy physical phenomena. Both of these research branches require the facile fabrication of clean graphene devices so as not to obscure its intrinsic physical properties. Hexagonal boron nitride has emerged as a promising substrate for graphene devices as it is insulating, atomically flat and provides a clean charge environment for the graphene. Additionally, the interaction between graphene and boron nitride provides a path for the study of new physical phenomena not present in bare graphene devices. This review focuses on recent advancements in the study of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride devices from the perspective of scanning tunneling microscopy with highlights of some important results from electrical transport measurements.

  18. Nitriding molybdenum: Effects of duration and fill gas pressure when using 100-Hz pulse DC discharge technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlaq, U.; R., Ahmad; Shafiq, M.; Saleem, S.; S. Shah, M.; Hussain, T.; A. Khan, I.; K., Abbas; S. Abbas, M.

    2014-10-01

    Molybdenum is nitrided by a 100-Hz pulsed DC glow discharge technique for various time durations and fill gas pressures to study the effects on the surface properties of molybdenum. X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used for the structural and morphological analysis of the nitrided layers. Vickers' microhardness tester is utilized to investigate surface microhardness. Phase analysis shows the formation of more molybdenum nitride molecules for longer nitriding durations at fill gas pressures of 2 mbar and 3 mbar (1 bar = 105 Pa). A considerable increase in surface microhardness (approximately by a factor of 2) is observed for longer duration (10 h) and 2-mbar pressure. Longer duration (10 h) and 2-mbar fill gas pressure favors the formation of homogeneous, smooth, hard layers by the incorporation of more nitrogen.

  19. Frequency-tunable superconducting resonators via nonlinear kinetic inductance

    SciTech Connect

    Vissers, M. R.; Hubmayr, J.; Sandberg, M.; Gao, J.; Chaudhuri, S.; Bockstiegel, C.

    2015-08-10

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a frequency-tunable high-Q superconducting resonator made from a niobium titanium nitride film. The frequency tunability is achieved by injecting a DC through a current-directing circuit into the nonlinear inductor whose kinetic inductance is current-dependent. We have demonstrated continuous tuning of the resonance frequency in a 180 MHz frequency range around 4.5 GHz while maintaining the high internal quality factor Q{sub i} > 180 000. This device may serve as a tunable filter and find applications in superconducting quantum computing and measurement. It also provides a useful tool to study the nonlinear response of a superconductor. In addition, it may be developed into techniques for measurement of the complex impedance of a superconductor at its transition temperature and for readout of transition-edge sensors.

  20. Nitride tuning of lanthanide chromites.

    PubMed

    Black, Ashley P; Johnston, Hannah E; Oró-Solé, Judith; Bozzo, Bernat; Ritter, Clemens; Frontera, Carlos; Attfield, J Paul; Fuertes, Amparo

    2016-03-21

    LnCrO(3-x)N(x) perovskites with Ln = La, Pr and Nd and nitrogen contents up to x = 0.59 have been synthesised through ammonolysis of LnCrO4 precursors. These new materials represent one of the few examples of chromium oxynitrides. Hole-doping through O(2-)/N(3-) anion substitution suppresses the magnetic transition far less drastically than Ln(3+)/M(2+) (M = Ca, Sr) cation substitutions because of the greater covalency of metal-nitride bonds. Hence, nitride-doping is a more benign method for doping metal oxides without suppressing electronic transitions.

  1. Optimization of Silicon Nitride Films For Use in Phase Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirois, Adam J.; Huber, Martin E.; Osborn, Kevin D.; Strong, Joshua A.; Simmonds, Raymond W.

    2007-03-01

    The lifetime (coherence time) of superconducting phase qubits is currently severely limited by lossy materials used in standard fabrication techniques. In particular, the insulator material - typically Silicon Nitride - used to isolate and physically separate different layers of the qubit is of interest. We have conducted a fractional factorial design experiment to optimize SiNx loss properties with respect to several deposition parameters in an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) reactor. Our experimental design included a three-level, four-parameter matrix with N2/SiH4 ratio, microwave power, rf power, and pressure as the parameters. The test-bed for these films is a low temperature microwave LC resonator circuit in which the various insulator films are used as the dielectric between a parallel plate capacitor and the Q (Quality Factor) of the circuit gives the relevant loss information for qubit operations.

  2. Metal optics and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    The articles contained in this collection are dedicated to the study of the electron structure of transition metals and superconducting alloys and compounds based on them. The study of the electron structure of materials is one of the central problems of solid-state physics and defines the solution of a number of problems. One of them is the problem of high-temperature superconductivity which has attracted exceptional attention from physicists in connection with the discovery of new classes of ceramic oxides which are superconducting at liquid-nitrogen temperature. The electron structure is one of the three whales on which all of superconductivity rests. It is frequently our ignorance of the electronic properties of a metal, alloy or compound in its normal state which makes it impossible to predict superconductivity in the material, preventing use from calculating the parameters of the superconducting state. There are now a number of effective methods for investigation of the electron structure of the metals and allows. This collection discusses metal optics, tunneling and magnetic measurements in superconductors. These methods are quite informative and allow us to obtain many important electron characteristics and temperature relations. Various characteristics of the superconducting compounds Nb{sub 3}Ge, Nb{sub 3}Al, nb{sub 3}Sn and Nb{sub 3}Ga with A15 structure and NbN with B1 structure, having rather high critical temperatures, are experimentally studied.

  3. Mechanical performance of thermally post-treated ion-nitrided steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales, I.; Martinez, H.; Guardian, R.

    2016-05-01

    To obtain an enlarged nitrided layer, a new diffusion heat treatment was applied to three different ion-nitriding steels. Selected steels were from the AISI series: 1045, O1, and H13. Fractographic analyses showed that layers of each one of the steels considerably grew after being exposed to diffusion heat treatment. Micro-hardness tests indicated that the modified steels showed a similar value when is compared with the nitrided condition. By comparing the results in fracture toughness tests, it was observed that the most positively affected steel by the treatment was the AISI-1045 steel. Wear analyses showed that diffusion heat-treated samples exhibited an enhanced wear behavior under moderate loads.

  4. Thermodynamic stability and unusual strength of ultra-incompressible rhenium nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R. F.; Lin, Zhijun; Mao, Ho-kwang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2011-02-11

    We report on a comprehensive study of thermodynamic and mechanical properties as well as a bond-deformation mechanism on ultra-incompressible Re{sub 2} N and Re{sub 3} N. The introduction of nitrogen into the rhenium lattice leads to thermodynamic instability in Re{sub 2} N at ambient conditions and enhanced incompressibility and strength for both rhenium nitrides. Rhenium nitrides, however, show substantially lower ideal shear strength than hard ReB{sub 2} and superhard c -BN, suggesting that they cannot be intrinsically superhard. An intriguing soft “ionic bond mediated plastic deformation” mechanism is revealed to underline the physical origin of their unusual mechanical strength. These results suggest a need to reformulate the design concept of intrinsically superhard transition-metal nitrides, borides, and carbides.

  5. High-coercivity samarium-iron-nitrogen from nitriding melt-spun ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, F. E.; Fuerst, C. D.

    1993-04-01

    Melt spinning has proven to be an excellent technique for magnetic hardening of a variety of permanent magnet materials, especially Nd-Fe-B. Recently, a new permanent magnet material has been discovered by nitriding the compound Sm2Fe17 to obtain Sm2Fe17Nx. The authors have obtained magnetically hard Sm-Fe-N ribbons with a room-temperature intrinsic coercivity H ci = 22 kOe (1.8 MA/m) by nitriding melt-spun Sm-Fe precursor ribbons. Best results were obtained by grinding the ribbons to a <25 µm powder, then heat treating the powder in vacuum for 1 h at 700 °C prior to nitriding in N2 gas at 450 to 480 °C. X-ray diffraction shows that the primary phase is TbCu7-type Sn2Fe17Nx, a disordered hexagonal modification of the rhombohedral Snu2Fe17 phase.

  6. Deposition of titanium nitride and hydroxyapatite-based biocompatible composite by reactive plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Dragoş, Uţu

    2012-02-01

    Titanium nitride is a bioceramic material successfully used for covering medical implants due to the high hardness meaning good wear resistance. Hydroxyapatite is a bioactive ceramic that contributes to the restoration of bone tissue, which together with titanium nitride may contribute to obtaining a superior composite in terms of mechanical and bone tissue interaction matters. The paper presents the experimental results in obtaining composite layers of titanium nitride and hydroxyapatite by reactive plasma spraying in ambient atmosphere. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that in both cases of powders mixtures used (10% HA + 90% Ti; 25% HA + 75% Ti), hydroxyapatite decomposition occurred; in variant 1 the decomposition is higher compared with the second variant. Microstructure of the deposited layers was investigated using scanning electron microscope, the surfaces presenting a lamellar morphology without defects such as cracks or microcracks. Surface roughness values obtained vary as function of the spraying distance, presenting higher values at lower thermal spraying distances.

  7. Synthesis, Structure, and Properties of New Ternary Calcium Nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Ming-Yau

    . Then, Appendix A contains all the experimental results in synthesizing new nitrides; Appendix B is a drawing of the x-ray holder used for Rietveld refinement.; and finally Appendix C is a hard copy of the temperature controller program described in the last chapter. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.).

  8. Homogeneous dispersion of gallium nitride nanoparticles in a boron nitride matrix by nitridation with urea.

    PubMed

    Kusunose, Takafumi; Sekino, Tohru; Ando, Yoichi

    2010-07-01

    A Gallium Nitride (GaN) dispersed boron nitride (BN) nanocomposite powder was synthesized by heating a mixture of gallium nitrate, boric acid, and urea in a hydrogen atmosphere. Before heat treatment, crystalline phases of urea, boric acid, and gallium nitrate were recognized, but an amorphous material was produced by heat treatment at 400 degrees C, and then was transformed into GaN and turbostratic BN (t-BN) by further heat treatment at 800 degrees C. TEM obsevations of this composite powder revealed that single nanosized GaN particles were homogeneously dispersed in a BN matrix. Homogeneous dispersion of GaN nanoparticles was thought to be attained by simultaneously nitriding gallium nitrate and boric acid to GaN and BN with urea.

  9. Superconductivity in Opal-based superconducting nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. K.; Charnaya, E. V.; Chang, L. J.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.; Lin, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we investigate superconducting nanocomposites (SCNCs) to elucidate superconductivity in nanostructured type I superconductor. In, Sn and Hg are loaded into opal matrices by high pressure up to 10kbar, in which introducing superconducting metals into templates preserves their own 3D nanostructures. The opal matrices is adopted because it is a well-developed nanoconfinement and widely used in the studies of photonic crystal due to its periodically-superlatticed nanoporous structure. The SCNCs are then measured by Quantum Design MPMS 3 under different external magnetic fields reveal the field dependences of Tc and irreversibility temperature (Tirr). Next, AC susceptibility measurements of SCNCs determine grain coupling, vortex dynamics and field dependence of activation barrier (Ua) as well as Tc. Additionally, the phase diagrams of these SCNCs are analyzed to study superconductivity for a system with similar nanogeometry. Exotic phase diagrams in the opal SCNC studies reveal an enhanced upper critical field (Hc2 (0)) and curvature crossover of upper critical field line. Additionally, according to the field dependence of Ua(H), curvature crossover of the upper critical field line can occur, owing to vortex phase transition.

  10. Tailoring the mesoporous texture of graphitic carbon nitride.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae-Hun; Kim, Gain; Domen, Kazunari; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2013-11-01

    Recently, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) materials have received a great attention from many researchers due to their various roles as a visible light harvesting photocatalyst, metal-free catalyst, reactive template, nitrogen source of nitridation reaction, etc. g-C3N4 could be prepared by temperature-induced polymerization of cyanamide or melamine. In this study, we report a preparation of mesoporous graphitic carbon nitrides with tailored porous texture including pore size, and specific surface area from cyanamide and colloidal silica nanoparticles (Ludox). At first, cyanamide-silica nanocomposites were prepared by mixing colloidal silica with different size in the range of 7-22 nm and cyanamide, followed by evaporating the solvent in the resulting mixture. Mesoporous g-C3N4 samples were prepared by calcining cyanamide-silica nanocomposite at 550 degrees C for 4 hrs and removing the silica nanoparticles by using ammonium hydrogen fluoride. The formation of g-C3N4 was confirmed by the sharp (002) peak (d = 3.25 A) of graphitic interlayer stacking, and the broad (100) peak (d = 6.86 A) of in-plane repeating unit in the X-ray diffraction patterns. According to N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, the pore size of mesoporous carbon nitrides was similar to the size of colloidal silica used as hard template (7-22 nm). The specific surface area of mesoporous g-C3N4 could be tailored in the range of 189 m2/g-288 m2/g.

  11. Structures behind superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1988-07-01

    The previously reported preparation and structures of superconducting materials are reviewed. The two systems, Y-Ba-Cu-O and La-Cu-O, previously reported with high transition temperatures are discussed in some detail. The new systems introduced in 1987 that were not based on a rare earth but including Bi-Sr-Cu-O are also reviewed. Superconductive materials including thallium rather than bismuth that have been reported but not thoroughly studied are discussed briefly. It is pointed out that many superconducting materials have been prepared, but good documentation of the structures and properties of these materials need much more study.

  12. Tunneling in superconducting structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2010-12-01

    Here we review our results on the breakpoint features in the coupled system of IJJ obtained in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A correspondence between the features in the current voltage characteristics (CVC) and the character of the charge oscillations in superconducting layers is demonstrated. Investigation of the correlations of superconducting currents in neighboring Josephson junctions and the charge correlations in neighboring superconducting layers reproduces the features in the CVC and gives a powerful method for the analysis of the CVC of coupled Josephson junctions. A new method for determination of the dissipation parameter is suggested.

  13. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  14. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  15. Thermal properties of silicon nitride beams below 1 Kelvin.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Yefremenko, V.; Novosad, V.; Datesman, A.; Pearson, J.; Shustakova, G.; Divan, R.; Chang, C.; McMahon, J.; Bleem, L.; Crites, A. T.; Downes, T.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the thermal transport of long, narrow beams of silicon nitride at cryogenic temperatures. Simultaneously employing a superconducting Transition Edge Sensor (TES) as both a heater and a sensor, we measured the thermal conductance of 1 {micro}m thick silicon nitride beams of different lateral dimensions. Based upon these measurements, we calculate the thermal parameters of the beams. We utilize a boundary limited phonon scattering model and assume the phonon mean free path to be temperature independent in the calculation. In the temperature range from 300 mK to 530 mK, the following results are obtained for 20 (30) {micro}m beams: the volume heat capacity is 0.083 T+0.509 T{sup 3} J/m{sup 3}-K, the width dependent phonon mean free path is 9.60 (11.05) {micro}m, and the width dependent thermal conductivity is 5.60 x 10{sup -3} T+3.41 x 10{sup -2} T{sup 3} (6.50 x 10{sup -3} T+3.93 x 10{sup -2} T{sup 3}) W/m-K.

  16. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

    1997-08-12

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

  17. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan; Fu, Tracy; Ross, Jennifer; Chan, James

    1997-01-01

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

  18. Structure of boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Buranova, Yu. S. Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-01-15

    The crystallographic structure of boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated. Various defects that may arise during nanotube synthesis are revealed by electron microscopy. Nanotubes with different numbers of walls and different diameters are modeled by molecular dynamics methods. Structural features of single-wall nanotubes are demonstrated. The causes of certain defects in multiwall nanotubes are indicated.

  19. Structure of boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buranova, Yu. S.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-01-01

    The crystallographic structure of boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated. Various defects that may arise during nanotube synthesis are revealed by electron microscopy. Nanotubes with different numbers of walls and different diameters are modeled by molecular dynamics methods. Structural features of single-wall nanotubes are demonstrated. The causes of certain defects in multiwall nanotubes are indicated.

  20. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.

    1996-07-01

    Superconductors, especially high T{sub c} ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO.

  1. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, John D.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  2. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1998-05-05

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat is disclosed. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device. 4 figs.

  3. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  4. Supertubes and Superconducting Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero, Ruben; Miguel-Pilar, Zelin

    2007-02-09

    We show the equivalence between configurations that arise from string theory of type IIA, called supertubes, and superconducting membranes at the bosonic level. We find equilibrium and oscillating configurations for a tubular membrane carrying a current along its axis.

  5. Graphitic carbon nitride based nanocomposites: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zaiwang; Sun, Yanjuan; Dong, Fan

    2015-01-07

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C(3)N(4)), as an intriguing earth-abundant visible light photocatalyst, possesses a unique two-dimensional structure, excellent chemical stability and tunable electronic structure. Pure g-C(3)N(4) suffers from rapid recombination of photo-generated electron-hole pairs resulting in low photocatalytic activity. Because of the unique electronic structure, the g-C(3)N(4) could act as an eminent candidate for coupling with various functional materials to enhance the performance. According to the discrepancies in the photocatalytic mechanism and process, six primary systems of g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites can be classified and summarized: namely, the g-C(3)N(4) based metal-free heterojunction, the g-C(3)N(4)/single metal oxide (metal sulfide) heterojunction, g-C(3)N(4)/composite oxide, the g-C(3)N(4)/halide heterojunction, g-C(3)N(4)/noble metal heterostructures, and the g-C(3)N(4) based complex system. Apart from the depiction of the fabrication methods, heterojunction structure and multifunctional application of the g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites, we emphasize and elaborate on the underlying mechanisms in the photocatalytic activity enhancement of g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites. The unique functions of the p-n junction (semiconductor/semiconductor heterostructures), the Schottky junction (metal/semiconductor heterostructures), the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect, photosensitization, superconductivity, etc. are utilized in the photocatalytic processes. Furthermore, the enhanced performance of g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites has been widely employed in environmental and energetic applications such as photocatalytic degradation of pollutants, photocatalytic hydrogen generation, carbon dioxide reduction, disinfection, and supercapacitors. This critical review ends with a summary and some perspectives on the challenges and new directions in exploring g-C(3)N(4)-based advanced nanomaterials.

  6. High Temperature Superconducting Compounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-02

    addition to superconducting films, non-superconducting mixed-valence manganite perovskites, which exhibit so-called colossal magnetoresistance were grown...The manganites are unique in that their charge carriers are believed to be almost 100% spin polarized. These materials were combined with the...brought about by the injection of spin polarized carriers from the manganite into the curate. This work may make possible new classes of devices based on

  7. Some Temperature Effects on AISI-304 Nitriding in an Inductively Coupled RF Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia-Alvarado, R.; Barocio, S. R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Pena-Eguiluz, R.; Munoz-Castro, A. E.; Piedad-Beneitez, A. de la; Rosa-Vazquez, J. de la; Lopez-Callejas, R.; Godoy-Cabrera, O. G.

    2006-12-04

    Some recent results obtained from nitriding AISI 304 stainless steel samples, 1.2 cm in diameter and 0.5 cm thick are reported here in the case of an 85% hydrogen and 15% nitrogen mixture work gas. The process was carried out from 300 to 400 W for (13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma within a 60 cm long pyrex glass tube 3.5 cm in diameter where the samples were biased up to -300 V with respect to earth. The resulting hardness appears to be a function of the substrate temperature which varied from 200 deg. C at a 0 V bias to 550 deg. C at -300 V. The plasma density at 400 W reached 3x1010 cm-3 with a 4 eV electron temperature. Prior to nitriding, all the samples were polished with 0.05 {mu}m diamond paste, leading to a 30 nm average roughness (Ra). After nitriding at -300 V, the Ra rose until {approx}400 nm while hardness values of 1500 HV under 300 g loads were measured. X ray diffraction indicates that the extended phase amplitude ({gamma}N), Fe and Cr nitride depends on the substrate temperature.

  8. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, K.E.

    1988-07-28

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

  9. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1989-01-01

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

  10. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  11. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  12. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  13. Microstructures and Mechanical Performance of Plasma-Nitrided Al0.3CrFe1.5MnNi0.5 High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei-Yeh; Chuang, Ming-Hao; Lin, Su-Jien; Yeh, Jien-Wei

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates the effect of plasma nitriding at 798 K (525 °C) on microstructures and the mechanical performance of Al0.3CrFe1.5MnNi0.5 high-entropy alloys (HEAs) obtained using different cast and wrought processing. All the alloys can be well nitride, with a thickness of around 80 μm, and attain a peak hardness level around Hv 1300 near the surface. The main nitride phases are CrN, AlN, and (Mn, Fe)4N. Those of the substrates are bcc, fcc, Al-, and Ni-rich B2 precipitates, and ρ phase. Their relative amounts depend on the prior processing and also change under the heat treatment during nitriding. The formation of ρ phase during nitriding could in-situ harden the substrate to attain the suitable level required for wear applications. This gives the advantage in simplifying the processing for making a wear-resistance component or a mold since austenitizing, quench hardening, and tempering required for steels such as SACM and SKD steels are no longer required and final finishing can be accomplished before nitriding. Nitrided Al0.3CrFe1.5MnNi0.5 samples have much better wear resistance than un-nitrided ones by 49 to 80 times and also exhibit superior adhesive wear resistance to conventional nitrided alloys: nitriding steel SACM-645 (AISI 7140), 316 stainless steel, and hot-mold steel SKD-61 (AISI H13) by 22 to 55 times depending on prior processing. The superiority is due to the fact that the present nitrided alloys possess a much thicker highly hardened layer than the conventional alloys.

  14. The superconducting spin valve and triplet superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garifullin, I. A.; Leksin, P. V.; Garif`yanov, N. N.; Kamashev, A. A.; Fominov, Ya. V.; Schumann, J.; Krupskaya, Y.; Kataev, V.; Schmidt, O. G.; Büchner, B.

    2015-01-01

    A review of our recent results on the spin valve effect is presented. We have used a theoretically proposed spin switch design F1/F2/S comprising a ferromagnetic bilayer (F1/F2) as a ferromagnetic component, and an ordinary superconductor (S) as the second interface component. Based on it we have prepared and studied in detail a set of multilayers CoOx/Fe1/Cu/Fe2/S (S=In or Pb). In these heterostructures we have realized for the first time a full spin switch effect for the superconducting current, have observed its sign-changing oscillating behavior as a function of the Fe2-layer thickness and finally have obtained direct evidence for the long-range triplet superconductivity arising due to noncollinearity of the magnetizations of the Fe1 and Fe2 layers.

  15. Superconducting mirror for laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.

    1991-05-14

    This paper describes an apparatus for reflecting a light beam. It comprises: a mirror assembly comprising a substrate and a superconductive mirror formed on such substrate, wherein: the substrate is optically transparent to the light beam and has a thickness of from about 0.5 to about 1.0 millimeter, and the superconductive mirror has a thickness of from about 0.5 to about 1.0 microns; means for cooling the superconductive mirror; means for measuring the temperature of the superconductive mirror; means for determining the reflectivity of the superconductive mirror; and means for varying the reflectivity of the superconductive mirror.

  16. Longitudinal Splitting of Boron Nitride Nanotubes for the Facile Synthesis of High Quality Boron Nitride Nanoribbons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-24

    Boron Nitride Nanotubes for the Facile Synthesis of High Quality Boron Nitride Nanoribbons Kris J. Erickson,†,‡,§ Ashley...We report the synthesis of BNNRs through the potassium-intercalation-induced longitudinal splitting of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). This facile...COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Longitudinal Splitting of Boron Nitride Nanotubes for the Facile Synthesis of High

  17. A reduction nitridation route to boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Wang, X.; Liu, J.; Wang, Z.; Qian, Y.

    2005-10-01

    Multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes were synthesized through a simple reduction nitridation route, in which boron trifluoride etherate ((C2H5)2OBF3) and sodium azide (NaN3) were used as reactants in the presence of Fe-Ni powder at 600 °C for 12 h. The obtained BN nanotubes have an average outer diameter of 60 nm, an average inner diameter of 30 nm, and an average length up to 300 nm. Some nanobamboo structured BN were found coexisting with the BN nanotubes. The experimental results show that the reaction temperature and Fe-Ni powder play important roles in the formation of BN nanotubes. Finally, a possible formation mechanism is also discussed.

