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Sample records for hard-solid lubricant coating

  1. Lubricant Coating Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    "Peen Plating," a NASA developed process for applying molybdenum disulfide, is the key element of Techniblast Co.'s SURFGUARD process for applying high strength solid lubricants. The process requires two machines -- one for cleaning and one for coating. The cleaning step allows the coating to be bonded directly to the substrate to provide a better "anchor." The coating machine applies a half a micron thick coating. Then, a blast gun, using various pressures to vary peening intensities for different applications, fires high velocity "media" -- peening hammers -- ranging from plastic pellets to steel shot. Techniblast was assisted by Rural Enterprises, Inc. Coating service can be performed at either Techniblast's or a customer's facility.

  2. Support of Oil Lubrication by Bonded Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holinski, R.

    1984-01-01

    A new generation of lubricating lacquers for treatment of metal surfaces has been developed. These coatings have proved to be oil-compatible and are used in oil-lubricated systems. The oil lubrication is supported thereby through reduction of friction and increase of load-carrying capacity during boundary conditions. For difficult tribological systems, the problem-solving lubricating concept has proved to be the beneficial combination of lubricating oil and bonded coatings. A number of practical applications are presented.

  3. Liquid-Solid Self-Lubricated Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armada, S.; Schmid, R.; Equey, S.; Fagoaga, I.; Espallargas, N.

    2013-02-01

    Self-lubricated coatings have been a major topic of interest in thermal spray in the last decades. Self-lubricated coatings obtained by thermal spray are exclusively based on solid lubricants (PTFE, h-BN, graphite, MoS2, etc.) embedded in the matrix. Production of thermal spray coatings containing liquid lubricants has not yet been achieved because of the complexity of keeping a liquid in a solid matrix during the spraying process. In the present article, the first liquid-solid self-lubricating thermal spray coatings are presented. The coatings are produced by inserting lubricant-filled capsules inside a polymeric matrix. The goal of the coating is to release lubricant to the system when needed. The first produced coatings consisted solely of capsules for confirming the feasibility of the process. For obtaining such a coating, the liquid-filled capsules were injected in the thermal spray flame without any other feedstock material. Once the concept and the idea were proven, a polymer was co-sprayed together with the capsules to obtain a coating containing the lubricant-filled capsules distributed in the solid polymeric matrix. The coatings and the self-lubricated properties have been investigated by means of optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and tribological tests.

  4. Coatings for wear and lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in the tribological uses of rf-sputtered and ion plated films of solid film lubricants (laminar solids, soft metals, organic polymers) and wear resistant refractory compounds (carbides, nitrides, silicides) are reviewed. The sputtering and ion plating potentials and the corresponding coatings formed were evaluated relative to the friction coefficient, wear endurance life and mechanical properties. The tribological and mechanical properties for each kind of film are discussed in terms of film adherence, coherence, density, grain size, morphology, internal stresses, thickness, and substrate conditions such as temperature, topography, chemistry and dc-biasing. The ion plated metallic films in addition to improved tribological properties also have better mechanical properties such as tensile strength and fatigue life.

  5. Coatings for wear and lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper we review the recent advances in the tribological uses of R.F.-sputtered and ion-plated films of solid film lubricants (laminar solids, soft metals, organic polymers) and wear-resistant refractory compounds (carbides, nitrides, silicides). The sputtering and ion-plating potentials and the corresponding coatings formed are evaluated relative to the friction coefficient, wear endurance life and mechanical properties. The tribological and mechanical properties of each kind of film are discussed in terms of film adherence, coherence, density, grain size, morphology, internal stresses and thickness and substrate conditions such as temperature, topography, chemistry and d.c. biasing. The ion-plated metallic films in addition to improved tribological properties also have better mechanical properties such as tensile strength and fatigue life.

  6. High-Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Edmonds, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA PS400 is a solid lubricant coating invented for high-temperature tribological applications. This plasma-sprayed coating is a variant of the previously patented PS304 coating, and has been formulated to provide higher density, smoother surface finish, and better dimensional stability. This innovation is a new composite material that provides a means to reduce friction and wear in mechanical components. PS400 is a blend of a nickel-molybdenum binder, chrome oxide hardener, silver lubricant, and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic lubricant that can either be sprayed or deposited by other means, such as powder metallurgy. The resulting composite material is then finished by grinding and polishing to produce a smooth, self-lubricating surface.

  7. Plasma-sprayed self-lubricating coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, H. H.; Logan, W. R.; Harada, Y.

    1982-01-01

    One of the most important criterion for acceptable commercial application of a multiple phase composition is uniformity and reproducibility. This means that the performance characteristics of the coat - e.g., its lubricating properties, bond strength to the substrate, and thermal properties - can be readily predicted to give a desired performance. The improvement of uniformity and reproducibility of the coats, the oxidation behavior at three temperature ranges, the effect of bond coat and the effect of preheat treatment as measured by adhesive strength tests, coating examination procedures, and physical property measurements were studied. The following modifications improved the uniformity and reproducibility: (1) changes and closer control in the particle size range of the raw materials used, (2) increasing the binder content from 3.2% to 4.1% (dried weight), and (3) analytical processing procedures using step by step checking to assure consistency.

  8. Lubrication by Diamond and Diamondlike Carbon Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1997-01-01

    Regardless of environment (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, dry nitrogen, or water), ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) and nitrogen-ion-implanted, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films had low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6)cu mm/N(dot)m). These films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings regardless of environment. On the other hand, as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond films; polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond films; and polished and then fluorinated, coarse-grain CVD diamond films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings in humid air, in dry nitrogen, and in water, but they had a high coefficient of friction and a high wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. The polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond film revealed an extremely low wear rate, far less than 10(exp 10) cu mm/N(dot)m, in water.

  9. Self-lubricating coatings for high-temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1990-01-01

    Solid lubricants with maximum temperature capabilities of about 1100 C are known. Unfortunately, none of the solid lubricants with the highest temperature capabilities are effective below 400 C. However, research at NASA's Lewis Research Center shows that silver and stable fluorides such as calcium and barium fluorides act synergistically to provide lubrication from below room temperature to about 900 C. This paper describes plasma-sprayed composite coatings that contain these solid lubricants in combination with a metal-bonded chromium carbide. The lubricants control friction, and the carbide matrix provides wear resistance. Successful tests of these coatings as backup lubricants for compliant gas bearings in turbomachinery and as self-lubricating liners in a four-cylinder Stirling engine are discussed.

  10. Water Lubrication of Stainless Steel using Reduced Graphene Oxide Coating

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae-Jin; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Lubrication of mechanical systems using water instead of conventional oil lubricants is extremely attractive from the view of resource conservation and environmental protection. However, insufficient film thickness of water due to low viscosity and chemical reaction of water with metallic materials have been a great obstacle in utilization of water as an effective lubricant. Herein, the friction between a 440 C stainless steel (SS) ball and a 440 C stainless steel (SS) plate in water lubrication could be reduced by as much as 6-times by coating the ball with reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The friction coefficient with rGO coated ball in water lubrication was comparable to the value obtained with the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. Moreover, the wear rate of the SS plate slid against the rGO coated ball in water lubrication was 3-times lower than that of the SS plate slid against the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. These results clearly demonstrated that water can be effectively utilized as a lubricant instead of oil to lower the friction and wear of SS components by coating one side with rGO. Implementation of this technology in mechanical systems is expected to aid in significant reduction of environmental pollution caused by the extensive use of oil lubricants. PMID:26593645

  11. Water Lubrication of Stainless Steel using Reduced Graphene Oxide Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hae-Jin; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2015-11-01

    Lubrication of mechanical systems using water instead of conventional oil lubricants is extremely attractive from the view of resource conservation and environmental protection. However, insufficient film thickness of water due to low viscosity and chemical reaction of water with metallic materials have been a great obstacle in utilization of water as an effective lubricant. Herein, the friction between a 440 C stainless steel (SS) ball and a 440 C stainless steel (SS) plate in water lubrication could be reduced by as much as 6-times by coating the ball with reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The friction coefficient with rGO coated ball in water lubrication was comparable to the value obtained with the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. Moreover, the wear rate of the SS plate slid against the rGO coated ball in water lubrication was 3-times lower than that of the SS plate slid against the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. These results clearly demonstrated that water can be effectively utilized as a lubricant instead of oil to lower the friction and wear of SS components by coating one side with rGO. Implementation of this technology in mechanical systems is expected to aid in significant reduction of environmental pollution caused by the extensive use of oil lubricants.

  12. Self-lubricating coatings for high-temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1987-01-01

    Some present-day aeropropulsion systems impose severe demands on the thermal and oxidative stability of lubricant, bearing, and seal materials. These demands will be much more severe for operational systems around the turn of the century. Solid lubricants with maximum temperature capabilities of about 1100 C are known. Unfortunately, none of the solid lubricants with the highest temperature capabilities are effective below approximately 400 C. However, research shows that silver and stable fluorides, such as calcium and barium fluoride act synergistically to provide lubrication from below room temperature to approximately 900 C. Plasma-sprayed, self-lubricating composite coatings that were developed at Lewis are described. Background information is given on coatings, designed as PS100 and PS101, that contain the solid lubricants in a Nichrome matrix. These coatings have low friction coefficients over a wide temperature range, but they have inadequate wear resistance for some long-duration applications. Wear resistance was dramatically improved in a recently developed coating PS200, by replacing the Nichrome matrix material with metal-bonded chromium carbide containing dispersed silver and calcium fluoride/barium fluoride eutectic (CaF2/BaF2). The lubricants control friction and the carbide matrix provides excellent wear resistance. Successful tests of these coatings are discussed.

  13. A New Type of Self-lubricated Thermal Spray Coatings: Liquid Lubricants Embedded in a Metal Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espallargas, N.; Armada, S.

