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Sample records for hard tooth tissue

  1. Microprocessing of human hard tooth tissues surface by mid-infrared erbium lasers radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Shatilova, Ksenia V.; Skrypnik, Alexei V.

    2015-03-01

    A new method of hard tooth tissues laser treatment is described. The method consists in formation of regular microdefects on tissue surface by mid-infrared erbium laser radiation with propagation ratio M2<2 (Er-laser microprocessing). Proposed method was used for preparation of hard tooth tissues surface before filling for improvement of bond strength between tissues surface and restorative materials, microleakage reduction between tissues surface and restorative materials, and for caries prevention as a result of increasing microhardness and acid resistance of tooth enamel.

  2. Nuclear-chemical methods in a hard tooth tissue abrasion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosman, A.; Spěváček, V.; Koníček, J.; Vopálka, D.; Houŝová, D.; Doležalová, L.

    1999-01-01

    The advanced method consists in implantation—labelling of the thin surface layers of the solid objects, e.g. hard tooth tissue, by atoms of suitable natural or artificial radionuclides. Nuclides from the uranium series were implanted into the surface by using nuclear recoil effect at alpha decay of 226Ra to 222Rn, alpha decay of 222Rn to RaA, alpha decay of RaA to RaB (beta-emitter) and further alpha or beta emitters. With regard to chosen alpha detection and to the half—lives of the radionuclides, there was actually measured the activity of 222Rn, RaA and RaC’ in the thin surface layer. This was followed by the laboratory simulation of the abrasion in the system of “toothbrush—various suspensions of the tooth-pastes—hard tooth tissue (or material standard—ivory)” in specially designed device—the dentoabrasionmeter. The activities of the tissue surface measured before and after abrasion were used for calculations of the relative drop of the surface activity. On this basis the influence of various tooth-pastes containing various abrasive substances was determined.

  3. Piezocision™: Accelerating Orthodontic Tooth Movement While Correcting Hard and Soft Tissue Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Dibart, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Piezocision™-assisted orthodontics is an innovative, minimally invasive surgical procedure designed to help achieve rapid orthodontic tooth movement while correcting/preventing mucogingival defects by adding bone and/or soft tissues. Microsurgical interproximal openings are done in the buccal gingiva to let the piezoelectric knife create the bone injury that will lead to transient demineralization and subsequent accelerated tooth movement. This technique can be used for the whole mouth, the cuts being simultaneously performed at the maxilla and the mandible (generalized Piezocision) or for segments of the dentition (localized Piezocision) to achieve specific localized results (intrusion, extrusion, distalization of teeth, etc.).

  4. The study of laser induced fluorescence of tooth hard tissues with aluminum phthalocyanine nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrakhova, D. S.; Kuznetsova, J. O.; Loschenov, V. B.

    2016-08-01

    This work is about the possibility of fluorescence diagnosis application with the use of aluminum phthalocyanine nanoparticles (nAlPc) in order to detect enamel microdamage. For the investigation, five human teeth samples of various age groups were removed for various reasons. The autofluorescence spectrums of these samples hard tissues and fluorescence spectrums of nAlPc mixed with enamel powder were obtained during the experiment. The research shows that sample pathogenic microflora causes nAlPc fluorescence. This fact will allow detecting enamel microdamage in future studies.

  5. Character of the hard tooth tissue-polymer bond. II. Study of the interaction of human tooth enamel and dentin with N-phenylglycine-glycidyl methacrylate adduct.

    PubMed

    Alexieva, C

    1979-09-01

    The interaction of powdered human tooth enamel and dentin with NPG-GMA was studied in alcoholic and alcoholic-aqueous solutions. The reaction produces ionized carboxylic groups capable of forming ionic bonds between the calcium ions in the tooth enamel or dentin and NPG-GMA.

  6. Functional tooth regenerative therapy: tooth tissue regeneration and whole-tooth replacement.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Tsuji, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Oral and general health is compromised by irreversible dental problems, including dental caries, periodontal disease and tooth injury. Regenerative therapy for tooth tissue repair and whole-tooth replacement is currently considered a novel therapeutic concept with the potential for the full recovery of tooth function. Several types of stem cells and cell-activating cytokines have been identified in oral tissues. These cells are thought to be candidate cell sources for tooth tissue regenerative therapies because they have the ability to differentiate into tooth tissues in vitro and in vivo. Whole-tooth replacement therapy is regarded as an important model for the development of an organ regenerative concept. A novel three-dimensional cell-manipulation method, designated the organ germ method, has been developed to recapitulate organogenesis. This method involves compartmentalisation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells at a high cell density to mimic multicellular assembly conditions and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. A bioengineered tooth germ can generate a structurally correct tooth in vitro and erupt successfully with the correct tooth structure when transplanted into the oral cavity. We have ectopically generated a bioengineered tooth unit composed of a mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, and that tooth unit was successfully engrafted into an adult jawbone through bone integration. Such bioengineered teeth were able to perform normal physiological tooth functions, such as developing a masticatory potential in response to mechanical stress and a perceptive potential for noxious stimuli. In this review, we describe recent findings and technologies underpinning tooth regenerative therapy.

  7. Histochemical and immunocytochemical study of hard tissue formation in dental pulp during the healing process in rat molars after tooth replantation.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto-Tanaka, Hiroko; Ikegame, Mika; Takagi, Ritsuo; Harada, Hidemitsu; Ohshima, Hayato

    2006-08-01

    Dental pulp is assumed to possess the capacity to elaborate both bone and dentin matrix under the pathological conditions following tooth injury. This study was undertaken to clarify the mechanism inducing bone formation in the dental pulp by investigating the pulpal healing process, after tooth replantation, by micro-computed tomography (mu-CT), immunocytochemistry for heat-shock protein (HSP)-25 and cathepsin K (CK), and histochemistry for both alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). Under deep anesthesia, the upper right first molar of 4-week-old Wistar rats was extracted and immediately repositioned in the original socket. In control teeth at this age, the periphery of the coronal dental pulp showed intense ALP-positive and HSP-25-positive reactions, whereas there were no TRAP-positive or CK-positive cells. Tooth replantation weakened or terminated ALP-positive and HSP-25-positive reactions in the pulp tissue at the initial stages. At 3-7 days after operation, the ALP-positive region recovered from the root apex to the coronal pulp followed by HSP-25-positive reactions in successful cases showing tertiary dentin formation. In other cases, TRAP-positive and CK-positive cells appeared in the pulp tissue of the replanted tooth at postoperative days 5-10 and remained associated with the bone tissue after 12-60 days. Immunoelectron microscopy clearly demonstrated that CK-positive osteoclast-lineage cells made contact with mesenchymal cells with prominent nucleoli and well-developed cell organelles. These data suggest that the appearance of TRAP-positive and CK-positive cells is involved in the induction of bone tissue formation in dental pulp. PMID:16596394

  8. Character of the hard tooth tissue-polymer bond. I. Study of the interaction of calcium phosphate with N-phenylglycine and with N-phenylglycine-glycidyl methacrylate adduct.

    PubMed

    Alexieva, C

    1979-09-01

    A model investigation was carried out to establish the chemical character of the bond between hard tooth tissues and polymeric materials. The interaction of NPG and NPG-GMA with Ca3(PO4)2 and 45Ca3(PO4)2 was studied in aqueous, alcoholic and aqueous-alcoholic solutions. It was shown that NPG and NPG-GMA react in solution with Ca ions which are in equilibrium with calcium phosphate. The reaction proceeds more intensively in aqueous-alcoholic medium due to its ionic character. The IR spectra of the reaction products show the presence of NPG-GMA calcium salt.

  9. Young's modulus and hardness of shark tooth biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Whitenack, Lisa B; Simkins, Daniel C; Motta, Philip J; Hirai, Makoto; Kumar, Ashok

    2010-03-01

    To date, the majority of studies on feeding mechanics in sharks have focused on the movement of cranial components and muscle function, with little attention to tooth properties or function. Attributes related to mechanical properties, such as structural strength, may also be subjected to natural selection. Additionally it is necessary to characterize these properties in order to construct biomechanical models of tooth function. The goal of this study was to determine hardness and elastic modulus for the shark tooth materials enameloid, osteodentine, and orthodentine. Five teeth each from one carcharhiniform species, the bonnethead Sphyrna tiburo, and one lamniform, the sand tiger shark Carcharias taurus, were utilized for nanoindentation testing. Each tooth was sectioned transversely, air-dried, and polished. Both enameloid and dentine were tested on each tooth via a Berkovich diamond tip, with nine 2 microm deep indentations per material. t-Tests were used to determine if there were differences in hardness and Young's modulus between the tooth materials of the two species. There was no significant difference between the two species for the material properties of enameloid, however both hardness and Young's modulus were higher for osteodentine than for orthodentine. This may be due to differences in microanatomy and chemical composition, however this needs to be studied in greater detail.

  10. Tissue Interactions Regulating Tooth Development and Renewal.

    PubMed

    Balic, Anamaria; Thesleff, Irma

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocal interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal tissues play a fundamental role in the morphogenesis of teeth and regulate all aspects of tooth development. Extensive studies on mouse tooth development over the past 25 years have uncovered the molecular details of the signaling networks mediating these interactions (reviewed by Jussila & Thesleff, 2012; Lan, Jia, & Jiang, 2014). Five conserved signaling pathways, namely, the Wnt, BMP, FGF, Shh, and Eda, are involved in the mediation of the successive reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal cross talk which follows the general principle of morphogenetic interactions (Davidson, 1993). The pathways regulate the expression of transcription factors which confer the identity of dental epithelium and mesenchyme. The signals and transcription factors are integrated in complex signaling networks whose fine-tuning allows the generation of the variation in tooth morphologies. In this review, we describe the principles and molecular mechanisms of the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions regulating successive stages of tooth formation: (i) the initiation of tooth development, with special reference to the shift of tooth-forming potential from epithelium to mesenchyme; (ii) the morphogenesis of the tooth crown, focusing on the roles of epithelial signaling centers; (iii) the differentiation of odontoblasts and ameloblasts, which produce dentin and enamel, respectively; and (iv) the maintenance of dental stem cells, which support the continuous growth of teeth. PMID:26589925

  11. Tissue Interactions Regulating Tooth Development and Renewal.

    PubMed

    Balic, Anamaria; Thesleff, Irma

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocal interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal tissues play a fundamental role in the morphogenesis of teeth and regulate all aspects of tooth development. Extensive studies on mouse tooth development over the past 25 years have uncovered the molecular details of the signaling networks mediating these interactions (reviewed by Jussila & Thesleff, 2012; Lan, Jia, & Jiang, 2014). Five conserved signaling pathways, namely, the Wnt, BMP, FGF, Shh, and Eda, are involved in the mediation of the successive reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal cross talk which follows the general principle of morphogenetic interactions (Davidson, 1993). The pathways regulate the expression of transcription factors which confer the identity of dental epithelium and mesenchyme. The signals and transcription factors are integrated in complex signaling networks whose fine-tuning allows the generation of the variation in tooth morphologies. In this review, we describe the principles and molecular mechanisms of the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions regulating successive stages of tooth formation: (i) the initiation of tooth development, with special reference to the shift of tooth-forming potential from epithelium to mesenchyme; (ii) the morphogenesis of the tooth crown, focusing on the roles of epithelial signaling centers; (iii) the differentiation of odontoblasts and ameloblasts, which produce dentin and enamel, respectively; and (iv) the maintenance of dental stem cells, which support the continuous growth of teeth.

  12. CO2 laser milling of hard tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Martin; Ivanenko, Mikhail; Harbecke, Daniela; Klasing, Manfred; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Hering, Peter

    2007-02-01

    Drilling of bone and tooth tissue belongs to recurrent medical procedures (screw- and pin-bores, bores for implant inserting, trepanation etc.). Small round bores can be in general quickly produced with mechanical drills. Problems arise however by angled drilling, by the necessity to fulfill the drilling without damaging of sensitive soft tissue beneath the bone, or by the attempt to mill precisely noncircular small cavities. We present investigations on laser hard tissue "milling", which can be advantageous for solving these problems. The "milling" is done with a CO2 laser (10.6 μm) with pulse duration of 50 - 100 μs, combined with a PC-controlled galvanic beam scanner and with a fine water-spray, which helps to avoid thermal side-effects. The damaging of underlying soft tissue can be prevented through control of the optical or acoustical ablation signal. The ablation of hard tissue is accompanied with a strong glowing, which is absent during the laser beam action on soft tissue. The acoustic signals from the diverse tissue types exhibit distinct differences in the spectral composition. Also computer image analysis could be a useful tool to control the operation. Laser "milling" of noncircular cavities with 1 - 4 mm width and about 10 mm depth is particularly interesting for dental implantology. In ex-vivo investigations we found conditions for fast laser "milling" of the cavities without thermal damage and with minimal tapering. It included exploration of different filling patterns (concentric rings, crosshatch, parallel lines and their combinations), definition of maximal pulse duration, repetition rate and laser power, optimal position of the spray. The optimized results give evidences for the applicability of the CO2 laser for biologically tolerable "milling" of deep cavities in the hard tissue.

  13. FATIGUE OF BIOMATERIALS: HARD TISSUES.

    PubMed

    Arola, D; Bajaj, D; Ivancik, J; Majd, H; Zhang, D

    2010-09-01

    The fatigue and fracture behavior of hard tissues are topics of considerable interest today. This special group of organic materials comprises the highly mineralized and load-bearing tissues of the human body, and includes bone, cementum, dentin and enamel. An understanding of their fatigue behavior and the influence of loading conditions and physiological factors (e.g. aging and disease) on the mechanisms of degradation are essential for achieving lifelong health. But there is much more to this topic than the immediate medical issues. There are many challenges to characterizing the fatigue behavior of hard tissues, much of which is attributed to size constraints and the complexity of their microstructure. The relative importance of the constituents on the type and distribution of defects, rate of coalescence, and their contributions to the initiation and growth of cracks, are formidable topics that have not reached maturity. Hard tissues also provide a medium for learning and a source of inspiration in the design of new microstructures for engineering materials. This article briefly reviews fatigue of hard tissues with shared emphasis on current understanding, the challenges and the unanswered questions.

  14. FATIGUE OF BIOMATERIALS: HARD TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Arola, D.; Bajaj, D.; Ivancik, J.; Majd, H.; Zhang, D.

    2009-01-01

    The fatigue and fracture behavior of hard tissues are topics of considerable interest today. This special group of organic materials comprises the highly mineralized and load-bearing tissues of the human body, and includes bone, cementum, dentin and enamel. An understanding of their fatigue behavior and the influence of loading conditions and physiological factors (e.g. aging and disease) on the mechanisms of degradation are essential for achieving lifelong health. But there is much more to this topic than the immediate medical issues. There are many challenges to characterizing the fatigue behavior of hard tissues, much of which is attributed to size constraints and the complexity of their microstructure. The relative importance of the constituents on the type and distribution of defects, rate of coalescence, and their contributions to the initiation and growth of cracks, are formidable topics that have not reached maturity. Hard tissues also provide a medium for learning and a source of inspiration in the design of new microstructures for engineering materials. This article briefly reviews fatigue of hard tissues with shared emphasis on current understanding, the challenges and the unanswered questions. PMID:20563239

  15. Biomaterials in tooth tissue engineering: a review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sarang; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Grover, Shibani; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials play a crucial role in the field of tissue engineering. They are utilized for fabricating frameworks known as scaffolds, matrices or constructs which are interconnected porous structures that establish a cellular microenvironment required for optimal tissue regeneration. Several natural and synthetic biomaterials have been utilized for fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds. Amongst different biomaterials, polymers are the most extensively experimented and employed materials. They can be tailored to provide good interconnected porosity, large surface area, adequate mechanical strengths, varying surface characterization and different geometries required for tissue regeneration. A single type of material may however not meet all the requirements. Selection of two or more biomaterials, optimization of their physical, chemical and mechanical properties and advanced fabrication techniques are required to obtain scaffold designs intended for their final application. Current focus is aimed at designing biomaterials such that they will replicate the local extra cellular environment of the native organ and enable cell-cell and cell-scaffold interactions at micro level required for functional tissue regeneration. This article provides an insight into the different biomaterials available and the emerging use of nano engineering principles for the construction of bioactive scaffolds in tooth regeneration.

  16. Biomaterials in Tooth Tissue Engineering: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sarang; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Grover, Shibani; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials play a crucial role in the field of tissue engineering. They are utilized for fabricating frameworks known as scaffolds, matrices or constructs which are interconnected porous structures that establish a cellular microenvironment required for optimal tissue regeneration. Several natural and synthetic biomaterials have been utilized for fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds. Amongst different biomaterials, polymers are the most extensively experimented and employed materials. They can be tailored to provide good interconnected porosity, large surface area, adequate mechanical strengths, varying surface characterization and different geometries required for tissue regeneration. A single type of material may however not meet all the requirements. Selection of two or more biomaterials, optimization of their physical, chemical and mechanical properties and advanced fabrication techniques are required to obtain scaffold designs intended for their final application. Current focus is aimed at designing biomaterials such that they will replicate the local extra cellular environment of the native organ and enable cell-cell and cell-scaffold interactions at micro level required for functional tissue regeneration. This article provides an insight into the different biomaterials available and the emerging use of nano engineering principles for the construction of bioactive scaffolds in tooth regeneration. PMID:24596804

  17. Peroxide interactions with hard tissues: effects on surface hardness and surface/subsurface ultrastructural properties.

    PubMed

    White, Donald J; Kozak, Kathy M; Zoladz, James R; Duschner, Heinz; Götz, Hermann

    2002-01-01

    Laboratory studies were performed to assess the impact of peroxide bleaching on enamel surface and subsurface physical and ultrastructural properties. Human enamel blocks were prepared, polished, and measured for native color. Cyclic bleaching treatments were carried out with soaks in whole stimulated saliva interspersed with bleaching treatments using bulk bleaching gels from commercial bleaching systems including Opalescence (20% and 10% carbamide peroxide systems) and Crest Whitestrips, a hydrogen peroxide gel formula, at doses of 5.3% and 6.5% hydrogen peroxide. Treatments ranged from conditions of normal use (14 hours as recommended for Crest Whitestrips) to excessive bleaching (70 hours). Controls included nontreated as well as treatments with placebo (not containing peroxide) gels. Surface hardness and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) techniques were used to characterize the effects of bleaching on the physical properties and ultrastructure of the teeth. Tooth color measurements revealed dose-response bleaching in vitro with the increases in L* and decreases in b* normally expected with effective bleaching. Placebo control treatments did not bleach. Surface hardness measurements showed no decreases associated with tooth bleaching. CLSM measurements also showed no effects from tooth bleaches on the surface or subsurface prism architecture of enamel. This was opposed to significant changes seen with even moderate levels of demineralization associated with the caries process. These studies support: (1) the safety of Crest Whitestrips formulas for enamel surfaces and tooth subsurfaces; and (2) the generic safety of peroxide bleaching of hard tissues associated with conditions of both recommended use and overuse.

  18. Laser Ablatin of Dental Hard Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Seka, W.; Rechmann, P.; Featherstone, J.D.B.; Fried, D.

    2007-07-31

    This paper discusses ablation of dental hard tissue using pulsed lasers. It focuses particularly on the relevant tissue and laser parameters and some of the basic ablation processes that are likely to occur. The importance of interstitial water and its phase transitions is discussed in some detail along with the ablation processes that may or may not directly involve water. The interplay between tissue parameters and laser parameters in the outcome of the removal of dental hard tissue is discussed in detail.

  19. Quantitative analysis of incipient mineral loss in hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, Anna; Mandelis, Andreas; Hellen, Adam; Jeon, Raymond; Abrams, Stephen; Amaechi, Bennett

    2009-02-01

    A coupled diffuse-photon-density-wave and thermal-wave theoretical model was developed to describe the biothermophotonic phenomena in multi-layered hard tissue structures. Photothermal Radiometry was applied as a safe, non-destructive, and highly sensitive tool for the detection of early tooth enamel demineralization to test the theory. Extracted human tooth was treated sequentially with an artificial demineralization gel to simulate controlled mineral loss in the enamel. The experimental setup included a semiconductor laser (659 nm, 120 mW) as the source of the photothermal signal. Modulated laser light generated infrared blackbody radiation from teeth upon absorption and nonradiative energy conversion. The infrared flux emitted by the treated region of the tooth surface and sub-surface was monitored with an infrared detector, both before and after treatment. Frequency scans with a laser beam size of 3 mm were performed in order to guarantee one-dimensionality of the photothermal field. TMR images showed clear differences between sound and demineralized enamel, however this technique is destructive. Dental radiographs did not indicate any changes. The photothermal signal showed clear change even after 1 min of gel treatment. As a result of the fittings, thermal and optical properties of sound and demineralized enamel were obtained, which allowed for quantitative differentiation of healthy and non-healthy regions. In conclusion, the developed model was shown to be a promising tool for non-invasive quantitative analysis of early demineralization of hard tissues.

  20. CO II laser free-form processing of hard tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Martin; Klasing, Manfred; Ivanenko, Mikhail; Harbecke, Daniela; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Hering, Peter

    2007-07-01

    Drilling and surface processing of bone and tooth tissue belongs to standard medical procedures (bores and embeddings for implants, trepanation etc.). Small circular bores can be generally quickly produced with mechanical drills. However problems arise at angled drilling, the need to execute drilling procedures without damaging of sensitive soft tissue structures underneath the bone or the attempt to mill small non-circular cavities in hard tissue with high precision. We present investigations on laser hard tissue "milling", which can be advantageous for solving these problems. The processing of bone is done with a CO II laser (10.6 μm) with pulse durations of 50 - 100 μs, combined with a PC-controlled fast galvanic laser beam scanner and a fine water-spray, which helps keeping the ablation process effective and without thermal side-effects. Laser "milling" of non-circular cavities with 1 - 4 mm width and about 10 mm depth can be especially interesting for dental implantology. In ex-vivo investigations we found conditions for fast laser processing of these cavities without thermal damage and with minimised tapering. It included the exploration of different filling patterns (concentric rings, crosshatch, parallel lines, etc.), definition of maximal pulse duration, repetition rate and laser power, and optimal water spray position. The optimised results give evidence for the applicability of pulsed CO II lasers for biologically tolerable effective processing of deep cavities in hard tissue.

  1. PROTEIN TEMPLATES IN HARD TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    George, Anne; Ravindran, Sriram

    2010-01-01

    Biomineralization processes such as formation of bones and teeth require controlled mineral deposition and self-assembly into hierarchical biocomposites with unique mechanical properties. Ideal biomaterials for regeneration and repair of hard tissues must be biocompatible, possess micro and macroporosity for vascular invasion, provide surface chemistry and texture that facilitate cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation of lineage specific progenitor cells, and induce deposition of calcium phosphate mineral. To expect in-vivo like cellular response several investigators have used extracellular matrix proteins as templates to recreate in-vivo microenvironment for regeneration of hard tissues. Recently, several novel methods of designing tissue repair and restoration materials using bioinspired strategies are currently being formulated. Nanoscale structured materials can be fabricated via the spontaneous organization of self-assembling proteins to construct hierarchically organized nanomaterials. The advantage of such a method is that polypeptides can be specifically designed as building blocks incorporated with molecular recognition features and spatially distributed bioactive ligands that would provide a physiological environment for cells in-vitro and in-vivo. This is a rapidly evolving area and provides a promising platform for future development of nanostructured templates for hard tissue engineering. In this review we try to highlight the importance of proteins as templates for regeneration and repair of hard tissues as well as the potential of peptide based nanomaterials for regenerative therapies. PMID:20802848

  2. Imaging of hard- and soft-tissue structure in the oral cavity by optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Colston, Bill W.; Everett, Mathew J.; Da Silva, Luiz B. Otis, Linda L. Stroeve, Pieter Nathel, Howard

    1998-06-01

    We have developed a prototype optical coherent tomography (OCT) system for the imaging of hard and soft tissue in the oral cavity. High-resolution images of {ital in vitro} porcine periodontal tissues have been obtained with this system. The images clearly show the enamel{endash}cementum and the gingiva{endash}tooth interfaces, indicating OCT is a potentially useful technique for diagnosis of periodontal diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first application of OCT for imaging biologic hard tissue. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  3. Dental hard tissue characterization using laser-based ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, David W.; Massey, Ward L.

    2003-07-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. One critical need is the detection of tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated to help re-mineralize the tooth. Currently employed x-ray imaging is limited in its ability to visualize interfaces and incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration. To this end, non-destructive and non-contact in vitro measurements on extracted human molars using laser-based ultrasonics are presented. Broadband ultrasonic waves are excited in the extracted sections by using a pulsed carbon-dioxide (CO2) laser operating in a region of high optical absorption in the dental hard tissues. Optical interferometric detection of the ultrasonic wave surface displacements in accomplished with a path-stabilized Michelson-type interferometer. Results for bulk and surface in-vitro characterization of caries are presented on extracted molars with pre-existing caries.

  4. Comparison of soft and hard tissue ablation with sub-ps and ns pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Stuart, B.C.; Celliers, P.M.; Feit, M.D.; Glinsky, M.E.; Heredia, N.J.; Herman, S.; Lane, S.M.; London, R.A.; Matthews, D.L.; Perry, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Chang, T.D.; Neev, J.

    1996-05-01

    Tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses offers several unique advantages. The nonlinear energy deposition is insensitive to tissue type, allowing this tool to be used for soft and hard tissue ablation. The localized energy deposition lead to precise ablation depth and minimal collateral damage. This paper reports on efforts to study and demonstrate tissue ablation using an ultrashort pulse laser. Ablation efficiency and extent of collateral damage for 0.3 ps and 1000 ps duration laser pulses are compared. Temperature measurements of the rear surface of a tooth section is also presented.

  5. Intentional reim plantation of a tooth with severe periodontal involvement using enamel matrix derivative in combination with guided tissue regeneration and bone grafting: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Kenji; Sato, Shuichi; Suzuki, Kuniharu; Ito, Koichi

    2008-02-01

    This case involved the intentional reimplantation of a tooth with severe periodontal involvement using regenerative therapies. The maxillary left central incisor was intentionally extracted, enamel matrix derivative (EMD) was applied, and the tooth was repositioned accurately. The bone defect was filled with a xenograft and a demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft, and a guided tissue regeneration membrane was adapted over the site. After 5 years, a reduction in probing depth and a gain in clinical attachment were observed. Conventional radiographs and cone-beam computerized tomographs showed hard tissue improvement. Favorable clinical results were obtained with reimplantation with applied EMD, combined with regenerative therapies, for treating a tooth with severe periodontal involvement.

  6. Autotransplantation of a tooth using guided tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hürzeler, M B; Quiñones, C R

    1993-08-01

    Autotransplantation is an alternative treatment to replace missing or periodontally-involved hopeless teeth. A prerequisite for performing this procedure is having a recipient site with sufficient bone volume to support the transplant. Often, however, crestal bone resorption following tooth extraction or periodontitis results in a reduced alveolar ridge with inadequate dimensions to properly house the transplant. In these cases, the procedure is contraindicated. A case is presented in which the biologic principle of guided tissue regeneration was used to gain periodontal support around an autotransplanted 3rd molar. The results suggest the potential use of guided tissue regeneration in conjunction with autotransplantation. This may represent a new area in reconstructive dentistry. PMID:8354731

  7. Measurements of erbium laser-ablation efficiency in hard dental tissues under different water cooling conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuščer, Lovro; Diaci, Janez

    2013-10-01

    Laser triangulation measurements of Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser-ablated volumes in hard dental tissues are made, in order to verify the possible existence of a "hydrokinetic" effect that has been proposed as an alternative to the "subsurface water expansion" mechanism for hard-tissue laser ablation. No evidence of the hydrokinetic effect could be observed under a broad range of tested laser parameters and water cooling conditions. On the contrary, the application of water spray during laser exposure of hard dental material is observed to diminish the laser-ablation efficiency (AE) in comparison with laser exposure under the absence of water spray. Our findings are in agreement with the generally accepted principle of action for erbium laser ablation, which is based on fast subsurface expansion of laser-heated water trapped within the interstitial structure of hard dental tissues. Our measurements also show that the well-known phenomenon of ablation stalling, during a series of consecutive laser pulses, can primarily be attributed to the blocking of laser light by the loosely bound and recondensed desiccated minerals that collect on the tooth surface during and following laser ablation. In addition to the prevention of tooth bulk temperature buildup, a positive function of the water spray that is typically used with erbium dental lasers is to rehydrate these minerals, and thus sustaining the subsurface expansion ablation process. A negative side effect of using a continuous water spray is that the AE gets reduced due to the laser light being partially absorbed in the water-spray particles above the tooth and in the collected water pool on the tooth surface. Finally, no evidence of the influence of the water absorption shift on the hypothesized increase in the AE of the Er,Cr:YSGG wavelength is observed.

  8. Measurements of erbium laser-ablation efficiency in hard dental tissues under different water cooling conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuščer, Lovro; Diaci, Janez

    2013-10-01

    Laser triangulation measurements of Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser-ablated volumes in hard dental tissues are made, in order to verify the possible existence of a "hydrokinetic" effect that has been proposed as an alternative to the "subsurface water expansion" mechanism for hard-tissue laser ablation. No evidence of the hydrokinetic effect could be observed under a broad range of tested laser parameters and water cooling conditions. On the contrary, the application of water spray during laser exposure of hard dental material is observed to diminish the laser-ablation efficiency (AE) in comparison with laser exposure under the absence of water spray. Our findings are in agreement with the generally accepted principle of action for erbium laser ablation, which is based on fast subsurface expansion of laser-heated water trapped within the interstitial structure of hard dental tissues. Our measurements also show that the well-known phenomenon of ablation stalling, during a series of consecutive laser pulses, can primarily be attributed to the blocking of laser light by the loosely bound and recondensed desiccated minerals that collect on the tooth surface during and following laser ablation. In addition to the prevention of tooth bulk temperature buildup, a positive function of the water spray that is typically used with erbium dental lasers is to rehydrate these minerals, and thus sustaining the subsurface expansion ablation process. A negative side effect of using a continuous water spray is that the AE gets reduced due to the laser light being partially absorbed in the water-spray particles above the tooth and in the collected water pool on the tooth surface. Finally, no evidence of the influence of the water absorption shift on the hypothesized increase in the AE of the Er,Cr:YSGG wavelength is observed. PMID:24105399

  9. Ordering of self-assembled nanobiominerals in correlation to mechanical properties of hard tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Huaidong; Liu Xiangyang; Lim, Chwee T.; Hsu, Chin Y.

    2005-04-18

    Biominerals in the hard tissues of many organisms exhibit superior mechanical properties due to their unique hierarchical nanostructures. In this article, we show the microstructure of human tooth enamel examined by position-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering and electron microscopy. It is found that the degree of ordering of the biominerals varies strikingly within the dental sample. Combined with nanoindentation, our results show that both the hardness and the elastic modulus increase predominantly with the ordering of the biomineral crystallites. This can be attributed to the fact that the ordered structure helps sustain a more complex mechanical stress.

  10. Comparison of tetrachromic VOF stain to other histochemical staining techniques for characterizing stromal soft and hard tissue components.

    PubMed

    Belaldavar, C; Hallikerimath, S; Angadi, P V; Kale, A D

    2014-11-01

    The components of hard tissues including dentin, enamel, cementum, bone and other calcified deposits, and mature and immature collagen pose problems for identification in routine hematoxylin and eosin (H & E) stained sections. Use of combinations of stains can demonstrate the components of hard tissues and soft tissues distinctly. We assessed the efficacy of the Verde Luz-orange G-acid fuchsin (VOF) stain for differentiating hard and soft connective tissues and compared results with other histochemical staining techniques. Eighty tissue sections comprising developing tooth (30), ossifying fibroma (30) and miscellaneous pathologies (20) expected to contain varying types of calcified tissues were stained with H & E, VOF, and Masson's trichrome (MT). In developing tooth, VOF demonstrated better differentiation of hard tissues, while it was comparable to MT for ossifying fibroma and miscellaneous pathologies. The intensity of staining was greater with VOF than with the other stains studied. VOF stains hard tissue components distinctly and gives good contrast with the surrounding connective tissue. VOF is comparable to MT, but has added advantages including single step staining, rapid and easy procedures, and it distinguishes the maturity of the tissues.

  11. When 1+1>2: Nanostructured composites for hard tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Uskoković, Vuk

    2015-12-01

    Multicomponent, synergistic and multifunctional nanostructures have taken over the spotlight in the realm of biomedical nanotechnologies. The most prospective materials for bone regeneration today are almost exclusively composites comprising two or more components that compensate for the shortcomings of each one of them alone. This is quite natural in view of the fact that all hard tissues in the human body, except perhaps the tooth enamel, are composite nanostructures. This review article highlights some of the most prospective breakthroughs made in this research direction, with the hard tissues in main focus being those comprising bone, tooth cementum, dentin and enamel. The major obstacles to creating collagen/apatite composites modeled after the structure of bone are mentioned, including the immunogenicity of xenogeneic collagen and continuously failing attempts to replicate the biomineralization process in vitro. Composites comprising a polymeric component and calcium phosphate are discussed in light of their ability to emulate the soft/hard composite structure of bone. Hard tissue engineering composites created using hard material components other than calcium phosphates, including silica, metals and several types of nanotubes, are also discoursed on, alongside additional components deliverable using these materials, such as cells, growth factors, peptides, antibiotics, antiresorptive and anabolic agents, pharmacokinetic conjugates and various cell-specific targeting moieties. It is concluded that a variety of hard tissue structures in the body necessitates a similar variety of biomaterials for their regeneration. The ongoing development of nanocomposites for bone restoration will result in smart, theranostic materials, capable of acting therapeutically in direct feedback with the outcome of in situ disease monitoring at the cellular and subcellular scales. Progress in this research direction is expected to take us to the next generation of biomaterials

  12. When 1+1>2: Nanostructured composites for hard tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Uskoković, Vuk

    2015-12-01

    Multicomponent, synergistic and multifunctional nanostructures have taken over the spotlight in the realm of biomedical nanotechnologies. The most prospective materials for bone regeneration today are almost exclusively composites comprising two or more components that compensate for the shortcomings of each one of them alone. This is quite natural in view of the fact that all hard tissues in the human body, except perhaps the tooth enamel, are composite nanostructures. This review article highlights some of the most prospective breakthroughs made in this research direction, with the hard tissues in main focus being those comprising bone, tooth cementum, dentin and enamel. The major obstacles to creating collagen/apatite composites modeled after the structure of bone are mentioned, including the immunogenicity of xenogeneic collagen and continuously failing attempts to replicate the biomineralization process in vitro. Composites comprising a polymeric component and calcium phosphate are discussed in light of their ability to emulate the soft/hard composite structure of bone. Hard tissue engineering composites created using hard material components other than calcium phosphates, including silica, metals and several types of nanotubes, are also discoursed on, alongside additional components deliverable using these materials, such as cells, growth factors, peptides, antibiotics, antiresorptive and anabolic agents, pharmacokinetic conjugates and various cell-specific targeting moieties. It is concluded that a variety of hard tissue structures in the body necessitates a similar variety of biomaterials for their regeneration. The ongoing development of nanocomposites for bone restoration will result in smart, theranostic materials, capable of acting therapeutically in direct feedback with the outcome of in situ disease monitoring at the cellular and subcellular scales. Progress in this research direction is expected to take us to the next generation of biomaterials

  13. Histology of tooth attachment tissues and plicidentine in Varanus (Reptilia: Squamata), and a discussion of the evolution of amniote tooth attachment.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Erin E; Caldwell, Michael W; Lamoureux, Denis O; Budney, Lisa A

    2011-10-01

    Few recent studies have examined the histological basis for tooth attachment in squamates. In the past few years, a surge of interest in this topic has led to the intriguing suggestion that the major tissues derived from the tooth germ (enamel, dentine, cementum and alveolar bone), are conservative and are present in all amniotes. In this study, we describe the histology and development of the tooth attachment complex in Varanus rudicollis, the rough-neck monitor. We provide the first published evidence for the role of cementum and alveolar bone in tooth attachment in varanoid lizards. In Varanus, cementum is deposited on the external surface of the tooth root as well as at the base of the tooth, where it plays a role in the attachment of the tooth to the jawbone. Alveolar bone is also involved in tooth ankylosis. Our results support the hypothesis that the major tooth germ tissues are found in all amniotes. We provide insights into the structure and development of plicidentine, defined as infolding of the dentine around the tooth base. This feature is unique to varanoids among extant tetrapods and is the third tissue implicated in tooth attachment in Varanus. Plicidentine develops asymmetrically along the labial-lingual axis of a tooth. Varanus is characterized by the presence of both primary and higher-order lamellae, which anastomose to form a honeycomb-like surface that then interacts with the more basal attachment tissues.

  14. Coordination of tooth morphogenesis and neuronal development through tissue interactions: lessons from mouse models.

    PubMed

    Luukko, Keijo; Kettunen, Päivi

    2014-07-15

    In addition to being an advantageous model to investigate general molecular mechanisms of organ formation, the tooth is a distinct target organ for peripheral nerve innervation. These nerves are required for the function and protection of the teeth and, as shown in fish, also for their regeneration. This review focuses on recent findings of the local tissue interactions and molecular signaling mechanisms that regulate the early nerve arrival and patterning of mouse mandibular molar tooth sensory innervation. Dental sensory nerve growth and patterning is a stepwise process that is intimately linked to advancing tooth morphogenesis. In particular, nerve growth factor and semaphorin 3A serve as essential functions during and are iteratively used at different stages of tooth innervation. The tooth germ controls development of its own nerve supply, and similar to the development of the tooth organ proper, tissue interactions between dental epithelial and mesenchymal tissues control the establishment of tooth innervation. Tgf-β, Wnt, and Fgf signaling, which regulate tooth formation, are implicated to mediate these interactions. Therefore, tissue interactions mediated by conserved signal families may constitute key mechanism for the integration of tooth organogenesis and development of its peripheral nerve supply.

  15. Tooth-Bleaching: A Review of the Efficacy and Adverse Effects of Various Tooth Whitening Products.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Farooq, Imran; Grobler, Sias R; Rossouw, R J

    2015-12-01

    Tooth bleaching (whitening) is one of the most common and inexpensive method for treating discolouration of teeth. Dental aesthetics, especially tooth colour, is of great importance to majority of the people; and discolouration of even a single tooth can negatively influence the quality of life. Therefore, a review of the literature was carried out (limited to aesthetic tooth-bleaching) to provide a broad overview of the efficacy and adverse effects of various tooth whitening products on soft and hard oral tissues.

  16. Hardness, elasticity, and ultrastructure of bonded sound and caries-affected primary tooth dentin.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Y; Tay, F R

    2007-04-01

    Biomechanical properties of bonded dentin are important factors for resin restoration. We evaluated the hardness and elastic modulus of bonded sound and caries-affected primary tooth dentin using a one-step adhesive system, and observed the microstructure of the bonded interface. Six sound and six carious primary teeth were used. For sound teeth, flat occlusal dentin surfaces were prepared with a water-cooled high-speed diamond bur. For carious teeth, infected dentin was stained with a caries detector and removed with a water-cooled low-speed round steel bur and hand instruments. The prepared dentin was bonded with One-Up Bond F Plus (Tokuyama Dental Co., Tokyo, Japan). The resin-dentin interface and dentin beneath the interface were measured with a nano-indentation tester and observed with SEM and TEM. For both the carious and sound teeth, there was no significant difference between the hardness of the interfacial dentin and dentin 10-80 microm beneath the interface. However, the Young's modulus of the interfacial dentin was significantly lower than the dentin 40-80 microm (carious teeth) or 50-80 microm (sound teeth) beneath the interface. Both the hardness and Young's modulus of the interfacial dentin were not significantly different between the carious and sound teeth. Compared to the sound dentin, the hybrid layer on the caries-affected dentin was thicker and exhibited more complicated morphologic features. The thickness of the hybrid layers was generally less than 1 microm.

  17. Hard-Soft Tissue Interface Engineering.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Oliver E; Oyen, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system is comprised of three distinct tissue categories: structural mineralized tissues, actuating muscular soft tissues, and connective tissues. Where connective tissues - ligament, tendon and cartilage - meet with bones, a graded interface in mechanical properties occurs that allows the transmission of load without creating stress concentrations that would cause tissue damage. This interface typically occurs over less than 1 mm and contains a three order of magnitude difference in elastic stiffness, in addition to changes in cell type and growth factor concentrations among others. Like all engineered tissues, the replication of these interfaces requires the production of scaffolds that will provide chemical and mechanical cues, resulting in biologically accurate cellular differentiation. For interface tissues however, the scaffold must provide spatially graded chemical and mechanical cues over sub millimetre length scales. Naturally, this complicates the manufacture of the scaffolds and every stage of their subsequent cell seeding and growth, as each region has different optimal conditions. Given the higher degree of difficulty associated with replicating interface tissues compared to surrounding homogeneous tissues, it is likely that the development of complex musculoskeletal tissue systems will continue to be limited by the engineering of connective tissues interfaces with bone.

  18. Microstructure of dental hard tissues in fossil and recent xenarthrans (Mammalia: Folivora and Cingulata).

    PubMed

    Kalthoff, Daniela C

    2011-06-01

    A striking difference between xenarthrans and other mammals is the complete loss of tooth enamel in all members but the earliest armadillos. However, sloth and armadillo teeth show structured wear facets, which in all other mammals are formed by tooth enamel. How is that possible? Here, I report about an analysis of fossil and recent xenarthran dental hard tissue microstructure. It shows that osteodentine is not exclusive to fossil Cingulata, but also occurs in some recent taxa. Furthermore, I found profound modifications of orthodentine architecture in comparison to other mammals. Remarkable features are (a) a larger proportion of the highly mineralized, collagen-free peritubular dentine, and (b) a modified architecture of the odontoblastic process with frequent interconnections between the extensions and unusually intensive branching of the extensions forming a complex meshwork, penetrating the intertubular dentine matrix. The orthodentine microstructural build-up is unique in Folivora and Cingulata. PMID:21456028

  19. Tessier 30 symphyseal mandibular cleft: early simultaneous soft and hard tissue correction - a case report.

    PubMed

    Ladani, Parit; Sailer, Hermann F; Sabnis, Rajesh

    2013-12-01

    A symphyseal mandibular facial cleft (Tessier 30) is a rare congenital abnormality. Nonunion of bone in the symphysis of the mandible, median cleft of the lower lip and tongue adherence in the midline to the floor of the mouth are the principle features of the anomaly. A satisfactory result can be achieved with early surgical correction of both hard and soft tissue defects in the age of 6 months. More than 3 years follow-up shows total bony fusion of the symphysis and normal lower lip function. There were only left deciduous central incisor and the ipsilateral tooth bud of the permanent central incisor missing.

  20. Quantitative analyses of the biomineralization of different hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Arnold, S; Plate, U; Wiesmann, H P; Stratmann, U; Kohl, H; Höhling, H J

    2001-06-01

    The primary crystallites of the different developing hard tissues have an apatite structure. However, they have crystal lattice distortions representing an intermediate state between amorphous and fully crystalline. We have applied energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy in the selected area electron diffraction mode to analyse different stages of crystal formation in dentine, bone, enamel and inorganic apatite mineral. We have obtained quantitative information on the degree of crystal lattice distortion using the paracrystal theory of Hosemann and Bagchi. We have found that the early formed crystallites of the hard tissues being analysed have a paracrystalline character comparable to biopolymers. However, with maturation, the lattice fluctuations of the crystallites of the hard tissues bone, enamel and dentine decrease to form a typical (para)crystalline character. Also the decrease of the organic proportion in the matrix corresponds to the decrease of the lattice fluctuation of the crystallites in the different hard tissues during maturation.

  1. Current considerations concerning endodontically treated teeth: alteration of hard dental tissues and biomechanical properties following endodontic therapy.

    PubMed

    Dimitriu, Bogdan; Vârlan, Constantin; Suciu, Ioana; Vârlan, Virginia; Bodnar, Dana

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this general article is to present an overview of the current knowledge about composition and structural changes and also about specific biomechanical alterations related to vitality loss or endodontic therapy. For a long time, these issues have been controversially approached from a clinical standpoint and are therefore still confusing for many practitioners. Vitality loss or endodontic procedures seem to induce only negligible changes in hard dental tissue moisture. Physico-chemical properties of dentin can be modified by some of the endodontic chemical products used for chemo-mechanical debridement. On the other hand, tooth biomechanical behavior is affected, since tooth strength is reduced proportionally to coronal tissue loss, due to either pre-existent carious/non-carious lesions or cavity acces preparation, besides restorative procedures. The related literature shows the lack of accepted clinical standards and consensus regarding the optimal way of approaching the specific tooth biomechanics following endodontic therapy. PMID:20108492

  2. Calcium phosphate bioceramics fabricated from extracted human teeth for tooth tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ki-Taek; Suh, Je Duck; Kim, Jangho; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2011-11-01

    Bioceramic tooth powders were prepared via heat treatment of extracted human teeth using sintering temperatures between 600°C and 1200°C, and their properties were investigated for potential tooth tissue engineering. The sintered human tooth powders were characterized using thermal analysis (thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA)), field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Additionally, the phase constitutions and chemical homogeneities of the composite samples were examined using a quantitative chemical analysis with inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy. The results revealed that the annealing process produced useful hydroxyapatite-based bioceramic biomaterials when annealed above 1000°C. The FTIR spectra and the TG/DTA thermograms of the tooth powders indicated the presence of organic compounds, which were completely removed after annealing at temperatures above 1000°C. The tooth powders annealed between 1000°C and 1200°C had good characteristics as bioceramic biomaterials. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of each tooth powder was evaluated using in vitro and in vivo techniques; our results indicate that the prepared human tooth powders have great potential for tooth tissue engineering applications.

  3. Laser processing of dental hard tissues (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel

    2005-04-01

    In addition to their use for the painless removal of dental decay, lasers are also well suited to modify the chemical composition of the mineral phase of dental hard tissues in order to render the tissues more resistant to acid dissolution and for the modification of the hard tissue morphology for better adhesion to restorative materials. In this paper the principal applications of lasers for the processing of dental hard tissues are discussed with an emphasis on the influence of an externally applied layer of water. The presence of an optically thick layer of water profoundly influences the phase composition of the laser irradiated tissue surface and the morphology resulting in more efficient ablation, better adhesion and improved resistance to acid dissolution.

  4. X-ray microscopy of soft and hard human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Stalder, Anja K.; Ilgenstein, Bernd; Holme, Margaret N.; Weitkamp, Timm; Beckmann, Felix; Hieber, Simone E.

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous post mortem visualization of soft and hard tissues using absorption-based CT remains a challenge. If the photon energy is optimized for the visualization of hard tissue, the surrounding soft tissue components are almost X-ray transparent. Therefore, the combination with other modalities such as phase-contrast CT, magnetic resonance microscopy, and histology is essential to detect the anatomical features. The combination of the 2D and 3D data sets using sophisticated segmentation and registration tools allows for conclusions about otherwise inaccessible anatomical features essential for improved patient treatments.

  5. Pulsed erbium laser ablation of hard dental tissue: the effects of atomized water spray versus water surface film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiberg, Robert J.; Cozean, Colette D.

    2002-06-01

    It has been established that the ability of erbium lasers to ablate hard dental tissue is due primarily to the laser- initiated subsurface expansion of the interstitial water trapped within the enamel and that by maintaining a thin film of water on the surface of the tooth, the efficiency of the laser ablation is enhanced. It has recently been suggested that a more aggressive ablative mechanism, designated as a hydrokinetic effect, occurs when atomized water droplets, introduced between the erbium laser and the surface of the tooth, are accelerated in the laser's field and impact the tooth's surface. It is the objective of this study to determine if the proposed hydrokinetic effect exists and to establish its contribution to the dental hard tissue ablation process. Two commercially available dental laser systems were employed in the hard tissue ablation studies. One system employed a water irrigation system in which the water was applied directly to the tooth, forming a thin film of water on the tooth's surface. The other system employed pressurized air and water to create an atomized mist of water droplets between the laser hand piece and the tooth. The ablative properties of the two lasers were studied upon hard inorganic materials, which were void of any water content, as well as dental enamel, which contained interstitial water within its crystalline structure. In each case the erbium laser beam was moved across the surface of the target material at a constant velocity. When exposing material void of any water content, no ablation of the surfaces was observed with either laser system. In contrast, when the irrigated dental enamel was exposed to the laser radiation, a linear groove was formed in the enamel surface. The volume of ablated dental tissue associated with each irrigation method was measured and plotted as a function of the energy within the laser pulse. Both dental laser systems exhibited similar enamel ablation rates and comparable ablated surface

  6. Porous Biodegradable Metals for Hard Tissue Scaffolds: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yusop, A. H.; Bakir, A. A.; Shaharom, N. A.; Abdul Kadir, M. R.; Hermawan, H.

    2012-01-01

    Scaffolds have been utilized in tissue regeneration to facilitate the formation and maturation of new tissues or organs where a balance between temporary mechanical support and mass transport (degradation and cell growth) is ideally achieved. Polymers have been widely chosen as tissue scaffolding material having a good combination of biodegradability, biocompatibility, and porous structure. Metals that can degrade in physiological environment, namely, biodegradable metals, are proposed as potential materials for hard tissue scaffolding where biodegradable polymers are often considered as having poor mechanical properties. Biodegradable metal scaffolds have showed interesting mechanical property that was close to that of human bone with tailored degradation behaviour. The current promising fabrication technique for making scaffolds, such as computation-aided solid free-form method, can be easily applied to metals. With further optimization in topologically ordered porosity design exploiting material property and fabrication technique, porous biodegradable metals could be the potential materials for making hard tissue scaffolds. PMID:22919393

  7. Dental histology of Coelophysis bauri and the evolution of tooth attachment tissues in early dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Fong, Raymond K M; LeBlanc, Aaron R H; Berman, David S; Reisz, Robert R

    2016-07-01

    Studies of dinosaur teeth have focused primarily on external crown morphology and thus, use shed or in situ tooth crowns, and are limited to the enamel and dentine dental tissues. As a result, the full suites of periodontal tissues that attach teeth to the jaws remain poorly documented, particularly in early dinosaurs. These tissues are an integral part of the tooth and thus essential to a more complete understanding of dental anatomy, development, and evolution in dinosaurs. To identify the tooth attachment tissues in early dinosaurs, histological thin sections were prepared from the maxilla and dentary of a partial skull of the early theropod Coelophysis bauri from the Upper Triassic (Rhaetian- 209-201 Ma) Whitaker Quarry, New Mexico, USA. As one of the phylogenetically and geologically oldest dinosaurs, it is an ideal candidate for examining dental tissues near the base of the dinosaurian clade. The teeth of C. bauri exhibited a fibrous tooth attachment in which the teeth possessed five tissues: enamel, dentine, cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL), and alveolar bone. Our findings, coupled with those of more recent studies of ornithischian teeth, indicate that a tripartite periodontium, similar to that of crocodilians and mammals, is the plesiomorphic condition for dinosaurs. The occurrence of a tripartite periodontium in dinosaurs adds to the growing consensus that the presence of these tissues is the plesiomorphic condition for the major amniote clades. Furthermore, this study establishes the relative timing of tissue development and growth directions of periodontal tissues and provides the first comparative framework for future studies of dinosaur periodontal development, tooth replacement, and histology. J. Morphol. 277:916-924, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27087142

  8. Dental histology of Coelophysis bauri and the evolution of tooth attachment tissues in early dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Fong, Raymond K M; LeBlanc, Aaron R H; Berman, David S; Reisz, Robert R

    2016-07-01

    Studies of dinosaur teeth have focused primarily on external crown morphology and thus, use shed or in situ tooth crowns, and are limited to the enamel and dentine dental tissues. As a result, the full suites of periodontal tissues that attach teeth to the jaws remain poorly documented, particularly in early dinosaurs. These tissues are an integral part of the tooth and thus essential to a more complete understanding of dental anatomy, development, and evolution in dinosaurs. To identify the tooth attachment tissues in early dinosaurs, histological thin sections were prepared from the maxilla and dentary of a partial skull of the early theropod Coelophysis bauri from the Upper Triassic (Rhaetian- 209-201 Ma) Whitaker Quarry, New Mexico, USA. As one of the phylogenetically and geologically oldest dinosaurs, it is an ideal candidate for examining dental tissues near the base of the dinosaurian clade. The teeth of C. bauri exhibited a fibrous tooth attachment in which the teeth possessed five tissues: enamel, dentine, cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL), and alveolar bone. Our findings, coupled with those of more recent studies of ornithischian teeth, indicate that a tripartite periodontium, similar to that of crocodilians and mammals, is the plesiomorphic condition for dinosaurs. The occurrence of a tripartite periodontium in dinosaurs adds to the growing consensus that the presence of these tissues is the plesiomorphic condition for the major amniote clades. Furthermore, this study establishes the relative timing of tissue development and growth directions of periodontal tissues and provides the first comparative framework for future studies of dinosaur periodontal development, tooth replacement, and histology. J. Morphol. 277:916-924, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Hard and soft tissue surgical complications in dental implantology.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Shahid R

    2015-05-01

    This article discusses surgical complications associated with the placement of dental implants, specifically focusing on how they occur (etiology), as well as their management and prevention. Dental implant surgical complications can be classified into those of hard and soft tissues. In general, complications can be avoided with thorough preoperative treatment planning and proper surgical technique.

  10. Investigation of formalin influence over hard and soft biological tissues fluorescent spectra in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Uzunov, Tz.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2007-05-01

    In order to investigate the formalin influence over fluorescence properties of hard and soft biological tissues during conservation, emission spectra have been registered. Nitrogen laser at 337 nm and light-emitting diode with maximum at 405 nm have been used as excitation sources. For investigation of formalin influence over hard tissues, an experiment was made on teeth samples. Sound teeth were demineralized with a phosphoric acid for 10 seconds to obtain enamel structure near to the tooth lesion, and were fixed in formalin. Before and after teeth treatment spectra from the areas of interest were detected. There were not observed changes in the shape of the teeth spectra, related to the introduction of formalin fluorescence. Samples from mucosa of esophagus and stomach, where initially an ALA/Protoporphyrin IX diagnosis was applied, were used as soft tissue specimens. After fluorescent diagnosis in vivo biopsy samples were obtained from normal and cancerous areas and were conserved in formalin. Initially, spectrum observed has one autofluorescence maximum from the mucous tissue at 500-600 nm and secondary maxima from the protoporphyrin fluorescence at 635 nm and 720 nm, as well as pronounced minima at 540 and 575 nm related to hemoglobin absorption. After formalin conservation hemoglobin absorption was strongly reduced that increases mucous emission signal in green-yellow spectral region. Simultaneously the maxima at 635 nm and 720 nm were reduced. As conclusion we could say that formalin has negligible influence over fluorescence spectra of conserved hard tissues and has more pronounced influence over fluorescence spectra obtained in the case of soft tissue conservation, which has to be taking into account in measurements in vitro.

  11. Tooth histology in the cretaceous ichthyosaur Platypterygius australis, and its significance for the conservation and divergence of mineralized tooth tissues in amniotes.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Erin E; Caldwell, Michael W; Lamoureux, Denis O

    2011-02-01

    Ichthyosaurs are an extinct group of secondarily aquatic reptiles that show ligamentous tooth attachment to the jaw in some derived forms. Here, we provide a modern description of tooth histology in ichthyosaurs, using Platypterygius australis, a large ichthyosaur from the Cretaceous of Australia. Our study supports evolutionary conservation of the principal mineralized tooth tissue types in amniotes with ligamentous tooth attachment: enamel, dentine, cellular, and acellular cementum. This is the first time that the latter tissue has been located in ichthyosaurs. Vascularized cementum (osteocementum) is reduced or absent in amniotes in which the teeth are ankylosed to the jaw bone, such as basal ichthyosaurs, and raises questions regarding the function of this tissue and the potential developmental or selective conditions leading to its convergent evolution. PMID:21210486

  12. [Hard dental tissue minimal-invasive preparation using contemporary polymer rotating instruments and laser].

    PubMed

    Beloica, Milos; Vulićević, Zoran R; Mandinić, Zoran; Radović, Ivana; Jovicić, Olivera; Carević, Momir; Tekić, Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    Goal of contemporary dentistry is to decrease the patient's discomfort during treatment. Dentists aim to achieve maximum with the newly developed dental materials as well as with new cavity preparation techniques in the shortest time span. Since the development of the first constructed borer (drilling machine) for caries removal, the preparation techniques have considerably changed. The progress of dental materials as well as the cavity preparation techniques has led us to contemporary carbide tungsten and diamond borers that are used with obligatory water cooling. The innovation within this field represents newly developed polymer borers that can detect the difference between carious lesions and healthy tooth structure. In this way the cavity preparation may be performed without damaging dental healthy tissue. This is possible owing to their hardness which is lower than the hardness of intact dentin. Polymer borer preparation is painless with less vibration, while the increase in temperature is negligible. Lasers have been used in clinical dentistry since 1980s so it can be said that they represent a new technology. The function of lasers is based on ablation which requires water. Erbium lasers have shown the highest potential with their ability to produce effective ablation of hard dental tissues. Laser application in dentistry requires special training as well as some protective measures. Laser advantages, compared to traditional preparation techniques, involve the absence of vibration, painless preparation, possibility of preparation without anesthetic and easier patient's adjustment to dental intervention which is of importance, especially in pediatric dentistry.

  13. Low-intensity lasers, modern filling materials, and bonding systems influence on mineral metabolism of hard dental tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Yesaulenko, I. E.; Zoibelmann, M.; Pankova, Svetlana N.; Ippolitov, Yu. A.; Oleinik, Olga I.; Popova, T. A.; Koretskaya, I. V.; Shumilovitch, Bogdan R.; Podolskaya, Elana E.

    2001-10-01

    One of the main reasons of low quality filling is breaking Ca-P balance in hard tissues. Our research was done with the purpose of studying the influence of low intensity lasers, diodic radiation, the newest filling and bonding systems on the processes of mineral metabolism in hard dental tissues while filling a tooth. 250 patients having caries and its compli-cations were examined and treated. Our complex research included: visual and instrumental examination, finding out the level of oral cavity hygiene, acid enamel biopsy, scanning electronic microscopy and X-ray spectrum microanalysis. Filling processes may produce a negative effect on mineral metabolism of hard dental tissues the latter is less pronounced when applying fluoride-containing filling materials with bonding systems. It has also been found that bonding dentin and enamel systems are designed for both a better filling adhesion (i.e. mechanical adhesion) and migration of useful microelements present in them by their sinking into hard dental tissues (i.e. chemical adhesion). Our research showed a positive influence of low intensity laser and diodic beams accompanying the use of modern filling and bonding systems on mineral metabolism of hard dental tissues.

  14. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadeethi, Y; Al-Jedani, S; Razvi, M A N; Saeed, A; Abdel-Daiem, A M; Ansari, M Shahnawaze; Babkair, Saeed S; Salah, Numan A; Al-Mujtaba, A

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased. PMID:27228169

  15. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Daiem, A. M.; Ansari, M. Shahnawaze; Babkair, Saeed S.; Salah, Numan A.; Al-Mujtaba, A.

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased. PMID:27228169

  16. Tooth abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling within the tooth. This causes a painful toothache . The toothache may stop if the pulp of the tooth ... tissue. Symptoms The main symptom is a severe toothache. The pain is continuous. It can be described ...

  17. Laser-induced autofluorescence of oral cavity hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E. G.; Uzunov, Tz. T.; Avramov, L. A.

    2007-03-01

    In current study oral cavity hard tissues autofluorescence was investigated to obtain more complete picture of their optical properties. As an excitation source nitrogen laser with parameters - 337,1 nm, 14 μJ, 10 Hz (ILGI-503, Russia) was used. In vitro spectra from enamel, dentine, cartilage, spongiosa and cortical part of the periodontal bones were registered using a fiber-optic microspectrometer (PC2000, "Ocean Optics" Inc., USA). Gingival fluorescence was also obtained for comparison of its spectral properties with that of hard oral tissues. Samples are characterized with significant differences of fluorescence properties one to another. It is clearly observed signal from different collagen types and collagen-cross links with maxima at 385, 430 and 480-490 nm. In dentine are observed only two maxima at 440 and 480 nm, related also to collagen structures. In samples of gingival and spongiosa were observed traces of hemoglobin - by its re-absorption at 545 and 575 nm, which distort the fluorescence spectra detected from these anatomic sites. Results, obtained in this study are foreseen to be used for development of algorithms for diagnosis and differentiation of teeth lesions and other problems of oral cavity hard tissues as periodontitis and gingivitis.

  18. [Effect of fluorine in drinking water of varying hardness on protein-mineral metabolism of mineralized tissues of rats maintained on a sugar diet].

    PubMed

    Kosenko, K M; Podorozhnia, R P; Henesina, T I

    1993-01-01

    Variations of mineral and protein metabolism in calcified tissues were studied using 32P, 45Ca and 35S methionine in the rats on sugar diet and water of different hardness with F and without it. Hard drinking water without F like soft water and water of medium hardness with F affect metabolism in mineralized tissues preventing the development of carious process. Incorporation of 32P and 45Ca to mineralized tissues, specific radioactivity of 32P and 35S methionine of tooth and bone proteins are lower in rats which drank soft water without F. These parameters increase in rats which received hard water without F almost to the level of animals which received water with F. Ways of the effect of Ca2+ Mg2+ and F on protein and mineral metabolism of calcified tissues of rats on sugar diet (including proteins (osteo-induced, etc., which initiate mineralization) and enzymes are considered.

  19. The corono-apically varying ultrasonic velocity in human hard dental tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Christoph

    2004-07-01

    The speed of ultrasound at 20 MHz is measured for hard dental tissues inside human teeth. This includes the cementum, for which no data are available. The spatial distribution, extrema, and means of the longitudinal ultrasound velocity (LUV) are determined with an emphasis on the apical thirds and an extended spectrum. Tissue areas are investigated by optical means and by acoustical scanning, in order to compare apical regions-of-interest with the complete mineralized wet porous tissue that lies beneath the enamel cap. The maximal LUV in a single dentin specimen varies from 3903 m/s to 4226 m/s. The dentin's frequency distribution of LUV at 20 °C exhibits a predominant peak feature comprising several Voigt functions. Introducing standardized relative tooth width portions, the corono-apical decrease in LUV of 21 specimens is approximated by LUV=4224-(257 * ln(y)) along reduced distances in dentin. Abnormal teeth require a higher resolution and an approximate equation of the form LUV=(∑(ai * yi))/(1+∑(bi+1 * y(i+1))). It can be used each time the corono-apical variation has to be quantified in each of the three tissues. Ten coefficients are numerically exemplified. An error evaluation is performed, which denotes errors of 0.2%+/-1.3% (enamel), -0.1%+/-1.6% (cementum), and acceptable residual errors for dentin.

  20. Tooth-Bleaching: A Review of the Efficacy and Adverse Effects of Various Tooth Whitening Products.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Farooq, Imran; Grobler, Sias R; Rossouw, R J

    2015-12-01

    Tooth bleaching (whitening) is one of the most common and inexpensive method for treating discolouration of teeth. Dental aesthetics, especially tooth colour, is of great importance to majority of the people; and discolouration of even a single tooth can negatively influence the quality of life. Therefore, a review of the literature was carried out (limited to aesthetic tooth-bleaching) to provide a broad overview of the efficacy and adverse effects of various tooth whitening products on soft and hard oral tissues. PMID:26691365

  1. Microscopic characterization of bacteria-hard tissue interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, S.; Kishen, A.

    2005-08-01

    Bacterial interaction with host tissues plays a major role in the cause and persistence of diseases. It has been confirmed by different clinical investigations that Enterococcus faecalis resist root canal treatment and commonly persist in tooth with post treatment infection. The purpose of this study is to apply different microscopic techniques to study the dynamics of the E. faecalis biofilm on root-canal-dentine tissues. Method- Ten intact non-carious human maxillary molars were prepared and incubated with bacterium in nutrient media under anaerobic condition for 16 weeks. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with Energy Dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), Fluorescents microscopy Light microscopy and Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM) were carried out to characterize the ultrastructure of biofilm. In addition Fourier Transfer Infra Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Von-Kossa staining and Fluorescent microscopy were also carried out to confirm the biochemical characteristics of the biofilm structure. Result- The mature biofilm formed on the root-canal wall showed a honey-comb like structure with viable cells bacterial cells inside. The EDX and FTIR analysis showed a significant increase in the levels of Calcium (Ca) and Phosphorus (P) and evidence of biomineralization of the matured biofilm.

  2. Age-related changes of dental pulp tissue after experimental tooth movement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Von Böhl, Martina; Ren, Yijin; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M.; Maltha, Jaap C.

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the effect of orthodontic tooth movement on the dental pulp in adolescents is reversible and that it has no long-lasting effect on pulpal physiology. However, it is not clear yet if the same conclusion is also valid for adult subjects. Thus, in two groups of rats, aged 6 and 40 weeks respectively, 3 molars at one side of the maxilla were moved together in a mesial direction with a standardized orthodontic appliance delivering a force of 10 cN. The contralateral side served as a control. Parasagittal histological sections were prepared after tooth movement for 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The pulp tissue was characterized for the different groups, with special emphasis on cell density, inflammatory cells, vascularity, and odontoblasts. Dimensions of dentin and the pulpal horns was determined and related with the duration of orthodontic force application and age ware evaluated. We found that neither in young nor in adult rats, force application led to long-lasting or irreversible changes in pulpal tissues. Dimensional variables showed significant age-related changes. In conclusion, orthodontic tooth movement per se has no long-lasting or irreversible effect on pulpal tissues, neither in the young nor in the adult animals. PMID:26855867

  3. Technique: imaging earliest tooth development in 3D using a silver-based tissue contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Raj, Muhammad T; Prusinkiewicz, Martin; Cooper, David M L; George, Belev; Webb, M Adam; Boughner, Julia C

    2014-02-01

    Looking in microscopic detail at the 3D organization of initiating teeth within the embryonic jaw has long-proved technologically challenging because of the radio-translucency of these tiny un-mineralized oral tissues. Yet 3D image data showing changes in the physical relationships among developing tooth and jaw tissues are vital to understand the coordinated morphogenesis of vertebrate teeth and jaws as an animal grows and as species evolve. Here, we present a new synchrotron-based scanning solution to image odontogenesis in 3D and in histological detail using a silver-based contrast agent. We stained fixed, intact wild-type mice aged embryonic (E) day 10 to birth with 1% Protargol-S at 37°C for 12-32 hr. Specimens were scanned at 4-10 µm pixel size at 28 keV, just above the silver K-edge, using micro-computed tomography (µCT) at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron. Synchrotron µCT scans of silver-stained embryos showed even the earliest visible stages of tooth initiation, as well as many other tissue types and structures, in histological detail. Silver stain penetration was optimal for imaging structures in intact embryos E15 and younger. This silver stain method offers a powerful yet straightforward approach to visualize at high-resolution and in 3D the earliest stages of odontogenesis in situ, and demonstrates the important of studying the tooth organ in all three planes of view.

  4. Application of coenzyme Q10 for accelerating soft tissue wound healing after tooth extraction in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Toshiki; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Kawabata, Yuya; Ekuni, Daisuke; Azuma, Tetsuji; Kataoka, Kota; Kunitomo, Muneyoshi; Morita, Manabu

    2014-12-10

    Accelerating wound healing after tooth extraction is beneficial in dental treatment. Application of antioxidants, such as reduced coenzyme Q10 (rCoQ10), may promote wound healing after tooth extraction. In this study, we examined the effects of topical application of rCoQ10 on wound healing after tooth extraction in rats. After maxillary first molars were extracted, male Fischer 344 rats (8 weeks old) (n = 27) received topical application of ointment containing 5% rCoQ10 (experimental group) or control ointment (control group) to the sockets for 3 or 8 days (n = 6-7/group). At 3 days after extraction, the experimental group showed higher collagen density and lower numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the upper part of socket, as compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Gene expression of interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and nuclear factor-κB were also lower in the experimental group than in the control group (p < 0.05). At 8 days after tooth extraction, there were no significant differences in collagen density, number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and bone fill between the groups. Our results suggest that topical application of rCoQ10 promotes wound healing in the soft tissue of the alveolar socket, but that rCoQ10 has a limited effect on bone remodeling in rats.

  5. Laser ablation of hard tissue: correlation between the laser beam parameters and the post-ablative tissue characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexandros A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan

    2003-11-01

    Hard dental tissue laser applications, such as preventive treatment, laser diagnosis of caries, laser etching of enamel, laser decay removal and cavity preparation, and more recently use of the laser light to enlarge the root canal during the endodontic therapy, have been investigated for in vitro and in vivo applications. Post-ablative surface characteristics, e.g. degree of charring, cracks and other surface deformation, can be evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The experimental data are discussed in relevance with the laser beam characteristics, e.g. pulse duration, beam profile, and the beam delivery systems employed. Techniques based on the laser illumination of the dental tissues and the subsequent evaluation of the scattered fluorescent light will be a valuable tool in early diagnosis of tooth diseases, as carious dentin or enamel. The laser induced autofluorescence signal of healthy dentin is much stronger than that of the carious dentin. However, a better understanding of the transmission patterns of laser light in teeth, for both diagnosis and therapy is needed, before the laser procedures can be used in a clinical environment.

  6. Determination of medicinal and illicit drugs in post mortem dental hard tissues and comparison with analytical results for body fluids and hair samples.