  18. Aluminum Nitride Nanofibers fabricated using Electrospinning and Nitridation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Xenia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge; Ramos, Idalia

    2012-02-01

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN) and other nitride semiconductors are important materials in the fields of optoelectronics and electronics. AlN nanofibers were synthesized using electrospinning and subsequent heating under N2 and NH3 atmospheres. The precursor solution for electrospining contains aluminium nitrate and cellulose acetate. The electrospun nanofibers were heated in N2 to eliminate the polymer and produce Al2O3, and then nitridized at a temperature of 1200 C under NH3 flow. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations demonstrate the production of fibers with diameters ranging from a few nanometers to several micrometers. X-Ray Diffraction and UV-VIs analyses show the production of AlN nanofibers with hexagonal wurzite structure and a band gap of approximately approximately 6 eV. Current-Voltage measurements on a single AlN fiber with gold electrodes suggest the formation of a Schottky contact The fabrication method and results from the fibers characterization will be presented.

  19. Superconducting nanostructured materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Metlushko, V.

    1998-07-13

    Within the last year it has been realized that the remarkable properties of superconducting thin films containing a periodic array of defects (such as sub-micron sized holes) offer a new route for developing a novel superconducting materials based on precise control of microstructure by modern photolithography. A superconductor is a material which, when cooled below a certain temperature, loses all resistance to electricity. This means that superconducting materials can carry large electrical currents without any energy loss--but there are limits to how much current can flow before superconductivity is destroyed. The current at which superconductivity breaks down is called the critical current. The value of the critical current is determined by the balance of Lorentz forces and pinning forces acting on the flux lines in the superconductor. Lorentz forces proportional to the current flow tend to drive the flux lines into motion, which dissipates energy and destroys zero resistance. Pinning forces created by isolated defects in the microstructure oppose flux line motion and increase the critical current. Many kinds of artificial pinning centers have been proposed and developed to increase critical current performance, ranging from dispersal of small non-superconducting second phases to creation of defects by proton, neutron or heavy ion irradiation. In all of these methods, the pinning centers are randomly distributed over the superconducting material, causing them to operate well below their maximum efficiency. We are overcome this drawback by creating pinning centers in aperiodic lattice (see Fig 1) so that each pin site interacts strongly with only one or a few flux lines.

  20. Effect of nitrogen pressure on the hardness and chemical states of TiAlCrN coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Jonathan F.; Huang Feng; Barnard, John A.; Weaver, Mark L.

    2005-01-01

    TiAlCrN coatings were reactively sputtered from a Ti{sub 0.37}Al{sub 0.51}Cr{sub 0.12} alloy target in this study with a nitrogen partial pressure ranging from 0% to 25% of the total pressure. The effects of the incorporation of nitrogen into the coatings on the hardness, elastic modulus, and chemical state of the metal atoms in the coatings were investigated. The hardness and reduced modulus of the coatings increased with increasing nitrogen partial pressures. The formation of ternary nitrides was inferred from the noticeable difference in the chemical states from those for the corresponding binary nitrides.

  1. Topotactic synthesis of vanadium nitride solid foams

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, S.T.; Kapoor, R.; Oyama, H.T.; Hofmann, D.J.; Matijevic, E. )

    1993-06-01

    Vanadium nitride has been synthesized with a surface area of 120 m[sup 2] g[sup [minus]1] by temperature programmed nitridation of a foam-like vanadium oxide (35 m[sup 2] g[sup [minus]1]), precipitated from vanadate solutions. The nitridation reaction was established to be topotactic and pseudomorphous by x-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The crystallographic relationship between the nitride and oxide was [l brace]200[r brace]//[l brace]001[r brace]. The effect of precursor geometry on the product size and shape was investigated by employing vanadium oxide solids of different morphologies.

  2. The effects of laser surface modification on the microstructure and properties of gas-nitrided 42CrMo4 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulka, M.; Panfil, D.; Michalski, J.; Wach, P.

    2016-08-01

    Gas nitriding, together with gas carburizing and gas carbonitriding, was the most commonly used thermochemical treatment, resulting in many advantageous properties: high hardness, enhanced corrosion resistance, considerably improved wear resistance and fatigue strength. However, an unfavorable increase in the thickness of compound layer (ε+γ‧) close to the surface was observed after conventional gas nitriding. This was the reason for undesirable embrittlement and flaking. Therefore, a controlled gas nitriding was developed, reducing the thickness of compound layer. In this study, laser modification with or without re-melting was carried out after the controlled gas nitriding in order to change microstructure and to improve wear resistance. The effects of laser beam power on the dimensions of simple laser tracks were analyzed. It enabled to control the obtained microstructure and to select the laser processing parameters during producing the multiple tracks. Such a treatment was necessary to investigate wear resistance. Laser re-melting resulted in dissolving the majority of nitrides as well as in producing the martensitic structure in re-melted and heat-affected zones. This treatment required argon shielding in order to protect the surface against uncontrolled oxidation. Laser heat treatment without re-melting caused a modification of ε nitrides which became less porous and more compact. Simultaneously, it provided heat-affected zone with the partially martensitic structure of increased hardness below compound zone. Argon shielding was not necessary in this case because of the resistance of nitrides to oxidation during rapid heating and cooling. All the laser-modified layers, irrespective if the nitrided layer was re-melted or not, were characterized by the improved wear resistance compared to the typical gas-nitrided layer.

  3. Effect of Temperature on Microstructure, Corrosion Resistance, and Toughness of Salt Bath Nitrided Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hangtao; Zhang, Jin; Huang, Jinfeng; Lian, Yong; Zhang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a type of hot work tool steel was modified through salt bath nitriding for 4 h at 540 and 560 °C, and post-oxidation was subsequently performed. Surface and cross-sectional hardness test results revealed that the surface hardness increased after the treatment because of the formation of compound layers and diffusion zones. Microstructures and phase analyses showed that more homogeneous compound layers and Fe3O4-phase could be generated after treatment at 560 than at 540 °C. As a result, the corrosion potential was elevated, and the corrosion current density was clearly reduced. The thickness and porosity of the compound layer were also increased with the elevated nitriding temperature. Because of the nitrogen atom solution, XRD diffraction peaks broadened, and the position of the peaks shifted to a lower angle in different degrees at different depths, thus showing the same tendency as the hardness curves. Salt bath nitriding significantly deteriorated the impact toughness from 32.3 to 5.2 J.

  4. Cryogenic Systems and Superconductive Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    subsystem suitable for providing reliable long-lived cryogenic refrigeration for a superconductive ship propulsion system; and, Provide a sound...technical basis for subsequent applications of superconductive power in the area of ship propulsion .

  5. Carbothermal synthesis of aluminum nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, L.D. )

    1988-07-01

    A synthetic route is described for making carbothermally reduced powders from colloidal oxide precursors trapped in a polymer matrix. The entrapping resin, which is formed by polymerization of a monomer dissolved in the colloid, serves both to minimize particle agglomeration during reaction and as the source of carbon for reduction. Following reduction, the remaining carbon matrix is removed by oxidation. This strategy was used to synthesize aluminum nitride powder via trapping of colloidal alumina in poly(furfuryl alcohol) resin.

  6. Silicon nitride equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert C.; Swaminathan, Pazhayannur K.

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the development of a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4).1 Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonal β-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data that have indicated a complex and slow time dependent phase change to the c-Si3N4 phase. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products; however, the need for a kinetic approach is suggested to combine with the single component solid models to simulate and further investigate the global phase coexistences.

  7. Silicon Nitride Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Pazhayannur; Brown, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This report presents the development a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4) . Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonalβ-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products and then combined with the single component solid models to study the global phase diagram. Sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Living With a Star program office.

  8. Highly flexible, mechanically robust superconducting wire consisting of NbN-carbon-nanotube nanofibril composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Gyun; Kang, Haeyong; Kim, Joonggyu; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Dongseok

    A flexible superconducting fiber is prepared by twisting carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets coated with sputter-deposited niobium nitride (NbN) layer to form the shape of yarn. Twisted CNT yarn, which has been extensively studied due to its high flexibility as well as excellent mechanical properties, and NbN, which is a superconducting material with high transition temperature (Tc) and critical magnetic field (Hc), are combined together by the deposition of NbN layer on free-standing CNT-sheet substrate followed by the biscrolling process. We tried many experimental conditions to investigate the superconducting properties of NbN-CNT yarn as a function of NbN thickness and number of CNT-sheet layers, and found out that the superconducting property of NbN on CNT-sheet can be comparable to that of NbN thin film on the normal solid substrate. In addition, the superconducting property survived even under the condition of severe mechanical deformation such as knotting. These results show the potential application of this technology as a large-scale fabrication method of flexible, mechanically robust, high performance superconducting wire. This work is supported by the Institute for Basic Science (IBS-R011-D1), and by the National Research Foundation (BSR-2013R1A1A1076063) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning, Republic of Korea.

  9. Interface high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-12-01

    Cuprate high-temperature superconductors consist of two quasi-two-dimensional (2D) substructures: CuO2 superconducting layers and charge reservoir layers. The superconductivity is realized by charge transfer from the charge reservoir layers into the superconducting layers without chemical dopants and defects being introduced into the latter, similar to modulation-doping in the semiconductor superlattices of AlGaAs/GaAs. Inspired by this scheme, we have been searching for high-temperature superconductivity in ultra-thin films of superconductors epitaxially grown on semiconductor/oxide substrates since 2008. We have observed interface-enhanced superconductivity in both conventional and unconventional superconducting films, including single atomic layer films of Pb and In on Si substrates and single unit cell (UC) films of FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with a superconducting gap of ∼20 meV in 1UC-FeSe/STO has stimulated tremendous interest in the superconductivity community, for it opens a new avenue for both raising superconducting transition temperature and understanding the pairing mechanism of unconventional high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we review mainly the experimental progress on interface-enhanced superconductivity in the three systems mentioned above with emphasis on 1UC-FeSe/STO, studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and transport experiments. We discuss the roles of interfaces and a possible pairing mechanism inferred from these studies.

  10. Superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The employment of superconductivity and other material properties at cryogenic temperatures to fabricate sensitive, low-drift, gravity gradiometer is described. The device yields a reduction of noise of four orders of magnitude over room temperature gradiometers, and direct summation and subtraction of signals from accelerometers in varying orientations are possible with superconducting circuitry. Additional circuits permit determination of the linear and angular acceleration vectors independent of the measurement of the gravity gradient tensor. A dewar flask capable of maintaining helium in a liquid state for a year's duration is under development by NASA, and a superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer for the NASA Geodynamics Program is intended for a LEO polar trajectory to measure the harmonic expansion coefficients of the earth's gravity field up to order 300.

  11. Structural/magnetic phase transitions and superconductivity in Ba(Fe1-xTMx)2As2 (TM=Co, Ni, Cu, Co/Cu, Rh and Pd) single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Ni

    2009-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1911, superconductivity has been one of the most actively studied fields in condensed matter physics and has attracted immense experimental and theoretical effort. At this point in time, with more and more superconductors discovered in elements, alloys, intermetallic compounds and oxides, it is becoming clear that superconductivity is actually not so rare in nature. Almost half of the elements in the periodic table and hundreds of compounds have been found to be superconducting. Fig. 1.1 shows the milestones in discovering higher Tc superconductors. Among the elemental superconductors, Niobium has the highest superconducting transition temperature, Tc, of 9.5 K. This record held for more than ten years, until the discovery of niobium nitride which superconducts below 16 K. It took another thirty years for Tc to increase from 16 K in niobium nitride to 23 K in niobium germanium.

  12. Preparation of the highly dispersed powder of titanium carbonitride by SHS azide technology with previous partial nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amosov, A. P.; Markov, Yu M.; Dobrovolskaya, R. A.; Nikolaeva, E. N.

    2017-02-01

    It is shown that the powder of very hard refractory titanium carbonitride (TiC0.5N0.5) is the basis of tungsten-free hard alloys which are prospective for application as inexpensive cutting tools. The finer the powder of titanium carbonitrideis, the moreenhanced properties of hard alloys, sintered from the powder, are. An opportunity to reduce the particle size of the titanium carbonitride powder obtained by energy-saving azide technology of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis at the cost of reducing the particle size of the initial titanium powderwas investigated. To ensure the safety of the grinding process of the initial metal titanium powder, it was offered to nitride a Ti powder partially into a TiN0.2 compound. Such partial nitriding was performed by the azidetechnology with lack of sodium azide (NaN3) as a nitriding reagent. After intensive grinding in the planetary ball mill, the TiN0.2 powder turned into a superfine powder with an ultrafine structure. This powder was capable of nitriding and carburizing in the azide technology with formation of superfine pure powder agglomerates which are composed of ultrafine and nano-particles of TiC0.5N0.5.

  13. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  14. Technology of RF superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This work has several parts, two of which are collaborative development projects with the majority of the work being performed at Argonne. The first is the development of a superconducting RFQ structure in collaboration with AccSys Technology Inc. of Pleasanton, California, funded as a Phase II SBIR grant. Another is a collaborative project with the Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi, India (who are funding the work) to develop new superconducting ion accelerating structures. Other initiatives are developing various aspects of the technology required to utilize ATLAS as a secondary beam linac for radioactive beams.

  15. Superconducting Metastable Compounds.

    PubMed

    Luo, H L; Merriam, M F; Hamilton, D C

    1964-08-07

    A number of metastable phases, germanides and tellurides of gold and silver, have been prepared, analyzed by x-ray diffraction, and investigated for superconductivity. The new superconductors and their transition temperatures are AgTe(3) (2.6 degrees K), Ag(4)Ge (0.85 degrees K), Au(3)Te(5) (1.62 degrees K), and Au(1-x)Ge(x) (0.99 degrees K-1.63 degrees K) where (0.27 superconduct above 0.32 degrees K.

  16. Ceramic superconducting components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haertling, G. H.

    1991-01-01

    An approach to the application of high-Tc ceramic superconductors to practical circuit elements was developed and demonstrated. This method, known as the rigid conductor process (RCP), involves the mounting of a preformed, sintered, and tested superconductor material onto an appropriate, rigid substrate with an epoxy adhesive which also serves to encapsulate the element from the ambient environment. Circuit elements such as straight conductors, coils and connectors were fabricated from YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconducting material. Performance results are included for a low-noise low-thermal-conductivity superconducting grounding link for NASA.

  17. Aluminum nitride, Scandium nitride, and Aluminum-Scandium-Nitride ternary alloys : Structural, optical, and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ruopeng

    Al and Sc are iso-electric, both of which have three valence electrons. Their nitrides AlN and ScN both have high melting points, high hardness, and good chemical inertness. And their distinct properties find applications in different areas: AlN in piezoelectric acoustic-wave devices, and ScN as candidate for high-temperature thermoelectricity. While there are unsettled problems to solve for AlN and ScN alone, which are to obtain tilted c-axis texture in AlN for shear mode acoustic-wave devices to maximize performance, and to determine electronic band structure of ScN that has been long debated due to free carrier effect, the alloying between AlN and ScN is also intriguing in that the ternary alloy Al-Sc-N connects their similarity and opens even wider possibility and greater potential. The significantly enhanced piezoelectric coefficient in the alloy compared to pure AlN is one of the best examples that is little understood, and alternate bandgap engineering in LED fabrication would probably be another contribution from the alloy. Structural, optical, and electrical properties of AlN, ScN, and Al-Sc-N ternary alloys are thus studied in order to answer these questions, and to explore more fundamental physics characteristics within these nitride materials. For the purpose of achieving tilted c-axis texture in AlN, off-axis deposition is conducted with a variable deposition angle α = 0-84° in 5 mTorr pure N2 at room temperature. XRD pole figure analysis show that layers deposited from a normal angle (α = 0°) exhibit fiber texture, with the c-axis tilted by 42+/-2° off the substrate normal. However, as α is increased to 45°, two preferred in-plane grain orientations emerge, with populations I and II having the c-axis tilted towards and away from the deposition flux, by 53+/-2° and 47+/-1° off the substrate normal, respectively. Increasing alpha further to 65 and 84°, results in the development of a single population II with a 43+/-1° tilt. The observed tilt

  18. A Crossover from High Stiffness to High Hardness: The Case of Osmium and Its Borides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yongming; Liu, Xiaomei; Li, Anhu; Liang, Yongcheng

    2016-09-01

    Transition-metal light-element compounds are currently raising great expectations for hard and superhard materials. Using the widely attracting osmium (Os) and its borides (OsB, Os2B3 and OsB2) as prototypes, we demonstrate by first-principles calculations that heavy transition metals, which possess high stiffness but low hardness, can be converted into highly hard materials by incorporating of light elements to form compounds. Such a crossover is a manifestation that the underlying sources of high stiffness and high hardness are fundamentally different. The stiffness is related to elastic deformation that is closely associated with valence electron density, whereas the hardness depends strongly on plastic deformation that is determined by bonding nature. Therefore, the incorporation of light atoms into transition metal should be a valid pathway of designing hard and superhard materials. This strategy is in principle also applicable to other transition-metal borides, carbides, and nitrides.

  19. Comparison between hot spot modeling and measurement of a superconducting hot electron bolometer mixer at submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Wei; Delorme, Yan; Feret, Alexandre; Lefevre, Rolland; Lecomte, Benoit; Dauplay, Fred; Krieg, Jean-Michel; Beaudin, Gerard; Zhang, Wen; Ren, Yuan; Shi, Sheng-Cai

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents the modeling and measurement of a quasioptical niobium nitride superconducting hot electron bolometer mixer at submillimeter wavelengths. The modeling is performed with a distributed hot spot model which is based on solving a heat balance equation for electron temperature along the superconducting microbridge. Particular care has been taken during the modeling concerning the temperature-dependent resistance and the bias current dependence of the critical temperature of the device. The dc and mixing characteristics of this mixer have been computed and we have observed a quite good match between the predicted and the measured results for both dc characteristics and mixing performances at submillimeter wavelengths.

  20. Ordering of hard particles between hard walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowska, A.; Teixeira, P. I. C.; Ehrentraut, H.; Cleaver, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    The structure of a fluid of hard Gaussian overlap particles of elongation κ = 5, confined between two hard walls, has been calculated from density-functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations. By using the exact expression for the excluded volume kernel (Velasco E and Mederos L 1998 J. Chem. Phys. 109 2361) and solving the appropriate Euler-Lagrange equation entirely numerically, we have been able to extend our theoretical predictions into the nematic phase, which had up till now remained relatively unexplored due to the high computational cost. Simulation reveals a rich adsorption behaviour with increasing bulk density, which is described semi-quantitatively by the theory without any adjustable parameters.

  1. Infrared Plasmonics with Conductive Ternary Nitrides.

    PubMed

    Metaxa, C; Kassavetis, S; Pierson, J F; Gall, D; Patsalas, P

    2017-03-29

    Conductive transition metal nitrides are emerging as promising alternative plasmonic materials that are refractory and CMOS-compatible. In this work, we show that ternary transition metal nitrides of the B1 structure and consisting of a combination of group-IVb transition metal, such as Ti or Zr, and group III (Sc, Y, Al) or group II (Mg, Ca) elements can have tunable plasmonic activity in the infrared range in contrast to Ta-based ternary nitrides, which exhibit plasmonic performance in the visible and UV ranges. We consider the intrinsic quality factors of surface plasmon polariton for the ternary nitrides, and we calculate the dispersion of surface plasmon polariton and the field enhancement at the vicinity of nitride/silica interfaces. Based on these calculations, it is shown that among these nitrides the most promising are TixSc1-xN and TixMg1-xN. In particular, TixSc1-xN can have plasmonic activity in the usual telecom bands at 850, 1300, and 1550 nm. Still, these nitrides exhibit substantial electronic losses mostly due to fine crystalline grains that deteriorate the plasmonic field enhancement. This unequivocally calls for improved growth processes that would enable the fabrication of such ternary nitrides of high crystallinity.

  2. Low loss nitride ceramics for terahertz windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naftaly, M.; Greenslade, P. J.; Miles, R. E.; Evans, D.

    2009-09-01

    Terahertz frequency transmission measurements on ceramic boron nitride and aluminium nitride are described. The absorption coefficients and refractive indices of these materials show that they have high terahertz transparency, which together with their high melting temperatures and mechanical strength makes them particularly suitable for use as THz windows in high pressure and/or high temperature applications.

  3. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  4. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, Joshua (Inventor); Hubbell, Theodore E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A surface of a steel substrate is nitrided without external heating by exposing it to a beam of nitrogen ions under low pressure, a pressure much lower than that employed for ion-nitriding. An ion source is used instead of a glow discharge. Both of these features reduce the introduction of impurities into the substrate surface.

  5. Duality picture of Superconductor-insulator transitions on Superconducting nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makise, Kazumasa; Terai, Hirotaka; Tominari, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Shukichi; Shinozaki, Bunju

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the electrical transport properties of niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN) nanowire with four-terminal geometries to clarify the superconducting phase slip phenomena and superconducting-insulator transitions (SIT) for one-dimensional superconductors. We fabricated various nanowires with different widths and lengths from epitaxial NbTiN films using the electron beam lithography method. The temperature dependence of resistance R(T) below the superconducting transition temperature Tc was analyzed using thermal activation phase slip (TAPS) and quantum phase slip (QPS) theories. Although the accuracy of experimental data at low temperatures can deviate when using the TAPS model, the QPS model thoroughly represents the R(T) characteristic with resistive tail at low temperatures. From the analyses of data on Tc, we found that NbTiN nanowires exhibit SIT because of the change in the ratio of kinetic inductance energy and QPS amplitude energy with respect to the flux-charge duality theory.

  6. Integrated superconducting detectors on semiconductors for quantum optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniber, M.; Flassig, F.; Reithmaier, G.; Gross, R.; Finley, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum photonic circuits can be used to efficiently generate, manipulate, route and exploit nonclassical states of light for distributed photon-based quantum information technologies. In this article, we review our recent achievements on the growth, nanofabrication and integration of high-quality, superconducting niobium nitride thin films on optically active, semiconducting GaAs substrates and their patterning to realize highly efficient and ultra-fast superconducting detectors on semiconductor nanomaterials containing quantum dots. Our state-of-the-art detectors reach external detection quantum efficiencies up to 20 % for ~4 nm thin films and single-photon timing resolutions <72 ps. We discuss the integration of such detectors into quantum dot-loaded, semiconductor ridge waveguides, resulting in the on-chip, time-resolved detection of quantum dot luminescence. Furthermore, a prototype quantum optical circuit is demonstrated that enabled the on-chip generation of resonance fluorescence from an individual InGaAs quantum dot, with a linewidth <15 μeV displaced by 1 mm from the superconducting detector on the very same semiconductor chip. Thus, all key components required for prototype quantum photonic circuits with sources, optical components and detectors on the same chip are reported.

  7. Liquid-gated interface superconductivity on an atomically flat film.

    PubMed

    Ye, J T; Inoue, S; Kobayashi, K; Kasahara, Y; Yuan, H T; Shimotani, H; Iwasa, Y

    2010-02-01

    Liquid/solid interfaces are attracting growing interest not only for applications in catalytic activities and energy storage, but also for their new electronic functions in electric double-layer transistors (EDLTs) exemplified by high-performance organic electronics, field-induced electronic phase transitions, as well as superconductivity in SrTiO(3) (ref. 12). Broadening EDLTs to induce superconductivity within other materials is highly demanded for enriching the materials science of superconductors. However, it is severely hampered by inadequate choice of materials and processing techniques. Here we introduce an easy method using ionic liquids as gate dielectrics, mechanical micro-cleavage techniques for surface preparation, and report the observation of field-induced superconductivity showing a transition temperature T(c)=15.2 K on an atomically flat film of layered nitride compound, ZrNCl. The present result reveals that the EDLT is an extremely versatile tool to induce electronic phase transitions by electrostatic charge accumulation and provides new routes in the search for superconductors beyond those synthesized by traditional chemical methods.