    2015-01-01

    Oils and greases are commonly used for lubricating, rotating and sliding systems such as bearings, gears, connectors, etc. The maintenance of such lubricated systems in some applications where access is difficult (e.g., offshore wind farms and subsea equipment) increases the operational costs. In some cases, it can be thought that the use of solid lubricants (MoS2, PTFE, graphite, etc.) embedded in coatings could be a solution for such applications; however, the mechanical and dynamic conditions of most of the systems are not appropriate for solid lubricants. Despite this, solid lubricants such as PTFE and MoS2 have been largely employed in different industries, especially in those applications where liquid lubricants cannot be used and when the dynamic conditions allow for it. Self-lubricated coatings have been a major topic of interest in thermal spray in the last decades. Although the use of liquid lubricants is desirable whenever it is possible, limited research has been addressed toward the development of self-lubricated coatings containing liquid lubricants. One of the main reasons for this is due to the complexity of embedding liquid lubricant reservoirs inside the coating matrix. In the present work, a new type of liquid-solid self-lubricated coatings is presented, being the matrix a metal alloy. Three thermal spray techniques used were as follows: arc-spray, plasma spray, and HVOAF. The metal matrices were two stainless steel types and liquid lubricant-filled capsules with different liquid contents were used. No degradation of the capsules during spraying was observed and the coatings containing capsules were able to keep a low coefficient of friction. The optimal performance is found for the coatings obtained at the lowest spraying temperature and velocity.

  14. A New Type of Self-lubricated Thermal Spray Coatings: Liquid Lubricants Embedded in a Metal Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espallargas, N.; Armada, S.

    2014-09-01

    Oils and greases are commonly used for lubricating, rotating and sliding systems such as bearings, gears, connectors, etc. The maintenance of such lubricated systems in some applications where access is difficult (e.g., offshore wind farms and subsea equipment) increases the operational costs. In some cases, it can be thought that the use of solid lubricants (MoS2, PTFE, graphite, etc.) embedded in coatings could be a solution for such applications; however, the mechanical and dynamic conditions of most of the systems are not appropriate for solid lubricants. Despite this, solid lubricants such as PTFE and MoS2 have been largely employed in different industries, especially in those applications where liquid lubricants cannot be used and when the dynamic conditions allow for it. Self-lubricated coatings have been a major topic of interest in thermal spray in the last decades. Although the use of liquid lubricants is desirable whenever it is possible, limited research has been addressed toward the development of self-lubricated coatings containing liquid lubricants. One of the main reasons for this is due to the complexity of embedding liquid lubricant reservoirs inside the coating matrix. In the present work, a new type of liquid-solid self-lubricated coatings is presented, being the matrix a metal alloy. Three thermal spray techniques used were as follows: arc-spray, plasma spray, and HVOAF. The metal matrices were two stainless steel types and liquid lubricant-filled capsules with different liquid contents were used. No degradation of the capsules during spraying was observed and the coatings containing capsules were able to keep a low coefficient of friction. The optimal performance is found for the coatings obtained at the lowest spraying temperature and velocity.

  15. Effect of metallic coating properties on the tribology of oil- lubricated coated-ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Fenske, G.R.; Erdemir, A.; Erck, R.A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-04-01

    The friction and wear behavior of zirconia ceramics lubricated with solid coatings (AG, Au, and Nb), deposited by ion-beam-assisted-deposition (IBAD) techniques, and a polyol-ester-based synthetic oil are presented. These results demonstrate that, although the simultaneous use of soft (e.g. Ag and Au) solid lubricants in conjunction with the synthetic lubricant significantly reduces the friction and wear under boundary lubrication at temperatures up to 250{degree}C, the durability of the soft films was poor. In contrast, durability of Nb coating (in terms of chemical reactivity and adhesion during the tribo-tests) was better than that of the Ag or Au films. However, the friction and wear behavior of the Nb-coated films was poorer than that of the ceramics coated with Ag or Au.

  16. Effect of metallic coating properties on the tribology of oil- lubricated coated-ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Fenske, G.R.; Erdemir, A.; Erck, R.A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    The friction and wear behavior of zirconia ceramics lubricated with solid coatings (AG, Au, and Nb), deposited by ion-beam-assisted-deposition (IBAD) techniques, and a polyol-ester-based synthetic oil are presented. These results demonstrate that, although the simultaneous use of soft (e.g. Ag and Au) solid lubricants in conjunction with the synthetic lubricant significantly reduces the friction and wear under boundary lubrication at temperatures up to 250{degree}C, the durability of the soft films was poor. In contrast, durability of Nb coating (in terms of chemical reactivity and adhesion during the tribo-tests) was better than that of the Ag or Au films. However, the friction and wear behavior of the Nb-coated films was poorer than that of the ceramics coated with Ag or Au.

  17. Vacuum tribological behaviour of self lubricant quasicrystalline composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcí de Blas, F. J.; Román, A.; de Miguel, C.; Longo, F.; Muelas, R.; Agüero, A.

    2003-09-01

    High temperature resistant self-lubricant coatings are needed in space vehicles for components that operate at high temperatures and/or under vacuum. Thick composite lubricant coatings containing quasicrystalline alloys (QC) as the hard phase for wear resistance, have been deposited by thermal spray. The coatings also comprise lubricating materials (silver and BaF2-CaF2 eutectic) and NiCr as the tough component. This paper describes the vacuum tribological properties of TH103, a coating belonging to this family, with excellent microstructural quality. The coating was deposited by HVOF and tested under vacuum on a pin-on-disc tribometer. Different loads, linear speeds and pin materials were studied. The pin scars and disc wear tracks were characterized by EDS-SEM. A minimum mean steady friction coefficient of 0.32 was obtained employing a X-750 Ni superalloy pin in vacuum conditions under 10 N load and 15 cm/s linear speed, showing moderate wear of the disc and low wear of the pin.

  18. Influence of service temperature on tribological characteristics of self-lubricant coatings: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun-Feng; Jiang, Yan; Hardell, Jens; Prakash, Braham; Fang, Qian-Feng

    2013-03-01

    Self-lubricating coatings have been widely used to reduce friction in moving machine assemblies. However, the tribological performance of these coatings is strongly dependent on the service temperature. In this paper, an extensive review pertaining to the influence of operating service temperature on tribological performance of self-lubricating coatings has been carried out. Based on the effective lubricating temperature range, the self-lubricating coatings developed in the past have been divided into three groups: low temperature lubricant coating (from -200°C to room temperature), moderate temperature lubricant coating (from room temperature to 500°C) and high temperature lubricant coating (> 500°C). Ideas concerning possible ways to extend the operating temperature range of self-lubricating coatings have been presented as follows: hybridized tribological coating, adaptive tribological coatings, and diffusion rate limited solid lubricant coating. In addition, a new self-lubricating coating formulation for potential application at a wide operating temperature range has been proposed.

  19. Effect of metallic-coating properties on the tribology of coated and oil-lubricated ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.R.; Erck, R.A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-09-01

    Friction and wear behavior was determined for zirconia ceramics lubricated with solid coatings (Ag, Au, and Nb) deposited by ion-beam-assisted-deposition (IBAD) techniques, and a polyol-ester-based synthetic oil. Although the use of soft Ag and Au coatings as solid lubricants in conjunction with the synthetic oil significantly reduced the friction and wear under boundary lubrication at temperatures up to 250[degrees]C, these films had poor durability. In contrast, the Nb coating was more durable (in terms of chemical reactivity and adhesion during the tribo-tests) than were the Ag or Au films. However, the friction and wear behavior of the Nb-coated zirconia was poorer than that of the ceramics coated with Ag or Au.

  20. Wide-temperature-spectrum self-lubricating coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Self-lubricating, multicomponent coatings, which lubricate over a wide range of operating conditions, are described. The coatings were successfully applied by plasma-spraying mixed powders onto superalloy substrates. They were evaluated in friction and wear experiments, and in sliding contact bearing tests. These coatings are wear resistant by virtue of their self lubricating characteristics rather than because of extreme hardness; a further benefit is low friction. Experiments with simple pin on disk sliding specimens and oscillating plain cylindrical bearing tests were performed to evaluate the tribological properties of the coatings. It was shown that coatings of nichrome, glass and calcium fluoride are self-lubricating from about 500 to 900 C, but give high friction at the lower temperatures. The addition of silver to the coating composition improved the low temperature bearing properties and resulted in coatings which are self-lubricating from cryogenic temperatures to at least 870 C; they are therefore, wide temperature spectrum, self-lubricating compositions.

  1. Effect of the External Lubrication Method for a Rotary Tablet Press on the Adhesion of the Film Coating Layer.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hisami; Toyota, Hiroyasu; Kamiya, Takayuki; Yamashita, Kazunari; Hakomori, Tadashi; Imoto, Junko; Kimura, Shin-Ichiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Itai, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    External lubrication is a useful method which reduces the adhesion of powder to punches and dies by spraying lubricants during the tableting process. However, no information is available on whether the tablets prepared using an external lubrication system can be applicable for a film coating process. In this study, we evaluated the adhesion force of the film coating layer to the surface of tablets prepared using an external lubrication method, compared with those prepared using internal lubrication method. We also evaluated wettability, roughness and lubricant distribution state on the tablet surface before film coating, and investigated the relationship between peeling of the film coating layer and these tablet surface properties. Increasing lubrication through the external lubrication method decreased wettability of the tablet surface. However, no change was observed in the adhesion force of the film coating layer. On the other hand, increasing lubrication through the internal lubrication method, decreased both wettability of the tablet surface and the adhesion force of the film coating layer. The magnesium stearate distribution state on the tablet surface was assessed using an X-ray fluorescent analyzer and lubricant agglomerates were observed in the case of the internal lubrication method. However, the lubricant was uniformly dispersed in the external lubrication samples. These results indicate that the distribution state of the lubricant affects the adhesion force of the film coating layer, and external lubrication maintained sufficient lubricity and adhesion force of the film coating layer with a small amount of lubricant.