    PubMed

    Klima, Miriam; Altenburger, Markus J; Kempf, Jürgen; Auwärter, Volker; Neukamm, Merja A

    2016-08-01

    In burnt or skeletonized bodies dental hard tissue sometimes is the only remaining specimen available. Therefore, it could be used as an alternative matrix in post mortem toxicology. Additionally, analysis of dental tissues could provide a unique retrospective window of detection. For forensic interpretation, routes and rates of incorporation of different drugs as well as physicochemical differences between tooth root, tooth crown and carious material have to be taken into account. In a pilot study, one post mortem tooth each from three drug users was analyzed for medicinal and illicit drugs. The pulp was removed in two cases; in one case the tooth was root canal treated. The teeth were separated into root, crown and carious material and drugs were extracted from the powdered material with methanol under ultrasonication. The extracts were screened for drugs by LC-MS(n) (ToxTyper™) and quantitatively analyzed with LC-ESI-MS/MS in MRM mode. The findings were compared to the analytical results for cardiac blood, femoral blood, urine, stomach content and hair. In dental hard tissues, 11 drugs (amphetamine, MDMA, morphine, codeine, norcodeine, methadone, EDDP, fentanyl, tramadol, diazepam, nordazepam, and promethazine) could be detected and concentrations ranged from approximately 0.13pg/mg to 2,400pg/mg. The concentrations declined in the following order: carious material>root>crown. Only the root canal treated tooth showed higher concentrations in the crown than in the root. In post mortem toxicology, dental hard tissue could be a useful alternative matrix facilitating a more differentiated consideration of drug consumption patterns, as the window of detection seems to overlap those for body fluids and hair. PMID:26930453

  7. Determination of medicinal and illicit drugs in post mortem dental hard tissues and comparison with analytical results for body fluids and hair samples.

    PubMed

    Klima, Miriam; Altenburger, Markus J; Kempf, Jürgen; Auwärter, Volker; Neukamm, Merja A

    2016-08-01

    In burnt or skeletonized bodies dental hard tissue sometimes is the only remaining specimen available. Therefore, it could be used as an alternative matrix in post mortem toxicology. Additionally, analysis of dental tissues could provide a unique retrospective window of detection. For forensic interpretation, routes and rates of incorporation of different drugs as well as physicochemical differences between tooth root, tooth crown and carious material have to be taken into account. In a pilot study, one post mortem tooth each from three drug users was analyzed for medicinal and illicit drugs. The pulp was removed in two cases; in one case the tooth was root canal treated. The teeth were separated into root, crown and carious material and drugs were extracted from the powdered material with methanol under ultrasonication. The extracts were screened for drugs by LC-MS(n) (ToxTyper™) and quantitatively analyzed with LC-ESI-MS/MS in MRM mode. The findings were compared to the analytical results for cardiac blood, femoral blood, urine, stomach content and hair. In dental hard tissues, 11 drugs (amphetamine, MDMA, morphine, codeine, norcodeine, methadone, EDDP, fentanyl, tramadol, diazepam, nordazepam, and promethazine) could be detected and concentrations ranged from approximately 0.13pg/mg to 2,400pg/mg. The concentrations declined in the following order: carious material>root>crown. Only the root canal treated tooth showed higher concentrations in the crown than in the root. In post mortem toxicology, dental hard tissue could be a useful alternative matrix facilitating a more differentiated consideration of drug consumption patterns, as the window of detection seems to overlap those for body fluids and hair.

  8. A method for rapid measurement of laser ablation rate of hard dental tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perhavec, T.; Gorkič, A.; Bračun, D.; Diaci, J.

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the study reported here is the development of a new method which allows rapid and accurate in-vitro measurements of three-dimensional (3D) shape of laser ablated craters in hard dental tissues and the determination of crater volume, ablation rate and speed. The method is based on the optical triangulation principle. A laser sheet projector illuminates the surface of a tooth, mounted on a linear translation stage. As the tooth is moved by the translation stage a fast digital video camera captures series of images of the illuminated surface. The images are analyzed to determine a 3D model of the surface. Custom software is employed to analyze the 3D model and to determine the volume of the ablated craters. Key characteristics of the method are discussed as well as some practical aspects pertinent to its use. The method has been employed in an in-vitro study to examine the ablation rates and speeds of the two main laser types currently employed in dentistry, Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG. Ten samples of extracted human molar teeth were irradiated with laser pulse energies from 80 mJ to the maximum available energy (970 mJ with the Er:YAG, and 260 mJ with the Er,Cr:YSGG). About 2000 images of each ablated tooth surface have been acquired along a translation range of 10 mm, taking about 10 s and providing close to 1 million surface measurement points. Volumes of 170 ablated craters (half of them in dentine and the other half in enamel) were determined from this data and used to examine the ablated volume per pulse energy and ablation speed. The results show that, under the same conditions, the ablated volume per pulse energy achieved by the Er:YAG laser exceeds that of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser in almost all regimes for dentine and enamel. The maximum Er:YAG laser ablation speeds (1.2 mm 3/s in dentine and 0.7 mm 3/s in enamel) exceed those obtained by the Er,Cr:YSGG laser (0.39 mm 3/s in dentine and 0.12 mm 3/s in enamel). Since the presented method proves to be easy to

  9. [Study on micro-hardness and wear resistance of human tooth at different depth].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Li, Hong; Zhou, Zhongrong; Chen, Guangxiong; Song, Zhimin

    2002-12-01

    Micro-hardness of human teeth was measured by micro hardnessmentry at different depths i.e. enamal, enamelo-dentinal junction and dentin. A simulated dental friction test was conducted of respectively in these three areas, opposing pure titanium ball under a modified fretting machine. The results showed that micro-hardness is 320.40 +/- 22.77 HV of enamal, 232.26 +/- 32.31 HV of enamelo-dentinal junction, and 61.17 +/- 9.42 HV of dentin (P < 0.05). Wear depth is 17.33 +/- 0.58 microns of enamal, 49.44 +/- 16.47 microns of enamelo-dentinal junction and 95.20 +/- 15.07 microns of dentin(P < 0.05). Wear resistance of enamal is much better than that of dentin's. This preliminary investigation should be very useful in clinical applications.

  10. Tooth hardness increases with zinc-content in mandibles of young adult leaf-cutter ants.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Robert M S; Nesson, Michael H; Richardson, Kathleen A

    2002-12-01

    A wide variety of arthropods and members of other phyla have elevated concentrations of Zn, Mn, other heavy metals and halogens in their jaws, leg claws, and other "tools" for interacting with the environment. While measured Zn concentrations reach 25% of dry mass in scorpion stings, concentrations are often lower than this and the enriched structures are not heavily biomineralized like vertebrate teeth and the radula of mollusks. For this reason, the degree to which the inorganic components of these structures modify their mechanical properties is in question. Here we address this problem by measuring hardness during the development of Zn accumulations in ant mandibles. We found that Zn is incorporated into the mandibular teeth of leaf-cutter ants during early adult life, reaching concentrations of about 16% of dry mass. We show that the hardness of the mandibular teeth increases nearly three-fold as the adults age and that hardness correlates with Zn content ( r=0.91). We suggest that young adults rarely cut leaves partly because their mandibles are not yet rich in Zn. Zinc enrichment (along with enrichment by other heavy metals and halogens) may play an unrecognized role in the behavioral ecology and evolution of a wide variety of invertebrates.

  11. Tooth hardness increases with zinc-content in mandibles of young adult leaf-cutter ants.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Robert M S; Nesson, Michael H; Richardson, Kathleen A

    2002-12-01

    A wide variety of arthropods and members of other phyla have elevated concentrations of Zn, Mn, other heavy metals and halogens in their jaws, leg claws, and other "tools" for interacting with the environment. While measured Zn concentrations reach 25% of dry mass in scorpion stings, concentrations are often lower than this and the enriched structures are not heavily biomineralized like vertebrate teeth and the radula of mollusks. For this reason, the degree to which the inorganic components of these structures modify their mechanical properties is in question. Here we address this problem by measuring hardness during the development of Zn accumulations in ant mandibles. We found that Zn is incorporated into the mandibular teeth of leaf-cutter ants during early adult life, reaching concentrations of about 16% of dry mass. We show that the hardness of the mandibular teeth increases nearly three-fold as the adults age and that hardness correlates with Zn content ( r=0.91). We suggest that young adults rarely cut leaves partly because their mandibles are not yet rich in Zn. Zinc enrichment (along with enrichment by other heavy metals and halogens) may play an unrecognized role in the behavioral ecology and evolution of a wide variety of invertebrates. PMID:12536282

  12. Three-dimensional Micro-culture System for Tooth Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Kuchler-Bopp, S; Bécavin, T; Kökten, T; Weickert, J L; Keller, L; Lesot, H; Deveaux, E; Benkirane-Jessel, N

    2016-06-01

    The arrangement of cells within a tissue plays an essential role in organogenesis, including tooth development. Progress is being made to regenerate teeth by reassociating dissociated embryonic dental cells and implanting them in vivo. In the present study, we tested the hanging drop method to study mixed epithelial-mesenchymal cell reorganization in a liquid instead of semisolid medium to see whether it could lead to tooth histogenesis and organogenesis. This method allowed the control of the proportion and number of cells to be used, and the forming microtissues showed homogeneous size. The liquid environment favored cell migrations as compared with collagen gels. Three protocols were compared. The one that sequentially combined the hanging drop and semisolid medium cultures prior to in vivo implantation gave the best results. Indeed, after implantation, teeth developed, showing a well-formed crown, mineralization of dentin and enamel, and the initiation of root formation. Vascularization and the cellular heterogeneity in the mesenchyme were similar to what was observed in developing molars. Finally, after coimplantation with a trigeminal ganglion, the dental mesenchyme, including the odontoblast layer, became innervated. The real advantage of this technique is the small number of cells required to make a tooth. This experimental model can be employed to study the development, physiology, metabolism, or toxicology in forming teeth and test other cell sources. PMID:26965424

  13. Interaction of slow highly charged ions with hard dental tissue: studies of fluoride uptake and reminalization efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalova, A.; Kasperski, G.; Rousseau, P.; Domaracka, A.; Lawicki, A.

    2014-05-01

    TOF-SIMS mass spectroscopy data are presented on ion irradiation of hard dental tissue using a beam of 129Xe20+ (15 kV) ions delivered in the ARIBE facility by an ECR source. The investigation was focused on the mass distribution of the fragment ions. A comparison is made between the mass spectra from hard dental tissue treated by olaflur-(C27H60F2N2O3) and untreated hard dental tissue obtained under irradiation by low-energy highly-charged ions (HCIs). We found significant differences between the mass spectra of enamel after introducing amine fluoride (olaflur) and the mass spectra of pure untreated enamel. Further, we separated out the effects caused by radiation induced in the tooth enamel from those induced in dentin, which has not been performed before. In order to conduct a further detailed analysis, it is necessary to extend the research scope to include the influence of fluorine compounds on enamel and dentin.

  14. Odontoblasts: Specialized hard-tissue-forming cells in the dentin-pulp complex.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Okiji, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Odontoblasts are specialized cells that produce dentin and exhibit unique morphological characteristics; i.e., they extend cytoplasmic processes into dentinal tubules. While osteoblasts, which are typical hard-tissue-forming cells, are generated from mesenchymal stem cells during normal and pathological bone metabolism, the induction of odontoblasts only occurs once during tooth development, and odontoblasts survive throughout the lives of healthy teeth. During the differentiation of odontoblasts, signaling molecules from the inner enamel epithelium are considered necessary for the differentiation of odontoblast precursors, i.e., peripheral dental papilla cells. If odontoblasts are destroyed by severe external stimuli, such as deep caries, the differentiation of dental pulp stem cells into odontoblast-like cells is induced. Various bioactive molecules, such as non-collagenous proteins, might be involved in this process, although the precise mechanisms responsible for odontoblast differentiation have not been fully elucidated. Recently, our knowledge about the other functional activities of odontoblasts (apart from dentin formation) has increased. For example, it has been suggested that odontoblasts might act as nociceptive receptors, and surveillance cells that detect the invasion of exogenous pathogens. The regeneration of the dentin-pulp complex has recently gained much attention as a promising future treatment modality that could increase the longevity of pulpless teeth. Finally, congenital dentin anomalies, which are concerned with the disturbance of odontoblast functions, are summarized. PMID:27131345

  15. Improved classification and visualization of healthy and pathological hard dental tissues by modeling specular reflections in NIR hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenik, Peter; Bürmen, Miran; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-03-01

    Despite major improvements in dental healthcare and technology, dental caries remains one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of modern society. The initial stages of dental caries are characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals, commonly known as white spots, which are difficult to diagnose. Near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging is a new promising technique for early detection of demineralization which can classify healthy and pathological dental tissues. However, due to non-ideal illumination of the tooth surface the hyperspectral images can exhibit specular reflections, in particular around the edges and the ridges of the teeth. These reflections significantly affect the performance of automated classification and visualization methods. Cross polarized imaging setup can effectively remove the specular reflections, however is due to the complexity and other imaging setup limitations not always possible. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on modeling the specular reflections of hard dental tissues, which significantly improves the classification accuracy in the presence of specular reflections. The method was evaluated on five extracted human teeth with corresponding gold standard for 6 different healthy and pathological hard dental tissues including enamel, dentin, calculus, dentin caries, enamel caries and demineralized regions. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for multivariate local modeling of healthy and pathological dental tissues. The classification was performed by employing multiple discriminant analysis. Based on the obtained results we believe the proposed method can be considered as an effective alternative to the complex cross polarized imaging setups.

  16. The Rachitic Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Nociti, Francisco H.; Somerman, Martha J.

    2014-01-01

    Teeth are mineralized organs composed of three unique hard tissues, enamel, dentin, and cementum, and supported by the surrounding alveolar bone. Although odontogenesis differs from osteogenesis in several respects, tooth mineralization is susceptible to similar developmental failures as bone. Here we discuss conditions fitting under the umbrella of rickets, which traditionally referred to skeletal disease associated with vitamin D deficiency but has been more recently expanded to include newly identified factors involved in endocrine regulation of vitamin D, phosphate, and calcium, including phosphate-regulating endopeptidase homolog, X-linked, fibroblast growth factor 23, and dentin matrix protein 1. Systemic mineral metabolism intersects with local regulation of mineralization, and factors including tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase are necessary for proper mineralization, where rickets can result from loss of activity of tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase. Individuals suffering from rickets often bear the additional burden of a defective dentition, and transgenic mouse models have aided in understanding the nature and mechanisms involved in tooth defects, which may or may not parallel rachitic bone defects. This report reviews dental effects of the range of rachitic disorders, including discussion of etiologies of hereditary forms of rickets, a survey of resulting bone and tooth mineralization disorders, and a discussion of mechanisms, known and hypothesized, involved in the observed dental pathologies. Descriptions of human pathology are augmented by analysis of transgenic mouse models, and new interpretations are brought to bear on questions of how teeth are affected under conditions of rickets. In short, the rachitic tooth will be revealed. PMID:23939820

  17. Photodynamic Inactivation of Root Canal Bacteria by Light Activation through Human Dental Hard and Simulated Surrounding Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cieplik, Fabian; Pummer, Andreas; Leibl, Christoph; Regensburger, Johannes; Schmalz, Gottfried; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Maisch, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Photodynamic inactivation of bacteria (PIB) may be a supportive antimicrobial approach for use in endodontics, but sufficient activation of photosensitizers (PS) in root canals is a critical point. Therefore, aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of PS absorbing blue (TMPyP) or red light (Methylene Blue; MB) for light activation through human dental hard and simulated surrounding tissue to inactivate root canal bacteria. Methods: A tooth model was fabricated with a human premolar and two molars in an acrylic resin bloc simulating the optical properties of a porcine jaw. The distal root canal of the first molar was enlarged to insert a glass tube (external diameter 2 mm) containing PS and stationary-phase Enterococcus faecalis. Both PS (10 μM) were irradiated for 120 s with BlueV (20 mW/cm2; λem = 400–460 nm) or PDT 1200L (37.8 mW/cm2; λem = 570–680 nm; both: Waldmann Medizintechnik), respectively. Irradiation parameters ensured identical numbers of photons absorbed by each PS. Three setups were chosen: irradiating the glass pipette only (G), the glass pipette inside the single tooth without (GT) and with (GTM) simulated surrounding tissues. Colony forming units (CFU) were evaluated. Transmission measurements of the buccal halves of hemisected mandibular first molars were performed by means of a photospectrometer. Results: PIB with both PS led to reduction by ≥ 5 log10 of E. faecalis CFU for each setup. From transmission measurements, a threshold wavelength λth for allowing an amount of light transmission for sufficient activation of PS was determined to be 430 nm. Conclusion: This study can be seen as proof of principle that light activation of given intra-canal PS from outside a tooth may be possible at wavelengths ≥ 430 nm, facilitating clinical application of PIB in endodontics. PMID:27379059

  18. Changes in blood circulation in teeth and supporting tissues incident to experimental tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Vandevska-Radunovic, V; Kristiansen, A B; Heyeraas, K J; Kvinnsland, S

    1994-10-01

    Fluorescent microspheres (FM) were used to semi-quantify the effect of orthodontic forces on blood flow in oral tissues in young rats. Forty-five animals had an orthodontic appliance inserted on the first maxillary molar on one side exerting a mesial force of approximately 50 g. Ten animals served as unoperated controls. On days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after the start of the experiment, FM were injected into the left ventricle through an abdominal approach in the experimental and control animals. FM were counted in serial sections from the jaws in the periodontal ligament, pulp, and alveolar bone in a fluorescent microscope. The number of FM per tissue volume and/or tissue weight was taken as a measure of blood flow. The experimental side had significantly lower numbers of FM/mm3 in the periodontal ligament of the first and the second molar on the first day, compared with the contralateral side. However, a steady, significant increase in the number of FM/mm3 in the periodontal and pulpal tissues, and FM/mg in the alveolar bone could be observed on the third and seventh days on the experimental side of the first, second, and third molars compared with the contralateral side, while in the later stages the values of the two sides approached each other. The results of this study indicate that a localized experimental tooth movement initiates a more generalized blood flow response in the periodontal ligament, dental pulp and alveolar bone.

  19. Teeth and tooth nerves.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, C; Fried, K; Tuisku, F; Johansson, C S

    1995-02-01

    (1) Although our knowledge on teeth and tooth nerves has increased substantially during the past 25 years, several important issues remain to be fully elucidated. As a result of the work now going on at many laboratories over the world, we can expect exciting new findings and major break-throughs in these and other areas in a near future. (2) Dentin-like and enamel-like hard tissues evolved as components of the exoskeletal bony armor of early vertebrates, 500 million years ago, long before the first appearance of teeth. It is possible that teeth developed from tubercles (odontodes) in the bony armor. The presence of a canal system in the bony plates, of tubular dentin, of external pores in the enamel layer and of a link to the lateral line system promoted hypotheses that the bony plates and tooth precursors may have had a sensory function. The evolution of an efficient brain, of a head with paired sense organs and of toothed jaws concurred with a shift from a sessile filter-feeding life to active prey hunting. (3) The wide spectrum of feeding behaviors exhibited by modern vertebrates is reflected by a variety of dentition types. While the teeth are continuously renewed in toothed non-mammalian vertebrates, tooth turnover is highly restricted in mammals. As a rule, one set of primary teeth is replaced by one set of permanent teeth. Since teeth are richly innervated, the turnover necessitates a local neural plasticity. Another factor calling for a local plasticity is the relatively frequent occurrence of age-related and pathological dental changes. (4) Tooth development is initiated through interactions between the oral epithelium and underlying neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells. The interactions are mediated by cell surface molecules, extracellular matrix molecules and soluble molecules. The possibility that the initiating events might involve a neural component has been much discussed. With respect to mammals, the experimental evidence available does not

  20. Predictability of soft tissue form around single-tooth implant restorations.

    PubMed

    Priest, George

    2003-02-01

    The objective of this study was to answer important questions about gingival responses to single-tooth implants: (1) Are papilla regeneration and sulcular recession expected results? (2) Do soft tissue profiles retain their sulcular form over an extended period? and (3) Do single-implant replacements require special restorative handling to achieve predictable soft tissue form? A retrospective, photographic examination was used to follow 55 single-implant restorations in 51 patients for a period from 1 to 9 years (mean 3.5 years). Papillae regenerated in 83.9% of implants for a mean growth of 0.65 mm mesially and 0.62 mm distally. The sulcular apex receded in 59% of patients for a mean of 0.06 mm. Complete papilla fill was noted in 75% of patients examined. Short- to long-term measurements revealed that papilla regrowth continued slightly and that sulcular recession abated. Papilla regeneration around single implants was a predictable outcome in this population; sulcular recession was not a predictable finding. Papilla levels demonstrated a tendency toward increasing height, and sulcular levels remained fairly constant over the long term. Predictable soft tissue profiles were achieved with a simplified implant prosthetic protocol, progressing directly from healing abutments to definitive crowns in most cases.

  1. Abfractions: a new classification of hard tissue lesions of teeth.

    PubMed

    Grippo, J O

    1991-01-01

    Due to the stresses resulting from biomechanical loading forces exerted on the teeth (static, as in swallowing and clenching or cyclic, as in chewing), both enamel and dentin can chip or break away. This loss of tooth substance, which shall be termed Abfraction, is dependent on the magnitude, duration, direction, frequency, and location of the forces. These abfractive lesions are caused by flexure and ultimate material fatigue of susceptible teeth at locations away from the point of loading. Clinical observation of a variety of enamel and dentin lesions due to the shapes, sizes, loci, and frequency warrants a new and distinct classification.

  2. Lasers in esthetic dentistry: soft tissue photobiomodulation, hard tissue decontamination, and ceramics conditioning.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Karen Müller; de Freitas, Patrícia Moreira; Correa-Aranha, Ana Cecília; Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Lopes, Roberta Marques da Graça; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula

    2014-01-01

    The increasing concern and the search for conservative dental treatments have resulted in the development of several new technologies. Low and high power lasers can be cited as one of these new technologies. Low power lasers act at cellular level leading to pain reduction, modulation of inflammation, and improvement of tissue healing. High power lasers act by increasing temperature and have the potential to promote microbial reduction and ablation of hard and soft tissues. The clinical application of both low and high power lasers requires specific knowledge concerning laser interaction with biological tissues, so that the correct irradiation protocol can be established. The present case report describes the clinical steps of two metal-ceramic crowns development in a 60-year-old patient. Three different laser wavelengths were applied throughout the treatment with different purposes: Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm) for dentin decontamination, diode (660 nm) for soft tissue biomodulation, and Er:YAG laser (2,940 nm) for inner ceramic surface conditioning. Lasers were successfully applied in the present case report as coadjutant in the treatment. This coadjutant technology can be a potential tool to assist treatment to reach the final success.

  3. Hardness Changes of Tissue Conditioners in Various Storage Media: An in Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Ntounis, Athanasios; Kamposiora, Phophi; Papavasiliou, George; Divaris, Kimon; Zinelis, Spiros

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of storage media on the longitudinal hardness changes of tissue conditioning materials. Four tissue-conditioning materials were used for fabrication of 80 disc-shaped specimens and divided in four groups, stored in four storage media. The specimens underwent artificial ageing corresponding to 30 nights of extra-oral storage. Hardness measurements were obtained at nine intervals between 8 and 240 hours after specimen fabrication. To test the effects of storage media on hardness we employed multivariate modelling (Bonferroni correction; α = 0.05). The materials exhibited varying hardness changes, most pronounced when stored in ambient air. PMID:26415333

  4. Tooth Eruption Results from Bone Remodelling Driven by Bite Forces Sensed by Soft Tissue Dental Follicles: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sarrafpour, Babak; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing; Zoellner, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent tongue, lip and cheek forces influence precise tooth position, so we here examine the possibility that tissue remodelling driven by functional bite-force-induced jaw-strain accounts for tooth eruption. Notably, although a separate true ‘eruptive force’ is widely assumed, there is little direct evidence for such a force. We constructed a three dimensional finite element model from axial computerized tomography of an 8 year old child mandible containing 12 erupted and 8 unerupted teeth. Tissues modelled included: cortical bone, cancellous bone, soft tissue dental follicle, periodontal ligament, enamel, dentine, pulp and articular cartilage. Strain and hydrostatic stress during incisive and unilateral molar bite force were modelled, with force applied via medial and lateral pterygoid, temporalis, masseter and digastric muscles. Strain was maximal in the soft tissue follicle as opposed to surrounding bone, consistent with follicle as an effective mechanosensor. Initial numerical analysis of dental follicle soft tissue overlying crowns and beneath the roots of unerupted teeth was of volume and hydrostatic stress. To numerically evaluate biological significance of differing hydrostatic stress levels normalized for variable finite element volume, ‘biological response units’ in Nmm were defined and calculated by multiplication of hydrostatic stress and volume for each finite element. Graphical representations revealed similar overall responses for individual teeth regardless if incisive or right molar bite force was studied. There was general compression in the soft tissues over crowns of most unerupted teeth, and general tension in the soft tissues beneath roots. Not conforming to this pattern were the unerupted second molars, which do not erupt at this developmental stage. Data support a new hypothesis for tooth eruption, in which the follicular soft tissues detect bite-force-induced bone-strain, and direct bone remodelling at the inner surface of

  5. Tooth eruption results from bone remodelling driven by bite forces sensed by soft tissue dental follicles: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Sarrafpour, Babak; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing; Zoellner, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent tongue, lip and cheek forces influence precise tooth position, so we here examine the possibility that tissue remodelling driven by functional bite-force-induced jaw-strain accounts for tooth eruption. Notably, although a separate true 'eruptive force' is widely assumed, there is little direct evidence for such a force. We constructed a three dimensional finite element model from axial computerized tomography of an 8 year old child mandible containing 12 erupted and 8 unerupted teeth. Tissues modelled included: cortical bone, cancellous bone, soft tissue dental follicle, periodontal ligament, enamel, dentine, pulp and articular cartilage. Strain and hydrostatic stress during incisive and unilateral molar bite force were modelled, with force applied via medial and lateral pterygoid, temporalis, masseter and digastric muscles. Strain was maximal in the soft tissue follicle as opposed to surrounding bone, consistent with follicle as an effective mechanosensor. Initial numerical analysis of dental follicle soft tissue overlying crowns and beneath the roots of unerupted teeth was of volume and hydrostatic stress. To numerically evaluate biological significance of differing hydrostatic stress levels normalized for variable finite element volume, 'biological response units' in Nmm were defined and calculated by multiplication of hydrostatic stress and volume for each finite element. Graphical representations revealed similar overall responses for individual teeth regardless if incisive or right molar bite force was studied. There was general compression in the soft tissues over crowns of most unerupted teeth, and general tension in the soft tissues beneath roots. Not conforming to this pattern were the unerupted second molars, which do not erupt at this developmental stage. Data support a new hypothesis for tooth eruption, in which the follicular soft tissues detect bite-force-induced bone-strain, and direct bone remodelling at the inner surface of the

  6. Forced orthodontic eruption for augmentation of soft and hard tissue prior to implant placement

    PubMed Central

    de Molon, Rafael Scaf; de Avila, Érica Dorigatti; de Souza, João Antonio Chaves; Nogueira, Andressa Vilas Boas; Cirelli, Carolina Chan; Margonar, Rogerio; Cirelli, Joni Augusto

    2013-01-01

    Forced orthodontic eruption (FOE) is a non-surgical treatment option that allows modifying the osseous and gingival topography. The aim of this article is to present a clinical case of a FOE, which resulted in an improvement of the amount of available bone and soft-tissues for implant site development. Patient was referred for treatment of mobility and unesthetic appearance of their maxillary incisors. Clinical and radiographic examination revealed inflamed gingival tissue, horizontal and vertical tooth mobility and interproximal angular bone defects. It was chosen a multidisciplinary treatment approach using FOE, tooth extraction, and immediate implant placement to achieve better esthetic results. The use of FOE, in periodontally compromised teeth, promoted the formation of a new bone and soft-tissue in a coronal direction, without additional surgical procedures, enabling an esthetic, and functional implant-supported restoration. PMID:24015019

  7. Eruption of tooth-like structure following the exfoliation of natal tooth: report of case.

    PubMed

    Ooshima, T; Mihara, J; Saito, T; Sobue, S

    1986-01-01

    Natal teeth, defined as those that are the mouth at birth, are rare: one case in 2,000 to 3,500 births. In this case, that of a nine-month-old Japanese boy, it is reasonable to infer that the tooth-like structure, described as a hard-tissue conglomerate with a bone-like appearance, originated in the remnant of the dental papilla and Hertwig's sheath of the natal tooth. Both dentin and root formation were thereby induced.

  8. Calcium and magnesium content in hard tissues of rats under condition of subchronic lead intoxication.

    PubMed

    Todorovic, Tatjana; Vujanovic, Dragana; Dozic, Ivan; Petkovic-Curcin, Aleksandra

    2008-03-01

    Lead manifests toxic effects in almost all organs and tissues, especially in: the nervous system, hematopoietic system, kidney and liver. This metal has a special affinity for deposition in hard tissue, i.e., bones and teeth. It is generally believed that the main mechanism of its toxicity relies on its interaction with bioelements, especially with Ca and Mg. This article analyses the influence of Pb poisoning on Ca and Mg content in hard tissues, (mandible, femur, teeth and skull) of female and young rats. Experiments were carried out on 60 female rats, AO breed, and on 80 of their young rats (offspring). Female rats were divided into three groups: the first one was a control group, the second one received 100 mg/kg Pb2+ kg b.wt. per day in drinking water, the third one received 30 mg/kg Pb(2+) kg b.wt. per day in drinking water. Young rats (offspring) were divided into the same respective three groups. Lead, calcium and magnesium content in hard tissues (mandible, femur, teeth-incisors and skull) was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry in mineralized samples. There was a statistically significant Pb deposition in all analyzed female and young rat hard tissues. Ca and Mg contents were significantly reduced in all female and young rat hard tissues. These results show that Pb poisoning causes a significant reduction in Ca and Mg content in animal hard tissues, which is probably the consequence of competitive antagonism between Pb and Ca and Mg.

  9. Comparison of hard tissues that are useful for DNA analysis in forensic autopsy.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yu; Ohira, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Yukio; Yamada, Yoshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Forensic analysis of DNA from hard tissues can be important when investigating a variety of cases resulting from mass disaster or criminal cases. This study was conducted to evaluate the most suitable tissues, method and sample size for processing of hard tissues prior to DNA isolation. We also evaluated the elapsed time after death in relation to the quantity of DNA extracted. Samples of hard tissues (37 teeth, 42 skull, 42 rib, and 39 nails) from 42 individuals aged between 50 and 83 years were used. The samples were taken from remains following forensic autopsy (from 2 days to 2 years after death). To evaluate the integrity of the nuclear DNA isolated, the percentage of allele calls for short tandem repeat profiles were compared between the hard tissues. DNA typing results indicated that until 1 month after death, any of the four hard tissue samples could be used as an alternative to teeth, allowing analysis of all of the loci. However, in terms of the sampling site, collection method and sample size adjustment, the rib appeared to be the best choice in view of the ease of specimen preparation. Our data suggest that the rib could be an alternative hard tissue sample for DNA analysis of human remains.

  10. Fatigue and fatigue crack growth processes in hard tissues: The importance of age and surface integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majd, Hessam

    With the progressive increase in partially and fully dentate seniors, fracture has become an increasingly common form of restored tooth failure. Dentin undergoes progressive changes in microstructure with patient age, and studies are now suggesting that there is a reduction in fatigue strength and fatigue crack growth resistance of this tissue. This dissertation explores aging of dentin, the influence of flaws that are introduced during restorative processes on the fatigue properties of dentin, and proposes models for characterizing the damage initiation and growth process during fatigue of dentin. Results from this investigation show that the fatigue crack growth properties (Paris Law parameters (C, m) andDeltaKth) of human dentin undergo the most significant changes at a patient age of 42 years. Based on the fatigue crack growth responses, three age groups were established including young (age≤33), aged (34≤age ≤49) and old (50≤age) patients for further analysis. There were significant differences in the initiation and growth behavior between the tissues of patients from the three age groups. With regards to the influence of restorative processes, there was no influence on the quasi-static responses of dentin. However, the endurance limit of dentin treated with the dental burs (28 MPa) and abrasive air jet (35 MPa) were approximately 36% and 20% lower than that of the control (44 MPa), respectively. Both cutting processes caused a significant reduction (p≤0.0001) in fatigue strength. An accumulative damage model was developed to characterize fatigue of the control and bur treated dentin as well as provide a model for fatigue life prediction. The damage models were derived as a function of number of loading cycles (N), and ratio of applied stress to ultimate strength (r). The developed models provide estimations for the initial state of damage, the state of damage during the life, as well as the damage accumulation rate for cyclic loading of dentin

  11. Tooth brushing, oil pulling and tissue regeneration: A review of holistic approaches to oral health.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhinav; Purohit, Bharathi

    2011-04-01

    Even though dentistry was not a specialized branch of Ayurveda, it is included in its Shalakya Tantra (system of surgery). Problems such as deformities of the oral cavity, plaques and infections were managed in ancient India. Traditional medicine can treat various infectious and chronic conditions. Research has shown that all kinds of chewing sticks described in ancient Ayurveda texts have medicinal and anti-cariogenic properties. Its oil pulling (Kaval, Gandush) practice is claimed to cure about 30 systemic diseases. Amla (Emblic myrobalan), is a general rebuilder of oral health. Bilberry fruit (Vaccinium myrtillus) and hawthorn berry (Crateagus oxycanthus) stabilize collagen, strengthening the gum tissue. Liquorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabral) promotes anti-cavity action, reduces plaque, and has an antibacterial effect. Use of safe, quality products and practices should be ensured based on available evidence if traditional medicine is to be acknowledged as part of primary health care. Scientific validations of the Ayurveda dental health practices could justify their incorporation into modern dental care. Publicity of these techniques using appropriate media would benefit the general population by giving more confidence in the ancient practices, thus preventing tooth decay and loss.

  12. Tooth brushing, oil pulling and tissue regeneration: A review of holistic approaches to oral health

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhinav; Purohit, Bharathi

    2011-01-01

    Even though dentistry was not a specialized branch of Ayurveda, it is included in its Shalakya Tantra (system of surgery). Problems such as deformities of the oral cavity, plaques and infections were managed in ancient India. Traditional medicine can treat various infectious and chronic conditions. Research has shown that all kinds of chewing sticks described in ancient Ayurveda texts have medicinal and anti-cariogenic properties. Its oil pulling (Kaval, Gandush) practice is claimed to cure about 30 systemic diseases. Amla (Emblic myrobalan), is a general rebuilder of oral health. Bilberry fruit (Vaccinium myrtillus) and hawthorn berry (Crateagus oxycanthus) stabilize collagen, strengthening the gum tissue. Liquorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabral) promotes anti-cavity action, reduces plaque, and has an antibacterial effect. Use of safe, quality products and practices should be ensured based on available evidence if traditional medicine is to be acknowledged as part of primary health care. Scientific validations of the Ayurveda dental health practices could justify their incorporation into modern dental care. Publicity of these techniques using appropriate media would benefit the general population by giving more confidence in the ancient practices, thus preventing tooth decay and loss. PMID:21760690

  13. Picosecond and femtosecond laser ablation of hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Kar, Ajoy K.; Khabbaz, Marouan

    1996-12-01

    In this study, the interaction of picosecond and femtosecond pulsed laser radiation with human dental tissue was investigated experimentally, as this unexplored field is expected to be a potential alternative in powerful laser processing of biomedical structures. Dentin ablation rate experiments were performed by using teeth sections of different thickness. Dental tissue samples were irradiated in air with i) a regenerative amplifier laser at 1064 nm, pulse duration 110 ps, ii) the second harmonic laser at 532 nm, pulse duration 100 ps, and iii) a picosecond tunable dye amplifier at 595 nm, pulse width 800 fs. In all the experiments the pulse repetition rate was 10 Hz. The ablation rate per pulse at different energy fluence settings was calculated by measuring the time needed for the perforation of the whole dental sample thickness. Short laser pulses can confine thermal energy within the optical zone, which maximizes photothermal and photomechanical mechanisms of interaction. Tissue ablation rates were found to be comparable to or better than other nanosecond lasers, and left smooth surfaces, free of thermal damage.

  14. Concentrations of 90Sr in the tooth tissues 60 years after intake: results of TL measurements and applications for Techa River dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, E A; Tolstykh, E I; Verdi, E; Volchkova, A Yu; Veronese, I; El-Faramawy, N A; Göksu, H Y; Degteva, M O

    2014-03-01

    This article focuses on the study of (90)Sr in the tooth tissues of Techa riverside residents 60 years after intake. The Techa River was contaminated by radioactive wastes in the 1950s. Contamination of the river system, including water, bottom sediment, floodplain soil, and grass, depended on the distance from the source of releases. Therefore, the average (90)Sr intake was different in different settlements located downstream the river. An additional factor influencing (90)Sr accumulation in the teeth is the rate of tissue mineralization at the time of intake which depended on the donor's age at the time of releases. Measurements of (90)Sr concentration in various dental tissues (enamel, crown, and root dentin) of 166 teeth were performed about 60 years after the main intake using the method of thermoluminescence passive beta detection. The paper presents the current levels of tooth tissue contamination, and the tooth-to-tooth variability of (90)Sr concentration in tooth tissues was assessed for the tissues which were matured at the time of massive liquid radioactive waste releases into the Techa River. A model describing the expected levels of (90)Sr in matured dental tissues depending on age and intake has been elaborated for the population under study. The results obtained will be used for calculation of internal dose in enamel and for interpretation of tooth doses measured by means of the electron paramagnetic resonance method, among the population of the Techa River region. PMID:24292426

  15. Comparison between laser-induced photoemissions and phototransmission of hard tissues using fibre-coupled Nd:YAG and Er(3+)-doped fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    El-Sherif, Ashraf Fathy

    2012-07-01

    During pulsed laser irradiation of dental enamel, laser-induced photoemissions result from the laser-tissue interaction through mechanisms including fluorescence and plasma formation. Fluorescence induced by non-ablative laser light interaction has been used in tissue diagnosis, but the photoemission signal accompanying higher power ablative processes may also be used to provide real-time monitoring of the laser-tissue interaction. The spectral characteristics of the photoemission signals from normal and carious tooth enamel induced by two different pulsed lasers were examined. The radiation sources compared were a high-power extra-long Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at a wavelength of 1,066 nm giving pulses (with pulse durations in the range 200-250 μs) in the near infrared and a free-running Er(3+)-doped ZBLAN fibre laser operating at a wavelength near 3 μm with similar pulse durations in the mid-infrared region. The photoemission spectra produced during pulsed laser irradiation of enamel samples were recorded using a high-resolution spectrometer with a CCD array detector that enabled an optical resolution as high as 0.02 nm (FWHM). The spectral and time-dependence of the laser-induced photoemission due to thermal emission and plasma formation were detected during pulsed laser irradiation of hard tissues and were used to distinguish between normal and carious teeth. The use of these effects to distinguish between hard and soft biological tissues during photothermal ablation with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser or an Er fibre laser appears feasible. The real-time spectrally resolved phototransmission spectrum produced during pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation of human tooth enamel samples was recorded, with a (normalized) relative transmission coefficient of 1 (100%) for normal teeth and 0.6 (60%) for the carious teeth. The photoemission signal accompanying ablative events may also be used to provide real-time monitoring of the laser-tissue interaction.

  16. Two-photon-excited autofluorescence and second-harmonic generation microscopy for the visualization of penetration of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles into human tooth tissue ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunina, Natalia A.; Popov, Alexey P.; Lademann, Jürgen; Tuchin, Valery V.; Myllylä, Risto; Darvin, Maxim E.

    2012-06-01

    Penetration of nanoparticles into tooth tissues is of significant interest in solving problems related to reduction of tooth sensitivity, enamel strengthening and restoration and cosmetic bleaching. In this work we demonstrate two-photonexcited autofluorescence and second-harmonic generation microscopy for visualization of penetration of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles into tooth tissues.

  17. Phase Transformations in a Human Tooth Tissue at the Initial Stage of Caries

    PubMed Central

    Prutskij, Tatiana; Ippolitov, Yury

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to study phase transformations in solid tissues of the human teeth during the development of fissure caries by Raman and fluorescence microspectroscopy. The study of the areas with fissure caries confirmed the assumption of the formation of a weak interaction between phosphate apatite enamel and organic acids (products of microorganisms). The experimental results obtained with by Raman microspectroscopy showed the formation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate - CaHPO4-2H2O in the area of mural demineralization of carious fissure. A comparative analysis of structural and spectroscopic data for the intact and carious enamel shows that emergence of a more soluble phase - carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite - is typical for the initial stage of caries. It is shown that microareas of dental hard tissues in the carious fissure due to an emerging misorientation of apatite crystals have a higher fluorescence yield than the area of the intact enamel. These areas can be easily detected even prior to a deep demineralization (white spot stage) for the case of irreversibly changed organomineral complex and intensive removal of the mineral component. PMID:25901743

  18. Phase transformations in a human tooth tissue at the initial stage of caries.

    PubMed

    Seredin, Pavel; Goloshchapov, Dmitry; Prutskij, Tatiana; Ippolitov, Yury

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to study phase transformations in solid tissues of the human teeth during the development of fissure caries by Raman and fluorescence microspectroscopy. The study of the areas with fissure caries confirmed the assumption of the formation of a weak interaction between phosphate apatite enamel and organic acids (products of microorganisms). The experimental results obtained with by Raman microspectroscopy showed the formation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate - CaHPO4-2H2O in the area of mural demineralization of carious fissure. A comparative analysis of structural and spectroscopic data for the intact and carious enamel shows that emergence of a more soluble phase - carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite - is typical for the initial stage of caries. It is shown that microareas of dental hard tissues in the carious fissure due to an emerging misorientation of apatite crystals have a higher fluorescence yield than the area of the intact enamel. These areas can be easily detected even prior to a deep demineralization (white spot stage) for the case of irreversibly changed organomineral complex and intensive removal of the mineral component.

  19. Soft and Hard Tissue Management in Implant Therapy—Part II: Prosthetic Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Manicone, Paolo Francesco; Raffaelli, Luca; Ghassemian, Marjan; D'Addona, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing pursuit of aesthetic excellence in the field of implant therapy has incorporated prosthetic concepts in the early treatment-planning phase, as well as the previously discussed surgical concepts. The literature has addressed these prosthetic and laboratory approaches required to enhance and perfect the soft and hard tissue management (SHTM). After surgically providing an acceptable hard tissue architecture and adequate timing of loading of the implant, the prosthetic phase is responsible for the soft tissue modeling, through correctly planned and executed procedures, which induce a satisfactory soft tissue profile by considering the microvasculature, the abutment connection and positioning, and the implementation of an adequate provisional phase. The objectives are the modeling of the soft tissues through the use of a conforming periorestorative interface which will produce desired and stable results. PMID:22811712

  20. Dental hard tissue modification and removal using sealed transverse excited atmospheric-pressure lasers operating at lambda=9.6 and 10.6 um

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel; Ragadio, Jerome N.; Akrivou, Maria; Featherstone, John D.; Murray, Michael W.; Dickenson, Kevin M.

    2001-04-01

    Pulsed CO2 lasers have been shown to be effective for both removal and modification of dental hard tissue for the treatment of dental caries. In this study, sealed transverse excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) laser systems optimally tuned to the highly absorbed 9.6 micrometers wavelength were investigated for application on dental hard tissue. Conventional TEA lasers produce an initial high energy spike at the beginning of the laser pulse of submicrosecond duration followed by a long tail of about 1 - 4 microsecond(s) . The pulse duration is well matched to the 1 - 2 microsecond(s) thermal relaxation time of the deposited laser energy at 9.6 micrometers and effectively heats the enamel to the temperatures required for surface modification at absorbed fluences of less than 0.5 J/cm2. Thus, the heat deposition in the tooth and the corresponding risk of pulpal necrosis from excessive heat accumulation is minimized. At higher fluences, the high peak power of the laser pulse rapidly initiates a plasma that markedly reduces the ablation rate and efficiency, severely limiting applicability for hard tissue ablation. By lengthening the laser pulse to reduce the energy distributed in the initial high energy spike, the plasma threshold can be raised sufficiently to increase the ablation rate by an order of magnitude. This results in a practical and efficient CO2 laser system for caries ablation and surface modification.

  1. Dental hard tissue modification and removal using sealed TEA lasers operating at λ=9.6 and 10.6 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel; Murray, Michael W.; Featherstone, John D. B.; Akrivou, Maria; Dickenson, Kevin M.; Duhn, Clifford W.; Ojeda, Orlando P.

    1999-05-01

    Pulsed CO2 lasers have been shown to be effective for both removal and modification of dental hard tissue for the treatment of dental caries. In this study, sealed TEA laser systems optimally tuned to the highly absorbed 9.6 μm wavelength were investigated for application on dental hard tissue. Conventional TEA lasers produce a laser pulse wit a 100-200 ns gain switched spike followed by a long tail of about 1-4 μs in duration. the pulse duration is well matched to the 1-2 μs thermal relaxation time of the deposited laser energy at 9.6 μm and effectively heats the enamel to temperatures required for surface modification for caries prevention at absorbed fluences of less than 0.5 J/cm2. Thus, the heat deposition in the tooth and the corresponding risk, of pulpal necrosis form excessive heat accumulation is minimized. At higher fluences the high peak power of the gain-switched spike rapidly initiates a plasma that markedly reduces the ablation rate and efficiency, severely limiting applicability for hard tissue ablation. By slightly stretching the pulse to reduce the energy distributed in the initial 100-200 ns of the laser pulse, the plasma threshold can be raised sufficiently to increase the ablation rate by an order of magnitude. This results in a practical and efficient CO2 laser system for caries ablation and surface modification.

  2. Dental silver tooth fillings: A source of mercury exposure revealed by whole-body image scan and tissue analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, L.J.; Kloiber, R.; Vimy, M.J.; Takahashi, Y.; Lorscheider, F.L. )

    1989-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) vapor is released from dental silver tooth fillings into human mouth air after chewing, but its possible uptake routes and distribution among body tissues are unknown. This investigation demonstrates that when radioactive 203Hg is mixed with dental Hg/silver fillings (amalgam) and placed in teeth of adult sheep, the isotope will appear in various organs and tissues within 29 days. Evidence of Hg uptake, as determined by whole-body scanning and measurement of isotope in specific tissues, revealed three uptake sites: lung, gastrointestinal, and jaw tissue absorption. Once absorbed, high concentrations of dental amalgam Hg rapidly localize in kidneys and liver. Results are discussed in view of potential health consequences from long-term exposure to Hg from this dental material.

  3. Hard tissue regeneration using bone substitutes: an update on innovations in materials.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Swapan Kumar; Lee, Byong Taek

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a unique organ composed of mineralized hard tissue, unlike any other body part. The unique manner in which bone can constantly undergo self-remodeling has created interesting clinical approaches to the healing of damaged bone. Healing of large bone defects is achieved using implant materials that gradually integrate with the body after healing is completed. Such strategies require a multidisciplinary approach by material scientists, biological scientists, and clinicians. Development of materials for bone healing and exploration of the interactions thereof with the body are active research areas. In this review, we explore ongoing developments in the creation of materials for regenerating hard tissues. PMID:25995658

  4. Hard tissue regeneration using bone substitutes: an update on innovations in materials.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Swapan Kumar; Lee, Byong Taek

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a unique organ composed of mineralized hard tissue, unlike any other body part. The unique manner in which bone can constantly undergo self-remodeling has created interesting clinical approaches to the healing of damaged bone. Healing of large bone defects is achieved using implant materials that gradually integrate with the body after healing is completed. Such strategies require a multidisciplinary approach by material scientists, biological scientists, and clinicians. Development of materials for bone healing and exploration of the interactions thereof with the body are active research areas. In this review, we explore ongoing developments in the creation of materials for regenerating hard tissues.

  5. Hard tissue regeneration using bone substitutes: an update on innovations in materials

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Swapan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a unique organ composed of mineralized hard tissue, unlike any other body part. The unique manner in which bone can constantly undergo self-remodeling has created interesting clinical approaches to the healing of damaged bone. Healing of large bone defects is achieved using implant materials that gradually integrate with the body after healing is completed. Such strategies require a multidisciplinary approach by material scientists, biological scientists, and clinicians. Development of materials for bone healing and exploration of the interactions thereof with the body are active research areas. In this review, we explore ongoing developments in the creation of materials for regenerating hard tissues. PMID:25995658

  6. Nanophase hydroxyapatite as a biomaterial in advanced hard tissue engineering: a review.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Siti Maisurah; Sharif Zein, Sharif Hussein; Othman, Mohd Roslee; Yang, Fang; Jansen, John A

    2013-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite is a biocompatible material that is extensively used in the replacement and regeneration of bone material. In nature, nanostructured hydroxyapatite is the main component present in hard body tissues. Hence, the state of the art in nanotechnology can be exploited to synthesize nanophase hydroxyapatite that has similar properties with natural hydroxyapatite. Sustainable methods to mass-produce synthetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles are being developed to meet the increasing demand for these materials and to further develop the progress made in hard tissue regeneration, especially for orthopedic and dental applications. This article reviews the current developments in nanophase hydroxyapatite through various manufacturing techniques and modifications.

  7. Periodontal tissues changes in tooth-borne distraction osteogenesis: an experimental study of closure of wide alveolar bone defects in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuxiang; Liu, Yanpu; Cao, Meng; Ma, Qin; Zhou, Hongzhi; Liu, Baolin

    2009-03-01

    We studied changes in periodontal tissue during maxillary dentoalveolar distraction osteogenesis using an intraoral tooth-borne distractor to close wide alveolar defects in four dogs. The dentoalveolar monofocal transport disc was made by complete horizontal subapical and vertical interdental osteotomy. Gradual distraction was started after a latency period of seven days at the rate of 0.4mm twice a day. We measured the displacement of the supporting tooth and the anchoring tooth, and took successive radiographs. On days 0, 14, 28, and 70 after distraction, the dentoalveolar segments were harvested for histological examination. There was periodontal hyperplasia in the tissues of the tension side, and absorption in the stress side. In the early period of consolidation, there was inflammation and local destruction of periodontal tissues, but the changes reversed over time. The anchoring tooth was not displaced and the periodontal tissues did not change. Morphological changes in the periodontal tissues of the supporting tooth were moderate and, like the physiological changes of the periodontal ligament of the orthodontic tooth, could be reversed if the rate and duration of distraction were correct.

  8. Case report: management of tooth tissue loss from intrinsic acid erosion.

    PubMed

    Yip, Kevin H; Smales, Roger J; Kaidonis, John A

    2003-09-01

    Acid erosive tooth wear is increasingly being reported in many western countries, and is also being recognised as a significant cause of tooth destruction in persons with xerostomia. The primary aetiology is related to a high consumption of dietary sources of acids and also to an increasing awareness of gastric acid as a significant factor in both children and adults. Recommended preventive dental treatments aim to neutralise the effects of acids, reduce the severity of xerostomia, stimulate salivary flow and buffering capacity, and increase the acid resistance of tooth substance. Initial restorative treatments should be conservative, using adhesive dentistry techniques. This treatment approach is illustrated by the oral rehabilitation of a severe erosion case using adhesive onlays, veneers and all ceramic crowns. PMID:14562646

  9. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices

    PubMed Central

    López-Frías, Francisco J.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction. PMID:24558525

  10. Hardness and elasticity of caries-affected and sound primary tooth dentin bonded with 4-META one-step self-etch adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Hosoya, Yumiko; Tay, Franklin R.; Miyakoshi, Shoichi; Pashley, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the quality of the interface of sound and carious primary tooth dentin bonded with two 4-META one-step self-etch adhesives. Methods Twelve sound and twelve carious primary molars were bonded with AQ Bond Plus (AQBP; Sun Medical) or Hybrid Bond (HB; Sun Medical) and restored with Clearfil Protect Liner F (Kuraray Medical Inc.). After 24 hours of water immersion, the teeth were sectioned and polished. Resin-dentin interfaces were measured with a nano-indentation tester and hardness and Young’s modulus were calculated. Data were analyzed using one-way or two-ways ANOVA and Fisher’s PLSD test with α=0.05. Resin-dentin interfaces were also observed with SEM and TEM. Ammoniacal silver nitrate was used as a tracer for TEM observation. Results Hardness and Young’s modulus of the interfacial dentin were significantly lower than the underlying intact dentin except for the carious-AQBP group. However, there was no significant difference of hardness and Young's moduli of the interfacial dentin among all groups. TEM revealed extensive interfacial nanoleakage in sound dentin bonded with either AQBP or HB. For the carious teeth, nanoleakage was absent in the hybrid layers bonded with the two adhesives. However, extensive silver deposits were identified from the subsurface, porous caries-affected dentin. PMID:18795517

  11. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental hard tissues with an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system.

    PubMed

    Braun, Andreas; Krillke, Raphael Franz; Frentzen, Matthias; Bourauel, Christoph; Stark, Helmut; Schelle, Florian

    2015-02-01

    Heat generation during the removal of dental hard tissues may lead to a temperature increase and cause painful sensations or damage dental tissues. The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental hard tissues following laser ablation using an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system. A total of 85 specimens of dental hard tissues were used, comprising 45 specimens of human dentine evaluating a thickness of 1, 2, and 3 mm (15 samples each) and 40 specimens of human enamel with a thickness of 1 and 2 mm (20 samples each). Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1,064 nm, a pulse duration of 9 ps, and a repetition rate of 500 kHz with an average output power of 6 W. Specimens were irradiated for 0.8 s. Employing a scanner system, rectangular cavities of 1-mm edge length were generated. A temperature sensor was placed at the back of the specimens, recording the temperature during the ablation process. All measurements were made employing a heat-conductive paste without any additional cooling or spray. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the dental hard tissue (enamel or dentine) and the thickness of the respective tissue (p < 0.05). Highest temperature increase could be observed in the 1-mm thickness group for enamel. Evaluating the 1-mm group for dentine, a significantly lower temperature increase could be measured (p < 0.05) with lowest values in the 3-mm group (p < 0.05). A time delay for temperature increase during the ablation process depending on the material thickness was observed for both hard tissues (p < 0.05). Employing the USPL system to remove dental hard tissues, heat generation has to be considered. Especially during laser ablation next to pulpal tissues, painful sensations and potential thermal injury of pulp tissue might occur.

  12. Chemical and X-ray analysis of fluoride, phosphorus, and calcium in human foetal blood and hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Montherrat-Carret, L; Perrat-Mabilon, B; Barbey, E; Bouloc, R; Boivin, G; Michelet, A; Magloire, H

    1996-12-01

    To evaluate the beneficial effect of prenatal fluoride supplementation, the presence of fluoride in hard tissues in two populations of human foetuses coming from fluoridated (> or = 0.7 parts/10(6) F in drinking water) and non-fluoridated areas (< or = 0.1 parts/10(6) F in drinking water) were compared by chemical analysis and X-ray microanalysis. The fluoride concentrations measured in maternal and venous cord blood confirmed that placental transfer of fluoride was passive when fluoride intake was low. Total fluoride contents of tooth germs and mandibular bone appeared to increase with fluoride level in drinking water. However, these concentrations were too low to be detected by X-ray microanalysis. Phosphorus and calcium total contents were identical in mandibular and femoral bone of both populations. In incisor germs, phosphorus and calcium concentrations in enamel and dentine close to the amelodentinal junction did not differ significantly between the two populations. It is suggested that the low fluoride concentrations in enamel and dentine formed in utero would not have a significant effect on acid solubility.

  13. Influence of water environment on holmium laser ablation performance for hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Lü, Tao; Xiao, Qing; Li, Zhengjia

    2012-05-01

    This study clarifies the ablation differences in air and in water for hard biological tissues, which are irradiated by fiber-guided long-pulsed holmium lasers. High-speed photography is used to record the dynamic characteristics of ablation plumes and vaporization bubbles induced by pulsed holmium lasers. The ablation morphologies and depth of hard tissues are quantitatively measured by optical coherence microscopy. Explosive vaporization effects in water play a positive role in the contact ablation process and are directly responsible for significant ablation enhancement. Furthermore, water layer depth can also contribute to ablation performance. Under the same laser parameters for fiber-tissue contact ablation in air and water, ablation performances are comparable for a single-laser pulse, but for more laser pulses the ablation performances in water are better than those in air. Comprehensive knowledge of ablation differences under various environments is important, especially in medical procedures that are performed in a liquid environment.

  14. Design and implementation of therapeutic ultrasound generating circuit for dental tissue formation and tooth-root healing.

    PubMed

    Woon Tiong Ang; Scurtescu, C; Wing Hoy; El-Bialy, T; Ying Yin Tsui; Jie Chen

    2010-02-01

    Biological tissue healing has recently attracted a great deal of research interest in various medical fields. Trauma to teeth, deep and root caries, and orthodontic treatment can all lead to various degrees of root resorption. In our previous study, we showed that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) enhances the growth of lower incisor apices and accelerates their rate of eruption in rabbits by inducing dental tissue growth. We also performed clinical studies and demonstrated that LIPUS facilitates the healing of orthodontically induced teeth-root resorption in humans. However, the available LIPUS devices are too large to be used comfortably inside the mouth. In this paper, the design and implementation of a low-power LIPUS generator is presented. The generator is the core of the final intraoral device for preventing tooth root loss and enhancing tooth root tissue healing. The generator consists of a power-supply subsystem, an ultrasonic transducer, an impedance-matching circuit, and an integrated circuit composed of a digital controller circuitry and the associated driver circuit. Most of our efforts focus on the design of the impedance-matching circuit and the integrated system-on-chip circuit. The chip was designed and fabricated using 0.8- ¿m high-voltage technology from Dalsa Semiconductor, Inc. The power supply subsystem and its impedance-matching network are implemented using discrete components. The LIPUS generator was tested and verified to function as designed and is capable of producing ultrasound power up to 100 mW in the vicinity of the transducer's resonance frequency at 1.5 MHz. The power efficiency of the circuitry, excluding the power supply subsystem, is estimated at 70%. The final products will be tailored to the exact size of teeth or biological tissue, which is needed to be used for stimulating dental tissue (dentine and cementum) healing.

  15. Interactions of hard tissues, soft tissues, and growth over time, and their impact on orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Sarver, David M

    2015-09-01

    The approach to orthodontic diagnosis has changed gradually but steadily over the past 2 decades. The shift away from diagnosis based entirely on hard tissue evaluations has been a result of a broadened recognition of the importance of facial and smile appearance to our patients, and how they change over time. The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the integration of the new soft tissue paradigm into long-term treatment planning, with a focus on the esthetic goals of treatment.

  16. Emotional stress and orthodontic tooth movement: effects on apical root resorption, tooth movement, and dental tissue expression of interleukin-1 alpha and calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactive nerve fibres in rats.

    PubMed

    Vandevska-Radunovic, Vaska; Murison, Robert

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of emotional stress on apical root resorption (ARR) and tooth displacement during orthodontic tooth movement in rats. A further area of interest was to evaluate if the expression of interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1alpha) as well as the density and distribution of peptidergic nerve fibres immunoreactive to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the periodontal ligament (PDL) are associated with possible stress-induced changes in root resorption and tooth movement. A total of 52 male Wistar rats, aged 6 weeks, were divided in three experimental and one control group (n = 4). Group 1 had orthodontic tooth movement and received foot shocks (OTMS; n = 16), group 2 had orthodontic tooth movement but received no foot shocks (OTMNS; n = 16), and group 3 had no orthodontic tooth movement and received foot shocks (NOTMS; n = 16). Each group was further divided into four subgroups (n = 4), corresponding to the period of the experiment, i.e. 3, 7, 13, and 21 days. At the end of each experimental period, the blood samples were taken, the animals were sacrificed, and the jaws excised, deminerialized, and processed for immunocytochemistry. One-way analysis of variance was used to detect inter-group differences for all investigated variables. CGRP immunopositive nerve fibres were evaluated qualitatively. All the experimental groups demonstrated higher corticosterone levels than the control group, suggesting a stress-induced experience by orthodontic treatment per se. The OTMS group had the least amount of cellular cementum throughout the experimental periods and showed significant reduction in tooth displacement, especially at 3 and 7 days. No obvious changes were observed in the dental tissue expression of IL-1alpha and CGRP immunoreactive nerve fibres between the stressed and non-stressed orthodontically treated groups.

  17. Imaging of cochlear tissue with a grating interferometer and hard X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Shintani-Smith, Stephanie; Fishman, Andrew; David, Christian; Robinson, Ian; Rau, Christoph

    2010-01-28

    This article addresses an important current development in medical and biological imaging: the possibility of imaging soft tissue at resolutions in the micron range using hard X-rays. Challenging environments, including the cochlea, require the imaging of soft tissue structure surrounded by bone. We demonstrate that cochlear soft tissue structures can be imaged with hard X-ray phase contrast. Furthermore, we show that only a thin slice of the tissue is required to introduce a large phase shift. It is likely that the phase contrast image of the soft tissue structures is sufficient to image the structures even if surrounded by bone. For the present set of experiments, structures with low-absorption contrast have been visualized using in-line phase contrast imaging and a grating interferometer. The experiments have been performed at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratories, a third generation source of synchrotron radiation. The source provides highly coherent X-ray radiation with high-photon flux (>10{sup 12} photons/s) at high-photon energies (5-70 keV). Radiographic and light microscopy images of the gerbil cochlear slice samples were compared. It has been determined that a 20-{micro}m thick tissue slice induces a phase shift between 1/3{pi} and 2/3{pi}.

  18. Soft- and hard-tissue facial anthropometry in three dimensions: what's new.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; de Menezes, Marcio; Ferrario, Virgilio

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years, technology has provided new instruments for the three-dimensional analysis of human facial morphology. Currently, quantitative assessments of dimensions, spatial positions and relative proportions of distinctive facial features can be obtained for both soft- and hard- (skeletal and dental) tissues. New mathematical tools allow to fuse digital data obtained from various image analyzers, thus providing quantitative information for anatomical and nthropometric descriptions, medical evaluations (clinical genetics, orthodontics, maxillo-facial and plastic surgery), and forensic medicine.

  19. [Study on the method of adsorbing albumin for enwrapping human hard tissue substitute biomaterials].

    PubMed

    Yu, K; Chen, Z

    1998-06-01

    The aim of this study was to cover up the surface of human hard tissue substitute biomaterials with albumin. The cidex cross-link method was adopted to adsorb albumin so as to form a membrane for wrapping hydroxyapatite(HA), bio-glass ceramics(BGC), and hydroxyl poly-calcium sodium phosphate (HP). The results showed that this membrane of protein could enwrap the biomaterials so firmly that urea solution could not wash it off.

  20. Hard tissue as a composite material. I - Bounds on the elastic behavior.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. L.

    1971-01-01

    Recent determination of the elastic moduli of hydroxyapatite by ultrasonic methods permits a re-examination of the Voigt or parallel model of the elastic behavior of bone, as a two phase composite material. It is shown that such a model alone cannot be used to describe the behavior of bone. Correlative data on the elastic moduli of dentin, enamel and various bone samples indicate the existence of a nonlinear dependence of elastic moduli on composition of hard tissue. Several composite models are used to calculate the bounds on the elastic behavior of these tissues. The limitations of these models are described, and experiments to obtain additional critical data are discussed.

  1. Hard tissue formation of STRO-1-selected rat dental pulp stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuechao; Walboomers, X Frank; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Bian, Zhuan; Fan, Mingwen; Jansen, John A

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine hard tissue formation of STRO-1-selected rat dental pulp-derived stem cells, seeded into a calcium phosphate ceramic scaffold, and implanted subcutaneously in mice. Previously, STRO-1 selection was used to obtain a mesenchymal stem cell progenitor subpopulation from primary dental pulp-derived stem cells. In the current study, these cells were cultured with three different media: "BMP-plus" medium containing dexamethasone and 100 ng/mL of rhBMP-2, "odontogenic" medium containing dexamethasone, and "control" medium without supplements. The cell-scaffold complexes were cultured in these media for 1, 4, or 8 days before implantation. Histological analysis demonstrated that the cultures with BMP-plus and 4 days of culture gave the highest percentage of hard tissue formation per implant (36 +/- 9% of pore area). Real-time PCR confirmed these results. In conclusion, STRO-1-selected dental pulp stem cells show effective hard tissue formation in vivo, and a short in vitro culture period and addition of BMP-2 can enhance this effect. PMID:18652538

  2. The effect of mechanical strain on soft (cardiovascular) and hard (bone) tissues

    PubMed Central

    Boccafoschi, Francesca; Mosca, Cecilia; Ramella, Martina; Valente, Guido; Cannas, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical stress plays a pivotal role in developing and maintaining tissues functionalities. Cells are constantly subjected to strain and compressive forces that are sensed by specialized membrane mechanosensors and converted in biochemical signals able to differently influence cellular behavior in terms of surviving, differentiation and extracellular matrix remodeling. This review focuses on the effects of mechanical strain on soft and hard tissues. Unexpectedly, different cells share almost the same membrane mechanosensors and the relative intracellular pathways, but to ultimately obtain very different biological effects. The events occurring in cardiovascular and bone tissues are treated in details, showing that integrins, cadherins, growth factor receptors and ions channels specifically expressed in the different tissues are the major actors of the sight. However, MAPkinases and RhoGTPases are mainly involved in the biochemical intracellular signaling directed to nuclear modifications. PMID:23287581

  3. Hydrodynamic model for ultra-short pulse ablation of hard dental tissue

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.; Alley, W.E.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Neev, J.

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 fsec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  4. Use of a compact fiber optic spectrometer for spectral feedback during the laser ablation of dental hard tissues and restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Joyce Y.; Fan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    One perceived disadvantage of caries removal using lasers is the loss of the tactile feedback associated with the handpiece. However, alternative methods of acoustic and optical feedback become available with the laser that can be exploited to provide information about the chemical composition of the material ablated, the ablation efficiency and rate, the depth of the incision, and the surface and plume temperature during ablation. Such information can be used to increase the selectivity of ablation, avoid peripheral thermal damage and excessive heat deposition in the tooth, and provide a mechanism of robotic automation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that a compact fiberoptic spectrometer could be used to differentiate between the ablation of sound and carious enamel and dentin and between dental hard tissues and composite. Sound and carious tooth surfaces along with composite restorative materials were scanned with λ=0.355, 2.79 and 9.3 μm laser pulses at irradiation intensities ranging from 0.5-100 J/cm2 and spectra were acquired from λ=250-900-nm using a compact fiber-optic spectrometer. Emission spectra varied markedly with the laser wavelength and pulse duration. Optical feedback was not successful in differentiating between sound and carious enamel and dentin even with the addition of various chromophores to carious lesion areas. However, the spectral feedback was successfully used to differentiate between composites and sound enamel and dentin enabling the selective removal of composite from tooth surfaces using a computer controlled λ=9.3-μm pulsed CO II laser and scanning system.

  5. The High Frequency Ultrasonic Diagnostic System for Hard and Soft Tissue Specific Assessments in Dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slak, Bartosz

    The numerical assessment of dental tissues is essential when selecting a relevant treatment protocol in the field of dentistry. This will have significant ramifications on the restoration quality of dental tissues. The aim of the research study presented in this thesis was to validate applicability and obtain non-invasively, quantitative data for hard and soft tissue thickness in dental applications. An ultrasonic system was developed and assembled for the purpose of these experiments. Numerous laboratory trials were conducted to validate system performance against traditional and destructive methods of assessment. Ultrasonic measurements were found to yield similar values to those obtained from invasive methods. Results obtained in these experiments have validated potentials of ultrasound as a supplementary diagnostic tool for dental healthcare.

  6. Interaction of a pulsed alexandrite laser with hard and soft biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, Lorna M.; Dickinson, Mark R.; King, Terence A.; Watts, David C.

    1994-02-01

    An alexandrite laser has been used in the fixed-Q and Q-switched modes, at the fundamental and frequency doubled wavelengths on a selection of hard and soft tissue. In an investigation into the potential use of the laser for the removal of deep lying lesions such as cutaneous vascular lesions and tatoos, studies have been carried out to characterize the depth and extent of the laser/tissue interaction in samples of tissue which greatly absorb the 750 nm radiation. The interaction of the laser radiation with extracted teeth was investigated looking at healthy enamel and dentine, and caries. Surface profile measurements of the enamel and dentine before and after irradiation show little physical effect of the laser irradiation, whereas caries appear to be ablated.

  7. Estimation of soft- and hard-tissue thickness at implant sites

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Mascarenhas, Rohan; Husain, Akhter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Anchorage control is a critical consideration when planning treatment for patients with dental and skeletal malocclusions. To obtain sufficient stability of implants, the thickness of the soft tissue and the cortical-bone in the placement site must be considered; so as to provide an anatomical map in order to assist the clinician in the placement of the implants. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the thickness of soft- and hard-tissue. Materials and Methods: To measure soft tissue and cortical-bone thicknesses, 12 maxillary cross-sectional specimens were obtained from the cadavers, which were made at three maxillary mid-palatal suture areas: The interdental area between the first and second premolars (Group 1), the second premolar and the first molar (Group 2), and the first and second molars (Group 3). Sectioned samples along with reference rulers were digitally scanned. Scanned images were calibrated and measurements were made with image-analysis software. We measured the thickness of soft and hard-tissues at five sectional areas parallel to the buccopalatal cementoenamel junction (CEJ) line at 2-mm intervals and also thickness of soft tissue at the six landmarks including the incisive papilla (IP) on the palate. The line perpendicular to the occlusal plane was made and measurement was taken at 4-mm intervals from the closest five points to IP. Results: (1) Group 1:6 mm from CEJ in buccal side and 2 mm from CEJ in palatal side. (2) Group 2:8 mm from CEJ in buccal side and 4 mm from CEJ in palatal side. (3) Group 3:8 mm from CEJ in buccal side and 8 mm from CEJ in palatal side. Conclusions: The best site for placement of implant is with thinnest soft tissue and thickest hard tissue, which is in the middle from CEJ in buccal side and closest from CEJ in palatal side in Group 1 and faraway from CEJ in buccal side and closest from CEJ in palatal side in Group 2 and faraway from CEJ in buccal side and faraway from CEJ in palatal side in

  8. [PREVALENCE OF NON-CARIOUS CERVICAL LESIONS AND ABFRACTIONS OF DENTAL HARD TISSUES IN AN ADULT IN DIFFERENT AGES].