  8. Fatigue life of silicon nitride balls

    SciTech Connect

    Galbato, A.T.; Cundill, R.T.; Harris, T.A. SKF Engineering and Research Center, Nieuwegein Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park )

    1992-11-01

    Because its specific weight is 40 percent that of steel, silicon nitride has been considered as a rolling element material in very high speed ball and roller bearings. Furthermore, similar to steel components, hot pressed silicon nitride rolling components, when properly manufactured, have demonstrated the capacity to fail in a non-catastrophic manner, i.e., fatigue of the rolling contact surfaces. In this investigation, hot isostatically-pressed silicon nitride balls were endurance-tested using a NASA 5-ball rig and the results were compared against similarly tested VIMVAR M50 balls. The silicon nitride balls demonstrated fatigue lives many times those obtained for the M50 balls. Therefore it is concluded that silicon nitride can be effectively employed in applications where steel rolling element life has previously proved to be a limiting factor. 12 refs.

  9. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  10. Applications of Superconductivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodkind, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Presents a general review of current practical applications of the properties of superconducters. The devices are classified into groups according to the property that is of primary importance. The article is inteded as a first introduction for students and professionals. (Author/DS)

  11. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  12. SUPERCONDUCTING VANADIUM BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, H.J.

    1958-10-21

    A new vanadium-base alloy which possesses remarkable superconducting properties is presented. The alloy consists of approximately one atomic percent of palladium, the balance being vanadium. The alloy is stated to be useful in a cryotron in digital computer circuits.

  13. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  14. Superconducting thermometer for cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Digital electronic device uses superconducting filaments as sensors. Simple solid-state circuitry combined with filaments comprise highly-reliable temperature monitor. Device has ability to track very fast thermal transients and "on/off" output is adaptable to remote sensing and telemetry.

  15. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, V.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-01

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, 10B + n → α + 7Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  16. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoelectricity is produced by applying a temperature differential to dissimilar electrically conducting or semiconducting materials, thereby producing a voltage that is proportional to the temperature difference. Thermoelectric generators use this effect to directly convert heat into electricity; however, presently-known generators have low efficiencies due to the production of high currents which in turn cause large resistive heating losses. Some thermoelectric generators operate at efficiencies between 4% and 7% in the 800{degrees} to 1200{degrees}C range. According to its major aspects and bradly stated, the present invention is an apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. In particular, the invention is a thermoelectric generator that juxtaposes a superconducting material and a semiconducting material - so that the superconducting and the semiconducting materials touch - to convert heat energy into electrical energy without resistive losses in the temperature range below the critical temperature of the superconducting material. Preferably, an array of superconducting material is encased in one of several possible configurations within a second material having a high thermal conductivity, preferably a semiconductor, to form a thermoelectric generator.

  17. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  18. New research in Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorrami, Mona

    2013-03-01

    Superconductors are materials that have no resistance to electricity's flow; they are one of the last great frontiers of scientific discovery. The theories that explain superconductor behavior seem to be constantly under review. In 1911 superconductivity was first observed in mercury by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes When he cooled it to the temperature of liquid helium, 4 degrees Kelvin (-452F, -269C), its resistance suddenly disappeared. It was necessary for Onnes to come within 4 degrees of the coldest temperature that is theoretically attainable to witness the phenomenon of superconductivity. In 1933 German researchers Walther Meissner and Robert Ochsenfeld discovered that a superconducting material will repel a magnetic field. A magnet moving by a conductor induces currents in the conductor, but, in a superconductor the induced currents exactly mirror the field that would have otherwise penetrated the superconducting material - causing the magnet to be repulsed. This phenomenon is known as strong diamagnetism and is today often referred to as the ``Meissner effect'' (an eponym). Later on the theory developed by American physicists John Bardeen, Leon Cooper, and John Schrieffer together with extensions and refinements of the theory, which followed in the years after 1957, succeeded in explaining in considerable detail the properties of superconductors.

  19. Magnetoquenched superconducting valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, T. W.; Johnson, Mark

    1998-06-01

    A superconducting switch has been developed in a simple bilayer cross strip geometry using the magnetic fringe field of a ferromagnetic film to control the critical current in an underlying superconducting bridge. The magnetization of the ferromagnet is rotated in the plane of the film to vary the magnitude of the fringe field locally applied to the superconductor from negligible to substantial values. In the latter case, the magnetization is oriented such that the magnetic poles are along the edges of the cross strip directly above the superconductor. The large fringe field near the poles suppresses superconductivity over a length of order microns, giving rise to superconducting weak link behavior. A large modulation of the critical current is observed. The effect is demonstrated in the low Tc superconductors Pb (Tc=7.3 K) and Sn (Tc=3.9 K). Fabrication of the device involves minimal processing. Applications as a high speed switch, amplifier, nonvolatile storage cell, and controllable weak link are possible.

  20. An evaluation of indentation and finishing properties of bearing grade silicon nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, J.F.; Gardos, M.N.; Hardisty, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the results of studies of the machining performance and the indentation hardness and fracture toughness of different silicon nitride materials as part of an effort to better define the optimum machining conditions for bearing components. This work builds on prior efforts by two of the authors, Gardos and Hardisty (1993) who formulated a simple relationship between diamond grinding performance of silicon nitride bearing balls and a wear equation first detailed by Evans and Wilshaw (1976). The goal of this present work was to determine the general applicability of such a relationship, i.e., could simple indentation studies be used to define finishing conditions for different silicon nitride materials? The availability of such a simple test would reduce the time required for developing an acceptable process when a supplier changes his formulation, or when a new material becomes available. Quicker development of optimum finishing conditions would eventually result in a lower-cost product for users. The initial study by Gardos and Hardisty (1993) was based on limited data taken at a fixed set of conditions. This study expanded the range of conditions evaluated and the number of ceramic materials studied in an effort to define the universality of the relationship between grinding wear, hardness, and toughness. This study has shown that no simple relationship like that first envisioned by the authors exists. The results showed that the grinding wear of the individual silicon nitride materials increased at different rates as a function of load. Because of the differences found in the load dependence of grinding rates, no simple relationship between hardness, fracture toughness, and grinding rate could be found that fit the data over the range of conditions studied.

  1. The Powder-Pack Nitriding Process: Growth Kinetics of Nitride Layers on Pure Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Silva, I.; Ortiz-Dominguez, M.; Elias-Espinosa, M.; Vega-Morón, R. C.; Bravo-Bárcenas, D.; Figueroa-López, U.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the growth kinetics of nitride layers that develop during the powder-pack nitriding process on the surface of ARMCO pure iron was estimated. The powder-pack nitriding of pure iron was performed according to the Pulnieren© (H.E.F. Durferrit) method using a "Pulnier" powder and an activator, at 798-848 K with different exposure times (2-12 h) for each temperature. In addition, for the entire set of nitriding conditions, three different activator/"Pulnier" powder ratios (0.20, 0.25, and 0.35) were used to evaluate the activation level during the growth of nitride layers. The kinetics of the nitride layers over the surface of ARMCO pure iron were estimated by two mathematical approaches, that consider the mass balance equations at the growth interphases. The resulting expressions for the effective diffusion coefficients in the nitride layers were evaluated as a function of nitriding temperatures and activator/"Pulnier" powder ratio. Finally, based on the experimental parameters ascribed to the powder-pack nitriding process, two expressions were proposed to estimate the nitride layer thicknesses at 798 and 823 K after 9 h of exposure for each temperature, to validate the diffusion models used in this work.

  2. Nanotwinned diamond with unprecedented hardness and stability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Quan; Yu, Dongli; Xu, Bo; Hu, Wentao; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan; Tian, Yongjun

    2014-06-12

    Although diamond is the hardest material for cutting tools, poor thermal stability has limited its applications, especially at high temperatures. Simultaneous improvement of the hardness and thermal stability of diamond has long been desirable. According to the Hall-Petch effect, the hardness of diamond can be enhanced by nanostructuring (by means of nanograined and nanotwinned microstructures), as shown in previous studies. However, for well-sintered nanograined diamonds, the grain sizes are technically limited to 10-30 nm (ref. 3), with degraded thermal stability compared with that of natural diamond. Recent success in synthesizing nanotwinned cubic boron nitride (nt-cBN) with a twin thickness down to ∼3.8 nm makes it feasible to simultaneously achieve smaller nanosize, ultrahardness and superior thermal stability. At present, nanotwinned diamond (nt-diamond) has not been fabricated successfully through direct conversions of various carbon precursors (such as graphite, amorphous carbon, glassy carbon and C60). Here we report the direct synthesis of nt-diamond with an average twin thickness of ∼5 nm, using a precursor of onion carbon nanoparticles at high pressure and high temperature, and the observation of a new monoclinic crystalline form of diamond coexisting with nt-diamond. The pure synthetic bulk nt-diamond material shows unprecedented hardness and thermal stability, with Vickers hardness up to ∼200 GPa and an in-air oxidization temperature more than 200 °C higher than that of natural diamond. The creation of nanotwinned microstructures offers a general pathway for manufacturing new advanced carbon-based materials with exceptional thermal stability and mechanical properties.

  3. Diverse ruthenium nitrides stabilized under pressure: a theoretical prediction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunkun; Wu, Lailei; Wan, Biao; Lin, Yangzheng; Hu, Qingyang; Zhao, Yan; Gao, Rui; Li, Zhiping; Zhang, Jingwu; Gou, Huiyang

    2016-01-01

    First-principles calculations were performed to understand the structural stability, synthesis routes, mechanical and electronic properties of diverse ruthenium nitrides. RuN with a new I-4m2 symmetry stabilized by pressure is found to be energetically preferred over the experimental NaCl-type and ZnS-type ones. The Pnnm-RuN2 is found to be stable above 1.1 GPa, in agreement with the experimental results. Specifically, new stoichiometries like RuN3 and RuN4 are proposed firstly to be thermodynamically stable, and the dynamical and mechanical stabilities of the newly predicted structures have been verified by checking their phonon spectra and elastic constants. A phase transition from P4/mmm-RuN4 to C2/c-RuN4 is also uncovered at 23.0 GPa. Drawn from bonding and band structure analysis, P4/mmm-RuN4 exhibits semi-metal-like behavior and becomes a semiconductor for the high-pressure C2/c-RuN4 phase. Meanwhile the P21/c-RuN3 shows metallic feature. Highly directional covalent N-N and Ru-N bonds are formed and dominating in N-enriched Ru nitrides, making them promising hard materials. PMID:27627856

  4. Radiation tolerance of piezoelectric bulk single-crystal aluminum nitride

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Parks; Bernhard R. Tittmann

    2014-07-01

    For practical use in harsh radiation environments, we pose selection criteria for piezoelectric materials for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and material characterization. Using these criteria, piezoelectric aluminum nitride is shown to be an excellent candidate. The results of tests on an aluminumnitride-based transducer operating in a nuclear reactor are also presented. We demonstrate the tolerance of single-crystal piezoelectric aluminum nitride after fast and thermal neutron fluences of 1.85 × 1018 neutron/cm2 and 5.8 × 1018 neutron/cm2, respectively, and a gamma dose of 26.8 MGy. The radiation hardness of AlN is most evident from the unaltered piezoelectric coefficient d33, which measured 5.5 pC/N after a fast and thermal neutron exposure in a nuclear reactor core for over 120 MWh, in agreement with the published literature value. The results offer potential for improving reactor safety and furthering the understanding of radiation effects on materials by enabling structural health monitoring and NDE in spite of the high levels of radiation and high temperatures, which are known to destroy typical commercial ultrasonic transducers.

  5. Synthesis of transition metal nitride by nitridation of metastable oxide precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huamin; Wu, Zijie; Kong, Jing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Minghui

    2012-10-15

    Metastable transition metal oxides were used as precursors to synthesize transition metal nitrides at low temperature. Amorphous MoO{sub 2} was prepared by reduction of (NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24} solution with hydrazine. As-synthesized amorphous MoO{sub 2} was transformed into fcc {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N at 400 Degree-Sign C and then into hexagonal {delta}-MoN by further increasing the temperature to 600 Degree-Sign C under a NH{sub 3} flow. The nitridation temperature employed here is much lower than that employed in nitridation of crystalline materials, and the amorphous materials underwent a unique nitridation process. Besides this, the bimetallic nitride Ni{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}N was also synthesized by nitridating amorphous bimetallic precursor. These results suggested that the nitridation of amorphous precursor possessed potential to be a general method for synthesizing many interstitial metallic compounds, such as nitrides and carbides at low temperature. - graphical abstract: Amorphous oxide was used as new precursor to prepare nitride at low temperature. Pure {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N and {delta}-MoN were obtained at 400 Degree-Sign C and at 600 Degree-Sign C, respectively. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We bring out a new method to synthesize transition metal nitrides at low temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both mono- and bimetallic molybdenum nitrides were synthesized at a mild condition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of two different molybdenum nitrides {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N and {delta}-MoN can be controlled from the same metastable precursor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nitridation temperature was much lower than that reported from crystalline precursors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The metastable precursor had different reaction process in comparison with crystalline precursor.

  6. Hardness Tester for Polyur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, D. L.; Buras, D. F.; Corbin, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Rubber-hardness tester modified for use on rigid polyurethane foam. Provides objective basis for evaluation of improvements in foam manufacturing and inspection. Typical acceptance criterion requires minimum hardness reading of 80 on modified tester. With adequate correlation tests, modified tester used to measure indirectly tensile and compressive strengths of foam.

  7. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  8. Preface: Bulk nitride workshop 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Jaime A.; Pasova, Tania; Bockowski, Michal; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The 9th ;International Workshop on Bulk Nitride Semiconductors; (IWBNS-IX) was held in Wonju, South Korea, from November 2-6, 2015, following the eight previous workshops held in November 2000 (Brazil), May 2002 (Brazil), September 2004 (Poland), October 2006 (Japan), September 2007 (Brazil), August 2009 (Poland), March 2011 (Japan), and October 2013 (Germany). The quietude and the beautiful surrounding nature of the Hansol Oak Valley provided the right environment to host the latest edition of this workshop series, the first one held in South Korea.

  9. Weak morphology dependent valence band structure of boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Chunyi; Ueda, Shigenori; Zeng, Haibo; Wang, Xuebin; Tian, Wei; Wang, Xi; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2013-08-01

    We report a hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HX-PES) investigation on valence band structure of Boron Nitrides (BN) having different morphologies, including nanosheets, nanotubes, and micro-sized particles. Very weak morphology/valence band structure dependence was observed. For each case, the B-N π-band overlapping with σ-band between 0 to -12.5 eV and the s-band below -15 eV were identified. No obvious morphology-induced band shifts and intensity variations were observed. First-principles calculations based on density functional theory were performed and the results were compared with the experimental data. This theoretical analysis well explains the weak morphology dependent valence band spectra of BN nanomaterials obtained during HX-PES measurements.

  10. Pressure-stabilized hafnium nitrides and their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Oganov, Artem R.; Li, Xinfeng; Niu, Haiyang

    2017-01-01

    We report hafnium nitrides under pressure using first-principles evolutionary calculations. Metallic P 63/m m c -HfN (calculated Vickers hardness 23.8 GPa) is found to be more energetically favorable than NaCl-type HfN at zero and high pressure. Moreover, NaCl-type HfN actually undergoes a phase transition to P 63/m m c -HfN below 670 K at ambient pressure. HfN10, which simultaneously has infinite armchairlike polymeric N chains and N2 molecules in its crystal structure, is discovered to be stable at moderate pressure above 23 GPa and can be preserved as a metastable phase at ambient pressure. At ambient conditions (298 K, 0 GPa), the gravimetric energy densities and the volumetric energy densities of HfN10 are 2.8 kJ/g and 14.1 kJ/cm3, respectively.

  11. Nanotribological performance of fullerene-like carbon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Ruiz, Francisco Javier; Enriquez-Flores, Christian Ivan; Chiñas-Castillo, Fernando; Espinoza-Beltrán, Francisco Javier

    2014-09-01

    Fullerene-like carbon nitride films exhibit high elastic modulus and low friction coefficient. In this study, thin CNx films were deposited on silicon substrate by DC magnetron sputtering and the tribological behavior at nanoscale was evaluated using an atomic force microscope. Results show that CNx films with fullerene-like structure have a friction coefficient (CoF ∼ 0.009-0.022) that is lower than amorphous CNx films (CoF ∼ 0.028-0.032). Analysis of specimens characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that films with fullerene-like structure have a higher number of sp3 CN bonds and exhibit the best mechanical properties with high values of elastic modulus (E > 180 GPa) and hardness (H > 20 GPa). The elastic recovery determined on specimens with a fullerene-like CNx structure was of 95% while specimens of amorphous CNx structure had only 75% elastic recovery.

  12. Process for the production of metal nitride sintered bodies and resultant silicon nitride and aluminum nitride sintered bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yajima, S.; Omori, M.; Hayashi, J.; Kayano, H.; Hamano, M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the manufacture of metal nitride sintered bodies, in particular, a process in which a mixture of metal nitrite powders is shaped and heated together with a binding agent is described. Of the metal nitrides Si3N4 and AIN were used especially frequently because of their excellent properties at high temperatures. The goal is to produce a process for metal nitride sintered bodies with high strength, high corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, thermal shock resistance, and avoidance of previously known faults.

  13. Nitridation and CVD reactions with hydrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, K.W.; Kohl, P.A.; Abys, J.A.

    1995-10-01

    The low-temperature nitridation of gallium arsenide, silicon and transition metals was investigated using hydrazine. Gallium nitride films were grown on gallium arsenide (GaAs) by direct reaction of the semiconductor surface layers with hydrazine at 200--400 C. Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses show that the films are primarily gallium nitride with a small oxide impurity. Thin nitride films ({approximately}15{angstrom}) were grown on silicon by reaction with hydrazine at 300--500 C. Ellipsometry results suggest that the film growth goes through different phases following linear, parabolic and logarithmic functions with time. XPS analysis shows that the nitride films could be formed at much lower temperatures than possible with ammonia (300 vs. 600 C). The formation of numerous transition metal nitrides (Co, Cr, Fe, Mo, Si, Ta, Ti, V, and W) by reaction with hydrazine at 400 C is demonstrated, as well as the chemical vapor deposition of boron nitride films from diborane and hydrazine reactants. The temperature at the mixing point was critical in determining the final composition of the film. A 1-D transport model suggests that the reaction rate at 400 C was kinetically limited. The results also agree qualitatively with thermodynamic equilibrium calculations.

  14. Computational Search for Novel Hard Chromium-Based Materials.

    PubMed

    Kvashnin, Alexander G; Oganov, Artem R; Samtsevich, Artem I; Allahyari, Zahed

    2017-02-16

    Nitrides, carbides, and borides of transition metals are an attractive class of hard materials. Our recent preliminary explorations of the binary chemical compounds indicated that chromium-based materials are among the hardest transition metal compounds. Motivated by this, here we explore in detail the binary Cr-B, Cr-C, and Cr-N systems using global optimization techniques. Calculated enthalpy of formation and hardness of predicted materials were used for Pareto optimization to define the hardest materials with the lowest energy. Our calculations recover all numerous known stable compounds (except Cr23C6 with its large unit cell) and discover a novel stable phase Pmn21-Cr2C. We resolve the structure of Cr2N and find it to be of anti-CaCl2 type (space group Pnnm). Many of these phases possess remarkable hardness, but only CrB4 is superhard (Vickers hardness 48 GPa). Among chromium compounds, borides generally possess the highest hardnesses and greatest stability. Under pressure, we predict stabilization of a layered TMDC-like phase of Cr2N, a WC-type phase of CrN, and a new compound CrN4. Nitrogen-rich chromium nitride CrN4 is a high-energy-density material featuring polymeric nitrogen chains. In the presence of metal atoms (e.g., Cr), polymerization of nitrogen takes place at much lower pressures; CrN4 becomes stable at ∼15 GPa (cf. 110 GPa for synthesis of pure polymeric nitrogen).

  15. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez, Anamaris; Morales, Kristle; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge J.

    2009-04-01

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH3 flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  16. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-03-17

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions.

  17. Ultralow wear of gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Guosong; Tan, Chee-Keong; Tansu, Nelson; Krick, Brandon A.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we reveal a remarkable (and surprising) physical property of GaN: it is extremely wear resistant. In fact, we measured the wear rate of GaN is approaching wear rates reported for diamond. Not only does GaN have an ultralow wear rate but also there are quite a few experimental factors that control the magnitude of its wear rate, further contributing to the rich and complex physics of wear of GaN. Here, we discovered several primary controlling factors that will affect the wear rate of III-Nitride materials: crystallographic orientation, sliding environment, and coating composition (GaN, InN and InGaN). Sliding in the ⟨ 1 2 ¯ 10 ⟩ is significantly lower wear than ⟨ 1 1 ¯ 00 ⟩ . Wear increases by 2 orders of magnitude with increasing humidity (from ˜0% to 50% RH). III-Nitride coatings are promising as multifunctional material systems for device design and sliding wear applications.

  18. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-03-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions.

  19. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions. PMID:28303948

  20. Internal grinding of high-speed steels: Shorter processing times with boron nitride grinding tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borse, D.

    Boron nitride grinding tools can be used to advantage for the grinding of high speed steel (HSS) with a high vanadium content. the abrasives available to date are of limited value because the HSS materials contain very hard carbides, grinding of which, and of vanadium carbide in particular, results in very rapid wear in silicon carbide or corundum grinding wheels. The hardness of these steels is usually 62 RC to 70 RC. Boron nitride grinding tools are advantageous for internal grinding of workpieces made of high speed steel for example, sockets, milling tool bores, cutting wheels and crushing rollers. To date, boron nitride grinding wheels or pencil grinders were bonded with synthetic resin. Consequently internal grinding is usually carried out as wet grinding. In the meantime grinding tools bonded with electrodeposited metal bonds (GSS) were developed and proved to be successful for internal grinding. The abrasive grains which are arranged in a single layer protrude freely from the electrobond. During grinding very little heat is generated, so that dry grinding is possible.

  1. Low Temperature Unbalanced Magnetron Deposition of Hard, Wear-Resistant Coatings for Liquid-Film Bearing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sproul, William D.

    1996-01-01

    The original program for evaluating the tribological properties several different hard coatings for liquid film bearing applications was curtailed when the time for the program was reduced from 3 years to 1. Of the several different coatings originally planned for evaluation, we decided to concentrate on one coating, carbon nitride. At BIRL, we have been instrumental in the development of reactively sputtered carbon nitride coatings, and we have found that it is a very interesting new material with very good tribological properties. In this program, we found that the reactively sputtered carbon nitride does not bond well directly to hardened 440C stainless steel; but if an interlayer of titanium nitride is added between the carbon nitride and the 440C, the adhesion of the dual coating combination is very good. Statistically designed experiments were run with the dual layer combination, and 3 variables were chosen for the Box-Benken design, which were the titanium nitride interlayer thickness, the nitrogen partial pressure during the reactive sputtering of the carbon nitride, and the carbon nitride substrate bias voltage. Two responses were studied from these three variables; the adhesion of the dual coating combination to the 440C substrate and the friction coefficient of the carbon nitride in dry sliding contact with 52100 steel in air. The best adhesion came with the thickness interlayer thickness studied, which was 4 micrometers, and the lowest coefficient of friction was 0.1, which was achieved when the bias voltage was in the range of -80 to - 120 V and the nitrogen partial pressure was 3 mTorr.