  2. Elastic deformation of soft coatings due to lubrication forces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yumo; Tan, Matthew R; Frechette, Joelle

    2017-08-17

    Elastic deformation of rigid materials with soft coatings (stratified materials) due to lubrication forces can alter the interpretation of dynamic surface forces measurements and prevent contact formation between approaching surfaces. Understanding the role of elastic deformation on the process of fluid drainage is necessary, in particular for the case where one (or both) of the interacting materials consists of a rigid substrate with a soft coating. We combine lubrication theory and solid linear elasticity to describe the dynamic of fluid drainage past a compliant stratified boundary. The analysis presented covers the full range of coating thicknesses, from an elastic foundation to a half-space for an incompressible coating. We decouple the individual contributions of the coating thickness and material properties on the elastic deformation, hydrodynamic forces, and fluid film thickness. We obtain a simple expression for the shift in contact position during force measurements that is valid for many experimental conditions. We compare directly the effect of stratification on the out-of-contact deformation to the well-known effect of stratification on indentation. We show that corrections developed for stratification in contact mechanics are not applicable to elastohydrodynamic deformation. Finally, we provide generalized contour maps that can be employed directly to estimate the elastic deformation present in most dynamic surface force measurements.

  3. Chromium nitride-silver self-lubricating nanoporous hard coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan Christopher P

    The focus of this thesis research is to explore a new approach to adaptive solid lubrication using nanoporous hard coatings. To investigate this approach, I deposited prototype coatings for study consisting of a hard chromium nitride (CrN) matrix co-deposited with a lubricious silver (Ag) phase by reactive magnetron co-sputtering. The idea is to exploit the relative immiscibility of the two phases to create nanocomposite structures with intrinsic lubricant transport properties enabled by the presence of the nanopores. Specifically, I develop the scientific understanding of the critical growth parameters that govern nanocomposite structural evolution which in turn control mechanical properties, solid lubricant diffusion, and tribological response. Mechanical properties were analyzed by both micro and nanoindentation measurements for the composites as a function of Ag aggregate morphology. For Ts ≤ 500°C, hardness as measured by nanoindentation into the surface is relatively uniform giving values of 14.6, 13.6, and 14.3 GPa for Ts = 300, 400, and 500°C respectively. For Ts > 500°C, the cross-sectional microhardness increases with T s from 16.5 to 19.7 to 24.3 GPa for Ts = 500, 600, and 700°C, respectively, which is attributed to a decrease in the effective Ag concentration associated with temperature activated segregation. The average hardness for pure CrN samples is 23.8 and 27.5 GPa as measured by surface nanoindentation and cross-sectional microindentation, respectively. Lubricant transport behavior was characterized by a series of vacuum annealing experiments. Vacuum annealing experiments at Ta = 425, 525, and 625°C show that Ag diffuses to the coating surface to form lubricious surface aggregates and that the rate for Ag lubricant transport increases with increasing DeltaT (Ta - Ts) for Ta > Ts, as determined by quantitative electron microscopy surface analyses. However, the Ag remains in the CrN matrix for Ta < Ts, which is attributed to the Ag aggregate

  4. Solid film lubricants and thermal control coatings flown aboard the EOIM-3 MDA sub-experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Taylor J.; David, Kaia E.; Babel, Hank W.

    1995-01-01

    Additional experimental data were desired to support the selection of candidate thermal control coatings and solid film lubricants for the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) Space Station hardware. The third Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions With Materials Mission (EOIM-3) flight experiment presented an opportunity to study the effects of the low Earth orbit environment on thermal control coatings and solid film lubricants. MDA provided five solid film lubricants and two anodic thermal control coatings for EOIM-3. The lubricant sample set consisted of three solid film lubricants with organic binders one solid film lubricant with an inorganic binder, and one solid film lubricant with no binder. The anodize coating sample set consisted of undyed sulfuric acid anodize and cobalt sulfide dyed sulfuric acid anodize, each on two different substrate aluminum alloys. The organic and inorganic binders in the solid film lubricants experienced erosion, and the lubricating pigments experienced oxidation. MDA is continuing to assess the effect of exposure to the low Earth orbit environment on the life and friction properties of the lubricants. Results to date support the design practice of shielding solid film lubricants from the low Earth orbit environment. Post-flight optical property analysis of the anodized specimens indicated that there were limited contamination effects and some atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation effects. These effects appeared to be within the values predicted by simulated ground testing and analysis of these materials, and they were different for each coating and substrate.

  5. Plasma-sprayed metal-glass fluoride coatings for lubrication to 1170 K (1650 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma spray of Nichrome matrix composite contains dispersed glass for oxidation protection and calcium fluoride for lubrication. Coatings can be applied to bearing journals and bearing bores. Coating was easily machinable and had excellent bond strength on substrate metal.

  6. Tribochemistry and Wear Life Improvement in Liquid-Lubricated H-DLC-Coated Bearings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-25

    AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TR-2007(8565)-2 Tribochemistry and Wear Life Improvement in Liquid-Lubricated H-DLC-Coated Bearings 25 July 2007 Prepared by J...Tribochemistry and Wear Life Improvement 5b. GRANT NUMBER in Liquid-Lubricated H-DLC-Coated Bearings 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 6d. PROJECT NUMBER...steel thrust bearings , lubricated with a multiply-alkylated cyclopentane oil, either unformulated, or formulated with lead naphthenate or an aryl

  7. Performance and Testing of Harmonic Drive Gears Lubricated with two Types of Lubrication: Liquid-Lubricated H-DLC-Coating and Solid MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Zhihua; Hao, Hong; Zhou, Hui; Guo, Shining; Hu, Hanjun; Yang, Lamaocao; Zhang, Kaifeng

    2013-09-01

    A series of performance testing regarding some harmonic drive gears with two types of lubrication had been carried out respectively in order to confirm the performance degradation of liquid-lubricated gears and the reliability of solid-lubricated ones. Accelerated life test under four kinds of output torque stress were adopted to evaluate the gears which were treated with PFPE-lubricated H-DLC-coating and to verify whether they could meet the requirement of long lifetime service. Several extreme environment simulation testing and life testing were designed to verify the feasibility and reliability of gears which were lubricated with sputtering MoS2 composite films and to confirm that they could be applied in extreme environment such as broader range of temperature from - 60 °C to +80°C simultaneous with high output torque(30Nm).

  8. Robotic burnishing system for solid film lubricant coated parts

    SciTech Connect

    Fureigh, M.L.

    1986-05-01

    A robotic burnishing system in the Painting Department reduced the operation average standard hour content by 64% and maintains a good part-to-part quality level for a group of parts coated with solid film lubricant. Required to be safe and simple to operate, the system uses a small PUMA 260 robot to process coated axisymmetrical pieceparts. Special tooling and seven pairs of robotic fingers were designed and built to handle 24 different small pieceparts. Individual robotic programs were created for each part and stored on 5-1/4 in. floppy disks with backup copies in Numerical Control. The operators and the manufacturing department readily accepted the robotic system. Additional part geometries will be developed for robotic processing. 12 figs.

  9. Lubricative coatings of copper oxide for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Masahiro; Kasahara, Akira; Oishi, Tetsuo; Konishi, Youko; Tosa, Masahiro

    2003-08-01

    Lubricative coatings of copper oxide on a stainless-steel substrate were synthesized by a rf magnetron sputter deposition method with a different gas ratio of oxygen and argon in sputter plasma. The crystal structure of the coatings was analyzed with x-ray diffraction spectroscopy. The friction force of the coating films in atmospheric pressure and in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) was evaluated by a vacuum pin-on-disk tribometer with different ball probes. Friction coefficients (μ) as low as 0.03 and 0.05 for a stainless-steel ball were achieved in atmospheric pressure and in an UHV, respectively. A value of μ=0.04 was also realized for a silicon nitride ball both in atmospheric pressure and in an UHV. Surface energy was analyzed by a contact angle measuring method which reveals that the behavior of the frictional properties correspond with that of the surface energy. Since the coatings consist of oxide, they will be applicable to a low-frictional coating with resistance to oxidation for aerospace applications in a low Earth orbit environment.

  10. Wear-Resistant, Self-Lubricating Surfaces of Diamond Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1995-01-01

    In humid air and dry nitrogen, as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films and polished, coarse-grain diamond films have low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/N-m). In an ultrahigh vacuum (10(exp -7) Pa), however, they have high steady-state coefficients of friction (greater than 0.6) and high wear rates (greater than or equal to 10(exp -4) mm(exp 3)/N-m). Therefore, the use of as-deposited, fine-grain and polished, coarse-grain diamond films as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings must be limited to normal air or gaseous environments such as dry nitrogen. On the other hand, carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films and nitrogen-ion-implanted, coarse-grain diamond films have low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/N-m) in all three environments. These films can be effectively used as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings in an ultrahigh vacuum as well as in normal air and dry nitrogen.