    PubMed

    Iordanishvili, A K; Chernyj, D A; Jankovskij, V V; Orlov, A K; Drobkova, K O

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to gerontostomatological and gender-specific prevalence of non-carious lesions of the hard tissue of teeth in adults. The paper presents data of epidemiological study on prevalence of non-carious lesions of dental hard tissues (high abrasion, erosion, wedge-shaped defects, hyperesthesia). Allocated to four age groups: young adults surveyed--from 22 to 39 years; middle ages--from 40 to 59 years; older--from 60 to 74 years of age; senile age--from 75 to 87 years. To determine the frequency of occurrence of different forms of non-carious lesions of the hard tissue of teeth we have used the following: general scientific and special methods: poll, dental examination, groupings, statistical and mathematical methods of processing sample. We have ranked low incidence of non-carious lesions of the hard tissue of the teeth in the sample surveyed: high abrasion, erosion, wedge-shaped defects of solid tissues, hyperesthesia. The features of clinical course of non-carious lesions have been determined. In particular a rare combined lesion of the teeth with advanced erasibility, wedge defects and erosion has been noted. Significant combination of the pathological processes of the hard tissue of teeth with their hyperesthesia has been found. Features of different forms of non-carious lesions of the hard tissue of teeth in different age periods of life have been determined. Noted that older people, due to non-carious esions of the hard tissue of teeth were more likely to require medical intervention aimed at addressing the ncreased sensitivity and loss of hard tissue of teeth by dental therapeutic activities or dental prosthetics. PMID:26856106

  9. Non-destructive phase contrast hard x-ray imaging to reveal the three-dimensional microstructure of soft and hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khimchenko, Anna; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Hieber, Simone E.; Hasan, Samiul; Bikis, Christos; Schulz, Joachim; Costeur, Loïc.; Müller, Bert

    2016-04-01

    X-ray imaging in the absorption contrast mode is an established method of visualising calcified tissues such as bone and teeth. Physically soft tissues such as brain or muscle are often imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the spatial resolution of MRI is insufficient for identifying individual biological cells within three-dimensional tissue. X-ray grating interferometry (XGI) has advantages for the investigation of soft tissues or the simultaneous three-dimensional visualisation of soft and hard tissues. Since laboratory microtomography (μCT) systems have better accessibility than tomography set-ups at synchrotron radiation facilities, a great deal of effort has been invested in optimising XGI set-ups for conventional μCT systems. In this conference proceeding, we present how a two-grating interferometer is incorporated into a commercially available nanotom m (GE Sensing and Inspection Technologies GmbH) μCT system to extend its capabilities toward phase contrast. We intend to demonstrate superior contrast in spiders (Hogna radiata (Fam. Lycosidae) and Xysticus erraticus (Fam. Thomisidae)), as well as the simultaneous visualisation of hard and soft tissues. XGI is an imaging modality that provides quantitative data, and visualisation is an important part of biomimetics; consequently, hard X-ray imaging provides a sound basis for bioinspiration, bioreplication and biomimetics and allows for the quantitative comparison of biofabricated products with their natural counterparts.

  10. Influence of water layer thickness on hard tissue ablation with pulsed CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Zhan, Zhenlin; Liu, Haishan; Zhao, Haibin; Xie, Shusen; Ye, Qing

    2012-03-01

    The theory of hard tissue ablation reported for IR lasers is based on a process of thermomechanical interaction, which is explained by the absorption of the radiation in the water component of the tissue. The microexplosion of the water is the cause of tissue fragments being blasted from hard tissue. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of the interdependence of water layer thickness and incident radiant exposure on ablation performance. A total of 282 specimens of bovine shank bone were irradiated with a pulse CO2 laser. Irradiation was carried out in groups: without a water layer and with a static water layer of thickness ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 mm. Each group was subdivided into five subgroups for different radiant exposures ranging from 18 to 84 J/cm2, respectively. The incision geometry, surface morphology, and microstructure of the cut walls as well as thermal injury were examined as a function of the water layer thickness at different radiant exposures. Our results demonstrate that the additional water layer is actually a mediator of laser-tissue interaction. There exists a critical thickness of water layer for a given radiant exposure, at which the additional water layer plays multiple roles, not only acting as a cleaner to produce a clean cut but also as a coolant to prevent bone heating and reduce thermal injury, but also helping to improve the regularity of the cut shape, smooth the cut surface, and enhance ablation rate and efficiency. The results suggest that desired ablation results depend on optimal selection of both water layer thickness and radiant exposure.

  11. Ultrashort pulse laser processing of hard tissue, dental restoration materials, and biocompatibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, A.; Strassl, M.; Beer, F.; Verhagen, L.; Wittschier, M.; Wintner, E.

    2007-07-01

    During the last few years, ultra-short laser pulses have proven their potential for application in medical tissue treatment in many ways. In hard tissue ablation, their aptitude for material ablation with negligible collateral damage provides many advantages. Especially teeth representing an anatomically and physiologically very special region with less blood circulation and lower healing rates than other tissues require most careful treatment. Hence, overheating of the pulp and induction of microcracks are some of the most problematic issues in dental preparation. Up till now it was shown by many authors that the application of picosecond or femtosecond pulses allows to perform ablation with very low damaging potential also fitting to the physiological requirements indicated. Beside the short interaction time with the irradiated matter, scanning of the ultra-short pulse trains turned out to be crucial for ablating cavities of the required quality. One main reason for this can be seen in the fact that during scanning the time period between two subsequent pulses incident on the same spot is so much extended that no heat accumulation effects occur and each pulse can be treated as a first one with respect to its local impact. Extension of this advantageous technique to biocompatible materials, i.e. in this case dental restoration materials and titanium plasma-sprayed implants, is just a matter of consequence. Recently published results on composites fit well with earlier data on dental hard tissue. In case of plaque which has to be removed from implants, it turns out that removal of at least the calcified version is harder than tissue removal. Therefore, besides ultra-short lasers, also Diode and Neodymium lasers, in cw and pulsed modes, have been studied with respect to plaque removal and sterilization. The temperature increase during laser exposure has been experimentally evaluated in parallel.

  12. Soft- and hard-tissue facial anthropometry in three dimensions: what's new.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; de Menezes, Marcio; Ferrario, Virgilio

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years, technology has provided new instruments for the three-dimensional analysis of human facial morphology. Currently, quantitative assessments of dimensions, spatial positions and relative proportions of distinctive facial features can be obtained for both soft- and hard- (skeletal and dental) tissues. New mathematical tools allow to fuse digital data obtained from various image analyzers, thus providing quantitative information for anatomical and nthropometric descriptions, medical evaluations (clinical genetics, orthodontics, maxillo-facial and plastic surgery), and forensic medicine. PMID:23833019

  13. Soft Tissue Chondroma of the Oral Cavity: An Extremely Rare Tumour Localized on the Hard Palate

    PubMed Central

    Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco; Merigo, Elisabetta; Manfredi, Maddalena; Corradi, Domenico; Poli, Tito; Nammour, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Chondromas are benign cartilaginous tumors usually localized within the tubular bones of the extremities. Soft tissue chondromas (STCs) are rare and only few cases have been reported in the oral cavity. The present case documents the exceptional finding of a 12-year-standing STC of the hard palate of a 63-year-old man. The tumor measured approximately 6 cm in its larger size and it was radically excised through the use of a quantic resonance molecular (QRM) lancet. No recurrence was observed during 1-year follow-up. A concise review of the relevant literature is included in the present paper. PMID:24715909

  14. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of orthopedic interface repair using a tissue scaffold with a continuous hard tissue-soft tissue transition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Tendon tears produce pain and decrease joint stability; each year, over 1.1 million rotator cuff tendon surgical procedures are performed worldwide. However, surgical success is highly variable, and the inability of the procedure to drive the regeneration of the normal tendon-bone interface has been identified as a key factor in surgical failure. This study focuses on the development, in vitro evaluation, and in vivo assessment of a tissue scaffold derived from bovine cancellous bone with the potential to direct regeneration of a bone-soft tissue interface. The scaffold is a highly porous scaffold with a continuous hard tissue-soft tissue transition that facilitates load transfer across the interface and contains all of the extracellular matrix components of the orthopedic interface. This study demonstrated the in vitro characterization of the mechanical properties and successful in vivo assessment using an ovine model. PMID:23782505

  15. An intramembranous ossification model for the in silico analysis of bone tissue formation in tooth extraction sites.

    PubMed

    Corredor-Gómez, Jennifer Paola; Rueda-Ramírez, Andrés Mauricio; Gamboa-Márquez, Miguel Alejandro; Torres-Rodríguez, Carolina; Cortés-Rodríguez, Carlos Julio

    2016-07-21

    The accurate modeling of biological processes allows us to predict the spatiotemporal behavior of living tissues by computer-aided (in silico) testing, a useful tool for the development of medical strategies, avoiding the expenses and potential ethical implications of in vivo experimentation. A model for bone healing in mouth would be useful for selecting proper surgical techniques in dental procedures. In this paper, the formulation and implementation of a model for Intramembranous Ossification is presented aiming to describe the complex process of bone tissue formation in tooth extraction sites. The model consists in a mathematical description of the mechanisms in which different types of cells interact, synthesize and degrade extracellular matrices under the influence of biochemical factors. Special attention is given to angiogenesis, oxygen-dependent effects and growth factor-induced apoptosis of fibroblasts. Furthermore, considering the depth-dependent vascularization of mandibular bone and its influence on bone healing, a functional description of the cell distribution on the severed periodontal ligament (PDL) is proposed. The developed model was implemented using the finite element method (FEM) and successfully validated by simulating an animal in vivo experiment on dogs reported in the literature. A good fit between model outcome and experimental data was obtained with a mean absolute error of 3.04%. The mathematical framework presented here may represent an important tool for the design of future in vitro and in vivo tests, as well as a precedent for future in silico studies on osseointegration and mechanobiology. PMID:27113783

  16. Dietary boron does not affect tooth strength, micro-hardness, and density, but affects tooth mineral composition and alveolar bone mineral density in rabbits fed a high-energy diet.

    PubMed

    Hakki, Sema S; SiddikMalkoc; Dundar, Niyazi; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Hakki, Erdogan E; Hamurcu, Mehmet; Baspinar, Nuri; Basoglu, Abdullah; Nielsen, Forrest H; Götz, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether dietary boron (B) affects the strength, density and mineral composition of teeth and mineral density of alveolar bone in rabbits with apparent obesity induced by a high-energy diet. Sixty female, 8-month-old, New Zealand rabbits were randomly assigned for 7 months into five groups as follows: (1) control 1, fed alfalfa hay only (5.91 MJ/kg and 57.5 mg B/kg); (2) control 2, high energy diet (11.76 MJ and 3.88 mg B/kg); (3) B10, high energy diet + 10 mg B gavage/kg body weight/96 h; (4) B30, high energy diet + 30 mg B gavage/kg body weight/96 h; (5) B50, high energy diet + 50 mg B gavage/kg body weight/96 h. Maxillary incisor teeth of the rabbits were evaluated for compression strength, mineral composition, and micro-hardness. Enamel, dentin, cementum and pulp tissue were examined histologically. Mineral densities of the incisor teeth and surrounding alveolar bone were determined by using micro-CT. When compared to controls, the different boron treatments did not significantly affect compression strength, and micro-hardness of the teeth, although the B content of teeth increased in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to control 1, B50 teeth had decreased phosphorus (P) concentrations. Histological examination revealed that teeth structure (shape and thickness of the enamel, dentin, cementum and pulp) was similar in the B-treated and control rabbits. Micro CT evaluation revealed greater alveolar bone mineral density in B10 and B30 groups than in controls. Alveolar bone density of the B50 group was not different than the controls. Although the B treatments did not affect teeth structure, strength, mineral density and micro-hardness, increasing B intake altered the mineral composition of teeth, and, in moderate amounts, had beneficial effects on surrounding alveolar bone.

  17. Effects of facial hard tissue surgery on facial aesthetics: changes in facial content and frames.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Young; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2012-11-01

    Aesthetic units of the face can be divided into facial content (FC; eyes, nose, lips, and mouth), anterior facial frame (AFF; a contour line from the trichion, the temporal line of the frontal bone, the lateral orbital rim, the most lateral line of the anterior part of the zygomatic body, the anterior border of the masseter muscle, to the inferior border of the chin), and posterior facial frame (PFF; a contour line from the hairline, the zygomatic arch, to the ramus and gonial angle area of the mandible). The size and shape of each FC and the balance and proportion between FCs create a unique appearance for each person. The facial form can be determined through the combination of AFF and PFF. In the Asian population, clinicians frequently encounter problems of FC (eg, acute nasolabial angle, protrusive and everted lips, nonconsonant lip line, or lip canting), AFF (eg, midface hypoplasia, protrusive and asymmetric chin, vertical deficiency/excess of the anterior maxilla and symphysis, or prominent zygoma), and PFF (eg, square mandibular angle). These problems can be efficiently and effectively corrected through the combination of hard tissue surgery such as anterior segmental osteotomy, genioplasty, mandibular angle reduction, malarplasty, and orthognathic surgery. Therefore, the purposes of this article were to introduce the concepts of FC, AFF, and PFF, and to explain the effects of facial hard tissue surgery on facial aesthetics.

  18. A novel basalt fiber-reinforced polylactic acid composite for hard tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Li, Yan; Gu, Ning

    2010-08-01

    A basalt fiber (BF) was, for the first time, introduced into a poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) matrix as innovative reinforcement to fabricate composite materials for hard tissue repair. Firstly, BF/PLLA composites and pure PLLA were produced by the methods of solution blending and freeze drying. The results showed that basalt fibers can be uniformly dispersed in the PLLA matrix and significantly improve the mechanical properties and hydrophilicity of the PLLA matrix. The presence of basalt fibers may retard the polymer degradation rate and neutralize the acid degradation from PLLA. Osteoblasts were cultured in vitro to evaluate the cytocompatibility of the composite. An MTT assay revealed that osteoblasts proliferated well for 7 days and there was little difference found in their viability on both PLLA and BF/PLLA films, which was consistent with the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity results. A fluorescent staining observation showed that osteoblasts grew well on the composites. SEM images displayed that osteoblasts tended to grow along the fiber axis. The formation of mineralized nodules was observed on the films by Alizarin red S staining. These results suggest that the presence of basalt fibers does not noticeably affect osteoblastic behavior and the designed composites are osteoblast compatible. It is concluded that basalt fibers, as reinforcing fibers, may have promising applications in hard tissue repair.

  19. Analysis of dental hard tissues exposed to high temperatures for forensic applications: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Shekhawat, Kuldeep Singh; Chauhan, Arunima

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to observe and record the macroscopic, radiographic, and microscopic findings obtained after subjecting the teeth to high temperatures. Materials and Methods: An in vitro study was conducted to observe macroscopic, radiographic, and microscopic changes in dental hard tissues in 60 unrestored non carious extracted human teeth. The teeth were grouped based on age: Below 30 years, 30–40 years, and above 40 years The teeth from each age group were further divided into five subgroups, and each subgroup was subjected to a particular temperature: 200°C, 400°C, 600°C, 800°C, and 1000°C. [C = Celsius]. Results: Various degrees of changes in relation to temperature were observed macroscopically, radiographically, and microscopically. The histological examination was limited for teeth exposed to 200°C. Conclusion: This investigation was carried out to study the gross changes, radiographic changes and histological changes in dental hard tissues exposed to high temperatures, which is an important part of forensic science. The aforementioned alterations caused by heat may provide useful information about temperature ranges and duration of exposure to high temperatures. PMID:27555725

  20. Typological and technological study of prehistoric implements in animal hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Broglio, Alberto; Cilli, Cristina; Giacobini, Giacomo; Guerreschi, Antonio; Malerba, Giancarla; Villa, Giuliano

    2004-06-01

    Several series of prehistoric implements in animal hard tissues, either from ancient and recent excavations, were studied by the typological and technological points of views. Their morpho-typological description was in many cases associated to microscopic study of surface modifications, often allowing identification of traces related to manufacture. This technological information in some cases could be integrated by the observations of use-wear, thus providing functional indications. Implements came from sites of different antiquity and different geographic areas (from Liguria to Calabria). Implements considered by the research program included tools, pendants and other ornamental objects, as well as unfinished implements and manufacture left-overs often identified during revision of faunal remains. Middle Paleolithic bone fragments bearing traces of non-alimentary anthropic actions were limited to the so-called "retouchers". However, during Upper Paleolithic, implements in animal hard tissues were relatively frequent in most Italian sites, even if those industries were not so rich, elaborated and typologically differentiated as in other European areas.

  1. PCL/alginate composite scaffolds for hard tissue engineering: fabrication, characterization, and cellular activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Bok; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2015-02-01

    Alginates have been used widely in biomedical applications because of good biocompatibility, low cost, and rapid gelation in the presence of calcium ions. However, poor mechanical properties and fabrication-ability for three-dimensional shapes have been obstacles in hard-tissue engineering applications. To overcome these shortcomings of alginates, we suggest a new composite system, consisting of a synthetic polymer, poly(ε-caprolactone), and various weight fractions (10-40 wt %) of alginate. The fabricated composite scaffolds displayed a multilayered 3D structure, consisting of microsized composite struts, and they provided a 100% offset for each layer. To show the feasibility of the scaffold for hard tissue regeneration, the composite scaffolds fabricated were assessed not only for physical properties, including surface roughness, tensile strength, and water absorption and wetting, but also in vitro osteoblastic cellular responses (cell-seeding efficiency, cell viability, fluorescence analyses, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and mineralization) by culturing with preosteoblasts (MC3T3-E1). Due to the alginate components in the composites, the scaffolds showed significantly enhanced wetting behavior, water-absorption (∼12-fold), and meaningful biological activities (∼2.1-fold for cell-seeding efficiency, ∼2.5-fold for cell-viability at 7 days, ∼3.4-fold for calcium deposition), compared with a pure PCL scaffold.

  2. Syntheses of single-crystal apatite particles with preferred orientation to the a- and c-axes as models of hard tissue and their applications.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Mamoru; Matsuura, Tomokazu; Zhuang, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2; HAp] is the mineral component of vertebrate hard tissues and an important raw material for biomaterials. The HAp crystal belongs to a hexagonal system and has two types of crystal plane with different atomic arrangements: positively charged calcium ions are mainly present in the a(b)-planes, while negatively charged phosphate ions and hydroxyl groups are mainly present in the c-planes. In vertebrate long bone surfaces, HAp crystals have a c-axis orientation, which leads to the development of the a(b)-plane; while in tooth enamel surfaces, they have an a(b)-axis orientation, which leads to the development of the c-plane. However, it is not clear why the orientations of long bone and tooth enamel are in different crystal planes. In order to clarify this question, we have synthesized single-crystal apatite particles with preferred orientation to the a- and c-axes as models for bone and teeth enamel. This review first describes the syntheses process of single-crystal apatite particles with preferred orientation to a(b)- and c-axes and then discusses specific protein adsorption to the crystal surface of the resulting plate- and fiber-shaped apatite particles with different surface charges. In addition, porous apatite-fiber scaffolds (AFSs) fabricated using the fiber-shaped apatite particles and their application to tissue engineering of bone are described on the basis of the three-dimensional cell culture of mesenchymal stem cells derived from rat bone marrow using the AFS settled into a radial-flow bioreactor.

  3. OCT monitoring of diffusion of clearing agents within tooth dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunina, N. A.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2009-08-01

    Monitoring of agent diffusion within tooth tissues is important in a wide context of tooth therapy (diffusion of medicinal preparations) and cosmetics (chemical whitening agents). We report here the results of optical coherence tomography (OCT) monitoring of diffusion of water and glycerol as clearing agents in samples of human tooth tissue. The diffusion process is analyzed by monitoring the changes in the OCT signal slope and the depth-resolved amplitude of OCT signal from a sample. Slow temporal kinetics of the mean attenuation coefficient was measured to monitor a saturable optical clearing due to the diffusion of the agent. The average permeability coefficient was estimated by dividing the measured thickness of the selected region by the time it took for the agent to diffuse through. The experimental results demonstrate that OCT can be an efficient tool in the study of agent diffusion through hard tissues.

  4. Diseases of the tooth: the genetic and molecular basis of inherited anomalies affecting the dentition.

    PubMed

    Cobourne, Martyn T; Sharpe, Paul T

    2013-01-01

    In humans, inherited variation in the number, size, and shape of teeth within the dentitions are relatively common, while rarer defects of hard tissue formation, including amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta, and problems associated with tooth eruption are also seen. In many cases, these anomalies occur in isolation, but they can also present as a feature of numerous well-characterized developmental syndromes. Complex reiterative signaling between the epithelium and mesenchyme is a feature of normal tooth development in the embryo, occurring from early patterning through morphogenesis, hard tissue formation and during root development. Significant events also occur during postnatal development of the dentition, including hard tissue maturation and tooth eruption. In the last decade, advances in human and mouse genetics have meant that in many cases candidate genes have been identified for these anomalies. These genes have provided a useful platform for developmental biologists, allowing them to begin elucidating how these signals interact to generate a functional dentition and understand the mechanisms underlying many of the anomalies that are seen in human populations. In this article, we review current concepts relating to the developmental biology of tooth number, size, and shape, formation of the dental hard tissues and eruption of the tooth into the oral cavity. We will focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes in both health and disease.

  5. A quantitative bioassay to measure the rate of respiration of isolated rat tooth pulp tissue.

    PubMed

    Levine, L S; Marcus, F; de Kooker, M

    1987-01-01

    The formation of carbon dioxide, expressed as milligrammes of carbon dioxide per gramme wet weight, was used to determine the rate of succinate-induced respiration in rat incisal dental pulp, after incubation in a phosphate buffer. Seven experimental parameters: (a) physical nature of the tissue; (b) mass of the rat; (c) pre-incubation time; (d) incubation time; (e) substrate concentration; (f) effect of pH; and (g) effects of technique on pH, were analysed; pH was a critical determinant for success with this assay.

  6. Parry-Romberg reconstruction: optimal timing for hard and soft tissue procedures.

    PubMed

    Slack, Ginger C; Tabit, Christina J; Allam, Karam A; Kawamoto, Henry K; Bradley, James P

    2012-11-01

    For the treatment of Parry-Romberg syndrome or progressive hemifacial atrophy, we studied 3 controversial issues: (1) optimal timing, (2) need for skeletal reconstruction, and (3) need for soft tissue (medial canthus/lacrimal duct) reconstruction. Patients with Parry-Romberg syndrome (>5 y follow-up) were divided into 2 groups: (1) younger than 14 years and (2) 14 years or older (n = 43). Sex, age, severity of deformity, number of procedures, operative times, and augmentation fat volumes were recorded. Physician and patient satisfaction surveys (5-point scale) were obtained, preoperative and postoperative three-dimensional computed tomographic scans were reviewed, and a digital three-dimensional photogrammetry system was used to determine volume retention. Our results indicate that the younger patient group required more procedures compared with the older patient group (4.3 versus 2.8); however, the younger group had higher patient/family satisfaction scores (3.8 versus 3.0). Skeletal and soft tissue reconstruction resulted in improved symmetry score (60% preoperatively to 93% final) and satisfaction scores (3.4 preoperatively to 3.8 final). Patients with Parry-Romberg syndrome required multiple corrective surgeries but showed improvements even when beginning before puberty. Soft and hard tissue reconstruction was beneficial. PMID:23154357

  7. Evaluation of 3D nano-macro porous bioactive glass scaffold for hard tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Falk, M M; Rashad, A; Saad, M M; Marques, A C; Almeida, R M; Marei, M K; Jain, H

    2011-05-01

    Recently, nano-macro dual-porous, three-dimensional (3D) glass structures were developed for use as bioscaffolds for hard tissue regeneration, but there have been concerns regarding the interconnectivity and homogeneity of nanopores in the scaffolds, as well as the cytotoxicity of the environment deep inside due to limited fluid access. Therefore, mercury porosimetry, nitrogen absorption, and TEM have been used to characterize nanopore network of the scaffolds. In parallel, viability of MG 63 human osteosarcoma cells seeded on scaffold surface was investigated by fluorescence, confocal and electron microscopy methods. The results show that cells attach, migrate and penetrate inside the glass scaffold with high proliferation and viability rate. Additionally, scaffolds were implanted under the skin of a male New Zealand rabbit for in vivo animal test. Initial observations show the formation of new tissue with blood vessels and collagen fibers deep inside the implanted scaffolds with no obvious inflammatory reaction. Thus, the new nano-macro dual-porous glass structure could be a promising bioscaffold for use in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering for bone regeneration. PMID:21445655

  8. Biomaterial selection for tooth regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Lili; Mao, Jeremy J

    2011-10-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth.

  9. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y.; Zhou, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth. PMID:21699433

  10. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... in your mouth made up mostly of germs. Tooth decay starts in the outer layer, called the enamel. Without a filling, the decay can get deep into the tooth and its nerves and cause a toothache or ...

  11. Tooth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... include eating, speaking and even smiling. But tooth disorders are nothing to smile about. They include problems ... your teeth. Fortunately, you can prevent many tooth disorders by taking care of your teeth and keeping ...

  12. Tooth extraction

    MedlinePlus

    Pulling a tooth; Tooth removal ... The procedure will take place in the dental office. It may involve removing one or more teeth. You may be asked to take antibiotics before the procedure. You will get a ...

  13. Investigations of soft and hard tissues in oral cavity by spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madjarova, Violeta Dimitrova; Yasuno, Yoshiaki; Makita, Shuichi; Hori, Yasuaki; Voeffray, Jean-Baptiste; Itoh, Masahide; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Tamura, Masami; Nanbu, Toshiyuki

    2006-02-01

    Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) systems for dental measurements are demonstrated. Two systems have been developed. The first system is fiber based Michelson interferometer with super luminescent diodes at 1310 nm and 100 nm FWHM as a light source. The sensitivity of the system was 106 dB with depth measurement range in air of 2.5 mm. The second systems is a fiber based Mach-Zehnder interferometer with wavelength scanning laser as light source at center wavelength of 1310 nm, wavelength range of 110 nm and scanning rate of 20 KHz. The sensitivity of the system is 112 dB and depth measurement range in air is 6 mm. Both systems can acquire real-time three dimensional (3-D) images in the range of several second. The systems were applied for early caries detection in tooth, for diagnostics of tooth condition after operational tooth treatment, and for diagnostics of the alveolar bone structure. In-vivo measurements were performed on two volunteers. The systems were able to detect discontinuities in tooth and resin filling after tooth treatment. In addition early carries lesion was detected in one of the volunteers. The 3-D profile of the alveolar bone was acquired for first time with non-contact method.

  14. Evaluation of DNA typing as a positive identification method for soft and hard tissues immersed in strong acids.

    PubMed

    Robino, C; Pazzi, M; Di Vella, G; Martinelli, D; Mazzola, L; Ricci, U; Testi, R; Vincenti, M

    2015-11-01

    Identification of human remains can be hindered by several factors (e.g., traumatic mutilation, carbonization or decomposition). Moreover, in some criminal cases, offenders may purposely adopt various expedients to thwart the victim's identification, including the dissolution of body tissues by the use of corrosive reagents, as repeatedly reported in the past for Mafia-related murders. By means of an animal model, namely porcine samples, we evaluated standard DNA typing as a method for identifying soft (muscle) and hard (bone and teeth) tissues immersed in strong acids (hydrochloric, nitric and sulfuric acid) or in mixtures of acids (aqua regia). Samples were tested at different time intervals, ranging between 2 and 6h (soft tissues) and 2-28 days (hard tissues). It was shown that, in every type of acid, complete degradation of the DNA extracted from soft tissues preceded tissue dissolution and could be observed within 4h of immersion. Conversely, high molecular weight DNA amenable to STR analysis could be isolated from hard tissues as long as cortical bone fragments were still present (28 days for sulfuric acid, 7 days for nitric acid, 2 days for hydrochloric acid and aqua regia), or the integrity of the dental pulp chamber was preserved (7 days, in sulfuric acid only). The results indicate that DNA profiling of acid-treated body parts (in particular, cortical bone) is still feasible at advanced stages of corrosion, even when the morphological methods used in forensic anthropology and odontology can no longer be applied for identification purposes.

  15. Testing adhesion of direct restoratives to dental hard tissue - a review.

    PubMed

    Salz, Ulrich; Bock, Thorsten

    2010-10-01

    This articles concerns itself with the testing of adhesion between direct restoratives and dental hard tissue, ie, enamel and dentin. The aim is to survey available methods for adhesion testing and influential parameters affecting experimental outcome. The testing of adhesion to indirect restorative materials, eg, ceramics and metals, is beyond the scope of this article and shall be discussed elsewhere. The longevity and success of modern dental restorations very often relies on potent dental adhesives to provide durable bonds between the dental hard substance and the restorative composite. To predict the clinical outcome of such restorative treatment, a large variety of in vitro laboratory tests and clinical in vivo experiments have been devised, analyzed, and published. The purpose of this review is to provide a current overview of bond strength testing methods and their applicability to the characterization of dental adhesives. Regardless of the method employed, subtle variations in sample preparation may already severely impact test results, usually necessitating at least co-testing of a well-known internal reference to allow conclusive interpretation. This article attempts to list and discuss the most influential parameters, such as substrate nature, age, health status, storage, clinically relevant pre-treatment, and sample preparation. Special attention is devoted to the last aspect, as numerous publications have stressed the tremendous influence of preparatory parameters on the validity and scope of obtained data. Added to the large variety of such factors, an equally large diversity of load-applying procedures exists to actually quantify adhesion between composites and dental hard substance. This article summarizes the basics of macro and micro approaches to shear and tensile bond strength testing, as well as push- and pull-out tests. The strengths and weaknesses inherent to each method and influential test parameters are reviewed and methods for

  16. Images of Soft-bodied Animals with External Hard Shell: 3D Visualization of the Embedded Soft Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Donepudi V.; Akatsuka, Takao; Tromba, Giuliana

    2004-05-12

    Images of soft-bodied animals (snails) of various types with external hard shell are obtained for 25, 27 and 29 keV synchrotron X-rays. The SYRMEP facility at Elettra,Trieste, Italy and the associated detection system has been used for the image acquisition. The interior properties of the embedded soft tissue are analysed utilizing the software. From the reconstructed images, the soft tissue distribution, void spaces associated with the soft tissue and external hard shell are identified. 3D images are reconstructed at these energies and optimum energy is chosen based on the quality of the image for further analysis. The optimum energy allowed us to visualize the visibility of low absorbing details and interior microstructure of the embedded soft tissue.

  17. [Tooth erosion - a multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Strużycka, Izabela; Rusyan, Ewa; Bogusławska-Kapała, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    During the last decades, an increasingly greater interest in dental erosion has been observed in clinical dental practice, in dental public health and in dental research because prevalence of erosive tooth wear is still increasing especially in young age group of population. Erosive tooth wear is a multifactorial etiology process characterized by progressive loss of hard dental tissue. It is defined as the exogenous and/or endogenous acids dissolution of the dental tissue, without bacterial involvement. In the development of dental erosive wear, interactions are required which include chemical, biological, behavioral, diet, time, socioeconomic, knowledge, education, and general health factors. Examples of risk groups could be patients with eating disorders, like anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, gastroesophageal reflux disease, chronic alcohol abuse or dependence. Special nutrition habits groups with high consumption of soft or sport drinks, special diets like vegetarian, vegan or raw food diet, the regular intake of drugs, medications and food supplements can also increase the risk for dental erosion. Comprehensive knowledge of the different risk and protective factors is a perquisite for initiating adequate preventive measures.

  18. [Tooth erosion - a multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Strużycka, Izabela; Rusyan, Ewa; Bogusławska-Kapała, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    During the last decades, an increasingly greater interest in dental erosion has been observed in clinical dental practice, in dental public health and in dental research because prevalence of erosive tooth wear is still increasing especially in young age group of population. Erosive tooth wear is a multifactorial etiology process characterized by progressive loss of hard dental tissue. It is defined as the exogenous and/or endogenous acids dissolution of the dental tissue, without bacterial involvement. In the development of dental erosive wear, interactions are required which include chemical, biological, behavioral, diet, time, socioeconomic, knowledge, education, and general health factors. Examples of risk groups could be patients with eating disorders, like anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, gastroesophageal reflux disease, chronic alcohol abuse or dependence. Special nutrition habits groups with high consumption of soft or sport drinks, special diets like vegetarian, vegan or raw food diet, the regular intake of drugs, medications and food supplements can also increase the risk for dental erosion. Comprehensive knowledge of the different risk and protective factors is a perquisite for initiating adequate preventive measures. PMID:27000809

  19. Combined effects of estrogen deficiency and cadmium exposure on calcified hard tissues: Animal model relating to itai-itai disease in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    KAKEI, Mitsuo; SAKAE, Toshiro; YOSHIKAWA, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Using ovariectomized rats as a model of postmenopausal women, we studied the effects of estrogen (Es) deficiency and in combination with cadmium (Cd) exposure on the calcified hard tissues related to the development of itai-itai disease. Es deficiency suppressed the synthesis of carbonic anhydrase required for the crystal nucleation process, causing the crystal structure defects in the tooth enamel. Regarding the combined effects of Es deficiency and Cd exposure on the bone, in which rats were given drinking water containing Cd ions, soft X-ray radiography revealed a development of labyrinthine pattern in the calvaria, and micro-computed tomography demonstrated the declining trabecular architecture of the tibia, suggesting Cd–induced osteoporotic change. Further, electron microscopy showed the increase of amorphous minerals in the calvaria. In conclusion, the combined effects of Es deficiency and Cd exposure can be responsible for accelerating the declining bone strength together with the crystal structure defects resulting in the preferential occurrence of itai-itai disease in postmenopausal women. PMID:23883612

  20. Tooth Tissue Engineering: The Importance of Blood Products as a Supplement in Tissue Culture Medium for Human Pulp Dental Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Pisciolaro, Ricardo Luiz; Duailibi, Monica Talarico; Novo, Neil Ferreira; Juliano, Yara; Pallos, Debora; Yelick, Pamela Crotty; Vacanti, Joseph Phillip; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; Duailibi, Silvio Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    One of the goals in using cells for tissue engineering (TE) and cell therapy consists of optimizing the medium for cell culture. The present study compares three different blood product supplements for improved cell proliferation and protection against DNA damage in cultured human dental pulp stem cells for tooth TE applications. Human cells from dental pulp were first characterized as adult stem cells (ectomesenchymal mixed origin) by flow cytometry. Next, four different cell culture conditions were tested: I, supplement-free; II, supplemented with fetal bovine serum; III, allogeneic human serum; and IV, autologous human serum. Cultured cells were then characterized for cell proliferation, mineralized nodule formation, and colony-forming units (CFU) capability. After 28 days in culture, the comet assay was performed to assess possible damage in cellular DNA. Our results revealed that Protocol IV achieved higher cell proliferation than Protocol I (p = 0.0112). Protocols II and III resulted in higher cell proliferation than Protocol I, but no statistical differences were found relative to Protocol IV. The comet assay revealed less cell damage in cells cultured using Protocol IV as compared to Protocols II and III. The damage percentage observed on Protocol II was significantly higher than all other protocols. CFUs capability was highest using Protocol IV (p = 0.0018) and III, respectively, and the highest degree of mineralization was observed using Protocol IV as compared to Protocols II and III. Protocol IV resulted in significantly improved cell proliferation, and no cell damage was observed. These results demonstrate that human blood product supplements can be used as feasible supplements for culturing adult human dental stem cells.

  1. Rapid ablation of dental hard tissue using promoter-assisted pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederickson, Christopher J.; Lu, Quiang; Hayes, Donald J.; Wallace, David B.; Grove, Michael E.; Bell, Brent A.; Motamedi, Massoud; Rastegar, Sohi; Wright, C. G.; Arcoria, Charles J.

    1997-05-01

    Nd:YAG lasers have been used previously for selective removal of various material from teeth. To permit ablation of healthy enamel with the Nd:YAG laser, we have adopted a strategy in which micro-drops of photoabsorptive 'promoters' are placed on the enamel to enhance absorption of individual laser pulses. Ink-jet technology dispenses the micro-drops with micron- and millisecond-scale precision. Various promoters using drug and cosmetic dyes, indocyanine green, or carbon-black pigments have been studied. Typical ablation parameters are 1.064 micrometers ; 20-180 mJ per pulse; 100 microsecond(s) ; 10-30 pulses/sec; 0.2-2.0 nl drops. Recent results from the program include: (1) For a variety of promoters, a monotonic relationship obtains between absorption coefficient at 1.064 micrometers and the efficiency of ablation of enamel. (2) With different promoter volumes, the efficiency of ablation rises, plateaus, then falls with increasing volume. (3) At drilling rates of 30 pulses/sec, ablation efficiency approaches rates of 0.1 mm3/sec. LM and SEM observations show a glassy 'pebbled' crater surface indicative of hydroxyapatite that has cooled, condensed, and solidified on the crater walls. Together these results favor the view that a micro-drop promoter-assisted Nd:YAG drill can five clinically useful ablations hard dental tissue.

  2. Corrosion behaviour and mechanical properties of functionally gradient materials developed for possible hard-tissue applications.

    PubMed

    Becker, B S; Bolton, J D

    1997-12-01

    Artificial hip joints have an average lifetime of 10 years due to aseptic loosening of the femoral stem attributed to polymeric wear debris; however, there is a steadily increasing demand from younger osteoarthritis patients aged between 15 and 40 year for a longer lasting joint of 25 years or more. Compliant layers incorporated into the acetabular cup generate elastohydrodynamic lubrication conditions between the bearing surfaces, reduce joint friction coefficients and wear debris production and could increase the average life of total hip replacements, and other human load-bearing joint replacements, i.e. total knee replacements. Poor adhesion between a fully dense substrate and the compliant layer has so far prevented any further exploitation. This work investigated the possibility of producing porous metallic, functionally gradient type acetabular cups using powder metallurgy techniques - where a porous surface was supported by a denser core - into which the compliant layers could be incorporated. The corrosion behaviour and mechanical properties of three biomedically approved alloys containing two levels of total porosity (>30% and <10%) were established, resulting in Ti-6Al-4V being identified as the most promising biocompatible functionally graded material, not only for this application but for other hard-tissue implants.

  3. A hard tissue cephalometric comparative study between hand tracing and computerized tracing

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Ramachandra; Rajakumar, P.; Karthikeyan, M. K.; Saravanan, R.; Vikram, N. Raj; Reddy, Adarsh

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To analyze and compare the angular and linear hard tissue cephalometric measurements using hand-tracing and computerized tracings with Nemoceph and Dolphin software systems. Subjects and Methods: A total of 30 cephalograms were randomly chosen for study with the following criteria, cephalograms of patients with good contrast, no distortion, and minimal radiographic artifacts were considered using the digital method (Kodak 8000 C) with 12 angular and nine linear parameters selected for the study. Comparisons were determined by post-hoc test using Tukey HSD method. The N-Par tests were performed using Kruskal-Walli's method. Statistical Analysis Used: ANOVA and post-hoc. Results: The results of this study show that there is no significant difference in the angular and linear measurements recorded. The P values were significant at 0.05 levels for two parameters, Co-A and Co-Gn with the hand-tracing method. This was significant in ANOVA and post-hoc test by Tukey HSD method. Conclusions: This study of comparison provides support for transition from digital hand to computerized tracing methodology. In fact, digital computerized tracings were easier and less time consuming, with the same reliability irrespective of each method of tracing. PMID:25210347

  4. Bone cement with a modified polyphosphate network structure stimulates hard tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Hong, Min-Ho; Kim, Min-Chul; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Ko, Yeong-Mu; Choi, Heon-Jin; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a calcium polyphosphate cement (CpPC) consisting of basic components was investigated to assess its potential for hard tissue regeneration. The added basic components for improving the structural stability, which controlled the setting time, where the setting reaction resulted in the formation of amorphous structure with a re-constructed polyphosphate. Moreover, the characteristics were controlled by the composition, which determined the polyphosphate structure. CpPC exhibited outstanding dissolution rate compared with the common biodegradable cement, brushite cement (2.5 times). Despite high amounts of dissolution products, no significant cytotoxicity ensued. Induction of calcification in MG-63 cells treated with CpPC, the level of calcification increased with increasing CpPC dissolution rate. Induced calcification was observed also in CpPC-treated ST2 cells, in contrast with MG-63 and ST2 treated with brushite cement, for which no calcification was observed. In vivo tests using a rat calvarial defect model showed that resorbed CpPC resulted in favorable host responses and promoted bone formation. Additionally, there was a significant increase in defect closure, and new bone formation progressed from CpPC mid-sites as well as defect margins. From these results, CpPC exhibits significant potential as biodegradable bone substitute for bone regeneration. PMID:27511981

  5. Multidisciplinary Treatment Options of Tooth Avulsion Considering Different Therapy Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Kostka, Eckehard; Meissner, Simon; Finke, Christian H; Mandirola, Manlio; Preissner, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Avulsion of permanent front teeth is a rare accident, mostly affecting children between seven and nine years of age. Replanted and splinted, these teeth often develop inflammation, severe resorption or ankylosis affecting alveolar bone development and have to be extracted sooner or later. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate different therapy concepts to create a structured concept for the treatment of avulsions. Results: Based on existing therapy concepts, a concept for different initial conditions (dry time, age, growth, tooth, hard and soft tissues) was developed and is presented here. Conclusion: A great deal of research has been performed during recent years and guidelines for the management of avulsions have been published. With the help of this literature it is possible to identify the best treatment procedure for each tooth. Clinical Relevance: The prognosis of avulsed teeth can be improved by considering evidence-based therapy concepts. Resorption, ankylosis and tooth loss could be minimized. PMID:25352922

  6. Hard and Soft Tissue Management of a Localized Alveolar Ridge Atrophy with Autogenous Sources and Biomaterials: A Challenging Clinical Case

    PubMed Central

    Andreoni, D.

    2016-01-01

    Particularly in the premaxillary area, the stability of hard and soft tissues plays a pivotal role in the success of the rehabilitation from both a functional and aesthetic aspect. The present case report describes the clinical management of a localized alveolar ridge atrophy in the area of the upper right canine associated with a thin gingival biotype with a lack of keratinized tissue. An autogenous bone block harvested from the chin associated with heterologous bone particles was used to replace the missing bone, allowing for a prosthetic driven implant placement. Soft tissues deficiency was corrected by means of a combined epithelialized and subepithelial connective tissue graft. The 3-year clinical and radiological follow-up demonstrated symmetric gingival levels of the upper canines, with physiological peri-implant probing depths and bone loss. Thus, the use of autogenous tissues combined with biomaterials might be considered a reliable technique in case of highly aesthetic demanding cases. PMID:27738534

  7. Microanatomy of Passerine hard-cornified tissues: beak and claw structure of the Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Handel, Colleen M.; Blake, J.; Swor, Rhonda; O'Hara, Todd M.

    2012-01-01

    The microanatomy of healthy beaks and claws in passerine birds has not been well described in the literature, despite the importance of these structures in avian life. Histological processing of hard-cornified tissues is notoriously challenging and only a few reports on effective techniques have been published. An emerging epizootic of beak deformities among wild birds in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest region of North America recently highlighted the need for additional baseline information about avian hard-cornified structures. In this study, we examine the beak and claw of the Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus), a common North American passerine that is affected by what has been described as “avian keratin disorder.” We use light and scanning electron microscopy and high-magnification radiography to document the healthy microanatomy of these tissues and identify features of functional importance. We also describe detailed methods for histological processing of avian hard-cornified structures and discuss the utility of special stains. Results from this study will assist in future research on the functional anatomy and pathology of hard-cornified structures and will provide a necessary reference for ongoing investigations of avian keratin disorder in Black-capped Chickadees and other wild passerine species.

  8. Microanatomy of passerine hard-cornified tissues: Beak and claw structure of the black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Hemert, C.; Handel, C.M.; Blake, J.E.; Swor, R.M.; O'Hara, T. M.

    2012-01-01

    The microanatomy of healthy beaks and claws in passerine birds has not been well described in the literature, despite the importance of these structures in avian life. Histological processing of hard-cornified tissues is notoriously challenging and only a few reports on effective techniques have been published. An emerging epizootic of beak deformities among wild birds in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest region of North America recently highlighted the need for additional baseline information about avian hard-cornified structures. In this study, we examine the beak and claw of the Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus), a common North American passerine that is affected by what has been described as "avian keratin disorder." We use light and scanning electron microscopy and high-magnification radiography to document the healthy microanatomy of these tissues and identify features of functional importance. We also describe detailed methods for histological processing of avian hard-cornified structures and discuss the utility of special stains. Results from this study will assist in future research on the functional anatomy and pathology of hard-cornified structures and will provide a necessary reference for ongoing investigations of avian keratin disorder in Black-capped Chickadees and other wild passerine species. ?? 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. β-Type Zr-Nb-Ti biomedical materials with high plasticity and low modulus for hard tissue replacements.

    PubMed

    Nie, Li; Zhan, Yongzhong; Hu, Tong; Chen, Xiaoxian; Wang, Chenghui

    2014-01-01

    In order to develop new biomedical materials for hard tissue replacements, Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3, 7, 11 and 15) alloys with required properties were designed and prepared by using the vacuum arc melting method for the first time. Phase analysis and microstructural observation showed that all the as cast samples consisted of equiaxed β-Zr phase. The mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of the Zr-20Nb-xTi alloys have been analyzed. It is found that these alloys exhibit high plasticity, moderate compressive strength (1044-1325MPa) and yield stress (854-1080MPa), high elastic energy (12-20MJ/m(3)) and low Young's modulus (28-31GPa). This good combination of mechanical properties makes them potential biomedical materials for hard tissue replacement.

  10. β-Type Zr-Nb-Ti biomedical materials with high plasticity and low modulus for hard tissue replacements.

    PubMed

    Nie, Li; Zhan, Yongzhong; Hu, Tong; Chen, Xiaoxian; Wang, Chenghui

    2014-01-01

    In order to develop new biomedical materials for hard tissue replacements, Zr-20Nb-xTi (x=0, 3, 7, 11 and 15) alloys with required properties were designed and prepared by using the vacuum arc melting method for the first time. Phase analysis and microstructural observation showed that all the as cast samples consisted of equiaxed β-Zr phase. The mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of the Zr-20Nb-xTi alloys have been analyzed. It is found that these alloys exhibit high plasticity, moderate compressive strength (1044-1325MPa) and yield stress (854-1080MPa), high elastic energy (12-20MJ/m(3)) and low Young's modulus (28-31GPa). This good combination of mechanical properties makes them potential biomedical materials for hard tissue replacement. PMID:24036526

  11. Tooth anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    The part of the tooth you can see is called the crown. The outer surface of the crown is made of enamel. Just beneath the enamel is dentin, a substance harder than bone. The gum surrounds the base (root) of the tooth. ...

  12. A staged approach of implant placement in immediate extraction sockets for preservation of peri-implant soft and hard tissue

    PubMed Central

    Vinnakota, Dileep Nag; Akula, Sreenivasa Rao; Krishna Reddy, V. Vamsi; Sankar, V. Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Esthetic zone restoration is a challenging aspect in implant dentistry because of two critical factors such as level of bone support and soft tissue dimensions. Preservation of healthy peri-implant tissues is of primary importance for ensuring better esthetics over an extended period. The aim of the present case-series was to evaluate a new staged approach of implant placement in immediate extraction sockets for preservation of peri-implant soft and hard tissues. Four subjects scheduled for extraction of teeth in the esthetic zone with neither a periapical nor periodontal infection and with thick tissue biotype were included. For all the subjects sand blasted, large grit, acid etched platform switched implant with a diameter 2 mm less than the diameter of extraction socket and a conical abutment-implant connection (Morse taper) were placed 2 mm below the crest of the socket, with almost 2 mm gap between the labial plate and the implant with shoulder placed palatally/lingually. The implants were loaded after 2 months healing period and followed for a period of 1-2 years. In all the four patients there was preservation of both hard and soft tissues around the implant with a good esthetic outcome in all the follow up visits. Integrating immediate placement with stable implant-abutment connection, platform switching concept and careful case selection, we can achieve a very good esthetic outcome. PMID:24872643

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite-Resorbable Polymer Composites for Hard Tissue Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiebner, Kristopher Robert

    Autografts are the orthopedic "gold standard" for repairing bone voids. Autografts are osteoconductive and do not elicit an immune response, but they are in short supply and require a second surgery to harvest the bone graft. Allografts are currently the most common materials used for the repair of segmental defects in hard tissue. Unlike autografts, allografts can cause an undesirable immune response and the possibility of disease transmission is a major concern. As an alternative to the above approaches, recent research efforts have focused on the use of composite materials made from hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioresorbable polymers, such as poly-L-lactide (PLLA). Recent results have shown that the surface hydroxides on HA can initiate the ring opening polymerization (ROP) of L-lactide and other lactones creating a composite with superior interfacial strength. This thesis demonstrates that the surface of porous biologically derived HA substrates, such as coralline HA and trabecular bone, can be used to initiate the ROP of L-lactide and other lactones from the vapor phase. This process increases the strength of the porous scaffold through the deposition of a thin, uniform polymer coating, while maintaining the porous structure. The kinetics of the chemical vapor deposition polymerization (CVDP) are described using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The reaction temperature and monomer vapor pressure are found to affect the rate of the polymerization. Also described in this thesis is the preparation of a porous polymer scaffold that mimics the structure of demineralized bone matrix (DBM). This demineralized bone matrix simulant (DBMS) is created using anorganic bovine bone as a template to initiate the polymerization of various lactones, followed by the removal of the HA scaffold. This material retained its shape and exhibits mechanical properties superior to DBM. Finally it is shown that HA can be used to initiate the ROP of a-caprolactam and the biocompatibility

  14. Design and synthesis of polyphosphazenes: Hard tissue scaffolding biomaterials and physically crosslinked elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modzelewski, Tomasz

    The work in this thesis is divided into two main parts. The first part examines the synthesis and characterization of polyphosphazenes as potential scaffolding materials usable for hard tissue repair. The goal of this work was to design polymers containing acidic functional groups in an attempt to encourage the deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite when the polymer is exposed to simulated body fluids. The second part examines the development of a new polymeric architecture which generates elastomeric properties without the use of traditional covalent or physical crosslinks. The goal was to examine the effects of this new architecture on the physical and mechanical properties of the final polymers. Chapter 1 provides a general background for the two main focus areas mentioned above. More specifically: a brief explanation is provided of the necessary physical and chemical properties of a suitable hard tissue engineering scaffolding substrate, and the basis of those requirements; together with an examination of the traditional ways in which elastomeric properties are introduced into a polymeric sample. Chapter 2 details the design and synthesis of polyphosphazenes bearing phosphonic acid and phosphoester side groups using two different routes. The first route utilized a linker unit which was functionalized with phosphoesters prior to its attachment to the polyphosphazene backbone, while the second route involved attachment of the same linking group to the polyphosphazene backbone before the introduction of the phosphoester moieties. In both cases, the samples were treated with iodotrimethylsilane to cleave the ester bonds and afford the parent phosphonic acid. Both routes proved successful. However, varying difficulties were encountered for each route. In Chapter 3 we examine the ability of the phosphonic acid functionalized polyphosphazenes described in Chapter 2 to mineralize calcium hydroxyapatite when exposed to simulated body fluid, which has the same ion

  15. En-face OCT microleakage investigation after laser-assisted dental hard tissue treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todea, Carmen; Balabuc, Cosmin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Filip, Laura; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate using en-face Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) the microleakage after Er:YAG laser cavity preparation. Material and Methods: Thirty single- and multi-rooted freshly extracted human teeth divided into two study groups, group I (laser) and group II (control), were used in this study. In group I, Class V cavities were prepared using laser on the buccal surface of each tooth. The laser device used was an Er:YAG laser (2940 nm, VSP, 250-320 mJ, 10-20 Hz). In group II, cavities were prepared conventionally and acid etched on the oral surface of the same tooth. All cavities were filled with composite resin. The cavity microleakage was investigated using en-face Optical Coherence Tomography prototype, based on transverse scanning and operating at 1300 nm. Results: The investigation demonstrated qualitatively the reduction of microleakage in cavities prepared with Er:YAG laser as compared to the control group, in which cavities were prepared conventionally. Conclusion: The en-face OCT method provided a superior non-invasive and real time investigation method, thus reducing the occurrence of secondary caries by early detection. Moreover, based on the results of this investigation, it may be concluded that Er:YAG laser-assisted cavity preparation leads to reduction of microleakage.

  16. Tooth movement - clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Julien; Le Gall, Michel

    2010-06-01

    The tissue-based phenomena and the tissue interactions responsible for tooth displacement can be modulated by varying the intensity of the applied forces or by means of medicated molecules absorbed by the patient or prescribed by the orthodontist. However, harmful side-effects such as inflammatory root resorption or replacement resorption (ankylosis) can occur requiring appropriate management on the part of the practitioner. PMID:20457024

  17. Methods for studying tooth root cementum by light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Foster, Brian L

    2012-09-01

    The tooth root cementum is a thin, mineralized tissue covering the root dentin that is present primarily as acellular cementum on the cervical root and cellular cementum covering the apical root. While cementum shares many properties in common with bone and dentin, it is a unique mineralized tissue and acellular cementum is critical for attachment of the tooth to the surrounding periodontal ligament (PDL). Resources for methodologies for hard tissues often overlook cementum and approaches that may be of value for studying this tissue. To address this issue, this report offers detailed methodology, as well as comparisons of several histological and immunohistochemical stains available for imaging the cementum-PDL complex by light microscopy. Notably, the infrequently used Alcian blue stain with nuclear fast red counterstain provided utility in imaging cementum in mouse, porcine and human teeth. While no truly unique extracellular matrix markers have been identified to differentiate cementum from the other hard tissues, immunohistochemistry for detection of bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteopontin (OPN), and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a reliable approach for studying both acellular and cellular cementum and providing insight into developmental biology of these tissues. Histological and immunohistochemical approaches provide insight on developmental biology of cementum. PMID:22996273

  18. Methods for studying tooth root cementum by light microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Brian L

    2012-01-01

    The tooth root cementum is a thin, mineralized tissue covering the root dentin that is present primarily as acellular cementum on the cervical root and cellular cementum covering the apical root. While cementum shares many properties in common with bone and dentin, it is a unique mineralized tissue and acellular cementum is critical for attachment of the tooth to the surrounding periodontal ligament (PDL). Resources for methodologies for hard tissues often overlook cementum and approaches that may be of value for studying this tissue. To address this issue, this report offers detailed methodology, as well as comparisons of several histological and immunohistochemical stains available for imaging the cementum–PDL complex by light microscopy. Notably, the infrequently used Alcian blue stain with nuclear fast red counterstain provided utility in imaging cementum in mouse, porcine and human teeth. While no truly unique extracellular matrix markers have been identified to differentiate cementum from the other hard tissues, immunohistochemistry for detection of bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteopontin (OPN), and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a reliable approach for studying both acellular and cellular cementum and providing insight into developmental biology of these tissues. Histological and immunohistochemical approaches provide insight on developmental biology of cementum. PMID:22996273

  19. Tooth Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine if you need to see your dentist right away. SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS SELF-CARE Begin Here ... You have TOOTH LOSS. DENTAL EMERGENCY See your dentist or go to the emergency room right away. ...

  20. [Biomechanical study of medical hard tissue adhesive bonding butterfly fracture fragment in middle part of fresh human tibia].

    PubMed

    Lu, Bo; Tu, Zhongqi; Pei, Fuxing; Chen, Mengshi; Liu, Lei

    2004-06-01

    A medical hard tissue adhesive, octyl-a-cyanoacrylate, was tested in 6 fresh human tibiae. A 90 degrees butter-fly fracture fragment was made in the middle part of tibia by bandsaw. The compressive stress, torsional stress and angular deflection were assessed before and after osteoectomy respectively. After adhesive bonding, the compressive stress, torsional stress and angular deflection were tested again. The butterfly fracture fagment decreased the bending strength, torsion strength, yielding strength of tibia bone. In torsion test, the torque of tibia before osteoectomy is greater than bonded tibia, the bonded tibia is greater than that of the unbonded tibia. In compression test, before adhesive bonding broken, the compressive curve slope of tibia before osteoectomy is greater than that of bonded tibia, the bonded tibia is greater than that of the unbonded tibia. In angular deflection test before adhesive bonding of broken,the curve slope of tibia before osteoectomy is not different from that of bonded tibia (P>0.05), the slope the bonded tibia is greater than the slope of unbonded tibia(P<0.05). The elastic modulus, rigidity coefficient and moment of area inertia show no statistical difference between the bonded tibia and intact tibia. The used of medical hard tissue adhesive to bond the fracture fragment could improve the bending strength, torsion strength, yielding strength of tibia bone. In operation, it can reduce the soft tissue injury when the fracture fragment is being fixed, and this will benefit bone healing.

  1. Tooth patterning and evolution.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac

    2012-12-01

    Teeth are a good system for studying development and evolution. Tooth development is largely independent of the rest of the body and teeth can be grown in culture to attain almost normal morphology. Their development is not affected by the patterns of movement or sensorial perception in the embryo. Teeth are hard and easily preserved. Thus, there is plenty of easily accessible information about the patterns of morphological variation occurring between and within species. This review summarises recent work and describes how tooth development can be understood as the coupling between a reaction-diffusion system and differential growth produced by diffusible growth factors: which growth factors are involved, how they affect each other's expression and how they affect the spatial patterns of proliferation that lead to final morphology. There are some aspects of tooth development, however, that do not conform to some common assumptions in many reaction-diffusion models. Those are discussed here since they provide clues about how reaction-diffusion systems may work in actual developmental systems. Mathematical models implementing what we know about tooth development are discussed.

  2. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  3. Intra-oral PTH administration promotes tooth extraction socket healing.

    PubMed

    Kuroshima, S; Kovacic, B L; Kozloff, K M; McCauley, L K; Yamashita, J

    2013-06-01

    Intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) administration increases systemic and craniofacial bone mass. However, the effect of PTH therapy on healing of tooth extraction sites is unknown. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of PTH therapy on tooth extraction socket healing and to examine whether PTH intra-oral injection promotes healing. The mandibular first molars were extracted in rats, and subcutaneous PTH was administered intermittently for 7, 14, and 28 days. In a second study, maxillary second molars were extracted, and PTH was administered by either subcutaneous or intra-oral injection to determine the efficacy of intra-oral PTH administration. Healing was assessed by micro-computed tomography and histomorphometric analyses. PTH therapy accelerated the entire healing process and promoted both hard- and soft-tissue healing by increasing bone fill and connective tissue maturation. PTH therapy by intra-oral injection was as effective as subcutaneous injection in promoting tooth extraction socket healing. The findings suggest that PTH therapy promotes tooth extraction socket healing and that intra-oral injections can be used to administer PTH.

  4. Plasma ablation of hard tissue by the free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, Lou; Ossoff, Robert H.

    1993-07-01

    The Vanderbilt Free Electron Laser operating at wavelengths from 2.8 to 5.0 micrometers was focused and used to ablate samples of human temporal bone from cadavers, swatches of leather, and Plexiglas. The ablation efficiency, energy density necessary for ablation, and thermal damage to the surrounding tissue was investigated in all three samples. Comparisons are made between the different wavelength and the light interaction with tissue. At the highest intensities, a plasma is formed at the air tissue interface. The ablation process at these intensities is strongly influenced by the plasma, and the rate of ablation appears to become nearly independent of the laser wavelength. At lower intensities, the laser light interacts with the tissue in a more traditional fashion.

  5. The use of nanoindentation for characterizing the properties of mineralized hard tissues: state-of-the art review.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gladius; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2008-10-01

    The use of nanoindentation to determine nanomechanical properties of mineralized tissues has been investigated extensively. A detailed, critical, and comprehensive review of this literature is the subject of the present work. After stating the motivation for the review, a succinct presentation of the challenges, advantages, and disadvantages of the various quasi-static nanoindentation test methods (to obtain elastic modulus, E, and hardness, H) and dynamic test methods (to obtain storage and loss moduli and/or loss/damping factor) is given in the form of a primer. Explicative summaries of literature reports on various intrinsic and extrinsic factors that significantly influence E and H, followed by 15 suggested topics for future research, are included additionally. This review is designed to present a compact guide to the principles of the nanoindentation technique and to emphasize considerations when determining material properties of mineralized tissues. PMID:18395829

  6. [Studying the effect of heavy metals on tissue protein of an edible fish Cirrhinus mrigala under the influence of pH and water hardness].

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, S; Mani, P

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate the influence of pH and water hardness on protein contents of muscle tissues of Cirrhinus mrigala fingerlings by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. FT-IR spectra revealed significant differences in absorbance intensities between control and toxic metal-treated muscle tissues, reflecting a change in protein contents due to heavy metals, nickel and chromium, influence at different pH and water hardness. Metal toxicity is also more pronounced at pH 9.0 than in hard water.

  7. Intrafibrillar silicification of collagen scaffolds for sustained release of stem cell homing chemokine in hard tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Li-Na; Jiao, Kai; Qi, Yi-Pin; Nikonov, Sergey; Yiu, Cynthia K. Y.; Arola, Dwayne D.; Gong, Shi-Qiang; El-Marakby, Ahmed; Carrilho, Marcela R. O.; Hamrick, Mark W.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Diogenes, Anibal; Chen, Ji-Hua; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2012-01-01

    Traditional bone regeneration strategies relied on supplementation of biomaterials constructs with stem or progenitor cells or growth factors. By contrast, cell homing strategies employ chemokines to mobilize stem or progenitor cells from host bone marrow and tissue niches to injured sites. Although silica-based biomaterials exhibit osteogenic and angiogenic potentials, they lack cell homing capability. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) plays a pivotal role in mobilization and homing of stem cells to injured tissues. In this work, we demonstrated that 3-dimensional collagen scaffolds infiltrated with intrafibrillar silica are biodegradable and highly biocompatible. They exhibit improved compressive stress-strain responses and toughness over nonsilicified collagen scaffolds. They are osteoconductive and up-regulate expressions of osteogenesis- and angiogenesis-related genes more significantly than nonsilicified collagen scaffolds. In addition, these scaffolds reversibly bind SDF-1α for sustained release of this chemokine, which exhibits in vitro cell homing characteristics. When implanted subcutaneously in an in vivo mouse model, SDF-1α-loaded silicified collagen scaffolds stimulate the formation of ectopic bone and blood capillaries within the scaffold and abrogate the need for cell seeding or supplementation of osteogenic and angiogenic growth factors. Intrafibrillar-silicified collagen scaffolds with sustained SDF-1α release represent a less costly and complex alternative to contemporary cell seeding approaches and provide new therapeutic options for in situ hard tissue regeneration.—Niu, L.-N., Jiao, K., Qi, Y.-P., Nikonov, S., Yiu, C. K. Y., Arola, D. D., Gong, S.-Q., El-Marakby, A., Carrilho, M. R. O., Hamrick, M. W., Hargreaves, K. M., Diogenes, A., Chen, J.-H., Pashley, D. H., Tay, F. R. Intrafibrillar silicification of collagen scaffolds for sustained release of stem cell homing chemokine in hard tissue regeneration. PMID:22859369

  8. Three-dimensional hard tissue palatal size and shape: a 10-year longitudinal evaluation in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Sforza, Chiarella; Dellavia, Claudia; Colombo, Anna; Ferrari, Raffaella P

    2002-01-01

    A 10-year longitudinal evaluation of the morphology (size and shape) of hard tissue palate was performed in 6 female and 6 male healthy adults (mean age at the second evaluation was 33 years, SD = 2.2). All subjects had a complete permanent dentition, including the second molars, and were free from respiratory problems. Palatal landmarks were digitized with a computerized 3D instrument, and their coordinates were used to derive a mathematical model of palatal form. Palatal shape (size-independent) was assessed by a fourth-grade polynomial in the sagittal and frontal plane projections. Palatal dimensions in the frontal and sagittal planes were computed and compared between the 2 evaluations by paired Student t tests. A great variability was observed, and no significant modifications in size were found (P > .05 for all variables). No variations in shape were observed. Sex had no significant effect for any variable (Student t for independent samples, P > .05). This study showed that in healthy subjects, hard tissue palatal morphology does not seem to change between the third and the fourth decades of life.

  9. Effects of gamma radiation on hard dental tissues of albino rats using scanning electron microscope - Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Faramawy, Nabil; Ameen, Reham; El-Haddad, Khaled; Maghraby, Ahmed; El-Zainy, Medhat

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, 40 adult male albino rats were used to study the effect of gamma radiation on the hard dental tissues (enamel surface, dentinal tubules and the cementum surface). The rats were irradiated at 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 6.0 Gy gamma doses. The effects of irradiated hard dental tissues samples were investigated using a scanning electron microscope. For doses up to 0.5 Gy, there was no evidence of the existence of cracks on the enamel surface. With 1 Gy irradiation dose, cracks were clearly observed with localized erosive areas. At 2 Gy irradiation dose, the enamel showed morphological alterations as disturbed prismatic and interprismatic areas. An increase in dentinal tubules diameter and a contemporary inter-tubular dentine volume decrease were observed with higher irradiation dose. Concerning cementum, low doses,<0.5 Gy, showed surface irregularities and with increase in the irradiation dose to≥1 Gy, noticeable surface irregularities and erosive areas with decrease in Sharpey's fiber sites were observed. These observations could shed light on the hazardous effects of irradiation fields to the functioning of the human teeth.

  10. Dental Applications of Natural-Origin Polymers in Hard and Soft Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Hossein E; Fahmy, Mina D; Razavi, Mehdi; Stein, Brett E; Nowman, Aatif; Masri, Radi M; Tayebi, Lobat

    2016-08-01

    Clinical advances in the treatment of dentoalveolar defects continue to evolve with the introduction of new innovations in regenerative medicine and tissue bioengineering. Recent developments in tissue engineering are aimed at safely and effectively regenerating a damaged or necrotic area by replenishing its cells and increasing surrounding gene expression. Various techniques have successfully given rise to porous scaffolds being used by clinicians to treat the defect and initiate the repair process. Tissue reconstruction using bioengineered scaffolds is advantageous over traditional autografting, since it prevents the instigation of pain and donor site morbidity while ultimately creating both the environment and machinery needed to induce cell proliferation, migration, and reattachment within the affected area. This review article aims to describe and review the available literature regarding the regenerative capacity of natural polymers used for the treatment of dentoalveolar defects. The repair mechanisms, advantages of protein and polysaccharide derivatives, and the potential of stem cell therapy are discussed.

  11. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130–135, 86.6–124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  12. A high repetition rate TEA CO II laser operating at λ=9.3-μm for the rapid and conservative ablation and modification of dental hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    TEA CO II lasers tuned to the strong mineral absorption of hydroxyapatite near λ=9-μm are ideally suited for the efficient ablation of dental hard tissues if the laser-pulse is stretched to greater than 5-10-μs to avoid plasma shielding phenomena. Such CO II lasers are capable of operating at high repetition rates for the rapid removal of dental hard tissues. An Impact 2500 TEA CO II laser system from GSI Lumonics (Rugby, UK) custom modified by LightMachinery (Ottawa, Canada) with a repetition rate of 0-500 Hz was used for rapid tissue removal. The single pulse ablation rates through enamel were determined for incident fluence ranging from (1-160 J/cm2). Lateral incisions using a computer controlled scanning stage and water spray were produced and the crater morphology and chemical composition were measured using optical microscopy and high-resolution synchrotron radiation infrared spectromicroscopy. The transmission through 2-meter length 300, 500, 750 and 1000-μm silica hollow waveguides was measured and 80% transmission was achieved with 40-mJ per pulse. The λ=9.3-μm laser pulses efficiently removed dental enamel at rates exceeding 15-μm per pulses with minimal heat accumulation. The residual energy remaining in tooth samples was measured to be 30-40% without water cooling, significantly lower than for longer CO II laser pulses. These results suggest that high repetition rate TEA CO II laser systems operating at λ=9.3-μm with pulse durations of 10-20-μs are ideally suited for dental application.

  13. Observation of a Soft Tissue by a Zernike Phase Contrast Hard X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Sadao; Namikawa, Tadahiro; Hoshino, Masato; Watanabe, Norio

    2007-01-19

    A Zernike-type phase contrast hard X-ray microscope was constructed at the Photon Factory BL3C2 (KEK). A white beam from a bending magnet was monochromatized by a silicon double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic parallel X-ray beam illuminated a sample, and transmitted and diffracted X-ray beams were imaged by a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) which had the outer zone width of 100 nm. A phase plate made of a thin aluminum foil with a pinhole was set at the back focal plane of the FZP. The phase plate modulated the diffraction beam from the FZP, whereas a direct beam passed through the pinhole. The resolution of the microscope was measured by observing a tantalum test pattern at an X-ray energy of 9 keV. A 100nm line-and-space pattern could be resolved. X-ray montage pictures of growing eggs of artemia (plankton) were obtained.

  14. Observation of a Soft Tissue by a Zernike Phase Contrast Hard X-ray Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Sadao; Namikawa, Tadahiro; Hoshino, Masato; Watanabe, Norio

    2007-01-01

    A Zernike-type phase contrast hard X-ray microscope was constructed at the Photon Factory BL3C2 (KEK). A white beam from a bending magnet was monochromatized by a silicon double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic parallel X-ray beam illuminated a sample, and transmitted and diffracted X-ray beams were imaged by a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) which had the outer zone width of 100 nm. A phase plate made of a thin aluminum foil with a pinhole was set at the back focal plane of the FZP. The phase plate modulated the diffraction beam from the FZP, whereas a direct beam passed through the pinhole. The resolution of the microscope was measured by observing a tantalum test pattern at an X-ray energy of 9 keV. A 100nm line-and-space pattern could be resolved. X-ray montage pictures of growing eggs of artemia (plankton) were obtained.