  2. Dynamic hardness of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xuecheng

    Dynamic hardness (Pd) of 22 different pure metals and alloys having a wide range of elastic modulus, static hardness, and crystal structure were measured in a gas pulse system. The indentation contact diameter with an indenting sphere and the radius (r2) of curvature of the indentation were determined by the curve fitting of the indentation profile data. r 2 measured by the profilometer was compared with that calculated from Hertz equation in both dynamic and static conditions. The results indicated that the curvature change due to elastic recovery after unloading is approximately proportional to the parameters predicted by Hertz equation. However, r 2 is less than the radius of indenting sphere in many cases which is contradictory to Hertz analysis. This discrepancy is believed due to the difference between Hertzian and actual stress distributions underneath the indentation. Factors which influence indentation elastic recovery were also discussed. It was found that Tabor dynamic hardness formula always gives a lower value than that directly from dynamic hardness definition DeltaE/V because of errors mainly from Tabor's rebound equation and the assumption that dynamic hardness at the beginning of rebound process (Pr) is equal to kinetic energy change of an impact sphere over the formed crater volume (Pd) in the derivation process for Tabor's dynamic hardness formula. Experimental results also suggested that dynamic to static hardness ratio of a material is primarily determined by its crystal structure and static hardness. The effects of strain rate and temperature rise on this ratio were discussed. A vacuum rotating arm apparatus was built to measure Pd at 70, 127, and 381 mum sphere sizes, these results exhibited that Pd is highly depended on the sphere size due to the strain rate effects. P d was also used to substitute for static hardness to correlate with abrasion and erosion resistance of metals and alloys. The particle size effects observed in erosion were

  3. Surface photovoltage spectroscopy of carbon nitride powder

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Th.; Fiechter, S.; Thomas, A.

    2011-08-22

    Powder of carbon nitride has been investigated by surface photovoltage spectroscopy at temperatures between 30 deg. C and 150 deg. C. Photo-generated holes were preferentially separated towards the external surface. Electronic states below the optical band gap from which charge separation may be possible have not been observed. The band gap of the investigated carbon nitride decreased from 2.93 to 2.80 eV with increasing temperature from 30 deg. C to 150 deg. C. The material exhibits a higher optical transition at E = 3.6 eV. Results are discussed from the point of view of photo-catalytic water splitting with carbon nitride.

  4. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.; Misra, M.

    1997-10-14

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector. 24 figs.

  5. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Misra, Mira

    1997-01-01

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector.

  6. Silicon Nitride Membranes for Filtration and Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, Paul; Zavadil, Kevin; Shul, Randy; Willison, Christi Gober; Miller, Sam

    1999-07-19

    Semi-Permeable silicon nitride membranes have been developed using a Bosch etch process followed by a reactive ion etch (NE) process. These membranes were observed to allow air but not water to pass through them into surface micromachined, silicon nitride microfluidic channels. Membranes with this property have potential use in microfluidic systems as gas bubble traps and vents, filters to remove particles and gas partitioning membranes. Membrane permeation was measured as 1.6 x 10{sup {minus}8} mol/m{sup 2}Pa s of helium for inline membranes at the entrance and exit of the silicon nitride microfluidic channels.

  7. Boron Nitride Nanoribbons: Synthesis and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Ashley; Erikson, Kris; Sinitskii, Alex; Rousseas, Michael; Alem, Nasim; Tour, James; Zettl, Alex

    2012-02-01

    Boron Nitride Nanoribbons (BNNR) have been theorized to have many interesting electrical and magnetic properties and edge states, but these characteristics have not been experimentally verified due to challenges in synthesis and purification. We have produced BNNRs by longitudinally splitting boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) using potassium vapor as an intercalant. Due to the strong interactions between boron nitride sheets, separation of nanoribbons from their parent tubes is challenging. We have used various solvent systems to assist with separation of the ribbons with the goal of probing their properties.

  8. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; ...

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic statesmore » and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.« less

  9. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  10. Tunable superconductivity in decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zheng; Allain, Adrien; Marty, Laetitia; Bendiab, Nedjma; Toulemonde, Pierre; Strobel, Pierre; Coraux, Johann; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    Graphene offers an exposed bidimensional gas of high mobility charge carriers with gate tunable density. Its chemical inertness offers an outstanding platform to explore exotic 2D superconductivity. Superconductivity can be induced in graphene by means of proximity effect (by depositing a set of superconducting metal clusters such as lead or tin nanoparticles). The influence of decoration material, density or particles and disorder of graphene will be discussed. In the case of disordered graphene, Tin decoration leads to a gate-tunable superconducting-to-insulator quantum phase transition. Superconductivity in graphene is also expected to occur under strong charge doping (induced either by gating or under chemical decoration, in analogy with graphite intercalated compounds). I will also show preliminary results showing the influence of Calcium intercalation of few layer graphene and progress toward the demonstration of intrinsic superconductivity in such systems. Work supported by EU GRANT FP7-NMP GRENADA.

  11. Superconducting miniaturized planar antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pischke, A.; Chaloupka, H.; Klein, N.; Splitt, G.

    This contribution reports on experimental as well as theoretical investigations of superconducting 2.4 GHz microstrip antenna. Due to both a new stepped-impedance patch shape and a high permittivity substrate (LaAlO3) the size was reduced to an area of only 6x6 mm. The measured radiation efficiency of antennas fabricated from YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) is at 77 K in the order of 45 and 65 percent for a substrate height of 0.5 mm and 1 mm respectively. In contrast, a copper antenna yields an efficiency of 3 and 6 percent only. Deviations from a linear transmission behavior of the superconducting antenna can be observed at a current density of 500,000 A/sq cm. An increase in frequency bandwidth from 4 MHz to over 9 MHz results from replacing the single-patch structure by a double-patch structure (stacked patches).

  12. Superconducting multipole corrector magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    A novel concept of superconducting multipole corrector magnet is discussed. This magnet assembled from 12 identical racetrack type coils and can generate any combination of dipole, quadrupole and sextupole magnetic fields. The coil groups are powered from separate power supplies. In the case of normal dipole, quadrupole and sextupole fields the total field is symmetrical relatively the magnet median plane and there are only five powered separately coil groups. This type multipole corrector magnet was proposed for BTeV, Fermilab project and has following advantages: universal configuration, simple manufacturing and high mechanical stability. The results of magnetic design including the field quality and magnetic forces in comparison with known shell type superconducting correctors are presented.

  13. High temperature interface superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-02-01

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both 'passive' hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  14. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE PAGES

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  15. High temperature interface superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, we conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  16. Design of Integrated III-Nitride/Non-III-Nitride Tandem Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Toledo, N. G.; Friedman, D..J.; Farrell, R. M.; Perl, E. E.; Lin, C. T.; Bowers, J. E.; Speck, J. S.; Mishra, U. K.

    2012-03-01

    The integration of III-nitride and non-III-nitride materials for tandem solar cell applications can improve the efficiency of the photovoltaic device due to the added power contributed by the III-nitride top cell to that of high-efficiency multi-junction non-III-nitride solar cells if the device components are properly designed and optimized. The proposed tandem solar cell is comprised of a III-nitride top cell bonded to a non-III-nitride, series-constrained, multi-junction subcell. The top cell is electrically isolated, but optically coupled to the underlying subcell. The use of a III-nitride top cell is potentially beneficial when the top junction of a stand-alone non-III-nitride subcell generates more photocurrent than the limiting current of the non-III-nitride subcell. Light producing this excess current can either be redirected to the III-nitride top cell through high energy photon absorption, redirected to the lower junctions through layer thickness optimization, or a combination of both, resulting in improved total efficiency. When the non-III-nitride cell's top junction is the limiting junction, the minimum power conversion efficiency that the III-nitride top cell must contribute should compensate for the spectrum filtered from the multi-junction subcell for this design to be useful. As the III-nitride absorption edge wavelength, {lambda}{sub N}, increases, the performance of the multi-junction subcell decreases due to spectral filtering. In the most common spectra of interest (AM1.5G, AM1.5 D, and AM0), the technology to grow InGaN cells with {lambda}{sub N}<520 nm is found to be sufficient for III-nitride top cell applications. The external quantum efficiency performance, however, of state-of-the-art InGaN solar cells still needs to be improved. The effects of surface/interface reflections are also presented. The management of these reflection issues determines the feasibility of the integrated III-nitride/non-III-nitride design to improve overall cell

  17. Unconventional pairing in doped band insulators on a honeycomb lattice: the role of the disconnected Fermi surface and a possible application to superconducting β-MNCl (M=Hf, Zr).

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Kazuhiko

    2008-12-01

    We investigate the possibility of realizing unconventional superconductivity in doped band insulators on the square and honeycomb lattices. The latter lattice is found to be a good candidate due to the disconnectivity of the Fermi surface. We propose applying the theory to the superconductivity in doped layered nitride β-MNCl (M= Hf, Zr). Finally, we compare two groups of superconductors with disconnected Fermi surface, β-MNCl and the iron pnictides, which have high critical temperature Tc, despite some faults against superconductivity are present.

  18. Superconducting magnet wire

    DOEpatents

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Ketterson, John B.; Banerjee, Indrajit

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting tape or wire with an improved critical field is formed of alternating layers of a niobium-containing superconductor such as Nb, NbTi, Nb.sub.3 Sn or Nb.sub.3 Ge with a thickness in the range of about 0.5-1.5 times its coherence length, supported and separated by layers of copper with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170-600 .ANG..

  19. Superconducting terahertz metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong; Singh, Ranjan; O' Hara, John F; Azad, Abul K; Trugman, Stuart A; Jia, Quanxi; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2010-01-01

    During the past ten years subwavelength metallic structures have enabled metamaterials exhibiting exotic physical properties that are not possible or difficult to realize using naturally occurring materials, This bottom-up metamaterial approach is particularly attractive in the terahertz (THz) frequency range, where the THz gap is inherently associated with the lack of materials with appropriate reponse. In fact THz metamaterial devices have accomplished unprecedented performance towards practical applications. In these devices, the key is to incorporate natural materials, e,g, semiconductors, as the metamaterial substrates or integration parts of metamaterial structures. The active or dynamic tunability of metamaterials is through the application of external stimuli such as temperature, photoexcitation, or electric field. to modify the capacitive gaps in split-ring resonators (SRRs), It becomes clear that we would not be able to do much on the metallic SRRs, i.e. the metal conductivity and therefore the inductance largely remain constant not affected by external stimuli. Recently, there has been increasing interest in superconducting metamaterials towards loss reduction. Significant Joule losses have often prevented resonant metal metamaterials from achieving proposed applications. particularly in the optical frequency range. At low temperatures, superconducting materials possess superior conductivity than metals at frequencies up to THz. and therefore it is expected that superconducting melamaterials will have a lower loss than metal metamatetials, More interestingly, superconductors exhibit tunable complex conductivity over a wide range of values through change of temperature and application of photoexcitation, electrical currents and magnetic fields. Therefore, we would expect correspondingly tunable metamaterials. which originate from the superconducting materials composing the metamaterial, in contrast to tuning the metamaterial embedded environment.

  20. Fringe Field Superconducting Switch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-31

    superconducting smp ,ine 10, and a ferromagnet ferromagnet 14 preferably has at least two easy axes of magnetization, shown here by the double- headed arrows...magnetic field of control current **p6fCooductor- S4 ’’/ eonteol^cun 7* insulator ■O Jöpptyzcöwem supercuiKhttstog-^2 ^ FIG.^ 4 //■ r.»~r

  1. A 200 SUPERCONDUCTING RACETRACK MICROTRON,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A race-track microtron is proposed consisting of two 180 degree magnets spaced 2.5 meters apart with a superconducting linac section between. The...MeV per turn. The electrons are injected into the microtron at about 12 MeV from a second superconducting accelerator section. The spacing between...superconducting linac sections, a beam current of 100 microamps at unity duty cycle is feasible. It is also possible to build the microtron using

  2. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F.; Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D.; Hasselbach, K.; Kirtley, J. R.

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  3. Superconducting Analog to Digital Converters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    superconductivity, Josephson junctions, and superconducting quantum interference devices ( SQUIDs ) are briefly described. Various techniques to perform analog-to...deployment in the 1990s may require a dynamic range in excess of 90 dB (15- bit precision) [3]. However, at the present time, A/D conversion with 16-bit...Interference Devices ( SQUIDs ). JOSEPHSON EFFECTS AND JUNCTIONS Consider a very thin, non-superconducting region separating two superconductors. In 1962

  4. Chiral magnetic superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2017-03-01

    Materials with charged chiral quasiparticles in external parallel electric and magnetic fields can support an electric current that grows linearly in time, corresponding to diverging DC conductivity. From experimental viewpoint, this "Chiral Magnetic Superconductivity" (CMS) is thus analogous to conventional superconductivity. However the underlying physics is entirely different - the CMS does not require a condensate of Cooper pairs breaking the gauge degeneracy, and is thus not accompanied by Meissner effect. Instead, it owes its existence to the (temperature-independent) quantum chiral anomaly and the conservation of chirality. As a result, this phenomenon can be expected to survive to much higher temperatures. Even though the chirality of quasiparticles is not strictly conserved in real materials, the chiral magnetic superconductivity should still exhibit itself in AC measurements at frequencies larger than the chirality-flipping rate, and in microstructures of Dirac and Weyl semimetals with thickness below the mean chirality-flipping length that is about 1 - 100 μm. In nuclear physics, the CMS should contribute to the charge-dependent elliptic flow in heavy ion collisions.

  5. Navy superconductivity efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  6. US Navy superconductivity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, Donald U.

    1991-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of the Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion) use LTS materials while space applications (millimeter wave electronics) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment to be conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity.

  7. Navy superconductivity efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-04-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  8. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    DOEpatents

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  9. Superconducting linacs: some recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    The paper is a review of superconducting linacs that are of interest for heavy-ion acceleration. Most of the paper is concerned with energy boosters for projectiles from tandem electrostatic accelerators, the only application for which superconducting linacs are now used for heavy-ion acceleration. There is also a brief discussion of the concept of a superconducting injector linac being developed as a replacement of the tandem in a multi-stage acceleration system. Throughout, the emphasis is on the technology of the superconducting linac, including some attention to the relationships between resonator design parameters and accelerator performance characteristics. 21 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Korea's developmental program for superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Gye-Won; Won, Dong-Yeon; Kuk, Il-Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity research in Korea was firstly carried out in the late 70's by a research group in Seoul National University (SNU), who fabricated a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system under the financial support from Korea Electric Power Company (KEPCO). But a few researchers were involved in superconductivity research until the oxide high Tc superconductor was discovered by Bednorz and Mueller. After the discovery of YBaCuO superconductor operating above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K)(exp 2), Korean Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) sponsored a special fund for the high Tc superconductivity research to universities and national research institutes by recognizing its importance. Scientists engaged in this project organized 'High Temperature Superconductivity Research Association (HITSRA)' for effective conducting of research. Its major functions are to coordinate research activities on high Tc superconductivity and organize the workshop for active exchange of information. During last seven years the major superconductivity research has been carried out through the coordination of HITSRA. The major parts of the Korea's superconductivity research program were related to high temperature superconductor and only a few groups were carrying out research on conventional superconductor technology, and Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) have led this research. In this talk, the current status and future plans of superconductivity research in Korea will be reviewed based on the results presented in interim meeting of HITSRA, April 1-2, 1994. Taejeon, as well as the research activity of KAERI.

  11. Superconductivity-related insulating behavior.

    PubMed

    Sambandamurthy, G; Engel, L W; Johansson, A; Shahar, D

    2004-03-12

    We present the results of an experimental study of superconducting, disordered, thin films of amorphous indium oxide. These films can be driven from the superconducting phase to a reentrant insulating state by the application of a perpendicular magnetic field (B). We find that the high-B insulator exhibits activated transport with a characteristic temperature, TI. TI has a maximum value (TpI) that is close to the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) at B=0, suggesting a possible relation between the conduction mechanisms in the superconducting and insulating phases. Tp(I) and Tc display opposite dependences on the disorder strength.

  12. Topological Superconductivity in Dirac Semimetals.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shingo; Sato, Masatoshi

    2015-10-30

    Dirac semimetals host bulk band-touching Dirac points and a surface Fermi loop. We develop a theory of superconducting Dirac semimetals. Establishing a relation between the Dirac points and the surface Fermi loop, we clarify how the nontrivial topology of Dirac semimetals affects their superconducting state. We note that the unique orbital texture of Dirac points and a structural phase transition of the crystal favor symmetry-protected topological superconductivity with a quartet of surface Majorana fermions. We suggest the possible application of our theory to recently discovered superconducting states in Cd_{3}As_{2}.

  13. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  14. Radiation from hard objects

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-02-01

    The inference of the diameter of hard objects is insensitive to radiation efficiency. Deductions of radiation efficiency from observations are very sensitive - possibly overly so. Inferences of the initial velocity and trajectory vary similarly, and hence are comparably sensitive.

  15. III-Nitride Nanowire Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a tremendous interest in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Among these devices are semiconductor nanowires whose diameters range from 10-100 nm. To date, nanowires have been grown using many semiconducting material systems and have been utilized as light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Nanowires possess a relatively large index contrast relative to their dielectric environment and can be used as lasers. A key gure of merit that allows for nanowire lasing is the relatively high optical con nement factor. In this work, I discuss the optical characterization of 3 types of III-nitride nanowire laser devices. Two devices were designed to reduce the number of lasing modes to achieve singlemode operation. The third device implements low-group velocity mode lasing with a photonic crystal constructed of an array of nanowires. Single-mode operation is necessary in any application where high beam quality and single frequency operation is required. III-Nitride nanowire lasers typically operate in a combined multi-longitudinal and multi-transverse mode state. Two schemes are introduced here for controlling the optical modes and achieving single-mode op eration. The rst method involves reducing the diameter of individual nanowires to the cut-o condition, where only one optical mode propagates in the wire. The second method employs distributed feedback (DFB) to achieve single-mode lasing by placing individual GaN nanowires onto substrates with etched gratings. The nanowire-grating substrate acted as a distributed feedback mirror producing single mode operation at 370 nm with a mode suppression ratio (MSR) of 17 dB. The usage of lasers for solid state lighting has the potential to further reduce U.S. lighting energy usage through an increase in emitter e ciency. Advances in nanowire fabrication, speci cally a two-step top-down approach, have allowed for the demonstration of a multi-color array of lasers on a single chip that emit

  16. III-nitride nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jeremy Benjamin

    In recent years there has been a tremendous interest in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Among these devices are semiconductor nanowires whose diameters range from 10-100 nm. To date, nanowires have been grown using many semiconducting material systems and have been utilized as light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Nanowires possess a relatively large index contrast relative to their dielectric environment and can be used as lasers. A key figure of merit that allows for nanowire lasing is the relatively high optical confinement factor. In this work, I discuss the optical characterization of 3 types of III-nitride nanowire laser devices. Two devices were designed to reduce the number of lasing modes to achieve single-mode operation. The third device implements low-group velocity mode lasing with a photonic crystal constructed of an array of nanowires. Single-mode operation is necessary in any application where high beam quality and single frequency operation is required. III-Nitride nanowire lasers typically operate in a combined multi-longitudinal and multi-transverse mode state. Two schemes are introduced here for controlling the optical modes and achieving single-mode operation. The first method involves reducing the diameter of individual nanowires to the cut-off condition, where only one optical mode propagates in the wire. The second method employs distributed feedback (DFB) to achieve single-mode lasing by placing individual GaN nanowires onto substrates with etched gratings. The nanowire-grating substrate acted as a distributed feedback mirror producing single mode operation at 370 nm with a mode suppression ratio (MSR) of 17 dB. The usage of lasers for solid state lighting has the potential to further reduce U.S. lighting energy usage through an increase in emitter efficiency. Advances in nanowire fabrication, specifically a two-step top-down approach, have allowed for the demonstration of a multi-color array of lasers on a single chip

  17. Reduced microwave loss in trenched superconducting coplanar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissers, Michael R.; Kline, Jeffrey S.; Gao, Jiansong; Wisbey, David S.; Pappas, David P.

    2012-02-01

    Reducing the contribution of all sources of microwave loss is important for increasing coherence times in superconducting qubits. In this paper we investigate reducing the loss by systematically removing Si substrate material from the gap region in titanium nitride coplanar waveguides fabricated on intrinsic Si substrates. By exploiting the radial dependence of the etch rate in a parallel plate reactive ion etcher, otherwise identical coplanar waveguides with only the Si gaps etched to varying depth, i.e., trenched, were created in a single TiN film within a single processing step. Measurements at these multiple depths permit the study of the loss reduction in isolation to the unintentional effects caused by any single processing step. When comparing the loss from all trench depths we found that the high power loss was similar, but in the single photon limit the loss was reduced by a factor of two for deeper trenches in agreement with predictions from finite element analysis.

  18. Chemical reaction of hexagonal boron nitride and graphite nanoclusters in mechanical milling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Y.; Grush, M.; Callcott, T.A.

    1997-04-01

    Synthesis of boron-carbon-nitride (BCN) hybrid alloys has been attempted extensively by many researchers because the BCN alloys are considered an extremely hard material called {open_quotes}super diamond,{close_quotes} and the industrial application for wear-resistant materials is promising. A mechanical alloying (MA) method of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with graphite has recently been studied to explore the industrial synthesis of the BCN alloys. To develop the MA method for the BCN alloy synthesis, it is necessary to confirm the chemical reaction processes in the mechanical milling systems and to identify the reaction products. Therefore, the authors have attempted to confirm the chemical reaction process of the h-BN and graphite in mechanical milling systems using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) methods.

  19. Nanoindentation measurements of a highly oriented wurtzite-type boron nitride bulk crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deura, Momoko; Kutsukake, Kentaro; Ohno, Yutaka; Yonenaga, Ichiro; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2017-03-01

    We succeeded in synthesizing a bulk crystal of wurtzite-type boron nitride (w-BN) by the direct conversion method. The synthesized crystal was approximately 2 mm wide and 350 µm thick, and highly oriented to the c-axis. We performed nanoindentation measurements on the c-plane of the w-BN crystal at room temperature to evaluate the mechanical properties of w-BN. The hardness and Young’s modulus of w-BN from the obtained curves were simultaneously determined to be 54 ± 2 and 860 ± 40 GPa, respectively. The underlying physical mechanism that dominates the mechanical properties of group-III nitride semiconductors is also examined.

  20. Silicon nitride reinforced with molybdenum disilicide

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprised of silicon nitride and molybdenum disilicide and methods of making the compositions, where the molybdenum disilicide is present in amounts ranging from about 5 to about 50 vol. %.

  1. Dissolution of bulk specimens of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. F.; Merkle, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    An accurate chemical characterization of silicon nitride has become important in connection with current efforts to incorporate components of this material into advanced heat engines. However, there are problems concerning a chemical analysis of bulk silicon nitride. Current analytical methods require the pulverization of bulk specimens. A pulverization procedure making use of grinding media, on the other hand, will introduce contaminants. A description is given of a dissolution procedure which overcomes these difficulties. It has been found that up to at least 0.6 g solid pieces of various samples of hot pressed and reaction bonded silicon nitride can be decomposed in a mixture of 3 mL hydrofluoric acid and 1 mL nitric acid overnight at 150 C in a Parr bomb. High-purity silicon nitride is completely soluble in nitric acid after treatment in the bomb. Following decomposition, silicon and hydrofluoric acid are volatilized and insoluble fluorides are converted to a soluble form.

  2. Low temperature route to uranium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Yeamans, Charles; Hartmann, Thomas; Silva, G. W. Chinthaka; Cerefice, Gary; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.

    2009-09-01

    A method of preparing an actinide nitride fuel for nuclear reactors is provided. The method comprises the steps of a) providing at least one actinide oxide and optionally zirconium oxide; b) mixing the oxide with a source of hydrogen fluoride for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the oxide to a fluoride salt; c) heating the fluoride salt to remove water; d) heating the fluoride salt in a nitrogen atmosphere for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the fluorides to nitrides; and e) heating the nitrides under vacuum and/or inert atmosphere for a period of time sufficient to convert the nitrides to mononitrides.

  3. ALUMINUM NITRIDE AS A HIGH TEMPERATURE TRANSDUCER

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, D. A.; Tittmann, B. R.; Kropf, M. M.

    2010-02-22

    The high temperature capabilities of bulk single crystal aluminum nitride are investigated experimentally. Temperatures in excess of 1100 deg. Celsius are obtained and held for eight hours. Variation in the performance of single crystal samples is demonstrated.