  11. Solid Lubricants and Coatings for Extreme Environments: State-of-the-Art Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2007-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to survey anticipated requirements for solid lubricants in lunar and Martian environments, as well as the effects of these environments on lubricants and their performance and durability. The success of habitats and vehicles on the Moon and Mars, and ultimately, of the human exploration of and permanent human presence on the Moon and Mars, are critically dependent on the correct and reliable operation of many moving mechanical assemblies and tribological components. The coefficient of friction and lifetime of any lubricant generally vary with the environment, and lubricants have very different characteristics under different conditions. It is essential, therefore, to select the right lubrication technique and lubricant for each mechanical and tribological application. Several environmental factors are hazardous to performance integrity on the Moon and Mars. Potential threats common to both the Moon and Mars are low ambient temperatures, wide daily temperature swings (thermal cycling), solar flux, cosmic radiation, and large quantities of dust. The surface of Mars has the additional challenges of dust storms, winds, and a carbon dioxide atmosphere. Solid lubricants and coatings are needed for lunar and Martian applications, where liquid lubricants are ineffective and undesirable, and these lubricants must perform well in the extreme environments of the Moon, Mars, and space, as well as on Earth, where they will be assembled and tested. No solid lubricants and coatings and their systems currently exist or have been validated that meet these requirements, so new solid lubricants must be designed and validated for these applications.

  12. Fabrics coated with lubricated nanostructures display robust omniphobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shillingford, Cicely; MacCallum, Noah; Wong, Tak-Sing; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The development of a stain-resistant and pressure-stable textile is desirable for consumer and industrial applications alike, yet it remains a challenge that current technologies have been unable to fully address. Traditional superhydrophobic surfaces, inspired by the lotus plant, are characterized by two main components: hydrophobic chemical functionalization and surface roughness. While this approach produces water-resistant surfaces, these materials have critical weaknesses that hinder their practical utility, in particular as robust stain-free fabrics. For example, traditional superhydrophobic surfaces fail (i.e., become stained) when exposed to low-surface-tension liquids, under pressure when impacted by a high-velocity stream of water (e.g., rain), and when exposed to physical forces such as abrasion and twisting. We have recently introduced slippery lubricant-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS), a self-healing, pressure-tolerant and omniphobic surface, to address these issues. Herein we present the rational design and optimization of nanostructured lubricant-infused fabrics and demonstrate markedly improved performance over traditional superhydrophobic textile treatments: SLIPS-functionalized cotton and polyester fabrics exhibit decreased contact angle hysteresis and sliding angles, omni-repellent properties against various fluids including polar and nonpolar liquids, pressure tolerance and mechanical robustness, all of which are not readily achievable with the state-of-the-art superhydrophobic coatings.

  13. Fabrics coated with lubricated nanostructures display robust omniphobicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shillingford, C; MacCallum, N; Wong, TS; Kim, P; Aizenberg, J

    2013-12-11

    The development of a stain-resistant and pressure-stable textile is desirable for consumer and industrial applications alike, yet it remains a challenge that current technologies have been unable to fully address. Traditional superhydrophobic surfaces, inspired by the lotus plant, are characterized by two main components: hydrophobic chemical functionalization and surface roughness. While this approach produces water-resistant surfaces, these materials have critical weaknesses that hinder their practical utility, in particular as robust stain-free fabrics. For example, traditional superhydrophobic surfaces fail (i.e., become stained) when exposed to low-surface-tension liquids, under pressure when impacted by a high-velocity stream of water (e. g., rain), and when exposed to physical forces such as abrasion and twisting. We have recently introduced slippery lubricant-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS), a self-healing, pressure-tolerant and omniphobic surface, to address these issues. Herein we present the rational design and optimization of nanostructured lubricant-infused fabrics and demonstrate markedly improved performance over traditional superhydrophobic textile treatments: SLIPS-functionalized cotton and polyester fabrics exhibit decreased contact angle hysteresis and sliding angles, omni-repellent properties against various fluids including polar and nonpolar liquids, pressure tolerance and mechanical robustness, all of which are not readily achievable with the state-of-the-art superhydrophobic coatings.

  14. Fabrics coated with lubricated nanostructures display robust omniphobicity

    DOE PAGES

    Shillingford, Cicely; MacCallum, Noah; Wong, Tak -Sing; ...

    2013-12-11

    The development of a stain-resistant and pressure-stable textile is desirable for consumer and industrial applications alike, yet it remains a challenge that current technologies have been unable to fully address. Traditional superhydrophobic surfaces, inspired by the lotus plant, are characterized by two main components: hydrophobic chemical functionalization and surface roughness. While this approach produces water-resistant surfaces, these materials have critical weaknesses that hinder their practical utility, in particular as robust stain-free fabrics. For example, traditional superhydrophobic surfaces fail (i.e., become stained) when exposed to low-surface-tension liquids, under pressure when impacted by a high-velocity stream of water (e.g., rain), and whenmore » exposed to physical forces such as abrasion and twisting. We have recently introduced slippery lubricant-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS), a self-healing, pressure-tolerant and omniphobic surface, to address these issues. However we present the rational design and optimization of nanostructured lubricant-infused fabrics and demonstrate markedly improved performance over traditional superhydrophobic textile treatments: SLIPS-functionalized cotton and polyester fabrics exhibit decreased contact angle hysteresis and sliding angles, omni-repellent properties against various fluids including polar and nonpolar liquids, pressure tolerance and mechanical robustness, all of which are not readily achievable with the state-of-the-art superhydrophobic coatings.« less

  15. Fabrics coated with lubricated nanostructures display robust omniphobicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shillingford, Cicely; MacCallum, Noah; Wong, Tak -Sing; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-12-11

    The development of a stain-resistant and pressure-stable textile is desirable for consumer and industrial applications alike, yet it remains a challenge that current technologies have been unable to fully address. Traditional superhydrophobic surfaces, inspired by the lotus plant, are characterized by two main components: hydrophobic chemical functionalization and surface roughness. While this approach produces water-resistant surfaces, these materials have critical weaknesses that hinder their practical utility, in particular as robust stain-free fabrics. For example, traditional superhydrophobic surfaces fail (i.e., become stained) when exposed to low-surface-tension liquids, under pressure when impacted by a high-velocity stream of water (e.g., rain), and when exposed to physical forces such as abrasion and twisting. We have recently introduced slippery lubricant-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS), a self-healing, pressure-tolerant and omniphobic surface, to address these issues. However we present the rational design and optimization of nanostructured lubricant-infused fabrics and demonstrate markedly improved performance over traditional superhydrophobic textile treatments: SLIPS-functionalized cotton and polyester fabrics exhibit decreased contact angle hysteresis and sliding angles, omni-repellent properties against various fluids including polar and nonpolar liquids, pressure tolerance and mechanical robustness, all of which are not readily achievable with the state-of-the-art superhydrophobic coatings.

  16. Theory of Hydrostatic Lubrication for Like Charge Polymer Hydrogel Coated and Cartilage Coated Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, Jeffrey

    2011-03-01

    Polysaccharides hydrogels provide excellent lubrication of tissues and organs in humans and animals. It is argued on the basis of a solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and scaling arguments that most asperities in ``contact'' at the interface between two hydrogel coated surfaces should be separated by a thin fluid layer, which is held in place by ion osmotic pressure. It is likely to be responsible for the excellent lubricating of these hydrogels. Although it appears that the same mechanism should operate in cartilage coated surfaces, it turns out that the friction coefficient is two orders of magnitude larger once equilibrium is established. A model will be provided which combines the biphasic model, traditionally used to explain the time dependence of the friction coefficient for two cartilage surfaces in contact , and the ion osmotic pressure mechanism used to explain the very low equilibrium friction coefficient for hydrogel interfaces.

  17. Tribological performance of quaternary CrSiCN coatings under dry and lubricated conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Lorenzo-Martin, C.; Ajayi, O.; Erdemir, A.; ...

    2017-06-15

    This paper presents an experimental study of friction and wear performance of quaternary CrSiCN coatings deposited on a hardened H-13 steel substrate by a plasma enhanced magnetron sputtering (PEMS) technique. Friction and wear tests were conducted with a reciprocating line contact between a hardened 4370 steel roller and coated and uncoated flat specimens under dry and lubricated conditions. The effects of coating thickness (1, 3.5 and 7.5 μm) on the mechanical properties, friction and wear performance were also assessed. In dry sliding, the friction of coated surfaces was about the same as for uncoated surfaces, except for the 1-μm coating,more » which had higher friction. Friction for coated surfaces under lubricated contact was in general higher than for uncoated surfaces. There was no measurable wear on any of the coated surfaces, under either dry or lubricated conditions. However, wear was higher on the steel roller counterface sliding against the coated surfaces, with the amount of wear proportional to the mating coating thickness. The effectiveness of formulated lubricant additives was also modified by the coating, resulting in major effects on friction and wear behavior. Finally, this reduction in lubricant additive efficacy is due to the fact that the additives were designed and optimized for ferrous surfaces.« less

  18. Effectiveness of solid lubricant coatings for friction in hard vacuum (10-9 tor)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verkin, B. I.; Lyubraskiy, I. M.; Udovenko, V. F.; Sentyurikhina, L. N.

    1974-01-01

    A study was made of the efficiency of solid lubricating coatings, based on MoS2 with various binders, during friction and under highvacuum conditions. Mass spectrometry was used for an analysis of the composition of the gas evolved from the coatings in the friction process. It is shown that the vacuum level, loading, and sliding velocity influence coating effectiveness. In the friction process the solid lubricant coatings yield characteristic decay products associated with the chemical nature of the binders. The mechanism of coating breakdown during friction is associated with the binder breakdown mechanism.

  19. Spacecraft materials guide. [including: encapsulants and conformal coatings; optical materials; lubrication; and, bonding and joining processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staugaitis, C. L. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Materials which have demonstrated their suitability for space application are summarized. Common, recurring problems in encapsulants and conformal coatings, optical materials, lubrication, and bonding and joining are noted. The subjects discussed include: low density and syntactic foams, electrical encapsulants; optical glasses, interference filter, mirrors; oils, greases, lamillar lubricants; and, soldering and brazing processes.