  15. Multivariate image analysis of laser-induced photothermal imaging used for detection of caries tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sherif, Ashraf F.; Abdel Aziz, Wessam M.; El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.

    2010-08-01

    Time-resolved photothermal imaging has been investigated to characterize tooth for the purpose of discriminating between normal and caries areas of the hard tissue using thermal camera. Ultrasonic thermoelastic waves were generated in hard tissue by the absorption of fiber-coupled Q-switched Nd:YAG laser pulses operating at 1064 nm in conjunction with a laser-induced photothermal technique used to detect the thermal radiation waves for diagnosis of human tooth. The concepts behind the use of photo-thermal techniques for off-line detection of caries tooth features were presented by our group in earlier work. This paper illustrates the application of multivariate image analysis (MIA) techniques to detect the presence of caries tooth. MIA is used to rapidly detect the presence and quantity of common caries tooth features as they scanned by the high resolution color (RGB) thermal cameras. Multivariate principal component analysis is used to decompose the acquired three-channel tooth images into a two dimensional principal components (PC) space. Masking score point clusters in the score space and highlighting corresponding pixels in the image space of the two dominant PCs enables isolation of caries defect pixels based on contrast and color information. The technique provides a qualitative result that can be used for early stage caries tooth detection. The proposed technique can potentially be used on-line or real-time resolved to prescreen the existence of caries through vision based systems like real-time thermal camera. Experimental results on the large number of extracted teeth as well as one of the thermal image panoramas of the human teeth voltanteer are investigated and presented.

  16. Test Tube Tooth: The Next Big Thing.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Preeti; Tahir, Mohammed; Yadav, Harsh; Sureka, Rakshit; Garg, Aarti

    2016-06-01

    Unlike some vertebrates and fishes, humans do not have the capacity for tooth regeneration after the loss of permanent teeth. Although artificial replacement with removable dentures, fixed prosthesis and implants is possible through advances in the field of prosthetic dentistry, it would be ideal to recreate a third set of natural teeth to replace lost dentition. For many years now, researchers in the field of tissue engineering have been trying to bioengineer dental tissues as well as whole teeth. In order to attain a whole tooth through dental engineering, that has the same or nearly same biological, mechanical and physical properties of a natural tooth, it's necessary to deal with all the cells and tissues which are concerned with the formation, maintenance and repair of the tooth. In this article we review the steps involved in odontogenesis or organogenesis of a tooth and progress in the bioengineering of a whole tooth. PMID:27504430

  17. Test Tube Tooth: The Next Big Thing

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Mohammed; Yadav, Harsh; Sureka, Rakshit; Garg, Aarti

    2016-01-01

    Unlike some vertebrates and fishes, humans do not have the capacity for tooth regeneration after the loss of permanent teeth. Although artificial replacement with removable dentures, fixed prosthesis and implants is possible through advances in the field of prosthetic dentistry, it would be ideal to recreate a third set of natural teeth to replace lost dentition. For many years now, researchers in the field of tissue engineering have been trying to bioengineer dental tissues as well as whole teeth. In order to attain a whole tooth through dental engineering, that has the same or nearly same biological, mechanical and physical properties of a natural tooth, it’s necessary to deal with all the cells and tissues which are concerned with the formation, maintenance and repair of the tooth. In this article we review the steps involved in odontogenesis or organogenesis of a tooth and progress in the bioengineering of a whole tooth. PMID:27504430

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cell technology using bioceramics: hard tissue regeneration towards clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Hiroe; Oda, Yasuaki; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2010-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells which show differentiation capabilities toward various cell lineages. We have already used MSCs for treatments of osteoarthritis, bone necrosis and bone tumor. For this purpose, culture expanded MSCs were combined with various ceramics and then implanted. Because of rejection response to allogeneic MSC implantation, we have utilized patients' own MSCs for the treatment. Bone marrow is a good cell source of MSCs, although the MSCs also exist in adipose tissue. When comparing osteogenic differentiation of these MSCs, bone marrow MSCs show more extensive bone forming capability than adipose MSCs. Thus, the bone marrow MSCs are useful for bone tissue regeneration. However, the MSCs show limited proliferation and differentiation capabilities that hindered clinical applications in some cases. Recent advances reveal that transduction of plural transcription factors into human adult cells results in generation of new type of stem cells called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). A drawback of the iPS cells for clinical applications is tumor formation after their in vivo implantation; therefore it is difficult to use iPS cells for the treatment. To circumvent the problem, we transduced a single factor of either SOX2 or NANOG into the MSCs and found high proliferation as well as osteogenic differentiation capabilities of the MSCs. The stem cells could be combined with bioceramics for clinical applications. Here, we summarize our recent technologies using adult stem cells in viewpoints of bone tissue regeneration.

  19. Versatile design of hydrogel-based scaffolds with manipulated pore structure for hard-tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, WonJin; Lee, Hyeongjin; Kim, YongBok; Choi, Chang Hyun; Lee, DaeWeon; Hwang, Heon; Kim, GeunHyung

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a variety of biomimetic hydrogel scaffolds have been used in tissue engineering because hydrogels can provide reasonable soft-tissue-like environmental conditions for various cell responses. However, although hydrogels can provide an outstanding biofunctional platform, their poor mechanical stability and low processability have been obstacles for their usage as biomedical scaffolds. To overcome this limitation, we propose a simple and versatile method using 3D printing supplemented with a low-temperature working plate and coating process to reinforce the mechanical properties and various cellular activities by accommodating the poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL). To determine the efficiency of the method, we used two typical hydrogels (alginate and collagen), which were deposited in a multi-layer configuration, and PCL as a coating agent. The scaffolds were evaluated in terms of various physical and cellular activities (metabolic activity and osteogenic activity). Throughout the experiments, significant increases in the tensile modulus (>6-fold), cell proliferation (>1.2-fold), and calcium deposition (>1.3-fold) were observed for the hydrogel/PCL scaffolds compared to those for pure hydrogel. Based on the experimental results, we can confirm that the proposed hydrogel scaffold can be a highly promising biomedical scaffold for application in tissue regeneration. PMID:27586518

  20. Intrafibrillar silicification of collagen scaffolds for sustained release of stem cell homing chemokine in hard tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Niu, Li-Na; Jiao, Kai; Qi, Yi-Pin; Nikonov, Sergey; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Arola, Dwayne D; Gong, Shi-Qiang; El-Marakby, Ahmed; Carrilho, Marcela R O; Hamrick, Mark W; Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Diogenes, Anibal; Chen, Ji-Hua; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2012-11-01

    Traditional bone regeneration strategies relied on supplementation of biomaterials constructs with stem or progenitor cells or growth factors. By contrast, cell homing strategies employ chemokines to mobilize stem or progenitor cells from host bone marrow and tissue niches to injured sites. Although silica-based biomaterials exhibit osteogenic and angiogenic potentials, they lack cell homing capability. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) plays a pivotal role in mobilization and homing of stem cells to injured tissues. In this work, we demonstrated that 3-dimensional collagen scaffolds infiltrated with intrafibrillar silica are biodegradable and highly biocompatible. They exhibit improved compressive stress-strain responses and toughness over nonsilicified collagen scaffolds. They are osteoconductive and up-regulate expressions of osteogenesis- and angiogenesis-related genes more significantly than nonsilicified collagen scaffolds. In addition, these scaffolds reversibly bind SDF-1α for sustained release of this chemokine, which exhibits in vitro cell homing characteristics. When implanted subcutaneously in an in vivo mouse model, SDF-1α-loaded silicified collagen scaffolds stimulate the formation of ectopic bone and blood capillaries within the scaffold and abrogate the need for cell seeding or supplementation of osteogenic and angiogenic growth factors. Intrafibrillar-silicified collagen scaffolds with sustained SDF-1α release represent a less costly and complex alternative to contemporary cell seeding approaches and provide new therapeutic options for in situ hard tissue regeneration.

  1. Robocasting nanocomposite scaffolds of poly(caprolactone)/hydroxyapatite incorporating modified carbon nanotubes for hard tissue reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dorj, Biligzaya; Won, Jong-Eun; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Choi, Seong-Jun; Shin, Ueon Sang; Kim, Hae-Won

    2013-06-01

    Nanocomposite scaffolds with tailored 3D pore configuration are promising candidates for the reconstruction of bone. Here we fabricated novel nanocomposite bone scaffolds through robocasting. Poly(caprolactone) (PCL)-hydroxyapatite (HA) slurry containing ionically modified carbon nanotubes (imCNTs) was robotic-dispensed and structured layer-by-layer into macrochanneled 3D scaffolds under adjusted processing conditions. Homogeneous dispersion of imCNTs (0.2 wt % relative to PCL-HA) was achieved in acetone, aiding in the preparation of PCL-HA-imCNTs slurry with good mixing property. Incorporation of imCNTs into PCL-HA composition significantly improved the compressive strength and elastic modulus of the robotic-dispensed scaffolds (~1.5-fold in strength and ~2.5-fold in elastic modulus). When incubated in simulated body fluid (SBF), PCL-HA-imCNT nanocomposite scaffold induced substantial mineralization of apatite in a similar manner to the PCL-HA scaffold, which was contrasted in pure PCL scaffold. MC3T3-E1 cell culture on the scaffolds demonstrated that cell proliferation levels were significantly higher in both PCL-HA-imCNT and PCL-HA than in pure PCL, and no significant difference was found between the nanocomposite scaffolds. When the PCL-HA-imCNT scaffold was implanted into a rat subcutaneous tissue for 4 weeks, soft fibrous tissues with neo-blood vessels formed well in the pore channels of the scaffolds without any significant inflammatory signs. Tissue reactions in PCL-HA-imCNT scaffold were similar to those in PCL-HA scaffold, suggesting incorporated imCNT did not negate the beneficial biological roles of HA. While more long-term in vivo research in bone defect models is needed to confirm clinical availability, our results suggest robotic-dispensed PCL-HA-imCNT nanocomposite scaffolds can be considered promising new candidate matrices for bone regeneration.

  2. Selective formation of metastable ferrihydrite in the chiton tooth.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lyle M; Román, Jessica K; Everly, R Michael; Cohen, Michael J; Wilker, Jonathan J; Joester, Derk

    2014-10-20

    Metastable precursors are thought to play a major role in the ability of organisms to create mineralized tissues. Of particular interest are the hard and abrasion-resistant teeth formed by chitons, a class of rock-grazing mollusks. The formation of chiton teeth relies on the precipitation of metastable ferrihydrite (Fh) in an organic scaffold as a precursor to magnetite. In vitro synthesis of Fh under physiological conditions has been challenging. Using a combination of X-ray absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we show that, prior to Fh formation in the chiton tooth, iron ions are complexed by the organic matrix. In vitro experiments demonstrate that such complexes facilitate the formation of Fh under physiological conditions. These results indicate that acidic molecules may be integral to controlling Fh formation in the chiton tooth. This biological approach to polymorph selection is not limited to specialized proteins and can be expropriated using simple chemistry.

  3. Selective formation of metastable ferrihydrite in the chiton tooth.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lyle M; Román, Jessica K; Everly, R Michael; Cohen, Michael J; Wilker, Jonathan J; Joester, Derk

    2014-10-20

    Metastable precursors are thought to play a major role in the ability of organisms to create mineralized tissues. Of particular interest are the hard and abrasion-resistant teeth formed by chitons, a class of rock-grazing mollusks. The formation of chiton teeth relies on the precipitation of metastable ferrihydrite (Fh) in an organic scaffold as a precursor to magnetite. In vitro synthesis of Fh under physiological conditions has been challenging. Using a combination of X-ray absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we show that, prior to Fh formation in the chiton tooth, iron ions are complexed by the organic matrix. In vitro experiments demonstrate that such complexes facilitate the formation of Fh under physiological conditions. These results indicate that acidic molecules may be integral to controlling Fh formation in the chiton tooth. This biological approach to polymorph selection is not limited to specialized proteins and can be expropriated using simple chemistry. PMID:25196134

  4. Bio-Corrosion Resistance and Biocompatibility of a ZrTi-BASED Bmgmc as Potential Hard Tissue Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaobo; Zou, Jiaojuan; Wang, Chan; Hang, Ruiqiang; Qiao, Junwei; Tang, Bin

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we compared the bio-corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of a ZrTi-based BMGMC (Zr58.5Ti14.3Ni4.9Cu6.1Nb5.2Be11.0). The Ti-6Al-4V alloy was used as a reference material. By utilizing the electrochemical measurements and M3T3 cell culture, the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of this BMGMC were evaluated. The BMGMC displayed high positive corrosion potentials and low corrosion current densities, which indicated that this material exhibited a highly improved corrosion resistance than the Ti alloy. The cells could adhere on the surface of this BMGMC and exhibited improved cellular behaviors, such as cellular viability and cytoskeketal structure. In summary, the ZrTi-based BMGMC showed great potential for applications in the hard tissue implants.

  5. Nonlinear inversion modeling for Ultrasound Computer Tomography: transition from soft to hard tissues imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasaygues, Philippe; Mensah, Serge; Guillermin, Régine; Rouyer, Julien; Franceschini, Emilie

    2012-03-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (UCT) is an imaging technique which has proved effective for soft-tissue (breast, liver,...) characterization. More recently, the use of UCT has been envisaged for bone imaging. In this field, the large variations of impedance distribution (high contrast) require that a finer model of wave propagation be integrated into the reconstruction scheme. Here, the tomographic procedure used is adapted to broadband data acquired in scattering configurations while the heterogeneous objects (Born approximation) are probed by spherical waves. An "elliptical" Fourier transform has been derived to solve the near-field inverse problem. This transform differs from the standard Fourier Transform in that, instead of plane waves, families of harmonic ellipsoidal waves are considered. For soft tissues it is possible to separate the impedance and speed of sound contributions and to reconstruct their cartographies using dedicated near-field Radon transforms. In the case of highly heterogeneous media such as bones, iterative inversion schemes are proposed. The various reconstruction procedures are set against experiments.

  6. Studies of Hard and Soft Tissue Elemental Compositions in Mice and Rats Subjected to Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rahul; Lane, Ryan A.; Fitch, Hannah M.; Ali, Nawab; Soulsby, Michael; Chowdhury, Parimal

    2009-03-01

    Microgravity has profound effects on skeletal as well as other body systems. To investigate the effect of microgravity, we have used a NASA validated Hind-limb suspension (HLS) animal model of simulated weightlessness. Groups of mice and rats were subjected to hind limb suspension between 1 and 14 days while the control groups were maintained without suspension for the same duration. To study the effect of diet, some groups of animals were fed on a special diet with defined composition. At term, the animals were sacrificed and the tibia, femur, and skull bones were collected. In addition, soft tissues from pancreas and muscles were also collected. All of the bones and tissues samples were analyzed for elemental analysis using Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) equipped on a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). In the EDS, 10-20 keV electrons bombarded the samples and a Si (Li) detector measured K-, L- and M-shell x-rays. Independently, X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) provided the data for comparison and normalization. Flame software, with Fuzzy Logic, was used to form elemental ratios. Elemental analysis of bone samples indicated a variation in the compositional ratios of calcium, potassium, oxygen and carbon in the leg bones and skulls of the HLS versus control specimens. These variations showed dependence on sample position in the bone.

  7. Role of stem cells in tooth bioengineering

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kamleshwar; Mishra, Niraj; Kumar, Lakshya; Agarwal, Kaushal Kishore; Agarwal, Bhaskar

    2012-01-01

    The creation of teeth in the laboratory depends upon the manipulation of stem cells and requires a synergy of all cellular and molecular events that finally lead to the formation of tooth-specific hard tissues, dentin, and enamel. This review focuses on the different sources of stem cells that have been used for making teeth in vitro. The search was performed from 1970 to 2012 and was limited to English language papers. The keywords searched on medline were ‘stem cells and dentistry,’ ‘stem cells and odontoblast,’ ‘stem cells and dentin,’ and ‘stem cells and ameloblasts.’ PMID:25756031

  8. Preserved microstructure and mineral distribution in tooth and periodontal tissues in early fossil hominin material from Koobi Fora, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Klinge, R Furseth; Dean, M C; Risnes, S; Erambert, M; Gunnaes, A E

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore further the preservation of tissues and the mineral distribution in 1.6 million-year-old fossil hominin material from Koobi Fora, Kenya attributed to Paranthropus boisei (KNM-ER 1817). Bone, dentine and cementum microstructure were well preserved. Electron microprobe analysis of dentine and bone revealed an F-bearing apatite. Calcite now filled the original soft tissue spaces. The average Ca/P atomic ratio was 1.93, as compared to 1.67 in biological hydroxyapatite, indicating that the Ca-content had increased during fossilization. Analytical sums for mineral content were approximately 90 wt%. Some of the remaining 10 wt% may be preserved organic material. Demineralized dentine fragments showed irregularly distributed tubules encircled with a fibrous-like electron-dense material. A similar material was observed in demineralized dentine. Within this, structures resembling bacteria were seen. In demineralized bone an electron-dense material with a fibrous appearance and a banding pattern that repeated every 64 nm, similar to that of collagen, was noted. SEM of an enamel fragment (KNM-ER 6081) showed signs of demineralization/remineralization. Retzius lines, Hunter-Schreger bands and prism cross-striations spaced 3.7-7.1.microm apart were noted. Prisms were arranged in a pattern 3 configuration and deeper areas containing aprismatic enamel were occasionally observed. We conclude that a great deal of informative microstructure and ultrastructure remains preserved in this fossil material. We also hypothesize that the high mineral content of the tissues may 'protect' parts of the organic matrix from degradation, since our findings indicate that some organic matrix may still be present. PMID:19828965

  9. Clinical management of a fused upper premolar with supernumerary tooth: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In dentistry, the term 'fusion' is used to describe a developmental disorder of dental hard tissues. In the permanent dentition, fusion of a normal tooth and a supernumerary tooth usually involves the incisors or canines. However, a few cases of fusion involving premolars have also been reported to date. We present a rare case in which fusion of the maxillary left second premolar and a supernumerary tooth in a 13-year-old girl was diagnosed using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, Alphard-3030, Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd.). The tooth was bicuspidized after routine nonsurgical root canal treatment, and the separated teeth underwent appropriate restoration procedures. The second premolar and supernumerary tooth remained asymptomatic without any signs of inflammation after a follow-up period of 9 years. Identification of anatomical anomalies is important for treatment in cases involving fusion with supernumerary tooth, and therefore the microscopic examinations and CBCT are essential for the diagnosis. Fused teeth can be effectively managed by the comprehensive treatment which includes both endodontic and periodontal procedures. PMID:25383352

  10. Tooth mobility changes subsequent to root fractures: a longitudinal clinical study of 44 permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Ahrensburg, Søren Steno; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth mobility changes in root-fractured permanent teeth and relate this to type of interfragment healing (hard tissue healing (HT), interfragment healing with periodontal ligament (PDL) and nonhealing with interposition of granulation tissue (GT) because of pulp necrosis in the coronal fragment. Furthermore, the effect of age, location of the fracture on the root, and observation period on mobility values was analyzed. Mobility values were measured for 44 of 95 previous reported root-fractured permanent incisors. Mobility changes were measured with a Mühlemanns periodontometer and noninjured incisors served as controls. The mobility values represented the labial-lingual excursion of the root measured in μm when the tooth received a frontal and a palatal impact of 100 g force. In 18 cases of hard tissue healing (HT), a slightly increased mobility was seen after 3 months and 1 year, and a normalization of mobility value was usually found after 5 and 10 years. In 17 cases of PDL healing, generally a higher mobility was found in comparison with root fractures healing with hard tissue, and a consistent decrease in mobility value was found in the course of the 10 year observation period. A tendency for reduced mobility over time was found, a relation that could possibly be explained by the known general decrease in tooth mobility with increasing age. Finally, nine cases of nonhealing with initial interposition of granulation tissue (GT) because of pulp necrosis in the coronal fragment resulted in increasing mobility values possibly related to a lateral breakdown of the PDL in relation to the fracture line. In control teeth, a lowering of mobility was found over the course of a 10-year observation period. In conclusion, mobility changes appeared to reflect the radiographic healing stages and known age effects upon tooth mobility.

  11. Human bone hardness seems to depend on tissue type but not on anatomical site in the long bones of an old subject.

    PubMed

    Ohman, Caroline; Zwierzak, Iwona; Baleani, Massimiliano; Viceconti, Marco

    2013-02-01

    It has been hypothesised that among different human subjects, the bone tissue quality varies as a function of the bone segment morphology. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the quality, evaluated in terms of hardness of packages of lamellae, of cortical and trabecular bones, at different anatomical sites within the human skeleton. The contralateral six long bones of an old human subject were indented at different levels along the diaphysis and at both epiphyses of each bone. Hardness value, which is correlated to the degree of mineralisation, of both cortical and trabecular bone tissues was calculated for each indentation location. It was found that the cortical bone tissue was harder (+18%) than the trabecular one. In general, the bone hardness was found to be locally highly heterogeneous. In fact, considering one single slice obtained for a bone segment, the coefficient of variation of the hardness values was up to 12% for cortical bone and up to 17% for trabecular bone. However, the tissue hardness was on average quite homogeneous within and among the long bones of the studied donor, although differences up to 9% among levels and up to 7% among bone segments were found. These findings seem not to support the mentioned hypothesis, at least not for the long bones of an old subject.

  12. Hard tissue ablation with a spray-assisted mid-IR laser.

    PubMed

    Kang, H W; Rizoiu, I; Welch, A J

    2007-12-21

    The objective of this study was to understand the dominant mechanism(s) for dental enamel ablation with the application of water spray. A free-running Er,Cr:YSGG (yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser was used to ablate human enamel tissue at various radiant exposures. During dental ablation, distilled water was sprayed on the sample surface, and these results were compared to ablation without a spray (dry ablation). In order to identify dominant ablation mechanisms, transient acoustic waves were compared to ablation thresholds and the volume of material removed. The ablation profile and depth were measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Irregular surface modification, charring and peripheral cracks were associated with dry ablation, whereas craters for spray samples were relatively clean without thermal damage. In spite of a 60% higher ablation threshold for spray associated irradiations owing to water absorption, acoustic peak pressures were six times higher and ablation volume was up to a factor of 2 larger compared to dry ablation. The enhanced pressure and ablation performance of the spray-assisted process was the result of rapid water vaporization, material ejection with recoil stress, interstitial water explosion and possibly liquid-jet formation. With water cooling and abrasive/disruptive mechanical effects, the spray ablation can be a safe and efficient modality for dental treatment. PMID:18065837

  13. Selective preparation of hard dental tissue: classical and laser treatments comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostálova, Tat'jana; Jelínkova, Helena; Němec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Iwai, Katsumasa; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2006-02-01

    For the purpose of micro-selective preparation which is part of the modern dentistry four various methods were examined: ablation by Er:YAG laser radiation (free-running or Q-switching regime), preparation of tissues by ultrasonic round ball tip, and by the classical dental drilling machine using diamond round bur. In the case of Er:YAG laser application the interaction energy 40 mJ in pulse of 200 us yielding to the interaction intensity 62 kW/cm2, and 20 mJ in pulse of 100 ns yielding to the interaction intensity 62 MW/cm2 was used for the case of free running, and Q-switch regime, respectively. For comparisson with the classical methods the ultrasound preparation tip (Sonixflex cariex TC, D - Sonicsys micro) and dental driller together with usual preparation burrs and standard handpiece were used. For the interaction experiment the samples of extracted human teeth and ebony cut into longitudinal sections and polished were used. The thickness of the prepared samples ranged from 5 to 7 mm. The methods were compared from the point of prepared cavity shape (SEM), inner surface, and possibility of selective removal of carries. The composite filling material was used to reconstruct the cavities. The dye penetrating analysis was performed.

  14. Experimental comparison of grating- and propagation-based hard X-ray phase tomography of soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, S.; Zanette, I.; Dominietto, M.; Langer, M.; Rack, A.; Schulz, G.; Le Duc, G.; David, C.; Mohr, J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Müller, B.; Weitkamp, T.

    2014-10-01

    When imaging soft tissues with hard X-rays, phase contrast is often preferred over conventional attenuation contrast due its superior sensitivity. However, it is unclear which of the numerous phase tomography methods yields the optimized results at given experimental conditions. Therefore, we quantitatively compared the three phase tomography methods implemented at the beamline ID19 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: X-ray grating interferometry (XGI), and propagation-based phase tomography, i.e., single-distance phase retrieval (SDPR) and holotomography (HT), using cancerous tissue from a mouse model and an entire heart of a rat. We show that for both specimens, the spatial resolution derived from the characteristic morphological features is about a factor of two better for HT and SDPR compared to XGI, whereas the XGI data generally exhibit much better contrast-to-noise ratios for the anatomical features. Moreover, XGI excels in fidelity of the density measurements, and is also more robust against low-frequency artifacts than HT, but it might suffer from phase-wrapping artifacts. Thus, we can regard the three phase tomography methods discussed as complementary. The application will decide which spatial and density resolutions are desired, for the imaging task and dose requirements, and, in addition, the applicant must choose between the complexity of the experimental setup and the one of data processing.

  15. The effects of prostaglandin E2 in growing rats - Increased metaphyseal hard tissue and cortico-endosteal bone formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, W. S. S.; Ueno, K.; Deng, Y. P.; Woodbury, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The role of in vivo prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in bone formation is investigated. Twenty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing between 223-267 g were injected subcutaneously with 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, and 6.0 mg of PGE2-kg daily for 21 days. The processing of the tibiae for observation is described. Radiographs and histomorphometric analyses are also utilized to study bone formation. Body weight, weights of soft tissues and bones morphometry are evaluated. It is observed that PGE2 depressed longitudinal bone growth, increased growth cartilage thickness, decreased degenerative cartilage cell size and cartilage cell production, and significantly increased proximal tibial metaphyseal hard tissue mass. The data reveal that periosteal bone formation is slowed down at higher doses of PGE2 and endosteal bone formation is slightly depressed less than 10 days post injection; however, here is a late increase (10 days after post injection) in endosteal bone formation and in the formation of trabecular bone in the marrow cavity of the tibial shaft. It is noted that the effects of PGE2 on bone formation are similar to the responses of weaning rats to PGE2.

  16. Waveguide and articulated arm for Er:YAG laser system: shape and depth of laser cavity in hard dental tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Dostalova, Tatjana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Wang, You; Shi, Yi-Wei; Dolezalova, Libuse; Hamal, Karel; Krejsa, Otakar; Kubelka, Jiri; Prochazka, Stanislav

    1998-04-01

    The aim of our study was to verify the efficiency of delivery systems for Er:YAG laser radiation which could be used in dentistry. The influence of increasing energy and number of pulses on a profile and depth of drilled holes was investigated. Er:YAG laser was operating in a free-running mode, generating a length of pulses 200 microsecond with a maximum energy of 500 mJ. The delivery systems investigated were an articulated arm and a fluorocarbon polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguide. The prepared hard tissues were a sliced part of enamel, dentine and ivory. The laser radiation was directed on them by focusing optics (CaF2 lens) together with the cooling water to ensure that the tissues will not be burned. For the evaluation of shapes, depth and profiles of the prepared cavities the metallographic microscope, x-ray microtomograph and scanning electron microscope were used. From the results it was observed that the profile and depth of the cavities prepared by the laser radiation delivered by the various systems (waveguide or articulated arm) are not the same. The laser radiation delivered by waveguide produces a larger diameter cavity with a lower depth. The holes are smoother and without side effects.

  17. Experimental comparison of grating- and propagation-based hard X-ray phase tomography of soft tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, S.; Schulz, G.; Müller, B.; Zanette, I.; Dominietto, M.; Langer, M.; Rack, A.; Le Duc, G.; David, C.; Mohr, J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Weitkamp, T.

    2014-10-21

    When imaging soft tissues with hard X-rays, phase contrast is often preferred over conventional attenuation contrast due its superior sensitivity. However, it is unclear which of the numerous phase tomography methods yields the optimized results at given experimental conditions. Therefore, we quantitatively compared the three phase tomography methods implemented at the beamline ID19 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: X-ray grating interferometry (XGI), and propagation-based phase tomography, i.e., single-distance phase retrieval (SDPR) and holotomography (HT), using cancerous tissue from a mouse model and an entire heart of a rat. We show that for both specimens, the spatial resolution derived from the characteristic morphological features is about a factor of two better for HT and SDPR compared to XGI, whereas the XGI data generally exhibit much better contrast-to-noise ratios for the anatomical features. Moreover, XGI excels in fidelity of the density measurements, and is also more robust against low-frequency artifacts than HT, but it might suffer from phase-wrapping artifacts. Thus, we can regard the three phase tomography methods discussed as complementary. The application will decide which spatial and density resolutions are desired, for the imaging task and dose requirements, and, in addition, the applicant must choose between the complexity of the experimental setup and the one of data processing.

  18. Distinctive Tooth-Extraction Socket Healing: Bisphosphonate Versus Parathyroid Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuroshima, Shinichiro; Mecano, Rodan B.; Tanoue, Ryuichiro; Koi, Kiyono; Yamashita, Junro

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with osteoporosis who receive tooth extractions are typically on either oral bisphosphonate or parathyroid hormone (PTH) therapy. Currently, the consequence of these therapies on hard- and soft-tissue healing in the oral cavity is not clearly defined. The aim of this study is to determine the differences in the therapeutic effect on tooth-extraction wound healing between bisphosphonate and PTH therapies. Methods Maxillary second molars were extracted in Sprague Dawley rats (n = 30), and either bisphosphonate (zoledronate [Zol]), PTH, or saline (vehicle control [VC]) was administered for 10 days (n = 10 per group). Hard-tissue healing was evaluated by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometric analyses. Collagen, blood vessels, inflammatory cell infiltration, and cathepsin K expression were assessed in soft tissue using immunohistochemistry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblotting. Results Both therapies significantly increased bone fill and suppressed vertical bone loss. However, considerably more devital bone was observed in the sockets of rats on Zol versus VC. Although Zol increased the numbers of blood vessels, the total blood vessel area in soft tissue was significantly smaller than in VC. PTH therapy increased osteoblastic bone formation and suppressed osteoclasts. PTH therapy promoted soft-tissue maturation by suppressing inflammation and stimulating collagen deposition. Conclusion Zoledronate therapy deters whereas PTH therapy promotes hard- and soft-tissue healing in the oral cavity, and both therapies prevent vertical bone loss. PMID:23688101

  19. Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis: Histopathologic Features.

    PubMed

    Smedley, R C; Earley, E T; Galloway, S S; Baratt, R M; Rawlinson, J E

    2015-09-01

    Equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis (EOTRH) is a painful progressive condition of older horses that involves multiple teeth, including canines and incisors. EOTRH is uncommonly recognized by veterinary pathologists and in some cases may be misdiagnosed as cementoblastoma. The cause is unknown. The goals of this study were to describe the histopathologic features of EOTRH in 17 affected horses from the United States and to increase awareness of this condition. Samples ranged from affected tooth to the entire rostral mandible and maxilla. Affected teeth exhibited cemental hyperplasia and lysis. The marked proliferation of cementum in severe cases caused bulbous enlargement of the intra-alveolar portions of affected teeth. Several teeth contained necrotic debris, bacteria, and plant material in the regions of cemental lysis. All horses exhibited dentinal lysis in at least affected tooth, and several contained necrotic debris in these regions. Endodontic disease was often present with inflammation, lysis, necrotic debris, fibrosis, and/or a thin rim of atubular mineralized tissue in the pulp cavity. Periodontal disease was a common feature that was primarily characterized by moderate lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. Resorption with secondary hypercementosis appears to begin on the external surface of the teeth rather than within the pulp cavity. Distinguishing EOTRH from other diseases requires a complete history that includes the number and location of affected teeth, a gross description of regional hard/soft tissue health, and radiographic findings.

  20. The relationship between surface free-energy and kinetics in the mineralization and demineralization of dental hard tissue.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Nancollas, G H

    1997-11-01

    The interfacial free-energy is an important factor in the regulation of mineralization and dissolution at the surfaces of dental hard tissues. However, few thermodynamic studies have been aimed at the elucidation of the interfacial terms. Contact angle measurements (sessile drop and thin layer wicking) and kinetic dissolution and growth techniques have been used to study the interfacial properties of root dentin (D), human enamel (E), and hydroxyapatite (HAP). The interfacial tensions between water (w) and each of these phases were calculated from contact angle data according to surface tension components theory. The values gamma wD = 4.5 x 10(-3) J m-2, gamma wE = 8.8 x 10(-3) J m-2, and gamma w,HAP = 10.4 x 10(-3) J m-2 were of the same order of magnitude as those obtained from dissolution kinetic data (pH = 4.5): gamma wD = 1.4 x 10(-3) J m-2, gamma wE = 3.2 x 10(-3) J m-2, and gamma wHAP = 9.3 x 10(-3) J m-2. Kinetics studies of the crystallization of HAP on HAP, dentin, and enamel yielded the interfacial free-energy values, gamma wHAP = 17.1 x 10(-3) J m-2, 17.7 x 10(-3) J m-2, and 9.4 x 10(-3) J m-2, respectively, probably reflecting the interfacial energies of the deposited phases rather than those of the dental hard-tissue substrata. The lower interfacial tension values are consistent with the higher solubilities of these solid phases: logKSO = -52.0, -55 approximately 57, and -58 approximately 59, for root dentin, enamel, and HAP, respectively, expressed as an equivalent HAP ionic product. The higher interfacial free-energy is also consistent with the slower mineralization of HAP on dentin and enamel surfaces.

  1. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics > Tooth Decay (Caries) > Seal Out Tooth Decay Seal Out Tooth Decay Main Content What are dental ... back teeth decay so easily? Who should get seal​ants? Should sealants be put on baby teeth? ...

  2. Primary B-Cell Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma of the Hard Palate and Parotid Gland: Report of One Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yonal-Hindilerden, Ipek; Hindilerden, Fehmi; Arslan, Serkan; Turan-Guzel, Nalan; Dogan, Ibrahim Oner; Nalcaci, Meliha

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with an ulcerated palate mass and swelling of the right parotid gland. Incisional biopsy from the hard palate revealed an extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma, also called mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Final diagnosis was MALT lymphoma of the parotid gland with concomitant involvement of an extremely seldom site of involvement: the hard palate. To our knowledge, this report illustrates the first case of MALT lymphoma of the hard palate and parotid gland without an underlying autoimmune disease. Rituximab-based combination regimen (R-CHOP) provided complete remission with total regression of mass lesions at the hard palate and parotid gland. At 44-month follow-up, there is no disease relapse. We adressed the manifestations and management of MALT lymphoma patients with involvement of salivary gland and oral cavity. PMID:27738485

  3. Feasibility of silica-hybridized collagen hydrogels as three-dimensional cell matrices for hard tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hye-Sun; Lee, Eun-Jung; Seo, Seog-Jin; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-09-01

    Exploiting hydrogels for the cultivation of stem cells, aiming to provide them with physico-chemical cues suitable for osteogenesis, is a critical demand for bone engineering. Here, we developed hybrid compositions of collagen and silica into hydrogels via a simple sol-gel process. The physico-chemical and mechanical properties, degradation behavior, and bone-bioactivity were characterized in-depth; furthermore, the in vitro mesenchymal stem cell growth and osteogenic differentiation behaviors within the 3D hybrid gel matrices were communicated for the first time. The hydrolyzed and condensed silica phase enabled chemical links with the collagen fibrils to form networked hybrid gels. The hybrid gels showed improved chemical stability and greater resistance to enzymatic degradation. The in vitro apatite-forming ability was enhanced by the hybrid composition. The viscoelastic mechanical properties of the hybrid gels were significantly improved in terms of the deformation resistance to an applied load and the modulus values under a dynamic oscillation. Mesenchymal stem cells adhered well to the hybrid networks and proliferated actively with substantial cytoskeletal extensions within the gel matrices. Of note, the hybrid gels substantially reduced the cell-mediated gel contraction behaviors, possibly due to the stiffer networks and higher resistance to cell-mediated degradation. Furthermore, the osteogenic differentiation of cells, including the expression of bone-associated genes and protein, was significantly upregulated within the hybrid gel matrices. Together with the physico-chemical and mechanical properties, the cellular behaviors observed within 3D gel matrices, being different from the previous approaches reported on 2D substrates, provide new information on the feasibility and usefulness of the silica-collagen system for stem cell culture and tissue engineering of hard tissues.

  4. Comparison of CT-Number and Gray Scale Value of Different Dental Materials and Hard Tissues in CT and CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Emadi, Naghmeh; Safi, Yaser; Akbarzadeh Bagheban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) are valuable diagnostic aids for many clinical applications. This study was designed to compare the gray scale value (GSV) and Hounsfield unit (HU) of selected dental materials and various hard tissues using CT or CBCT. Methods and Materials: Three samples of all test materials including amalgam (AM), composite resin (CR), glass ionomer (GI), zinc-oxide eugenol (ZOE), calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement, AH-26 root canal sealer (AH-26), gutta-percha (GP), Coltosol (Col), Dycal (DL), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), zinc phosphate (ZP), and polycarbonate cement (PC) were prepared and scanned together with samples of bone, dentin and enamel using two CBCT devices, Scanora 3D (S3D) and NewTom VGi (NTV) and a spiral CT (SCT) scanner (Somatom Emotion 16 multislice spiral CT);. Subsequently, the HU and GSV values were determined and evaluated. The data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The level of significance was determined at 0.05. Results: There were significant differences among the three different scanners (P<0.05). The differences between HU/GSV values of 12 selected dental materials using NTV was significant (P<0.05) and for S3D and SCT was insignificant (P>0.05). All tested materials showed maximum values in S3D and SCT (3094 and 3071, respectively); however, bone and dentin showed low/medium values (P<0.05). In contrast, the tested materials and tissues showed a range of values in NTV (366 to15383; P<0.05). Conclusion: Scanner system can influence the obtained HU/GSV of dental materials. NTV can discriminate various dental materials, in contrast to S3D/SCT scanners. NTV may be a more useful diagnostic aid for clinical practice. PMID:25386210

  5. Precise ablation of dental hard tissues with ultra-short pulsed lasers. Preliminary exploratory investigation on adequate laser parameters.

    PubMed

    Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Wehner, Martin; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Lampert, Friedrich; Poprawe, Reinhart; Hermans, Martin; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of introducing ultra-short pulsed lasers (USPL) in restorative dentistry by maintaining the well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also overcoming disadvantages, such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. USPL ablation of dental hard tissues was investigated in two phases. Phase 1--different wavelengths (355, 532, 1,045, and 1,064 nm), pulse durations (picoseconds and femtoseconds) and irradiation parameters (scanning speed, output power, and pulse repetition rate) were assessed for enamel and dentin. Ablation rate was determined, and the temperature increase measured in real time. Phase 2--the most favorable laser parameters were evaluated to correlate temperature increase to ablation rate and ablation efficiency. The influence of cooling methods (air, air-water spray) on ablation process was further analyzed. All parameters tested provided precise and selective tissue ablation. For all lasers, faster scanning speeds resulted in better interaction and reduced temperature increase. The most adequate results were observed for the 1064-nm ps-laser and the 1045-nm fs-laser. Forced cooling caused moderate changes in temperature increase, but reduced ablation, being considered unnecessary during irradiation with USPL. For dentin, the correlation between temperature increase and ablation efficiency was satisfactory for both pulse durations, while for enamel, the best correlation was observed for fs-laser, independently of the power used. USPL may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, since effective ablation and low temperature increase were observed. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this technique seems to be promising for promoting the laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach.

  6. Enhanced osteogenesis of human alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells for tooth tissue engineering using fluid shear stress in a rocking culture method.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ki-Taek; Kim, Jangho; Seonwoo, Hoon; Chang, Jung Uk; Choi, Hwajung; Hexiu, Jin; Cho, Woo Jae; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2013-02-01

    This study instituted a simple approach to stimulate alveolar bone regeneration for tooth tissue engineering by controlling effects of low fluid dynamic shear stress (LFDSS) on growth and differentiation in vitro. Human alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hABMSCs) harvested from human mandibular alveolar bone were cultured with LFDSS to generate cultures containing bone-like formations. To distinguish between osteodifferentiation and bone-like formation, cells were cultured either with or without fluid shear stress. The calcium content and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of hABMSCs were used as indicators of osteogenesis. Cell viability and proliferation after stimulating with LFDSS for 10-60 min/day were higher than with longer stimulations. Mineralized nodules formed when osteoblasts were cultured with an induction medium, a marker of osteogenic differentiation. ALP activity tended to increase after 10 and 60 min/day of stimulation. In addition, LFDSS conditions also increased gene expression of IBSP, RUNX2, COL-I, ALP, OCN, and OPN, as shown by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. From the results of a proteomics array, LFDSS groups were intensely expressed with several factors (EGF, HGF, IGF, TGF, and PDGF). Furthermore, CD146 and Stro-1 expression increased in cells treated with 30 min/day and decreased in cells treated with 120 min/day, as determined by cell surface antigen analysis by fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis. These results strongly showed that LFDSS at the proper intensity and time enhanced the differentiation and maturation of hABMSCs. In conclusion, an appropriate level of LFDSS can potently and positively modulate proliferation and differentiation in hABMSCs.

  7. Evaluation of peri-implant soft tissue and bone levels around early loaded implant in restoring single missing tooth: A clinico-radiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Isha; Bhushan, Anoop; Baiju, Chandrababu Sudha; Bali, Shweta; Joshi, Vaibhav

    2016-01-01

    Background: One-stage nonsubmerged protocol which can achieve success rates comparable to implants placed in a two-staged submerged procedure also the preconditions for periimplant bone regeneration has lead to more refined concepts of implant loading. Materials and Methods: Twenty sites with single missing tooth were included in this study. Clinical parameters included sulcus bleeding index (sBI), probing pocket depth (PD), and papilla index (PI) and radiographic parameters included crestal bone level were assessed for a period of 9 months. Results: The crestal bone loss showed mean value ranging from baseline 0.25 ± 0.11 to 0.31 ± 0.08 at 3 weeks, to 0.67 ± 0.13 at 3 months, to 0.85 ± 0.09 at 6 months, and to 0.88 ± 0.12 at 9 months. Probing PD, the mean value for probing PD at 3 weeks 1.20 ± 0.83, 3 months 1.60 ± 1.1, at 6 months 1.40 ± 1.14, and at 9 months 1.20 ± 1.0. sBI, mean value for sBI at 3 weeks 0.00 ± 0.00, 3 months 0.3 ± 0.11, at 6 months 0.09 ± 0.25, and at 9 months 0.08 ± 0.24. PI, showed a significant difference among at different points of time with P = 0.000. Conclusion: The dental implants showed <1 mm of crestal bone loss at 9 months follow-up, clinically significant marginal bone loss occurred between the time of implant placement and 3 months. Subsequent to that, bone loss observed around the implant up to 9 months was minimal. The periimplant soft tissue maturity was maintained throughout the study. PMID:27041836

  8. Chick tooth induction revisited.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinglei; Cho, Sung-Won; Ishiyama, Mikio; Mikami, Masato; Hosoya, Akihiro; Kozawa, Yukishige; Ohshima, Hayato; Jung, Han-Sung

    2009-07-15

    Teeth have been missing from Aves for almost 100 million years. However, it is believed that the avian oral epithelium retains the molecular signaling required to induce odontogenesis, and this has been widely examined using heterospecific recombinations with mouse dental mesenchyme. It has also been argued that teeth can form from the avian oral epithelium owing to contamination of the mouse mesenchyme with mouse dental epithelial cells. To investigate the possibility of tooth formation from chick oral epithelium and the characteristics of possible chick enamel, we applied LacZ transgenic mice during heterospecific recombination and examined the further tooth formation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to identify the two tissues during development after heterospecific recombination. No mixing was detected between chick oral epithelium and mouse dental mesenchyme after 2 days, and secretory ameloblasts with Tomes' processes were observed after 1 week. Teeth were formed after 3 weeks with a single cusp pattern, possibly determined by epithelial factors, which is similar to that of the avian tooth in the late Jurassic period. These recombinant teeth were smaller than mouse molars, whereas perfect structures of both ameloblasts and enamel showed histological characteristics similar to those of mice. Together these observations consistent with previous report that odontogenesis is initially directed by species-specific mesenchymal signals interplaying with common epithelial signals. PMID:19226602

  9. Chick tooth induction revisited.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinglei; Cho, Sung-Won; Ishiyama, Mikio; Mikami, Masato; Hosoya, Akihiro; Kozawa, Yukishige; Ohshima, Hayato; Jung, Han-Sung

    2009-07-15

    Teeth have been missing from Aves for almost 100 million years. However, it is believed that the avian oral epithelium retains the molecular signaling required to induce odontogenesis, and this has been widely examined using heterospecific recombinations with mouse dental mesenchyme. It has also been argued that teeth can form from the avian oral epithelium owing to contamination of the mouse mesenchyme with mouse dental epithelial cells. To investigate the possibility of tooth formation from chick oral epithelium and the characteristics of possible chick enamel, we applied LacZ transgenic mice during heterospecific recombination and examined the further tooth formation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to identify the two tissues during development after heterospecific recombination. No mixing was detected between chick oral epithelium and mouse dental mesenchyme after 2 days, and secretory ameloblasts with Tomes' processes were observed after 1 week. Teeth were formed after 3 weeks with a single cusp pattern, possibly determined by epithelial factors, which is similar to that of the avian tooth in the late Jurassic period. These recombinant teeth were smaller than mouse molars, whereas perfect structures of both ameloblasts and enamel showed histological characteristics similar to those of mice. Together these observations consistent with previous report that odontogenesis is initially directed by species-specific mesenchymal signals interplaying with common epithelial signals.

  10. Hard-tissue drilling by short-pulse CO2 laser with controllable pulse-tail energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Sasaki, Tatsufumi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2016-02-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse with the almost same spike-pulse energy of about 0.8 mJ and the controllable pulse-tail energy of 0-21.26 mJ. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance and a spark-gap switch. In single-shot irradiation using these laser pulses, the dependence of the drilling depth of dry ivory samples on the fluence was investigated. The drilling depth increased with the fluence in the same laser pulse waveform. In this work, the effective short laser pulse for the hard tissue drilling was the laser pulse with the spike pulse energy of 0.87 mJ and the pulse tail energy of 6.33 mJ that produced the drilling depth of 28.1 μm at the fluence of 3.48 J/cm2 and the drilling depth per the fluence of 7.27 μm/J/cm2.

  11. Biomedical nanocomposites of poly(lactic acid) and calcium phosphate hybridized with modified carbon nanotubes for hard tissue implants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Sang Shin, Ueon; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hae-Won

    2011-08-01

    Degradable polymer-based materials are attractive in orthopedics and dentistry as an alternative to metallic implants for use as bone fixatives. Herein, a degradable polymer poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was combined with novel hybrid nanopowder of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-calcium phosphate (CP) for this application. In particular, CNTs-CP hybrid nanopowders (0.1 and 0.25% CNTs) were prepared from the solution of ionically modified CNTs (mCNTs), which was specifically synthesized to be well-dispersed and thus to effectively adsorb onto the CP nanoparticles. The mCNTs-CP hybrid nanopowders were then mixed with PLA (up to 50%) to produce mCNTs-CP-PLA nanocomposites. The mechanical tensile strength of the nanocomposites was significantly improved by the addition of mCNTs-CP hybrid nanopowders. Moreover, nanocomposites containing low concentration of mCNTs (0.1%) showed significantly stimulated biological responses including cell proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation in terms of gene and protein expressions. Based on this study, the addition of novel mCNT-CP hybrid nanopowders to PLA biopolymer may be considered a new material choice for developing hard tissue implants.

  12. Identification of benign and malignant endometrial cancer with transvaginal ultrasonography combined with elastography and tissue hardness analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Luo, L; Luo, Q

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to explore tissue hardness and distinguish benign and malignant endometrial cancer with the use of transvaginal ultrasonography combined with elastography. Color Doppler ultrasonic diasonograph was used to carry out transvaginal ultrasonography and elastography. Once the nidus was observed, features of the 2D image were analyzed. Then features of elasticity of the uterine cavity in different states were analyzed by elastography, and strain rate ratio was measured. Finally, elasticity scoring (0~5 points) was made. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn based on elasticity score and strain rate ratio. The area under the elasticity score curve and strain rate ratio curve was 0.761 and 0.852, respectively, and there was no statistically significant difference between them (c2= 4.663, P>0.05). Then 2.98 was confirmed as the diagnostic cut-off value of benign and malignant lesions, based on strain rate ratio. Ultrasonic elastography as an effective assistance for transvaginal ultrasonography provides more valuable information for confirmation of lesions and offers more accurate evidence for diagnosis of disease in the uterine cavity.

  13. β-type Ti-10Mo-1.25Si-xZr biomaterials for applications in hard tissue replacements.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yongzhong; Li, Chunliu; Jiang, Wenping

    2012-08-01

    In order to develop new β-type Ti-based biochemical materials, a series of Ti-10Mo-1.25Si-xZr (x=4-13) alloys were designed and prepared using vacuum arc melting method. Phase analysis and microstructural observation showed that all the as cast samples consisted of equiaxed β-Ti phase. With the increase of Zr content, the structure of grain boundary changed from semi-continuous network to denser granular, and the microstructure was refined. The solid solution effect of the β-phase stabilization elements (i.e. Mo, Zr and Si) predominantly determined the mechanical properties. These β-type Ti-10Mo-1.25Si-xZr biomaterials exhibited a good combination of high compressive strength, high yield stress, good plasticity, as well as rather low Young's modulus (in the range of 23.086 GPa-32.623 GPa), which may offer potential advantages in the applications in hard tissue replacements (HTRs). PMID:24364974

  14. Patterning the size and number of tooth and its cusps.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinglei; Cho, Sung-Won; Kim, Jae-Young; Lee, Min-Jung; Cha, Yoon-Geun; Jung, Han-Sung

    2007-04-15

    Mice and rats, two species of rodents, show some dental similarities such as tooth number and cusp number, and differences such as tooth size and cusp size. In this study, the tooth size, tooth number, cusp size and cusp number, which are four major factors of the tooth patterning, were investigated by the heterospecific recombinations of tissues from the molar tooth germs of mice and rats. Our results suggest that the dental epithelium and mesenchyme determine the cusp size and tooth size respectively and the cusp number is co-regulated by the tooth size and cusp size. It is also suggested that the mesenchymal cell number regulates not the tooth size but the tooth number. The relationships among these factors in tooth patterning including micropatterning (cusp size and cusp number) and macropatterning (tooth size and tooth number) were analyzed in a reaction diffusion mechanism. Key molecules determining the patterning of teeth remains to be elucidated for controlling the tooth size and cusp size of bioengineered tooth.

  15. Investigation of EPR signals on tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, A.; Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Polakov, M.; Riekstina, D.

    2007-12-01

    Calcified tissues are involved in continues metabolic process in human organism exchanging a number of chemical elements with environment. The rate of biochemical reactions is tissue dependent and the slowest one at the tooth enamel, the most mineralized tissue of human organism. The long time stability and unique chemical composition make tooth enamel suitable for number of application. The assessment of individual radiation dose by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and evaluations of elemental composition by Instrumentation Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) are the well known procedures where properties of tooth enamel intensively used. The current work is focused on investigation of EPR signals and determination of chemical composition on several teeth samples having different origin. The EPR spectra and INAA element content of milk tooth, caries tooth, and paradantose tooth have been compared to each other. The results showed that the intensity of EPR signal is much higher for the caries tooth than the for paradantose tooth that is in agreement with depleted Ca content.

  16. Eating with a saw for a jaw: functional morphology of the jaws and tooth-whorl in Helicoprion davisii.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Jason B; Wilga, Cheryl D; Tapanila, Leif; Pruitt, Jesse; Pradel, Alan; Schlader, Robert; Didier, Dominique A

    2015-01-01

    The recent reexamination of a tooth-whorl fossil of Helicoprion containing intact jaws shows that the symphyseal tooth-whorl occupies the entire length of Meckel's cartilage. Here, we use the morphology of the jaws and tooth-whorl to reconstruct the jaw musculature and develop a biomechanical model of the feeding mechanism in these early Permian predators. The jaw muscles may have generated large bite-forces; however, the mechanics of the jaws and whorl suggest that Helicoprion was better equipped for feeding on soft-bodied prey. Hard shelled prey would tend to slip anteriorly from the closing jaws due to the curvature of the tooth-whorl, lack of cuspate teeth on the palatoquadrate (PQ), and resistance of the prey. When feeding on soft-bodied prey, deformation of the prey traps prey tissue between the two halves of the PQ and the whorl. The curvature of the tooth-whorl and position of the exposed teeth relative to the jaw joint results in multiple tooth functions from anterior to posterior tooth that aid in feeding on soft-bodied prey. Posterior teeth cut and push prey deeper into the oral cavity, while middle teeth pierce and cut, and anterior teeth hook and drag more of the prey into the mouth. Furthermore, the anterior-posterior edges of the teeth facilitate prey cutting with jaw closure and jaw depression. The paths traveled by each tooth during jaw depression are reminiscent of curved pathways used with slashing weaponry such as swords and knifes. Thus, the jaws and tooth-whorl may have formed a multifunctional tool for capturing, processing, and transporting prey by cyclic opening and closing of the lower jaw in a sawing fashion.

  17. Pathologic tooth migration.

    PubMed

    Brunsvold, Michael A

    2005-06-01

    Pathologic tooth migration (PTM) is a common complication of moderate to severe periodontitis and is often the motivation for patients to seek periodontal therapy. In this review of the literature, available information concerning prevalence, etiology, treatment, and prevention of pathologic tooth migration is summarized. Prevalence of PTM among periodontal patients has been reported to range from 30.03% to 55.8%. A survey of the literature regarding chief complaints of periodontal patients support these high prevalence findings. The etiology of PTM appears to be multifactorial. Periodontal bone loss appears to be a major factor in the etiology of PTM. Many aspects of occlusion can contribute to abnormal migration of teeth, and more than one of those factors may be present in an individual patient. Soft tissue forces of the tongue, cheeks, and lips are known to cause tooth movement and in some situations can cause PTM. Also considered important in the etiology of PTM is pressure produced from inflammatory tissues within periodontal pockets. Because extrusion is a common form of PTM, clinical observations support the theory that eruption forces sometimes play a role in the etiology of PTM. Many oral habits have been associated with PTM which are often difficult for the therapist to detect. Most cases of severe PTM require a team approach to achieve success. Periodontal, orthodontic, and prosthodontic treatment are often required. Many patient variables enter into the selection of treatment for PTM. In early stages of PTM, spontaneous correction of migrated teeth sometimes occurs after periodontal therapy. Light intrusive forces are used successfully to treat extrusion and flaring forms of PTM. Based on the literature reviewed, it appears that many cases of PTM could be prevented through the early diagnosis and treatment of periodontal disease, occlusal contributing factors, gingival enlargement, and oral habits. PMID:15948679

  18. Multiscale biomechanical responses of adapted bone-periodontal ligament-tooth fibrous joints.

    PubMed

    Jang, Andrew T; Merkle, Arno P; Fahey, Kevin P; Gansky, Stuart A; Ho, Sunita P

    2015-12-01

    Reduced functional loads cause adaptations in organs. In this study, temporal adaptations of bone-ligament-tooth fibrous joints to reduced functional loads were mapped using a holistic approach. Systematic studies were performed to evaluate organ-level and tissue-level adaptations in specimens harvested periodically from rats (N=60) given powder food for 6 months over 8,12,16,20, and 24 weeks. Bone-periodontal ligament (PDL)-tooth fibrous joint adaptation was evaluated by comparing changes in joint stiffness with changes in functional space between the tooth and alveolar bony socket. Adaptations in tissues included mapping changes in the PDL and bone architecture as observed from collagen birefringence, bone hardness and volume fraction in rats fed soft foods (soft diet, SD) compared to those fed hard pellets as a routine diet (hard diet, HD). In situ biomechanical testing on harvested fibrous joints revealed increased stiffness in SD groups (SD:239-605 N/mm) (p<0.05) at 8 and 12 weeks. Increased joint stiffness in early development phase was due to decreased functional space (at 8 weeks change in functional space was -33 μm, at 12 weeks change in functional space was -30 μm) and shifts in tissue quality as highlighted by birefringence, architecture and hardness. These physical changes were not observed in joints that were well into function, that is, in rodents older than 12 weeks of age. Significant adaptations in older groups were highlighted by shifts in bone growth (bone volume fraction 24 weeks: Δ-0.06) and bone hardness (8 weeks: Δ-0.04 GPa, 16 weeks: Δ-0.07 GPa, 24 weeks: Δ-0.06 GPa). The response rate (N/s) of joints to mechanical loads decreased in SD groups. Results from the study showed that joint adaptation depended on age. The initial form-related adaptation (observed change in functional space) can challenge strain-adaptive nature of tissues to meet functional demands with increasing age into adulthood. The coupled effect between functional

  19. The Multidisciplinary Management of Fused Maxillary Lateral Incisor with a Supernumerary Tooth in Cleft Lip Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Yagci, Ahmet; Cantekin, Kenan; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmis; Pala, Kansad

    2014-01-01

    Fusion, an uncommon anomaly of the hard dental tissues, is potentially the cause of clinical problems related to esthetics, tooth spacing, and other periodontal complications. This paper describes a multidisciplinary approach involving surgical, endodontic, restorative, and orthodontic attention for the successful, functional, and esthetic rehabilitation of a maxillary left lateral incisor fused with a supernumerary tooth in unilateral cleft lip adolescence in contralateral side. After clinical and radiographic examinations, a fusion between the left maxillary lateral incisor and a supernumerary tooth was diagnosed in the patient, and a small connection was detected between the pulp systems of the two root canals. The case reported in this paper presents the successful resolution of a fused maxillary lateral incisor with a supernumerary tooth, using endodontic, surgical, restorative, and orthodontic management. The decision made in extracting or retaining the fused tooth depends on the arch discrepancy and esthetic needs. Future studies, with long-term followup, will be helpful in evaluating the long-term efficacy of the different treatment options. PMID:24516763

  20. Fabrication of a Hard Tissue Replacement Using Natural Hydroxyapatite Derived from Bovine Bones by Thermal Decomposition Method

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinzadeh, E.; Davarpanah, M.; Hassanzadeh Nemati, N.; Tavakoli, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: For the treatment of bone defects that exceed the critical size of the injury, several therapies have been investigated. Thermal decomposition method is suggested for extraction of natural hydroxyapatite bioceramic (HA). This technique in comparison with other methods of producing HA, has less complexity and greater economic efficiency. Objective: In the present study, a thermal decomposition method is suggested for extraction of natural HA from bovine femur bones. Methods: In this experiment, to extract the ceramic material, the bone samples were first de-fatted and ground to particles less than 420 μm, and also 420–500 μm, respectively. Prepared powders were heated at 170 °C for 24 h, and then divided into two groups for 6 h. The first group was heated at 750 °C; the second group was heated at 850 °C. The calcium phosphate compounds were obtained with complete elimination of the organic phase of the bone. These bioceramic compounds were characterized physiochemically by X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: We found that the powder heated at 750 °C in two dimensional scales was rich in carbonated hydroxyapatite, and therefore, eminently suitable for using in hard tissue replacements. However, increasing the temperature up to 850 °C reduced the Ca/P ratio to 1.5 in the powder sample sizes less than 420 μm. Consequently, the obtained composition became rather similar to the chemical formula of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) that is appropriate in tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. Conclusion: The observations affirmed that by eliminating the collagen and other organic materials existing in the bovine bones, the mineral phase of the bone had the potential of transformation to nano-particles. To investigate the repair of critical-size bone defects and bone augmentation, cylindrical blocks were fabricated by applying

  1. Tooth Wear Prevalence and Sample Size Determination : A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Abd. Karim, Nama Bibi Saerah; Ismail, Noorliza Mastura; Naing, Lin; Ismail, Abdul Rashid

    2008-01-01

    Tooth wear is the non-carious loss of tooth tissue, which results from three processes namely attrition, erosion and abrasion. These can occur in isolation or simultaneously. Very mild tooth wear is a physiological effect of aging. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of tooth wear among 16-year old Malay school children and determine a feasible sample size for further study. Fifty-five subjects were examined clinically, followed by the completion of self-administered questionnaires. Questionnaires consisted of socio-demographic and associated variables for tooth wear obtained from the literature. The Smith and Knight tooth wear index was used to chart tooth wear. Other oral findings were recorded using the WHO criteria. A software programme was used to determine pathological tooth wear. About equal ratio of male to female were involved. It was found that 18.2% of subjects have no tooth wear, 63.6% had very mild tooth wear, 10.9% mild tooth wear, 5.5% moderate tooth wear and 1.8 % severe tooth wear. In conclusion 18.2% of subjects were deemed to have pathological tooth wear (mild, moderate & severe). Exploration with all associated variables gave a sample size ranging from 560 – 1715. The final sample size for further study greatly depends on available time and resources. PMID:22589636

  2. Tooth development: 2. Regenerating teeth in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Onyekwelu, Obinna; Seppala, Maisa; Zoupa, Maria; Cobourne, Martyn T

    2007-01-01

    Tooth loss can occur for a number of reasons and a variety of prosthetic tooth replacement solutions are available to the dental practitioner. This article discusses current approaches in the use of tissue engineering to replace teeth or repair dental tissues. These strategies will depend upon the manipulation of stem cells in the laboratory and, whilst much progress has recently been made, it is likely that successful human tooth regeneration is still some years ahead.

  3. Mössbauer Studies of Stannous Fluoride Reactivity with Synthetic Tooth Enamel - A Model for the Tooth Cavity Protection Actions of Novel Dentifrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dénès, Georges; Muntasar, Abdualhafeed; Kozak, Kathy M.; Baig, Arif A.; White, Donald J.

    2002-06-01

    SnF2 is an important toothpaste ingredient, added for the provision of clinical efficacy for hard and soft tissue diseases and in breath protection. Synthetic calcium hydroxyapatite powders were exposed to liquid supernates (25 w/w% toothpaste water slurries, centrifuged) of Crest Gum Care® (SnF2) dentifrice. One-minute treatments were followed by 3x water washing, centrifugation and lyophilization. Post treatment, powders were analyzed by Mössbauer spectroscopy with 0.5-1 gram of treated apatite powder. Results show that tooth mineral stannous fluoride interactions include: (1) formation of surface reaction products with both Sn(II) and Sn(IV) oxidation states; (2) Sn-F binding on mineral surfaces with no evidence of SnO. The surface binding is, however, not pure Sn-F but contains contributions of other ligands, probably oxygens from surface phosphates or hydroxyl groups. Results also suggest that surface reacted stannous tin is oxidized with time, even when bound as a layer on the tooth surface. This study demonstrates for the first time the presence of Sn-F on tooth enamel post treatment and the contribution of passivation to long term stannous chemistry on tooth surfaces. The study also illustrates the practical applications of the Mössbauer technique.

  4. Reconstruction of a hard connective tissue utilizing a pressed silk sheet and type-I collagen as the scaffold for fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Toshiaki; Ozaki, Katsuyuki; Takabayashi, Chiyuki

    2007-06-01

    A pressed silk sheet is a new biomaterial composed of a network of numerous cocoon filaments and having excellent mechanical strength and shape stability compared to a cotton-gauze sheet. To reconstruct a hard connective tissue using the silk sheet and type-I collagen as the scaffold for fibroblasts, three different three-dimensional floating culture systems were designed. "On sheet" system: fibroblasts were seeded on the silk sheet coated with collagen and the cell-attached sheet was cultured. "In gel" system: fibroblasts and the silk sheet were co-embedded in a collagen gel and the gel was cultured. "On vitrigel" system: fibroblasts were seeded on both sides of a collagen vitrigel involving the silk sheet and the vitrigel was cultured. The fibroblasts in all culture systems grew and formed disk-shaped connective tissue models involving the silk sheet by 14 days of culture. The "on sheet" and "on vitrigel" models retained a maximum elastic load of about 23 kgf and an ultimate tensile load of about 3.6 kgf, which were almost the same as for the individual silk sheet. However, the "in gel" system showed a low value for the tensile load. Cell damage following application of mechanical stress was lowest in the "on vitrigel" system. These data demonstrated the advantage of the "on vitrigel" system in reconstructing hard connective tissues. Such a novel culture method would contribute to a regenerative medicine for the failure of ligaments, tendons, and other connective tissues.

  5. Ion channels, channelopathies, and tooth formation.

    PubMed

    Duan, X

    2014-02-01

    The biological functions of ion channels in tooth development vary according to the nature of their gating, the species of ions passing through those gates, the number of gates, localization of channels, tissue expressing the channel, and interactions between cells and microenvironment. Ion channels feature unique and specific ion flux in ameloblasts, odontoblasts, and other tooth-specific cell lineages. Both enamel and dentin have active chemical systems orchestrating a variety of ion exchanges and demineralization and remineralization processes in a stage-dependent manner. An important role for ion channels is to regulate and maintain the calcium and pH homeostasis that are critical for proper enamel and dentin biomineralization. Specific functions of chloride channels, TRPVs, calcium channels, potassium channels, and solute carrier superfamily members in tooth formation have been gradually clarified in recent years. Mutations in these ion channels or transporters often result in disastrous changes in tooth development. The channelopathies of tooth include altered eruption (CLCN7, KCNJ2, TRPV3), root dysplasia (CLCN7, KCNJ2), amelogenesis imperfecta (KCNJ1, CFTR, AE2, CACNA1C, GJA1), dentin dysplasia (CLCN5), small teeth (CACNA1C, GJA1), tooth agenesis (CLCN7), and other impairments. The mechanisms leading to tooth channelopathies are primarily related to pH regulation, calcium homeostasis, or other alterations of the niche for tooth eruption and development. PMID:24076519

  6. Overview of Tooth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... as when chewing or when tapped by a dental instrument. Pain in a tooth suggests tooth decay or gum ... fractured. Sinus congestion can cause similar symptoms of pain in the area of the upper ... CONSUMERS: ...

  7. Industrial Noise and Tooth Wear - Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Tavares, Vitor; Borrecho, Gonçalo; Oliveira, Maria João; Oliveira, Pedro; Brito, José; Águas, Artur; dos Santos, José Martins

    2015-01-01

    Tooth wear is a complex multifactorial process that involves the loss of hard dental tissue. Parafunctional habits have been mentioned as a self-destructive process caused by stress, which results in hyperactivity of masticatory muscles. Stress manifests itself through teeth grinding, leading to progressive teeth wear. The effects of continuous exposure to industrial noise, a “stressor” agent, cannot be ignored and its effects on the teeth must be evaluated. Aims: The aim of this study was to ascertain the effects of industrial noise on dental wear over time, by identifying and quantifying crown area loss. Material and Methods: 39 Wistar rats were used. Thirty rats were divided in 3 experimental groups of 10 animals each. Animals were exposed to industrial noise, rich in LFN components, for 1, 4 and 7 months, with an average weekly exposure of 40 hours (8h/day, 5 days/week with the weekends in silence). The remaining 9 animals were kept in silence. The areas of the three main cusps of the molars were measured under light microscopy. Statistical analysis used: A two-way ANOVA model was applied at significance level of 5%. Results: The average area of the molar cusps was significantly different between exposed and non-exposed animals. The most remarkable differences occurred between month 1 and 4. The total crown loss from month 1 to month 7 was 17.3% in the control group, and 46.5% in the exposed group, and the differences between these variations were significant (p<0.001). Conclusions: Our data suggest that industrial noise is an important factor in the pathogenesis of tooth wear. PMID:25798052

  8. Evaluation of stress distributions in peri-implant and periodontal bone tissues in 3- and 5-unit tooth and implant-supported fixed zirconia restorations by finite elements analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Sedat; Beydemir, Koksal; Dundar, Serkan; Eratilla, Veysel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this study, it is aimed to compare the distribution of stress on periodontal and peri-implant bone tissues in 3- and 5-unit-dental and implant-supported zirconia restorations using finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: Stress distribution formed in periodontal and peri-implant bone tissues as a result of chewing forces was analyzed in dental and implant-supported three-dimensional (3D) finite element models of zirconia restoration with 5-unit placed on the numbers of 43, 44, 45, 46, and 47 and with 3-unit placed on the number of 45, 46, and 47. Four different loading conditions were used. 200 N force was applied in 30° from the buccal inclination of number 43, 45, and 47 restorations separately and totally 850 N force was applied in 30° from the buccal inclination of whole restoration. The study was performed through static nonlinear analysis with the 3D finite element analysis method. Results: Stress accumulation in bone tissues in the tooth-supported model was found less than in implant-supported models. Stress accumulation was observed in the cervical portion of the implant in implant-supported models, and stress accumulation was observed surrounding bone of roots in tooth-supported models. The highest stress values were occurred in 5 unit implant-supported model in all loadings. Conclusion: In posterior restorations increased in the number of supported teeth and implant can reduce the destructive forces on periodontal and peri-implant bone tissues and may allow longer period retention of the restorations in the mouth. PMID:26430359

  9. Mechanical properties of human enamel as a function of age and location in the tooth.

    PubMed

    Park, Saejin; Wang, Duck H; Zhang, Dongsheng; Romberg, Elaine; Arola, Dwayne

    2008-06-01

    Aging and the related changes in mechanical behavior of hard tissues of the human body are becoming increasingly important. In this study the influence of aging on the mechanical behavior of human enamel was evaluated using 3rd molars from young (18 < or = age < or = 30 years) and old (55 < or = age) patients. The hardness and elastic modulus were quantified using nanoindentation as a function of distance from the Dentin-Enamel Junction (DEJ) and within three different regions of the crown (i.e. cervical, cuspal and inter-cuspal enamel). Results of the evaluation showed that the elastic modulus and hardness increased with distance from the DEJ in all three regions examined, regardless of patient age. The largest increases with distance from the DEJ occurred within the cervical region of the old enamel. Overall, the results showed that there were no age-dependent differences in properties of enamel near the DEJ. However, near the tooth's surface, both the hardness (p < 0.025) and elastic modulus (p < 0.0001) were significantly greater in the old enamel. At the surface of the tooth the average elastic modulus of "old" enamel was nearly 20% greater than that of enamel from the young patients.