  4. Method of nitriding refractory metal articles

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Omatete, O.O.; Young, A.C.

    1994-03-15

    A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  5. Silicon nitride reinforced with molybdenum disilicide

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.

    1990-12-31

    Compositions of matter comprised of silicon nitride and molybdenum disilicide and methods of making the compositions, where the molybdenum disilicide is present in amounts ranging from about 5 to about 50 vol%.

  6. Materials synthesis: Two-dimensional gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koratkar, Nikhil A.

    2016-11-01

    Graphene is used as a capping sheet to synthesize 2D gallium nitride by means of migration-enhanced encapsulation growth. This technique may allow the stabilization of 2D materials that are not amenable to synthesis by traditional methods.

  7. Method of nitriding refractory metal articles

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.; Omatete, Ogbemi O.; Young, Albert C.

    1994-01-01

    A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  8. Concerning superconducting inertial guidance gyroscopes inside superconducting magnetic shields

    SciTech Connect

    Satterthwaite, J.C.; Gawlinski, E.T.

    1997-12-01

    Superconductors can in theory be used to detect rotation by Josephson interference or by detection of the London field, a magnetic induction that fills the interior of any rotating bulk superconductor. One might hope to use these properties of superconductors to build a practical inertial guidance gyroscope. A problem arises from the necessity of surrounding the device with superconducting magnetic shielding: the London field generated by a co-rotating shield eliminates the response of the superconducting device within the shield. The present article demonstrates this point more rigorously than has been done before, discussing solutions of Ampere`s law for rotating and nonrotating superconductors and paying careful attention to boundary conditions. Beginning with a supercurrent density derivable from either the Ginzburg-Landau or the London theory of superconductivity, the article shows: (1) that a superconducting device cannot distinguish between rotation and an applied magnetic field; (2) that a superconducting device surrounded by a co-rotating superconducting shield cannot detect rotation. The term `superconducting gyroscope` in this article refers only to a device whose working principle is the response of the superconductor itself to rotation, not to any device in which superconducting electronic components are used to detect some other effect. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1996-09-17

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings are disclosed. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures. 20 figs.

  10. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures.

  11. Waveguide silicon nitride grating coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvik, Jan; Dolnak, Ivan; Dado, Milan

    2016-12-01

    Grating couplers are one of the most used elements for coupling of light between optical fibers and photonic integrated components. Silicon-on-insulator platform provides strong confinement of light and allows high integration. In this work, using simulations we have designed a broadband silicon nitride surface grating coupler. The Fourier-eigenmode expansion and finite difference time domain methods are utilized in design optimization of grating coupler structure. The fully, single etch step grating coupler is based on a standard silicon-on-insulator wafer with 0.55 μm waveguide Si3N4 layer. The optimized structure at 1550 nm wavelength yields a peak coupling efficiency -2.6635 dB (54.16%) with a 1-dB bandwidth up to 80 nm. It is promising way for low-cost fabrication using complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor fabrication process.

  12. Band anticrossing in dilute nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.

    2003-12-23

    Alloying III-V compounds with small amounts of nitrogen leads to dramatic reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy in the resulting dilute nitride alloys. The effect originates from an anti-crossing interaction between the extended conduction-band states and localized N states. The interaction splits the conduction band into two nonparabolic subbands. The downward shift of the lower conduction subband edge is responsible for the N-induced reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy. The changes in the conduction band structure result in significant increase in electron effective mass and decrease in the electron mobility, and lead to a large enhance of the maximum doping level in GaInNAs doped with group VI donors. In addition, a striking asymmetry in the electrical activation of group IV and group VI donors can be attributed to mutual passivation process through formation of the nearest neighbor group-IV donor nitrogen pairs.

  13. Mass dependence of nitride sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elovikov, S. S.; Khrustachev, I. K.; Mosunov, A. S.; Yurasova, V. E.

    2003-08-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study the sputtering yield Y for BN, AlN and GaN polycrystals of wurtzite structure as a function of the masses m 1 of bombarding ions with energies from 200 to 2000 eV. A nonmonotonic behavior of the Y ( m 1 ) curve was obtained for the irradiation by low-energy ions, the curve having a maximum with a position being dependent on m 2 / m 1 ( m 2 is the average mass of atoms in a compound). For AlN and GaN the maximum was observed at m 2 / m 1 = 2, and for BN at m 2 / m 1 = 1. The effect of the mass of bombarding ions on the mean energies and energy spectra of sputtered particles, the depth of sputtering origin, and the generation of emitted atoms for nitrides was also investigated and discussed.

  14. The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.

    SciTech Connect

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

  15. Modeling and Investigation of the Wear Resistance of Salt Bath Nitrided Aisi 4140 via ANN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekinci, Şerafettin; Akdemir, Ahmet; Kahramanli, Humar

    2013-05-01

    Nitriding is usually used to improve the surface properties of steel materials. In this way, the wear resistance of steels is improved. We conducted a series of studies in order to investigate the microstructural, mechanical and tribological properties of salt bath nitrided AISI 4140 steel. The present study has two parts. For the first phase, the tribological behavior of the AISI 4140 steel which was nitrided in sulfinuz salt bath (SBN) was compared to the behavior of the same steel which was untreated. After surface characterization using metallography, microhardness and sliding wear tests were performed on a block-on-cylinder machine in which carbonized AISI 52100 steel discs were used as the counter face. For the examined AISI 4140 steel samples with and without surface treatment, the evolution of both the friction coefficient and of the wear behavior were determined under various loads, at different sliding velocities and a total sliding distance of 1000 m. The test results showed that wear resistance increased with the nitriding process, friction coefficient decreased due to the sulfur in salt bath and friction coefficient depended systematically on surface hardness. For the second part of this study, four artificial neural network (ANN) models were designed to predict the weight loss and friction coefficient of the nitrided and unnitrided AISI 4140 steel. Load, velocity and sliding distance were used as input. Back-propagation algorithm was chosen for training the ANN. Statistical measurements of R2, MAE and RMSE were employed to evaluate the success of the systems. The results showed that all the systems produced successful results.

  16. Modelling of the layer evolution during nitriding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, U.; Oseguera, J.; Schabes, P.

    1995-12-31

    The evolution of concomitant layers of nitrides is presented. The layer formation is experimentally achieved through two processes: Nitriding with a weakly ionized plasma and nitrogen post-discharge nitriding. The nitriding processes were performed on samples of pure iron and carbon steel. Nitriding temperatures were close but different from the eutectoid transformation point temperature. The experimental layer growth pattern is compared with a model of mass transfer, in which interface mass balance is considered. In the model the authors have considered the formation of one and two compact nitride layers. For short time of treatment, it is shown that a parabolic profile does not satisfactorily describe the layer growth.

  17. Portraying Physicists and Physics in Hard Science Fiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, John G.

    2001-03-01

    "Hard" science fiction is that sub-genre of SF in which a serious attempt is made to portray science and scientists as accurately as possible, often by using scientists and engineers as principal characters and by using scientific problem solving as a major plot element. The speaker, a Professor of Physics, writes a regular bimonthly science column (see http://www.npl.washington.edu/av) and has also written two hard SF novels, Twistor, which is about ``small" science in a university physics research laboratory, and Einstein's Bridge, which portrays ``big" science and in particular the 1993 cancellation of the Superconducting Super Collider Project, as played out against a fictional background of breakthrough discoveries, alien contact, wormholes, and time travel. The speaker will discuss his experiences in planning, writing, and publishing hard SF, and will consider how these activities address the general problem of public appreciation, perception, and mis-perception of science.

  18. Electrochemical Solution Growth of Magnetic Nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Monson, Todd C.; Pearce, Charles

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic nitrides, if manufactured in bulk form, would provide designers of transformers and inductors with a new class of better performing and affordable soft magnetic materials. According to experimental results from thin films and/or theoretical calculations, magnetic nitrides would have magnetic moments well in excess of current state of the art soft magnets. Furthermore, magnetic nitrides would have higher resistivities than current transformer core materials and therefore not require the use of laminates of inactive material to limit eddy current losses. However, almost all of the magnetic nitrides have been elusive except in difficult to reproduce thin films or as inclusions in another material. Now, through its ability to reduce atmospheric nitrogen, the electrochemical solution growth (ESG) technique can bring highly sought after (and previously inaccessible) new magnetic nitrides into existence in bulk form. This method utilizes a molten salt as a solvent to solubilize metal cations and nitrogen ions produced electrochemically and form nitrogen compounds. Unlike other growth methods, the scalable ESG process can sustain high growth rates (~mm/hr) even under reasonable operating conditions (atmospheric pressure and 500 °C). Ultimately, this translates into a high throughput, low cost, manufacturing process. The ESG process has already been used successfully to grow high quality GaN. Below, the experimental results of an exploratory express LDRD project to access the viability of the ESG technique to grow magnetic nitrides will be presented.

  19. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; Ufuktepe, Yüksel; Myneni, Ganapati

    2015-12-04

    Niobium nitride (NbN{sub x}) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbN{sub x} films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ∼40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbN{sub x} films from mixed β-Nb{sub 2}N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb{sub 2}N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbN{sub x} deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbN{sub x} films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbN{sub x} film morphology and phase.

  20. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan; Ufuktepe, Yüksel; Myneni, Ganapati; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2015-12-01

    Niobium nitride (NbNx) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbNx films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ˜40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbNx films from mixed β-Nb2N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb2N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbNx deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbNx films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbNx film morphology and phase.

  1. Titanium nitride as a seed layer for Heusler compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Niesen, Alessia Glas, Manuel; Ludwig, Jana; Schmalhorst, Jan-Michael; Reiss, Günter; Sahoo, Roshnee; Ebke, Daniel; Arenholz, Elke

    2015-12-28

    Titanium nitride (TiN) shows low resistivity at room temperature (27 μΩ cm), high thermal stability and thus has the potential to serve as seed layer in magnetic tunnel junctions. High quality TiN thin films with regard to the crystallographic and electrical properties were grown and characterized by x-ray diffraction and 4-terminal transport measurements. Element specific x-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed pure TiN inside the thin films. To investigate the influence of a TiN seed layer on a ferro(i)magnetic bottom electrode in magnetic tunnel junctions, an out-of-plane magnetized Mn{sub 2.45}Ga as well as in- and out-of-plane magnetized Co{sub 2}FeAl thin films were deposited on a TiN buffer, respectively. The magnetic properties were investigated using a superconducting quantum interference device and anomalous Hall effect for Mn{sub 2.45}Ga. Magneto optical Kerr effect measurements were carried out to investigate the magnetic properties of Co{sub 2}FeAl. TiN buffered Mn{sub 2.45}Ga thin films showed higher coercivity and squareness ratio compared to unbuffered samples. The Heusler compound Co{sub 2}FeAl showed already good crystallinity when grown at room temperature on a TiN seed-layer.

  2. Quantum State Transmission in a Superconducting Charge Qubit-Atom Hybrid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Deshui; Valado, María Martínez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-12-06

    Hybrids consisting of macroscopic superconducting circuits and microscopic components, such as atoms and spins, have the potential of transmitting an arbitrary state between different quantum species, leading to the prospective of high-speed operation and long-time storage of quantum information. Here we propose a novel hybrid structure, where a neutral-atom qubit directly interfaces with a superconducting charge qubit, to implement the qubit-state transmission. The highly-excited Rydberg atom located inside the gate capacitor strongly affects the behavior of Cooper pairs in the box while the atom in the ground state hardly interferes with the superconducting device. In addition, the DC Stark shift of the atomic states significantly depends on the charge-qubit states. By means of the standard spectroscopic techniques and sweeping the gate voltage bias, we show how to transfer an arbitrary quantum state from the superconducting device to the atom and vice versa.

  3. Quantum State Transmission in a Superconducting Charge Qubit-Atom Hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Deshui; Valado, María Martínez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Hybrids consisting of macroscopic superconducting circuits and microscopic components, such as atoms and spins, have the potential of transmitting an arbitrary state between different quantum species, leading to the prospective of high-speed operation and long-time storage of quantum information. Here we propose a novel hybrid structure, where a neutral-atom qubit directly interfaces with a superconducting charge qubit, to implement the qubit-state transmission. The highly-excited Rydberg atom located inside the gate capacitor strongly affects the behavior of Cooper pairs in the box while the atom in the ground state hardly interferes with the superconducting device. In addition, the DC Stark shift of the atomic states significantly depends on the charge-qubit states. By means of the standard spectroscopic techniques and sweeping the gate voltage bias, we show how to transfer an arbitrary quantum state from the superconducting device to the atom and vice versa. PMID:27922087

  4. Quantum State Transmission in a Superconducting Charge Qubit-Atom Hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deshui; Valado, María Martínez; Hufnagel, Christoph; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Amico, Luigi; Dumke, Rainer

    2016-12-01

    Hybrids consisting of macroscopic superconducting circuits and microscopic components, such as atoms and spins, have the potential of transmitting an arbitrary state between different quantum species, leading to the prospective of high-speed operation and long-time storage of quantum information. Here we propose a novel hybrid structure, where a neutral-atom qubit directly interfaces with a superconducting charge qubit, to implement the qubit-state transmission. The highly-excited Rydberg atom located inside the gate capacitor strongly affects the behavior of Cooper pairs in the box while the atom in the ground state hardly interferes with the superconducting device. In addition, the DC Stark shift of the atomic states significantly depends on the charge-qubit states. By means of the standard spectroscopic techniques and sweeping the gate voltage bias, we show how to transfer an arbitrary quantum state from the superconducting device to the atom and vice versa.

  5. Hard X-ray Sources for the Mexican Synchrotron Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Herrera, Juan

    2016-10-01

    One of the principal tasks for the design of the Mexican synchrotron was to define the storage ring energy. The main criteria for choosing the energy come from studying the electromagnetic spectrum that can be obtained from the synchrotron, because the energy range of the spectrum that can be obtained will determine the applications available to the users of the future light source. Since there is a public demand of hard X-rays for the experiments in the synchrotron community users from Mexico, in this work we studied the emission spectra from some hard X-ray sources which could be the best options for the parameters of the present Mexican synchrotron design. The calculations of the flux and the brightness for one Bending Magnet and four Insertion Devices are presented; specifically, for a Superconducting Bending Magnet (SBM), a Superconducting Wiggler (SCW), an In Vacuum Short Period Undulator (IV-SPU), a Superconducting Undulator (SCU) and for a Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU). Two commonly available synchrotron radiation programs were used for the computation (XOP and SRW). From the results, it can be concluded that the particle beam energy from the current design is enough to have one or more sources of hard X-rays. Furthermore, a wide range of hard X-ray region can be covered by the analyzed sources, and the choice of each type should be based on the specific characteristics of the X-ray beam to perform the experiments at the involved beamline. This work was done within the project Fomix Conacyt-Morelos ”Plan Estrategico para la construccion y operación de un Sincrotron en Morelos” (224392).

  6. Phase Identification of Iron Nitrides and Iron Oxy-Nitrides with Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsa, D. M.; Boerma, D. O.

    2003-12-01

    The Mössbauer spectroscopy of all known Fe nitrides is the topic of this paper. Most of the data were accumulated during a study of the growth of the various Fe nitride phases using molecular beam epitaxy of Fe in the presence of a flux of atomic N, or by post-nitriding freshly grown Fe layers also in a flux of atomic N. To get accurate data, most samples were grown with iron enriched in the isotope57Fe. Part of the samples were capped in the ultra-high vacuum (UHV) growth facility before exposure to air. By comparing MS data of samples which were capped with that of uncapped samples, we were able to measure the MS components due to oxidation of the nitrides. Also the oxidation behavior at elevated temperatures was studied. This led to a coherent description of the formation of oxy-nitrides as a function of temperature. The UHV conditions during growth and the capping of samples allowed us also to produce for the first time clean samples of Fe nitrides with a composition close to FeN. The phase formation in this composition range is extensively discussed. A fairly complete set of Mössbauer data for all Fe nitride phases and the phases occurring during their exposure to air is presented. This data set may serve to analyze samples of unknown composition, containing Fe nitrides.

  7. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-06-10

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  8. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  9. High critical current superconducting tapes

    DOEpatents

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-09-23

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of a superconducting RE-BCO layer including a mixture of rare earth metals, e.g., yttrium and europium, where the ratio of yttrium to europium in the RE-BCO layer ranges from about 3 to 1 to from about 1.5 to 1.

  10. A superconducting magnetic gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    A comparison is made between a magnetic gear using permanent magnets and superconductors. The objective is to see if there are any fundamental reasons why superconducting magnets should not provide higher power densities than permanent magnets. The gear is based on the variable permeability design of Attilah and Howe (2001 IEEE Trans. Magn. 37 2844-46) in which a ring of permanent magnets surrounding a ring of permeable pole pieces with a different spacing gives an internal field component at the beat frequency. Superconductors can provide much larger fields and forces but will saturate the pole pieces. However the gear mechanism still operates, but in a different way. The magnetisation of the pole pieces is now constant but rotates with angle at the beat frequency. The result is a cylindrical Halbach array which produces an internal field with the same symmetry as in the linear regime, but has an analytic solution. In this paper a typical gear system is analysed with finite elements using FlexPDE. It is shown that the gear can work well into the saturation regime and that the Halbach array gives a good approximation to the results. Replacing the permanent magnets with superconducting tapes can give large increases in torque density, and for something like a wind turbine a combined gear and generator is possible. However there are major practical problems. Perhaps the most fundamental is the large high frequency field which is inevitably present and which will cause AC losses. Also large magnetic fields are required, with all the practical problems of high field superconducting magnets in rotating machines. Nevertheless there are ways of mitigating these difficulties and it seems worthwhile to explore the possibilities of this technology further.

  11. Materials processing and in-vivo animal studies of nitrided hydroxyapatite bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Nancy Elizabeth

    2000-10-01

    Calcium phosphate bioceramics are currently being used in medicine and dentistry, for reconstruction or repair of diseased or injured bone, but with limited success. Incorporating nitrogen into phosphate glasses has resulted in improved properties, and it is proposed that similar benefits may be gained from nitriding calcium phosphate bioceramics for bone implants as well. This work focuses on processing of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate bioceramics nitrided by using solid, liquid, gas and ion sources. These materials were characterized by chemical, structural, mechanical, and biological methods to determine both the material structure and their suitability as implant materials. Calcium nitride and NaPON glass were unsatisfactory sources of nitrogen for hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramics. Calcium nitride, Ca3N2, is reacts with water vapor in the air, releasing ammonia, and leaving behind crystals of calcium oxide, CaO. The calcium oxide byproduct decreases the chemical stability of hydroxyapatite and HA/TCP composites in simulated body fluid. Sodium phosphorus oxynitride (NaPON) glass, in the form of a liquid sintering aid for HA, produces an inhomogeneous, composite as well. Hydroxyapatite heated at 800C in an ammonia atmosphere produces a homogeneous material with up to 2 wt% N. Infrared spectroscopy indicates cyanamide ions, CN22-, are formed by the incorporated nitrogen and impurity carbon. The use of 15N-doped ammonia results in an 15N NMR peak at 83.2 ppm, indicating P--N bonding. Raman spectroscopy may also indicate P--N bonding, but it is inconclusive. In a limited study, nitrogen may decrease the hardness and fracture toughness of the phosphate ceramic, hydroxyapatite, contrary to results expected for nitrogen in phosphate glasses. Nitrogen ions are incorporated in hydroxyapatite by ion implantation, with lower energies producing higher nitrogen contents. The highest concentration achieved was 3.55 wt% N, as determined

  12. Nitride Fuel Modeling Recommendation for Nitride Fuel Material Property Measurement Priority

    SciTech Connect

    William Carmack; Richard Moore

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this effort was to provide the basis for a model that effectively predicts nitride fuel behavior. Material property models developed for the uranium nitride fuel system have been used to approximate the general behavior of nitride fuels with specific property models for the transuranic nitride fuels utilized as they become available. The AFCI fuel development program now has the means for predicting the behavior of the transuranic nitride fuel compositions. The key data and models needed for input into this model include: Thermal conductivity with burnup Fuel expansion coefficient Fuel swelling with burnup Fission gas release with burnup. Although the fuel performance model is a fully functional FEA analysis tool, it is limited by the input data and models.

  13. Growth of epitaxial iron nitride ultrathin film on zinc-blende gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, J.; Lin, W.; Wang, K.; Chinchore, A.; Shi, M.; Ingram, D. C.; Smith, A. R.; Sun, K.; Lucy, J. M.; Hauser, A. J.; Yang, F. Y.

    2010-07-15

    The authors report the growth of iron nitride on zinc-blende gallium nitride using molecular beam epitaxy. First, zinc-blende GaN is grown on a magnesium oxide substrate having (001) orientation; second, an ultrathin layer of FeN is grown on top of the GaN layer. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction is used to monitor the surface during growth, and a well-defined epitaxial relationship is observed. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy is used to reveal the epitaxial continuity at the gallium nitride-iron nitride interface. Surface morphology of the iron nitride, similar to yet different from that of the GaN substrate, can be described as plateau valley. The FeN chemical stoichiometry is probed using both bulk and surface sensitive methods, and the magnetic properties of the sample are revealed.

  14. Imprinting superconducting vortex footsteps in a magnetic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisbois, Jérémy; Motta, Maycon; Avila, Jonathan I.; Shaw, Gorky; Devillers, Thibaut; Dempsey, Nora M.; Veerapandian, Savita K. P.; Colson, Pierre; Vanderheyden, Benoît; Vanderbemden, Philippe; Ortiz, Wilson A.; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy; Kramer, Roman B. G.; Silhanek, Alejandro V.

    2016-06-01

    Local polarization of a magnetic layer, a well-known method for storing information, has found its place in numerous applications such as the popular magnetic drawing board toy or the widespread credit cards and computer hard drives. Here we experimentally show that a similar principle can be applied for imprinting the trajectory of quantum units of flux (vortices), travelling in a superconducting film (Nb), into a soft magnetic layer of permalloy (Py). In full analogy with the magnetic drawing board, vortices act as tiny magnetic scribers leaving a wake of polarized magnetic media in the Py board. The mutual interaction between superconducting vortices and ferromagnetic domains has been investigated by the magneto-optical imaging technique. For thick Py layers, the stripe magnetic domain pattern guides both the smooth magnetic flux penetration as well as the abrupt vortex avalanches in the Nb film. It is however in thin Py layers without stripe domains where superconducting vortices leave the clearest imprints of locally polarized magnetic moment along their paths. In all cases, we observe that the flux is delayed at the border of the magnetic layer. Our findings open the quest for optimizing magnetic recording of superconducting vortex trajectories.

  15. Imprinting superconducting vortex footsteps in a magnetic layer.

    PubMed

    Brisbois, Jérémy; Motta, Maycon; Avila, Jonathan I; Shaw, Gorky; Devillers, Thibaut; Dempsey, Nora M; Veerapandian, Savita K P; Colson, Pierre; Vanderheyden, Benoît; Vanderbemden, Philippe; Ortiz, Wilson A; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy; Kramer, Roman B G; Silhanek, Alejandro V

    2016-06-06

    Local polarization of a magnetic layer, a well-known method for storing information, has found its place in numerous applications such as the popular magnetic drawing board toy or the widespread credit cards and computer hard drives. Here we experimentally show that a similar principle can be applied for imprinting the trajectory of quantum units of flux (vortices), travelling in a superconducting film (Nb), into a soft magnetic layer of permalloy (Py). In full analogy with the magnetic drawing board, vortices act as tiny magnetic scribers leaving a wake of polarized magnetic media in the Py board. The mutual interaction between superconducting vortices and ferromagnetic domains has been investigated by the magneto-optical imaging technique. For thick Py layers, the stripe magnetic domain pattern guides both the smooth magnetic flux penetration as well as the abrupt vortex avalanches in the Nb film. It is however in thin Py layers without stripe domains where superconducting vortices leave the clearest imprints of locally polarized magnetic moment along their paths. In all cases, we observe that the flux is delayed at the border of the magnetic layer. Our findings open the quest for optimizing magnetic recording of superconducting vortex trajectories.