  20. Wide-temperature-spectrum self-lubricating coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Self-lubricating, multicomponent coatings, which lubricate over a wide range of operating conditions, are described. The coatings have been successfully applied by plasma-spraying mixed powders onto superalloy substrates. They have been evaluated in friction and wear experiments, and in sliding contact bearing tests. These coatings are wear resistant by virtue of their self-lubricating characteristics rather than because of extreme hardness; a further benefit is low friction. Experiments with simple pin on disk sliding specimens and oscillating plain cylindrical bearing tests were performed to evaluate the tribological properties of the coatings. It was shown that coatings of nichrome, glass and calcium fluoride are self-lubricating from about 500 to 900 C, but give high friction at the lower temperatures. The addition of silver to the coating composition improved the low temperature bearing properties and resulted in coatings which are self-lubricating from cryogenic temperatures to at least 870 C; they are therefore 'wide temperature spectrum,' self-lubricating compositions.

  1. Wide-temperature-spectrum self-lubricating coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Self-lubricating, multicomponent coatings, which lubricate over a wide range of operating conditions, are described. The coatings have been successfully applied by plasma-spraying mixed powders onto superalloy substrates. They have been evaluated in friction and wear experiments, and in sliding contact bearing tests. These coatings are wear resistant by virtue of their self-lubricating characteristics rather than because of extreme hardness; a further benefit is low friction. Experiments with simple pin on disk sliding specimens and oscillating plain cylindrical bearing tests were performed to evaluate the tribological properties of the coatings. It was shown that coatings of nichrome, glass and calcium fluoride are self-lubricating from about 500 to 900 C, but give high friction at the lower temperatures. The addition of silver to the coating composition improved the low temperature bearing properties and resulted in coatings which are self-lubricating from cryogenic temperatures to at least 870 C; they are therefore 'wide temperature spectrum,' self-lubricating compositions.

  2. Technology Exploitation/Exploration/Examination Report (TeX3): Adaptive Self-Lubricating Nanoporous Hard Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    lubricant layer of silver is present on the surface. As the solid lubricant layer is transferred to the wear surface and depleted, Ag diffuses out of...wear damage to set sufficient Ag free to replenish the depleted lubrication layer . Consequently, our new approach will result in a reduced amount of...lubricant is directed to the layer surface during operation. Technology to produce nanocomposite coatings providing adaptive lubrication has been studied

  3. Evaluation of PS 212 Coatings Under Boundary Lubrication Conditions with an Ester-based Oil to 300 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Loomis, William R.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    High friction and wear of turbine engine components occur during high temperature excursions above the oxidation threshold of the liquid lubricant. This paper reports on research to study the use of a high temperature self lubricating coating, PS 212 for back-up lubrication in the event of failure of the liquid lubricant. Pin on disk tests were performed under dry and boundary-lubricated conditions at disk temperatures up to 300 C. The liquid lubricant was a formulated polyol ester qualified under MIL L-23699. At test temperatures above the oil's thermal degradation level, the use of PS 212 reduced wear, providing a back-up lubricant effect.

  4. Status and New Directions for Solid Lubricant Coatings and Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    At one time, solid lubricants were used almost entirely in aerospace applications. Today there is a pronounced trend to use them over a much broader range of applications. For example, self-lubricating polymer-based composites have displaced traditional oil-lubricated, metallic composites for many journal bearings and thrust washers in applications as diverse as earth-moving machinery and snow blowers to aircraft applications. For moderate temperatures below 200 C, glass filament-wound epoxy bearings with PTFE lubricating liners are usefl; for temperatures up to 350 C, graphite fiber reinforced polyimide bearing materials are finding applications. Advanced technology engines have severe lubrication and wear problems at temperatures beyond the capabilities of any of these lubricants. Here, self-lubricating ceramics and inorganic composites for use at 1000 C or higher are of interest. However, perhaps the most significant new direction for solid lubricant coatings and self-lubricating composites is their steadily increasing use in dry bearings for large volume, moderate temperature applications. This can be attributed to their simplicity of use (no supporting lubricant system needed), light weight, convenience, and general cost effectiveness.

  5. Development of a self-lubricating plasma sprayed coating for rolling/sliding contact wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebuhr, David Vernon

    The friction and wear that occurs between wheel and rail exacts millions of dollars out of maintenance budgets each year. Standard lubrication practices have been found to be unreliable in effectively lubricating curved track sections. Consequently, a method of reducing cost and increasing rail life is of significance to the railroad industry. Through the use of self-lubricating materials and thermal spray technology a composite surface coating was developed. A 1080 steel coating provided a wear-resistant matrix, in which to incorporate solid lubricants. The 1080 steel coating was found to provide increased wear resistance and some friction reduction (mu = 0.46 vs. mu = 0.5-0.7 for uncoated rail). The reduced wear stems from the coatings resistance to degenerate into severe wear modes. The wear rate of uncoated rail steel can be an order of magnitude greater than that of a 1080 steel coating. Three solid lubricant/steel coating systems were investigated; graphite incorporated into 1080 steel, copper incorporated into 1080 steel, and various polymers deposited over a 1080 steel coating. The structure of the coatings were evaluated by metallography and wear performance. Metallographic analysis included optical, SEM, and FIB. Polymer film analysis was performed with FTIR. Wear testing and friction measurement were accomplished with the Amsler twin disk wear testing machine. Coatings were tested against class C wheel steel at 5% and 35% slide/roll ratios, with contact pressures ranging from 700 to 1315 N/mmsp2. The work identified unique wear mechanisms for each coating system. The friction reduction and durability of the graphite/steel coatings was good at low slide/roll ratios. The copper/steel coatings were unable to control friction and had limited life. The polymer/steel coatings, particularly nylon/steel, had excellent performance at a wide range of slide/roll ratios and contact pressures. The nylon/1080 steel coatings were applied to rail sections for large

  6. TiN-Coating Effects on Stainless Steel Tribological Behavior Under Dry and Lubricated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liqiang; Yang, Huisheng; Pang, Xiaolu; Gao, Kewei; Tran, Hai T.; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2014-04-01

    The tribological properties of magnetron sputtered titanium nitride coating on 316L steel, sliding against Si3N4 ceramic ball under dry friction and synthetic perspiration lubrication, were investigated. The morphology of the worn surface and the elemental composition of the wear debris were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. TiN coatings and 316L stainless steel had better tribological properties under synthetic perspiration lubrication than under dry friction. Among the three tested materials (316L, 1.6 and 2.4 μm TiN coatings), 2.4 μm TiN coating exhibits the best wear resistance. The difference in wear damage of the three materials is essentially due to the wear mechanisms. For the TiN coating, the damage is attributed to abrasive wear under synthetic perspiration lubrication and the complex interactive mechanisms, including abrasive and adhesive wear, along with plastic deformation, under dry friction.

  7. A Review to the Laser Cladding of Self-Lubricating Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quazi, M. M.; Fazal, M. A.; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.; Yusof, Farazila; Masjuki, H. H.; Arslan, A.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid lubricants are extremely viable in reducing wear damage and friction of mating components. However, due to the relentless pressure and the recent trend towards higher operating environments in advanced automotive and aerospace turbo-machineries, these lubricants cease to perform and hence, an alternate system is required for maintaining the self-lubricating environment. From the viewpoint of tribologist, wear is related to near-surface regions and hence, surface coatings are considered suitable for improving the functioning of tribo-pairs. Wear resistant coatings can be fabricated with the addition of various solid lubricants so as to reduce friction drag. In order to protect bulk substrates, self-lubricating wear resistant composite coatings have been fabricated by employing various surface coating techniques such as electrochemical process, physical and chemical vapor depositions, thermal and plasma spraying, laser cladding etc. Studies related to laser-based surface engineering approaches have remained vibrant and are recognized in altering the near surface regions. In this work, the latest developments in laser based self-lubricating composite coatings are highlighted. Furthermore, the effect of additives, laser processing parameters and their corresponding influence on mechanical and tribological performance is briefly reviewed.

  8. Evaluation of Advanced Solid Lubricant Coatings for Foil Air Bearings Operating at 25 and 500 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Fellenstein, James A.; Benoy, Patricia A.

    1998-01-01

    The tribological properties of one chrome oxide and one chrome carbide based solid lubricant coating were evaluated in a partial-arc foil bearing at 25 and 500 C. Start/stop bearing operation up to 20,000 cycles were run under 10 kPa (1.5 psi) static deadweight load. Bearing friction (torque) was measured during the test. Specimen wear and SEM/EDS surface analyses were conducted after testing to understand and elucidate the tribological characteristics observed. The chrome oxide coating which contains both (Ag) and (BaF2/CaF2) for low and high temperature lubrication, exhibited low friction in sliding against Al2O3 coated foils at 25 and 500 C. The chrome carbide coating, which lacked a low temperature lubricant but contained BaF2/CaF2 as a high temperature lubricant, exhibited high friction at 25 C and low friction at 500 C against both bare and Al2O3 coated superalloy foil surfaces. Post test surface analyses suggest that improved tribological performance is exhibited when a lubricant film from the coating transfers to the foil surface.

  9. High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating for High Temperature Wear Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor); Edmonds, Brian J (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite useful over a wide temperature range is described herein. The composite includes metal bonded chromium oxide dispersed in a metal binder having a substantial amount of nickel. The composite contains a fluoride of at least one Group I, Group II, or rare earth metal, and optionally a low temperature lubricant metal.