  10. Bio-inspired dicalcium phosphate anhydrate/poly(lactic acid) nanocomposite fibrous scaffolds for hard tissue regeneration: in situ synthesis and electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Chae, Taesik; Yang, Heejae; Ko, Frank; Troczynski, Tom

    2014-02-01

    The fundamental building blocks of hierarchically structured bone tissue are mineralized collagen fibrils with calcium phosphate nanocrystals that are biologically "engineered" through biomineralization. In this study, we demonstrate an original invention of dicalcium phosphate anhydrate (DCPA)/poly(lactic acid) (PLA) composite nanofibers, which mimics the mineralized collagen fibrils via biomimetic in situ synthesis and electrospinning for hard tissue regenerative medicines. The interaction of the Ca(2+) ions and the carbonyl groups in the PLA provides nucleation sites for DCPA during the in situ synthesis process. This resulted in the improved dispersion of DCPA nanocrystallites in the intrananoporous PLA nanofibers through electrospinning, compared to the severely agglomerated clusters of DCPA nanoparticles fabricated by conventional mechanical blending/electrospinning methods. The addition of poly(ethylene glycol), as a copolymer source, generated more stable and efficient electrospun jets and aided in the electrospinability of the PLA nanofibers incorporating the nanocrystallites. It is expected that the uniformly distributed DCPA nanocrystallites and its unique nanocomposite fibrous topography will enhance the biological performance and the structural stability of the scaffolds used for hard tissue reconstruction and regeneration.

  11. Dental cell sheet biomimetic tooth bud model.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Nelson; Smith, Elizabeth E; Angstadt, Shantel; Zhang, Weibo; Khademhosseini, Ali; Yelick, Pamela C

    2016-11-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine technologies offer promising therapies for both medicine and dentistry. Our long-term goal is to create functional biomimetic tooth buds for eventual tooth replacement in humans. Here, our objective was to create a biomimetic 3D tooth bud model consisting of dental epithelial (DE) - dental mesenchymal (DM) cell sheets (CSs) combined with biomimetic enamel organ and pulp organ layers created using GelMA hydrogels. Pig DE or DM cells seeded on temperature-responsive plates at various cell densities (0.02, 0.114 and 0.228 cells 10(6)/cm(2)) and cultured for 7, 14 and 21 days were used to generate DE and DM cell sheets, respectively. Dental CSs were combined with GelMA encapsulated DE and DM cell layers to form bioengineered 3D tooth buds. Biomimetic 3D tooth bud constructs were cultured in vitro, or implanted in vivo for 3 weeks. Analyses were performed using micro-CT, H&E staining, polarized light (Pol) microscopy, immunofluorescent (IF) and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses. H&E, IHC and IF analyses showed that in vitro cultured multilayered DE-DM CSs expressed appropriate tooth marker expression patterns including SHH, BMP2, RUNX2, tenascin and syndecan, which normally direct DE-DM interactions, DM cell condensation, and dental cell differentiation. In vivo implanted 3D tooth bud constructs exhibited mineralized tissue formation of specified size and shape, and SHH, BMP2 and RUNX2and dental cell differentiation marker expression. We propose our biomimetic 3D tooth buds as models to study optimized DE-DM cell interactions leading to functional biomimetic replacement tooth formation.

  12. Dental cell sheet biomimetic tooth bud model.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Nelson; Smith, Elizabeth E; Angstadt, Shantel; Zhang, Weibo; Khademhosseini, Ali; Yelick, Pamela C

    2016-11-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine technologies offer promising therapies for both medicine and dentistry. Our long-term goal is to create functional biomimetic tooth buds for eventual tooth replacement in humans. Here, our objective was to create a biomimetic 3D tooth bud model consisting of dental epithelial (DE) - dental mesenchymal (DM) cell sheets (CSs) combined with biomimetic enamel organ and pulp organ layers created using GelMA hydrogels. Pig DE or DM cells seeded on temperature-responsive plates at various cell densities (0.02, 0.114 and 0.228 cells 10(6)/cm(2)) and cultured for 7, 14 and 21 days were used to generate DE and DM cell sheets, respectively. Dental CSs were combined with GelMA encapsulated DE and DM cell layers to form bioengineered 3D tooth buds. Biomimetic 3D tooth bud constructs were cultured in vitro, or implanted in vivo for 3 weeks. Analyses were performed using micro-CT, H&E staining, polarized light (Pol) microscopy, immunofluorescent (IF) and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses. H&E, IHC and IF analyses showed that in vitro cultured multilayered DE-DM CSs expressed appropriate tooth marker expression patterns including SHH, BMP2, RUNX2, tenascin and syndecan, which normally direct DE-DM interactions, DM cell condensation, and dental cell differentiation. In vivo implanted 3D tooth bud constructs exhibited mineralized tissue formation of specified size and shape, and SHH, BMP2 and RUNX2and dental cell differentiation marker expression. We propose our biomimetic 3D tooth buds as models to study optimized DE-DM cell interactions leading to functional biomimetic replacement tooth formation. PMID:27565550

  13. Giant panda׳s tooth enamel: Structure, mechanical behavior and toughening mechanisms under indentation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Z Y; Liu, Z Q; Ritchie, R O; Jiao, D; Li, D S; Wu, H L; Deng, L H; Zhang, Z F

    2016-12-01

    The giant panda׳s teeth possess remarkable load-bearing capacity and damage resistance for masticating bamboos. In this study, the hierarchical structure and mechanical behavior of the giant panda׳s tooth enamel were investigated under indentation. The effects of loading orientation and location on mechanical properties of the enamel were clarified and the evolution of damage in the enamel under increasing load evaluated. The nature of the damage, both at and beneath the indentation surfaces, and the underlying toughening mechanisms were explored. Indentation cracks invariably were seen to propagate along the internal interfaces, specifically the sheaths between enamel rods, and multiple extrinsic toughening mechanisms, e.g., crack deflection/twisting and uncracked-ligament bridging, were active to shield the tips of cracks from the applied stress. The giant panda׳s tooth enamel is analogous to human enamel in its mechanical properties, yet it has superior hardness and Young׳s modulus but inferior toughness as compared to the bamboo that pandas primarily feed on, highlighting the critical roles of the integration of underlying tissues in the entire tooth and the highly hydrated state of bamboo foods. Our objective is that this study can aid the understanding of the structure-mechanical property relations in the tooth enamel of mammals and further provide some insight on the food habits of the giant pandas. PMID:27498423

  14. Giant panda׳s tooth enamel: Structure, mechanical behavior and toughening mechanisms under indentation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Z Y; Liu, Z Q; Ritchie, R O; Jiao, D; Li, D S; Wu, H L; Deng, L H; Zhang, Z F

    2016-12-01

    The giant panda׳s teeth possess remarkable load-bearing capacity and damage resistance for masticating bamboos. In this study, the hierarchical structure and mechanical behavior of the giant panda׳s tooth enamel were investigated under indentation. The effects of loading orientation and location on mechanical properties of the enamel were clarified and the evolution of damage in the enamel under increasing load evaluated. The nature of the damage, both at and beneath the indentation surfaces, and the underlying toughening mechanisms were explored. Indentation cracks invariably were seen to propagate along the internal interfaces, specifically the sheaths between enamel rods, and multiple extrinsic toughening mechanisms, e.g., crack deflection/twisting and uncracked-ligament bridging, were active to shield the tips of cracks from the applied stress. The giant panda׳s tooth enamel is analogous to human enamel in its mechanical properties, yet it has superior hardness and Young׳s modulus but inferior toughness as compared to the bamboo that pandas primarily feed on, highlighting the critical roles of the integration of underlying tissues in the entire tooth and the highly hydrated state of bamboo foods. Our objective is that this study can aid the understanding of the structure-mechanical property relations in the tooth enamel of mammals and further provide some insight on the food habits of the giant pandas.

  15. Digital dissection - using contrast-enhanced computed tomography scanning to elucidate hard- and soft-tissue anatomy in the Common Buzzard Buteo buteo.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Stephan; Bright, Jen A; Rayfield, Emily J

    2014-04-01

    Gross dissection has a long history as a tool for the study of human or animal soft- and hard-tissue anatomy. However, apart from being a time-consuming and invasive method, dissection is often unsuitable for very small specimens and often cannot capture spatial relationships of the individual soft-tissue structures. The handful of comprehensive studies on avian anatomy using traditional dissection techniques focus nearly exclusively on domestic birds, whereas raptorial birds, and in particular their cranial soft tissues, are essentially absent from the literature. Here, we digitally dissect, identify, and document the soft-tissue anatomy of the Common Buzzard (Buteo buteo) in detail, using the new approach of contrast-enhanced computed tomography using Lugol's iodine. The architecture of different muscle systems (adductor, depressor, ocular, hyoid, neck musculature), neurovascular, and other soft-tissue structures is three-dimensionally visualised and described in unprecedented detail. The three-dimensional model is further presented as an interactive PDF to facilitate the dissemination and accessibility of anatomical data. Due to the digital nature of the data derived from the computed tomography scanning and segmentation processes, these methods hold the potential for further computational analyses beyond descriptive and illustrative proposes.

  16. Digital dissection – using contrast-enhanced computed tomography scanning to elucidate hard-and soft-tissue anatomy in the Common Buzzard Buteo buteo

    PubMed Central

    Lautenschlager, Stephan; Bright, Jen A; Rayfield, Emily J

    2014-01-01

    Gross dissection has a long history as a tool for the study of human or animal soft-and hard-tissue anatomy. However, apart from being a time-consuming and invasive method, dissection is often unsuitable for very small specimens and often cannot capture spatial relationships of the individual soft-tissue structures. The handful of comprehensive studies on avian anatomy using traditional dissection techniques focus nearly exclusively on domestic birds, whereas raptorial birds, and in particular their cranial soft tissues, are essentially absent from the literature. Here, we digitally dissect, identify, and document the soft-tissue anatomy of the Common Buzzard (Buteo buteo) in detail, using the new approach of contrast-enhanced computed tomography using Lugol's iodine. The architecture of different muscle systems (adductor, depressor, ocular, hyoid, neck musculature), neurovascular, and other soft-tissue structures is three-dimensionally visualised and described in unprecedented detail. The three-dimensional model is further presented as an interactive PDF to facilitate the dissemination and accessibility of anatomical data. Due to the digital nature of the data derived from the computed tomography scanning and segmentation processes, these methods hold the potential for further computational analyses beyond descriptive and illustrative proposes. PMID:24350638

  17. Changing the facial features of patients with Treacher Collins syndrome: protocol for 3-stage treatment of hard and soft tissue hypoplasia in the upper half of the face.

    PubMed

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Saiga, Atsuomi; Satoh, Kaneshige

    2014-07-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a disorder characterized by various congenital soft tissue anomalies involving hypoplasia of the zygoma, maxilla, and mandible. A variety of treatments have been reported to date. These treatments can be classified into 2 major types. The first type involves osteotomy for hard tissue such as the zygoma and mandible. The second type involves plastic surgery using bone grafting in the malar region and soft tissue repair of eyelid deformities. We devised a new treatment to comprehensively correct hard and soft tissue deformities in the upper half of the face of Treacher Collins patients. The aim was to "change facial features and make it difficult to tell that the patients have this disorder." This innovative treatment strategy consists of 3 stages: (1) placement of dermal fat graft from the lower eyelid to the malar subcutaneous area, (2) custom-made synthetic zygomatic bone grafting, and (3) Z-plasty flap transposition from the upper to the lower eyelid and superior repositioning and fixation of the lateral canthal tendon using a Mitek anchor system. This method was used on 4 patients with Treacher Collins syndrome who had moderate to severe hypoplasia of the zygomas and the lower eyelids. Facial features of these patients were markedly improved and very good results were obtained. There were no major complications intraoperatively or postoperatively in any of the patients during the series of treatments. In synthetic bone grafting in the second stage, the implant in some patients was in the way of the infraorbital nerve. Thus, the nerve was detached and then sutured under the microscope. Postoperatively, patients had almost full restoration of sensory nerve torpor within 5 to 6 months. We devised a 3-stage treatment to "change facial features" of patients with hypoplasia of the upper half of the face due to Treacher Collins syndrome. The treatment protocol provided a very effective way to treat deformities of the upper half of the face

  18. Does Laser Surgery Interfere with Optical Nerve Identification in Maxillofacial Hard and Soft Tissue?--An Experimental Ex Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Bergauer, Bastian; Knipfer, Christian; Amann, Andreas; Rohde, Maximilian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Schmidt, Michael; Nkenke, Emeka; Stelzle, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The protection of sensitive structures (e.g., nerves) from iatrogenic damage is of major importance when performing laser surgical procedures. Especially in the head and neck area both function and esthetics can be affected to a great extent. Despite its many benefits, the surgical utilization of a laser is therefore still limited to superficial tissue ablation. A remote feedback system which guides the laser in a tissue-specific way would provide a remedy. In this context, it has been shown that nerval structures can be specifically recognized by their optical diffuse reflectance spectra both before and after laser ablation. However, for a translation of these findings to the actual laser ablation process, a nerve protection within the laser pulse is of utmost significance. Thus, it was the aim of the study to evaluate, if the process of Er:YAG laser surgery--which comes with spray water cooling, angulation of the probe (60°) and optical process emissions--interferes with optical tissue differentiation. For the first time, no stable conditions but the ongoing process of laser tissue ablation was examined. Therefore, six different tissue types (nerve, skin, muscle, fat, cortical and cancellous bone) were acquired from 15 pig heads. Measurements were performed during Er:YAG laser ablation. Diffuse reflectance spectra (4500, wavelength range: 350-650 nm) where acquired. Principal component analysis (PCA) and quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) were calculated for classification purposes. The clinical highly relevant differentiation between nerve and bone was performed correctly with an AUC of 95.3% (cortial bone) respectively 92.4% (cancellous bone). The identification of nerve tissue against the biological very similar fat tissue yielded good results with an AUC value of 83.4% (sensitivity: 72.3%, specificity: of 82.3%). This clearly demonstrates that nerve identification by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy works reliably in the ongoing process of laser ablation

  19. Therapeutic ultrasound for dental tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Scheven, B A A; Shelton, R M; Cooper, P R; Walmsley, A D; Smith, A J

    2009-10-01

    Dental disease affects human health and the quality of life of millions worldwide. Tooth decay (caries) and diseases of the dental pulp result in loss of tooth vitality and function requiring invasive treatment to restore the tooth to health. "Therapeutic" low intensity pulsed ultrasound has been shown to accelerate bone fracture healing indicating that ultrasound may be used as a tool to facilitate hard tissue regeneration. We have shown recently that low frequency ultrasound is able to exert biological effects on odontoblast-like cells. In this paper, we postulate that low frequency, low intensity ultrasound may stimulate endogenous coronal tooth repair by stimulating dentine formation from existing odontoblasts or by activating dental pulp stem cells to differentiate into new reparative dentine-producing cells. Ultrasound therapy promoting dentine formation and repair may also have the potential benefit of alleviating dentine hypersensitivity by inducing occlusion of dentinal tubules. It is envisaged that therapeutic ultrasound may be used in future to facilitate dental tissue engineering and stem cell therapy applications for dental tissue regeneration. Further research is warranted in this clinically important area and we envisage that novel strategies in dental therapy will be realised that may ultimately lead to the development of novel non-invasive, multifunctional ultrasound devices for dental diagnostics, repair and regeneration.

  20. Interrelationships between tooth properties and biochemical bone turnover markers investigated on six-month-old pig model.

    PubMed

    Tymczyna, Barbara; Tatara, Marcin R; Krupski, Witold; Tymczyna-Sobotka, Monika; Bachanek, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine interrelationships between bone tissue metabolism indices and morphological, biomechanical and densitometric properties of hard dental tissues. First primary maxillary incisor from 6-month-old pigs (N=27) was evaluated in terms of weight and length. Mean volumetric tooth mineral density, total tooth volume, enamel total volume, enamel volumetric mineral density, dentine total volume and dentine volumetric mineral density were estimated with the use of quantitative computed tomography and micro computed tomography techniques. Tooth mineral density and tooth mineral content were evaluated with the use of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Microhardness of enamel was measured using Vicker's test. Evaluations of total calcium, ionized calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, bone alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, C-terminal telopeptide of type-I collagen (CTX), insulin-like growth factor-1, growth hormone and parathyroid hormone were performed in plasma and serum samples. Pearson's correlation coefficients were determined between all the investigated variables, and P<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The obtained results have shown mainly mutual dependences between biochemical indicators of bone metabolism. Evaluation of CTX concentration in serum of pigs has shown the highest predictive value in relation to morphological, densitometric and biomechanical properties of teeth. PMID:23076035

  1. Improving oral rehabilitation through the preservation of the tissues through alveolar preservation

    PubMed Central

    Kurtzman, Gregori Michael; Mahesh, Lanka

    2012-01-01

    When performing a tooth extraction, imminent collapse of the tissue by resorption and remodeling of the socket is a natural occurrence. The procedure for the preservation of the alveolar ridge has been widely described in the dental literatures and aims to maintain hard and soft tissues in the extraction site for optimal rehabilitation either with conventional fixed or removable prosthetics or implant-supported prosthesis. PMID:22977727

  2. 3D planning in orthognathic surgery: CAD/CAM surgical splints and prediction of the soft and hard tissues results - our experience in 16 cases.

    PubMed

    Aboul-Hosn Centenero, Samir; Hernández-Alfaro, Federico

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this article is to determine the advantages of 3D planning in predicting postoperative results and manufacturing surgical splints using CAD/CAM (Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing) technology in orthognathic surgery when the software program Simplant OMS 10.1 (Materialise(®), Leuven, Belgium) was used for the purpose of this study which was carried out on 16 patients. A conventional preoperative treatment plan was devised for each patient following our Centre's standard protocol, and surgical splints were manufactured. These splints were used as study controls. The preoperative treatment plans devised were then transferred to a 3D-virtual environment on a personal computer (PC). Surgery was simulated, the prediction of results on soft and hard tissue produced, and surgical splints manufactured using CAD/CAM technology. In the operating room, both types of surgical splints were compared and the degree of similitude in results obtained in three planes was calculated. The maxillary osteotomy line was taken as the point of reference. The level of concordance was used to compare the surgical splints. Three months after surgery a second set of 3D images were obtained and used to obtain linear and angular measurements on screen. Using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient these postoperative measurements were compared with the measurements obtained when predicting postoperative results. Results showed that a high degree of correlation in 15 of the 16 cases. A high coefficient of correlation was obtained in the majority of predictions of results in hard tissue, although less precise results were obtained in measurements in soft tissue in the labial area. The study shows that the software program used in the study is reliable for 3D planning and for the manufacture of surgical splints using CAD/CAM technology. Nevertheless, further progress in the development of technologies for the acquisition of 3D images, new versions of software programs

  3. The tissue diagnostic instrument.

    PubMed

    Hansma, Paul; Yu, Hongmei; Schultz, David; Rodriguez, Azucena; Yurtsev, Eugene A; Orr, Jessica; Tang, Simon; Miller, Jon; Wallace, Joseph; Zok, Frank; Li, Cheng; Souza, Richard; Proctor, Alexander; Brimer, Davis; Nogues-Solan, Xavier; Mellbovsky, Leonardo; Peña, M Jesus; Diez-Ferrer, Oriol; Mathews, Phillip; Randall, Connor; Kuo, Alfred; Chen, Carol; Peters, Mathilde; Kohn, David; Buckley, Jenni; Li, Xiaojuan; Pruitt, Lisa; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Alliston, Tamara; Weaver, Valerie; Lotz, Jeffrey

    2009-05-01

    Tissue mechanical properties reflect extracellular matrix composition and organization, and as such, their changes can be a signature of disease. Examples of such diseases include intervertebral disk degeneration, cancer, atherosclerosis, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and tooth decay. Here we introduce the tissue diagnostic instrument (TDI), a device designed to probe the mechanical properties of normal and diseased soft and hard tissues not only in the laboratory but also in patients. The TDI can distinguish between the nucleus and the annulus of spinal disks, between young and degenerated cartilage, and between normal and cancerous mammary glands. It can quantify the elastic modulus and hardness of the wet dentin left in a cavity after excavation. It can perform an indentation test of bone tissue, quantifying the indentation depth increase and other mechanical parameters. With local anesthesia and disposable, sterile, probe assemblies, there has been neither pain nor complications in tests on patients. We anticipate that this unique device will facilitate research on many tissue systems in living organisms, including plants, leading to new insights into disease mechanisms and methods for their early detection.

  4. The tissue diagnostic instrument

    PubMed Central

    Hansma, Paul; Yu, Hongmei; Schultz, David; Rodriguez, Azucena; Yurtsev, Eugene A.; Orr, Jessica; Tang, Simon; Miller, Jon; Wallace, Joseph; Zok, Frank; Li, Cheng; Souza, Richard; Proctor, Alexander; Brimer, Davis; Nogues-Solan, Xavier; Mellbovsky, Leonardo; Peña, M. Jesus; Diez-Ferrer, Oriol; Mathews, Phillip; Randall, Connor; Kuo, Alfred; Chen, Carol; Peters, Mathilde; Kohn, David; Buckley, Jenni; Li, Xiaojuan; Pruitt, Lisa; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Alliston, Tamara; Weaver, Valerie; Lotz, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Tissue mechanical properties reflect extracellular matrix composition and organization, and as such, their changes can be a signature of disease. Examples of such diseases include intervertebral disk degeneration, cancer, atherosclerosis, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and tooth decay. Here we introduce the tissue diagnostic instrument (TDI), a device designed to probe the mechanical properties of normal and diseased soft and hard tissues not only in the laboratory but also in patients. The TDI can distinguish between the nucleus and the annulus of spinal disks, between young and degenerated cartilage, and between normal and cancerous mammary glands. It can quantify the elastic modulus and hardness of the wet dentin left in a cavity after excavation. It can perform an indentation test of bone tissue, quantifying the indentation depth increase and other mechanical parameters. With local anesthesia and disposable, sterile, probe assemblies, there has been neither pain nor complications in tests on patients. We anticipate that this unique device will facilitate research on many tissue systems in living organisms, including plants, leading to new insights into disease mechanisms and methods for their early detection. PMID:19485522

  5. The tissue diagnostic instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansma, Paul; Yu, Hongmei; Schultz, David; Rodriguez, Azucena; Yurtsev, Eugene A.; Orr, Jessica; Tang, Simon; Miller, Jon; Wallace, Joseph; Zok, Frank; Li, Cheng; Souza, Richard; Proctor, Alexander; Brimer, Davis; Nogues-Solan, Xavier; Mellbovsky, Leonardo; Peña, M. Jesus; Diez-Ferrer, Oriol; Mathews, Phillip; Randall, Connor; Kuo, Alfred; Chen, Carol; Peters, Mathilde; Kohn, David; Buckley, Jenni; Li, Xiaojuan; Pruitt, Lisa; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Alliston, Tamara; Weaver, Valerie; Lotz, Jeffrey

    2009-05-01

    Tissue mechanical properties reflect extracellular matrix composition and organization, and as such, their changes can be a signature of disease. Examples of such diseases include intervertebral disk degeneration, cancer, atherosclerosis, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and tooth decay. Here we introduce the tissue diagnostic instrument (TDI), a device designed to probe the mechanical properties of normal and diseased soft and hard tissues not only in the laboratory but also in patients. The TDI can distinguish between the nucleus and the annulus of spinal disks, between young and degenerated cartilage, and between normal and cancerous mammary glands. It can quantify the elastic modulus and hardness of the wet dentin left in a cavity after excavation. It can perform an indentation test of bone tissue, quantifying the indentation depth increase and other mechanical parameters. With local anesthesia and disposable, sterile, probe assemblies, there has been neither pain nor complications in tests on patients. We anticipate that this unique device will facilitate research on many tissue systems in living organisms, including plants, leading to new insights into disease mechanisms and methods for their early detection.

  6. Human tooth and root canal morphology reconstruction using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    DRĂGAN, OANA CARMEN; FĂRCĂŞANU, ALEXANDRU ŞTEFAN; CÂMPIAN, RADU SEPTIMIU; TURCU, ROMULUS VALERIU FLAVIU

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Visualization of the internal and external root canal morphology is very important for a successful endodontic treatment; however, it seems to be difficult considering the small size of the tooth and the complexity of the root canal system. Film-based or digital conventional radiographic techniques as well as cone beam computed tomography provide limited information on the dental pulp anatomy or have harmful effects. A new non-invasive diagnosis tool is magnetic resonance imaging, due to its ability of imaging both hard and soft tissues. The aim of this study was to demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging to be a useful tool for imaging the anatomic conditions of the external and internal root canal morphology for endodontic purposes. Methods The endodontic system of one freshly extracted wisdom tooth, chosen for its well-known anatomical variations, was mechanically shaped using a hybrid technique. After its preparation, the tooth was immersed into a recipient with saline solution and magnetic resonance imaged immediately. A Bruker Biospec magnetic resonance imaging scanner operated at 7.04 Tesla and based on Avance III radio frequency technology was used. InVesalius software was employed for the 3D reconstruction of the tooth scanned volume. Results The current ex-vivo experiment shows the accurate 3D volume rendered reconstruction of the internal and external morphology of a human extracted and endodontically treated tooth using a dataset of images acquired by magnetic resonance imaging. The external lingual and vestibular views of the tooth as well as the occlusal view of the pulp chamber, the access cavity, the distal canal opening on the pulp chamber floor, the coronal third of the root canals, the degree of root separation and the apical fusion of the two mesial roots, details of the apical region, root canal curvatures, furcal region and interradicular root grooves could be clearly bordered. Conclusions Magnetic resonance imaging offers 3

  7. Tooth Germ-Like Construct Transplantation for Whole-Tooth Regeneration: An In Vivo Study in the Miniature Pig.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai-Chiang; Kitamura, Yutaka; Wu, Chang-Chin; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Ling, Thai-Yen; Kuo, Tzong-Fu

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of whole-tooth regeneration using a tooth germ-like construct. Dental pulp from upper incisors, canines, premolars, and molars were extracted from sexually mature miniature pigs. Pulp tissues were cultured and expanded in vitro to obtain dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), and cells were differentiated into odontoblasts and osteoblasts. Epithelial cells were isolated from gingival epithelium. The epithelial cells, odontoblasts, and osteoblasts were seeded onto the surface, upper, and lower layers, respectively, of a bioactive scaffold. The lower first and second molar tooth germs were removed bilaterally and the layered cell/scaffold constructs were transplanted to the mandibular alveolar socket of a pig. At 13.5 months postimplantation, seven of eight pigs developed two teeth with crown, root, and pulp structures. Enamel-like tissues, dentin, cementum, odontoblasts, and periodontal tissues were found upon histological inspection. The regenerated tooth expressed dentin matrix protein-1 and osteopontin. All pigs had regenerated molar teeth regardless of the original tooth used to procure the DPSCs. Pigs that had tooth germs removed or who received empty scaffolds did not develop teeth. Although periodontal ligaments were generated, ankylosis was found in some animals. This study revealed that implantation of a tooth germ-like structure generated a complete tooth with a high success rate. The implant location may influence the morphology of the regenerated tooth.

  8. Tooth formation - delayed or absent

    MedlinePlus

    Delayed or absent tooth formation; Teeth - delayed or absent formation ... The age at which a tooth comes in varies. Most infants get their first tooth between 6 and 9 months, but it may be earlier or later. ...

  9. Cracked tooth syndrome: Overview of literature

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Shamimul; Singh, Kuldeep; Salati, Naseer

    2015-01-01

    Pain is defined as an “unpleasant sensory and emotional feeling which is associated with actual or potential injury of tissue or expressed in terms of such injury.” Tooth pain usually refers to pain around the teeth or jaws mainly as a result of a dental condition. Mostly, toothaches are caused by a carious cavity, a broken tooth, an exposed tooth root or gum disease. The toothache may sometimes be the result of radiating pain from structures in the vicinity of tooth and jaws (cardiac pain, ear, nose, throat pain, and sinusitis). Therefore, evaluation by both dentists and physicians are sometimes necessary to diagnose medical illnesses causing “toothache.” Cracked tooth syndrome is a major diagnostic challenge in clinical practice. Accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment are complicated due to lack of awareness of this condition and its bizarre clinical features. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and good prognosis. This article provides a detailed literature on the causes, classification, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment planning of cracked tooth syndrome. PMID:26539363

  10. A comparison in mechanical properties of cermets of calcium silicate with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V alloys for hard tissues replacement.

    PubMed

    Ataollahi Oshkour, Azim; Pramanik, Sumit; Shirazi, Seyed Farid Seyed; Mehrali, Mehdi; Yau, Yat-Huang; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of calcium silicate (CS) content on composition, compressive mechanical properties, and hardness of CS cermets with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V alloys sintered at 1200°C. The powder metallurgy route was exploited to prepare the cermets. New phases of materials of Ni16Ti6Si7, CaTiO3, and Ni31Si12 appeared in cermet of Ti-55Ni with CS and in cermet of Ti-6Al-4V with CS, the new phases Ti5Si3, Ti2O, and CaTiO3, which were emerged during sintering at different CS content (wt%). The minimum shrinkage and density were observed in both groups of cermets for the 50 and 100 wt% CS content, respectively. The cermets with 40 wt% of CS had minimum compressive Young's modulus. The minimum of compressive strength and strain percentage at maximum load were revealed in cermets with 50 and 40 wt% of CS with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V cermets, respectively. The cermets with 80 and 90 wt% of CS showed more plasticity than the pure CS. It concluded that the composition and mechanical properties of sintered cermets of Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V with CS significantly depend on the CS content in raw cermet materials. Thus, the different mechanical properties of the cermets can be used as potential materials for different hard tissues replacements. PMID:25538954

  11. Interactions of the tooth and bone during development.

    PubMed

    Alfaqeeh, S A; Gaete, M; Tucker, A S

    2013-12-01

    The tooth works as a functional unit with its surrounding bony socket, the alveolar bone. The growth of the tooth and alveolar bone is co-ordinated so that a studied distance always separates the 2, known as the tooth-bone interface (TBI). Lack of mineralization, a crucial feature of the TBI, creates the space for the developing tooth to grow and the soft tissues of the periodontium to develop. We have investigated the interactions between the tooth and its surrounding bone during development, focusing on the impact of the developing alveolar bone on the development of the mouse first molar (M1). During development, TRAP-positive osteoclasts are found to line the TBI as bone starts to be deposited around the tooth, removing the bone as the tooth expands. An enhancement of osteoclastogenesis through RANK-RANKL signaling results in an expansion of the TBI, showing that osteoclasts are essential for defining the size of this region. Isolation of the M1 from the surrounding mesenchyme and alveolar bone leads to an expansion of the tooth germ, driven by increased proliferation, indicating that, during normal development, the growth of the tooth germ is constrained by the surrounding tissues.

  12. Assessment of the amount of tooth wear on dental casts and intra-oral photographs.

    PubMed

    Wetselaar, P; Wetselaar-Glas, M J M; Koutris, M; Visscher, C M; Lobbezoo, F

    2016-08-01

    Tooth wear is a multifactorial condition, leading to the loss of dental hard tissues. Many grading scales are available to assess the amount of tooth wear, one of which is the tooth wear evaluation system (TWES). A grading scale can be used chairside, on casts and on photographs. The aim was to test whether the grading scales of the TWES, used on casts and on photographs, resulted in comparable scores. In addition, it was tested whether these scales can be used to assess tooth wear reliably on photographs. Of 75 tooth wear patients, sets of casts and series of photographs were obtained and graded. Comparison of the grading on casts and on photographs revealed equal median values and percentiles for both occlusal/incisal grading and non-occlusal/non-incisal grading. The grading on casts and on photographs showed a high correlation for the occlusal/incisal grading and a low correlation for the non-occlusal/non-incisal grading (Spearman's rho = 0·74 and rho = 0·47; P < 0·001). Concerning the grading on photographs, the interexaminer reliability was fair-to-good (ICC = 0·41 to ICC = 0·55) while the intra-examiner reliability was fair-to-good to excellent (ICC = 0·68 to ICC = 0·86) for the occlusal/incisal grading. For the non-occlusal/non-incisal grading, the interexaminer reliability was poor to fair-to-good (ICC = 0·22 to ICC = 0·59), while the intra-examiner reliability was fair-to-good to excellent (ICC = 0·64 to ICC = 0·82). It was concluded that the scores obtained with the grading scales of the TWES on casts and on photographs are comparable. The grading scales can be used in a reliable way on photographs, which is especially the case for occlusal/incisal grading.

  13. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a new zirconia/niobium biocermet for hard tissue replacement.

    PubMed

    Bartolomé, J F; Moya, J S; Couceiro, R; Gutiérrez-González, C F; Guitián, F; Martinez-Insua, A

    2016-01-01

    Metals and ceramics are commonly used in orthopaedics, dentistry and other load bearing applications. However, the use of ceramic matrix composites reinforced with biocompatible metals for heavy load-bearing hard tissue replacement applications has not previously been reported. In order to improve the reliability and the mechanical properties of biomedical implants, new zirconia-Nb composites have been recently developed. The aim of this study was to investigate the biological tolerance of these new zirconia/Nb biocermets implants with both in vitro and in vivo approaches. At first, human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on sintered biocermet discs with polished surfaces and were compared with responses to niobium metal. In vitro, the biocermets showed no deleterious effect on cell proliferation, extra-cellular matrix production or on cell morphology. Furthermore, the biocermet showed a higher percentage of cell proliferation than Nb metal. On the other hand, the bone response to these new zirconia/Nb biocermets was studied. Cylinders of biocermets, as well as commercially Nb rod were implanted in the tibiae of New Zealand white rabbits. All the animals were euthanatized after 6 months. The specimens were processed to obtain thin ground sections. The slides were observed in normal transmitted light microscope. A newly formed bone was observed in close contact with material surfaces. No inflamed or multinucleated cells were present. This study concluded that zirconia/Nb composites are biocompatible and osteoconductive. The ceramic-metal composite has even better osteointegration ability than pure Nb. In conclusion, zirconia-Nb biocermet is suitable for heavy load-bearing hard tissue replacement from the point of view of both mechanical properties and biocompatibility.

  14. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a new zirconia/niobium biocermet for hard tissue replacement.

    PubMed

    Bartolomé, J F; Moya, J S; Couceiro, R; Gutiérrez-González, C F; Guitián, F; Martinez-Insua, A

    2016-01-01

    Metals and ceramics are commonly used in orthopaedics, dentistry and other load bearing applications. However, the use of ceramic matrix composites reinforced with biocompatible metals for heavy load-bearing hard tissue replacement applications has not previously been reported. In order to improve the reliability and the mechanical properties of biomedical implants, new zirconia-Nb composites have been recently developed. The aim of this study was to investigate the biological tolerance of these new zirconia/Nb biocermets implants with both in vitro and in vivo approaches. At first, human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on sintered biocermet discs with polished surfaces and were compared with responses to niobium metal. In vitro, the biocermets showed no deleterious effect on cell proliferation, extra-cellular matrix production or on cell morphology. Furthermore, the biocermet showed a higher percentage of cell proliferation than Nb metal. On the other hand, the bone response to these new zirconia/Nb biocermets was studied. Cylinders of biocermets, as well as commercially Nb rod were implanted in the tibiae of New Zealand white rabbits. All the animals were euthanatized after 6 months. The specimens were processed to obtain thin ground sections. The slides were observed in normal transmitted light microscope. A newly formed bone was observed in close contact with material surfaces. No inflamed or multinucleated cells were present. This study concluded that zirconia/Nb composites are biocompatible and osteoconductive. The ceramic-metal composite has even better osteointegration ability than pure Nb. In conclusion, zirconia-Nb biocermet is suitable for heavy load-bearing hard tissue replacement from the point of view of both mechanical properties and biocompatibility. PMID:26561930

  15. A Critical Role of TRPM7 As an Ion Channel Protein in Mediating the Mineralization of the Craniofacial Hard Tissues.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yukiko; Le, Michael H; Abduweli, Dawud; Ho, Sunita P; Ryazanova, Lillia V; Hu, Zhixian; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Den Besten, Pamela K; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) is the fourth most common cation in the human body, and has a crucial role in many physiological functions. Mg(2+) homeostasis is an important contributor to bone development, however, its roles in the development of dental mineralized tissues have not yet been well known. We identified that transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7), was significantly upregulated in the mature ameloblasts as compared to other ameloblasts through our whole transcript microarray analyses of the ameloblasts. TRPM7, an ion channel for divalent metal cations with an intrinsic serine/threonine protein kinase activity, has been characterized as a key regulator of whole body Mg(2+) homeostasis. Semi-quantitative PCR and immunostaining for TRMP7 confirmed its upregulation during the maturation stage of enamel formation, at which ameloblasts direct rapid mineralization of the enamel matrix. The significantly hypomineralized craniofacial structures, including incisors, molars, and cranial bones were demonstrated by microCT analysis, von Kossa and trichrome staining in Trpm7 (Δkinase∕+) mice. A previously generated heterozygous mouse model with the deletion of the TRPM7 kinase domain. Interestingly, the skeletal phenotype of Trpm7 (Δkinase∕+) mice resembled those found in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (Alpl) KO mice, thus we further examined whether ALPL protein content and alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) activity in ameloblasts, odontoblasts and osteoblasts were affected in those mice. While ALPL protein in Trpm7 (Δkinase∕+) mice remained at the similar level as that in wt mice, ALPase activities in the Trpm7 (Δkinase∕+) mice were almost nonexistent. Supplemented magnesium successfully rescued the activities of ALPase in ameloblasts, odontoblasts and osteoblasts of Trpm7 (Δkinase∕+) mice. These results suggested that TRPM7 is essential for mineralization of enamel as well as dentin and bone by providing

  16. Preparation of a partially calcified gelatin membrane as a model for a soft-to-hard tissue interface.

    PubMed

    Aviv-Gavriel, Meital; Garti, Nissim; Füredi-Milhofer, Helga

    2013-01-15

    Cartilage and/or bone tissue engineering is a very challenging area in modern medicine. Since cartilage is an avascular tissue with limited capacity for self-repair, using scaffolds provides a promising option for the repair of severe cartilage damage caused by trauma, age-related degeneration, and/or diseases. Our aim in this study was to design a model for a functional biomedical membrane to form the interface between a cartilage-forming scaffold and bone. To realize such a membrane gelatin gels containing calcium or phosphate ions were exposed from one side to a solution of the other constituent ion (i.e., a sodium phosphate solution was allowed to diffuse into a calcium-containing gel and vice versa). The partially calcified gels were analyzed by XRD, ATR-FTIR spectra, E-SEM, and EDX. Thus, we confirmed the existence of a gradient of crystals, with a dense top layer, extending several micrometers into the gel. XRD spectra and Ca/P atomic ratios confirmed the existence of calcium deficient apatites. The effect of different experimental parameters on the calcification process within the gelatin membranes has been elucidated. It was shown that increasing the gelatin concentration from 5 wt % to 10 wt % retards calcification. A similar effect was observed when glycerol, which is frequently used as plasticizer, was added to the system. With increasing calcium concentration within the organic matrix, the quantity and density of calcium phosphate crystals over/within the gel increased. The possible explanations for the above phenomena are discussed. PMID:23231089

  17. A Critical Role of TRPM7 As an Ion Channel Protein in Mediating the Mineralization of the Craniofacial Hard Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yukiko; Le, Michael H.; Abduweli, Dawud; Ho, Sunita P.; Ryazanova, Lillia V.; Hu, Zhixian; Ryazanov, Alexey G.; Den Besten, Pamela K.; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium ion (Mg2+) is the fourth most common cation in the human body, and has a crucial role in many physiological functions. Mg2+ homeostasis is an important contributor to bone development, however, its roles in the development of dental mineralized tissues have not yet been well known. We identified that transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7), was significantly upregulated in the mature ameloblasts as compared to other ameloblasts through our whole transcript microarray analyses of the ameloblasts. TRPM7, an ion channel for divalent metal cations with an intrinsic serine/threonine protein kinase activity, has been characterized as a key regulator of whole body Mg2+ homeostasis. Semi-quantitative PCR and immunostaining for TRMP7 confirmed its upregulation during the maturation stage of enamel formation, at which ameloblasts direct rapid mineralization of the enamel matrix. The significantly hypomineralized craniofacial structures, including incisors, molars, and cranial bones were demonstrated by microCT analysis, von Kossa and trichrome staining in Trpm7Δkinase∕+ mice. A previously generated heterozygous mouse model with the deletion of the TRPM7 kinase domain. Interestingly, the skeletal phenotype of Trpm7Δkinase∕+ mice resembled those found in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (Alpl) KO mice, thus we further examined whether ALPL protein content and alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) activity in ameloblasts, odontoblasts and osteoblasts were affected in those mice. While ALPL protein in Trpm7Δkinase∕+ mice remained at the similar level as that in wt mice, ALPase activities in the Trpm7Δkinase∕+ mice were almost nonexistent. Supplemented magnesium successfully rescued the activities of ALPase in ameloblasts, odontoblasts and osteoblasts of Trpm7Δkinase∕+ mice. These results suggested that TRPM7 is essential for mineralization of enamel as well as dentin and bone by providing sufficient Mg2+ for the ALPL

  18. [Dental implants in tooth grinders].

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Brouwers, J E; Cune, M S; Naeije, M

    2004-03-01

    Bruxism (tooth grinding and clenching) is generally considered a contraindication for dental implants, although the evidence is usually based on clinical experience only. So far, studies to the possible cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure do not yield consistent and specific outcomes. This is partly due to the large variation in the technical and the biological aspects of the investigations. Although there is still no proof that bruxism causes overload of dental implants and their suprastructures, a careful approach is recommended. Practical advices as to minimize the chance of implant failure are given. Besides the recommendation to reduce or eliminate bruxism itself, these advices concern the number and dimensions of the implants, the design of the occlusion and articulation patterns, and the use of a hard nightguard. PMID:15058243

  19. Beads in the Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ila

    2011-01-01

    Foreign objects in a tooth are often diagnosed accidentally. A detailed case history, clinical and radiographic examinations are necessary to know the exact nature, size, location of the foreign body and the difficulty involved in its retrieval. In the present case, two beads, one radiopaque and one radiolucent were found in the same tooth at different places of 11-year-old girl. Patient did not reveal proper history out of fear. Both the foreign objects were discovered during routine endodontic procedure which were removed following simple clinical procedure causing minimal damage to the internal tooth structure.

  20. Novel silicificated PVAc/POSS composite nanofibrous mat via facile electrospinning technique: potential scaffold for hard tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ha, Yu-Mi; Amna, Touseef; Kim, Mi-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Chel; Hassan, M Shamshi; Khil, Myung-Seob

    2013-02-01

    This study presents the fabrication of novel porous silicificated PVAc/POSS composite nanofibers by facile electrospinning technique and the interaction of synthesized mats with simulated body fluid (SBF). The physicochemical properties of the electrospun composites were determined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron probe micro-analysis, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry analysis. To examine the in vitro cytotoxicity, mouse myoblast C2C12 cells were treated with pristine and composite nanofibrous mats and the viability of cells was analyzed by cell counting kit-8 assay at regular time intervals. Our results indicated the enhanced nucleation and the formation of apatite-like structures at the surface of silicificated PVAc/POSS during the incubation of electrospun mats in SBF solution. Cytotoxicity experiments designated that the myoblasts could attach to the composite after being cultured. We observed in the present study that PVAc/POSS nanofibrous mat could support cell adhesion and guide the spreading behavior of myoblasts. We conclude that the new electrospun silicificated PVAc/POSS composite scaffold with unique porous morphology have excellent biocompatibility. Consequently, our investigation results showed that the as-spun porous PVAc/POSS composite nanofibrous scaffold could be a potential substrate for the proliferation and mineralization of osteoblasts, enhancing bone regeneration. The biocomposite mats represent a promising biomaterial to be exploited for various tissue engineering applications such as guided bone regeneration. PMID:23107958

  1. Effects of a tartar control whitening dentifrice on tooth shade in a population with long-standing natural stain.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, R W; Barker, M L; Hyde, J D; Jones, M B; Cordero, R E

    2001-01-01

    Changing and whitening tooth color in people with long-standing tooth stain without excessive hard tissue abrasion may represent one of the more difficult challenges for whitening dentifrices. An eight-week clinical trial was conducted to evaluate change in tooth color by a silica-based, enamel-safe tartar control whitening dentifrice compared to a marketed baking soda dentifrice control. First, a screening exercise was conducted to identify individuals with long-standing extrinsic dental stain. This exercise targeted adults who reported "stained teeth" and coffee/tea drinking or smoking, but who had no recent history of dental prophylaxis. Targeted subjects were examined for stain (Lobene Index) and tooth shade/color (Vita). A total of 291 adults having extrinsic stain and discolored teeth were enrolled in the study. Subjects were randomized to one of the two treatment groups, and all dentifrice use was unsupervised. Tooth color was measured at 4 and 8 weeks from shade values collected from the 8 incisors, and averages were determined from a linear ordering of the shade guide. A total of 278 evaluable subjects completed the 8-week study. Overall, the tartar control whitening dentifrice group experienced an improvement in color, differing statistically from baseline (p < 0.001) and from the marketed control (p < 0.05). Safety profiles for the two dentifrices were generally similar. Among patients with long-standing extrinsic stain, use of the tartar control whitening dentifrice resulted in superior overall tooth shade and reduced maximum or worst color compared to the marketed baking soda dentifrice control. PMID:11476014

  2. Effects of a tartar control whitening dentifrice on tooth shade in a population with long-standing natural stain.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, R W; Barker, M L; Hyde, J D; Jones, M B; Cordero, R E

    2001-01-01

    Changing and whitening tooth color in people with long-standing tooth stain without excessive hard tissue abrasion may represent one of the more difficult challenges for whitening dentifrices. An eight-week clinical trial was conducted to evaluate change in tooth color by a silica-based, enamel-safe tartar control whitening dentifrice compared to a marketed baking soda dentifrice control. First, a screening exercise was conducted to identify individuals with long-standing extrinsic dental stain. This exercise targeted adults who reported "stained teeth" and coffee/tea drinking or smoking, but who had no recent history of dental prophylaxis. Targeted subjects were examined for stain (Lobene Index) and tooth shade/color (Vita). A total of 291 adults having extrinsic stain and discolored teeth were enrolled in the study. Subjects were randomized to one of the two treatment groups, and all dentifrice use was unsupervised. Tooth color was measured at 4 and 8 weeks from shade values collected from the 8 incisors, and averages were determined from a linear ordering of the shade guide. A total of 278 evaluable subjects completed the 8-week study. Overall, the tartar control whitening dentifrice group experienced an improvement in color, differing statistically from baseline (p < 0.001) and from the marketed control (p < 0.05). Safety profiles for the two dentifrices were generally similar. Among patients with long-standing extrinsic stain, use of the tartar control whitening dentifrice resulted in superior overall tooth shade and reduced maximum or worst color compared to the marketed baking soda dentifrice control.

  3. Finite element modeling of occlusal variation in durophagous tooth systems.

    PubMed

    Crofts, Stephanie

    2015-09-01

    In addition to breaking hard prey items, the teeth of durophagous predators must also resist failure under high loads. To understand the effects of morphology on tooth resistance to failure, finite element models were used to examine differences in total strain energy (J), first principal strain and the distribution of strains in a diversity of canonical durophagous tooth morphologies. By changing the way loads were applied to the models, I was also able to model the effects of large and small prey items. Tooth models with overall convex morphologies have higher in-model strains than those with a flat or concave occlusal surface. When a cusp is added to the tooth model, taller or thinner cusps increase in-model strain. While there is little difference in the relationships between tooth morphology and strain measurements for most models, there is a marked difference between effects of the large and small prey loads on the concave and flat tooth morphologies. Comparing these data with measurements of force required by these same morphologies to break prey items illustrates functional trade-offs between the need to prevent tooth failure under high loads by minimizing in-tooth strain versus the drive to reduce the total applied force.

  4. Tooth in oropharynx.

    PubMed

    Nagarajappa, D; Manjunatha, Bs

    2011-09-01

    The incidence of ectopic teeth has increased. In many cases, the etiology of ectopic teeth cannot be identified. Ectopic tooth in deciduous dentition period is very rare and information is limited about its causes and characteristics. The conditions commonly associated with an increased prevalence of ectopic teeth include cleft lip and palate, cleidocranial dysplasia, and Gardner syndrome. The diagnosis is made by the clinical and radiological examinations. The indication for extraction in ectopic teeth cases is in general determined by the presence of symptomatology, or by the need for preventing future complications. We present a case of an ectopic maxillary tooth in a 4 year-old boy. In addition, this report also addresses a young patient with a tooth in the oropharynx with the objective of non traumatic etiology, and such a clinical presentation is extremely rare. The authors believe the case presented here is the first documented case of an ectopic supernumerary tooth seen in the oropharynx. PMID:22144844

  5. Replacing a Missing Tooth

    MedlinePlus

    ... majority of patients with clefts will require full orthodontic treatment, especially if the cleft has passed through ... later replacement of the missing lateral incisor. During orthodontic treatment, an artificial tooth may be attached to ...

  6. Allogenous tooth fragment reattachment

    PubMed Central

    Maitin, Nitin; Maitin, Shipra; Rastogi, Khushboo; Bhushan, Rajarshi

    2013-01-01

    Coronal fractures of the anterior teeth are a common form of dental trauma and its sequelae may impair the establishment and accomplishment of an adequate treatment plan. Among the various treatment options, reattachment of a crown fragment obtained from a previously extracted tooth is a conservative treatment that should be considered for crown fractures of anterior teeth. This article reports reattachment of an allogenous tooth fragment in a fractured maxillary lateral incisor in a 38-year-old patient. It is suggested that allogenous reattachment in a fractured anterior tooth serves to be a better alternative and should be further researched. Aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of a fractured complicated anterior crown using allogenous tooth fragment is a better alternative to other more conventional treatment options. PMID:23845684

  7. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... thickness of enamel or the calcium or protein content of the enamel. This can cause color changes. Metabolic diseases may ... or coffee Genetic defects that affect the tooth enamel, such as ... from environmental sources (natural high water fluoride levels) ...

  8. Scales and Dermal Skeletal Histology of an Early Bony Fish Psarolepis romeri and Their Bearing on the Evolution of Rhombic Scales and Hard Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Qingming; Zhu, Min; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries of early bony fishes from the Silurian and earliest Devonian of South China (e.g. Psarolepis, Achoania, Meemannia, Styloichthys and Guiyu) have been crucial in understanding the origin and early diversification of the osteichthyans (bony fishes and tetrapods). All these early fishes, except Guiyu, have their dermal skeletal surface punctured by relatively large pore openings. However, among these early fishes little is known about scale morphology and dermal skeletal histology. Here we report new data about the scales and dermal skeletal histology of Psarolepis romeri, a taxon with important implications for studying the phylogeny of early gnathostomes and early osteichthyans. Seven subtypes of rhombic scales with similar histological composition and surface sculpture are referred to Psarolepis romeri. They are generally thick and show a faint antero-dorsal process and a broad peg-and-socket structure. In contrast to previously reported rhombic scales of osteichthyans, these scales bear a neck between crown and base as in acanthodian scales. Histologically, the crown is composed of several generations of odontodes and an irregular canal system connecting cylindrical pore cavities. Younger odontodes are deposited on older ones both superpositionally and areally. The bony tissues forming the keel of the scale are shown to be lamellar bone with plywood-like structure, whereas the other parts of the base are composed of pseudo-lamellar bone with parallel collagen fibers. The unique tissue combination in the keel (i.e., extrinsic Sharpey's fibers orthogonal to the intrinsic orthogonal sets of collagen fibers) has rarely been reported in the keel of other rhombic scales. The new data provide insights into the early evolution of rhombic (ganoid and cosmoid) scales in osteichthyans, and add to our knowledge of hard tissues of early vertebrates. PMID:23585902

  9. Tooth whitening: current status.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kimberly; Berry, Thomas G; Woolum, James

    2010-09-01

    This article reviews the history of tooth whitening and its rapid evolution and briefly discusses tooth whitening agents and protocols. The active ingredients and mode of action during the whitening process are explained. The factors affecting the speed of whitening and its final results are discussed, as well as adverse effects and safety precautions. Protocols are explained in detail, and the predicted outcomes, including those for tetracycline-stained teeth, are covered.

  10. Reptilian tooth development.

    PubMed

    Richman, Joy M; Handrigan, Gregory R

    2011-04-01

    Dental patterns in vertebrates range from absence of teeth to multiple sets of teeth that are replaced throughout life. Despite this great variation, most of our understanding of tooth development is derived from studies on just a few model organisms. Here we introduce the reptile as an excellent model in which to study the molecular basis for early dental specification and, most importantly, for tooth replacement. We review recent snake studies that highlight the conserved role of Shh in marking the position of the odontogenic band. The distinctive molecular patterning of the dental lamina in the labial-lingual and oral-aboral axes is reviewed. We explain how these early signals help to specify the tooth-forming and non-tooth forming sides of the dental lamina as well as the presumptive successional lamina. Next, the simple architecture of the reptilian enamel organ is contrasted with the more complex, mammalian tooth bud and we discuss whether or not there is an enamel knot in reptilian teeth. The role of the successional lamina during tooth replacement in squamate reptiles is reviewed and we speculate on the possible formation of a vestigial, post-permanent dentition in mammals. In support of these ideas, we present data on agamid teeth in which development of a third generation is arrested. We suggest that in diphyodont mammals, similar mechanisms may be involved in reducing tooth replacement capacity. Finally, we review the location of label-retaining cells and suggest ways in which these putative dental epithelial stem cells contribute to continuous tooth replacement.

  11. Estimated Tissue and Blood N(2) Levels and Risk of Decompression Sickness in Deep-, Intermediate-, and Shallow-Diving Toothed Whales during Exposure to Naval Sonar.

    PubMed

    Kvadsheim, P H; Miller, P J O; Tyack, P L; Sivle, L D; Lam, F P A; Fahlman, A

    2012-01-01

    Naval sonar has been accused of causing whale stranding by a mechanism which increases formation of tissue N(2) gas bubbles. Increased tissue and blood N(2) levels, and thereby increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS), is thought to result from changes in behavior or physiological responses during diving. Previous theoretical studies have used hypothetical sonar-induced changes in both behavior and physiology to model blood and tissue N(2) tension [Formula: see text], but this is the first attempt to estimate the changes during actual behavioral responses to sonar. We used an existing mathematical model to estimate blood and tissue N(2) tension [Formula: see text] from dive data recorded from sperm, killer, long-finned pilot, Blainville's beaked, and Cuvier's beaked whales before and during exposure to Low- (1-2 kHz) and Mid- (2-7 kHz) frequency active sonar. Our objectives were: (1) to determine if differences in dive behavior affects risk of bubble formation, and if (2) behavioral- or (3) physiological responses to sonar are plausible risk factors. Our results suggest that all species have natural high N(2) levels, with deep diving generally resulting in higher end-dive [Formula: see text] as compared with shallow diving. Sonar exposure caused some changes in dive behavior in both killer whales, pilot whales and beaked whales, but this did not lead to any increased risk of DCS. However, in three of eight exposure session with sperm whales, the animal changed to shallower diving, and in all these cases this seem to result in an increased risk of DCS, although risk was still within the normal risk range of this species. When a hypothetical removal of the normal dive response (bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction), was added to the behavioral response during model simulations, this led to an increased variance in the estimated end-dive N(2) levels, but no consistent change of risk. In conclusion, we cannot rule out the possibility that a combination

  12. Estimated Tissue and Blood N2 Levels and Risk of Decompression Sickness in Deep-, Intermediate-, and Shallow-Diving Toothed Whales during Exposure to Naval Sonar

    PubMed Central

    Kvadsheim, P. H.; Miller, P. J. O.; Tyack, P. L.; Sivle, L. D.; Lam, F. P. A.; Fahlman, A.

    2012-01-01

    Naval sonar has been accused of causing whale stranding by a mechanism which increases formation of tissue N2 gas bubbles. Increased tissue and blood N2 levels, and thereby increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS), is thought to result from changes in behavior or physiological responses during diving. Previous theoretical studies have used hypothetical sonar-induced changes in both behavior and physiology to model blood and tissue N2 tension PN2, but this is the first attempt to estimate the changes during actual behavioral responses to sonar. We used an existing mathematical model to estimate blood and tissue N2 tension PN2 from dive data recorded from sperm, killer, long-finned pilot, Blainville’s beaked, and Cuvier’s beaked whales before and during exposure to Low- (1–2 kHz) and Mid- (2–7 kHz) frequency active sonar. Our objectives were: (1) to determine if differences in dive behavior affects risk of bubble formation, and if (2) behavioral- or (3) physiological responses to sonar are plausible risk factors. Our results suggest that all species have natural high N2 levels, with deep diving generally resulting in higher end-dive PN2 as compared with shallow diving. Sonar exposure caused some changes in dive behavior in both killer whales, pilot whales and beaked whales, but this did not lead to any increased risk of DCS. However, in three of eight exposure session with sperm whales, the animal changed to shallower diving, and in all these cases this seem to result in an increased risk of DCS, although risk was still within the normal risk range of this species. When a hypothetical removal of the normal dive response (bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction), was added to the behavioral response during model simulations, this led to an increased variance in the estimated end-dive N2 levels, but no consistent change of risk. In conclusion, we cannot rule out the possibility that a combination of behavioral and physiological responses to sonar

  13. A Comparison in Mechanical Properties of Cermets of Calcium Silicate with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V Alloys for Hard Tissues Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Pramanik, Sumit; Shirazi, Seyed Farid Seyed; Mehrali, Mehdi; Yau, Yat-Huang; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of calcium silicate (CS) content on composition, compressive mechanical properties, and hardness of CS cermets with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V alloys sintered at 1200°C. The powder metallurgy route was exploited to prepare the cermets. New phases of materials of Ni16Ti6Si7, CaTiO3, and Ni31Si12 appeared in cermet of Ti-55Ni with CS and in cermet of Ti-6Al-4V with CS, the new phases Ti5Si3, Ti2O, and CaTiO3, which were emerged during sintering at different CS content (wt%). The minimum shrinkage and density were observed in both groups of cermets for the 50 and 100 wt% CS content, respectively. The cermets with 40 wt% of CS had minimum compressive Young's modulus. The minimum of compressive strength and strain percentage at maximum load were revealed in cermets with 50 and 40 wt% of CS with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V cermets, respectively. The cermets with 80 and 90 wt% of CS showed more plasticity than the pure CS. It concluded that the composition and mechanical properties of sintered cermets of Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V with CS significantly depend on the CS content in raw cermet materials. Thus, the different mechanical properties of the cermets can be used as potential materials for different hard tissues replacements. PMID:25538954

  14. Autotransplantation donor tooth site harvesting using piezosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Ylikontiola, Leena P.; Sándor, George K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The harvesting of a tooth as a candidate for tooth autotransplantation requires that the delicate dental tissues around the tooth be minimally traumatized. This is especially so for the periradicular tissues of the tooth root and the follicular tissues surrounding the crown. The aim of this report is to describe the use of piezosurgery as an attempt at morbidity reduction in the harvesting of teeth for autotransplantation. Methods: A piezosurgical handpiece and its selection of tips were easily adapted to allow the harvesting and delivery of teeth for autotransplantation purposes. Results: Twenty premolar teeth were harvested using a piezosurgical device. The harvested teeth were subsequently successfully autotransplanted. All twenty teeth healed in a satisfactory manner without excessive mobility or ankyloses. Conclusions: Piezosurgery avoids some of the traumatic aspects of harvesting teeth and removing bone which are associated with thermal damage from the use of conventional rotary instruments or saws. Piezosurgery can be adapted to facilitate the predictable harvesting of teeth for autotransplantation purposes. PMID:27563612

  15. Tooth-derived bone graft material

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Kyun; Lee, Junho; Kim, Kyung-Wook; Murata, Masaru; Akazawa, Toshiyuki; Mitsugi, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    With successful extraction of growth factors and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) from mammalian teeth, many researchers have supported development of a bone substitute using tooth-derived substances. Some studies have also expanded the potential use of teeth as a carrier for growth factors and stem cells. A broad overview of the published findings with regard to tooth-derived regenerative tissue engineering technique is outlined. Considering more than 100 published papers, our team has developed the protocols and techniques for processing of bone graft material using extracted teeth. Based on current studies and studies that will be needed in the future, we can anticipate development of scaffolds, homogenous and xenogenous tooth bone grafts, and dental restorative materials using extracted teeth. PMID:24471027

  16. Role of trace elements (Zn, Sr, Fe) in bone development: energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence study of rat bone and tooth tissue.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Karina; Drzazga, Zofia; Kaszuba, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common debilitating disease around the world and it is more and more established among young people. There are well known recommendations for nutrition of newborns and children concerning adequate calcium and vitamin D intake in order to maintain proper bone density. Nevertheless, important role in structure and function of a healthy bone tissue is played by an integration between all constituents including elements other than Ca, like trace elements, which control vital processes in bone tissue. It is important from scientific point of view as well as prevention of bone diseases, to monitor the mineralization process considering changes of the concentration of minerals during first stage of bone formation. This work presents studies of trace element (zinc, strontium, and iron) concentration in bones and teeth of Wistar rats at the age of 7, 14, and 28 days. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was used to examine mandibles, skulls, femurs, tibiae, and incisors. The quantitative analysis was performed using fundamental parameters method (FP). Zn and Sr concentrations were highest for the youngest individuals and decreased with age of rats, while Fe content was stable in bone matrix for most studied bones. Our results reveal the necessity of monitoring concentration of not only major, but also minor elements, because the trace elements play special role in the first period of bone development. PMID:24615876

  17. Collagen hydrogels incorporated with surface-aminated mesoporous nanobioactive glass: Improvement of physicochemical stability and mechanical properties is effective for hard tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    El-Fiqi, Ahmed; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hae-Won

    2013-12-01

    Collagen (Col) hydrogels have poor physicochemical and mechanical properties and are susceptible to substantial shrinkage during cell culture, which limits their potential applications in hard tissue engineering. Here, we developed novel nanocomposite hydrogels made of collagen and mesoporous bioactive glass nanoparticles (mBGns) with surface amination, and addressed the effects of mBGn addition (Col:mBG = 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2) and its surface amination on the physicochemical and mechanical properties of the hydrogels. The amination of mBGn was shown to enable chemical bonding with collagen molecules. As a result, the nanocomposite hydrogels exhibited a significantly improved physicochemical and mechanical stability. The hydrolytic and enzymatic degradation of the Col-mBGn hydrogels were slowed down due to the incorporation of mBGn and its surface amination. The mechanical properties of the hydrogels, specifically the resistance to loading as well as the stiffness, significantly increased with the addition of mBGn and its aminated form, as assessed by a dynamic mechanical analysis. Mesenchymal stem cells cultivated within the Col-mBGn hydrogels were highly viable, with enhanced cytoskeletal extensions, due to the addition of surface aminated mBGn. While the Col hydrogel showed extensive shrinkage (down to ∼20% of initial size) during a few days of culture, the shrinkage of the mBGn-added hydrogel was substantially reduced, and the aminated mBGn-added hydrogel had no observable shrinkage over 21 days. Results demonstrated the effective roles of aminated mBGn in significantly improving the physicochemical and mechanical properties of Col hydrogel, which are ultimately favorable for applications in stem cell culture for bone tissue engineering.

  18. Characterizing bubble dynamics created by high-intensity focused ultrasound for the delivery of antibacterial nanoparticles into a dental hard tissue.

    PubMed

    Ohl, S W; Shrestha, A; Khoo, B C; Kishen, A

    2010-11-01

    Hig hintensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been applied for drug delivery in various disease conditions. Delivery of antibacterial-nanoparticles into dental hard tissues may open up new avenues in the treatment of dental infections. However, the basic mechanism of bubble dynamics, its characterization, and working parameters for effective delivery of nanoparticles, warrants further understanding. This study was conducted to highlight the basic concept of HIFU and the associated bubble dynamics for the delivery of nanoparticles. Characterization experiments to deliver micro-scale particles into simulated tubular channels, activity of ultrasonic bubbles, and pressure measurement inside the HIFU system were conducted. Subsequently, experiments were carried out to test the ability of HIFU to deliver nanoparticles into human dentine using field emission scanning electron micrographs (FESEM) and elemental dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The characterization experiments showed that the bubbles collapsing at the opening of tubular channels were able to propel particles along their whole length. The pressure measured showed sufficient negative and positive pressure suggesting that the bubble grew to a certain size before collapsing, thus enabling the particles to be pushed. The FESEM and EDX analysis highlighted the ability of HIFU to deliver nanoparticles deep within the dentinal tubules. This study highlighted the characteristics and the mechanism involved of the bubbles generated by the HIFU and their capability to deliver nanoparticles.

  19. Comparative evaluation of soft and hard tissue dimensions in the anterior maxilla using radiovisiography and cone beam computed tomography: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mallikarjun, Savita; Babu, Harsha Mysore; Das, Sreedevi; Neelakanti, Abhilash; Dawra, Charu; Shinde, Sachin Vaijnathrao

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To assess and compare the thickness of gingiva in the anterior maxilla using radiovisiography (RVG) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and its correlation with the thickness of underlying alveolar bone. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study included 10 male subjects in the age group of 20–45 years. Materials and Methods: After analyzing the width of keratinized gingiva of the maxillary right central incisor, the radiographic assessment was done using a modified technique for RVG and CBCT, to measure the thickness of both the labial gingiva and labial plate of alveolar bone at 4 predetermined locations along the length of the root in each case. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test and Pearson's correlation test, with the help of statistical software (SPSS V13). Results: No statistically significant differences were obtained in the measurement made using RVG and CBCT. The results of the present study also failed to reveal any significant correlation between the width of gingiva and the alveolar bone in the maxillary anterior region. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that both CBCT and RVG can be used as valuable tools in the assessment of the soft and hard tissue dimensions. PMID:27143830

  20. Single-tooth morse taper connection implant placed in grafted site of the anterior maxilla: clinical and radiographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Francesco Guido; Zecca, Piero; Luongo, Fabrizia; Iezzi, Giovanna; Mangano, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve aesthetically pleasing soft tissue contours in a severely compromised tooth in the anterior region of the maxilla. For a right-maxillary central incisor with localized advanced chronic periodontitis a tooth extraction followed by reconstructive procedures and delayed implant placement was proposed and accepted by the patient. Guided bone regeneration (GBR) technique was employed, with a biphasic calcium-phosphate (BCP) block graft placed in the extraction socket in conjunction with granules of the same material and a resorbable barrier membrane. After 6 months of healing, an implant was installed. The acrylic provisional restoration remained in situ for 3 months and then was substituted with the definitive crown. This ridge reconstruction technique enabled preserving both hard and soft tissues and counteracting vertical and horizontal bone resorption after tooth extraction and allowed for an ideal three-dimensional implant placement. Localized severe alveolar bone resorption of the anterior maxilla associated with chronic periodontal disease can be successfully treated by means of ridge reconstruction with GBR and delayed implant insertion; the placement of an early-loaded, Morse taper connection implant in the grafted site was effective to create an excellent clinical aesthetic result and to maintain it along time.

  1. Single-Tooth Morse Taper Connection Implant Placed in Grafted Site of the Anterior Maxilla: Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, Francesco Guido; Zecca, Piero; Luongo, Fabrizia; Iezzi, Giovanna; Mangano, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve aesthetically pleasing soft tissue contours in a severely compromised tooth in the anterior region of the maxilla. For a right-maxillary central incisor with localized advanced chronic periodontitis a tooth extraction followed by reconstructive procedures and delayed implant placement was proposed and accepted by the patient. Guided bone regeneration (GBR) technique was employed, with a biphasic calcium-phosphate (BCP) block graft placed in the extraction socket in conjunction with granules of the same material and a resorbable barrier membrane. After 6 months of healing, an implant was installed. The acrylic provisional restoration remained in situ for 3 months and then was substituted with the definitive crown. This ridge reconstruction technique enabled preserving both hard and soft tissues and counteracting vertical and horizontal bone resorption after tooth extraction and allowed for an ideal three-dimensional implant placement. Localized severe alveolar bone resorption of the anterior maxilla associated with chronic periodontal disease can be successfully treated by means of ridge reconstruction with GBR and delayed implant insertion; the placement of an early-loaded, Morse taper connection implant in the grafted site was effective to create an excellent clinical aesthetic result and to maintain it along time. PMID:25431687

  2. Midkine expression correlating with growth activity and tooth morphogenesis in odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Shuichi; Seki, Sachiko; Fujiwara, Mutsunori; Ikeda, Tohru

    2008-05-01

    Midkine (MK; a low molecular weight heparin-binding growth factor) is a multifunctional cytokine. MK plays a role in morphogenesis of many organs including teeth through epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. We immunohistochemically examined MK expression in various human odontogenic tumors. There was no difference in positive rate and intensity of MK between benign odontogenic tumors and their malignant counterparts. Ameloblastoma showed MK localization in the peripheral columnar cells in budding processes from the parenchyma, which frequently expressed proliferating cell nuclear antigen. MK was also preferentially expressed in keratinized cells in acanthomatous ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor. In odontogenic mixed tumors except for odontoma, intense immunoreactivity to MK was found in epithelial follicles, the surrounding odontogenic ectomesenchymal tissue, and the basement membrane between them. Intensity in the odontogenic ectomesenchyme decreased in relation to distance from the epithelial follicles. No expression was found in tumor cells associated with production of dental hard tissues in odontogenic mixed tumors including odontoma. These findings suggested that MK is involved in the reciprocal interaction between odontogenic epithelium and odontogenic ectomesenchymal tissue in areas without dental hard tissue formation in odontogenic mixed tumors. Coexpression of MK and proliferating cell nuclear antigen was also observed in epithelial follicles and highly cellular nodules in the ectomesenchyme of odontogenic mixed tumors. MK is considered to mediate growth activity of odontogenic tumors and cell differentiation of odontogenic mixed tumors through molecular mechanisms similar to those involved in morphogenesis of the tooth.