  16. Imprinting superconducting vortex footsteps in a magnetic layer

    PubMed Central

    Brisbois, Jérémy; Motta, Maycon; Avila, Jonathan I.; Shaw, Gorky; Devillers, Thibaut; Dempsey, Nora M.; Veerapandian, Savita K. P.; Colson, Pierre; Vanderheyden, Benoît; Vanderbemden, Philippe; Ortiz, Wilson A.; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy; Kramer, Roman B. G.; Silhanek, Alejandro V.

    2016-01-01

    Local polarization of a magnetic layer, a well-known method for storing information, has found its place in numerous applications such as the popular magnetic drawing board toy or the widespread credit cards and computer hard drives. Here we experimentally show that a similar principle can be applied for imprinting the trajectory of quantum units of flux (vortices), travelling in a superconducting film (Nb), into a soft magnetic layer of permalloy (Py). In full analogy with the magnetic drawing board, vortices act as tiny magnetic scribers leaving a wake of polarized magnetic media in the Py board. The mutual interaction between superconducting vortices and ferromagnetic domains has been investigated by the magneto-optical imaging technique. For thick Py layers, the stripe magnetic domain pattern guides both the smooth magnetic flux penetration as well as the abrupt vortex avalanches in the Nb film. It is however in thin Py layers without stripe domains where superconducting vortices leave the clearest imprints of locally polarized magnetic moment along their paths. In all cases, we observe that the flux is delayed at the border of the magnetic layer. Our findings open the quest for optimizing magnetic recording of superconducting vortex trajectories. PMID:27263660

  17. Development of Ultrathin Niobium Nitride and Niobium Titanium Nitride Films for THz Hot-Electron Bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedorf, Sven Holger

    2005-12-01

    The GREAT (German Receiver for Astronomy at Terahertz Frequencies) aboard of SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) requires superconducting hot-electron bolometer (HEB) as heterodyne mixers for 1.9 THz and 2.7 THz. Within this research work, ultrathin (< 5 nm) niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN) and niobium nitride (NbN) films have been developed and successfully implemented in the mixers for GREAT. The main focus of this work is the development of ultrathin NbN and NbTiN films. A reproducible and reliable deposition process for ultrathin NbN and NbTiN films for the use in phonon-cooled HEB devices was established. The ultrathin films were deposited on silicon (Si) substrates and on 2 μm Si3N4 membranes by DC reactive magnetron sputtering. A method for the precise control of the nitrogen partial pressure by monitoring the target voltage has been introduced to deposit high quality, ultrathin NbN (3-4 nm, Tc=8.5 K) and NbTiN (4-5 nm, Tc=8 K) films. Substrate heating of at least 600C during the deposition is essential for the fabrication of ultrathin NbN and NbTiN films on Si substrates and Si3N4 membranes. The fabrication process required for HEB devices to be used in a quasi-optical mixer was developed. The ultrathin film was patterned by electron beam lithography (EBL), resulting in bolometer devices that measure areas of about 0.4 μm × 4 μm. The nature of the contact determines the interface transparency between the bolometer and the contact structure. Different cleaning processes have been performed and the influence on the contact resistance have been instigated. A better interface transparency gives less RF losses and could improve the HEB sensitivity and local oscillator (LO) requirement. A better control of the interface transparency also leads to a better reproducibility in values of the normal state resistance of the HEB devices. Heterodyne measurements were performed at 0.8 THz and 1.6 THz. For the NbTiN HEB devices, the double sideband

  18. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, F.; Shi, W.; Ideue, T.; Yoshida, M.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.; Kikitsu, T.; Inoue, D.; Hashizume, D.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity--unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures.

  19. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube.

    PubMed

    Qin, F; Shi, W; Ideue, T; Yoshida, M; Zak, A; Tenne, R; Kikitsu, T; Inoue, D; Hashizume, D; Iwasa, Y

    2017-02-16

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity-unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures.

  20. High-temperature conventional superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremets, M. I.; Drozdov, A. P.

    2017-02-01

    Conventional superconductors are described well by the Bardeen – Cooper – Schrieffer (BCS) theory (1957) and its related theories, all of which importantly put no explicit limit on transition temperature Tc. While this allows, in principle, room-temperature superconductivity, no such phenomenon has been observed. Since the discovery of superconductivity in 1911, the measured critical temperature of BCS superconductors has not until recently exceeded 39 K. In 2014, hydrogen sulfide under high pressure was experimentally found to exhibit superconductivity at Tc = 200 K, a record high value which greatly exceeds that of the previous class of high-temperature superconductors, the cuprates. The superconductivity mechanism in cuprates has not yet been explained. Over a period of 25 years, the critical temperature of cuprates has not been increased above 164 K. The paper reviews research on record-high Tc superconductivity in hydrogen sulphide and other hydrides. Prospects for increasing Tc to room temperature are also discussed.

  1. High-temperature conventional superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremets, M. I.; Drozdov, A. P.

    2016-11-01

    Conventional superconductors are described well by the Bardeen - Cooper - Schrieffer (BCS) theory (1957) and its related theories, all of which importantly put no explicit limit on transition temperature T_c. While this allows, in principle, room-temperature superconductivity, no such phenomenon has been observed. Since the discovery of superconductivity in 1911, the measured critical temperature of BCS superconductors has not until recently exceeded 39 K. In 2014, hydrogen sulfide under high pressure was experimentally found to exhibit superconductivity at T_c=200 K, a record high value which greatly exceeds that of the previous class of high-temperature superconductors, the cuprates. The superconductivity mechanism in cuprates has not yet been explained. Over a period of 25 years, the critical temperature of cuprates has not been increased above 164 K. The paper reviews research on record-high T_c superconductivity in hydrogen sulphide and other hydrides. Prospects for increasing T_c to room temperature are also discussed.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Superconducting bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, John R.

    2000-02-01

    The physics and technology of superconducting bearings is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in rotating bearings. The basic phenomenology of levitational forces is presented, followed by a brief discussion of the theoretical models that can be used for conceptual understanding and calculations. The merits of various HTS bearing designs are presented, and the behaviour of HTS bearings in typical situations is discussed. The article concludes with a brief survey of various proposed applications for HTS bearings.

  3. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  4. Superconducting dipole electromagnet

    DOEpatents

    Purcell, John R.

    1977-07-26

    A dipole electromagnet of especial use for bending beams in particle accelerators is wound to have high uniformity of magnetic field across a cross section and to decrease evenly to zero as the ends of the electromagnet are approached by disposing the superconducting filaments of the coil in the crescent-shaped nonoverlapping portions of two intersecting circles. Uniform decrease at the ends is achieved by causing the circles to overlap increasingly in the direction of the ends of the coil until the overlap is complete and the coil is terminated.

  5. Superconductivity in plutonium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrao, J. L.; Bauer, E. D.; Mitchell, J. N.; Tobash, P. H.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    Although the family of plutonium-based superconductors is relatively small, consisting of four compounds all of which crystallize in the tetragonal HoCoGa5 structure, these materials serve as an important bridge between the known Ce- and U-based heavy fermion superconductors and the high-temperature cuprate superconductors. Further, the partial localization of 5f electrons that characterizes the novel electronic properties of elemental plutonium appears to be central to the relatively high superconducting transition temperatures that are observed in PuCoGa5, PuRhGa5, PuCoIn5, and PuRhIn5.

  6. Textured silicon nitride: processing and anisotropic properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinwen; Sakka, Yoshio

    2008-01-01

    Textured silicon nitride (Si3N4) has been intensively studied over the past 15 years because of its use for achieving its superthermal and mechanical properties. In this review we present the fundamental aspects of the processing and anisotropic properties of textured Si3N4, with emphasis on the anisotropic and abnormal grain growth of β-Si3N4, texture structure and texture analysis, processing methods and anisotropic properties. On the basis of the texturing mechanisms, the processing methods described in this article have been classified into two types: hot-working (HW) and templated grain growth (TGG). The HW method includes the hot-pressing, hot-forging and sinter-forging techniques, and the TGG method includes the cold-pressing, extrusion, tape-casting and strong magnetic field alignment techniques for β-Si3N4 seed crystals. Each processing technique is thoroughly discussed in terms of theoretical models and experimental data, including the texturing mechanisms and the factors affecting texture development. Also, methods of synthesizing the rodlike β-Si3N4 single crystals are presented. Various anisotropic properties of textured Si3N4 and their origins are thoroughly described and discussed, such as hardness, elastic modulus, bending strength, fracture toughness, fracture energy, creep behavior, tribological and wear behavior, erosion behavior, contact damage behavior and thermal conductivity. Models are analyzed to determine the thermal anisotropy by considering the intrinsic thermal anisotropy, degree of orientation and various microstructure factors. Textured porous Si3N4 with a unique microstructure composed of oriented elongated β-Si3N4 and anisotropic pores is also described for the first time, with emphasis on its unique mechanical and thermal-mechanical properties. Moreover, as an important related material, textured α-Sialon is also reviewed, because the presence of elongated α-Sialon grains allows the production of textured α-Sialon using the

  7. Textured silicon nitride: processing and anisotropic properties.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinwen; Sakka, Yoshio

    2008-07-01

    Textured silicon nitride (Si3N4) has been intensively studied over the past 15 years because of its use for achieving its superthermal and mechanical properties. In this review we present the fundamental aspects of the processing and anisotropic properties of textured Si3N4, with emphasis on the anisotropic and abnormal grain growth of β-Si3N4, texture structure and texture analysis, processing methods and anisotropic properties. On the basis of the texturing mechanisms, the processing methods described in this article have been classified into two types: hot-working (HW) and templated grain growth (TGG). The HW method includes the hot-pressing, hot-forging and sinter-forging techniques, and the TGG method includes the cold-pressing, extrusion, tape-casting and strong magnetic field alignment techniques for β-Si3N4 seed crystals. Each processing technique is thoroughly discussed in terms of theoretical models and experimental data, including the texturing mechanisms and the factors affecting texture development. Also, methods of synthesizing the rodlike β-Si3N4 single crystals are presented. Various anisotropic properties of textured Si3N4 and their origins are thoroughly described and discussed, such as hardness, elastic modulus, bending strength, fracture toughness, fracture energy, creep behavior, tribological and wear behavior, erosion behavior, contact damage behavior and thermal conductivity. Models are analyzed to determine the thermal anisotropy by considering the intrinsic thermal anisotropy, degree of orientation and various microstructure factors. Textured porous Si3N4 with a unique microstructure composed of oriented elongated β-Si3N4 and anisotropic pores is also described for the first time, with emphasis on its unique mechanical and thermal-mechanical properties. Moreover, as an important related material, textured α-Sialon is also reviewed, because the presence of elongated α-Sialon grains allows the production of textured α-Sialon using the

  8. A study of nitride devices for computer memory applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raburn, W. D.

    1971-01-01

    Metal-nitride-oxide-silicon /MNOS/ capacitors act like metal-nitride-silicon /MNS/ capacitors with extra interface where sheet of charge can be stored in slow states. Flatband voltage shifts over a wide range by adjusting store charge density.

  9. Method of manufacture of atomically thin boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-08-06

    The present invention provides a method of fabricating at least one single layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) suspending at least one multilayer boron nitride across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure. The present invention also provides a method of fabricating single layer hexagonal boron nitride. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) providing multilayer boron nitride suspended across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure.

  10. Boron nitride fibers from polymer precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, B.E.

    1992-12-31

    Conversion of polymer precursors to high performance boron nitride fibers as explored through a fundamental study of the mutually dependent chemical, morphological, and processing requirements in precursor polymer synthesis, formation of continuous precursor fibers, and finally thermochemical conversion to oriented boron nitride fibers. Polyborate and polyborazylene precursors were investigated. method of incorporating polyborazine in polyborate were also explored in order to stabilize the shape of polyborate fibers and to help initiate an orientable boron nitride structure. Polyborazylene, a polyborazine of fused borazine polycyclic structures was chosen for study as a precursor for boron nitride fibers because of the closeness of its structure to that of the desired turbostratic boron nitride. Both poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(methyl methacrylate) were found to be compatible with the monomer, borazine, and polyborazylenesolutions with monoglyme. They could be used to build the viscosity of solutions. However, fibers that were hand-drawn from these solutions were very sticky and quickly hydrolyzed in room atmosphere. Conversion of polyborazylene to oriented boron nitride fibers was not realized. Processable polyborates were produced by polycondensation of trimethoxyboroxine and boric acid and also by disproportionation or trimethyoxyboraxine. It was shown that the rheological characteristics of the polyborate formed could be controlled by an appropriate combination of the conversion of the monomer to polymer and the addition of a linear organic polymer as a rheological aid. Poly(methyl methacrylate) was found to be a suitable rheological aid, with a decomposition temperature that is high enough to facilitate its incorporation in the polymerizing system and low energy to be fugitive during thermochemical conversion of the polyborate to boron nitride.

  11. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip.

    PubMed

    Schuck, C; Guo, X; Fan, L; Ma, X; Poot, M; Tang, H X

    2016-01-21

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single-photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standard semiconductor thin-film technology, making it possible to implement more complex and larger scale quantum photonic circuits on silicon chips.

  12. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, C.; Guo, X.; Fan, L.; Ma, X.; Poot, M.; Tang, H. X.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single-photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standard semiconductor thin-film technology, making it possible to implement more complex and larger scale quantum photonic circuits on silicon chips. PMID:26792424

  13. Surface hardness increasing of iron alloys by nitrogen-deuterium ion implanting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, C. A.; Alvarez, F.

    2004-12-01

    In situ x-ray photoemission spectroscopy is used to study the deuterium and hydrogen oxygen etching effect in nitrogen-implanted iron alloys. A suitable deuterium-nitrogen mixture can increase the surface original steel hardness up to ˜40%. In similar conditions, hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures improves the hardness by ˜10%. On deuteration, the main change is the reduction of the zero-point energy of the hydrides bond. Due to this, the lower scission energy of hydrogen-metal bonds as compared with deuterium-metal bonds determines the favorable effect of deuterium on the nitriding process.

  14. Superconducting Bolometer Array Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Chervenak, Jay; Irwin, Kent; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shafer, Rick; Staguhn, Johannes; Wollack, Ed; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of far-infrared and submillimeter instruments require large arrays of detectors containing thousands of elements. These arrays will necessarily be multiplexed, and superconducting bolometer arrays are the most promising present prospect for these detectors. We discuss our current research into superconducting bolometer array technologies, which has recently resulted in the first multiplexed detections of submillimeter light and the first multiplexed astronomical observations. Prototype arrays containing 512 pixels are in production using the Pop-Up Detector (PUD) architecture, which can be extended easily to 1000 pixel arrays. Planar arrays of close-packed bolometers are being developed for the GBT (Green Bank Telescope) and for future space missions. For certain applications, such as a slewed far-infrared sky survey, feedhorncoupling of a large sparsely-filled array of bolometers is desirable, and is being developed using photolithographic feedhorn arrays. Individual detectors have achieved a Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) of -10(exp 17) W/square root of Hz at 300mK, but several orders of magnitude improvement are required and can be reached with existing technology. The testing of such ultralow-background detectors will prove difficult, as this requires optical loading of below IfW. Antenna-coupled bolometer designs have advantages for large format array designs at low powers due to their mode selectivity.

  15. Driven superconducting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2014-03-01

    Driven nonlinear quantum systems show rich phenomena in various fields of physics. Among them, superconducting quantum circuits have very attractive features such as well-controlled quantum states with design flexibility, strong nonlinearity of Josephson junctions, strong coupling to electromagnetic driving fields, little internal dissipation, and tailored coupling to the electromagnetic environment. We have investigated properties and functionalities of driven superconducting quantum circuits. A transmon qubit coupled to a transmission line shows nearly perfect spatial mode matching between the incident and scattered microwave field in the 1D mode. Dressed states under a driving field are studied there and also in a semi-infinite 1D mode terminated by a resonator containing a flux qubit. An effective Λ-type three-level system is realized under an appropriate driving condition. It allows ``impedance-matched'' perfect absorption of incident probe photons and down conversion into another frequency mode. Finally, the weak signal from the qubit is read out using a Josephson parametric amplifier/oscillator which is another nonlinear circuit driven by a strong pump field. This work was partly supported by the Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST), Project for Developing Innovation Systems of MEXT, MEXT KAKENHI ``Quantum Cybernetics,'' and the NICT Commissioned Research.

  16. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  17. Thermal transport in silicon nitride membranes and far infrared studies of novel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Warren Albert

    The central theme of this thesis is the design and use of bolometers for detection of far infrared and submillimeter wavelength radiation. A new material, micrometer thick membranes of silicon nitride, is used in modern bolometer designs. An understanding of thermal transport in silicon nitride is critical to evaluate and optimize detector performance. We have measured the thermal conductance, G, of {≈}1μm thick low-stress silicon nitride membranes over the temperature range, 0.06 4K,\\ G is independent of surface morphology indicating that the thermal transport is determined by bulk scattering. For T < 4K, scattering from membrane surfaces becomes significant. We find that G is reduced by a factor as large as 5 for membranes which have sub-micron sized Ag particles glued to the surface or are micromachined into narrow strips as are required in many applications when compared with that of clean, solid membranes with the same ratio of cross section to length. We have used optimized bolometers for the study of two novel materials, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and single crystals of high temperature superconductors. We have measured the transmittance of several samples of bundles of SWNT over the frequency range 10 < nu < 300cmsp{-1} at temperatures 1.2 < T < 300K. The broadband shape of the transmittance has a temperature dependence similar to the DC transport measurements. We find a temperature dependent feature near nu≈ 30cmsp{-1} that is consistent with the prediction of a small energy gap Esb{g}≈ 4meV and also with a soft librational mode in SWNT bundles. We have directly measured the absorptivity of high quality single crystals of YBasb2Cusb3Osb{6.5} and Tlsb2Basb2Casb2Cusb3Osb{10-delta} over the frequency range 50 < nu < 800cmsp{-1} at a temperature of 1.2K. Direct absorptivity measurements are powerful for studying materials in the superconducting state since in conventional superconductors the loss at frequencies below the energy gap is zero

  18. Doped niobium superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Tao; Kang, Lin; Zhang, Labao; Zhao, Qingyuan; Gu, Min; Qiu, Jian; Chen, Jian; Jin, Biaobing

    2014-09-01

    We designed and fabricated a special doped niobium (Nb*) superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD) on MgO substrate. The superconductivity of this ultra-thin Nb* film was further improved by depositing an ultra-thin aluminum nitride protective layer on top. Compared with traditional Nb films, Nb* films present higher T C and J C. We investigated the dependence of the characteristics of devices, such as cut-off wavelength, response bandwidth, and temperature, on their geometrical dimensions. Results indicate that reduction in both the width and thickness of Nb* nanowires extended the cut-off wavelength and improved the sensitivity. The Nb* SNSPD (50 nm width and 4.5 nm thickness) exhibited single-photon sensitivities at 1,310, 1,550, and 2,010 nm. We also demonstrated an enhancement in the detection efficiency by a factor of 10 in its count rate by lowering the working temperature from 2.26 K to 315 mK.

  19. Short-duration gas nitriding of parts made of high-strength cast iron in the gaz joint-stock company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostin, V. N.; Pytyaeva, E. I.; Pershina, V. V.

    1998-10-01

    Castings of high-strength iron are use very widely. The range of automobile parts cast from iron with globular graphite is widening. It includes crankshafts and camshafts, flywheels, crankcases, various engine parts, etc. In order to increase hardness of the surface layer, the wear resistance, and the service life of parts made of high-strength cast iron, they are often subjected to nitriding. The present work is aimed at studying the nitriding process for parts made of VCh70 and VCh85 high-strength cast iron.

  20. Formation of boron nitride and boron carbide composite by nitrogen implantation at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, N.; Romero-Borja, F.; Zhang, Z. H.; Cui, X. T.; Liu, J. R.; Wood, L. T.; Chu, W. K.; Marton, D.; Rabalais, J. W.; Forster, K. M.; Reeber, R. R.

    1993-09-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a wear resistant material with hardness slightly less than that of diamond. It has an excellent strength to weight ratio and relatively high toughness under controlled processing. These essential mechanical properties make B4C an ideal candidate for cutting tool and bearing applications. We will demonstrate that hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), a good solid lubricant, can be formed on B4C surfaces through high temperature (850 °C) nitrogen ion implantation. The formation of composite B4C and h-BN on the B4C surface can potentially reduce surface friction coefficients, making the material more attractive for tribological applications.

  1. Terahertz Mixing Characteristics of NbN Superconducting Tunnel Junctions and Related Astronomical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.

    2010-01-01

    High-sensitivity superconducting SIS (superconductor-insulator-superconductor) mixers are playing an increasingly important role in the terahertz (THz) astronomical observation, which is an emerging research frontier in modern astrophysics. Superconducting SIS mixers with niobium (Nb) tunnel junctions have reached a sensitivity close to the quantum limit, but have a frequency limit about 0.7 THz (i.e., gap frequency of Nb tunnel junctions). Beyond this frequency Nb superconducting films will absorb energetic photons (i.e., energy loss) to break Cooper pairs, thereby resulting in significant degradation of the mixer performance. Therefore, it is of particular interest to develop THz superconducting SIS mixers incorporating tunnel junctions with a larger energy gap. Niobium-nitride (NbN) superconducting tunnel junctions have been long known for their large energy gap, almost double that of Nb ones. With the introduction of epitaxially grown NbN films, the fabrication technology of NbN superconducting tunnel junctions has been considerably improved in the recent years. Nevertheless, their performances are still not as good as Nb ones, and furthermore they are not yet demonstrated in real astronomical applications. Given the facts mentioned above, in this paper we systematically study the quantum mixing behaviors of NbN superconducting tunnel junctions in the THz regime and demonstrate an astronomical testing observation with a 0.5 THz superconducting SIS mixer developed with NbN tunnel junctions. The main results of this study include: (1) successful design and fabrication of a 0.4˜0.6 THz waveguide mixing circuit with the high-dielectric-constant MgO substrate; (2) successful fabrication of NbN superconducting tunnel junctions with the gap voltage reaching 5.6 mV and the quality factor as high as 15; (3) demonstration of a 0.5 THz waveguide NbN superconducting SIS mixer with a measured receiver noise temperature (no correction) as low as five times the quantum limit

  2. Budgeting in Hard Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrino, Frank M.

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with school board members and administrators produced a list of suggestions for balancing a budget in hard times. Among these are changing calendars and schedules to reduce heating and cooling costs; sharing personnel; rescheduling some extracurricular activities; and forming cooperative agreements with other districts. (MLF)

  3. Running in Hard Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    Roberta Stevens and Kent Oliver are campaigning hard for the presidency of the American Library Association (ALA). Stevens is outreach projects and partnerships officer at the Library of Congress. Oliver is executive director of the Stark County District Library in Canton, Ohio. They have debated, discussed, and posted web sites, Facebook pages,…

  4. CSI: Hard Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Acting on information from students who reported seeing a classmate looking at inappropriate material on a school computer, school officials used forensics software to plunge the depths of the PC's hard drive, searching for evidence of improper activity. Images were found in a deleted Internet Explorer cache as well as deleted file space.…

  5. Structural properties of Alumnum nitride compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, R.; Katırcıoğlu, Ş.