  10. Sputtered silver films to improve chromium carbide based solid lubricant coatings for use to 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.; Deadmore, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    Thin silver films, 250 to 3500 A thick, were sputtered onto PS200, a plasma sprayed, chromium carbide based solid lubricant coating, to reduce run-in wear and improve tribological properties. The coating contains bonded chromium carbide as the wear resistant base stock with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic added as low and high temperature lubricants, respectively. Potential applications for the PS200 coating are cylinder wall/piston ring lubrication for Stirling engines and foil bearing journal lubrication. In this preliminary program, the silver film overlay thickness was optimized based on tests using a pin-on-disk tribometer. The friction and wear studies were performed in a helium atmosphere at temperatures from 25 to 760 C with a sliding velocity of 2.7 m/s under a 4.9 N load. Films between 1000 and 1500 A provide the best lubrication of the counterface material. The films enrich the sliding surface with lubricant and reduce the initial abrasiveness of the as ground, plasma-sprayed coating surface, thus reducing wear.

  11. Sputtered silver films to improve chromium carbide based solid lubricant coatings for use to 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.; Deadmore, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    Thin silver films, 250 to 3500 A thick, were sputtered onto PS200, a plasma sprayed, chromium carbide based solid lubricant coating, to reduce run-in wear and improve tribological properties. The coating contains bonded chromium carbide as the wear resistant base stock with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic added as low and high temperature lubricants respectively. Potential applications for the PS200 coating are cylinder wall/piston ring lubrication for Stirling engines and foil bearing journal lubrication. In this preliminary program, the silver film overlay thickness was optimized based on tests using a pin-on-disk tribometer. The friction and wear studies were performed in a helium atmosphere at temperatures from 25 to 760 C with a sliding velocity of 2.7 m/s under a 4.9 N load. Films between 1000 and 1500 A provide the best lubrication of the counterface material. The films enrich the sliding surface with lubricant and reduce the initial abrasiveness of the as ground, plasma-sprayed coating surface, thus reducing wear.

  12. Sputtered silver films to improve chromium carbide based solid lubricant coatings for use to 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.; Deadmore, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    Thin silver films, 250 to 3500 A thick, were sputtered onto PS200, a plasma sprayed, chromium carbide based solid lubricant coating, to reduce run-in wear and improve tribological properties. The coating contains bonded chromium carbide as the wear resistant base stock with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic added as low and high temperature lubricants, respectively. Potential applications for the PS200 coating are cylinder wall/piston ring lubrication for Stirling engines and foil bearing journal lubrication. In this preliminary program, the silver film overlay thickness was optimized based on tests using a pin-on-disk tribometer. The friction and wear studies were performed in a helium atmosphere at temperatures from 25 to 760 C with a sliding velocity of 2.7 m/s under a 4.9 N load. Films between 1000 and 1500 A provide the best lubrication of the counterface material. The films enrich the sliding surface with lubricant and reduce the initial abrasiveness of the as ground, plasma-sprayed coating surface, thus reducing wear.

  13. Tribological behavior of oil-lubricated, TiN-coated steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A. ); Sproul, W.D.; Graham, M.; Rudnik, P.J. )

    1992-02-01

    The effects of titanium nitride (TiN) coatings on the tribological behavior of M50 and 52100 steels under both dry and synthetic polyol ester-based oil lubrication were evaluated using a reciprocating sliding pin-on-flat test machine. Under dry conditions, the TiN coating reduced the wear, which occurred by abrasion as well as the oxidation of the sliding surface. It also reduced the amount of wear-debris accumulation at the contact interface. During oil lubrication, wear and roughening of the contact area, usually associated with the boundary lubrication regime, was eliminated by the TiN coating. Formation of boundary film by the chemical interaction between the oil additives and wearing surface was also prevented by the TiN coating.

  14. Tribological behavior of oil-lubricated, TiN-coated steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A.; Sproul, W.D.; Graham, M.; Rudnik, P.J.

    1992-02-01

    The effects of titanium nitride (TiN) coatings on the tribological behavior of M50 and 52100 steels under both dry and synthetic polyol ester-based oil lubrication were evaluated using a reciprocating sliding pin-on-flat test machine. Under dry conditions, the TiN coating reduced the wear, which occurred by abrasion as well as the oxidation of the sliding surface. It also reduced the amount of wear-debris accumulation at the contact interface. During oil lubrication, wear and roughening of the contact area, usually associated with the boundary lubrication regime, was eliminated by the TiN coating. Formation of boundary film by the chemical interaction between the oil additives and wearing surface was also prevented by the TiN coating.

  15. Lubricating coating prepared by PIIID on a forming tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinatti, J. F.; Santos, L. V.; Durrant, S. F.; Cruz, N. C.; Rangel, E. C.

    2012-06-01

    In this work, the performance of a-C:H films produced by the hybrid Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition technique as lubricating layers for a steel forming tool has been investigated. Hardened steel (AISI M2, 64 HRC) plates coated with a commercial TiN layer were used as substrates and the films were deposited in a vacuum chamber fitted with two parallel-plate electrodes. The discharges were generated in atmospheres composed of 91% C2H2 and 9% Ar by the application of radiofrequency power (13.56 MHz, 100 W) to the upper electrode while the lower one, also used as the sample holder, was biased with high voltage negative pulses (3.6 kV, 30 μs, 300 Hz). A deposition time of 840 s was used. The effects of the gas pressure, p, on thickness, molecular structure, wettability, surface morphology and topography, hardness and friction coefficient of the films were investigated. Film thickness increased from 0.3 to 0.5 μm when p was increased from 2.7 to 16.5 Pa. Generally, the films were slightly hydrophilic, with contact angles of around 84°, and the deposition decreased the roughness of the steel. A polymer-like structure was detected in high pressure depositions and an amorphous carbon structure derived from the low pressure procedures. Hardness decreased from 8.2 to 7.0 GPa with increasing p. Improvement in tribological performance was indicated by the fall in the friction coefficient from 0.5 to 0.2 as the deposition pressure was reduced. Operating at the latter value (of μ) would lead to a significant reduction in wear and hence to significant economy in diverse industrial applications.

  16. Microstructure of laser-clad high-temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. B.; Wang, C. M.; Yu, L. G.; Wang, Hua Ming

    1999-09-01

    In this paper, a 5 kW cw CO2 laser was used to fabricate a new high-temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant composite coating on austenite stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti. Microstructure of the coatings was characterized by OM, SEM, XRD and EDS as functions of laser processing parameters. The hybrid composite coating consists of rapidly solidified wear-resistant primary Cr7C3 and eutectic Cr23C6 carbides, high-temperature self-lubricating CaAgF4 or CaF2 particles and the oxidation-resistant austenitic Ni-Cr matrix. Microstructure and hardness within the whole laser clad composite coating is homogeneous and the bonding to the substrate is purely metallurgical. Microhardness of the composite coating is 700 approximately 1000 HV on average. The hybrid composite coatings fabricated by laser cladding are expected to have good high-temperature tribological properties.

  17. Durability of a lubricant-infused Electrospray Silicon Rubber surface as an anti-icing coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi; Yang, Ying; Huang, Meng; Zhou, Yuanxiang; Liu, Yingyan; Liang, Xidong

    2015-08-01

    Slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) are attracting great interest as anti-icing coatings. However, the most challenging point for SLIPS is their durability. A heptadecafluorodecyl trimethoxysilane-fluorinated hierarchically micro-structured silicone rubber surface was prepared by electrospray method coupled with phase separation which had a contact angle of the lubricant θls(a) = 0°. This study investigated the effects of the surface chemistry, length scale and hierarchy of the surface topography of the underlying substrates on their ability to retain the lubricant during repetitive icing/deicing, water washout and ice-shedding treatments. This study compares the lubricant retention rate, ice formation time and ice adhesion strength. The result demonstrated that SLIPS with a fluorinated hierarchical micro/nano scale substrate maintains the best anti-icing capability. Lubricant in the microscale pores can easily creep up to the surface with nano-scale pores providing stronger capillary forces to hold the lubricant in the pores only if θls(a) = 0° with a rolling hill pattern lubricant surface morphology formed during the loss of lubricant. Such fluorinated hierarchically nano/micro structured substrate will enable the lubricant to completely cover the surface which reduces heterogeneous nucleation and frost propagation velocity.

  18. Tribological performance of NFC coatings under oil lubrication[Near Frictionless Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O. O.; Alzoubi, M.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Zimmerman, S.

    2000-01-20

    An increase in engine and vehicle efficiency usually requires an increase in the severity of contact at the interfaces of many critical components. Examples of such components include piston rings and cylinder liners in the engine, gears in the transmission and axle, bearings, etc. These components are oil-lubricated and require enhancement of their tribological performance. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) recently developed a carbon-based coating with very low friction and wear properties. These near-frictionless-carbon (NFC) coatings have potential for application in various engine components for performance enhancement. This paper presents the study of the tribological performance of NFC-coated steel surfaces when lubricated with fully formulated and basestock synthetic oils. The NFC coatings reduced both the friction and wear of lubricated steel surfaces. The effect of the coating was much more pronounced in tests with basestock oil. This suggests that NFC-coated parts may not require heavily formulated lubricant oils to perform satisfactorily in terms of reliability and durability.

  19. Synergistic effect between nano-ceramic lubricating additives and electroless deposited Ni-W-P coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; Cheng, Wushan; Zhao, Zuxin; Huang, Xiaobo

    2013-01-01

    The major solving ways for the material wear are surface modification and lubrication. Currently, the researches at home and abroad are all limited to the single study of either nano-lubricating oil additive or electroless deposited coating. The surface coating has high hardness and high wear resistance, however, the friction reduction performance of the coating with high hardness is not good, the thickness of the coating is limited, and the coating can not regenerate after wearing. The nano-lubricating additives have good tribological performance and self-repair function, but under heavy load, the self-repair rate to the worn surface with the nano-additives is smaller than the wearing rate of the friction pair. To solve the above problems, the Ni-W-P alloy coating and deposition process with excellent anti-wear, and suitable for industrial application were developed, the optimum bath composition and process can be obtained by studying the influence of the bath composition, temperature and PH value to the deposition rate and the plating solution stability. The tribological properties as well as anti-wear and friction reduction mechanism of wear self-repair nano-ceramic lubricating additives are also studied. The ring-block abrasion testing machine and energy dispersive spectrometer are used to explore the internal relation between the coating and the nano-lubricating oil additives, and the tribology mechanism, to seek the synergetic effect between the two. The test results show that the wear resistance of Ni-W-P alloy coating (with heat treatment and in oil with nano-ceramic additives) has increased hundreds times than 45 steel as the metal substrate in basic oil, the friction reduction performance is improved. This research breaks through the bottleneck of previous separate research of the above-mentioned two methods, and explores the combination use of the two methods in industrial field.