  3. The effects of dentin bonding agent formulas on their polymerization quality, and together with tooth tissues on their microleakage and shear bond strength: an explorative 3-step experiment

    PubMed Central

    Erfan, Mohmmad; Jafarzadeh-Kashi, Tahereh Sadat; Ghadiri, Malihe

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Bonding agents (BA) are the crucial weak link of composite restorations. Since the commercial materials' compositions are not disclosed, studies to formulize the optimum ratios of different components are of value. The aim of this study was to find a proper formula of BAs. MATERIALS AND METHODS This explorative experimental in vitro study was composed of 4 different sets of extensive experiments. A commercial BA and 7 experimental formulas were compared in terms of degree of conversion (5 experimental formulas), shear bond strength, mode of failure, and microleakage (3 experimental formulas). Statistical analyses were performed (α=.05). The DC of selected formula was tested one year later. RESULTS The two-way ANOVA indicated a significant difference between the shear bond strength (SBS) of two tissues (dentin vs. enamel, P=.0001) in a way that dentinal bonds were weaker. However, there was no difference between the four materials (P=.283). The adhesive mode of failure was predominant in all groups. No differences between the microleakage of the four materials at occlusal (P=.788) or gingival (P=.508) sites were detected (Kruskal-Wallis). The Mann-Whitney U test showed a significant difference between the microleakage of all materials (3 experimental formulas and a commercial material) together at the occlusal site versus the gingival site (P=.041). CONCLUSION A formula with 62% bisphenol A-glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA), 37% hydroxy ethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 0.3% camphorquinone (CQ), and 0.7% dimethyl-para-toluidine (DMPT) seems a proper formula for mass production. The microleakage and SBS might be respectively higher and lower on dentin compared to enamel. PMID:25352955

  4. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  5. Influence of residual ridge resorption patterns on fixture placement and tooth position, Part III: Presurgical assessment of ridge augmentation requirements.

    PubMed

    Mecall, R A; Rosenfeld, A L

    1996-08-01

    Implant diagnostic methods using computed tomography with barium-coated templates have revealed the relationship between the optimal final tooth position and the residual alveolar process or ridge. While information with regard to emergence axis, anatomic limitations, fixture length, buccolingual cantilever, and prediction of the the final prosthetic design is available, presurgical information relating to the reconstruction potential of smile zone deformities remains elusive. The use of a complete provisional wax-up and the modification of a barium-coated template design can provide the implant team with presurgical information regarding the need for augmentation of hard tissue and soft tissue and the volume of tissue needed for reconstruction. This information can assist the implant team in the development of realistic treatment objectives and in more accurately addressing the needs and concerns of the patient during presurgical treatment planning.

  6. Prevalence and Indicators of Tooth Wear among Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhao; Du, Yangge; Zhang, Jing; Tai, Baojun

    2016-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have focused on the prevalence and related indicators of tooth wear. However, no sufficient studies have been conducted with Chinese adults. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of tooth wear and identify related indicators among adults aged 36 to 74 years in Wuhan City, P.R. China. A cross-sectional and analytic study was conducted with 720 participants, aged 35–49 yrs and 50–74 yrs, in 2014. Each age group included 360 participants, of which 50% were males and 50% were females. All participants completed a questionnaire before examination. Tooth wear was assessed using the modified Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) index. The data were analyzed using the chi-square test and binary logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of tooth wear was 67.5% and 100% in the 35–49 and 50–74 age groups, respectively. The prevalence of dentin exposure was 64.7% and 98.3%, respectively. A significantly higher prevalence of tooth wear and dentin exposure was found in the 50–74 yr group than in the 35–49 yr group (p < 0.05). Critical indicators of tooth wear and dentin exposure included high frequency of acidic drinks and foods consumption, low socio-economic status, and unilateral chewing. The frequency of changing toothbrushes and the habit of drinking water during meals were associated with tooth wear. In addition, the usage of hard-bristle toothbrushes and consuming vitamin C and aspirin were found to be linked with dentin exposure. In conclusion, the prevalence of tooth wear and dentin exposure observed in Chinese adults was high, and the results revealed an association between tooth wear and socio-behavioral risk indicators. PMID:27583435

  7. Prevalence and Indicators of Tooth Wear among Chinese Adults.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhao; Du, Yangge; Zhang, Jing; Tai, Baojun; Du, Minquan; Jiang, Han

    2016-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have focused on the prevalence and related indicators of tooth wear. However, no sufficient studies have been conducted with Chinese adults. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of tooth wear and identify related indicators among adults aged 36 to 74 years in Wuhan City, P.R. China. A cross-sectional and analytic study was conducted with 720 participants, aged 35-49 yrs and 50-74 yrs, in 2014. Each age group included 360 participants, of which 50% were males and 50% were females. All participants completed a questionnaire before examination. Tooth wear was assessed using the modified Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) index. The data were analyzed using the chi-square test and binary logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of tooth wear was 67.5% and 100% in the 35-49 and 50-74 age groups, respectively. The prevalence of dentin exposure was 64.7% and 98.3%, respectively. A significantly higher prevalence of tooth wear and dentin exposure was found in the 50-74 yr group than in the 35-49 yr group (p < 0.05). Critical indicators of tooth wear and dentin exposure included high frequency of acidic drinks and foods consumption, low socio-economic status, and unilateral chewing. The frequency of changing toothbrushes and the habit of drinking water during meals were associated with tooth wear. In addition, the usage of hard-bristle toothbrushes and consuming vitamin C and aspirin were found to be linked with dentin exposure. In conclusion, the prevalence of tooth wear and dentin exposure observed in Chinese adults was high, and the results revealed an association between tooth wear and socio-behavioral risk indicators. PMID:27583435

  8. Novel resorbable glass-ceramic scaffolds for hard tissue engineering: from the parent phosphate glass to its bone-like macroporous derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bretcanu, Oana; Baino, Francesco; Verné, Enrica; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2014-05-01

    One of the major challenges of hard tissue engineering research focuses on the development of scaffolds that can match the mechanical properties of the host bone and resorb at the same rate as the bone is repaired. The aim of this work was the synthesis and characterization of a resorbable phosphate glass, as well as its application for the fabrication of three dimensional (3-D) scaffolds for bone regeneration. The glass microstructure and behaviour upon heating were analysed by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and hot stage microscopy. The glass solubility was investigated according to relevant ISO standards using distilled water, simulated body fluid (SBF) and Tris-HCl as testing media. The glass underwent progressive dissolution over time in all three media but the formation of a hydroxyapatite-like layer was also observed on the samples soaked in SBF and Tris-HCl, which demonstrated the bioactivity of the material. The glass powder was used to fabricate 3-D macroporous bone-like glass-ceramic scaffolds by adopting polyethylene particles as pore formers: during thermal treatment, the polymer additive was removed and the sintering of glass particles was allowed. The obtained scaffolds exhibited high porosity (87 vol.%) and compressive strength around 1.5 MPa. After soaking for 4 months in SBF, the scaffolds mass loss was 76 wt.% and the pH of the solution did not exceed the 7.55 value, thereby remaining in a physiological range. The produced scaffolds, being resorbable, bioactive, architecturally similar to trabecular bone and exhibiting interesting mechanical properties, can be proposed as promising candidates for bone repair applications.

  9. Ultrashort pulsed laser (USPL) application in dentistry: basic investigations of ablation rates and thresholds on oral hard tissue and restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Schelle, Florian; Polz, Sebastian; Haloui, Hatim; Braun, Andreas; Dehn, Claudia; Frentzen, Matthias; Meister, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    Modern ultrashort pulse lasers with scanning systems provide a huge set of parameters affecting the suitability for dental applications. The present study investigates thresholds and ablation rates of oral hard tissues and restorative materials with a view towards a clinical application system. The functional system consists of a 10 W Nd:YVO4 laser emitting pulses with a duration of 8 ps at 1,064 nm. Measurements were performed on dentin, enamel, ceramic, composite, and mammoth ivory at a repetition rate of 500 kHz. By employing a scanning system, square-shaped cavities with an edge length of 1 mm were created. Ablation threshold and rate measurements were assessed by variation of the applied fluence. Examinations were carried out employing a scanning electron microscope and optical profilometer. Irradiation time was recorded by the scanner software in order to calculate the overall ablated volume per time. First high power ablation rate measurements were performed employing a laser source with up to 50 W. Threshold values in the range of 0.45 J/cm(2) (composite) to 1.54 J/cm(2) (enamel) were observed. Differences between any two materials are statistically significant (p < 0.05). Preparation speeds up to 37.53 mm(3)/min (composite) were achieved with the 10 W laser source and differed statistically significant for any two materials (p < 0.05) with the exception of dentin and mammoth ivory (p > 0.05). By employing the 50 W laser source, increased rates up to ∼50 mm(3)/min for dentin were obtained. The results indicate that modern USPL systems provide sufficient ablation rates to be seen as a promising technology for dental applications.

  10. Tooth decay - early childhood

    MedlinePlus

    Bottle mouth; Bottle carries; Baby bottle tooth decay; Early childhood caries (ECC) ... Your child needs strong, healthy baby teeth to chew food and to talk. Baby teeth also make space in children's jaws for their adult teeth to grow in straight. ...

  11. [Tooth extraction in irradiated areas].

    PubMed

    Gourmet, René; Chaux-Bodard, Anne-Ga lle

    2002-04-01

    Tooth avulsion after head and neck radiotherapy has always been and is still a risk gesture when the avulsion is situated on the irradiation sites. The post-operating effects can become complicated with a delay in healing which can eventually induce an osteoradionecrosis. Dental treatment before the begining of radiotherapy aiming at the elimination of any suspicious tooth, and the generalisation of fluorotherapy aiming at limiting the decayed degeneration, did not make the avulsion indication disappear. At present tooth avulsion is still possible in case of tooth infection or broken tooth.

  12. Corticision: A Flapless Procedure to Accelerate Tooth Movement.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Guk

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement results from applied forces to the teeth evoking cellular responses in the teeth and their surrounding tissues, including the periodontal ligament, alveolar bone and gingiva. It is advantageous for the orthodontist to be well informed of the detailed process of the biological events that unfold during tooth movement, since some of these details may differ from one person to another due to biological differences such as periodontal metabolism or alveolar bone density. This led us to emphasize that orthodontics is a field of endeavor where the integration of mechanics and biology is materialized, and to affirm the fact that tooth movement is conducted in individual human beings, each composed of a unique and intricate physiological system. Biological variations may be the foundation of the differences that are frequently observed in the outcomes of orthodontic treatment in particular with reference to treatment duration between patients with similar malocclusions and who were treated identically. A wide diversity of clinical trials has been carried out to control the tissue resistance to facilitate orthodontic tooth movement, which involves biomechanical, pharmaceutical, surgical, electrical regimens or tissue engineering technology. The term 'Corticision' is a neologism which indicates 'cortical bone incision'. It is a minimally invasive periodontal procedure without flap elevation, thus accelerating tooth movement with an enhanced turnover rate of the surrounding structures. This chapter introduces the technical procedure, and the biological background of how such a minor surgical procedure can receive the accelerated tooth movement with impunity and thereby shorten the duration of treatment. PMID:26599124

  13. Ectopic supernumerary tooth on the inferior nasal concha.

    PubMed

    Ray, Bappaditya; Singh, Lav Kumar; Das, Chandan Jyoti; Roy, T S

    2006-01-01

    Variations regarding the location of an ectopic tooth in the human nasal cavity, although rare, are documented in the literature, but presence of an ectopic tooth on the inferior nasal concha (INC) has not been reported. We observed an anomalous tooth projecting from the posterior margin of the right INC in two adult female skulls. A small quadrangular tooth projected beyond the posterior margin of the hard palate in one of the skulls and a medium sized conical tooth was observed in the other skull. The affected INC in both skulls were located more inferiorly compared to the opposite side and were in close approximation with the hard palate. No similar findings were noted on the contralateral side nor were there any associated congenital or iatrogenic deformity. The phylogenetic, ontogenetic, and clinical importance of this variant is described. Knowledge of such an anomaly is of paramount importance to otorhinolaryngologists, reconstructive and dental surgeons, and radiologists for identification of such rarities encountered during invasive or non-invasive procedures. PMID:16283635

  14. Matrix Gla protein inhibition of tooth mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kaipatur, N R; Murshed, M; McKee, M D

    2008-09-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization is regulated by mineral ion availability, proteins, and other molecular determinants. To investigate protein regulation of mineralization in tooth dentin and cementum, and in alveolar bone, we expressed matrix Gla protein (MGP) ectopically in bones and teeth in mice, using an osteoblast/odontoblast-specific 2.3-kb Col1a1 promoter. Mandibles were analyzed by radiography, micro-computed tomography, light microscopy, histomorphometry, and transmission electron microscopy. While bone and tooth ECMs were established in the Col1a1-Mgp mice, extensive hypomineralization was observed, with values of unmineralized ECM from four- to eight-fold higher in dentin and alveolar bone when compared with that in wild-type tissues. Mineralization was virtually absent in tooth root dentin and cellular cementum, while crown dentin showed "breakthrough" areas of mineralization. Acellular cementum was lacking in Col1a1-Mgp teeth, and unmineralized osteodentin formed within the pulp. These results strengthen the view that bone and tooth mineralization is critically regulated by mineralization inhibitors. PMID:18719210

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Gingival Tissue and Alveolar Bone during Alveolar Bone Healing*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Young; Kwon, Joseph; Kook, Min-Suk; Kang, Seong Soo; Kim, Se Eun; Sohn, Sungoh; Jung, Seunggon; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue regeneration is orchestrated by the surrounding supporting tissues and involves the build-up of osteogenic cells, which orchestrate remodeling/healing through the expression of numerous mediators and signaling molecules. Periodontal regeneration models have proven useful for studying the interaction and communication between alveolar bone and supporting soft tissue. We applied a quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare proteins with altered expression in gingival soft tissue and alveolar bone following tooth extraction. For target identification and validation, hard and soft tissue were extracted from mini-pigs at the indicated times after tooth extraction. From triplicate experiments, 56 proteins in soft tissue and 27 proteins in alveolar bone were found to be differentially expressed before and after tooth extraction. The expression of 21 of those proteins was altered in both soft tissue and bone. Comparison of the activated networks in soft tissue and alveolar bone highlighted their distinct responsibilities in bone and tissue healing. Moreover, we found that there is crosstalk between identified proteins in soft tissue and alveolar bone with respect to cellular assembly, organization, and communication. Among these proteins, we examined in detail the expression patterns and associated networks of ATP5B and fibronectin 1. ATP5B is involved in nucleic acid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry, and neurological disease, and fibronectin 1 is involved in cellular assembly, organization, and maintenance. Collectively, our findings indicate that bone regeneration is accompanied by a profound interaction among networks regulating cellular resources, and they provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the healing of periodontal tissue after tooth extraction. PMID:23824910

  16. Acceleration of hard and soft tissue healing in the oral cavity by a single transmucosal injection of fluvastatin-impregnated poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres. An in vitro and rodent in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Yasunami, Noriyuki; Ayukawa, Yasunori; Furuhashi, Akihiro; Atsuta, Ikiru; Rakhmatia, Yunia Dwi; Moriyama, Yasuko; Masuzaki, Tomohiro; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Antihyperlipidemic drug statins reportedly promote both bone formation and soft tissue healing. We examined the effect of sustained-release, fluvastatin-impregnated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres on the promotion of bone and gingival healing at an extraction socket in vivo, and the effect of fluvastatin on epithelial cells and fibroblasts in vitro. The maxillary right first molar was extracted in rats, then one of the following was immediately injected, as a single dose, into the gingivobuccal fold: control (no administration), PLGA microspheres without a statin (active control), or PLGA microspheres containing 20 or 40 μg kg(-1) of fluvastatin. At days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 after injection, bone and soft tissue healing were histologically evaluated. Cell proliferation was measured under the effect of fluvastatin at dosages of 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 10, and 50 μM. Cell migration and morphology were observed at dosages of 0 and 0.1 μM. Following tooth extraction, the statin significantly enhanced bone volume and density, connective tissue volume, and epithelial wound healing. In the in vitro study, it promoted significant proliferation and migration of epithelial cells and fibroblasts. A single dose of topically administered fluvastatin-impregnated PLGA microspheres promoted bone and soft tissue healing at the extraction site. PMID:26694986

  17. Acceleration of hard and soft tissue healing in the oral cavity by a single transmucosal injection of fluvastatin-impregnated poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres. An in vitro and rodent in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Yasunami, Noriyuki; Ayukawa, Yasunori; Furuhashi, Akihiro; Atsuta, Ikiru; Rakhmatia, Yunia Dwi; Moriyama, Yasuko; Masuzaki, Tomohiro; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2015-12-23

    Antihyperlipidemic drug statins reportedly promote both bone formation and soft tissue healing. We examined the effect of sustained-release, fluvastatin-impregnated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres on the promotion of bone and gingival healing at an extraction socket in vivo, and the effect of fluvastatin on epithelial cells and fibroblasts in vitro. The maxillary right first molar was extracted in rats, then one of the following was immediately injected, as a single dose, into the gingivobuccal fold: control (no administration), PLGA microspheres without a statin (active control), or PLGA microspheres containing 20 or 40 μg kg(-1) of fluvastatin. At days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 after injection, bone and soft tissue healing were histologically evaluated. Cell proliferation was measured under the effect of fluvastatin at dosages of 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 10, and 50 μM. Cell migration and morphology were observed at dosages of 0 and 0.1 μM. Following tooth extraction, the statin significantly enhanced bone volume and density, connective tissue volume, and epithelial wound healing. In the in vitro study, it promoted significant proliferation and migration of epithelial cells and fibroblasts. A single dose of topically administered fluvastatin-impregnated PLGA microspheres promoted bone and soft tissue healing at the extraction site.

  18. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L.C.

    2000-05-23

    A three tooth kinematic coupling is disclosed based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  19. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Layton C.

    2000-01-01

    A three tooth kinematic coupling based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  20. Gear tooth topological modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kish, Jules G. (Inventor); Isabelle, Charles (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The topology of parallel axis gears, such as spur and helical gears is modified to produce quieter and more smoothly operating gear sets with more uniform load distribution. A finite element analysis of the gear in its operating mode is made to produce a plot of radial and tangential deflections of the pinion and gear tooth surfaces which will occur when the gears are loaded during operation. The resultant plot is then inverted to produce a plot, or set of coordinates, which will define the path of travel of the gear tooth grinding wheel, which path is a mirror image of the plot of the finite element analysis. The resulting gears, when subjected to operating loads, will thus be deflected tangentially and radially to their optimum operating, or theoretical true involute, positions so as to produce quieter, smoother, and more evenly loaded gear trains.

  1. Tooth whitening in children.

    PubMed

    Donly, Kevin J; Donly, Adriana Segura; Baharloo, Laila; Rojas-Candelas, Edith; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Zhou, Xiaojie; Gerlach, Robert W

    2002-01-01

    Although there are several case reports of vital tooth bleaching in children, there is limited clinical trial evidence of the safety or efficacy of this practice. Accordingly, a new clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of 2 different bleaching systems, a 6.5% hydrogen peroxide strip system and a 10% carbamide peroxide tray system, in a population of preteens and teens. A total of 106 volunteers, aged 11 to 18 years, took part in this 8-week study. Patients were randomized by a ratio of 2:1 to the strip or tray groups, with each group treating the maxillary arch first and then the mandibular arch for 4 consecutive weeks each. Individuals assigned to the strip group used the system twice daily for 30 minutes (a total of 56 contact hours over the 8-week study). Those assigned to the tray group used that system overnight (approximately 448 contact hours). Digital images were obtained at baseline and after every 2-week treatment period. Average tooth color was determined in L*, a*, b* color space, where L* indicated lightness, a* indicated red-green, and b* indicated yellow-blue. Both systems significantly whitened teeth (P < 0.0001). While there were no significant differences between groups with respect to the primary whitening response (delta b*) on the maxillary teeth, 4 weeks of overnight treatment with the 10% carbamide peroxide tray (approximately 224 contact hours) yielded statistically significant whitening (P < 0.05) on the mandibular teeth compared with the 6.5% hydrogen peroxide strip used for 28 hours. Both tooth-whitening systems had similar sensitivity/irritation reported after instructed use. This research demonstrates that tooth whitening in teens may be safely accomplished using either the short-contact-time hydrogen peroxide bleaching strips or the overnight carbamide peroxide tray systems tested in this study.

  2. Tooth whitening in children.

    PubMed

    Donly, Kevin J; Donly, Adriana Segura; Baharloo, Laila; Rojas-Candelas, Edith; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Zhou, Xiaojie; Gerlach, Robert W

    2002-01-01

    Although there are several case reports of vital tooth bleaching in children, there is limited clinical trial evidence of the safety or efficacy of this practice. Accordingly, a new clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of 2 different bleaching systems, a 6.5% hydrogen peroxide strip system and a 10% carbamide peroxide tray system, in a population of preteens and teens. A total of 106 volunteers, aged 11 to 18 years, took part in this 8-week study. Patients were randomized by a ratio of 2:1 to the strip or tray groups, with each group treating the maxillary arch first and then the mandibular arch for 4 consecutive weeks each. Individuals assigned to the strip group used the system twice daily for 30 minutes (a total of 56 contact hours over the 8-week study). Those assigned to the tray group used that system overnight (approximately 448 contact hours). Digital images were obtained at baseline and after every 2-week treatment period. Average tooth color was determined in L*, a*, b* color space, where L* indicated lightness, a* indicated red-green, and b* indicated yellow-blue. Both systems significantly whitened teeth (P < 0.0001). While there were no significant differences between groups with respect to the primary whitening response (delta b*) on the maxillary teeth, 4 weeks of overnight treatment with the 10% carbamide peroxide tray (approximately 224 contact hours) yielded statistically significant whitening (P < 0.05) on the mandibular teeth compared with the 6.5% hydrogen peroxide strip used for 28 hours. Both tooth-whitening systems had similar sensitivity/irritation reported after instructed use. This research demonstrates that tooth whitening in teens may be safely accomplished using either the short-contact-time hydrogen peroxide bleaching strips or the overnight carbamide peroxide tray systems tested in this study. PMID:11913290

  3. ClC-7 Deficiency Impairs Tooth Development and Eruption

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Pan, Meng; Ni, Jinwen; Zhang, Yanli; Zhang, Yutao; Gao, Shan; Liu, Jin; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Rong; He, Huiming; Wu, Buling; Duan, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    CLCN7 gene encodes the voltage gated chloride channel 7 (ClC-7) in humans. The mutations in CLCN7 have been associated with osteopetrosis in connection to the abnormal osteoclasts functions. Previously, we found that some osteopetrosis patients with CLCN7 mutations suffered from impacted teeth and root dysplasia. Here we set up two in vivo models under a normal or an osteoclast-poor environment to investigate how ClC-7 affects tooth development and tooth eruption. Firstly, chitosan-Clcn7-siRNA nanoparticles were injected around the first maxillary molar germ of newborn mice and caused the delay of tooth eruption and deformed tooth with root dysplasia. Secondly, E13.5 molar germs infected with Clcn7 shRNA lentivirus were transplanted under the kidney capsule and presented the abnormal changes in dentin structure, periodontal tissue and cementum. All these teeth changes have been reported in the patients with CLCN7 mutation. In vitro studies of ameloblasts, odontoblasts and dental follicle cells (DFCs) were conducted to explore the involved mechanism. We found that Clcn7 deficiency affect the differentiation of these cells, as well as the interaction between DFCs and osteoclasts through RANKL/OPG pathway. We conclude that ClC-7 may affect tooth development by directly targeting tooth cells, and regulate tooth eruption through DFC mediated osteoclast pathway. PMID:26829236

  4. Nanofibers implant functionalized by neural growth factor as a strategy to innervate a bioengineered tooth.

    PubMed

    Eap, Sandy; Bécavin, Thibault; Keller, Laetitia; Kökten, Tunay; Fioretti, Florence; Weickert, Jean-Luc; Deveaux, Etienne; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia; Kuchler-Bopp, Sabine

    2014-03-01

    Current strategies for jaw reconstruction require multiple procedures, to repair the bone defect, to offer sufficient support, and to place the tooth implant. The entire procedure can be painful and time-consuming, and the desired functional repair can be achieved only when both steps are successful. The ability to engineer combined tooth and bone constructs, which would grow in a coordinated fashion with the surrounding tissues, could potentially improve the clinical outcomes and also reduce patient suffering. A unique nanofibrous and active implant for bone-tooth unit regeneration and also the innervation of this bioengineered tooth are demonstrated. A nanofibrous polycaprolactone membrane is functionalized with neural growth factor, along with dental germ, and tooth innervation follows. Such innervation allows complete functionality and tissue homeostasis of the tooth, such as dentinal sensitivity, odontoblast function, masticatory forces, and blood flow. PMID:24124118

  5. The detection of sleep apnea in the awake patient. The 'saw-tooth' sign.

    PubMed

    Sanders, M H; Martin, R J; Pennock, B E; Rogers, R M

    1981-06-19

    We studied 21 subjects, 13 of whom had the sleep apnea hypersomnolence syndrome associated with upper airway obstruction during sleep (SAHS-UAO) to determine if "saw-toothing" on the flow-volume loop was significantly associated with the phenomenon of airway occlusion during sleep. A "saw-tooth" pattern was present on the flow-volume loop in 11 of 13 subjects with SAHS-UAO. The presence of saw-toothing correlated with fluttering of tissue that was visualized in the upper airway via the fiberoptic bronchoscope. The specificity of the saw-tooth pattern for SAHS-UAO was 100%. Generalized obesity may indirectly influence the presence of saw-toothing due to deposition of what appeared to be adipose tissue in the pharyngeal walls. Although the number of subjects in this study is small, saw-toothing on the flow-volume loop appears to be an important aid in the diagnosis of SAHS-UAO.

  6. Expression and localization of MGP in rat tooth cementum.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, F; Kobayashi, Y; Kobayashi, E T; Sakai, E; Kobayashi, K; Shibata, M; Kato, Y; Sakai, H

    2001-07-01

    Tooth cementum, a calcified hard tissue covering the root surfaces, is an important component connecting the teeth to the collagenous fibres of the periodontal ligament. Although the overall composition of cementum may closely resemble that of bone, each part has not been fully characterized. Here, the localization of the matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) protein (MGP), one of the major Gla-containing proteins in the body, in cementum was investigated using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. (1) Strong MGP antigenicity was observed in the acellular cementum, but was only moderate in the cellular cementum; (2) polygonal periodontal ligament cells facing the acellular cementum and the uncalcified cellular cementum expressed MGP mRNA, indicating that these cells produced MGP and deposited it on the cementum; (3) MGP accumulated at the junction between the uncalcified and calcified cellular cementum; and (4) the distribution pattern of MGP antigenicity resembled that of osteopontin. As one function of MGP could be as a negative regulator for mineral apposition, the expression of MGP in the cells adjacent to the cementum may be important to prevent hyperapposition of minerals. PMID:11369313

  7. [Study of influence of endoopalescence on the solid tissue by means of raster microscope].

    PubMed

    Kobakhidze, G D; Vadachkoriia, N R

    2006-05-01

    During the process of endowhitening as a result of penetration of peroxide into dentine tubules the adhesion of tooth tissues sharply decreases, it requires the delay of restoration by filling for several days. Surely it is not comfortable for the patient. The best way out is the application of antioxidants after whitening. Under their influence the sedimentary layer on the hard tissues of the teeth neutralizes much quicker. The urgency of this issue is preconditioned by the fact that under the influence of antioxidant the restored adhesiveness enables the immediate restoration of tooth. Our previous experiment is the good proof of that. In the experiment we studied the level of micro leakage and origination of microfissures by effecting with antioxidant, precisely with 10% sodium ascorbate on the hard tissues of tooth after using the whitening agent. As a result of this experiment we have not obtained any microfissure in the teeth covered with antioxidant unlike those teeth where we had not used the antioxidant. According to the reference data it is known that after acide angraving there occurs the removing of adhesive layer from the enamel and dentin of tooth. As a result of this the prisms of enamel and the dentine tubules are widened and this creates condition for the further penetration of the primer of the adhesive system. This process is followed by the origination of transitional i.e. hybrid layer. The latter one is the best link for the adhesive tar and tooth tissues. Modern investigations in the esthetic stomatology prove that the whitening agents produce the peroxide molecules during the process of whitening. These molecules cause the widening of the tooth enamel prisms. We also studied the results of post endo-whitening influence of peroxidation processes on the enamel and dentine of tooth by means of the raster microscope. Studies by electron microscope showed that the antioxidant - 10% sodium ascorbate was characterized by high penetration and was

  8. Imunohistological aspects of the tissue around dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimigean, Victor; Nimigean, Vanda R.; Sǎlǎvǎstru, Dan I.; Moraru, Simona; BuÅ£incu, Lavinia; Ivaşcu, Roxana V.; Poll, Alexandru

    2016-03-01

    Objectives: study of soft and hard tissues around implants. Material and methods: For the immunohistochemical and histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface, we examined pieces of peri-implant mucosa harvested from 35 patients. The implant/bone interface was assessed using histologic and histomorphometric examination of hard tissues around unloaded, early loaded or delayed loaded dental implants with pre-established design, with a sandblasted and acid-etched surface, placed both in extraction sockets, or after bone healing following tooth removal. This study was performed on 9 common race dogs. Results: The histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface showed regenerative modifications and moderate chronic subepithelial inflammatory reactions. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the soft tissue biopsies revealed the presence of specific immunocompetent cells and proteins of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. Bone-implants contacts were more obvious in the apical half of the implants and at the edges of the threads, than between them. A mature, lamelliform bone containing lacunae with osteocytes and lack of connective tissue were noticed around implants that were late placed and loaded. The new-formed bone was also abundant in the crestal zone, not only in the apical part of the implants. Conclusions: A thorough understanding of the microstructure of dental implant/soft and hard tissue interface will improve the longevity of osseointegrated implants.

  9. A supernumerary tooth fused to the distal surface of a mandibular third molar.

    PubMed

    Conte, Michael; Lombardi, Paul; Linfant, Jerrery

    2002-01-01

    Fusion is a tooth anomaly considered to be the result of the union between two adjacent tooth buds. The incidence of fusion is less than 1 percent of the population. The following is a case report of a unique form of a supernumerary tooth fused to the distal surface of a mandibular third molar. Radiographic evaluation demonstrates the communication of the pupal tissues. A differential diagnosis of developmental anomalies is discussed. PMID:15658196

  10. Boron enhances odontogenic and osteogenic differentiation of human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Taşlı, Pakize Neslihan; Doğan, Ayşegül; Demirci, Selami; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2013-06-01

    Stem cell technology has been a great hope for the treatment of many common problems such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, cancer, and tissue regeneration. Therefore, the main challenge in hard tissue engineering is to make a successful combination of stem cells and efficient inductors in the concept of stem cell differentiation into odontogenic and osteogenic cell types. Although some boron derivatives have been reported to promote bone and teeth growth in vivo, the molecular mechanism of bone formation has not been elucidated yet. Different concentrations of sodium pentaborate pentahydrate (NaB) were prepared for the analysis of cell toxicity and differentiation evaluations. The odontogenic, osteogenic differentiation and biomineralization of human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs) were evaluated by analyzing the mRNA expression levels, odontogenic and osteogenic protein expressions, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralization, and calcium deposits. The NaB-treated group displayed the highest ALP activity and expression of osteo- and odontogenic-related genes and proteins compared to the other groups and baseline. In the current study, increased in vitro odontogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacity of hTGSCs by NaB application has been shown for the first time. The study offers considerable promise for the development of new scaffold systems combined with NaB in both functional bone and tooth tissue engineering.

  11. Effect of lactoferrin on odontogenic differentiation of stem cells derived from human 3rd molar tooth germ.

    PubMed

    Taşlı, Pakize Neslihan; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2014-11-01

    Stem cell technology has been a great hope for the treatment of many common tissue regeneration-related diseases. Therefore, the main challenge in hard tissue engineering is to make a successful combination of stem cells and efficient inductors such as biomaterials or growth factors, in the concept of stem cell conversion into odontogenic cell. Even though lactoferrin has been reported to promote bone growth in vivo, the molecular mechanism of teeth formation has not been elucidated yet. Different concentrations of lactoferrin were prepared for the analysis of cell toxicity and differentiation evaluations. The odontogenic differentiation of human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs) was assessed by gene expression analysis, determination of protein levels in odontogenic differentiation-related protein, measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralization, and calcium deposit levels. Lactoferrin-treated group showed the highest ALP activity as opposed to the other groups which were untreated. In addition, the gene expression levels as well as the protein levels of odontogenic factors were found to be high in compared to the control groups. In the current study, it is shown for the first time that there is a significant increase in odontogenic differentiation capacity in hTGSCs when lactoferrin is applied in vitro. The study offers a considerable promise for the development of pulp regeneration by using stem cell technology combined with lactoferrin in functional tooth tissue engineering.

  12. Effect of gamma irradiation on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Ping; Huang, Shengbin; Gao, Shanshan; Qian, Linmao; Yu, Haiyang

    2015-06-01

    Radiotherapy is a frequently used treatment for oral cancer. Extensive research has been conducted to detect the mechanical properties of dental hard tissues after irradiation at the macroscale. However, little is known about the influence of irradiation on the tribological properties of enamel at the micro- or nanoscale. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel in relation to prism orientation. Nanoscratch tests, surface profilometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis were used to evaluate the friction behaviour of enamel slabs before and after treatment with identical irradiation procedures. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were performed to analyse the changes in crystallography and chemical composition induced by irradiation. Surface microhardness (SMH) alteration was also evaluated. The results showed that irradiation resulted in different scratch morphologies, friction coefficients and remnant depth and width at different loads. An inferior nanoscratch resistance was observed independent of prism orientation. Moreover, the variation of wear behaviours was closely related to changes in the crystallography, chemical composition and SMH of the enamel. Together, these measures indicated that irradiation had a direct deleterious effect on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel.

  13. Effect of gamma irradiation on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Ping; Huang, Shengbin; Gao, ShanShan; Qian, LinMao; Yu, HaiYang

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a frequently used treatment for oral cancer. Extensive research has been conducted to detect the mechanical properties of dental hard tissues after irradiation at the macroscale. However, little is known about the influence of irradiation on the tribological properties of enamel at the micro- or nanoscale. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel in relation to prism orientation. Nanoscratch tests, surface profilometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis were used to evaluate the friction behaviour of enamel slabs before and after treatment with identical irradiation procedures. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were performed to analyse the changes in crystallography and chemical composition induced by irradiation. Surface microhardness (SMH) alteration was also evaluated. The results showed that irradiation resulted in different scratch morphologies, friction coefficients and remnant depth and width at different loads. An inferior nanoscratch resistance was observed independent of prism orientation. Moreover, the variation of wear behaviours was closely related to changes in the crystallography, chemical composition and SMH of the enamel. Together, these measures indicated that irradiation had a direct deleterious effect on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel. PMID:26099692

  14. Sea urchin tooth mineralization: calcite present early in the aboral plumula.

    PubMed

    Stock, Stuart R; Veis, Arthur; Xiao, Xianghui; Almer, Jonathan D; Dorvee, Jason R

    2012-11-01

    In both vertebrate bone, containing carbonated hydroxyapatite as the mineral phase, and in invertebrate hard tissue comprised of calcium carbonate, a popular view is that the mineral phase develops from a long-lived amorphous precursor which later transforms into crystal form. Important questions linked to this popular view are: when and where is the crystallized material formed, and is amorphous solid added subsequently to the crystalline substrate? Sea urchin teeth, in which the earliest mineral forms within isolated compartments, in a time and position dependent manner, allow direct investigation of the timing of crystallization of the calcite primary plates. Living teeth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, in their native coelomic fluid, were examined by high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The diffraction data show that calcite is present in the most aboral portions of the plumula, representing the very earliest stages of mineralization, and that this calcite has the same crystal orientation as in the more mature adoral portions of the same tooth. Raman spectroscopy of the aboral plumula confirms the initial primary plate mineral material is calcite and does not detect amorphous calcium carbonate; in the more mature adoral incisal flange, it does detect a broader calcite peak, consistent with two or more magnesium compositions. We hypothesize that some portion of each syncytial membrane in the plumula provides the information for nucleation of identically oriented calcite crystals that subsequently develop to form the complex geometry of the single crystal sea urchin tooth.

  15. Sea urchin tooth mineralization: Calcite present early in the aboral plumula

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Stuart R.; Veis, Arthur; Xiao, Xianghui; Almer, Jonathan D.; Dorvee, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    In both vertebrate bone, containing carbonated hydroxyapatite as the mineral phase, and in invertebrate hard tissue comprised of calcium carbonate, a popular view is that the mineral phase develops from a long-lived amorphous precursor which later transforms into crystal form. Important questions linked to this popular view are: When and where is the crystallized material formed, and is amorphous solid added subsequently to the crystalline substrate? Sea urchin teeth, in which the earliest mineral forms within isolated compartments, in a time and position dependent manner, allow direct investigation of the timing of crystallization of the calcite primary plates. Living teeth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, in their native coelomic fluid, were examined by high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The diffraction data show that calcite is present in the most aboral portions of the plumula, representing the very earliest stages of mineralization, and that this calcite has the same crystal orientation as in the more mature adoral portions of the same tooth. Raman spectroscopy of the aboral plumula confirms the initial primary plate mineral material is calcite and does not detect amorphous calcium carbonate; in the more mature adoral incisal flange, it does detect a broader calcite peak, consistent with two or more magnesium compositions. We hypothesize that some portion of each syncytial membrane in the plumula provides the information for nucleation of identically oriented calcite crystals that subsequently develop to form the complex geometry of the single crystal sea urchin tooth. PMID:22940703

  16. Hair keratin mutations in tooth enamel increase dental decay risk.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Olivier; Ohara, Takahiro; Shaffer, John R; Donahue, Danielle; Zerfas, Patricia; Dullnig, Andrew; Crecelius, Christopher; Beniash, Elia; Marazita, Mary L; Morasso, Maria I

    2014-12-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and has a unique combination of hardness and fracture toughness that protects teeth from dental caries, the most common chronic disease worldwide. In addition to a high mineral content, tooth enamel comprises organic material that is important for mechanical performance and influences the initiation and progression of caries; however, the protein composition of tooth enamel has not been fully characterized. Here, we determined that epithelial hair keratins, which are crucial for maintaining the integrity of the sheaths that support the hair shaft, are expressed in the enamel organ and are essential organic components of mature enamel. Using genetic and intraoral examination data from 386 children and 706 adults, we found that individuals harboring known hair disorder-associated polymorphisms in the gene encoding keratin 75 (KRT75), KRT75(A161T) and KRT75(E337K), are prone to increased dental caries. Analysis of teeth from individuals carrying the KRT75(A161T) variant revealed an altered enamel structure and a marked reduction of enamel hardness, suggesting that a functional keratin network is required for the mechanical stability of tooth enamel. Taken together, our results identify a genetic locus that influences enamel structure and establish a connection between hair disorders and susceptibility to dental caries.

  17. Hair keratin mutations in tooth enamel increase dental decay risk

    PubMed Central

    Duverger, Olivier; Ohara, Takahiro; Shaffer, John R.; Donahue, Danielle; Zerfas, Patricia; Dullnig, Andrew; Crecelius, Christopher; Beniash, Elia; Marazita, Mary L.; Morasso, Maria I.

    2014-01-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and has a unique combination of hardness and fracture toughness that protects teeth from dental caries, the most common chronic disease worldwide. In addition to a high mineral content, tooth enamel comprises organic material that is important for mechanical performance and influences the initiation and progression of caries; however, the protein composition of tooth enamel has not been fully characterized. Here, we determined that epithelial hair keratins, which are crucial for maintaining the integrity of the sheaths that support the hair shaft, are expressed in the enamel organ and are essential organic components of mature enamel. Using genetic and intraoral examination data from 386 children and 706 adults, we found that individuals harboring known hair disorder–associated polymorphisms in the gene encoding keratin 75 (KRT75), KRT75A161T and KRT75E337K, are prone to increased dental caries. Analysis of teeth from individuals carrying the KRT75A161T variant revealed an altered enamel structure and a marked reduction of enamel hardness, suggesting that a functional keratin network is required for the mechanical stability of tooth enamel. Taken together, our results identify a genetic locus that influences enamel structure and establish a connection between hair disorders and susceptibility to dental caries. PMID:25347471

  18. Dental root size in bats with diets of different hardness.

    PubMed

    Self, Casey J

    2015-09-01

    The relationship between tooth roots and diet is relatively unexplored, although a logical relationship between harder diets and increased root surface area (RSA) is suggested. This study addresses the interaction between tooth morphology, diet, and bite force in small mammals, phyllostomid bats. Using micro computed tomography (microCT), tooth root morphology of two fruit-eating species (Carollia perspicillata and Chiroderma villosum) and two insect-eating species (Mimon bennettii and Macrotus californicus) was compared. These species did not differ in skull or estimated body size. Food hardness, rather than dietary classification, proved to be the strongest grouping factor, with the two insectivores and the seed-processing frugivore (C. villosum) having significantly larger RSAs. Bite force was estimated using skull measurements; bite force significantly correlated with tooth RSA but not with body size. Although the three durophagous species did exhibit larger crowns, the area of the occlusal surface did not vary among the four species. There was a linear relationship between root size and crown size, indicating that the roots were not expanded disproportionately; instead the entire tooth was larger in the hard diet species. MicroCT allows the nondestructive quantification of previously difficult-to-access tooth morphology; this method shows the potential for tooth roots to provide valuable dietary, behavioral, and ecological information in small mammals. J. Morphol. 276:1065-1074, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26011087

  19. Multiple essential MT1-MMP functions in tooth root formation, dentinogenesis, and tooth eruption.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Snider, T N; Wimer, H F; Yamada, S S; Yang, T; Holmbeck, K; Foster, B L

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MT1-MMP) is a transmembrane zinc-endopeptidase that breaks down extracellular matrix components, including several collagens, during tissue development and physiological remodeling. MT1-MMP-deficient mice (MT1-MMP(-/-)) feature severe defects in connective tissues, such as impaired growth, osteopenia, fibrosis, and conspicuous loss of molar tooth eruption and root formation. In order to define the functions of MT1-MMP during root formation and tooth eruption, we analyzed the development of teeth and surrounding tissues in the absence of MT1-MMP. In situ hybridization showed that MT1-MMP was widely expressed in cells associated with teeth and surrounding connective tissues during development. Multiple defects in dentoalveolar tissues were associated with loss of MT1-MMP. Root formation was inhibited by defective structure and function of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS). However, no defect was found in creation of the eruption pathway, suggesting that tooth eruption was hampered by lack of alveolar bone modeling/remodeling coincident with reduced periodontal ligament (PDL) formation and integration with the alveolar bone. Additionally, we identified a significant defect in dentin formation and mineralization associated with the loss of MT1-MMP. To segregate these multiple defects and trace their cellular origin, conditional ablation of MT1-MMP was performed in epithelia and mesenchyme. Mice featuring selective loss of MT1-MMP activity in the epithelium were indistinguishable from wild type mice, and importantly, featured a normal HERS structure and molar eruption. In contrast, selective knock-out of MT1-MMP in Osterix-expressing mesenchymal cells, including osteoblasts and odontoblasts, recapitulated major defects from the global knock-out including altered HERS structure, short roots, defective dentin formation and mineralization, and reduced alveolar bone formation, although molars were able to erupt. These data

  20. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    MedlinePlus

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a group of disorders passed down through families that affect the nerves outside the brain ... Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease slowly gets worse. Some parts of the body may become numb, and pain can range from ...

  1. Risk Assessment for Tooth Wear.

    PubMed

    Kontaxopoulou, Isavella; Alam, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Tooth wear has an increasing prevalence in the UK population. The aetiology is commonly multifactorial, and the aetiopathology is through a combination of erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is associated with intrinsic or extrinsic acids, and therefore subjects with reflux disease and eating disorders are at increased risk. Fruit juice, fruits and carbonated drink consumption, frequency of consumption and specific habits are also risk factors. Attrition is more prevalent in bruxists. Other habits need to be considered when defining the risk of tooth wear. Abrasion is usually associated with toothbrushing and toothpastes, especially in an already acidic environment. Patients with extensive lesions that affect dentin may be at higher risk, as well as those presenting with unstained lesions. Monitoring of the progress of tooth wear is recommended to identify those with active tooth wear. Indices for tooth wear are a helpful aid. PMID:26556515

  2. Risk Assessment for Tooth Wear.

    PubMed

    Kontaxopoulou, Isavella; Alam, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Tooth wear has an increasing prevalence in the UK population. The aetiology is commonly multifactorial, and the aetiopathology is through a combination of erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is associated with intrinsic or extrinsic acids, and therefore subjects with reflux disease and eating disorders are at increased risk. Fruit juice, fruits and carbonated drink consumption, frequency of consumption and specific habits are also risk factors. Attrition is more prevalent in bruxists. Other habits need to be considered when defining the risk of tooth wear. Abrasion is usually associated with toothbrushing and toothpastes, especially in an already acidic environment. Patients with extensive lesions that affect dentin may be at higher risk, as well as those presenting with unstained lesions. Monitoring of the progress of tooth wear is recommended to identify those with active tooth wear. Indices for tooth wear are a helpful aid.

  3. Tooth structure studied using the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasas, Sandor; Berdal, Ariane; Celio, Marco R.

    1993-06-01

    We used the atomic force microscope (AFM) to observe structure of the tooth, both rat and human. The rigidity and the surface flatness of thin sections of this mineralized tissue, allow us to attain good resolution with the AFM. As enamel contains uniquely large crystals of hydroxyapatite it can be investigated at high resolution. Tooth enamel and thin slices of undecalcified developing tooth germs from 2 - 12 day old rats were observed, embedded in acrylic resin (Lowicryl K4M). In addition, as orthophosphoric acid is widely used clinically to etch tooth enamel before restoring with composites, we studied its action at pH2 on the tooth surface during 1 hour of exposition. Hydroxyapatite crystals and collagen fibers were seen in the tooth slices observed in air, and the classical structure of the enamel was visible. The etched enamel surface under liquid, showed dramatic differences to that imaged in air. Modifications to the surface were also seen during exposure to the acid.

  4. Effect of Alendronate on Bone Formation during Tooth Extraction Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, R; Koi, K; Yamashita, J

    2015-09-01

    Alendronate (ALN) is an antiresorptive agent widely used for the treatment of osteoporosis. Its suppressive effect on osteoclasts has been extensively studied. However, the effect of ALN on bone formation is not as clear as its effect on resorption. The objective was to determine the effect of short-term ALN on bone formation and tooth extraction wound healing. Molar tooth extractions were performed in mice. ALN, parathyroid hormone (PTH), or saline (vehicle control) was administered. PTH was used as the bone anabolic control. Mice were euthanized at 3, 5, 7, 10, and 21 d after extractions. Hard tissue healing was determined histomorphometrically. Neutrophils and lymphatic and blood vessels were quantified to evaluate soft tissue healing. Gene expression in the wounds was assessed at the RNA level. Furthermore, the vossicle bone transplant system was used to verify findings from extraction wound analysis. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was visualized in the vossicles to assess osteoblast activity. ALN exhibited no negative effect on bone formation. In intact tibiae, ALN increased bone mass significantly more than PTH did. Consistently, significantly elevated osteoblast numbers were noted. In the extraction sockets, bone fill in the ALN-treated mice was equivalent to the control. Genes associated with bone morphogenetic protein signaling, such as bmp2, nog, and dlx5, were activated in the extraction wounds of the ALN-treated animals. Bone formation in vossicles was significantly enhanced in the ALN versus PTH group. In agreement with this, ALN upregulated ALP activity considerably in vossicles. Neutrophil aggregation and suppressed lymphangiogenesis were evident in the soft tissue at 21 d after extraction, although gross healing of extraction wounds was uneventful. Bone formation was not impeded by short-term ALN treatment. Rather, short-term ALN treatment enhanced bone formation. ALN did not alter bone fill in extraction sockets.

  5. Immediate 3-dimensional ridge augmentation after extraction of periodontally hopeless tooth using chinblock graft

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Ankit; Thomas, Raison; A. Baron, Tarunkumar; Shah, Rucha; Mehta, Dhoom-Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate clinically and radiographically, the efficacy of immediate ridge augmentation to reconstruct the vertical and horizontal dimensions at extraction sites of periodontally hopeless tooth using an autogenous chin block graft. Material and Methods A total of 11 patients (7 male & 4 female) with localized advanced bone loss around single rooted teeth having hopeless prognosis and indicated for extraction were selected for the study. The teeth were atraumatically extracted and deficient sites were augmented using autogenous chin block graft. Parameters like clinically soft tissue height - width and also radiographic ridge height -width were measured before and 6 months after augmentation. Obtained results were tabulated and analysed statistically. Results After 6 months of immediate ridge augmentation, the mean gain in radiographic vertical height and horizontal width was 7.64 + 1.47 mm (P = 0.005) and 5.28 + 0.46 mm (P = 0.007) respectively which was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Mean change of width gain of 0.40mm and height loss of 0.40mm of soft tissue parameters, from the baseline till completion of the study at 6 months was observed. Conclusions The present study showed predictable immediate ridge augmentation with autogenous chin block graft at periodontally compromised extraction site. It can provide adequate hard and soft tissue foundation for perfect 3-Dimensional prosthetic positioning of implant in severely deficient ridges. Key words:Immediate ridge augmentation, periondontally hopeless tooth, autogenous chin graft, dental implant. PMID:26644832

  6. Tooth regeneration: a revolution in stomatology and evolution in regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Sibel; Fu, Susan Y; Kim, Keith; Zhou, Hong; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Kim, Sahng Gyoon; Wang, Shuang; Mao, Jeremy J

    2011-01-01

    A tooth is a complex biological organ and consists of multiple tissues including the enamel, dentin, cementum and pulp. Tooth loss is the most common organ failure. Can a tooth be regenerated? Can adult stem cells be orchestrated to regenerate tooth structures such as the enamel, dentin, cementum and dental pulp, or even an entire tooth? If not, what are the therapeutically viable sources of stem cells for tooth regeneration? Do stem cells necessarily need to be taken out of the body, and manipulated ex vivo before they are transplanted for tooth regeneration? How can regenerated teeth be economically competitive with dental implants? Would it be possible to make regenerated teeth affordable by a large segment of the population worldwide? This review article explores existing and visionary approaches that address some of the above-mentioned questions. Tooth regeneration represents a revolution in stomatology as a shift in the paradigm from repair to regeneration: repair is by metal or artificial materials whereas regeneration is by biological restoration. Tooth regeneration is an extension of the concepts in the broad field of regenerative medicine to restore a tissue defect to its original form and function by biological substitutes. PMID:21789959

  7. A novel prosthetic device and method for guided tissue preservation of immediate postextraction socket implants.

    PubMed

    Chu, Stephen J; Hochman, Mark N; Tan-Chu, Jocelyn Hui-Ping; Mieleszko, Adam J; Tarnow, Dennis P

    2014-01-01

    Preservation of the surrounding hard and soft tissues associated with an immediate postextraction socket implant to replace a nonrestorable tooth in the esthetic zone is one of the greatest challenges facing the dental team. Several studies have documented the biologic and esthetic benefits of bone graft containment with either a custom healing abutment or provisional restoration. Use of a prefabricated shell that replicates the extracted tooth at the cervical region can help achieve guided tissue preservation and sustainable esthetic outcomes in an easy, simple, consistent, and less time consuming way. The following case report of a hopeless maxillary right central incisor in a female patient possessing adjacent teeth with a thin periodontal phenotype illustrates this new treatment device, method, and concept.

  8. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  9. ["Carious" and "noncarious" lesions of the hard dental tissues. Ultrastructural (SEM) and microanalytical (EDS) analyses of teeth from the 3rd century B.C].

    PubMed

    Caltabiano, C; Leonardi, R; Martinez, G; Viscuso, O; Romeo, M; Caltabiano, R

    1996-05-01

    The study was carried out on 80 teeth (70 of permanent dentition and 10 of primary one) of mandibular and maxillary bones. The teeth owned to subjects lived in the III c.b.C. in Sicily, and they were found in Naxos necropolis. The teeth were examined as far as carious and non carious lesions, then they were prepared for instrumental analyses by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersed X ray spectrometry (EDS). To an objective examination of the sample no caries were detected in the teeth sample apart one tooth, on the other hand there was an extensive occlusal abrasion, from a macroscopic point of view there were no difference as far teeth morphology. SEM examination pointed out all around dentinal tubules a circle of sclerotic dentin as reaction to occlusal wear. The amelocemental junction showed from a ultramicroscopic point of view an overlap of cementum onto enamel. EDS analysis pointed out a higher P concentration on the crown versus the root in all the teeth of the sample.

  10. CHIPPING FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF DENTURE TOOTH MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G. D.; Giuseppetti, A. A.; Hoffman, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The applicability of the edge chipping method to denture tooth materials was assessed. These are softer materials than those usually tested by edge chipping. The edge chipping fracture resistances of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) based and two filled resin composite denture tooth materials were compared. Methods An edge chipping machine was used to chip rectangular blocks and flattened anterior denture teeth. Force versus edge distance data were collected over a broad range of forces and distances. Between 20 and 65 chips were made per condition depending upon the material, the scatter, and the indenter type. Different indenter types were used including Rockwell C, sharp conical 120°, Knoop, and Vickers. The edge toughness, Te, was evaluated for different indenter types. Results The edge chipping data collected on the blocks matched the data collected from flattened teeth. High scatter, particularly at large distances and loads, meant that many tests (up to 64) were necessary to compare the denture tooth materials and to ascertain the appropriate data trends. A linear force – distance trend analysis was adequate for comparing these materials. A power law trend might be more appropriate, but the large scatter obscured the definitive determination of the precise trend. Different indenters produce different linear trends, with the ranking of: sharp conical 120°, Rockwell C, and Knoop, from lowest to highest edge toughness. Vickers indenter data were extremely scattered and a sensible trend could not be obtained. Edge toughness was inversely correlated to hardness. Significance Edge chipping data collected either from simple laboratory scale test blocks or from actual denture teeth may be used to evaluate denture materials. The edge chipping method’s applicability has been extended to another class of restorative materials. PMID:24674342

  11. The effects of corrosive substances on human bone, teeth, hair, nails, and soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Kristen M; Fulginiti, Laura C; Di Modica, Frank

    2011-07-01

    This research investigates the effects of household chemicals on human tissues. Five different human tissues (bone, tooth, hair, fingernails, and skin/muscle/fat) were immersed into six different corrosive agents. These agents consisted of hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, lye, bleach, organic septic cleaner, and Coca-Cola(®) soda. Tap water was used as a control. Tissue samples were cut to consistent sizes and submerged in the corrosive liquids. Over time, the appearance, consistency, and weight were documented. Hydrochloric acid was the most destructive agent in this study, consuming most tissues within 24 h. Sulfuric acid was the second most destructive agent in this study. Bleach, lye, and cola had no structural effects on the hard tissues of the body, but did alter the appearance or integrity of the hair, nails, or flesh in some way. The organic septic cleaner and tap water had no effect on any of the human tissue tested during the timeframe of the study. PMID:21447075

  12. The effects of corrosive substances on human bone, teeth, hair, nails, and soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Kristen M; Fulginiti, Laura C; Di Modica, Frank

    2011-07-01

    This research investigates the effects of household chemicals on human tissues. Five different human tissues (bone, tooth, hair, fingernails, and skin/muscle/fat) were immersed into six different corrosive agents. These agents consisted of hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, lye, bleach, organic septic cleaner, and Coca-Cola(®) soda. Tap water was used as a control. Tissue samples were cut to consistent sizes and submerged in the corrosive liquids. Over time, the appearance, consistency, and weight were documented. Hydrochloric acid was the most destructive agent in this study, consuming most tissues within 24 h. Sulfuric acid was the second most destructive agent in this study. Bleach, lye, and cola had no structural effects on the hard tissues of the body, but did alter the appearance or integrity of the hair, nails, or flesh in some way. The organic septic cleaner and tap water had no effect on any of the human tissue tested during the timeframe of the study.

  13. Responses of macrophage-associated antigen-expressing cells in the dental pulp of rat molars to experimental tooth replantation.

    PubMed

    Rungvechvuttivittaya, S; Okiji, T; Suda, H

    1998-09-01

    Bacterial infection of the dental pulp is a major hindrance to successful pulp regeneration after tooth replantation. This study examined how macrophages and class II molecule-expressing cells of the pulp respond to tooth replantation, on the hypothesis that they contribute to the defence and repair of the traumatized pulp. Upper right first molars of 5-week-old male Wistar rats were replanted immediately after extraction; contralateral untreated teeth served as controls. Pulpal cells expressing macrophage-associated antigens were immunohistochemically demonstrated at 0 h (immediately after the replantation) to 84 days postoperatively using antirat monoclonal antibodies OX6 (anti-class II molecules), ED1 (pan-macrophage antibody, reactive also with dendritic cells) and ED2 (anti-resident macrophages). Between 3 and 7 days postoperatively, ED1+ and OX6+ cells, but not ED2+ cells, were concentrated in areas of degeneration formed in the coronal pulp, and frequently showed a marked accumulation along the pulp-dentine border of the cuspal area. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that some of the OX6+ cells with a dendritic profile extended several cytoplasmic processes into the dentinal tubules communicating with the enamel-free area at the tip of the cusp. From 14-84 days, approx. two-thirds of specimens exhibited pulp-tissue regeneration with increasing formation of reparative dentine. Following the formation of sound reparative dentine, cells positive to each antibody were distributed more centrally in the pulp than in the controls, and thus did not show any accumulation along the pulp-dentine border. However, in the other specimens where a bone-like hard tissue had formed in the pulp chamber, many ED1+ and OX6+ cells were still concentrated in the remaining pulp tissue and showed a marked accumulation along the pulp dentine border. Few ED2+ cells were observed in these specimens. These findings suggest that, following tooth replantation, exudative

  14. Tributyltin alters osteocalcin, matrix metalloproteinase 20 and dentin sialophosphoprotein gene expression in mineralizing mouse embryonic tooth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Salmela, Eija; Alaluusua, Satu; Sahlberg, Carin; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa

    2012-01-01

    We showed in a previous in vitro study that tributyltin (TBT) arrests dentin mineralization and enamel formation in developing mouse tooth. The present aim was to investigate the effect of TBT on the expression of genes associated with mineralization of dental hard tissues. Embryonic day 18 mouse mandibular first molars were cultured for 3, 5 or 7 days and exposed to 1.0 μM TBT and studied by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-QPCR) for the expressions of osteocalcin (Ocn), alkaline phosphatase (Alpl), dentin matrix protein 1 (Dmp1), dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp) and matrix metalloproteinase 20 (Mmp-20).Ocn, Mmp-20 and Dspp, whose expressions showed changes in RT- QPCR, were further analyzed by in situ hybridization of tissue sections. In situ hybridization showed that TBT decreased Ocn expression in odontoblasts but increased the expression in the epithelial tooth compartment. In QPCR assays, the net effect in the whole tooth was increased expression. TBT also reduced Mmp-20 expression in ameloblasts and odontoblasts. Dspp expression varied but both QPCR assays and in situ hybridization showed a decreasing trend. TBT exposure had no clear effect on Alpl and Dmp1 expressions. Increased Ocn expression by epithelial enamel organ may inhibit dentin mineralization and enamel formation. Decreased Ocn, Mmp-20 and Dspp expressions in odontoblasts may indicate delayed cell differentiation, or TBT may specifically decrease the expression of genes involved in dentin mineralization. While decreased Mmp-20 expression by TBT in ameloblasts may impair enamel mineralization, the coincident reduction in Mmp-20 and Dspp expressions in odontoblasts may potentiate the delay of dentin mineralization.

  15. Does Laser Surgery Interfere with Optical Nerve Identification in Maxillofacial Hard and Soft Tissue?—An Experimental Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Bergauer, Bastian; Knipfer, Christian; Amann, Andreas; Rohde, Maximilian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Schmidt, Michael; Nkenke, Emeka; Stelzle, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The protection of sensitive structures (e.g., nerves) from iatrogenic damage is of major importance when performing laser surgical procedures. Especially in the head and neck area both function and esthetics can be affected to a great extent. Despite its many benefits, the surgical utilization of a laser is therefore still limited to superficial tissue ablation. A remote feedback system which guides the laser in a tissue-specific way would provide a remedy. In this context, it has been shown that nerval structures can be specifically recognized by their optical diffuse reflectance spectra both before and after laser ablation. However, for a translation of these findings to the actual laser ablation process, a nerve protection within the laser pulse is of utmost significance. Thus, it was the aim of the study to evaluate, if the process of Er:YAG laser surgery—which comes with spray water cooling, angulation of the probe (60°) and optical process emissions—interferes with optical tissue differentiation. For the first time, no stable conditions but the ongoing process of laser tissue ablation was examined. Therefore, six different tissue types (nerve, skin, muscle, fat, cortical and cancellous bone) were acquired from 15 pig heads. Measurements were performed during Er:YAG laser ablation. Diffuse reflectance spectra (4500, wavelength range: 350–650 nm) where acquired. Principal component analysis (PCA) and quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) were calculated for classification purposes. The clinical highly relevant differentiation between nerve and bone was performed correctly with an AUC of 95.3% (cortial bone) respectively 92.4% (cancellous bone). The identification of nerve tissue against the biological very similar fat tissue yielded good results with an AUC value of 83.4% (sensitivity: 72.3%, specificity: of 82.3%). This clearly demonstrates that nerve identification by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy works reliably in the ongoing process of laser

  16. Measurement of tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, R J; Worms, F W; Speidel, T M

    1976-09-01

    1. Tooth movement relative to the alveolar bone can be precisely described only by superimposing on fixed points in the bone. Implants are the best known way today. Over short-term studies laminagraphy and the use of bony trabeculations are also useful. Remodeling occurs extensively on bony surfaces, making them too labile for use as stable landmarks. To project small amounts of tooth movement based on the use of such methods is so questionable as to represent little better than a guess or a clinical impression. 2. Growth can be separated into vertical and anteroposterior vectors with respect to the dentition. Since the occlusion is the concern, orientation of vertical and anteroposterior vectors to the occlusal plane is a reasonable baseline. The vertical and anteroposterior dental changes may not show a linear relationship in the anterior and posterior parts of the mouth when jaw rotations are occurring. 3. Growth can be disproportionate in either the vertical and/or the anteroposteroir plane of space. If the vertical increments of the anterior face differ from the vertical increments at the posterior face, mandibular rotations occur. This growth is accompanied by dental compensations that tend to mask the rotation. Therefore, open bite and deep bite are frequently skeletal growth problems. 4. Disproportional forward growth of the maxilla or mandible in an anteroposterior direction can lead to Class II or III relations. The growth that leads to Class II or Class III is accompanied by dental migrations that tend to mask this disproportionate growth. Orthodontic treatment of growth disproportionalities usually represents attempts to make the teeth further compensate. If surgical options are elected, the dental compensations should be removed prior to surgery in order to achieve a full surgical correction. 5. The teeth tend to move and grow in the opposite direction of the growth disproportionality. The teeth tend to mask the disproportionality. Thus, in an open

  17. Functional tooth restoration utilising split germs through re-regionalisation of the tooth-forming field

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naomi; Oshima, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Chie; Ogawa, Miho; Nakajima, Kei; Ishida, Kentaro; Moriyama, Keiji; Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The tooth is an ectodermal organ that arises from a tooth germ under the regulation of reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Tooth morphogenesis occurs in the tooth-forming field as a result of reaction-diffusion waves of specific gene expression patterns. Here, we developed a novel mechanical ligation method for splitting tooth germs to artificially regulate the molecules that control tooth morphology. The split tooth germs successfully developed into multiple correct teeth through the re-regionalisation of the tooth-forming field, which is regulated by reaction-diffusion waves in response to mechanical force. Furthermore, split teeth erupted into the oral cavity and restored physiological tooth function, including mastication, periodontal ligament function and responsiveness to noxious stimuli. Thus, this study presents a novel tooth regenerative technology based on split tooth germs and the re-regionalisation of the tooth-forming field by artificial mechanical force. PMID:26673152

  18. Delayed Tooth Replantation after Traumatic Avulsion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Khalilak, Zohreh; Shikholislami, Mahshid; Mohajeri, Ladan

    2008-01-01

    Avulsion is a serious injury which causes damage to dental and supportive tissues, ranging from 1-16 % among dental injuries and it mostly occurs in maxillary incisors. This report presents a case of replantation of a traumatically avulsed central incisor. The left central incisor of an 8 year-old boy with open apex was avulsed and was left in unclean and dry conditions. Tooth was replaced after 270 min and splinted. After 24 hours, tooth was treated endodontically. The calcium hydroxide paste was applied as intracanal medicament. After one year the calcium hydroxide was not replaced and was maintained in the canal, permanently. The tooth followed for 5 years. During follow up, the tooth kept stable. However, the resulted dent alveolar ankylosis prevented growth of the alveolar process. Spite of the fact that in children, replacement resorption leads to the loss of ankylosed teeth within 1-5 years; this tooth has remained in a stable, infra-position for 5 year and in functional position after coronal restoration. However, in such cases other treatments such as decoronation should be considered. PMID:24146677

  19. Energy output reduction and surface alteration of quartz tips following Er:YAG laser contact irradiation on soft and hard tissues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Taichen; Kawamura, Rie; Aoki, Akira; Ichinose, Shizuko; Mizutani, Koji; Taniguchi, Yoichi; Eguro, Toru; Saito, Norihito; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Though the Er:YAG laser (ErL) has been used in periodontal therapy, the irradiated tip damage has not been studied in detail. In this study, the change in the energy output, surface morphology, and temperature of quartz tips was evaluated following contact irradiation. Soft tissue, calculus on extracted human teeth, and porcine bone were irradiated by ErL for 60 min at 14.2 or 28.3 J/cm(2)/pulse and 20 Hz with or without water spray. The energy output ratio declined the most in the calculus group, followed by the bone and soft tissue groups with and/or without water spray. Carbon contamination was detected in all groups, and contamination by P, Ca, and/or other inorganic elements was observed in the calculus and bone groups. The rate of energy output reduction and the degree of surface alteration/contamination is variously influenced by the targeting tissue, temperature elevation of the tip and water spray.