    2014-10-01

    Structural properties of Alumnum nitride in wurtzite, zinc-blende and rock-salt phases have been investigated by Full Potential-Linearized Augmented Plane Waves method based on Density Functional Theory within Local Density Approximation and seven Generalized Gradient schemes. It is found that, Alumnum nitride in wurtzite phase is the stable ground state structure and makes a transition to rock-salt phase at a low transition pressure (11.54 GPa). According to present total energy calculations, zinc-blende phase of Alumnum nitride also makes a transition to rock-salt phase, at a low transition pressure (10.17 GPa). Generalized Gradient functionals of Perdew-Wang-Engel-Vosko and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof are found to be more successful than other approximations considered in this work for providing the closest values of the structural features, such as, lattice constants, bulk moduli, first order pressure derivatives of bulk moduli and cohesive energies of Alumnum nitride three phases to available experimental ones. Although Generalized Gradient approaches of Perdew-Wang-Engel-Vosko, Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof, Becke-Perdew-Wang and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (revised) are found to be accurate schemes for elastic constants of rock-salt AlN, only Perdew-Wang-Engel-Vosko and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functionals are observed to be more successful than the other schemes for supplying accurately both C_{11} and C_{12} of zinc-blende Alumnum nitride structure. Perdew-Wang-Engel-Vosko functional is observed to be superior to Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof for elastic constants of wurtzite Alumnum nitride structure. Elastic constants of wurtzite Alumnum nitride obtained by self Perdew-Wang-Engel-Vosko approach and Martin's transformation calculations in which elastic constants of zinc-blende Alumnum nitride are calculated with Perdew-Wang-Engel-Vosko scheme, are very close to the experimental ones. Hence, functional of Perdew-Wang-Engel-Vosko is decided to be the most accurate approximation

  6. Spin-orbit-coupled superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Wang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Sheng-Di; Liang, C-T

    2014-06-25

    Superconductivity and spin-orbit (SO) interaction have been two separate emerging fields until very recently that the correlation between them seemed to be observed. However, previous experiments concerning SO coupling are performed far beyond the superconducting state and thus a direct demonstration of how SO coupling affects superconductivity remains elusive. Here we investigate the SO coupling in the critical region of superconducting transition on Al nanofilms, in which the strength of disorder and spin relaxation by SO coupling are changed by varying the film thickness. At temperatures T sufficiently above the superconducting critical temperature T(c), clear signature of SO coupling reveals itself in showing a magneto-resistivity peak. When T < T(c), the resistivity peak can still be observed; however, its line-shape is now affected by the onset of the quasi two-dimensional superconductivity. By studying such magneto-resistivity peaks under different strength of spin relaxation, we highlight the important effects of SO interaction on superconductivity.

  7. X-ray diffraction investigation of ultrafine boron nitride powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gurov, S.V.; Chukalin, V.I.; Rezchikova, T.V.; Torbov, V.J.; Troitskii, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an x-ray diffraction analysis of ultrafine boron nitride powders of different mean particle sizes. Diffraction spectra of the ultrafine boron nitride powders were obtained using a DRON-1 apparatus. The experimental facts are indicative of a turbostratic character of deformation of the hexagonal lattice of ultrafinely divided boron nitride.

  8. Anticorrosion nitrided layers on unalloyed and alloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wach, P.; Michalski, J.; Burdyński, K.; Ciski, A.

    2017-02-01

    In the paper, nitrided layers on unalloyed and alloyed steels and their corrosion properties are presented. Nitrided layers in the controlled gas nitriding process on C10 and 42CrMo4 steels were formed. Two types of nitrided layers are presented: with nitride iron layers above and below 15 µm. Nitrided layer with nitride layer above 15 µm has good corrosion resistance, but after nitriding of machine parts were subsequently oxidised and impregnated. In the second type of nitrided layer, the surface layers of iron nitrides had a thickness of 3.0 to 11.0 µm. Nitrided layers with a surface layer of iron nitrides with the γ’ (Fe4N) structure were formed on unalloyed steel and investigated. The so-formed layers were subject to basic metallographic, X-ray diffraction and corrosion resistance studies carried out by electrochemical methods and in a neutral salt spray chamber. It was found that the layers consisting only of γ’ phase had a good corrosion resistance. Necessary requirements for achieving an enhanced resistance comprise their complete tightness and thickness not lower than 9.0 µm. Thinner layers had good electrochemical properties but did not exhibit corrosion resistance in the salt spray chamber.

  9. 77 FR 51825 - Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... COMMISSION Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1... antidumping duty order on ferrovanadium and nitrided vanadium from Russia would not be likely to lead to... contained in USITC Publication 4345 (August 2012), entitled Ferrovanadium and Nitrided Vanadium from...

  10. Silicon nitride ceramic having high fatigue life and high toughness

    DOEpatents

    Yeckley, Russell L.

    1996-01-01

    A sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising between about 0.6 mol % and about 3.2 mol % rare earth as rare earth oxide, and between about 85 w/o and about 95 w/o beta silicon nitride grains, wherein at least about 20% of the beta silicon nitride grains have a thickness of greater than about 1 micron.

  11. Nitride semiconductors for ultraviolet detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. F.; Bremser, M. D.; Gruss, K.; Linthicum, K.; Ferry, B.

    1995-06-01

    Continued development and commercialization of optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes and semiconductor lasers produced from 3-5 gallium arsenide-based materials, has also generated interest in the much wider bandgap semiconductor mononitride materials containing aluminum, gallium, and indium. The majority of the studies have been conducted on pure gallium nitride thin films having the wurtzite structure, and this emphasis continues to the present day. The program objectives achieved in this reporting period have been (1) the growth of undoped, high resistivity and n- and p-type doped monocrystalline, GaN thin films on alpha(6H)-SiC(000l) wafers via organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE), and their characterization via photoluminescence; (2) the growth and cathodoluminescence characterization of Al(x)Ga(1-x)N alloys and abrupt heterojunctions of these alloys; (3) the development and application of a novel NH3 cracker cell for gas source MBE to reduce film damage; and (4) the reactive ion etching of undoped GaN films via use of Cl-containing compounds.

  12. Boron nitride nanotubes and nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio; Huang, Yang; Terao, Takeshi; Mitome, Masanori; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2010-06-22

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a layered material with a graphite-like structure in which planar networks of BN hexagons are regularly stacked. As the structural analogue of a carbon nanotube (CNT), a BN nanotube (BNNT) was first predicted in 1994; since then, it has become one of the most intriguing non-carbon nanotubes. Compared with metallic or semiconducting CNTs, a BNNT is an electrical insulator with a band gap of ca. 5 eV, basically independent of tube geometry. In addition, BNNTs possess a high chemical stability, excellent mechanical properties, and high thermal conductivity. The same advantages are likely applicable to a graphene analogue-a monatomic layer of a hexagonal BN. Such unique properties make BN nanotubes and nanosheets a promising nanomaterial in a variety of potential fields such as optoelectronic nanodevices, functional composites, hydrogen accumulators, electrically insulating substrates perfectly matching the CNT, and graphene lattices. This review gives an introduction to the rich BN nanotube/nanosheet field, including the latest achievements in the synthesis, structural analyses, and property evaluations, and presents the purpose and significance of this direction in the light of the general nanotube/nanosheet developments.

  13. Single gallium nitride nanowire lasers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Justin C; Choi, Heon-Jin; Knutsen, Kelly P; Schaller, Richard D; Yang, Peidong; Saykally, Richard J

    2002-10-01

    There is much current interest in the optical properties of semiconductor nanowires, because the cylindrical geometry and strong two-dimensional confinement of electrons, holes and photons make them particularly attractive as potential building blocks for nanoscale electronics and optoelectronic devices, including lasersand nonlinear optical frequency converters. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor of much practical interest, because it is widely used in electrically pumped ultraviolet-blue light-emitting diodes, lasers and photodetectors. Recent progress in microfabrication techniques has allowed stimulated emission to be observed from a variety of GaN microstructures and films. Here we report the observation of ultraviolet-blue laser action in single monocrystalline GaN nanowires, using both near-field and far-field optical microscopy to characterize the waveguide mode structure and spectral properties of the radiation at room temperature. The optical microscope images reveal radiation patterns that correlate with axial Fabry-Perot modes (Q approximately 10(3)) observed in the laser spectrum, which result from the cylindrical cavity geometry of the monocrystalline nanowires. A redshift that is strongly dependent on pump power (45 meV microJ x cm(-2)) supports the idea that the electron-hole plasma mechanism is primarily responsible for the gain at room temperature. This study is a considerable advance towards the realization of electron-injected, nanowire-based ultraviolet-blue coherent light sources.

  14. Hardness analysis of cubic metal mononitrides from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulcher, B. D.; Cui, X. Y.; Delley, B.; Stampfl, C.

    2012-05-01

    Density functional theory calculations are performed to evaluate the hardness of various cubic metal nitrides: rocksalt TiN, VN, ZrN, NbN, AlN, and SiN; zincblende AlN and BN; and diamond C for comparison. The isotropic elastic stiffness constants cij, bulk modulus K, shear modulus G, Young's modulus E, and isotropic Poisson's ratio ν¯ are calculated. From simulated uniaxial stress-strain curves, ideal strength values σmax in the [100], [110], and [111] directions are also evaluated for all systems. In particular, rocksalt AlN is found to possess both high elastic moduli and ideal strength. These quantities are then compared for correlations with existing experimental Vicker's hardness data. The bulk modulus is found to be a poor indicator of hardness, while E, G, 1/ν¯, and σmax all exhibit stronger correlations. With a view to circumvent the need to run computationally expensive relaxation steps, different methodologies for approximating uniaxial stress-strain curves are introduced. Utilizing the anisotropic Poisson's ratio to approximate the relaxed transverse lattice parameters at a given axial strain is a good approximation to stress-strain curves, and the ideal strengths obtained in this way exhibit strong correlations to experimental Vicker's hardness values.

  15. Knoop Hardness - Apparent Yield Stress Relationship in Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Swab, Jeffrey J; LaSalvia, Jerry; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Strong, Kevin T; Danna, Dominic; Ragan, Meredith E; Ritt, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    In Tabor's classical studies of the deformation of metals, the yield stress (Y) and hardness (H) were shown to be related according to H/Y {approx} 3 for complete or fully plastic deformation. Since then it has been anecdotally shown for ceramics that this ratio is <3. Interest exists to explore this further so Hertzian indentation was used to measure the apparent yield stress of numerous ceramics and metals and their results were compared with each material's load-dependent Knoop hardness. The evaluated ceramics included standard reference materials for hardness (silicon nitride and tungsten carbide), silicon carbide, alumina, and glass. Several steel compositions were also tested for comparison. Knoop hardness measurements at 19.6 N (i.e., toward 'complete or fully plastic deformation'), showed that 2 < H/Y < 3 for the metals and 0.8 < H/Y < 1.8 for the glasses and ceramics. Being that H/Y {ne} 3 for the ceramics indicates that Tabor's analysis is either not applicable to ceramics or that full plastic deformation is not achieved with a Knoop indentation or both.

  16. Superconducting interfaces between insulating oxides.

    PubMed

    Reyren, N; Thiel, S; Caviglia, A D; Kourkoutis, L Fitting; Hammerl, G; Richter, C; Schneider, C W; Kopp, T; Rüetschi, A-S; Jaccard, D; Gabay, M; Muller, D A; Triscone, J-M; Mannhart, J

    2007-08-31

    At interfaces between complex oxides, electronic systems with unusual electronic properties can be generated. We report on superconductivity in the electron gas formed at the interface between two insulating dielectric perovskite oxides, LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. The behavior of the electron gas is that of a two-dimensional superconductor, confined to a thin sheet at the interface. The superconducting transition temperature of congruent with 200 millikelvin provides a strict upper limit to the thickness of the superconducting layer of congruent with 10 nanometers.

  17. Antiferromagnetic hedgehogs with superconducting cores

    SciTech Connect

    Goldbart, P.M.; Sheehy, D.E.

    1998-09-01

    Excitations of the antiferromagnetic state that resemble antiferromagnetic hedgehogs at large distances but are predominantly superconducting inside a core region are discussed within the context of Zhang{close_quote}s SO(5)-symmetry-based approach to the physics of high-temperature superconducting materials. Nonsingular, in contrast with their hedgehog cousins in pure antiferromagnetism, these texture excitations are what hedgehogs become when the antiferromagnetic order parameter is permitted to {open_quotes}escape{close_quotes} into superconducting directions. The structure of such excitations is determined in a simple setting, and a number of their experimental implications are examined. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Antiferromagnetic hedgehogs with superconducting cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul M.; Sheehy, Daniel E.

    1998-09-01

    Excitations of the antiferromagnetic state that resemble antiferromagnetic hedgehogs at large distances but are predominantly superconducting inside a core region are discussed within the context of Zhang's SO(5)-symmetry-based approach to the physics of high-temperature superconducting materials. Nonsingular, in contrast with their hedgehog cousins in pure antiferromagnetism, these texture excitations are what hedgehogs become when the antiferromagnetic order parameter is permitted to ``escape'' into superconducting directions. The structure of such excitations is determined in a simple setting, and a number of their experimental implications are examined.

  19. Nozzle for superconducting fiber production

    DOEpatents

    Righi, Jamal

    1992-11-17

    A nozzle apparatus for producing flexible fibers of superconducting material receives melted material from a crucible for containing a charge of the superconducting material. The material is melted in the crucible and falls in a stream through a bottom hole in the crucible. The stream falls through a protecting collar which maintains the stream at high temperatures. The stream is then supplied through the downwardly directed nozzle where it is subjected to a high velocity air flow which breaks the melted superconducting material into ligaments which solidify into the flexible fibers. The fibers are collected by blowing them against a porous cloth.

  20. Longitudinal splitting of boron nitride nanotubes for the facile synthesis of high quality boron nitride nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kris J; Gibb, Ashley L; Sinitskii, Alexander; Rousseas, Michael; Alem, Nasim; Tour, James M; Zettl, Alex K

    2011-08-10

    Boron nitride nanoribbons (BNNRs), the boron nitride structural equivalent of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), are predicted to possess unique electronic and magnetic properties. We report the synthesis of BNNRs through the potassium-intercalation-induced longitudinal splitting of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). This facile, scalable synthesis results in narrow (down to 20 nm), few sheet (typically 2-10), high crystallinity BNNRs with very uniform widths. The BNNRs are at least 1 μm in length with minimal defects within the ribbon plane and along the ribbon edges.

  1. A study on various fabrication routes for preparing multilayered cubic boron nitride films and sp(3)-like boron nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Sing Fai

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) has a sp3-bonded structure which leads to excellent mechanical properties. Though cBN-rich films have been successfully fabricated by many techniques, the adhesion of the films is still unsatisfactory due to the high stresses. The maximum sustainable thickness of cBN-rich films with good adhesion is widely reported to be around 200 nm, so many practical applications of cBN coatings are hindered. In this study, we designed a series of deposition schemes in a logical sequence, in order to explore whether stress can be released, or other structural forms of BN with potential applications can be made, and to gain more fundamental understanding on the growth mechanisms of various phases observed in the films. Various fabrication processes were employed according to the following sequence: (1) A single-step process. It was showed that the maximum tolerable thickness of the cBN-rich films prepared by our system (183nm) was compatible with the result in literatures (200nm). (2) A multilayered deposition process. A thick sp2-bonded boron nitride (sP2-BN) buffer layer which was relatively deformable was added, and hence some stresses were released so as to allow a 643nm-thick, 87vol.% cBN-rich layer with acceptable adhesion to grow on top. (3) An advanced multilayer process with subsequent annealing process. A zirconium layer was pre-deposited to remove the soft buffer layer after postannealing. The interface could be strengthened as the zirconium-boride/nitride was formed. (4) Ion assist deposition at unheated condition. Composite BN films containing sp3 nanoclusters embedded in a sp2-BN matrix were fabricated. The IR technique was not sensitive enough to detect spa nanoclusters, but their presence was verified by the results of other measurements. In particular, the sp3 content can be over 30vo1.%, with a hardness 20GPa. The influences of the assist beam energy and substrate temperature on the generation of the sp3 nanoclusters were investigated

  2. Infrared bolometers with silicon nitride micromesh absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, J. J.; Turner, A. D.; DelCastillo, H. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Lange, A. E.; Mauskopf, P. D.

    1996-01-01

    Sensitive far infrared and millimeter wave bolometers fabricated from a freestanding membrane of low stress silicon nitride are reported. The absorber, consisting of a metallized silicon nitride micromesh thermally isolated by radial legs of silicon nitride, is placed in an integrating cavity to efficiently couple to single mode or multiple mode infrared radiation. This structure provides low heat capacity, low thermal conduction and minimal cross section to energetic particles. A neutron transmutation doped Ge thermister is bump bonded to the center of the device and read out with evaporated Cr-Au leads. The limiting performance of the micromesh absorber is discussed and the recent results obtained from a 300 mK cold stage are summarized.

  3. Evaluation of silicon-nitride ceramic valves.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. G.; Zhang, J. M.; Andrews, M. J.; Tretheway, J. S.; Phillips, N. S .L.; Jensen, J. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Univ. of Texas; Caterpillar, Inc.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon-nitride ceramic valves can improve the performance of both light- and heavy-duty automotive engines because of the superior material properties of silicon nitrides over current metal alloys. However, ceramics are brittle materials that may introduce uncertainties in the reliability and durability of ceramic valves. As a result, the lifetime of ceramic valves are difficult to predict theoretically due to wide variations in the type and distribution of microstructural flaws in the material. Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are therefore required to assess the quality and reliability of these valves. Because ceramic materials are optically translucent and the strength-limiting flaws are normally located near the valve surface, a laser-scatter method can be used for NDE evaluation of ceramic valves. This paper reviews the progress in the development of this NDE method and its application to inspect silicon-nitride ceramic valves at various stages of manufacturing and bench and engine tests.

  4. Superconducting electromagnetic thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, J.

    1993-02-11

    An electromagnetic thruster for marine vehicles using a jet of water driven by the interaction of a mutually perpendicular intensified magnetic field and an intensified electric field is disclosed. The intensified magnetic field is produced by superconducting coils cooled by a coolant such as liquid helium. An intensified electric field is produced by passing high amperage current across the seawater jet. These interacting fields produce a Lorentz force perpendicular to mutually perpendicular electric and magnetic field vectors which is used to drive the seawater jet. In some embodiments, the force may also be used to draw water into the jet from the boundary layer flow around the vehicle thereby reducing boundary layer turbulence and associated radiated noise.

  5. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1996-06-11

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  6. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, D.; Schwall, R.E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil. 15 figs.

  7. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  8. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01

    Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Superconductivity in Cuprate Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozovic, Ivan; Eckstein, J. N.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * YBCO/DBCO superlattices: the commencement * YBCO/PBCO superlattices: conjectures * Bi-2212:2201 superlattices: Q2D superconductivity * YBCO/(Pr,Y,Ca)BCO superlattices: clarification * More Bi-2212 superlattices: afterthoughts * Positive proximity effect in Dy-doped 2212 * Long-range proximity effect in 2201 * HTS in one-unit-cell thick 2212 layer * Inelastic hopping via localized states * Materials and layering * Integrity of ultrathin layers * Thickness dependence of the barrier resistance * Temperature dependence of the barrier resistance * Voltage dependence of current through the barrier * Interpretation: multiple inelastic hopping * Negative proximity effect on 2212 * Interlayer coupling in HTS superlattices: conclusions * The science and technology of HTS superlattices * Vortex dynamics * Critical current scaling law * Thermal activation of vortex motion * Superlattice phonons * Atomic-layer engineering of artificial HTS materials * Technological applications of HTS superlattices * Summary * Intercell coupling in HTS superlattices * Vortex dynamics * Phonon spectra * Atomic-layer engineering of artificial HTS materials * Applications * Acknowledgments * References

  10. Negative refraction and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amariti, Antonio; Forcella, Davide; Mariotti, Alberto; Siani, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    We discuss exotic properties of charged hydrodynamical systems, in the broken superconducting phase, probed by electromagnetic waves. Motivated by general arguments from hydrodynamics, we observe that negative refraction, namely the propagation in opposite directions of the phase velocities and of the energy flux, is expected for low enough frequencies. We corroborate this general idea by analyzing a holographic superconductor in the AdS/CFT correspondence, where the response functions can be explicitly computed. We study the dual gravitational theory both in the probe and in the backreacted case. We find that, while in the first case the refractive index is positive at every frequency, in the second case there is negative refraction at low enough frequencies. This is in agreement with hydrodynamic considerations.

  11. Superconducting energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Giese, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

  12. Anyon Superconductivity of Sb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksoed, Wh-; Parengkuan, August

    2016-10-01

    In any permutatives to Pedro P. Kuczhynski from Peru, for anyon superconductivity sought EZ Kuchinskii et al.: ``Anion height dependence of Tc & d.o.s of Fe-based Superconductors'', 2010 as well as ``on the basis of electron microscopy & AFM measurements, these phenomena are quantified with focus on fractal dimension, particle perimeter & size of the side branch(tip width) in bert Stegemann et al.:Crystallization of Sb nanoparticles-Pattern Formation & Fractal Growth'', J.PhysChem B., 2004. For dendritic & dendrimer fractal characters shown further: ``antimony denrites were found to be composed of well-crystallized nanoflakes with size 20-4 nm''- Bou Zhau, et al., MaterialLetters, 59 (2005). The alkyl triisopropyl attached in TIPSb those includes in DNA, haemoglobin membrane/fixed-bed reactor for instance quotes in Dragony Fu, Nature Review Cancer, 12 (Feb 2012). Heartfelt Gratitudes to HE. Mr. Prof. Ir. Handojo.

  13. Superconducting combined function magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.; Fernow, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    Superconducting accelerators and storage rings, presently under construction or in the design phase, are based on separate dipole and quadrupole magnets. It is here suggested that a hybrid lattice configuration consisting of dipoles and combined function gradient magnets would: (1) reduce the number of magnet units and their total cost; and (2) increase the filling factor and thus the energy at a given field. Coil cross sections are presented for the example of the Brookhaven Colliding Beam Accelerator. An asymmetric two-layer cable gradient magnet would have transfer functions of 10.42 G/A and 0.628 G cm/sup -1//A versus 15.77 G/A and 2.03 G cm/sup -1//A of the present separate dipoles and quadrupoles.

  14. High-coercivity samarium-iron-nitrogen from nitriding melt-spun ribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkerton, F.E.; Fuerst, C.D. )

    1993-04-01

    Melt spinning has proven to be an excellent technique for magnetic hardening of a variety of permanent magnet materials, especially Nd-Fe-B. Recently, a new permanent magnet material has been discovered by nitriding the compound Sm[sub 2]Fe[sub 17] to obtain Sm[sub 2]Fe[sub 17]N[sub x]. The authors have obtained magnetically hard Sm-Fe-N ribbons with a room-temperature intrinsic coercivity H[sub ci] = 22 kOe (1.8 MA/m) by nitriding melt-spun Sm-Fe precursor ribbons. Best results were obtained by grinding the ribbons to a <25 [mu]m powder, then heat treating the powder in vacuum for 1 h at 700 C prior to nitriding in N[sub 2] gas at 450 to 480 C. X-ray diffraction shows that the primary phase is TbCu[sub 7]-type Sm[sub 2]Fe[sub 17]N[sub x], a disordered hexagonal modification of the rhombohedral Sm[sub 2]Fe[sub 17] phase.

  15. Formation of titanium aluminum nitride layers on AISI D2 steel by nitro-titanizing treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegil, Ozkan; Sen, Saduman

    2012-09-01

    In this study, titanium aluminum nitride coating was realized on AISI D2 steels by nitro-titanizing treatment. Steel samples were nitrided at 575 °C for 8 h in the first step of the coating process, and then titanized by thermo-reactive diffusion method in the powder mixture consisting of ferro-titanium, aluminum, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1000 °C for 2 h. The effects of the aluminum content to the coating bath were investigated. The thickness of the titanium aluminum nitride layer formed on the steel samples ranged from 6.30±0.5 to 7.89±0.34μm, depending on the aluminum content. The average micro-hardness value of the layer was 1468 ± 96 HV0.005 and 2630± 83 HV0.005. The phases formed on the coating layers are TiN, AlTi3N and Ti3Al2N2 which are characterized by XRD. EDS analysis results showed that coating layer includes titanium, aluminum and nitrogen.