  20. Lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Shubkin, R.L.

    1980-08-19

    Hydrogenated dimers of /sup 12 -18/C alpha olefins (e.g., 1-tetradecene) made using a friedel-crafts catalyst (e.g., /sup 3/Bf promoted with water) have low pour points, low volatility and viscosities which make them suitable as crankcase lubricants for internal combustion engines.

  1. Fabrication of self-lubricating coating on aluminum and its frictional behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Haowei

    2007-02-01

    A self-lubricating anodic film has been formed on aluminum by anodization in phosphoric acid-base electrolyte and a subsequent technique containing ultrasonic impregnation and heat treatment. The results show that the ultrasonic impregnation after anodization of aluminum in an electrolyte of phosphoric acid and some additives can fill some PTFE into the holes of alumina and the surface hardness decreases little within appropriate ultrasonic time. The final heat treatment technology can increase the coating hardness greatly, especially to the alumina acquired by general anodization. With this fabricating method, the properties of anti-attrition and abrasion resistance of self-lubricating coating improved greatly.

  2. Wear behaviors of HVOF sprayed WC-12Co coatings by laser remelting under lubricated condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejun, Kong; Tianyuan, Sheng

    2017-03-01

    A HVOF (high velocity oxygen fuel) sprayed WC-12Co coating was remelted with a CO2 laser. The surface-interface morphologies and phases were analyzed by means of SEM (scanning electron microscopy), and XRD (X-ray diffraction), respectively. The friction and wear behaviors of WC-12Co coating under the dry and lubricated conditions were investigated with a wear test. The morphologies and distributions of chemical elements on worn scar were analyzed with a SEM, and its configured EDS (energy diffusive spectrometer), respectively, and the effects of lubricated condition on COFs (coefficient of friction) and wear performance were also discussed. The results show that the adhesion between the coating and the substrate is stronger after laser remetling (LR), in which mechanical bonding, accompanying with metallurgical bonding, was found. At the load of 80 N, the average COF under the dry and lubricated friction conditions is 0.069, and 0.052, respectively, the latter lowers by 23.3% than the former, and the wear rate under the lubricated condition decreases by 302.3% than that under the dry condition. The wear mechanism under the dry and lubrication conditions is primarily composed of abrasive wear, cracking, and fatigue failure.

  3. Plasma-sprayed coatings for lubrication of a titanium alloy in air at 430 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Wisander, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Plasma sprayed coatings of pure silver and of composite materials containing silver were investigated as possible self lubricating coatings for titanium alloys in air at 430 C. Pure silver provided low friction but was prone to severe plastic deformation and excessive transfer except in coating thicknesses of 0.02 mm or less. Additions of nichrome, calcium fluoride, and glass to silver were all beneficial in reducing plastic deformation and otherwise improving the coatings. The longest coating wear life, low wear of Ti alloy pins in sliding contact with the coatings, and a steady friction coefficient of 0.19 were obtained with a four component coating of 0.17 mm thickness. The coating composition, in weight percent is 30 nichrome-30 Ag-25 CaF2-15 glass.

  4. Commercialization of NASA PS304 Solid Lubricant Coating Enhanced by Fundamental Powder Flow Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Malcolm K.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a patented high-temperature solid lubricant coating, designated PS304, for reducing friction and wear in bearing systems. The material used to produce the coating is initially a blend of metallic and ceramic powders that are deposited on the bearing surface by the plasma spray process. PS304 was developed to lubricate foil air bearings in Oil-Free turbomachinery, where the moving surfaces are coated with a hydrodynamic air film except at the beginning and end of an operation cycle when the air film is not present. The coating has been successful in several applications including turbochargers, land-based turbines, and industrial drying furnace conveyor components, with current development activities directed at implementation in Oil-Free aeropropulsion engines.

  5. Lubricating Properties of Lead-Monoxide-Base Coatings of Various Compositions at Temperatures to 1250 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1959-01-01

    A number of ceramic coatings of different compositions containing lead monoxide (PbO) were studied to determine their relative merits as dry-film lubricants. Lead monoxide is known to be an effective solid lubricant at elevated temperatures, and this oxide was the main component in all compositions studied. Friction and wear properties were determined at temperatures from 750 to 1250 F, at a sliding velocity of 430 feet per minute, and at a normal load of 1 kilogram. In all of the coatings, PbO was the component primarily responsible for the lubricating properties. Oxides other than PbO had an indirect effect on lubrication by influencing such properties as adhesion, hardness, vitrifying or glaze-forming tendency, melting or softening point, and chemical stability of the coatings. Notable among these oxides were magnetite (Fe3O4.), which had generally a beneficial influence on ceramic- to-metal adhesion, and silica (SiO2), which inhibited the oxidation of PbO and enhanced the tendency for glaze formation on the sliding surfaces. Several of the compositions studied provided protection against metal-to-metal adhesive wear, galling, or seizure at test temperatures from 750 to 1250 F. Coating friction coefficients ranged from 0.20 to 0.37 at 75 F but were around 0.08 to 0.20 at temperatures of 1250 F.

  6. Lubricating Properties of Some Bonded Fluoride and Oxide Coatings for Temperature to 1500 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1960-01-01

    The lubricating properties of some experimental ceramic coatings, diffusion-bonded fluoride coatings, and ceramic-bonded fluoride coatings were determined. The experiments were conducted in an air atmosphere at a sliding velocity of 430 feet per minute and at temperatures from 75 to 1500 F. Several ceramic coatings provided substantial reductions in friction coefficient and rider wear (compared with the unlubricated metals). For example, a cobaltous oxide (CoO) base coating gave friction coefficients of 0.24 to 0.36 within the temperature range of 75 to 1400 F; serious galling and welding of the metal surfaces were prevented. The friction coefficients were higher than the arbitrary maximum (0.2) usually considered for effective boundary lubrication. However, when a moderately high friction coefficient can be tolerated, this type of coating may be a useful antiwear composition. Diffusion-bonded calcium fluoride (CaF2) on Haynes Stellite 21 and on Inconel X gave friction coefficients of 0.1 to 0.2 at 1500 F. Endurance life was dependent on the thermal history of the coating; life improved with increased exposure time at elevated temperatures prior to running. Promising results were obtained with ceramic-bonded CaF2 on Inconel X. Effective lubrication and good adherence were obtained with a 3 to 1 ratio of CaF2 to ceramic. A very thin sintered and burnished film of CaF2 applied to the surface of this coating further improved lubrication, particularly above 1350 F. The friction coefficient was 0.2 at 500 F and decreased with increasing temperature to 0.06-at 1500 F. It was 0.25 at 75 F and 0.22 at 250 F.

  7. Functional regulation of Pb-Ti/MoS2 composite coatings for environmentally adaptive solid lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Siming; Li, Hao; Cui, Mingjun; Wang, Liping; Pu, Jibin

    2017-04-01

    The lubrication of molybdenum disulfide coatings has commonly been limited by the application environments, for instance, the crystal MoS2 are easily affected by water to form MoO3 that causes a higher friction coefficient and short lifetime. Therefore, to improve the tribolgical performance of MoS2 in high humidity condition, the co-doped Pb-Ti/MoS2 composite coatings are deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering system. The design of the co-doping elements in MoS2-based coatings can not only maintain the characteristic of low humidity-sensitivity as the Ti/MoS2 coating but also improve the mechanical properties and tribological performance of coatings as a comparison with single-doped ones. Moreover, the ultra-low friction coefficient with a minimum value of 0.006 under the vacuum condition is achieved for Pb-Ti/MoS2 composite coating containing about 4.6 at.% Pb, depending on the densification structure of coating. Intriguingly, the wear behaviours of Pb-Ti/MoS2 composite coatings are in accordance with the variation in H/E (hardness to the elastic modulus) ratio that the coating with higher H/E exhibits lower wear rate. These results demonstrate that the lubricating properties of MoS2 coatings in both humid environment and vacuum condition can be achieved through the Pb and Ti co-doped, which is of great significant for developing MoS2 coatings as the environmentally adaptive lubricants.