  20. Energy output reduction and surface alteration of quartz tips following Er:YAG laser contact irradiation on soft and hard tissues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Taichen; Kawamura, Rie; Aoki, Akira; Ichinose, Shizuko; Mizutani, Koji; Taniguchi, Yoichi; Eguro, Toru; Saito, Norihito; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Though the Er:YAG laser (ErL) has been used in periodontal therapy, the irradiated tip damage has not been studied in detail. In this study, the change in the energy output, surface morphology, and temperature of quartz tips was evaluated following contact irradiation. Soft tissue, calculus on extracted human teeth, and porcine bone were irradiated by ErL for 60 min at 14.2 or 28.3 J/cm(2)/pulse and 20 Hz with or without water spray. The energy output ratio declined the most in the calculus group, followed by the bone and soft tissue groups with and/or without water spray. Carbon contamination was detected in all groups, and contamination by P, Ca, and/or other inorganic elements was observed in the calculus and bone groups. The rate of energy output reduction and the degree of surface alteration/contamination is variously influenced by the targeting tissue, temperature elevation of the tip and water spray. PMID:26830823

  1. Varanoid Tooth Eruption and Implantation Modes in a Late Cretaceous Mosasaur.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Reed, David A; Cecchini, Giancarlo M; Lu, Xuanyu; Ganjawalla, Karan; Gonzales, Carol S; Monahan, Richard; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2016-01-01

    Erupting teeth are some of the oldest witnesses of developmental processes in the vertebrate fossil record and provide an important resource for vertebrate cladistics. Here, we have examined a mosasaur jaw fragment from central Texas using ultrathin ground section histology and 3D tomographic imaging to assess features critical for the cladistic placement of mosasaurs among varanoids vs. snakes: (i) the orientation of replacement teeth compared to the major tooth axis, (ii) the occurrence of resorption pits, and (iii) the mode of tooth implantation/attachment to the tooth bearing element (TBE). The replacement tooth studied here developed in an inclined position slightly distal of the deciduous parent tooth, similar to another varanoid squamate, the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum. Ground sections and tomographs also demonstrated that the replacement tooth attachment apparatus was entirely intact and that there was no evidence of mechanical deformation. Sections and tomographs further illustrated that the replacement tooth was located within a bony crypt and the inclination of the crypt matched the inclination of the replacement tooth. These preparations also revealed the presence of a resorption pit within the boundaries of the deciduous tooth that surrounded the developing replacement tooth. This finding suggests that developing mosasaur teeth developed within the walls of resorption pits similar to varanoid tooth germs and unlike developing snake teeth which are surrounded by fibrous connective tissue integuments. Finally, mosasaurs featured pseudo-thecodont tooth implantation with teeth anchored within a socket of mineralized tissue by means of a mineralized periodontal ligament. Together, these data indicate that the moderate inclination of the erupting mosasaur tooth studied here is neither a result of postmortem displacement nor a character representative of snakes, but rather a shared character between Mosasaurs and other varanoids such as Heloderma. In

  2. Varanoid Tooth Eruption and Implantation Modes in a Late Cretaceous Mosasaur

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Reed, David A.; Cecchini, Giancarlo M.; Lu, Xuanyu; Ganjawalla, Karan; Gonzales, Carol S.; Monahan, Richard; Luan, Xianghong

    2016-01-01

    Erupting teeth are some of the oldest witnesses of developmental processes in the vertebrate fossil record and provide an important resource for vertebrate cladistics. Here, we have examined a mosasaur jaw fragment from central Texas using ultrathin ground section histology and 3D tomographic imaging to assess features critical for the cladistic placement of mosasaurs among varanoids vs. snakes: (i) the orientation of replacement teeth compared to the major tooth axis, (ii) the occurrence of resorption pits, and (iii) the mode of tooth implantation/attachment to the tooth bearing element (TBE). The replacement tooth studied here developed in an inclined position slightly distal of the deciduous parent tooth, similar to another varanoid squamate, the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum. Ground sections and tomographs also demonstrated that the replacement tooth attachment apparatus was entirely intact and that there was no evidence of mechanical deformation. Sections and tomographs further illustrated that the replacement tooth was located within a bony crypt and the inclination of the crypt matched the inclination of the replacement tooth. These preparations also revealed the presence of a resorption pit within the boundaries of the deciduous tooth that surrounded the developing replacement tooth. This finding suggests that developing mosasaur teeth developed within the walls of resorption pits similar to varanoid tooth germs and unlike developing snake teeth which are surrounded by fibrous connective tissue integuments. Finally, mosasaurs featured pseudo-thecodont tooth implantation with teeth anchored within a socket of mineralized tissue by means of a mineralized periodontal ligament. Together, these data indicate that the moderate inclination of the erupting mosasaur tooth studied here is neither a result of postmortem displacement nor a character representative of snakes, but rather a shared character between Mosasaurs and other varanoids such as Heloderma. In

  3. Epithelial topography for repetitive tooth formation

    PubMed Central

    Gaete, Marcia; Fons, Juan Manuel; Popa, Elena Mădălina; Chatzeli, Lemonia; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During the formation of repetitive ectodermally derived organs such as mammary glands, lateral line and teeth, the tissue primordium iteratively initiates new structures. In the case of successional molar development, new teeth appear sequentially in the posterior region of the jaw from Sox2+ cells in association with the posterior aspect of a pre-existing tooth. The sequence of molar development is well known, however, the epithelial topography involved in the formation of a new tooth is unclear. Here, we have examined the morphology of the molar dental epithelium and its development at different stages in the mouse in vivo and in molar explants. Using regional lineage tracing we show that within the posterior tail of the first molar the primordium for the second and third molar are organized in a row, with the tail remaining in connection with the surface, where a furrow is observed. The morphology and Sox2 expression of the tail retains characteristics reminiscent of the earlier stages of tooth development, such that position along the A-P axes of the tail correlates with different temporal stages. Sox9, a stem/progenitor cell marker in other organs, is expressed mainly in the suprabasal epithelium complementary with Sox2 expression. This Sox2 and Sox9 expressing molar tail contains actively proliferating cells with mitosis following an apico-basal direction. Snail2, a transcription factor implicated in cell migration, is expressed at high levels in the tip of the molar tail while E-cadherin and laminin are decreased. In conclusion, our studies propose a model in which the epithelium of the molar tail can grow by posterior movement of epithelial cells followed by infolding and stratification involving a population of Sox2+/Sox9+ cells. PMID:26538639

  4. How to best smash a snail: the effect of tooth shape on crushing load

    PubMed Central

    Crofts, S. B.; Summers, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Organisms that are durophagous, hard prey consumers, have a diversity of tooth forms. To determine why we see this variation, we tested whether some tooth forms break shells better than others. We measured the force needed with three series of aluminium tooth models, which varied in concavity and the morphology of a stress concentrating cusp, to break a shell. We created functionally identical copies of two intertidal snail shells: the thicker shelled Nucella ostrina and the more ornamented Nucella lamellosa using a three-dimensional printer. In this way, we reduced variation in material properties between test shells, allowing us to test only the interaction of the experimental teeth with the two shell morphologies. We found that for all tooth shapes, thicker shells are harder to break than the thinner shells and that increased ornamentation has no discernible effect. Our results show that for both shell morphologies, domed and flat teeth break shells better than cupped teeth, and teeth with tall or skinny cusps break shells best. While our results indicate that there is an ideal tooth form for shell breaking, we do not see this shape in nature. This suggests a probable trade-off between tooth function and the structural integrity of the tooth. PMID:24430124

  5. How to best smash a snail: the effect of tooth shape on crushing load.

    PubMed

    Crofts, S B; Summers, A P

    2014-03-01

    Organisms that are durophagous, hard prey consumers, have a diversity of tooth forms. To determine why we see this variation, we tested whether some tooth forms break shells better than others. We measured the force needed with three series of aluminium tooth models, which varied in concavity and the morphology of a stress concentrating cusp, to break a shell. We created functionally identical copies of two intertidal snail shells: the thicker shelled Nucella ostrina and the more ornamented Nucella lamellosa using a three-dimensional printer. In this way, we reduced variation in material properties between test shells, allowing us to test only the interaction of the experimental teeth with the two shell morphologies. We found that for all tooth shapes, thicker shells are harder to break than the thinner shells and that increased ornamentation has no discernible effect. Our results show that for both shell morphologies, domed and flat teeth break shells better than cupped teeth, and teeth with tall or skinny cusps break shells best. While our results indicate that there is an ideal tooth form for shell breaking, we do not see this shape in nature. This suggests a probable trade-off between tooth function and the structural integrity of the tooth.

  6. Tooth polishing: The current status

    PubMed Central

    Sawai, Madhuri Alankar; Bhardwaj, Ashu; Jafri, Zeba; Sultan, Nishat; Daing, Anika

    2015-01-01

    Healthy teeth and gums make a person feel confident and fit. As people go about their daily routines and with different eating and drinking habits, the tooth enamel turns yellowish or gets stained. Polishing traditionally has been associated with the prophylaxis procedure in most dental practices, which patients know and expect. However, with overzealous use of polishing procedure, there is wearing of the superficial tooth structure. This would lead to more accumulation of local deposits. Also, it takes a long time for the formation of the fluoride-rich layer of the tooth again. Hence, now-a-days, polishing is not advised as a part of routine oral prophylaxis procedure but is done selectively based on the patients’ need. The article here, gives an insight on the different aspects of the polishing process along with the different methods and agents used for the same. PMID:26392683

  7. Novel production method and in-vitro cell compatibility of porous Ti-6Al-4V alloy disk for hard tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Shanta Raj; Khalil, Khalil Abdel-Razek; Dewidar, Montasser; Hwang, Pyoung Han; Yi, Ho Keun; Kim, Hak Yong

    2008-08-01

    Porous metals are attractive due to its unique physical, mechanical, and new bone tissue ingrowth properties. In the present study, the production of highly porous Ti-6Al-4V parts by powder metallurgical technology and subsequently it's uses in in vitro bone tissue engineering is described. A space-holder method using carbamide with different particle size to produce parts with porosities between 35 and 70% were applied. The compressive strength and Young's modulus of porous Ti-6Al-4V were determined. Results indicated that stress and Young's modulus decrease with increasing porosity and pore size. The porous parts are characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, study was to investigate the effects of three different porosities of porous Ti-6Al-4V (35, 50, and 70%) on proliferation, differentiation, and cell-matrix interaction of mouse osteoblast-like cells, MC-3T3. Results showed that the cell proliferation was significantly (p < 0.05) higher on 70% porous Ti-6Al-4V. However, synthesis of different types of extra cellular matrix proteins was also more abundant on 70% porous Ti-6Al-4V than 35 and 50% porous Ti-6Al-4V disk except some specific proteins. An increase in alkaline phosphate activity was significantly (p < 0.05) higher on 70 and 50% porous Ti-6Al-4V disk after 12 days of MC-3T3 cells incubation. Above all, results indicated that porosity (nearly 70%) of porous Ti-6Al-4V topography affects proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast-like MC-3T3 cells. The results showed that this novel process is a promise to fabricate porous biomaterials for bone implants.

  8. Biological restorations using tooth fragments.

    PubMed

    Busato, A L; Loguercio, A D; Barbosa, A N; Sanseverino, M do C; Macedo, R P; Baldissera, R A

    1998-02-01

    A "biological" restoration technique using dental fragments and adhesive materials is described. These fragments were obtained from extracted human teeth which had been previously sterilized and stored in a tooth bank. The advantages are: the use of extracted teeth as restorative material, esthetics, and treatment cost. The positive sensation of having back the missing tooth was the most mentioned comment among patients. The disadvantages are: the difficulty of obtaining teeth with the needed characteristics, problems of making an indirect restoration, matching the original color, and the non-acceptance by some patients who consider it strange to have other people's teeth placed in their mouths.

  9. Coordination of Cellular Dynamics Contributes to Tooth Epithelium Deformations

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Ritsuko; Kihira, Miho; Nakatsu, Yousuke; Nomoto, Yohei; Ogawa, Miho; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Morishita, Yoshihiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The morphologies of ectodermal organs are shaped by appropriate combinations of several deformation modes, such as invagination and anisotropic tissue elongation. However, how multicellular dynamics are coordinated during deformation processes remains to be elucidated. Here, we developed a four-dimensional (4D) analysis system for tracking cell movement and division at a single-cell resolution in developing tooth epithelium. The expression patterns of a Fucci probe clarified the region- and stage-specific cell cycle patterns within the tooth germ, which were in good agreement with the pattern of the volume growth rate estimated from tissue-level deformation analysis. Cellular motility was higher in the regions with higher growth rates, while the mitotic orientation was significantly biased along the direction of tissue elongation in the epithelium. Further, these spatio-temporal patterns of cellular dynamics and tissue-level deformation were highly correlated with that of the activity of cofilin, which is an actin depolymerization factor, suggesting that the coordination of cellular dynamics via actin remodeling plays an important role in tooth epithelial morphogenesis. Our system enhances the understanding of how cellular behaviors are coordinated during ectodermal organogenesis, which cannot be observed from histological analyses. PMID:27588418

  10. Coordination of Cellular Dynamics Contributes to Tooth Epithelium Deformations.

    PubMed

    Morita, Ritsuko; Kihira, Miho; Nakatsu, Yousuke; Nomoto, Yohei; Ogawa, Miho; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Morishita, Yoshihiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The morphologies of ectodermal organs are shaped by appropriate combinations of several deformation modes, such as invagination and anisotropic tissue elongation. However, how multicellular dynamics are coordinated during deformation processes remains to be elucidated. Here, we developed a four-dimensional (4D) analysis system for tracking cell movement and division at a single-cell resolution in developing tooth epithelium. The expression patterns of a Fucci probe clarified the region- and stage-specific cell cycle patterns within the tooth germ, which were in good agreement with the pattern of the volume growth rate estimated from tissue-level deformation analysis. Cellular motility was higher in the regions with higher growth rates, while the mitotic orientation was significantly biased along the direction of tissue elongation in the epithelium. Further, these spatio-temporal patterns of cellular dynamics and tissue-level deformation were highly correlated with that of the activity of cofilin, which is an actin depolymerization factor, suggesting that the coordination of cellular dynamics via actin remodeling plays an important role in tooth epithelial morphogenesis. Our system enhances the understanding of how cellular behaviors are coordinated during ectodermal organogenesis, which cannot be observed from histological analyses. PMID:27588418

  11. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    PubMed

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled. PMID:26599117

  12. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    PubMed

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled.

  13. [A tooth or an implant--literature based decision making].

    PubMed

    Bar On, H; Sharon, E; Lipovezky-Adler, M; Haramaty, O; Smidt, A

    2014-07-01

    The common use of dental implants in the daily practice led to a profound change in the available treatment strategies. The option of replacing a diagnosed doubtful tooth with an implant has become widely accepted and often used. The prognosis systems in use today are based on the three major disciplines: endodontics, periodontics and prosthodontics. Combining these three may impair and bias the decision making process and increase the tendency to base it on subjective clinical experience and personal preference. Reading and reviewing the relevant literature gives no clear tool for use. Root canal treatment is considered a highly predictable treatment procedure and a treated tooth is affected mainly by the quality and type of the fabricated restoration and the risk of caries. Periodontal treatment followed by a suitable maintenance regimen will likely allow long term tooth survival. When comparing the success rates of natural teeth rehabilitation versus implant supported restorations, it appears that with implants an additional treatment is demanded along the years. This coincides with the fact that to date there is no consensus regarding the extent of perimplantitis and perimucositis that is to be expected around a restored implant. In addition, a peri implant tissue problem or a failure of a dental implant may prove to be more challenging than a failure of a tooth. It is important to remember that a dental implant is made to substitute a missing tooth and it is a treatment modality with known and clear indications for rehabilitation of an edentulous space. The aim of this paper is to review and discuss the various aspects of whether to maintain a compromised or a doubtful tooth or to prefer a treatment modality using dental implants. In conclusion it is advised here, to incorporate the discussed issues in the decision making process towards the most suitable treatment plan. PMID:25219096

  14. Physicochemical and mechanical properties of freeze cast hydroxyapatite-gelatin scaffolds with dexamethasone loaded PLGA microspheres for hard tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Farnaz; Nojehdehian, Hanieh; Zamanian, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-gelatin scaffolds incorporated with dexamethasone-loaded polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres were synthesized by freeze casting technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs demonstrated a unidirectional microstructure and a decrease in the pore size as a function of temperature gradient. Higher amounts of HA resulted in a decrease in the pore size. According to the results, at lower cooling rates, the formation of a lamellar structure decreased the mechanical strength, but at the same time, enhanced the swelling ratio, biodegradation rate and drug release level. On the other hand, higher weight ratios of HA increased the compressive strength, and reduced the swelling ratio, biodegradation rate and drug release level. The results obtained by furrier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and bioactivity analysis illustrated that the interactions of the materials support the apatite formation in the simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. Based on the obtained results, the synthesized composite scaffolds have the necessary mechanical and physicochemical features to support the regeneration of defects and to maintain their stability during the neo-tissue formation.

  15. In vivo degradation of magnesium plate/screw osteosynthesis implant systems: Soft and hard tissue response in a calvarial model in miniature pigs.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Benoit; Saulacic, Nikola; Imwinkelried, Thomas; Beck, Stefan; Liu, Edwin Wei Yang; Gralla, Jan; Nakahara, Ken; Hofstetter, Willy; Iizuka, Tateyuki

    2016-03-01

    Biodegradable magnesium plate/screw osteosynthesis systems were implanted on the frontal bone of adult miniature pigs. The chosen implant geometries were based on existing titanium systems used for the treatment of facial fractures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo degradation and tissue response of the magnesium alloy WE43 with and without a plasma electrolytic surface coating. Of 14 animals, 6 received magnesium implants with surface modification (coated), 6 without surface modification (uncoated), and 2 titanium implants. Radiological examination of the skull was performed at 1, 4, and 8 weeks post-implantation. After euthanasia at 12 and 24 weeks, X-ray, computed tomography, and microfocus computed tomography analyses and histological and histomorphological examinations of the bone/implant blocks were performed. The results showed a good tolerance of the plate/screw system without wound healing disturbance. In the radiological examination, gas pocket formation was found mainly around the uncoated plates 4 weeks after surgery. The micro-CT and histological analyses showed significantly lower corrosion rates and increased bone density and bone implant contact area around the coated screws compared to the uncoated screws at both endpoints. This study shows promising results for the further development of coated magnesium implants for the osteosynthesis of the facial skeleton.

  16. Mechanically reinforced cell-laden scaffolds formed using alginate-based bioink printed onto the surface of a PCL/alginate mesh structure for regeneration of hard tissue.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Bok; Lee, Hyeongjin; Yang, Gi-Hoon; Choi, Chang Hyun; Lee, DaeWeon; Hwang, Heon; Jung, Won-Kyo; Yoon, Hyeon; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Cell-printing technology has provided a new paradigm for biofabrication, with potential to overcome several shortcomings of conventional scaffold-based tissue regeneration strategies via controlled delivery of various cell types in well-defined target regions. Here we describe a cell-printing method to obtain mechanically reinforced multi-layered cell-embedded scaffolds, formed of micron-scale poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)/alginate struts coated with alginate-based bioink. To compare the physical and cellular activities, we used a scaffold composed of pure alginate (without cells) coated PCL/alginate struts as a control. We systematically varied the ratio of alginate cross-linking agent, and determined the optimal cell-coating conditions to form the PCL/alginate struts. Following fabrication of the cell (MG63)-laden PCL/alginate scaffold, the bioactivity was evaluated in vitro. The laden cells exhibited a substantially more developed cytoskeleton compared with those on a control scaffold consisting of the same material composition. Based on these results, the printed cells exhibited a significantly more homogenous distribution within the scaffold compared with the control. Cell proliferation was determined via MTT assays at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days of culture, and the proliferation of the cell-printed scaffold was substantially in excess (∼2.4-fold) of that on the control. Furthermore, the osteogenic activity such as ALP was measured, and the cell-laden scaffold exhibited significantly greater activity (∼3.2-fold) compared with the control scaffold.

  17. Gelatin-apatite bone mimetic co-precipitates incorporated within biopolymer matrix to improve mechanical and biological properties useful for hard tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Won, Jong-Eun; El-Fiqi, Ahmed; Jegal, Seung-Hwan; Han, Cheol-Min; Lee, Eun-Jung; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biopolymers are commonly used for the repair and regeneration of damaged tissues. Specifically targeting bone, the composite approach of utilizing inorganic components is considered promising in terms of improving mechanical and biological properties. We developed gelatin-apatite co-precipitates which mimic the native bone matrix composition within poly(lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLCL). Ionic reaction of calcium and phosphate with gelatin molecules enabled the co-precipitate formation of gelatin-apatite nanocrystals at varying ratios. The gelatin-apatite precipitates formed were carbonated apatite in nature, and were homogeneously distributed within the gelatin matrix. The incorporation of gelatin-apatite significantly improved the mechanical properties, including tensile strength, elastic modulus and elongation at break, and the improvement was more pronounced as the apatite content increased. Of note, the tensile strength increased to as high as 45 MPa (a four-fold increase vs. PLCL), the elastic modulus was increased up to 1500 MPa (a five-fold increase vs. PLCL), and the elongation rate was ∼240% (twice vs. PLCL). These results support the strengthening role of the gelatin-apatite precipitates within PLCL. The gelatin-apatite addition considerably enhanced the water affinity and the acellular mineral-forming ability in vitro in simulated body fluid; moreover, it stimulated cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, the GAp-PLCL nanocomposite composition is considered to have excellent mechanical and biological properties, which hold great potential for use as bone regenerative matrices. PMID:23985536

  18. Physicochemical and mechanical properties of freeze cast hydroxyapatite-gelatin scaffolds with dexamethasone loaded PLGA microspheres for hard tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Farnaz; Nojehdehian, Hanieh; Zamanian, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-gelatin scaffolds incorporated with dexamethasone-loaded polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres were synthesized by freeze casting technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs demonstrated a unidirectional microstructure and a decrease in the pore size as a function of temperature gradient. Higher amounts of HA resulted in a decrease in the pore size. According to the results, at lower cooling rates, the formation of a lamellar structure decreased the mechanical strength, but at the same time, enhanced the swelling ratio, biodegradation rate and drug release level. On the other hand, higher weight ratios of HA increased the compressive strength, and reduced the swelling ratio, biodegradation rate and drug release level. The results obtained by furrier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and bioactivity analysis illustrated that the interactions of the materials support the apatite formation in the simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. Based on the obtained results, the synthesized composite scaffolds have the necessary mechanical and physicochemical features to support the regeneration of defects and to maintain their stability during the neo-tissue formation. PMID:27612706

  19. Biology of tooth replacement in amniotes

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, John A; Richman, Joy M

    2013-01-01

    Tooth replacement is a common trait to most vertebrates, including mammals. Mammals, however, have lost the capacity for continuous tooth renewal seen in most other vertebrates, and typically have only 1–2 generations of teeth. Here, we review the mechanisms of tooth replacement in reptiles and mammals, and discuss in detail the current and historical theories on control of timing and pattern of tooth replacement and development. PMID:23788284

  20. Mechanically reinforced cell-laden scaffolds formed using alginate-based bioink printed onto the surface of a PCL/alginate mesh structure for regeneration of hard tissue.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Bok; Lee, Hyeongjin; Yang, Gi-Hoon; Choi, Chang Hyun; Lee, DaeWeon; Hwang, Heon; Jung, Won-Kyo; Yoon, Hyeon; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Cell-printing technology has provided a new paradigm for biofabrication, with potential to overcome several shortcomings of conventional scaffold-based tissue regeneration strategies via controlled delivery of various cell types in well-defined target regions. Here we describe a cell-printing method to obtain mechanically reinforced multi-layered cell-embedded scaffolds, formed of micron-scale poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)/alginate struts coated with alginate-based bioink. To compare the physical and cellular activities, we used a scaffold composed of pure alginate (without cells) coated PCL/alginate struts as a control. We systematically varied the ratio of alginate cross-linking agent, and determined the optimal cell-coating conditions to form the PCL/alginate struts. Following fabrication of the cell (MG63)-laden PCL/alginate scaffold, the bioactivity was evaluated in vitro. The laden cells exhibited a substantially more developed cytoskeleton compared with those on a control scaffold consisting of the same material composition. Based on these results, the printed cells exhibited a significantly more homogenous distribution within the scaffold compared with the control. Cell proliferation was determined via MTT assays at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days of culture, and the proliferation of the cell-printed scaffold was substantially in excess (∼2.4-fold) of that on the control. Furthermore, the osteogenic activity such as ALP was measured, and the cell-laden scaffold exhibited significantly greater activity (∼3.2-fold) compared with the control scaffold. PMID:26409783

  1. Tooth Avulsion in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause-Parello, Cheryl A.

    2005-01-01

    Tooth avulsions occur when a tooth is displaced from its socket. Tooth avulsions are common dental injuries that may occur before, during, or after school. Therefore, it is essential that school nurses be well prepared to intervene when such a dental emergency arises. It is also imperative that school nurses and school personnel are fully equipped…

  2. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A porcelain tooth is a prefabricated device made of porcelain powder for clinical use (§ 872.6660) intended for...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A porcelain tooth is a prefabricated device made of porcelain powder for clinical use (§ 872.6660) intended for...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A porcelain tooth is a prefabricated device made of porcelain powder for clinical use (§ 872.6660) intended for...

  5. Microhardness of composite resin cured through different primary tooth thicknesses with different light intensities and curing times: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mazhari, Fatemeh; Ajami, Behjatolmolok; Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Baghaee, Bahareh; Hafez, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increased exposure time and light intensity on microhardness of cured composite through different thicknesses of tooth structure in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: One hundred and seventy cylindrical resin composite specimens were prepared. All specimens were divided into 17 experimental and control groups. “Light-emitting diode” light curing unit (LCU) applied directly or through 1, 2, and 3 mm thicknesses tooth slices for experimental groups. The irradiation protocols were 25 and 50 s at 650 mW/cm2 and 15 and 30 s at 1100 mW/cm2. The “quartz-tungsten-halogen” LCU (400 mW/cm2) for 40 s was used in control group. Microhardness was measured by the Vickers hardness test. Results: Indirectly cured specimens and those cured through a 1 mm thick tooth structure, an increase in intensity caused hardness drop. In the specimens cured through 2 and 3 mm thick tooth structures, increased intensity and/or exposure time did not show any appropriate changes on microhardness. Conclusion: Irradiation through a 1.0 mm thick tooth slice resulted in reduced microhardness although it was still within the clinically acceptable level. The hardness values of the specimens cured through 2 or 3 mm thick tooth slices fell below the clinically acceptable level even after doubling the exposure time and/or light intensity. PMID:27095897

  6. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a group of genetic nerve disorders. It is named after the three doctors who first identified it. ... a nerve biopsy. There is no cure. The disease can be so mild you don't realize ...

  7. Tooth-bleaching procedures and their controversial effects: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Mohammed Q.

    2014-01-01

    Aim This review article will help clinicians improve their understanding of the history of bleaching procedures, bleaching types, components, mechanisms, and their effects on soft tissue, tooth structures, resin composite, and bonding. Methods The controversial issues about bleaching procedures and their effects are reviewed. Additionally, the consequences of pre- and post-bleaching on the bonding potential of composite resin restorations to tooth structure are discussed. Conclusion The overall goal of the paper is to help reduce risks for patients. PMID:25408594

  8. Cell proliferation in teeth reconstructed from dispersed cells of embryonic tooth germs in a three-dimensional scaffold.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Shinji; Honda, Masaki J; Harada, Hidemitsu; Ueda, Minoru

    2006-08-01

    Tissue engineering can now reproduce tooth from postnatal tooth cells. However, crown formation is not accurately reconstituted, even when the complex structure of the enamel dentin is reproduced. Here, we showed that a tissue-engineered (TE) tooth, exhibiting morphogenesis according to regular crown-cusp pattern formation, was produced by embryonic tooth germ cells in a three-dimensional scaffold. Heterogeneous cells dissociated from embryonic day 14 (E14) mice tooth germs were seeded on a scaffold and implanted under a kidney capsule in adult mice. The developmental process of the implants was examined for up to 14 d. At 5 d, the cells had formed initial tooth germ, followed by enamel-covered dentin tissue formed symmetrically. To study the developmental process, we examined the growth pattern using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeling analysis. The initial cell-proliferation patterns of the TE teeth were similar to that at the cap and early bell stages in natural teeth. This was particularly true in the cervical loop, which showed a similar distribution pattern of BrdU-positive cells in TE- and natural teeth. These results suggested that even when embryonic tooth germs are dissociated, the single cells can reconstitute tooth, and that enamel organ morphogenesis proceeds as in natural teeth.

  9. Future dentistry: cell therapy meets tooth and periodontal repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Catón, Javier; Bostanci, Nagihan; Remboutsika, Eumorphia; De Bari, Cosimo; Mitsiadis, Thimios A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cell-based tissue repair of the tooth and – tooth-supporting – periodontal ligament (PDL) is a new attractive approach that complements traditional restorative or surgical techniques for replacement of injured or pathologically damaged tissues. In such therapeutic approaches, stem cells and/or progenitor cells are manipulated in vitro and administered to patients as living and dynamic biological agents. In this review, we discuss the clonogenic potential of human dental and periodontal tissues such as the dental pulp and the PDL and their potential for tooth and periodontal repair and/or regeneration. We propose novel therapeutic approaches using stem cells or progenitor cells, which are targeted to regenerate the lost dental or periodontal tissue. PMID:21199329

  10. Microstructure and self-sharpening of the magnetite cap in chiton tooth.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Li, Q Y; Wang, S N; Qu, S X; Wang, X X

    2014-04-01

    The magnetite cap of chiton tooth (Acanthochiton rubrolineatus) was studied with SEM. Three microstructurally distinct regions were recognized: Region I, close to the anterior surface of the cusp and composed of thick rod microstructure units; Region III, close to the posterior surface and composed of fine fibers; and Region II, sandwiched between Regions I and II and composed of thin sheets. The microstructure units in the three regions constitute a continuous and integrated architecture component. The hardness of Regions I and II was measured to be Hv270 and Hv490, respectively. Based on these microstructure observation and hardness data, the abrasive behavior and microstructural mechanism of self-sharpening of the chiton tooth were discussed in the paper. The self-sharpening was attributed to the combined effect of the hardness and the texture orientation of the microstructure units in Regions I and II.

  11. Microstructure and self-sharpening of the magnetite cap in chiton tooth.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Li, Q Y; Wang, S N; Qu, S X; Wang, X X

    2014-04-01

    The magnetite cap of chiton tooth (Acanthochiton rubrolineatus) was studied with SEM. Three microstructurally distinct regions were recognized: Region I, close to the anterior surface of the cusp and composed of thick rod microstructure units; Region III, close to the posterior surface and composed of fine fibers; and Region II, sandwiched between Regions I and II and composed of thin sheets. The microstructure units in the three regions constitute a continuous and integrated architecture component. The hardness of Regions I and II was measured to be Hv270 and Hv490, respectively. Based on these microstructure observation and hardness data, the abrasive behavior and microstructural mechanism of self-sharpening of the chiton tooth were discussed in the paper. The self-sharpening was attributed to the combined effect of the hardness and the texture orientation of the microstructure units in Regions I and II. PMID:24582215

  12. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY OF TOOTH RESORPTION IN CATS.

    PubMed

    Lang, Linda G; Wilkinson, Thomas E; White, Tammy L; Farnsworth, Raelynn K; Potter, Kathleen A

    2016-09-01

    Tooth resorption is the most common dental disease in cats and can be a source of oral pain. The current clinical gold standard for diagnosis includes a combination of oral exam and dental radiography, however early lesions are not always detected. Computed tomography (CT) of the skull, including the dental arches, is a commonly performed diagnostic procedure, however the appearance of tooth resorption on CT and the diagnostic ability of CT to detect tooth resorption have not been evaluated. The purpose of this prospective, descriptive, diagnostic accuracy study was to characterize the CT appearance of tooth resorption in a sample of affected cats and to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of CT for tooth resorption compared to the clinical gold standard of oral exam and intraoral dental radiography. Twenty-eight cat cadaver specimens were recruited for inclusion. Each specimen was evaluated using oral exam, intraoral dental radiography, and computed tomography (four different slice thicknesses). Each tooth was evaluated for the presence or absence of tooth resorption. Teeth with lesions and a subset of normal teeth were evaluated with histopathology. On CT, tooth resorption appeared as irregularly marginated hypoattenuating defects in the mineral attenuating tooth components, most commonly involving the root or cementoenamel junction. Sensitivity for CT detection of tooth resorption was fair to poor (42.2-57.7%) and specificity was good to excellent (92.8-96.3%). Findings from this study indicated that CT has high specificity but low sensitivity for detection of tooth resorption in cats.

  13. Tooth-derived stem cells: Update and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Miki Taketomi; Silvério, Karina Gonzales; Casati, Márcio Zaffalon; Sallum, Enilson Antonio; Nociti Jr, Francisco Humberto

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an emerging field of science that focuses on creating suitable conditions for the regeneration of tissues. The basic components for tissue engineering involve an interactive triad of scaffolds, signaling molecules, and cells. In this context, stem cells (SCs) present the characteristics of self-renewal and differentiation capacity, which make them promising candidates for tissue engineering. Although they present some common markers, such as cluster of differentiation (CD)105, CD146 and STRO-1, SCs derived from various tissues have different patterns in relation to proliferation, clonogenicity, and differentiation abilities in vitro and in vivo. Tooth-derived tissues have been proposed as an accessible source to obtain SCs with limited morbidity, and various tooth-derived SCs (TDSCs) have been isolated and characterized, such as dental pulp SCs, SCs from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, periodontal ligament SCs, dental follicle progenitor cells, SCs from apical papilla, and periodontal ligament of deciduous teeth SCs. However, heterogeneity among these populations has been observed, and the best method to select the most appropriate TDSCs for regeneration approaches has not yet been established. The objective of this review is to outline the current knowledge concerning the various types of TDSCs, and discuss the perspectives for their use in regenerative approaches. PMID:25815123

  14. A model for predicting wear rates in tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Borrero-Lopez, Oscar; Pajares, Antonia; Constantino, Paul J; Lawn, Brian R

    2014-09-01

    It is hypothesized that wear of enamel is sensitive to the presence of sharp particulates in oral fluids and masticated foods. To this end, a generic model for predicting wear rates in brittle materials is developed, with specific application to tooth enamel. Wear is assumed to result from an accumulation of elastic-plastic micro-asperity events. Integration over all such events leads to a wear rate relation analogous to Archard׳s law, but with allowance for variation in asperity angle and compliance. The coefficient K in this relation quantifies the wear severity, with an arbitrary distinction between 'mild' wear (low K) and 'severe' wear (high K). Data from the literature and in-house wear-test experiments on enamel specimens in lubricant media (water, oil) with and without sharp third-body particulates (silica, diamond) are used to validate the model. Measured wear rates can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on contact asperity conditions, accounting for the occurrence of severe enamel removal in some human patients (bruxing). Expressions for the depth removal rate and number of cycles to wear down occlusal enamel in the low-crowned tooth forms of some mammals are derived, with tooth size and enamel thickness as key variables. The role of 'hard' versus 'soft' food diets in determining evolutionary paths in different hominin species is briefly considered. A feature of the model is that it does not require recourse to specific material removal mechanisms, although processes involving microplastic extrusion and microcrack coalescence are indicated.

  15. Mechanics of microwear traces in tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Borrero-Lopez, Oscar; Pajares, Antonia; Constantino, Paul J; Lawn, Brian R

    2015-03-01

    It is hypothesized that microwear traces in natural tooth enamel can be simulated and quantified using microindentation mechanics. Microcontacts associated with particulates in the oral wear medium are modeled as sharp indenters with fixed semi-apical angle. Distinction is made between markings from static contacts (pits) and translational contacts (scratches). Relations for the forces required to produce contacts of given dimensions are derived, with particle angularity and compliance specifically taken into account so as to distinguish between different abrasives in food sources. Images of patterns made on human enamel with sharp indenters in axial and sliding loading are correlated with theoretical predictions. Special attention is given to threshold conditions for transition from a microplasticity to a microcracking mode, corresponding to mild and severe wear domains. It is demonstrated that the typical microwear trace is generated at loads on the order of 1N - i.e. much less than the forces exerted in normal biting - attesting to the susceptibility of teeth to wear in everyday mastication, especially in diets with sharp, hard and large inclusive intrinsic or extraneous particulates.

  16. Fatigue Crack Propagation in a Gear Tooth in the Presence of an Inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Vineet; Zagade, Pramod R.; Khan, Danish; Gautham, B. P.

    2014-05-01

    A computational model for studying the fatigue crack propagation characteristics in a gear tooth root in the presence of inclusions is presented. A step-by-step crack growth scheme is implemented to predict the crack path using the finite element method and linear elastic fracture mechanics. Paris law approach is used to model fatigue crack propagation. The effect of size and location of hard circular inclusion on the growth of a surface-initiated crack and service life in a gear tooth is studied.

  17. Saw-toothed pattern of relative paleointensity records and cumulative viscous remanence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, Yvo S.; Tauxe, Lisa

    1996-01-01

    Several studies of relative paleointensity data derived from marine sediments spanning the last 4 Myr display an asymmetrical "saw-toothed" pattern. Polarity reversals of the geomagnetic field are associated with low points in paleofield intensity, preceded by a long-term progressive decay of the field and followed by a rapid post-transitional recovery [1-3]. Since similar behavior is observed in far-flung sites whose rock magnetic records are different, it is argued that the world-wide "saw-toothing" represents geomagnetic field behavior[3]. We present an alternative explanation, calling on the effect of "hard" viscous remanence.

  18. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  19. Ultrastructural organization and micromechanical properties of shark tooth enameloid.

    PubMed

    Enax, Joachim; Janus, Anna M; Raabe, Dierk; Epple, Matthias; Fabritius, Helge-Otto

    2014-09-01

    The outer part of shark teeth is formed by the hard and mineral-rich enameloid that has excellent mechanical properties, which makes it a very interesting model system for the development of new bio-inspired dental materials. We characterized the microstructure, chemical composition and resulting local mechanical properties of the enameloid from teeth of Isurus oxyrinchus (shortfin mako shark) by performing an in-depth analysis using various high-resolution analytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, qualitative energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and nanoindentation. Shark tooth enameloid reveals an intricate hierarchical arrangement of thin (50-80nm) and long (>1μm) crystallites of fluoroapatite with a high degree of structural anisotropy, which leads to exceptional mechanical properties. Both stiffness and hardness are surprisingly homogeneous in the shiny layer as well as in the enameloid: although both tooth phases differ in structure and composition, they show almost no orientation dependence with respect to the loading direction of the enameloid crystallites. The results were used to determine the structural hierarchy of shark teeth, which can be used as a base for establishing design criteria for synthetic bio-inspired and biomimetic dental composites.

  20. Cellular and Molecular Changes in Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Zainal Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham; Yamamoto, Zulham; Zainol Abidin, lntan Zarina; Megat Abdul Wahab, Rohaya; Zainal Ariffin, Zaidah

    2011-01-01

    Tooth movement induced by orthodontic treatment can cause sequential reactions involving the periodontal tissue and alveolar bone, resulting in the release of numerous substances from the dental tissues and surrounding structures. To better understand the biological processes involved in orthodontic treatment, improve treatment, and reduce adverse side effects, several of these substances have been proposed as biomarkers. Potential biological markers can be collected from different tissue samples, and suitable sampling is important to accurately reflect biological processes. This paper covers the tissue changes that are involved during orthodontic tooth movement such as at compression region (involving osteoblasts), tension region (involving osteoclasts), dental root, and pulp tissues. Besides, the involvement of stem cells and their development towards osteoblasts and osteoclasts during orthodontic treatment have also been explained. Several possible biomarkers representing these biological changes during specific phenomenon, that is, bone remodelling (formation and resorption), inflammation, and root resorption have also been proposed. The knowledge of these biomarkers could be used in accelerating orthodontic treatment. PMID:22125437

  1. Prosthetic clone and natural human tooth comparison by speckle interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slangen, Pierre; Corn, Stephane; Fages, Michel; Raynal, Jacques; Cuisinier, Frederic J. G.

    2010-09-01

    New trends in dental prosthodontic interventions tend to preserve the maximum of "body" structure. With the evolution of CAD-CAM techniques, it is now possible to measure "in mouth" the remaining dental tissues. The prosthetic crown is then designed using this shape on which it will be glued on, and also by taking into account the contact surface of the opposite jaw tooth. Several theories discuss on the glue thickness and formulation, but also on the way to evolve to a more biocompatible crown and also new biomechanical concepts. In order to validate these new concepts and materials, and to study the mechanical properties and mechanical integrity of the prosthesis, high resolution optical measurements of the deformations of the glue and the crown are needed. Samples are two intact premolars extracted for orthodontics reasons. The reference sample has no modifications on the tooth while the second sample tooth is shaped to receive a feldspathic ceramic monoblock crown which will be glued. This crown was manufactured with a chairside CAD-CAM system from an intra-oral optical print. The software allows to realize a nearly perfect clone of the reference sample. The necessary space for the glue is also entered with ideal values. This duplication process yields to obtain two samples with identical anatomy for further processing. The glue joint thickness can also be modified if required. The purpose is to compare the behaviour of a natural tooth and its prosthetic clone manufactured with "biomechanical" concepts. Vertical cut samples have been used to deal with planar object observation, and also to look "inside" the tooth. We have developed a complete apparatus enabling the study of the compressive mechanical behaviour of the concerned tooth by speckle interferometry. Because in plane displacements are of great interest for orthodontic measurements1, an optical fiber in-plane sensitive interferometer has been designed. The fibers are wrapped around piezoelectric

  2. Automating digital leaf measurement: the tooth, the whole tooth, and nothing but the tooth.

    PubMed

    Corney, David P A; Tang, H Lilian; Clark, Jonathan Y; Hu, Yin; Jin, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Many species of plants produce leaves with distinct teeth around their margins. The presence and nature of these teeth can often help botanists to identify species. Moreover, it has long been known that more species native to colder regions have teeth than species native to warmer regions. It has therefore been suggested that fossilized remains of leaves can be used as a proxy for ancient climate reconstruction. Similar studies on living plants can help our understanding of the relationships. The required analysis of leaves typically involves considerable manual effort, which in practice limits the number of leaves that are analyzed, potentially reducing the power of the results. In this work, we describe a novel algorithm to automate the marginal tooth analysis of leaves found in digital images. We demonstrate our methods on a large set of images of whole herbarium specimens collected from Tilia trees (also known as lime, linden or basswood). We chose the genus Tilia as its constituent species have toothed leaves of varied size and shape. In a previous study we extracted c.1600 leaves automatically from a set of c.1100 images. Our new algorithm locates teeth on the margins of such leaves and extracts features such as each tooth's area, perimeter and internal angles, as well as counting them. We evaluate an implementation of our algorithm's performance against a manually analyzed subset of the images. We found that the algorithm achieves an accuracy of 85% for counting teeth and 75% for estimating tooth area. We also demonstrate that the automatically extracted features are sufficient to identify different species of Tilia using a simple linear discriminant analysis, and that the features relating to teeth are the most useful.

  3. A personal perspective and update on erosive tooth wear - 10 years on: Part 2 - Restorative management.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D

    2016-08-26

    The management challenge with erosive tooth wear is that the condition involves erosion and contributions from attrition and abrasion, both of which impact on the longevity of restorations. Severe erosive tooth wear results in visibly shorter teeth, exposure of dentine and adaptive changes which complicate restorative management. There is increasing evidence to suggest if the risk factors, such as reducing the frequency of acidic foods and drinks, are reduced the progression of tooth wear slows and follows a normal pattern of wear. But once teeth become shorter patients often seek advice from dentists on restorative intervention. Composite restorations are successful in some patients but they often involve regular maintenance with repairs and rebuilds, which for some patients is unacceptable. Full coverage crowns, although destructive of tooth tissue, remain an option for restorations. PMID:27561573

  4. Identification of a tooth-like foreign body in swine sausage.

    PubMed

    Dias, Paulo Eduardo Miamoto; Beaini, Thiago Leite; Melani, Rodolfo Francisco Haltenhoff

    2012-09-01

    A tooth-like foreign body (FB) was found inside a sausage bread. Analysis aimed to investigate whether the FB was a tooth and its origin. The FB was measured, weighed, photographed, and radiographed. Macroscopic findings were suggestive of an anterior tooth. Histological slides of undecalcified cross-sections of the FB and samples of human and swine teeth were prepared. Histological features of the FB (in light microscopy, 125× magnification) were discrepant from human tissues. Compared histological analysis displayed majority of features consistent with a hypsodont swine tooth, probably a canine. Cellularized cementum in crown region, adjacent to the enamel, and shape of the cementocytes were the main criteria excluding the possibility of human origin of the FB. Scanning electronic microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy were not performed because of fewer features to be analyzed and FB size. It was concluded that the FB may have been incorporated during meat grinding of the sausage.

  5. A review of the effect of vital teeth bleaching on the mechanical properties of tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Elfallah, Hunida M; Swain, Michael V

    2013-09-01

    Tooth whitening is considered the easiest and most cost-effective procedure for treating tooth discoloration. Contemporary bleaching agents contain hydrogen peroxide as the active ingredient. It is either applied directly or produced from its precursor, carbamide peroxide. A review of the published literature was undertaken to investigate the potential adverse effects of whitening products on dental enamel, with a focus on its mechanical properties and the influence of various parameters on study outcomes. There appear to be considerable differences in opinion as to whether changes in mechanical properties occur as a result of tooth whitening. However, the mechanical property findings of those studies appear to be related to the load applied during the indentation tests. Most studies which used loads higher than 500mN to determine enamel hardness showed no effect of bleaching, whereas those using lower loads were able to detect hardness reduction in the surface layer of enamel. In conclusion, bleaching reduces the hardness of the enamel surface of enamel, and that is more readily detected with instrumented low load testing systems. This hardness reduction may arise due to degradation or denaturation of enamel matrix proteins by the peroxide oxidation.

  6. The importance of soft tissue examination in post-traumatic decision-making: a case report.

    PubMed

    Altundasar, Emre; Demiralp, Burak

    2013-04-01

    Dental and facial traumas involving teeth and supporting tissues are common sports-related injuries. In this case report treatment of a 23-year-old student who had been elbowed by an opponent player during a basketball game, which caused oblique fractures on both maxillary incisor teeth is presented. The patient presented 17 days following trauma having completed full recovery of soft tissues. A fragment of upper incisor tooth had been embedded in lower lip at the time of trauma, which was covered by healing tissues. At the 1 month control the patient complained of a hard structure in his lower lip. The elusive broken fragment was revealed by a radiograph and then removed surgically. This case report is a good example of the importance of the training of general dentists about sports-related traumatic injuries as well as emphasising the importance of the use of mouthguards during contact sports.

  7. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth.

    PubMed

    Nagappa, G; Aspalli, Shivanand; Devanoorkar, Archana; Shetty, Sudhir; Parab, Prachi

    2013-09-01

    Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in replanted teeth is root resorption, specifically ankylosis or replacement resorption. Although the success rate is not always high, intentional replantation may be a treatment alternative that deserves consideration to maintain the natural dentition and avoid extraction of the tooth. Here is case report of a patient desiring alignment of malpositioned periodontally involved anterior single tooth due to various causes treated by intentional replantation.

  8. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth

    PubMed Central

    Nagappa, G.; Aspalli, Shivanand; Devanoorkar, Archana; Shetty, Sudhir; Parab, Prachi

    2013-01-01

    Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in replanted teeth is root resorption, specifically ankylosis or replacement resorption. Although the success rate is not always high, intentional replantation may be a treatment alternative that deserves consideration to maintain the natural dentition and avoid extraction of the tooth. Here is case report of a patient desiring alignment of malpositioned periodontally involved anterior single tooth due to various causes treated by intentional replantation. PMID:24174765

  9. Aspartic acid racemization in tooth enamel from living humans.

    PubMed Central

    Helfman, P M; Bada, J L

    1975-01-01

    The aspartic acid in human tooth enamel shows increasing racemization with age. This increase is not seen in the metabolically active protein hemoglobin. The rate constant for the racemization reaction of aspartic acid in human tooth enamel was found to be 8.29 X 10(-4) yr-1. This rate constant suggests that in any protein with a long in vivo lifetime, D-aspartic acid will accumulate with age (about 8% of total aspartic acid in enamel will be the D-enantiomer after 60 years). Thus, racemization may play some role in the aging process affecting metabolically stable tissues in long-lived homeotherms. Aspartic acid racemization in toogh enamel also provides a biochronological tool for assessing the age of living mammals. PMID:1059082

  10. Beeswax as dental filling on a neolithic human tooth.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Federico; Tuniz, Claudio; Coppa, Alfredo; Mancini, Lucia; Dreossi, Diego; Eichert, Diane; Turco, Gianluca; Biasotto, Matteo; Terrasi, Filippo; De Cesare, Nicola; Hua, Quan; Levchenko, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of prehistoric dentistry has been limited to a few cases, the most ancient dating back to the Neolithic. Here we report a 6500-year-old human mandible from Slovenia whose left canine crown bears the traces of a filling with beeswax. The use of different analytical techniques, including synchrotron radiation computed micro-tomography (micro-CT), Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dating, Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), has shown that the exposed area of dentine resulting from occlusal wear and the upper part of a vertical crack affecting enamel and dentin tissues were filled with beeswax shortly before or after the individual's death. If the filling was done when the person was still alive, the intervention was likely aimed to relieve tooth sensitivity derived from either exposed dentine and/or the pain resulting from chewing on a cracked tooth: this would provide the earliest known direct evidence of therapeutic-palliative dental filling.

  11. Excimer laser interaction with dentin of the human tooth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Gilliam, Ruth L.; Baker, George R.

    1989-01-01

    The use an excimer laser produced many unusual conical structures within the dentin of the inner part of the human tooth. By varying the frequency of the laser one can disperse the energy and cause more bleeding in laser surgery, but not destroy the cells associated with the incision. Therefore, the healing process will virtually be without scarring. Whereas, using the infrared laser the blood loss would be less, but the healing process would tend to be longer because cells are being destroyed due to the cauterization effect of the laser. The question is, are these structures produced as an interaction with the laser or are they an intrinsic part of the structure. The effects of the laser interaction upon dentin was studied, and in using electron microscopy the interaction of the excimer laser upon the tooth dentin and other various biological tissue is more clearly understood.

  12. Mechanisms of Tooth Eruption and Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Wise, G.E.; King, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Teeth move through alveolar bone, whether through the normal process of tooth eruption or by strains generated by orthodontic appliances. Both eruption and orthodontics accomplish this feat through similar fundamental biological processes, osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis, but there are differences that make their mechanisms unique. A better appreciation of the molecular and cellular events that regulate osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis in eruption and orthodontics is not only central to our understanding of how these processes occur, but also is needed for ultimate development of the means to control them. Possible future studies in these areas are also discussed, with particular emphasis on translation of fundamental knowledge to improve dental treatments. PMID:18434571

  13. Tooth brushing inhibits oral bacteria in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Kotaro; Kijima, Saku; Nonaka, Chie; Yamazoe, Kazuaki

    2015-10-01

    In this study, scaling, polishing and daily tooth brushing were performed in 20 beagle dogs, and the number of oral bacteria was determined using a bacterial counter. The dogs were randomized into the scaling (S), scaling + polishing (SP), scaling + tooth daily brushing (SB) and scaling + polishing + tooth daily brushing (SPB) groups. Samples were collected from the buccal surface of the maxillary fourth premolars of the dogs immediately after scaling and every week thereafter from weeks 1 to 8. Throughout the study, the number of bacteria was significantly lower in the SB and SPB groups compared with the S group. The findings suggest that daily tooth brushing inhibited oral bacterial growth in the dogs.

  14. Biological synthesis of tooth enamel instructed by an artificial matrix.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhan; Newcomb, Christina J; Bringas, Pablo; Stupp, Samuel I; Snead, Malcolm L

    2010-12-01

    The regenerative capability of enamel, the hardest tissue in the vertebrate body, is fundamentally limited due to cell apoptosis following maturation of the tissue. Synthetic strategies to promote enamel formation have the potential to repair damage, increase the longevity of teeth and improve the understanding of the events leading to tissue formation. Using a self-assembling bioactive matrix, we demonstrate the ability to induce ectopic formation of enamel at chosen sites adjacent to a mouse incisor cultured in vivo under the kidney capsule. The resulting material reveals the highly organized, hierarchical structure of hydroxyapatite crystallites similar to native enamel. This artificially triggered formation of organized mineral demonstrates a pathway for developing cell fabricated materials for treatment of dental caries, the most ubiquitous disease in man. Additionally, the artificial matrix provides a unique tool to probe cellular mechanisms involved in tissue formation further enabling the development of tooth organ replacements.

  15. Surgical Management of Compound Odontoma Associated with Unerupted Tooth.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Andrea; Carbone, Daniele; Marini, Roberta; Pacifici, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Odontomas represent the most common type of odontogenic benign jaws tumors among patients younger than 20 years of age. These tumors are composed of enamel, dentine, cementum, and pulp tissue. According to the World Health Organization classification, two distinct types of odontomas are acknowledged: complex and compound odontoma. In complex odontomas, all dental tissues are formed, but appeared without an organized structure. In compound odontomas, all dental tissues are arranged in numerous tooth-like structures known as denticles. Compound odontomas are often associated with impacted adjacent permanent teeth and their surgical removal represents the best therapeutic option. A case of a 20-year-old male patient with a compound odontoma-associated of impacted maxillary canine is presented. A minimally invasive surgical technique is adopted to remove the least amount of bone tissue as far as possible.

  16. Surgical Management of Compound Odontoma Associated with Unerupted Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, Andrea; Carbone, Daniele; Marini, Roberta; Pacifici, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Odontomas represent the most common type of odontogenic benign jaws tumors among patients younger than 20 years of age. These tumors are composed of enamel, dentine, cementum, and pulp tissue. According to the World Health Organization classification, two distinct types of odontomas are acknowledged: complex and compound odontoma. In complex odontomas, all dental tissues are formed, but appeared without an organized structure. In compound odontomas, all dental tissues are arranged in numerous tooth-like structures known as denticles. Compound odontomas are often associated with impacted adjacent permanent teeth and their surgical removal represents the best therapeutic option. A case of a 20-year-old male patient with a compound odontoma-associated of impacted maxillary canine is presented. A minimally invasive surgical technique is adopted to remove the least amount of bone tissue as far as possible. PMID:26199762

  17. The grinding tip of the sea urchin tooth exhibits exquisite control over calcite crystal orientation and Mg distribution

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yurong; Aichmayer, Barbara; Paris, Oskar; Fratzl, Peter; Meibom, Anders; Metzler, Rebecca A.; Politi, Yael; Addadi, Lia; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.; Weiner, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The sea urchin tooth is a remarkable grinding tool. Even though the tooth is composed almost entirely of calcite, it is used to grind holes into a rocky substrate itself often composed of calcite. Here, we use 3 complementary high-resolution tools to probe aspects of the structure of the grinding tip: X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM), X-ray microdiffraction, and NanoSIMS. We confirm that the needles and plates are aligned and show here that even the high Mg polycrystalline matrix constituents are aligned with the other 2 structural elements when imaged at 20-nm resolution. Furthermore, we show that the entire tooth is composed of 2 cooriented polycrystalline blocks that differ in their orientations by only a few degrees. A unique feature of the grinding tip is that the structural elements from each coaligned block interdigitate. This interdigitation may influence the fracture process by creating a corrugated grinding surface. We also show that the overall Mg content of the tooth structural elements increases toward the grinding tip. This probably contributes to the increasing hardness of the tooth from the periphery to the tip. Clearly the formation of the tooth, and the tooth tip in particular, is amazingly well controlled. The improved understanding of these structural features could lead to the design of better mechanical grinding and cutting tools. PMID:19332795

  18. Effect of Whitening Dentifrice on Micro Hardness, Colour Stability and Surface Roughness of Aesthetic Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Basappa, N.; Prabhakar, AR; Raju, OS; Lamba, Gagandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Whitening agents present in the novel whitening dentifrices may have deleterious effects over the aesthetic restorations. Aim The present study evaluated the invitro effect of whitening dentifrice on micro hardness, colour stability and surface roughness on aesthetic restorative materials. Materials and Methods Forty specimens each of compomer and of composite were prepared using brass mould. Specimens were equally divided into 4 groups. Group I (20 disks of compomer are subjected to brushing with conventional tooth paste) Group II (20 disks of composite subjected to brushing with conventional tooth paste), Group III (20 disks of compomer subjected to brushing with whitening tooth paste). Group IV (20 disks of composite subjected to brushing with whitening toothpaste). Each group was further divided into two subgroups, where 10 sample were subjected for two weeks of brushing with respective tooth paste and other 10 were subjected for four weeks of brushing. For the evaluation of micro hardness, colour stability and surface roughness, micro hardness testing machine, spectrophotometer and surface testing machine were used respectively. Initial and final readings were taken for each specimen and difference obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. One-way ANOVA was used for multiple group comparison followed by post-hoc Tukey’s-test. The paried t-test was used for intra group comparison and unpaired t-test for comparing independent sample groups. Results The compomer and composite showed no significant difference in micro hardness either with conventional or whitening tooth paste both at two and four weeks. Although there was a highly significant colour change observed after using whitening tooth paste for both compomer and composite. Regarding surface roughness, there was a significant change in roughness in both conventional and whitening tooth paste with compomer and composite. However, whitening tooth paste had a significant change in surface

  19. Comparative evaluation of surface topography of tooth prepared using erbium, chromium: Yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet laser and bur and its clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Mahesh; Kumari, Pooja; Gupta, Rekha; Gill, Shubhra; Gupta, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Background: Erbium, chromium: Yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er, Cr: YSGG) laser has been successfully used in the ablation of dental hard and soft tissues. It has been reported that this system is also useful for preparing tooth surfaces and etching, but no consensus exist in the literature regarding the advantage of lasers over conventional tooth preparation technique. Materials and Methods: Labial surfaces of 25 extracted human maxillary central incisors were divided into two halves. Right half was prepared with diamond bur and left half with Er, Cr; YSGG laser and a reduction of 0.3–0.5 mm was carried out. Topography of prepared surfaces of five teeth were examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The remaining samples were divided into 4 groups of 10 specimens each based on the surface treatment received: One group was acid etched and other was nonetched. Composite resin cylinders were bonded on prepared surfaces and shear bond strength was assessed using a universal testing machine. Results: The SEM observation revealed that the laser prepared surfaces were clean, highly irregular and devoid of a smear layer. Bur prepared surfaces were relatively smooth but covered with smear layer. Highest bond strength was shown by laser prepared acid etched group, followed by bur prepared the acid etched group. The bur prepared nonacid etched group showed least bond strength. Conclusions: Er, Cr: YSGG laser can be used for preparing tooth and bond strength value achieved by laser preparation alone without surface treatment procedure lies in the range of clinical acceptability. PMID:26929482

  20. Coronal Pulpotomy Technique Analysis as an Alternative to Pulpectomy for Preserving the Tooth Vitality, in the Context of Tissue Regeneration: A Correlated Clinical Study across 4 Adult Permanent Molars

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Raji Viola; Faizuddin, Umrana; Karunakar, Parupalli; Deepthi Sarvani, Grandhala; Sree Soumya, Sevvana

    2015-01-01

    Aim. (1) The aim of the clinical study revolves around the accurate diagnosis, proper case selection, and the management of acute irreversible pulpitis in permanent molars with closed apices using conservative and economical treatment modalities like vital pulpotomies with regenerative approaches over conventional root canal procedures. (2) To evaluate the use of autologous substances such as platelet concentrates and calcium silicate based materials in promoting the healing and regeneration of the inflamed pulp. Summary. Vital pulpotomy was performed on 5 carious involved, permanent molars diagnosed with acute irreversible pulpitis in 17- to 22-year-old patients. Taking into consideration the patient's age and the condition of the underlying pulp tissue, PRF pulpotomy was planned in view of preserving the vitality of the intact radicular pulps. Regenerative procedures with second generation blood matrices were chosen to encourage the recovery of the inflamed pulps. The systematic follow-up examinations performed at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, 22, and 24 months revealed a successful clinical and radiological outcome. Within the limits of the present clinical study and correlating the success across the treated clinical cases, we safely conclude the potential scope of regenerative pulpotomy approaches in acute irreversible pulpitis in adult permanent teeth. PMID:26097752

  1. Bio-Root and Implant-Based Restoration as a Tooth Replacement Alternative.

    PubMed

    Gao, Z H; Hu, L; Liu, G L; Wei, F L; Liu, Y; Liu, Z H; Fan, Z P; Zhang, C M; Wang, J S; Wang, S L

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that dental stem cell-mediated bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) regeneration could restore tooth loss in a miniature pig model. As a potential new method for tooth restoration, it is essential to compare this method with the widely used commercial dental implant-based method of tooth restoration. Tooth loss models were created by extracting mandibular incisors from miniature pigs. Allogeneic periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were isolated and cultured. A PDLSC sheet was prepared by adding 20.0 µg/mL vitamin C to the culture medium; in addition, a hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP)/DPSC graft was fabricated and cultured in a 3-dimensional culture system. A total of 46 bio-root implantations and 9 dental implants were inserted, and crown restorations were performed 6 mo after implantation. Histological, radiological, biomechanical, and elemental analyses were used to evaluate and compare tissue-engineered bio-roots and dental implants to the natural tooth roots. After 6 mo, both computed tomography scans and histological examinations showed that root-like structures and dentin-like tissues had formed. Three months after crown restoration, clinical assessments revealed that tooth function was equivalent in the regenerated bio-root and the dental implant. Biomechanical testing showed that the bio-roots were similar to natural tooth roots in compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and torsional force; however, these properties were significantly higher in the dental implants. Elemental analysis revealed a higher similarity in elemental composition between bio-roots and natural tooth roots than between bio-roots and dental implants. However, the dental implant success rate was 100% (9 of 9) and the bio-root success rate was only 22% (10 of 46). Taken together, we showed that an allogeneic HA/TCP/DPSC/PDLSC sheet could successfully build a bio-root with structure and function similar to

  2. Bio-Root and Implant-Based Restoration as a Tooth Replacement Alternative.

    PubMed

    Gao, Z H; Hu, L; Liu, G L; Wei, F L; Liu, Y; Liu, Z H; Fan, Z P; Zhang, C M; Wang, J S; Wang, S L

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that dental stem cell-mediated bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) regeneration could restore tooth loss in a miniature pig model. As a potential new method for tooth restoration, it is essential to compare this method with the widely used commercial dental implant-based method of tooth restoration. Tooth loss models were created by extracting mandibular incisors from miniature pigs. Allogeneic periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were isolated and cultured. A PDLSC sheet was prepared by adding 20.0 µg/mL vitamin C to the culture medium; in addition, a hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP)/DPSC graft was fabricated and cultured in a 3-dimensional culture system. A total of 46 bio-root implantations and 9 dental implants were inserted, and crown restorations were performed 6 mo after implantation. Histological, radiological, biomechanical, and elemental analyses were used to evaluate and compare tissue-engineered bio-roots and dental implants to the natural tooth roots. After 6 mo, both computed tomography scans and histological examinations showed that root-like structures and dentin-like tissues had formed. Three months after crown restoration, clinical assessments revealed that tooth function was equivalent in the regenerated bio-root and the dental implant. Biomechanical testing showed that the bio-roots were similar to natural tooth roots in compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and torsional force; however, these properties were significantly higher in the dental implants. Elemental analysis revealed a higher similarity in elemental composition between bio-roots and natural tooth roots than between bio-roots and dental implants. However, the dental implant success rate was 100% (9 of 9) and the bio-root success rate was only 22% (10 of 46). Taken together, we showed that an allogeneic HA/TCP/DPSC/PDLSC sheet could successfully build a bio-root with structure and function similar to

  3. Tooth shape formation and tooth renewal: evolving with the same signals.

    PubMed

    Jernvall, Jukka; Thesleff, Irma

    2012-10-01

    Teeth are found in almost all vertebrates, and they therefore provide a general paradigm for the study of epithelial organ development and evolution. Here, we review the developmental mechanisms underlying changes in tooth complexity and tooth renewal during evolution, focusing on recent studies of fish, reptiles and mammals. Mammals differ from other living vertebrates in that they have the most complex teeth with restricted capacity for tooth renewal. As we discuss, however, limited tooth replacement in mammals has been compensated for in some taxa by the evolution of continuously growing teeth, the development of which appears to reuse the regulatory pathways of tooth replacement.

  4. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Sivera, Rafael; Vílchez, Juan Jesús; Martínez-Rubio, Dolores; Chumillas, María José; Vázquez, Juan Francisco; Muelas, Nuria; Bataller, Luis; Millán, José María; Palau, Fancesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the genetic distribution and the phenotypic correlation of an extensive series of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in a geographically well-defined Mediterranean area. Methods: A thorough genetic screening, including most of the known genes involved in this disease, was performed and analyzed in this longitudinal descriptive study. Clinical data were analyzed and compared among the genetic subgroups. Results: Molecular diagnosis was accomplished in 365 of 438 patients (83.3%), with a higher success rate in demyelinating forms of the disease. The CMT1A duplication (PMP22 gene) was the most frequent genetic diagnosis (50.4%), followed by mutations in the GJB1 gene (15.3%), and in the GDAP1 gene (11.5%). Mutations in 13 other genes were identified, but were much less frequent. Sixteen novel mutations were detected and characterized phenotypically. Conclusions: The relatively high frequency of GDAP1 mutations, coupled with the scarceness of MFN2 mutations (1.1%) and the high proportion of recessive inheritance (11.6%) in this series exemplify the particularity of the genetic distribution of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in this region. PMID:24078732

  5. Tooth chipping can reveal the diet and bite forces of fossil hominins

    PubMed Central

    Constantino, Paul J.; Lee, James J.-W.; Chai, Herzl; Zipfel, Bernhard; Ziscovici, Charles; Lawn, Brian R.; Lucas, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian tooth enamel is often chipped, providing clear evidence for localized contacts with large hard food objects. Here, we apply a simple fracture equation to estimate peak bite forces directly from chip size. Many fossil hominins exhibit antemortem chips on their posterior teeth, indicating their use of high bite forces. The inference that these species must have consumed large hard foods such as seeds is supported by the occurrence of similar chips among known modern-day seed predators such as orangutans and peccaries. The existence of tooth chip signatures also provides a way of identifying the consumption of rarely eaten foods that dental microwear and isotopic analysis are unlikely to detect. PMID:20519197

  6. Tooth wear in aging people: an investigation of the prevalence and the influential factors of incisal/occlusal tooth wear in northwest China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of tooth wear in the aging population of northwest China and to investigate the factors associated with such tooth wear. Methods Cross-sectional analytic clinical and questionnaire study was performed in 704 participants who had a mean age of 46.5 ± 0.2 SD and of which 367(52.13%) were males and 337(47.87%) female. These participants were invited when they attended the hospital which located in northwest China for routine oral examination. Results In the maxilla of the examined patients, the rate of tooth wear varied from 85.51% for molar group, 89.77% for premolar group, 100.0% for canine group to 87.22% for incisor group. In the mandible, the rates were 86.36%, 88.92%, 100.0% and 91.19% for the four groups respectively. Moreover, both the incisor and canine groups of these patients showed median scores of 3, the premolar group showed a median score of 1, and the molar group had a median score of 2. Additionally, multiple factors were considered to contribute to these patterns of tooth wear, especially the habitual consumption of a hard or sour diet (P < 0.05,odds ratio 1.21, 95% confidence intervals 1.04-1.49). Conclusions Tooth wear is a common disease in which the anterior teeth exhibit greater wear than posterior teeth. The data support an association between tooth wear and dietary patterns. PMID:24902953

  7. Optimum force magnitude for orthodontic tooth movement: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yijin; Maltha, Jaap C; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of the literature concerning the optimal force or range of forces for orthodontic tooth movement. Over 400 articles both on human research and animal experiments were found in Medline and by hand searching of main orthodontic and dental journals. Articles on animal experiments were in the majority. A wide range of animal species such as rat, cat, rabbit, beagle dog, monkey, mouse, and guinea pig were used. Besides variation in species, there was also a wide range of force magnitudes, teeth under study, directions of tooth movement, duration of experimental period, and force reactivation. Furthermore, hardly any experiments were reported that provide information on the relation between the velocity of tooth movement and the magnitude of the applied force. Data from human research on the efficiency of orthodontic tooth movement appeared to be very limited. The large variation in data from current literature made it impossible to perform a meta-analysis. Therefore, we have systematically reviewed the literature. It appeared that no evidence about the optimal force level in orthodontics could be extracted from literature. Well-controlled clinical studies and more standardized animal experiments in the orthodontic field are required to provide more insight into the relation between the applied force and the rate of tooth movement. PMID:12607860

  8. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A...

  10. Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

  11. Influence of photoactivation method and mold for restoration on the Knoop hardness of resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Brandt, William Cunha; Silva-Concilio, Lais Regiane; Neves, Ana Christina Claro; de Souza-Junior, Eduardo Jose Carvalho; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the Knoop hardness in the top and bottom of composite photo activated by different methods when different mold materials were used. Z250 (3M ESPE) and XL2500 halogen unit (3M ESPE) were used. For hardness test, conical restorations were made in extracted bovine incisors (tooth mold) and also metal mold (approximately 2 mm top diameter × 1.5 mm bottom diameter × 2 mm in height). Different photoactivation methods were tested: high-intensity continuous (HIC), low-intensity continuous (LIC), soft-start, or pulse-delay (PD), with constant radiant exposure. Knoop readings were performed on top and bottom restoration surfaces. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p = 0.05). On the top, regardless of the mold used, no significant difference in the Knoop hardness (Knoop hardness number, in kilograms-force per square millimeter) was observed between the photoactivation methods. On the bottom surface, the photoactivation method HIC shows higher means of hardness than LIC when tooth and metal were used. Significant differences of hardness on the top and in the bottom were detected between tooth and metal. The photoactivation method LIC and the material mold can interfere in the hardness values of composite restorations.

  12. Human life history evolution explains dissociation between the timing of tooth eruption and peak rates of root growth.

    PubMed

    Dean, M Christopher; Cole, Tim J

    2013-01-01

    We explored the relationship between growth in tooth root length and the modern human extended period of childhood. Tooth roots provide support to counter chewing forces and so it is advantageous to grow roots quickly to allow teeth to erupt into function as early as possible. Growth in tooth root length occurs with a characteristic spurt or peak in rate sometime between tooth crown completion and root apex closure. Here we show that in Pan troglodytes the peak in root growth rate coincides with the period of time teeth are erupting into function. However, the timing of peak root velocity in modern humans occurs earlier than expected and coincides better with estimates for tooth eruption times in Homo erectus. With more time to grow longer roots prior to eruption and smaller teeth that now require less support at the time they come into function, the root growth spurt no longer confers any advantage in modern humans. We suggest that a prolonged life history schedule eventually neutralised this adaptation some time after the appearance of Homo erectus. The root spurt persists in modern humans as an intrinsic marker event that shows selection operated, not primarily on tooth tissue growth, but on the process of tooth eruption. This demonstrates the overarching influence of life history evolution on several aspects of dental development. These new insights into tooth root growth now provide an additional line of enquiry that may contribute to future studies of more recent life history and dietary adaptations within the genus Homo. PMID:23342167

  13. Human life history evolution explains dissociation between the timing of tooth eruption and peak rates of root growth.

    PubMed

    Dean, M Christopher; Cole, Tim J

    2013-01-01

    We explored the relationship between growth in tooth root length and the modern human extended period of childhood. Tooth roots provide support to counter chewing forces and so it is advantageous to grow roots quickly to allow teeth to erupt into function as early as possible. Growth in tooth root length occurs with a characteristic spurt or peak in rate sometime between tooth crown completion and root apex closure. Here we show that in Pan troglodytes the peak in root growth rate coincides with the period of time teeth are erupting into function. However, the timing of peak root velocity in modern humans occurs earlier than expected and coincides better with estimates for tooth eruption times in Homo erectus. With more time to grow longer roots prior to eruption and smaller teeth that now require less support at the time they come into function, the root growth spurt no longer confers any advantage in modern humans. We suggest that a prolonged life history schedule eventually neutralised this adaptation some time after the appearance of Homo erectus. The root spurt persists in modern humans as an intrinsic marker event that shows selection operated, not primarily on tooth tissue growth, but on the process of tooth eruption. This demonstrates the overarching influence of life history evolution on several aspects of dental development. These new insights into tooth root growth now provide an additional line of enquiry that may contribute to future studies of more recent life history and dietary adaptations within the genus Homo.