  16. Functionally gradient hard carbon composites for improved adhesion and wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Roger Jagdish

    A new approach is proposed for fabricating biomedical devices that last longer and are more biocompatible than those presently available. In this approach, a bulk material is chosen that has desirable mechanical properties (low modulus, high strength, high ductility and high fatigue strength). This material is coated with corrosion-resistant, wear-resistant, hard, and biocompatible hard carbon films. One of the many forms of carbon, tetrahedral amorphous carbon, consists mainly of sp3-bonded atoms. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon possesses properties close to diamond in terms of hardness, atomic smoothness, and inertness. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon and diamond films usually contain large amounts of compressive and sometimes tensile stresses; adhesive failure from these stresses has limited widespread use of these materials. This research involves processing, characterization and modeling of functionally gradient tetrahedral amorphous carbon and diamond composite films on metals (cobalt-chromium and titanium alloys) and polymers (polymethylmethacrylate and polyethylene) used in biomedical applications. Multilayer discontinuous thin films of titanium carbide, titanium nitride, aluminum nitride, and tungsten carbide have been developed to control stresses and graphitization in diamond films. A morphology of randomly interconnected micron sized diamond crystallites provides increased toughness and stress reduction. Internal stresses in tetrahedral amorphous carbon were reduced via incorporation of carbide forming elements (silicon and titanium) and noncarbide forming elements (copper, platinum, and silver). These materials were produced using a novel target design during pulsed laser deposition. These alloying atoms reduce hardness and sp3-bonded carbon content, but increase adhesion and wear resistance. Silver and platinum provide the films with antimicrobial properties, and silicon provides bioactivity and aids bone formation. Bilayer coatings were created that couple

  17. Nitride Fuel Development at the INL

    SciTech Connect

    W.E. Windes

    2007-06-01

    A new method for fabricating nitride-based fuels for nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A primary objective of this research is the development of a process that could be operated as an automated or semi-automated technique reducing costs, worker doses, and eventually improving the final product form. To achieve these goals the fabrication process utilizes a new cryo-forming technique to produce microspheres formed from sub-micron oxide powder to improve material handling issues, yield rapid kinetics for conversion to nitrides, and reduced material impurity levels within the nitride compounds. The microspheres are converted to a nitride form within a high temperature particle fluidizing bed using a carbothermic process that utilizes a hydrocarbon – hydrogen - nitrogen gas mixture. A new monitor and control system using differential pressure changes in the fluidizing gas allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor during conversion. This monitor and control system can provide real-time data that is used to control the gas flow rates, temperatures, and gas composition to optimize the fluidization of the particle bed. The small size (0.5 µm) of the oxide powders in the microspheres dramatically increases the kinetics of the conversion process yielding reduced process times and temperatures. Initial studies using surrogate ZrO2 powder have yielded conversion efficiencies of 90 -95 % nitride formation with only small levels of oxide and carbide contaminants present. Further studies are being conducted to determine optimal gas mixture ratios, process time, and temperature range for providing complete conversion to a nitride form.

  18. Unemployment: Hard-Core or Hard-Shell?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauer, Robert H.

    1972-01-01

    The term hard-core'' makes the unemployed culpable; the term hard shell'' shifts the burden to the employer, and the evidence from the suburban plant indicates that a substantial part of the problem must lie there. (DM)

  19. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube

    PubMed Central

    Qin, F.; Shi, W.; Ideue, T.; Yoshida, M.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.; Kikitsu, T.; Inoue, D.; Hashizume, D.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity—unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures. PMID:28205518

  20. Search for Superconductivity in Micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guénon, S.; Ramírez, J. G.; Basaran, Ali C.; Wampler, J.; Thiemens, M.; Taylor, S.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a very sensitive, highly selective, non-destructive technique for screening inhomogeneous materials for the presence of superconductivity. This technique, based on phase sensitive detection of microwave absorption is capable of detecting 10-12 cc of a superconductor embedded in a non-superconducting, non-magnetic matrix. For the first time, we apply this technique to the search for superconductivity in extraterrestrial samples. We tested approximately 65 micrometeorites collected from the water well at the Amundsen-Scott South pole station and compared their spectra with those of eight reference materials. None of these micrometeorites contained superconducting compounds, but we saw the Verwey transition of magnetite in our microwave system. This demonstrates that we are able to detect electro-magnetic phase transitions in extraterrestrial materials at cryogenic temperatures.

  1. Superconductivity from Emerging Magnetic Moments.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Shintaro; Werner, Philipp

    2015-12-11

    Multiorbital Hubbard models are shown to exhibit a spatially isotropic spin-triplet superconducting phase, where equal-spin electrons in different local orbitals are paired. This superconducting state is stabilized in the spin-freezing crossover regime, where local moments emerge in the metal phase, and the pairing is substantially assisted by spin anisotropy. The phase diagram features a superconducting dome below a non-Fermi-liquid metallic region and next to a magnetically ordered phase. We suggest that this type of fluctuating-moment-induced superconductivity, which is not originating from fluctuations near a quantum critical point, may be realized in spin-triplet superconductors such as strontium ruthenates and uranium compounds.

  2. Cryogenic Systems and Superconductive Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report defines, investigates, and experimentally evaluates the key elements of a representative crogenic turborefrigerator subsystem suitable for providing reliable long-lived cryogenic refrigeration for a superconductive ship propulsion system.

  3. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Mulcahy, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  4. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1998-03-03

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

  5. Superconductivity: A celebration of pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Michael R.

    2007-12-01

    It is fifty years since John Bardeen, Leon Cooper and Bob Schrieffer presented the microscopic theory of superconductivity. At a wonderful conference in Urbana the 'good old days' were remembered, and the challenges ahead surveyed.

  6. Search for Superconductivity in Micrometeorites

    PubMed Central

    Guénon, S.; Ramírez, J. G.; Basaran, Ali C.; Wampler, J.; Thiemens, M.; Taylor, S.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a very sensitive, highly selective, non-destructive technique for screening inhomogeneous materials for the presence of superconductivity. This technique, based on phase sensitive detection of microwave absorption is capable of detecting 10−12 cc of a superconductor embedded in a non-superconducting, non-magnetic matrix. For the first time, we apply this technique to the search for superconductivity in extraterrestrial samples. We tested approximately 65 micrometeorites collected from the water well at the Amundsen-Scott South pole station and compared their spectra with those of eight reference materials. None of these micrometeorites contained superconducting compounds, but we saw the Verwey transition of magnetite in our microwave system. This demonstrates that we are able to detect electro-magnetic phase transitions in extraterrestrial materials at cryogenic temperatures. PMID:25476841

  7. Search for superconductivity in micrometeorites.

    PubMed

    Guénon, S; Ramírez, J G; Basaran, Ali C; Wampler, J; Thiemens, M; Taylor, S; Schuller, Ivan K

    2014-12-05

    We have developed a very sensitive, highly selective, non-destructive technique for screening inhomogeneous materials for the presence of superconductivity. This technique, based on phase sensitive detection of microwave absorption is capable of detecting 10(-12) cc of a superconductor embedded in a non-superconducting, non-magnetic matrix. For the first time, we apply this technique to the search for superconductivity in extraterrestrial samples. We tested approximately 65 micrometeorites collected from the water well at the Amundsen-Scott South pole station and compared their spectra with those of eight reference materials. None of these micrometeorites contained superconducting compounds, but we saw the Verwey transition of magnetite in our microwave system. This demonstrates that we are able to detect electro-magnetic phase transitions in extraterrestrial materials at cryogenic temperatures.

  8. Silicon-nitride and metal composite

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Huffsmith, Sarah A.

    1981-01-01

    A composite and a method for bonding the composite. The composite includes a ceramic portion of silicon nitride, a refractory metal portion and a layer of MoSi.sub.2 indirectly bonding the composite together. The method includes contacting the layer of MoSi.sub.2 with a surface of the silicon nitride and with a surface of the metal; heating the layer to a temperature below 1400.degree. C.; and, simultaneously with the heating, compressing the layer such that the contacting is with a pressure of at least 30 MPa. This composite overcomes useful life problems in the fabrication of parts for a helical expander for use in power generation.

  9. Silicon-nitride and metal composite

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.; Huffsmith, S.A.

    A composite and a method for bonding the composite are described. The composite includes a ceramic portion of silicon nitride, a refractory metal portion and a layer of MoSi/sub 2/ indirectly bonding the composite together. The method includes contacting the layer of MoSi/sub 2/ with a surface of the silicon nitride and with a surface of the metal; heating the layer to a temperature below 1400/sup 0/C; and, simultaneously, compressing the layer such that the contacting is with a pressure of at least 30 MPa. This composite overcomes useful life problems in the fabrication of parts for a helical expander for use in power generation.

  10. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  11. Transition-Metal Oxide Superconductivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-20

    pyramidally coordinated complexes of the 02"- deficient compounds, and (iii) that ordering of the sources that produce the mixed-valence Cu2+ɛ+) ions in...With the strong antiferromagnetic exchange coupling of the Fe2+(3+) pairs in ferrites , no superconducting cells should be anticipated and only normal...I couplings dictate significant antiferromagnetic ordering and little chance of superconductivity. This group includes the common ferrite conduction

  12. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; McConnell, B.W.; Phillips, B.A.

    1996-07-02

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit. 6 figs.

  13. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; McConnell, Benjamin W.; Phillips, Benjamin A.

    1996-01-01

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit.

  14. Y-Ba Superconducting Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shunbao, Tian; Xiaofei, Li; Tinglian, Wen; Zuxiang, Lin; Shichun, Li; Huijun, Yu

    Polycrystalline Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting materials have been studied. It was found that chemical composition and processing condition may play an important role in the final structure and superconducting properties. The density has been determined and compared with the calculated value according to the structure model reported by Bell Labs. The grain size and the morphology of the materials were observed by SEM.

  15. Development of Concepts in Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardeen, John

    This is an excerpt from a talk that John Bardeen gave on the development of the theory of superconductivity in London, England on September 17, 1962 when he received the Fritz London award for his work developing the BCS theory of superconductivity. The talk was given at the Eighth International Conference on Low Temperature Physics at Queen Mary College in London and was reprinted in Physics Today in January of 1963.

  16. Four Terminal Gallium Nitride MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veety, Matthew Thomas

    All reported gallium nitride (GaN) transistors to date have been three-terminal devices with source, drain, and gate electrodes. In the case of GaN MOSFETs, this leaves the bulk of the device at a floating potential which can impact device threshold voltage. In more traditional silicon-based MOSFET fabrication a bulk contact can be made on the back side of the silicon wafer. For GaN grown on sapphire substrates, however, this is not possible and an alternate, front-side bulk contact must be investigated. GaN is a III-V, wide band gap semiconductor that as promising material parameters for use in high frequency and high power applications. Possible applications are in the 1 to 10 GHz frequency band and power inverters for next generation grid solid state transformers and inverters. GaN has seen significant academic and commercial research for use in Heterojunction Field Effect Transistors (HFETs). These devices however are depletion-mode, meaning the device is considered "on" at zero gate bias. A MOSFET structure allows for enhancement mode operation, which is normally off. This mode is preferrable in high power applications as the device has lower off-state power consumption and is easier to implement in circuits. Proper surface passivation of seminconductor surface interface states is an important processing step for any device. Preliminary research on surface treatments using GaN wet etches and depletion-mode GaN devices utilizing this process are discussed. Devices pretreated with potassium pursulfate prior to gate dielectric deposition show significant device improvements. This process can be applied to any current GaN FET. Enhancement-mode GaN MOSFETs were fabricated on magnesium doped p-type Wurtzite gallium nitride grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on c-plane sapphire substrates. Devices utilized ion implant source and drain which was activated under NH3 overpressure in MOCVD. Also, devices were fabricated with a SiO2 gate dielectric

  17. Process for producing clad superconductive materials

    DOEpatents

    Cass, Richard B.; Ott, Kevin C.; Peterson, Dean E.

    1992-01-01

    A process for fabricating superconducting composite wire by the steps of placing a superconductive precursor admixture capable of undergoing a self propagating combustion in stoichiometric amounts sufficient to form a superconductive product within a metal tube, sealing one end of said tube, igniting said superconductive precursor admixture whereby said superconductive precursor admixture endburns along the length of the admixture, and cross-section reducing said tube at a rate substantially equal to the rate of burning of said superconductive precursor admixture and at a point substantially planar with the burnfront of the superconductive precursor mixture, whereby a clad superconductive product is formed in situ, the product characterized as superconductive without a subsequent sintering stage, is disclosed.

  18. Boron nitride nanotubes for spintronics.

    PubMed

    Dhungana, Kamal B; Pati, Ranjit

    2014-09-22

    With the end of Moore's law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  19. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    PubMed Central

    Dhungana, Kamal B.; Pati, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    With the end of Moore's law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics. PMID:25248070

  20. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Mansor, Noramalina; Jorge, A Belen; Corà, Furio; Gibbs, Christopher; Jervis, Rhodri; McMillan, Paul F; Wang, Xiaochen; Brett, Daniel J L

    2014-04-03

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li(+)Cl(-)), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li(+)Cl(-) catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA.

  1. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li+Cl–), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li+Cl– catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA. PMID:24748912

  2. Feasibility study of silicon nitride protection of plastic encapsulated semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, J. W.; Hall, T. C.; Erickson, J. J.; Gebhart, F. L.

    1979-01-01

    The application of low temperature silicon nitride protective layers on wire bonded integrated circuits mounted on lead frame assemblies is reported. An evaluation of the mechanical and electrical compatibility of both plasma nitride and photochemical silicon nitride (photonitride) passivations (parallel evaluations) of integrated circuits which were then encapsulated in plastic is described. Photonitride passivation is compatible with all wire bonded lead frame assemblies, with or without initial chip passivation. Plasma nitride passivation of lead frame assemblies is possible only if the chip is passivated before lead frame assembly. The survival rate after the environmental test sequence of devices with a coating of plasma nitride on the chip and a coating of either plasma nitride or photonitride over the assembled device is significantly greater than that of devices assembled with no nitride protective coating over either chip or lead frame.

  3. Optimization of processing temperature in the nitridation process for the synthesis of iron nitride nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rohith Vinod, K.; Sakar, M.; Balakumar, S.; Saravanan, P.

    2015-06-24

    We have demonstrated an effective strategy on the nitridation process to synthesize ε-Fe{sub 3}N nanoparticles (NPs) from the zero valent iron NPs as a starting material. The transformation of iron into iron nitride phase was systematically studied by performing the nitridation process at different processing temperatures. The phase, crystal structure was analyzed by XRD. Morphology and size of the ZVINPs and ε-Fe{sub 3}N NPs were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope. Further, their room temperature magnetic properties were studied by using vibrating sample magnetometer and it revealed that the magnetic property of ε-Fe{sub 3}N is associated with ratio of Fe-N in the iron nitride system.

  4. Optimization of processing temperature in the nitridation process for the synthesis of iron nitride nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohith Vinod, K.; Saravanan, P.; Sakar, M.; Balakumar, S.

    2015-06-01

    We have demonstrated an effective strategy on the nitridation process to synthesize ɛ-Fe3N nanoparticles (NPs) from the zero valent iron NPs as a starting material. The transformation of iron into iron nitride phase was systematically studied by performing the nitridation process at different processing temperatures. The phase, crystal structure was analyzed by XRD. Morphology and size of the ZVINPs and ɛ-Fe3N NPs were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope. Further, their room temperature magnetic properties were studied by using vibrating sample magnetometer and it revealed that the magnetic property of ɛ-Fe3N is associated with ratio of Fe-N in the iron nitride system.

  5. Growth of gallium nitride and indium nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-03-07

    We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices.

  6. Mechanical properties of polycrystalline translucent cubic boron nitride as characterized by the Vickers indentation method

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Takashi; Akaishi, Minoru; Yamaoka, Shinobu

    1996-02-01

    Mechanical properties of polycrystalline translucent cubic boron nitride (cBN) were characterized by Vickers indentation measurement. The calculated hardness decreased from 54 to 49 GPa as the load increased to 39 N, and then remained constant for values above this load. According to the relationship between crack length and applied indentation load, the formation of the median/radial type of cracks seems to take place at an applied load above 29 N. Assuming that the ratio of hardness and Young`s modulus is constant in the polycrystalline cBN, the fracture toughness, K{sub IC}, of cBN was estimated to be 5.0 {+-} 0.5 MPa {center_dot} m{sup 1/2}.

  7. Deposition and properties of novel nitride superlattice coatings. Final report, May 1990--January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, S.A.; Sproul, W.D.; Wong, M.S.

    1996-03-01

    The authors have fulfilled the primary objectives of this research program which were to establish the feasibility of depositing polycrystalline nitride superlattices with high hardnesses on steel substrates, to understand the relationship between deposition process parameters, film microstructure, and resulting film properties, and to investigate the theories of superlattice strengthening/hardening. An opposed-cathode unbalanced magnetron sputtering system was modified for the deposition of the superlattices. Thin films of several microns thick, composed of many alternating thin layers of two (or more) different materials with periods between 3 and 150 nm, were deposited at low temperature onto various engineering substrate mate5rials such as steel. They have developed several superlattices with superior properties unattainable from either single-layer or thicker multilayer coatings. The nitride superlattices that they have explored so far include TiN/NbN, TiN/VN, NbN/VN, TiN/CrN, AlN/TiN, TiN/Ni, and TiN/NiCr. The effects of deposition parameters on film structure and properties were systematically studied, and optimized parameters for both monolithic films and superlattices were developed. The results of this research show that polycrystalline nitride superlattices have great promise for replacing commonly used nitride-based wear protective coatings. The existence of metastable crystalline phases has been observed in some of the superlattices explored, which they have named nanolayer-stabilized materials. The theoretical knowledge and experimental methods developed in this work have already been used to design and produce superlattice coatings for industrial work. A parallel industrial group program has been established to transfer the superlattice coating technology to industry. The detailed results achieved in this project have been discussed in over a dozen publications. The most important results from the work are summarized.

  8. Electrical conduction mechanism in silicon nitride and oxy-nitride-sputtered thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, M.; Román, E.; Prieto, C.

    2005-06-01

    We have studied the effect of reactive and nonreactive sputtering preparations on the composition and properties of silicon nitride thin films. Films were prepared from both silicon nitride ceramic and pure silicon targets under different Ar /N2 gas mixtures. For the different resulting samples, we have performed optical, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and transport measurements. The preparation conditions change the sample atomic composition and the effect of oxygen in the films, which in turn determines the dominant conduction mechanism. It becomes important to determine both the nonstoichiometry of the film and the phase where the oxygen is incorporated. Oxygen may appear as silicon oxide, forming a secondary phase inside silicon nitride; or it may consist of silicon oxy-nitride phases. The presence of these different phases, as revealed by XPS, determines the electrical properties and conduction mechanisms. Samples presenting space-charge-limited current as the dominant conduction mechanism correspond to those where a silicon oxy-nitride phase is formed (that becomes Ohmic for overstoichiometric Si content samples), while a Poole-Frenkel conduction behavior is characteristic of the silicon nitride phase.

  9. Intrinsic ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Si, M. S.; Gao, Daqiang E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn; Yang, Dezheng; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Z. Y.; Xue, Desheng E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn; Liu, Yushen; Deng, Xiaohui; Zhang, G. P.

    2014-05-28

    Understanding the mechanism of ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which possess only s and p electrons in comparison with normal ferromagnets based on localized d or f electrons, is a current challenge. In this work, we report an experimental finding that the ferromagnetic coupling is an intrinsic property of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which has never been reported before. Moreover, we further confirm it from ab initio calculations. We show that the measured ferromagnetism should be attributed to the localized π states at edges, where the electron-electron interaction plays the role in this ferromagnetic ordering. More importantly, we demonstrate such edge-induced ferromagnetism causes a high Curie temperature well above room temperature. Our systematical work, including experimental measurements and theoretical confirmation, proves that such unusual room temperature ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets is edge-dependent, similar to widely reported graphene-based materials. It is believed that this work will open new perspectives for hexagonal boron nitride spintronic devices.

  10. Intrinsic ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Si, M S; Gao, Daqiang; Yang, Dezheng; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Z Y; Xue, Desheng; Liu, Yushen; Deng, Xiaohui; Zhang, G P

    2014-05-28

    Understanding the mechanism of ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which possess only s and p electrons in comparison with normal ferromagnets based on localized d or f electrons, is a current challenge. In this work, we report an experimental finding that the ferromagnetic coupling is an intrinsic property of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which has never been reported before. Moreover, we further confirm it from ab initio calculations. We show that the measured ferromagnetism should be attributed to the localized π states at edges, where the electron-electron interaction plays the role in this ferromagnetic ordering. More importantly, we demonstrate such edge-induced ferromagnetism causes a high Curie temperature well above room temperature. Our systematical work, including experimental measurements and theoretical confirmation, proves that such unusual room temperature ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets is edge-dependent, similar to widely reported graphene-based materials. It is believed that this work will open new perspectives for hexagonal boron nitride spintronic devices.

  11. Intrinsic ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, M. S.; Gao, Daqiang; Yang, Dezheng; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Z. Y.; Xue, Desheng; Liu, Yushen; Deng, Xiaohui; Zhang, G. P.

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the mechanism of ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which possess only s and p electrons in comparison with normal ferromagnets based on localized d or f electrons, is a current challenge. In this work, we report an experimental finding that the ferromagnetic coupling is an intrinsic property of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which has never been reported before. Moreover, we further confirm it from ab initio calculations. We show that the measured ferromagnetism should be attributed to the localized π states at edges, where the electron-electron interaction plays the role in this ferromagnetic ordering. More importantly, we demonstrate such edge-induced ferromagnetism causes a high Curie temperature well above room temperature. Our systematical work, including experimental measurements and theoretical confirmation, proves that such unusual room temperature ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets is edge-dependent, similar to widely reported graphene-based materials. It is believed that this work will open new perspectives for hexagonal boron nitride spintronic devices.

  12. Slip casting and nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiko, Y.

    1985-03-01

    Powdered Silicon was slip-cast with a CaSO4 x 0.5H2O mold and nitrided in a N atm. containing 0 or 5 vol. % H at 1000 to 1420 deg. To remove the castings, the modeling faces were coated successively with an aq. salt soap and powdered cellulose containing Na alginate, and thus prevented the sticking problem.

  13. REACTIVE SPUTTER DEPOSITION OF CHROMIUM NITRIDE COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of substrate temperature and sputtering gas compositon on the structure and properties of chromium-chromium nitride films deposited on C-1040 steel using r.f. magnetron sputter deposition was investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the structure ...

  14. Chemical Profiling of Silicon Nitride Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    Zip Can*) 7b ADORESSC, State. anid 71PCoaej 4.800 Oak Grove Drive ?asadena CA 91103 Hanscom AFB MA 01721-S-COC 3a NAM );: ION SPCNSOR!NG 130 OFItSYMBOL...I Chapter 2: Studies of Metal -Nitride-Oxide-Semiconductor (MNOS) Structures ................................ 12 Chapter 3...3 88 II. SO Formed by Ion Implantation .......................................................... 8 89 Ill. SO

  15. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  16. Solar cell with a gallium nitride electrode

    DOEpatents

    Pankove, Jacques I.

    1979-01-01

    A solar cell which comprises a body of silicon having a P-N junction therein with a transparent conducting N-type gallium nitride layer as an ohmic contact on the N-type side of the semiconductor exposed to solar radiation.

  17. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  18. Improved "Green" Forming Of Silicon Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Marc R.; Sanders, William A.; Kiser, James D.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced processing techniques reduce incidence of critical flaws. Critical flaws reduced by processing of powders to avoid organic and metallic contamination and combination of colloidal techniques with innovative slurry-pressing technique avoiding agglomeration. Silicon nitride considered for many applications ranging from components of turbine engines to industrial heat exchangers.

  19. Titanium nitride electrodes for thermoelectric generators

    DOEpatents

    Novak, Robert F.; Schmatz, Duane J.; Hunt, Thomas K.

    1987-12-22

    The invention is directed to a composite article suitable for use in thermoelectric generators. The article comprises a thin film of titanium nitride as an electrode deposited onto solid electrolyte. The invention is also directed to the method of making same.

  20. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.

    1998-12-08

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal. 24 figs.