  14. Stem cell sources for tooth regeneration: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Otsu, Keishi; Kumakami-Sakano, Mika; Fujiwara, Naoki; Kikuchi, Kazuko; Keller, Laetitia; Lesot, Hervé; Harada, Hidemitsu

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are capable of renewing themselves through cell division and have the remarkable ability to differentiate into many different types of cells. They therefore have the potential to become a central tool in regenerative medicine. During the last decade, advances in tissue engineering and stem cell-based tooth regeneration have provided realistic and attractive means of replacing lost or damaged teeth. Investigation of embryonic and adult (tissue) stem cells as potential cell sources for tooth regeneration has led to many promising results. However, technical and ethical issues have hindered the availability of these cells for clinical application. The recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has provided the possibility to revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine (dentistry) by offering the option of autologous transplantation. In this article, we review the current progress in the field of stem cell-based tooth regeneration and discuss the possibility of using iPS cells for this purpose.

  15. Natural tooth as an interim prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dhariwal, Neha S.; Gokhale, Niraj S.; Patel, Punit; Hugar, Shivayogi M.

    2016-01-01

    A traumatic injury to primary maxillary anterior tooth is one of the common causes for problems with the succedaneous tooth leading to it noneruption. A missing anterior tooth can be psychologically and socially damaging to the patient. Despite a wide range of treatment options available, sometimes, it is inevitable to save the natural tooth. This paper describes the immediate replacement of a right central incisor using a fiber-composite resin splint with the natural tooth crown as a pontic following surgical extraction of the dilacerated impacted permanent maxillary central incisor. The abutment teeth can be conserved with minimal or no preparation, thus keeping the technique reversible and can be completed at chair side thereby avoiding laboratory costs. It can be used as an interim measure until a definitive prosthesis can be fabricated as the growth is still incomplete. PMID:27433074

  16. Biologically Based Restorative Management of Tooth Wear

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Martin G. D.; Bomfim, Deborah I.; Austin, Rupert S.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of tooth wear is increasing in industrialised nations. Yet, there is no high-level evidence to support or refute any therapeutic intervention. In the absence of such evidence, many currently prevailing management strategies for tooth wear may be failing in their duty of care to first and foremost improve the oral health of patients with this disease. This paper promotes biologically sound approaches to the management of tooth wear on the basis of current best evidence of the aetiology and clinical features of this disease. The relative risks and benefits of the varying approaches to managing tooth wear are discussed with reference to long-term follow-up studies. Using reference to ethical standards such as “The Daughter Test”, this paper presents case reports of patients with moderate-to-severe levels of tooth wear managed in line with these biologically sound principles. PMID:22315608

  17. Early epithelial signaling center governs tooth budding morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahtiainen, Laura; Uski, Isa; Thesleff, Irma; Mikkola, Marja L

    2016-09-12

    During organogenesis, cell fate specification and patterning are regulated by signaling centers, specialized clusters of morphogen-expressing cells. In many organs, initiation of development is marked by bud formation, but the cellular mechanisms involved are ill defined. Here, we use the mouse incisor tooth as a model to study budding morphogenesis. We show that a group of nonproliferative epithelial cells emerges in the early tooth primordium and identify these cells as a signaling center. Confocal live imaging of tissue explants revealed that although these cells reorganize dynamically, they do not reenter the cell cycle or contribute to the growing tooth bud. Instead, budding is driven by proliferation of the neighboring cells. We demonstrate that the activity of the ectodysplasin/Edar/nuclear factor κB pathway is restricted to the signaling center, and its inactivation leads to fewer quiescent cells and a smaller bud. These data functionally link the signaling center size to organ size and imply that the early signaling center is a prerequisite for budding morphogenesis. PMID:27621364

  18. The potential optical coherence tomography in tooth bleaching quantitative assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y. R.; Guo, Z. Y.; Shu, S. Y.; Zeng, C. C.; Zhong, H. Q.; Chen, B. L.; Liu, Z. M.; Bao, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we report the outcomes from a pilot study on using OCT functional imaging method to evaluate and quantify color alteration in the human teeth in vitro. The image formations of the dental tissues without and with treatment 35% hydrogen peroxide were obtained by an OCT system at a 1310 nm central wavelength. One parameter for the quantification of optical properties from OCT measurements is introduced in our study: attenuate coefficient (μ). And the attenuate coefficient have significant decrease ( p < 0.001) in dentine as well as a significant increase ( p < 0.001) in enamel was observed during tooth bleaching process. From the experimental results, it is found that attenuate coefficient could be useful to assess color alteration of the human tooth samples. OCT has a potential to become an effective tool for the assessment tooth bleaching. And our experiment offer a now method to evaluate color change in visible region by quantitative analysis of the infrared region information from OCT.

  19. Tooth segmentation system with intelligent editing for cephalometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shoupu

    2015-03-01

    Cephalometric analysis is the study of the dental and skeletal relationship in the head, and it is used as an assessment and planning tool for improved orthodontic treatment of a patient. Conventional cephalometric analysis identifies bony and soft-tissue landmarks in 2D cephalometric radiographs, in order to diagnose facial features and abnormalities prior to treatment, or to evaluate the progress of treatment. Recent studies in orthodontics indicate that there are persistent inaccuracies and inconsistencies in the results provided using conventional 2D cephalometric analysis. Obviously, plane geometry is inappropriate for analyzing anatomical volumes and their growth; only a 3D analysis is able to analyze the three-dimensional, anatomical maxillofacial complex, which requires computing inertia systems for individual or groups of digitally segmented teeth from an image volume of a patient's head. For the study of 3D cephalometric analysis, the current paper proposes a system for semi-automatically segmenting teeth from a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) volume with two distinct features, including an intelligent user-input interface for automatic background seed generation, and a graphics processing unit (GPU) acceleration mechanism for three-dimensional GrowCut volume segmentation. Results show a satisfying average DICE score of 0.92, with the use of the proposed tooth segmentation system, by 15 novice users who segmented a randomly sampled tooth set. The average GrowCut processing time is around one second per tooth, excluding user interaction time.

  20. Primary cilia integrate hedgehog and Wnt signaling during tooth development.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Chen, S; Cheng, D; Jing, W; Helms, J A

    2014-05-01

    Many ciliopathies have clinical features that include tooth malformations but how these defects come about is not clear. Here we show that genetic deletion of the motor protein Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in an arrest in odontogenesis. Incisors are completely missing, and molars are enlarged in Wnt1(Cre+)Kif3a(fl/fl) embryos. Although amelogenesis and dentinogenesis initiate in the molar tooth bud, both processes terminate prematurely. We demonstrate that loss of Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in loss of Hedgehog signaling and gain of Wnt signaling in this same tissue. The defective dental mesenchyme then aberrantly signals to the dental epithelia, which prompts an up-regulation in the Hedgehog and Wnt responses in the epithelia and leads to multiple attempts at invagination and an expanded enamel organ. Thus, the primary cilium integrates Hedgehog and Wnt signaling between dental epithelia and mesenchyme, and this cilia-dependent integration is required for proper tooth development.

  1. Failure of Tooth Formation Mediated by miR-135a Overexpression via BMP Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, E J; Lee, M J; Li, L; Yoon, K S; Kim, K S; Jung, H S

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are known to regulate a variety of gene functions in many tissues and organs, but their expression and function in tooth development are not well-understood. A specific miRNA, miR-135a, was determined to be highly expressed at the bud stage. Interestingly, after the cap stage, miR-135a was expressed in the epithelium and mesenchyme but not in the inner enamel epithelium. To identify the relationship between miR-135a and its putative target genes, Bmpr-Ia and Bmpr-Ib, in early tooth development, miR-135a was ectopically overexpressed with a lentivirus. This overexpression resulted in the repression of Bmpr-Ia and Bmpr-Ib. Furthermore, miR-135a inhibited both Bmpr-Ia and Bmpr-Ib transcription. BMP2 proteins were expressed ectopically in tooth germs during the cap stage to determine the relationship between miR-135a and BMP signaling in early tooth development. When miR-135a was ectopically expressed, no tooth formation was observed after 4 wk of incubation in the kidney capsule. This study suggested that Bmp signaling, specifically Bmpr-Ia and Bmpr-Ib, regulates tooth formation via miR-135a.

  2. Hedgehog signaling regulates dental papilla formation and tooth size during zebrafish odontogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeffrey C.; Fox, Zachary D.B.; Crimp, James L.; Littleford, Hana E.; Jowdry, Andrea L.; Jackman, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intercellular communication by the hedgehog cell signaling pathway is necessary for tooth development throughout the vertebrates, but it remains unclear which specific developmental signals control cell behavior at different stages of odontogenesis. To address this issue, we have manipulated hedgehog activity during zebrafish tooth development and visualized the results using confocal microscopy. Results We first established that reporter lines for dlx2b, fli1, NF-κB, and prdm1a are markers for specific subsets of tooth germ tissues. We then blocked hedgehog signaling with cyclopamine and observed a reduction or elimination of the cranial neural crest derived dental papilla, which normally contains the cells that later give rise to dentin-producing odontoblasts. Upon further investigation we observed that the dental papilla begins to form and then regresses in the absence of hedgehog signaling, through a mechanism unrelated to cell proliferation or apoptosis. We also found evidence of an isometric reduction in tooth size that correlates with the time of earliest hedgehog inhibition. Conclusions We hypothesize that these results reveal a previously uncharacterized function of hedgehog signaling during tooth morphogenesis, regulating the number of cells in the dental papilla and thereby controlling tooth size. PMID:25645398

  3. Biomechanical adaptation of the bone-periodontal ligament (PDL)-tooth fibrous joint as a consequence of disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jeremy D; Lee, Jihyun; Ozcoban, Hüseyin; Schneider, Gerold A; Ho, Sunita P

    2014-06-27

    In this study, an in vivo ligature-induced periodontitis rat model was used to investigate temporal changes to the solid and fluid phases of the joint by correlating shifts in joint biomechanics to adaptive changes in soft and hard tissue morphology and functional space. After 6 and 12 weeks of ligation, coronal regions showed a significant decrease in alveolar crest height, increased expression of TNF-α, and degradation of attachment fibers as indicated by decreased collagen birefringence. Cyclical compression to peak loads of 5-15N at speeds of 0.2-2.0mm/min followed by load relaxation tests showed decreased stiffness and reactionary load rate values, load relaxation, and load recoverability, of ligated joints. Shifts in joint stiffness and reactionary load rate increased with time while shifts in joint relaxation and recoverability decreased between control and ligated groups, complementing measurements of increased tooth displacement as evaluated through digital image correlation. Shifts in functional space between control and ligated joints were significantly increased at the interradicular (Δ10-25μm) and distal coronal (Δ20-45μm) regions. Histology revealed time-dependent increases in nuclei elongation within PDL cells and collagen fiber alignment, uncrimping, and directionality, in 12-week ligated joints compared to random orientation in 6-week ligated joints and to controls. We propose that altered strains from tooth hypermobility could cause varying degrees of solid-to-fluid compaction, alter dampening characteristics of the joint, and potentiate increased adaptation at the risk of joint failure.

  4. Biomechanical adaptation of the bone-periodontal ligament (PDL)-tooth fibrous joint as a consequence of disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jeremy D; Lee, Jihyun; Ozcoban, Hüseyin; Schneider, Gerold A; Ho, Sunita P

    2014-06-27

    In this study, an in vivo ligature-induced periodontitis rat model was used to investigate temporal changes to the solid and fluid phases of the joint by correlating shifts in joint biomechanics to adaptive changes in soft and hard tissue morphology and functional space. After 6 and 12 weeks of ligation, coronal regions showed a significant decrease in alveolar crest height, increased expression of TNF-α, and degradation of attachment fibers as indicated by decreased collagen birefringence. Cyclical compression to peak loads of 5-15N at speeds of 0.2-2.0mm/min followed by load relaxation tests showed decreased stiffness and reactionary load rate values, load relaxation, and load recoverability, of ligated joints. Shifts in joint stiffness and reactionary load rate increased with time while shifts in joint relaxation and recoverability decreased between control and ligated groups, complementing measurements of increased tooth displacement as evaluated through digital image correlation. Shifts in functional space between control and ligated joints were significantly increased at the interradicular (Δ10-25μm) and distal coronal (Δ20-45μm) regions. Histology revealed time-dependent increases in nuclei elongation within PDL cells and collagen fiber alignment, uncrimping, and directionality, in 12-week ligated joints compared to random orientation in 6-week ligated joints and to controls. We propose that altered strains from tooth hypermobility could cause varying degrees of solid-to-fluid compaction, alter dampening characteristics of the joint, and potentiate increased adaptation at the risk of joint failure. PMID:24332618

  5. Selective β2-adrenergic Antagonist Butoxamine Reduces Orthodontic Tooth Movement.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Miyazawa, K; Suzuki, Y; Mizutani, Y; Uchibori, S; Asaoka, R; Arai, M; Togari, A; Goto, S

    2014-08-01

    Recently, involvement of the sympathetic nervous system in bone metabolism has attracted attention. β2-Adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) is presented on osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells. We previously demonstrated that β-AR blockers at low dose improve osteoporosis with hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system via β2-AR blocking, while they may have a somewhat inhibitory effect on osteoblastic activity at high doses. In this study, the effects of butoxamine (BUT), a specific β2-AR antagonist, on tooth movement were examined in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) showing osteoporosis with hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system. We administered BUT (1 mg/kg) orally, and closed-coil springs were inserted into the upper-left first molar. After sacrifice, we calculated the amount of tooth movement and analyzed the trabecular microarchitecture and histomorphometry. The distance in the SHR control was greater than that in the Wistar-Kyoto rat group, but no significant difference was found in the SHR treated with BUT compared with the Wistar-Kyoto rat control. Analysis of bone volume per tissue volume, trabecular number, and osteoclast surface per bone surface in the alveolar bone showed clear bone loss by an increase of bone resorption in SHR. In addition, BUT treatment resulted in a recovery of alveolar bone loss. Furthermore, TH-immunoreactive nerves in the periodontal ligament were increased by tooth movement, and BUT administration decreased TH-immunoreactive nerves. These results suggest that BUT prevents alveolar bone loss and orthodontic tooth movement via β2-AR blocking.

  6. Towards Unraveling the Human Tooth Transcriptome: The Dentome

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to characterize the transcriptome profiles of human ameloblasts and odontoblasts, evaluate molecular pathways and advance our knowledge of the human “dentome”. Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate odontoblasts and ameloblasts from human tooth buds (15-20week gestational age) from 4 fetuses. RNA was examined using Agilent 41k whole genome arrays at 2 different stages of enamel formation, presecretory and secretory. Probe detection was considered against the array negative control to control for background noise. Differential expression was examined using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) 4.0 between different cell types and developmental stages with a false discovery rate of 20%. Pathway analysis was conducted using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. We found that during primary tooth formation, odontoblasts expressed 14,802 genes, presecretory ameloblasts 15,179 genes and secretory ameloblasts 14,526 genes. Genes known to be active during tooth development for each cell type (eg COL1A1, AMELX) were shown to be expressed by our approach. Exploring further into the list of differentially expressed genes between the motile odontoblasts and non-motile presecretory ameloblasts we found several genes of interest that could be involved in cell movement (FN1, LUM, ASTN1). Furthermore, our analysis indicated that the Phospholipase C and ERK5 pathways, that are important for cell movement, were activated in the motile odontoblasts. In addition our pathway analysis identified WNT3A and TGFB1 as important upstream contributors. Recent studies implicate these genes in the development of Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia. The utility of laser capture microdissection can be a valuable tool in the examination of specific tissues or cell populations present in human tooth buds. Advancing our knowledge of the human dentome and related molecular pathways provides new insights into the complex mechanisms regulating odontogenesis and

  7. Osteoblast and osteoclast behaviors in the turnover of attachment bones during medaka tooth replacement.

    PubMed

    Mantoku, Akiko; Chatani, Masahiro; Aono, Kazushi; Inohaya, Keiji; Kudo, Akira

    2016-01-15

    Tooth replacement in polyphyodont is a well-organized system for maintenance of homeostasis of teeth, containing the dynamic structural change in skeletal tissues such as the attachment bone, which is the supporting element of teeth. Histological analyses have revealed the character of tooth replacement, however, the cellular mechanism of how skeletal tissues are modified during tooth replacement is largely unknown. Here, we showed the important role of osteoblasts for controlling osteoclasts to modify the attachment bone during tooth replacement in medaka pharyngeal teeth, coupled with an osterix-DsRed/TRAP-GFP transgenic line to visualize osteoblasts and osteoclasts. In the turnover of the row of attachment bones, these bones were resorbed at the posterior side where most developed functional teeth were located, and generated at the anterior side where teeth were newly erupted, which caused continuous tooth replacement. In the cellular analysis, osteoclasts and osteoblasts were located at attachment bones separately, since mature osteoclasts were localized at the resorbing side and osteoblasts gathered at the generating side. To demonstrate the role of osteoclasts in tooth replacement, we established medaka made deficient in c-fms-a by TALEN. c-fms-a deficient medaka showed hyperplasia of attachment bones along with reduced bone resorption accompanied by a low number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts, indicating an important role of osteoclasts in the turnover of attachment bones. Furthermore, nitroreductase-mediated osteoblast-specific ablation induced disappearance of osteoclasts, indicating that osteoblasts were essential for maintenance of osteoclasts for the proper turnover. Taken together, our results suggested that the medaka attachment bone provides the model to understand the cellular mechanism for tooth replacement, and that osteoblasts act in the coordination of bone morphology by supporting osteoclasts.

  8. Ultrasonic assessment of tooth structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, David W.

    2002-06-01

    A means of assessing the internal structure of teeth based upon use of high frequency, highly localized ultrasound (acoustic waves) generated by a short laser pulse is discussed. Some key advantages of laser-generated ultrasound over more traditional contact transducer methods are that it is noncontact and nondestructive in nature and requires no special surface preparation. Optical interferometric detection of ultrasound provides a complementary nondestructive, noncontact technique with a very small detection footprint. This combination of techniques, termed laser-based ultrasonics, holds promise for future in-vivo diagnostics of tooth health. In this paper, initial results using laser-based ultrasound for assessment of dental structures are presented on an extracted human incisor. Results show the technique to be sensitive to the enamel/dentin, dentin/pulp, and dentin/cementum junctions as well as a region of dead tracts in the dentin.

  9. Laser ultrasonic techniques for assessment of tooth structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, David W.; Baldwin, Kevin C.

    2000-06-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. For example, there is a need to image the margins of a restoration for the detection of poor bonding or voids between the restorative material and the dentin. With conventional x-ray techniques, it is difficult to detect cracks and to visualize interfaces between hard media. This due to the x-ray providing only a 2 dimensional projection of the internal structure (i.e. a silhouette). In addition, a high resolution imaging modality is needed to detect tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated which can help the tooth to re-mineralize itself. Currently employed x-ray imaging is incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration with a synthetic material. Other clinical applications include the visualization of periodontal defects, the localization of intraosseous lesions, and determining the degree of osseointegration between a dental implant and the surrounding bone. A means of assessing the internal structure of the tooth based upon use of high frequency, highly localized ultrasound (acoustic waves) generated by a laser pulse is discussed. Optical interferometric detection of ultrasound provides a complementary technique with a very small detection footprint. Initial results using laser-based ultrasound for assessment of dental structures are presented. Discussion will center on the adaptability of this technique to clinical applications.

  10. Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A New Therapeutic Option for Tooth Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanwei; Yu, Yongchun; Chen, Lin; Ye, Lanfeng; Cui, Junhui; Sun, Quan; Li, Kaide; Li, Zhiyong; Liu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Tooth regeneration is considered to be an optimistic approach to replace current treatments for tooth loss. It is important to determine the most suitable seed cells for tooth regeneration. Recently, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been regarded as a promising candidate for tissue regeneration. However, it has not been reported whether hUCMSCs can be employed in tooth regeneration. Here, we report that hUCMSCs can be induced into odontoblast-like cells in vitro and in vivo. Induced hUCMSCs expressed dentin-related proteins including dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), and their gene expression levels were similar to those in native pulp tissue cells. Moreover, DSP- and DMP-1-positive calcifications were observed after implantation of hUCMSCs in vivo. These findings reveal that hUCMSCs have an odontogenic differentiation potency to differentiate to odontoblast-like cells with characteristic deposition of dentin-like matrix in vivo. This study clearly demonstrates hUCMSCs as an alternative therapeutic cell source for tooth regeneration.

  11. Dental Stem Cells and their Applications in Dental Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Lymperi, S; Ligoudistianou, C; Taraslia, V; Kontakiotis, E; Anastasiadou, E

    2013-01-01

    Tooth loss or absence is a common condition that can be caused by various pathological circumstances. The replacement of the missing tooth is important for medical and aesthetic reasons. Recently, scientists focus on tooth tissue engineering, as a potential treatment, beyond the existing prosthetic methods. Tooth engineering is a promising new therapeutic approach that seeks to replace the missing tooth with a bioengineered one or to restore the damaged dental tissue. Its main tool is the stem cells that are seeded on the surface of biomaterials (scaffolds), in order to create a biocomplex. Several populations of mesenchymal stem cells are found in the tooth. These different cell types are categorized according to their location in the tooth and they demonstrate slightly different features. It appears that the dental stem cells isolated from the dental pulp and the periodontal ligament are the most powerful cells for tooth engineering. Additional research needs to be performed in order to address the problem of finding a suitable source of epithelial stem cells, which are important for the regeneration of the enamel. Nevertheless, the results of the existing studies are encouraging and strongly support the belief that tooth engineering can offer hope to people suffering from dental problems or tooth loss.

  12. A Case Report of Tooth Wear Associated with a Patient's Inappropriate Efforts to Reduce Oral Malodor Caused by Endodontic Lesion.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Masahiro; Uchida, Hatsumi; Suzuki, Nao; Mine, Mariko; Iwamoto, Tomoyuki; Masuo, Yosuke; Naito, Toru; Hatano, Yuko; Hirofuji, Takao

    2009-01-01

    Here, we report a case of severe tooth wear associated with a patient's inappropriate efforts to reduce oral malodor. A 72-year-old male patient visited our breath clinic complaining of strong breath odor. Former dentists had performed periodontal treatments including scaling and root planing, but his oral malodor did not decrease. His own subsequent breath odor-reducing efforts included daily use of lemons and vinegar to reduce or mask the odor, eating and chewing hard foods to clean his teeth, and extensive tooth brushing with a hard-bristled toothbrush. Oral malodor was detected in our breath clinic by several tests, including an organoleptic test, portable sulphide monitor, and gas chromatography. Although patient's oral hygiene and periodontal condition were not poor on presentation, his teeth showed heavy wear and hypersensitiving with an unfitted restoration on tooth 16. Radiographic examination of the tooth did not reveal endodontic lesion, but when the metal crown was removed, severe pus discharge and strong malodor were observed. When this was treated, his breath odor was improved. After dental treatment and oral hygiene instruction, no further tooth wear was observed; he was not concerned about breath odor thereafter. PMID:20339568

  13. Responses of the pulp, periradicular and soft tissues following trauma to the permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Yu, C Y; Abbott, P V

    2016-03-01

    Trauma to the permanent teeth involves not only the teeth but also the pulp, the periodontal ligament, alveolar bone, gingiva and other associated structures. There are many variations in the types of injuries with varying severity and often a tooth may sustain more than one injury at the same time. In more severe trauma cases, there are many different cellular systems of mineralized hard and unmineralized soft tissues involved, each with varying potential for healing. Furthermore, the responses of the different tissues may be interrelated and dependent on each other. Hence, healing subsequent to dental trauma has long been known to be very complex. Because of this complexity, tissue responses and the consequences following dental trauma have been confusing and puzzling for many clinicians. In this review, the tissue responses are described under the tissue compartments typically involved following dental trauma: the pulp, periradicular and associated soft tissues. The factors involved in the mechanisms of trauma are analysed for their effects on the tissue responses. A thorough understanding of the possible tissue responses is imperative for clinicians to overcome the confusion and manage dental trauma adequately and conservatively in order to minimize the consequences following trauma. PMID:26923447

  14. Chick limbs with mouse teeth: an effective in vivo culture system for tooth germ development and analysis.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Eiki; Wu, Changshan; Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2003-01-01

    Mouse tooth germ development is currently studied by three main approaches: in wild-type and mutant mouse lines, after transplantation of tooth germs to ectopic sites, and in organ culture. The in vivo approaches are the most physiological but do not provide accessibility to tooth germs for further experimental manipulation. Organ cultures, although readily accessible, do not sustain full tooth germ development and are appropriate for short-term analysis. Thus, we sought to establish a new approach that would combine experimental accessibility with sustained development. We implanted fragments of embryonic day 12 mouse embryo first branchial arch containing early bud stage tooth germs into the lateral mesenchyme of day 4-5 chick embryo wing buds in ovo. Eggs were reincubated, and implanted tissues were examined by histochemistry and in situ hybridization over time. The tooth germs underwent seemingly normal growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis. They reached the cap, bell, and crown stages in approximately 3, 6, and 10 days, respectively, mimicking in a striking manner native temporal patterns. To examine mechanisms regulating tooth germ development, we first implanted tooth germ fragments, microinjected them with neutralizing antibodies to the key signaling molecule Sonic hedgehog (Shh), and examined them over time. Tooth germ development was markedly delayed, as revealed by poor morphogenesis and lack of mature ameloblasts and odontoblasts displaying characteristic traits such as an elongated cell shape, nuclear relocalization, and amelogenin gene expression. These phenotypic changes began to be reversed upon further incubation. The data show that the limb bud represents an effective, experimentally accessible as well as economical system for growth and analysis of developing tooth germs. The inhibitory effects of Shh neutralizing antibody treatment are discussed in relation to roles of this signaling pathway proposed by this and other groups previously.

  15. Imaging of human tooth enamel using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Culjat, M; Singh, R S; Yoon, D C; Brown, E R

    2003-04-01

    This paper reports the results of a complete circumferential scan of a human tooth and its underlying dentino-enamel junction using ultrasound at frequencies in the 10-MHz range. The imagery shows clearly a two-dimensional contour of the dentinoenamel junction with a depth and lateral resolution of approximately 100 microm and 750 microm, respectively. The resulting sonograph is compared with an optical micrograph of the same tooth to verify the accuracy of the ultrasonic technique. The results are a significant step toward the biolocation of submillimeter size features within the tooth volume.

  16. Effect of different tetra pack juices on microhardness of direct tooth colored-restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Nazish; Abidi, Syed Yawar Ali; Qazi, Fazal-Ur-Rehaman; Jat, Shahbaz Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effect of apple and orange juices on the surface hardness of direct tooth-colored restorative materials. Materials and methods The materials included resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer 3M™ ESPE™ Core buildup restorative) and composite resin (Filtek™ 3M™ ESPE™ Z350). A total of 45 disks of each restorative material were prepared. The disks were divided into groups of 15, which were immersed for 7 days in deionized water (G1/G4, control group), apple juice (G2/G5), or orange juice (G3/G6). The pH of the apple juice was approximately 4.8 and the pH of the orange juice was approximately 4.9. Surface hardness tests were performed before immersion and at various times following immersion. Statistical analysis included two-way ANOVA with repeated measurement and Tukey’s test. Results Exposure to juices significantly reduced the hardness of both materials (p < 0.05), while deionized water did not affect the surface hardness of either material. The ionomer cement experienced a greater reduction than the composite resin (p = 0.000). There was no significant difference in the effect of apple and orange juices. Conclusion Juice box-type fruit juices reduced the hardness of direct tooth-colored restorative materials. Material selection should be considered when planning restorations in patients who have experienced tooth surface loss. In terms of the materials evaluated in this study, the composite material provides greater durability under acidic conditions. PMID:23960552

  17. Evolution of High Tooth Replacement Rates in Sauropod Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kathlyn M.; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wilson, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. Methodology/Principal Findings We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days). Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. Conclusions/Significance Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size), and derived titanosaurs and diplodocoids independently

  18. Regenerative Applications Using Tooth Derived Stem Cells in Other Than Tooth Regeneration: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Park, Yun-Jong; Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Tooth derived stem cells or dental stem cells are categorized according to the location from which they are isolated and represent a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. Originally, as one kind of mesenchymal stem cells, they are considered an alternative of bone marrow stromal cells. They share many commonalties but maintain differences. Considering their original function in development and the homeostasis of tooth structures, many applications of these cells in dentistry have aimed at tooth structure regeneration; however, the application in other than tooth structures has been attempted extensively. The availability from discarded or removed teeth can be an innate benefit as a source of autologous cells. Their origin from the neural crest results in exploitation of neurological and numerous other applications. This review briefly highlights current and future perspectives of the regenerative applications of tooth derived stem cells in areas beyond tooth regeneration.

  19. Regenerative Applications Using Tooth Derived Stem Cells in Other Than Tooth Regeneration: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yun-Jong; Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Tooth derived stem cells or dental stem cells are categorized according to the location from which they are isolated and represent a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. Originally, as one kind of mesenchymal stem cells, they are considered an alternative of bone marrow stromal cells. They share many commonalties but maintain differences. Considering their original function in development and the homeostasis of tooth structures, many applications of these cells in dentistry have aimed at tooth structure regeneration; however, the application in other than tooth structures has been attempted extensively. The availability from discarded or removed teeth can be an innate benefit as a source of autologous cells. Their origin from the neural crest results in exploitation of neurological and numerous other applications. This review briefly highlights current and future perspectives of the regenerative applications of tooth derived stem cells in areas beyond tooth regeneration. PMID:26798366

  20. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  1. Hardness Tester for Polyur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, D. L.; Buras, D. F.; Corbin, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Rubber-hardness tester modified for use on rigid polyurethane foam. Provides objective basis for evaluation of improvements in foam manufacturing and inspection. Typical acceptance criterion requires minimum hardness reading of 80 on modified tester. With adequate correlation tests, modified tester used to measure indirectly tensile and compressive strengths of foam.

  2. Immediate Esthetic Rehabilitation of Periodontally Compromised Anterior Tooth Using Natural Tooth as Pontic

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. Pavan; Nujella, Surya Kumari; Gopal, S. Sujatha

    2016-01-01

    For patients who require removal of anterior teeth and their replacement various treatment modalities are available. With advancement in technology and availability of glass/polyethylene fibres, use of natural tooth as pontic with fibre reinforced composite restorations offers the promising results. The present case report describes management of periodontally compromised mandibular anterior tooth using natural tooth pontic with fibre reinforcement. A 1-year follow-up showed that the bridge was intact with good esthetics and no problem was reported. PMID:27195156

  3. The hard metal diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Cugell, D.W. )

    1992-06-01

    Hard metal is a mixture of tungsten carbide and cobalt, to which small amounts of other metals may be added. It is widely used for industrial purposes whenever extreme hardness and high temperature resistance are needed, such as for cutting tools, oil well drilling bits, and jet engine exhaust ports. Cobalt is the component of hard metal that can be a health hazard. Respiratory diseases occur in workers exposed to cobalt--either in the production of hard metal, from machining hard metal parts, or from other sources. Adverse pulmonary reactions include asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis. A peculiar, almost unique form of lung fibrosis, giant cell interstitial pneumonia, is closely linked with cobalt exposure.66 references.

  4. The hard metal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cugell, D W

    1992-06-01

    Hard metal is a mixture of tungsten carbide and cobalt, to which small amounts of other metals may be added. It is widely used for industrial purposes whenever extreme hardness and high temperature resistance are needed, such as for cutting tools, oil well drilling bits, and jet engine exhaust ports. Cobalt is the component of hard metal that can be a health hazard. Respiratory diseases occur in workers exposed to cobalt--either in the production of hard metal, from machining hard metal parts, or from other sources. Adverse pulmonary reactions include asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis. A peculiar, almost unique form of lung fibrosis, giant cell interstitial pneumonia, is closely linked with cobalt exposure.

  5. The hard metal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cugell, D W

    1992-06-01

    Hard metal is a mixture of tungsten carbide and cobalt, to which small amounts of other metals may be added. It is widely used for industrial purposes whenever extreme hardness and high temperature resistance are needed, such as for cutting tools, oil well drilling bits, and jet engine exhaust ports. Cobalt is the component of hard metal that can be a health hazard. Respiratory diseases occur in workers exposed to cobalt--either in the production of hard metal, from machining hard metal parts, or from other sources. Adverse pulmonary reactions include asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis. A peculiar, almost unique form of lung fibrosis, giant cell interstitial pneumonia, is closely linked with cobalt exposure. PMID:1511554

  6. Three Ways To Be a Saber-Toothed Cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, L. D.; Babiarz, J. P.; Naples, V. L.; Hearst, J.

    Saber-toothed carnivores, until now, have been divided into two groups: scimitar-toothed cats with shorter, coarsely serrated canines coupled with long legs for fast running, and dirk-toothed cats with more elongate, finely serrated canines coupled to short legs built for power rather than speed. In the Pleistocene of North America, as in Europe, the scimitar-cat was Homotherium; the North American dirk-tooth was Smilodon. We now describe a new sabercat from the Early Pleistocene of Florida, combining the scimitar-tooth canine with the short, massive limbs of a dirk-tooth predator. This presents a third way to construct a saber-toothed carnivore.

  7. Biomedical Applications of Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas to Cancerous Cell Treatment and Tooth Bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Myoung Soo; Byun, June Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Kim, Gyoo Cheon; Park, Gan Young

    2011-08-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have attracted great interests and they have been widely applied to biomedical applications to interact with living tissues, cells, and bacteria due to their non-thermal property. This paper reviews the biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas to cancerous cell treatment and tooth bleaching. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with cancer-specific antibodies have been introduced to cancerous cells to enhance selective killing of cells, and the mechanism of cell apoptosis induced by plasma has been investigated. Tooth exposed to helium plasma jet with hydrogen peroxide has become brighter and the productions of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide have been enhanced by plasma exposure.

  8. Critical appraisal. In-office tooth whitening: pulpal effects and tooth sensitivity issues.

    PubMed

    Kwon, So Ran; Swift, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    In-office bleaching is an effective method for whitening teeth.Tooth sensitivity associated with in-office whitening is reversible and may range from mild to considerable. The incidence and severity of tooth sensitivity can be reduced by pretreatment with a desensitizer such as potassium nitrate. Histologic studies and clinical studies on long-term pulpal effects are lacking to definitively support the safety of in-office tooth whitening. Future studies on the etiology of tooth sensitivity related to whitening might greatly improve the means of preventing and managing this side effect.

  9. Robust tooth surface reconstruction by iterative deformation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaotong; Dai, Ning; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Wang, Jun; Peng, Qingjin; Liu, Hao; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Digital design technologies have been applied extensively in dental medicine, especially in the field of dental restoration. The all-ceramic crown is an important restoration type of dental CAD systems. This paper presents a robust tooth surface reconstruction algorithm for all-ceramic crown design. The algorithm involves three necessary steps: standard tooth initial positioning and division; salient feature point extraction using Morse theory; and standard tooth deformation using iterative Laplacian Surface Editing and mesh stitching. This algorithm can retain the morphological features of the tooth surface well. It is robust and suitable for almost all types of teeth, including incisor, canine, premolar, and molar. Moreover, it allows dental technicians to use their own preferred library teeth for reconstruction. The algorithm has been successfully integrated in our Dental CAD system, more than 1000 clinical cases have been tested to demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Computer simulation of gear tooth manufacturing processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri; Huston, Ronald L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of computer graphics to simulate gear tooth manufacturing procedures is discussed. An analytical basis for the simulation is established for spur gears. The simulation itself, however, is developed not only for spur gears, but for straight bevel gears as well. The applications of the developed procedure extend from the development of finite element models of heretofore intractable geometrical forms, to exploring the fabrication of nonstandard tooth forms.

  11. Tooth avulsions resulting from basketball net entanglement.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, D P; Winters, J; Novickas, D; Mesa, K

    1997-09-01

    The authors conducted a survey of dentists reporting tooth avulsions from basketball net accidents. Although the number of people injured was small, the dental injuries were serious. In many cases, multiple teeth were avulsed as a result of the maxillary anterior teeth becoming entangled in the basketball net while the patients were attempting to slamdunk a basketball either on a lowered backboard or from a raised take-off area. The authors present recommendations for preventing tooth avulsions resulting from basketball net entanglement.

  12. Autotransplantation and replantation of tooth germs in monkeys. Effect of damage to the dental follicle and position of transplant in the alveolus.

    PubMed

    Kristerson, L; Andreasen, J O

    1984-08-01

    The effect of damage to the follicle and of superficial positioning of tooth germs after replantation or autotransplantation was studied in green Vervet monkeys. Radiographs were taken immediately after surgery and 3, 6 and 9 months postoperatively, whereafter the animals were sacrificed. The tissue blocks were sectioned in step serial sections along a frontal plane and histologic and radiographic evaluation was made. Tooth germs whose follicle was either damaged or removed showed no sign of eruption, while tooth germs which were replanted with an intact follicle were fully erupted within 3 months. Non-operated control teeth were fully erupted within 6 months. Histologic examination revealed that roots of replanted teeth were only slightly shorter than the non-operated control teeth. Transplantation of tooth germs in different positions in relation to the alveolar crest showed that teeth placed in their original position attained an average tooth length of 12.5 mm, whereas teeth placed in a semi-erupted position achieved an average length of only 9.7 mm. A control group of non-operated incisors demonstrated an average tooth length of 13.7 mm. This study indicates that damage to the follicle at the time of replantation of tooth germs is of major importance for tooth eruption and that placing tooth germs in a semi-erupted position adversely influences later root development.

  13. Ultrasonographic Detection of Tooth Flaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.; Ghorayeb, S. R.

    2010-02-01

    The goal of our work is to adapt pulse-echo ultrasound into a high resolution imaging modality for early detection of oral diseases and for monitoring treatment outcome. In this talk we discuss our preliminary results in the detection of: demineralization of the enamel and dentin, demineralization or caries under and around existing restorations, caries on occlusal and interproximal surfaces, cracks of enamel and dentin, calculus, and periapical lesions. In vitro immersion tank experiments are compared to results from a handpiece which uses a compliant delay line to couple the ultrasound to the tooth surface. Because the waveform echoes are complex, and in order to make clinical interpretation of ultrasonic waveform data in real time, it is necessary to automatically interpret the signals. We apply the dynamic wavelet fingerprint algorithms to identify and delineate echographic features that correspond to the flaws of interest in teeth. The resulting features show a clear distinction between flawed and unflawed waveforms collected with an ultrasonic handpiece on both phantom and human cadaver teeth.

  14. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Manganelli, Fiore; Nolano, Maria; Pisciotta, Chiara; Provitera, Vincenzo; Fabrizi, Gian M.; Cavallaro, Tiziana; Stancanelli, Annamaria; Caporaso, Giuseppe; Shy, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate, by skin biopsy, dermal nerve fibers in 31 patients with 3 common Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) genotypes (CMT1A, late-onset CMT1B, and CMTX1), and rarer forms of CMT caused by mutations in RAB7 (CMT2B), TRPV4 (CMT2C), and GDAP1 (AR-CMT2K) genes. Methods: We investigated axonal loss by quantifying Meissner corpuscles and intrapapillary myelinated endings and evaluated morphometric changes in myelinated dermal nerve fibers by measuring fiber caliber, internodal, and nodal gap length. Results: The density of both Meissner corpuscles and intrapapillary myelinated endings was reduced in skin samples from patients with CMT1A and all the other CMT genotypes. Nodal gaps were larger in all the CMT genotypes though widening was greater in CMT1A. Perhaps an altered communication between axons and glia may be a common feature for multiple forms of CMT. Internodal lengths were shorter in all the CMT genotypes, and patients with CMT1A had the shortest internodes of all our patients. The uniformly shortened internodes in all the CMT genotypes suggest that mutations in both myelin and axon genes may developmentally impede internode formation. The extent of internodal shortening and nodal gap widening are likely both important in determining nerve conduction velocities in CMT. Conclusions: This study extends the information gained from skin biopsies on morphologic abnormalities in various forms of CMT and provides insights into potential pathomechanisms of axonal and demyelinating CMT. PMID:26362287

  15. A rare case of osteogenesis imperfecta combined with complete tooth loss.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanqin; Zhao, Fei; Ren, Xiuzhi; Li, Zhiliang; Yang, Xiaomeng; Han, Jinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable disorder of the connective tissue characterized by blue sclerae, osteoporosis and bone fragility. Dentinogenesis imperfecta type I is commonly seen in OI patients, but other dental impairments, such as tooth agenesis or complete tooth loss, are rarely reported for these patients. Here, we report the case of a 37-year-old female Chinese OI patient who experienced complete tooth loss before puberty. The patient has a family history of OI and her father has a history of tooth loss. She showed obvious OI phenotypes, including a dwarfed stature, blue sclerae, scoliosis, pigeon chest and a history of fractures. Tooth loss began at the age of 6 years and continued until complete tooth loss at 20 years; this occurred in the absence of dental decay, gum disease, accidents or drug usage. Radiological studies revealed osteoporosis of the lower limbs and an underdeveloped scapula. Type I collagen gene analysis identified a known c.2314G>A (p.Gly772Ser) substitution in the COL1A2 gene, which we suggest affects the interaction between type I collagen and extracellular matrix proteins, including cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, phosphophoryn and SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine). In silico prediction indicated a relatively mild effect of the mutation, so it is conceivable that the severity of the clinical phenotype may result from additional mutations in candidate genes responsible for abnormal dental phenotypes in this family. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an OI patient with a phenotype of complete tooth loss at a young age.

  16. Tooth loss early in life accelerates age-related bone deterioration in mice.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Minori; Kondo, Hiroko; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Tamura, Yasuo; Chen, Huayue; Kubo, Kin-ya

    2015-01-01

    Both osteoporosis and tooth loss are health concerns that affect many older people. Osteoporosis is a common skeletal disease of the elderly, characterized by low bone mass and microstructural deterioration of bone tissue. Chronic mild stress is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Many studies showed that tooth loss induced neurological alterations through activation of a stress hormone, corticosterone, in mice. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that tooth loss early in life may accelerate age-related bone deterioration using a mouse model. Male senescence-accelerated mouse strain P8 (SAMP8) mice were randomly divided into control and toothless groups. Removal of the upper molar teeth was performed at one month of age. Bone response was evaluated at 2, 5 and 9 months of age. Tooth loss early in life caused a significant increase in circulating corticosterone level with age. Osteoblast bone formation was suppressed and osteoclast bone resorption was activated in the toothless mice. Trabecular bone volume fraction of the vertebra and femur was decreased in the toothless mice with age. The bone quality was reduced in the toothless mice at 5 and 9 months of age, compared with the age-matched control mice. These findings indicate that tooth loss early in life impairs the dynamic homeostasis of the bone formation and bone resorption, leading to reduced bone strength with age. Long-term tooth loss may have a cumulative detrimental effect on bone health. It is important to take appropriate measures to treat tooth loss in older people for preventing and/or treating senile osteoporosis.

  17. Post-Odontoma autotransplantation of an impacted tooth: A case report.

    PubMed

    Robindro Singh, Waikhom; Aheibam, Kirankumar; Nameirakpam, Anthopia

    2015-01-01

    After years of relegation by dental implants, autotransplantation has recently become more popular because of a better understanding of its science. The prognosis of autotransplantation primarily depends upon the presence of an intact alveolar bone at the transplant site and the regeneration of a functional periodontal ligament of the transplant. Replacement of an unsalvaged or a missing tooth by a natural tooth with normal periodontium within a short duration of treatment is the ultimate challenge of autotransplantation. Meanwhile, Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF) is popular as a biomaterial which helps in the regeneration of bone and periodontal tissues. To improve the prognosis, and also shorten the treatment time in a rare case of autotransplantation of an impacted tooth in a post-odontoma site, we did a two-stage surgical procedure aided by synthetic bone granules (Biograft) and PRF. The clinical and radiological findings at 6 months follow-up showed good result and promise.

  18. Post-Odontoma autotransplantation of an impacted tooth: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Robindro Singh, Waikhom; Aheibam, Kirankumar; Nameirakpam, Anthopia

    2015-01-01

    After years of relegation by dental implants, autotransplantation has recently become more popular because of a better understanding of its science. The prognosis of autotransplantation primarily depends upon the presence of an intact alveolar bone at the transplant site and the regeneration of a functional periodontal ligament of the transplant. Replacement of an unsalvaged or a missing tooth by a natural tooth with normal periodontium within a short duration of treatment is the ultimate challenge of autotransplantation. Meanwhile, Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF) is popular as a biomaterial which helps in the regeneration of bone and periodontal tissues. To improve the prognosis, and also shorten the treatment time in a rare case of autotransplantation of an impacted tooth in a post-odontoma site, we did a two-stage surgical procedure aided by synthetic bone granules (Biograft) and PRF. The clinical and radiological findings at 6 months follow-up showed good result and promise. PMID:26258027

  19. Epithelial-Specific Requirement of FGFR2 Signaling During Tooth and Palate Development

    PubMed Central

    HOSOKAWA, RYOICHI; DENG, XUEMEI; TAKAMORI, KAZUNORI; XU, XUN; URATA, MARK; BRINGAS, PABLO; CHAI, YANG

    2010-01-01

    Reciprocal interactions between epithelium and mesenchyme are crucial for embryonic development. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a growth factor family that play an important role in epithelial–mesenchymal tissue interaction. We have generated epithelial-specific conditional knockout mice targeting Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (Fgfr2) to investigate the function of FGF signaling during craniofacial development. K14-Cre;Fgfr2fl/fl mice have skin defects, retarded tooth formation, and cleft palate. During the formation of the tooth primordium and palatal processes, cell proliferation in the epithelial cells of K14-Cre;Fgfr2fl/fl mice is reduced. Thus, FGF signaling via FGFR2 in the epithelium is crucial for cell proliferation activity during tooth and palate development. PMID:19235875

  20. The scalpel finishing technique: a tooth-friendly way to finish dental composites in anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Kup, Elaine; Tirlet, Gil; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Optimal results can be obtained on direct restorations by the application of layering procedures that combine the accurate morphological insertion of restorative materials with the knowledge of the optical and mechanical properties of both composite resin and natural hard dental tissue. Even if the finishing procedures on restorations, such as margination (the trimming of margins), are minimized by anatomical layering techniques, finishing can still be highly complicated due to a number of pre-finishing sequences using specific instruments proposed in the literature, which include finishing burs and abrasive discs. Finishing procedures performed with a scalpel on polymerized direct composite restorations can improve the quality of the final sculptured surface by developing natural contours and characteristics and by removing the excess restorative material at the tooth-structure margin. Enhanced movement control and fine fingertip perception of the surface texture while moving the scalpel blade allow the operator to detect and cut the excess composite material during the margination procedure and to refine the final anatomy. Avoiding the use of finishing burs during finishing procedures on direct composite restorations may save adjacent enamel surfaces from abrasive damage. The composite surface and margins may also benefit from using the scalpel finishing technique, considering the potential risk of excess removal and surface crazing that the improper use of finishing burs could cause to composite material. The purpose of this article is to propose and describe the scalpel finishing technique step by step, as well as to briefly discuss the advantages of its application within the limits of a clinical case report.

  1. The scalpel finishing technique: a tooth-friendly way to finish dental composites in anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Kup, Elaine; Tirlet, Gil; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Optimal results can be obtained on direct restorations by the application of layering procedures that combine the accurate morphological insertion of restorative materials with the knowledge of the optical and mechanical properties of both composite resin and natural hard dental tissue. Even if the finishing procedures on restorations, such as margination (the trimming of margins), are minimized by anatomical layering techniques, finishing can still be highly complicated due to a number of pre-finishing sequences using specific instruments proposed in the literature, which include finishing burs and abrasive discs. Finishing procedures performed with a scalpel on polymerized direct composite restorations can improve the quality of the final sculptured surface by developing natural contours and characteristics and by removing the excess restorative material at the tooth-structure margin. Enhanced movement control and fine fingertip perception of the surface texture while moving the scalpel blade allow the operator to detect and cut the excess composite material during the margination procedure and to refine the final anatomy. Avoiding the use of finishing burs during finishing procedures on direct composite restorations may save adjacent enamel surfaces from abrasive damage. The composite surface and margins may also benefit from using the scalpel finishing technique, considering the potential risk of excess removal and surface crazing that the improper use of finishing burs could cause to composite material. The purpose of this article is to propose and describe the scalpel finishing technique step by step, as well as to briefly discuss the advantages of its application within the limits of a clinical case report. PMID:25874271

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor and nitric oxide synthase expression in human tooth germ development.

    PubMed

    Mastrangelo, F; Sberna, M T; Tettamanti, L; Cantatore, G; Tagliabue, A; Gherlone, E

    2016-01-01

    Vascular Endothelia Growth Factor (VEGF) and Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) expression, were evaluated in human tooth germs at two different stages of embryogenesis, to clarify the role of angiogenesis during tooth tissue differentiation and growth. Seventy-two third molar germ specimens were selected during oral surgery. Thirty-six were in the early stage and 36 in the later stage of tooth development. The samples were evaluated with Semi-quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase chain Reaction analyses (RT-PcR), Western blot analysis (WB) and immunohistochemical analysis. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis showed a VEGF and NOS 1-2-3 positive reaction in all samples analysed. VEGF high positive decrease reaction was observed in stellate reticulum cells, ameloblast and odontoblast clusters in early stage compared to later stage of tooth germ development. Comparable VEGF expression was observed in endothelial cells of early and advanced stage growth. NOS1 and NOS3 expressions showed a high increased value in stellate reticulum cells, and ameloblast and odontoblast clusters in advanced stage compared to early stage of development. The absence or only moderate positive reaction of NOS2 was detected in all the different tissues. Positive NOS2 expression showed in advanced stage of tissue development compared to early stage. The action of VEGF and NOS molecules are important mediators of angiogenesis during dental tissue development. VEGF high positive expression in stellate reticulum cells in the early stage of tooth development compared to the later stage and the other cell types, suggests a critical role of the stellate reticulum during dental embryo-morphogenesis.

  3. Hydroxyapatite-anchored dendrimer for in situ remineralization of human tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Wu, Duo; Yang, Jiaojiao; Li, Jiyao; Chen, Liang; Tang, Bei; Chen, Xingyu; Wu, Wei; Li, Jianshu

    2013-07-01

    In situ remineralization of hydroxyapatite (HA) on human tooth enamel surface induced by organic matrices is of great interest in the fields of material science and stomatology. In order to mimic the organic matrices induced biomineralization process in developing enamel and enhance the binding strength at the remineralization interface, carboxyl-terminated poly(amido amine) (PAMAM-COOH)-alendronate (ALN) conjugate (ALN-PAMAM-COOH) was synthesized and characterized. PAMAM-COOH has a highly ordered architecture and is capable of promoting the HA crystallization process. ALN is conjugated on PAMAM-COOH due to its specific adsorption on HA (the main component of tooth enamel), resulting in increased binding strength which is tight enough to resist phosphate buffered saline (PBS) rinsing as compared with that of PAMAM-COOH alone. While incubated in artificial saliva, ALN-PAMAM-COOH could induce in situ remineralization of HA on acid-etched enamel, and the regenerated HA has the nanorod-like crystal structure similar to that of human tooth enamel. The hardness of acid-etched enamel samples treated by ALN-PAMAM-COOH can recover up to 95.5% of the original value with strong adhesion force. In vivo experiment also demonstrates that ALN-PAMAM-COOH is effective in repairing acid-etched enamel in the oral cavity. Overall, these results suggest that ALN-PAMAM-COOH is highly promising as a restorative biomaterial for in situ remineralization of human tooth enamel.

  4. A new idea and method of tooth movement using a ratchet bracket.

    PubMed

    Noda, Koji; Nakamura, Yoshiki; Oikawa, Takashi; Shimpo, Satoshi; Kogure, Kyotaro; Hirashita, Ayao

    2007-06-01

    Since ideally effective tooth movement in orthodontics should occur without causing damage to the periodontal ligament (PDL), a new bracket with a ratchet-locking system, the 'Ratchet Bracket', was designed to produce tooth movement while maintaining blood circulation. To define the mechanism of the appliance, a histological study was carried out on four Beagle dogs (9 months old) and a clinical study on five female patients (11 years to 38 years 10 months of age). Five upper canines in the dogs were moved 1.82 mm per month. On light microscopic observations, vascular forms showed a round-oval shape, without undermining bone resorption. No root resorption was observed in the compressed PDL at days 1, 14, and 35 of the experimental period. On fluorescent images at day 46, distinctive bone formation was apparent at the tension side. In the clinical investigation, nine upper canines in the five female patients were moved 1.92 mm per month. A wide and long alveolar hard line was seen only on the tension side of the canines on dental radiographs, indicating bodily tooth movement, without obvious signs of root resorption in all subjects. Neither spontaneous pain nor pain during biting were reported. The findings indicate that use of the ratchet bracket could result in rapid and pain-free tooth movement with vascular clarity to maintain blood circulation in the PDL.

  5. Structural Morphology of Molars in Large Mammalian Herbivores: Enamel Content Varies between Tooth Positions.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Daniela E; Kaiser, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of dental tissues in mammalian herbivores can be very different from taxon to taxon. While grazers tend to have more elaborated and complexly folded enamel ridges, browsers have less complex enamel ridges which can even be so far reduced that they are completely lost. The gradient in relative enamel content and complexity of structures has so far not been addressed within a single species. However, several studies have noted tooth position specific wear rates in small mammals (rabbits, guinea pigs) which may be related to individual tooth morphology. We investigate whether differentiated enamel content by tooth position is also to be found in large herbivores. We use CT-scanning techniques to quantify relative enamel content in upper and lower molar teeth of 21 large herbivorous mammal species. By using a broad approach and including both perissodactyls and artiodactyls, we address phylogenetic intraspecific differences in relative enamel content. We find that enamel is highly unevenly distributed among molars (upper M1, M2, M3 and lower m1, m2, m3) in most taxa and that relative enamel content is independent of phylogeny. Overall, relative enamel content increases along the molar tooth row and is significantly higher in lower molars compared to upper molars. We relate this differential enamel content to prolonged mineralisation in the posterior tooth positions and suggest a compensatory function of m3 and M3 for functional losses of anterior teeth.

  6. Functional Cues in the Development of Osseous Tooth Support in the Pig, Sus scrofa

    PubMed Central

    Popowics, T.; Yeh, K.; Rafferty, K.; Herring, S.

    2009-01-01

    Alveolar bone supports teeth during chewing through a ligamentous interface with tooth roots. Although tooth loads are presumed to direct the development and adaptation of these tissues, strain distribution in the alveolar bone at different stages of tooth eruption and periodontal development is unknown. This study investigates the biomechanical effects of tooth loading on developing alveolar bone as a tooth erupts into occlusion. Mandibular segments from miniature pigs, Sus scrofa, containing M1 either erupting or in functional occlusion, were loaded in compression. Simultaneous recordings were made from rosette strain gages affixed to the lingual alveolar bone and the M2 crypt. Overall, specimens with erupting M1's were more deformable than specimens with occluding M1's (mean stiffness of 246 vs. 944 Mpa, respectively, p=0.004). The major difference in alveolar strain between the two stages was in orientation. The vertically applied compressive loads were more directly reflected in the alveolar bone strains of erupting M1's, than those of occluding M1's, presumably because of the mediation of a more mature periodontal ligament (PDL) in the latter. The PDL interface between occluding teeth and alveolar bone is likely to stiffen the system, allowing transmission of occlusal loads. Alveolar strains may provide a stimulus for bone growth in the alveolar process and crest. PMID:19501361

  7. The chiton stylus canal: An element delivery pathway for tooth cusp biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jeremy A; Macey, David J; Brooker, Lesley R; Stockdale, Edward J; Saunders, Martin; Clode, Peta L

    2009-05-01

    A detailed investigation of the stylus canal situated within the iron mineralized major lateral teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura hirtosa was undertaken in conjunction with a row-by-row examination of cusp mineralization. The canal is shown to contain columnar epithelial tissue similar to that surrounding the mineralized cusps, including the presence of iron rich particles characteristic of the iron storage protein ferritin. Within the tooth core, a previously undescribed internal pathway or plume is evident above the stylus canal, between the junction zone and mineralizing posterior face of the cusp. Plume formation coincides with the appearance of iron in the superior epithelium and the onset of mineralization at tooth row 13. The plume persists during the delivery of phosphorous and calcium into the tooth core, and is the final region of the cusp to become mineralized. The presence of the stylus canal was confirmed in a further 18 chiton species, revealing that the canal is common to polyplacophoran molluscs. These new data strongly support the growing body of evidence highlighting the importance of the junction zone for tooth mineralization in chiton teeth, and indicate that the chemical and structural environment within the tooth cusp is under far greater biological control than previously considered.

  8. A mimic study on effects of fluoride on tooth enamel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guobin; Wang, Mu; Liu, Xiang Yang

    2010-03-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest tissue in human body, and this superior mechanical property is contributed by its unique microstructures, i.e., oriented growth of rod-like apatite crystals into basic structural units called the prisms Fluoride (F^-) has been recognized to have significant effects on the physical and chemical properties of tooth enamel. However, the role of F^- on microstructures of apatite crystals is not well understood yet. Here we report a detailed investigation on the topic. Mimic in vitro growth of tooth enamel structures is performed at the biophysical conditions in simulated body fluids, using belt-like hydroxyapatite crystals as substrates It shows that F^- on the order of 0.1 mM will dramatically change the morphology of the grown crystals from irregular slabs to nano-needles, and the needles are aligned along the substrate with an average misorientation of ˜12 . Branched growth of bundles of nano-needles occurs with further increase of F^-, and finally, growth of highly porous structures as well as microspheres takes place when the F^- concentration exceeds 5 mM. In comparison with real tooth enamel structures, the relationship between enamel microstructures and tooth caries as well as fluorosis is discussed.

  9. Impact of Ellagic Acid in Bone Formation after Tooth Extraction: An Experimental Study on Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Obaidi, Mazen M. Jamil; Al-Bayaty, Fouad Hussain; Hussaini, Jamal; Khor, Goot Heah

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate the impact of ellagic acid (EA) towards healing tooth socket in diabetic animals, after tooth extraction. Methods. Twenty-four Sprague Dawley male rats weighing 250–300 g were selected for this study. All animals were intraperitoneally injected with 45 mg/kg (b.w.) of freshly prepared streptozotocin (STZ), to induce diabetic mellitus. Then, the animals were anesthetized, and the upper left central incisor was extracted and the whole extracted sockets were filled with Rosuvastatin (RSV). The rats were separated into three groups, comprising 8 rats each. The first group was considered as normal control group and orally treated with normal saline. The second group was regarded as diabetic control group and orally treated with normal saline, whereas the third group comprised diabetic rats, administrated with EA (50 mg/kg) orally. The maxilla tissue stained by eosin and hematoxylin (H&E) was used for histological examinations and immunohistochemical technique. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were used to evaluate the healing process in the extracted tooth socket by immunohistochemistry test. Results. The reactions of immunohistochemistry for FGF-2 and ALP presented stronger expression, predominantly in EA treated diabetic rat, than the untreated diabetic rat. Conclusion. These findings suggest that the administration of EA combined with RSV may have accelerated the healing process of the tooth socket of diabetic rats, after tooth extraction. PMID:25485304

  10. The chiton stylus canal: An element delivery pathway for tooth cusp biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jeremy A; Macey, David J; Brooker, Lesley R; Stockdale, Edward J; Saunders, Martin; Clode, Peta L

    2009-05-01

    A detailed investigation of the stylus canal situated within the iron mineralized major lateral teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura hirtosa was undertaken in conjunction with a row-by-row examination of cusp mineralization. The canal is shown to contain columnar epithelial tissue similar to that surrounding the mineralized cusps, including the presence of iron rich particles characteristic of the iron storage protein ferritin. Within the tooth core, a previously undescribed internal pathway or plume is evident above the stylus canal, between the junction zone and mineralizing posterior face of the cusp. Plume formation coincides with the appearance of iron in the superior epithelium and the onset of mineralization at tooth row 13. The plume persists during the delivery of phosphorous and calcium into the tooth core, and is the final region of the cusp to become mineralized. The presence of the stylus canal was confirmed in a further 18 chiton species, revealing that the canal is common to polyplacophoran molluscs. These new data strongly support the growing body of evidence highlighting the importance of the junction zone for tooth mineralization in chiton teeth, and indicate that the chemical and structural environment within the tooth cusp is under far greater biological control than previously considered. PMID:19107814

  11. Structural Morphology of Molars in Large Mammalian Herbivores: Enamel Content Varies between Tooth Positions

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Daniela E.; Kaiser, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of dental tissues in mammalian herbivores can be very different from taxon to taxon. While grazers tend to have more elaborated and complexly folded enamel ridges, browsers have less complex enamel ridges which can even be so far reduced that they are completely lost. The gradient in relative enamel content and complexity of structures has so far not been addressed within a single species. However, several studies have noted tooth position specific wear rates in small mammals (rabbits, guinea pigs) which may be related to individual tooth morphology. We investigate whether differentiated enamel content by tooth position is also to be found in large herbivores. We use CT-scanning techniques to quantify relative enamel content in upper and lower molar teeth of 21 large herbivorous mammal species. By using a broad approach and including both perissodactyls and artiodactyls, we address phylogenetic intraspecific differences in relative enamel content. We find that enamel is highly unevenly distributed among molars (upper M1, M2, M3 and lower m1, m2, m3) in most taxa and that relative enamel content is independent of phylogeny. Overall, relative enamel content increases along the molar tooth row and is significantly higher in lower molars compared to upper molars. We relate this differential enamel content to prolonged mineralisation in the posterior tooth positions and suggest a compensatory function of m3 and M3 for functional losses of anterior teeth. PMID:26313359

  12. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  13. Age-Related Tooth Wear Differs between Forest and Savanna Primates

    PubMed Central

    Galbany, Jordi; Romero, Alejandro; Mayo-Alesón, Mercedes; Itsoma, Fiacre; Gamarra, Beatriz; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Willaume, Eric; Kappeler, Peter M.; Charpentier, Marie J. E.

    2014-01-01

    Tooth wear in primates is caused by aging and ecological factors. However, comparative data that would allow us to delineate the contribution of each of these factors are lacking. Here, we contrast age-dependent molar tooth wear by scoring percent of dentine exposure (PDE) in two wild African primate populations from Gabonese forest and Kenyan savanna habitats. We found that forest-dwelling mandrills exhibited significantly higher PDE with age than savanna yellow baboons. Mandrills mainly feed on large tough food items, such as hard-shell fruits, and inhabit an ecosystem with a high presence of mineral quartz. By contrast, baboons consume large amounts of exogenous grit that adheres to underground storage organs but the proportion of quartz in the soils where baboons live is low. Our results support the hypothesis that not only age but also physical food properties and soil composition, particularly quartz richness, are factors that significantly impact tooth wear. We further propose that the accelerated dental wear in mandrills resulting in flatter molars with old age may represent an adaptation to process hard food items present in their environment. PMID:24732967

  14. Enamel Regeneration in Making a Bioengineered Tooth.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruoshi; Zhou, Yachuan; Zhang, Binpeng; Shen, Jiefei; Gao, Bo; Xu, Xin; Ye, Ling; Zheng, Liwei; Zhou, Xuedong

    2015-01-01

    Overall enamel is the hard tissue overlying teeth that is vulnerable to caries, congenital defects, and damage due to trauma. Not only is enamel incapable of self-repair in most species, but it is also subject to attrition. Besides the use of artificial materials to restore enamel, enamel regeneration is a promising approach to repair enamel damage. In order to comprehend the progression and challenges in tissue-engineered enamel, this article elaborates alternative stem cells potential for enamel secretion and expounds fined strategies for enamel regeneration in bioengineered teeth. Consequently, more and more cell types have been induced to differentiate into ameloblasts and to secrete enamel, and an increasing number of reports have emerged to provide various potential approaches to induce cells to secrete enamel based on recombination experiments, artificial bioactive nano-materials, or gene manipulation. Accordingly, it is expected to further project more optimal conditions for enamel formation in bioengineering based on a more thorough knowledge of reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, by which the procedures of enamel regeneration are able to be practically recapitulated and widely spread for the potential clinical value of enamel repair.

  15. Use of a Piezosurgery Technique to Remove a Deeply Impacted Supernumerary Tooth in the Anterior Maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Sukegawa, Shintaro; Kanno, Takahiro; Kawakami, Kiyokazu; Shibata, Akane; Takahashi, Yuka; Furuki, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Deeply impacted supernumerary teeth in the anterior maxillary cannot be generally removed by the conventional labial or palatal surgical approach because of the risk of damaging the surrounding soft tissues and the possibility of injuring the roots of adjacent permanent teeth. In piezosurgery, bony tissues are selectively cut, thereby avoiding the soft tissue damage caused by rotary cutting instruments. We report the case of a 15-year-old Japanese boy from whom a deeply impacted supernumerary tooth in the anterior maxillary was safely removed through the floor of the nasal cavity. The surgical extraction was performed without damaging the nasal mucosa or adjacent structures such as the roots of the adjacent permanent teeth. Considering that piezosurgery limits the extent of surgical invasion, this technique can be practiced as a minimally invasive and safe surgical procedure for treating suitably selected cases with a deeply impacted supernumerary tooth. PMID:26779355

  16. Glucose uptake mediated by glucose transporter 1 is essential for early tooth morphogenesis and size determination of murine molars.

    PubMed

    Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Harada, Hidemitsu; Takata, Hiroki; Baba, Otto; Ohshima, Hayato

    2012-03-01

    Glucose is an essential source of energy for body metabolism and is transported into cells by glucose transporters (GLUTs). Well-characterized class I GLUT is subdivided into GLUTs1-4, which are selectively expressed depending on tissue glucose requirements. However, there is no available data on the role of GLUTs during tooth development. This study aims to clarify the functional significance of class I GLUT during murine tooth development using immunohistochemistry and an in vitro organ culture experiment with an inhibitor of GLUTs1/2, phloretin, and Glut1 and Glut2 short interfering RNA (siRNA). An intense GLUT1-immunoreaction was localized in the enamel organ of bud-stage molar tooth germs, where the active cell proliferation occurred. By the bell stage, the expression of GLUT1 in the dental epithelium was dramatically decreased in intensity, and subsequently began to appear in the stratum intermedium at the late bell stage. On the other hand, GLUT2-immunoreactivity was weakly observed in the whole tooth germs throughout all stages. The inhibition of GLUTs1/2 by phloretin in the bud-stage tooth germs induced the disturbance of primary enamel knot formation, resulting in the developmental arrest of the explants and the squamous metaplasia of dental epithelial cells. Furthermore, the inhibition of GLUTs1/2 in cap-to-bell-stage tooth germs reduced tooth size in a dose dependent manner. These findings suggest that the expression of GLUT1 and GLUT2 in the dental epithelial and mesenchymal cells seems to be precisely and spatiotemporally controlled, and the glucose uptake mediated by GLUT1 plays a crucial role in the early tooth morphogenesis and tooth size determination. PMID:22226978

  17. Amorphous calcium phosphates for tooth mineralization.

    PubMed

    Tung, Ming S; Eichmiller, Frederick C

    2004-09-01

    The destruction of tooth structure through caries and erosive processes is due to two types of acidic challenges that affect the tooth in different ways. Acidic attack by cariogenic bacteria initially produces subsurface lesions that weaken the enamel and, if left unchecked, can progress through the enamel and dentin and eventually into the pulpal cavity. Erosive attack by acidic foods and beverages removes mineral from the surface of enamel and initially causes dulling and loss of tooth luster; if left unchecked, it can progress to a more severe loss of enamel thickness and contour. This article focuses on the potential means of improving the cosmetic appearance of teeth by depositing mineral into surface defects. Several approaches use the unique properties of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) compounds, which have the highest rates of formation and dissolution among all the calcium phosphates. ACP has been shown to rapidly hydrolyze to form apatite, similar to carbonated apatite, the tooth mineral. Products containing ACP or ingredients that form ACP can include toothpastes, mouth rinses, artificial saliva, chewing gums, topically applied coatings, and other vehicles for topical use. When applied, they readily precipitate ACPs on and into tooth-surface defects. These products hopefully will provide users with new tools to restore and enhance the smoothness and luster of their teeth.

  18. [Growth factors in human tooth development].

    PubMed

    Bellone, C; Barni, T; Pagni, L; Balboni, G C; Vannelli, G B

    1990-03-01

    Our research concerns the immunohistochemical localization of EGF and IGF-I receptors in the tooth germ, using monoclonal antibodies. The results show that in the early phases of human tooth development EGF and IGF-I receptors are present. At bud stage both receptors are localized at dental laminae level, in some epithelial cells of the tooth bud and in some mesenchymal cells. At cap stage the receptors are present in the outer and inner enamel epithelium, and in some cells of stellate reticulum. As far as concerns the mesenchymal cells, some cells of dental papilla in contact with enamel organ, are intensely positive. The immunopositivity is present also in some mesenchymal cells at follicular level. At late cap stage and at early bell stage receptors are not present at inner enamel epithelium level but they can be detectable in the mesenchyma of dental papilla and in some cells of the follicle. On the basis of these results it may be hypothesized that EGF and IGF-I can act as growth factors in the modulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation during the human tooth morphogenesis. Moreover, it is possible that these substances can play a role in the mesenchymal-epithelial interaction in the developing human tooth.