  8. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 10(exp 13) to 10(exp 15) n per square centimeters. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 10(exp 15) to 10(exp 16) n per square centimeters with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  9. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1013 to 1015 n/cm2. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1015 to 1016 n/cm2 with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  10. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-30

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1013 to 1015 n/cm2. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1015 to 1016 n/cm2 with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  11. Development of self-lubricating coatings via cold spray process: Feedstock formulation and deformation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Gaurav

    Because of their low density, high specific strength and high stiffness, titanium alloys are one of the prime candidates for structural application often requiring specific tribological properties. However, their relatively high friction coefficients and low wear resistance are limiting their application over a wider temperature range. Various coatings deposited with technologies like high velocity oxy flame (HVOF), detonation gun (DGun), electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD), etc., can improve wear performance and decrease corrosion damage. These technologies require high processing temperatures precluding the integration of thermally vulnerable lubricants. This research looks at a relatively new coating process called Cold Spray for self-lubricating coatings on Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Cold Spray can produce coatings without significant heating of the sprayed powder or substrate. The particles are in solid state as they hit the substrate, and the formation of coatings occurs mainly due to the kinetic energy of the particles. Therefore, the impact velocity plays an important role. Below a critical value, the particles can cause densification and abrasion of the substrate. The focus of this study is to design composite coatings for the cold spray process and determination of the critical velocity through finite element modeling. Different powders and feedstock formulation techniques are discussed in order to find an optimum formulation for self-lubricating coatings. A composite powder (Ni coated hBN) was found to be the best candidate for the feedstock. The deformation of composite particles upon impact on the substrate was modeled and compared to the experiments. A number of approaches involving different modeling platforms, particle-substrate geometries, and material models have been tried. This work presents the results of ANSYS (version 10.0) analysis using an axisymmetric model of the particle impact. Stress and strain distributions in the particle

  12. Tribological properties of Ti-doped DLC coatings under ionic liquids lubricated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Yanqiu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, titanium doped diamond-like carbon (Ti-DLC) coatings were prepared onto AISI 52100 steel substrates using medium frequency magnetic sputtering process, and were analyzed using the Raman and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Two kinds of 1,3-dialkyl imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) were synthesized and evaluated as lubricants for Ti-DLC/steel contacts at room temperature, and PFPE as comparison lubricant. The tribological properties of the ILs were investigated using a ball-on-disk type UMT reciprocating friction tester. The results indicated that the ILs have excellent friction-reducing properties, the friction coefficient kept at a relatively stable value of 0.07-0.06, which was reduced approximately by 47% compared with perfluoropolyether (PFPE). The worn surfaces of Ti-DLC coatings were observed and analyzed using a MICROXAM-3D non-contact surface profiler, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Ti-DLC coatings using ionic liquids lubricating systems are considered as potential lubricating system in vacuum and space moving friction pairs.

  13. High-Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating by Plasma Spraying Using Metal-Metal Clad Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Lan, Hao; Yu, Shouquan; Huang, Chuanbing; Du, Lingzhong; Zhang, Weigang

    2017-08-01

    NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating was fabricated by atmospheric plasma spray technology using clad powders as the feedstock. Its tribological properties at variable temperature were evaluated using a ball-on-disk high-temperature tribometer in air. The results showed that compared with NiCr, the NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating exhibited better lubrication effect and higher wear resistance at all test temperatures, especially above 600 °C. At 800 °C, NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating showed the lowest friction coefficient of about 0.2 and its corresponding wear rate reached 2.5 × 10-5 mm3/Nm. Characterizations of NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating revealed that at temperatures below 400 °C, Ag was smeared and spread onto the wear surface, reducing the friction and wear. At temperature above 500 °C, the Ag2MoO4 lubrication film formed by tribo-oxidation significantly improved the coating's lubrication effect and wear resistance.

  14. High-Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating by Plasma Spraying Using Metal-Metal Clad Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Lan, Hao; Yu, Shouquan; Huang, Chuanbing; Du, Lingzhong; Zhang, Weigang

    2017-07-01

    NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating was fabricated by atmospheric plasma spray technology using clad powders as the feedstock. Its tribological properties at variable temperature were evaluated using a ball-on-disk high-temperature tribometer in air. The results showed that compared with NiCr, the NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating exhibited better lubrication effect and higher wear resistance at all test temperatures, especially above 600 °C. At 800 °C, NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating showed the lowest friction coefficient of about 0.2 and its corresponding wear rate reached 2.5 × 10-5 mm3/Nm. Characterizations of NiCr/Ag-Mo composite coating revealed that at temperatures below 400 °C, Ag was smeared and spread onto the wear surface, reducing the friction and wear. At temperature above 500 °C, the Ag2MoO4 lubrication film formed by tribo-oxidation significantly improved the coating's lubrication effect and wear resistance.

  15. Experimental evaluation of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings for use to 760 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    A research program is described which further developed and investigated chromium carbide based self-lubricating coatings for use to 760 C. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The three coating components were blended in powder form, applied to stainless steel substrates by plasma spraying and then diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. A variety of coating compositions was tested to determine the coating composition which gave optimum tribological results. Coatings were tested in air, helium, and hydrogen at temperatures from 25 to 760 C. Several counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications, such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines. In general, silver and fluoride additions to chromium carbide reduced the friction coefficient and increased the wear resistance relative to the unmodified coating. The lubricant additives acted synergistically in reducing friction and wear.

  16. Fabrication of self-lubricating cobalt coatings on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Hilla; Eidelman, Orly; Feldman, Yishay; Moshkovich, Alexey; Perfiliev, Vladislav; Rapoport, Lev; Cohen, Hagai; Yoffe, Alexander; Tenne, Reshef

    2007-03-01

    Composite coatings of Co + fullerene-like WS2 nanoparticles on stainless steel substrate were obtained through electroless deposition, using DMAB (dimethyl borane complex, 97%) as the reducing agent, and by electroplating in acidic solution. Phase analysis results show that the coatings consist of Co and the fullerene-like WS2 nanoparticles alone. Tribological measurements show reduced wear and friction of the composite coatings as compared with the pure cobalt film or the stainless steel substrate.

  17. Annual Report - Compatibility of ZDDP and ionic liquid anti-wear additives with hard coatings for engine lubrications

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Zhou, Yan; Leonard, Donovan N; Meyer, III, Harry M; Luo, Huimin

    2016-03-01

    The objectives for this considerations described here are to; investigate the compatibility of engine lubricant antiwear (AW) additives, specifically conventional zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) and newly developed ionic liquids (ILs), with selected commercial hard coatings, and provide fundamental understanding to guide future development of engine lubricants.

  18. Effects of nano-LaF3 on the friction and wear behaviors of PTFE-based bonded solid lubricating coatings under different lubrication conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yulong; Wan, Hongqi; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Huidi; Chen, Jianmin

    2016-09-01

    Influence of nanometer lanthanum fluoride (nano-LaF3) on the tribological behaviors of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bonded solid lubricating coatings were investigated using a ring-on-block friction-wear tester under dry friction and RP-3 jet fuel lubrication conditions. The worn surfaces and transfer films formed on the counterpart steel rings were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope (OM), respectively. The microstructures of the nano-LaF3 modified coatings and the distribution states of nano-LaF3 were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The results show that incorporation of nano-LaF3 improves the microhardness and the friction-reduced and anti-wear abilities of PTFE bonded solid lubricating coatings. The wear life of the modified coating is about 6 times longer than that of the coating without nano-LaF3 filler at a relatively low applied load (200 N) and rotary speed (1000 rev/min) under dry friction condition. The friction coefficient and wear life of the modified coating decrease with increase of applied load under dry friction, but the friction coefficient has hardly any variation and wear life decreases under RP-3 jet fuel lubrication condition. In addition, the friction coefficient of the modified coating reduces with the rotary speed increasing under dry sliding but has little change under RP-3 lubrication, the wear life increases firstly and then decreases. The results indicated that the wear failure mechanism is dominated by applied load, which plays an important role in guidance of application of nano-LaF3 modified PTFE bonded coating under different working environment.

  19. Investigation of Thermal Processing on the Properties of PS304: A Solid Lubricant Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoy, Patricia A.; Williams, Syreeta (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The effect of thermal processing on PS304, a solid lubricant coating, was investigated. PS304 is a plasma sprayed solid lubricant consisting of 10% Ag and 10% BaF2 and CaF2 in a eutectic mixture for low and high temperature lubricity respectively. In addition, PS304 contains 20% Cr2O3 for increased hardness and 60% NiCr which acts as a binder. All percents are in terms of weight not volume. Previous research on thermal processing (NAG3-2245) of PS304 revealed that substrate affected both the pre- and post-anneal hardness of the plasma spray coating. The objective of this grant was to both quantify this effect and determine whether the root cause was an artifact of the substrate or an actual difference in hardness due to interaction between the substrate and the coating. In addition to clarifying past research developments new data was sought in terms of coating growth due to annealing.

  20. Program for plasma-sprayed self-lubricating coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walther, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    A method for preparing composite powders of the three coating components was developed and a procedure that can be used in applying uniform coatings of the composite powders was demonstrated. Composite powders were prepared by adjusting particle sizes of the components and employing a small amount of monoaluminum phosphate as an inorganic binder. Quantitative microscopy (image analysis) was found to be a convenient method of characterizing the composition of the multiphase plasma-sprayed coatings. Area percentages and distribution of the components were readily obtained by this method. The adhesive strength of the coating to a nickel-chromium alloy substrate was increased by about 40 percent by a heat treatment of 20 hours at 650 C.

  1. The Effect of Composition on the Surface Finish of PS400: A New High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Stanford, malcolm K.; Thomas, Fransua; Edmonds, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    A new composite, multi-constituent, solid lubricant coating, NASA PS400, developed for high temperature tribological applications, exhibits a smoother surface finish after grinding and polishing than its predecessors PS200 and PS300. In this paper, the baseline composition of PS400 is modified to investigate each individual constituent s role on the achievable surface finish through a series of coating deposition, grinding, and polishing experiments. Furthermore, to explore the limits of compositional tailoring for improved tribological performance, several PS400 coatings were doped with additional solid lubricants (graphite, MoS2 and BN) and tribologically tested. The test results clearly showed that, compared to PS300 coatings, PS400 achieves a smoother surface finish via a reduced lubricant content. Coatings prepared with higher than the baseline level (10 wt%) of lubricants exhibited higher final surface roughness than the earlier generation PS300 coatings. Reducing or eliminating the one or both lubricants (fluorides or silver) did not further improve the surface finish suggesting that the current composition of PS400 is near optimal with respect to surface finish. Lastly, attempts to improve the poor initial room temperature tribological behavior of PS400 via the addition of traditional solid lubricants were unsuccessful. Based upon this work and earlier results it is expected that future research will concentrate on developing methods to produce a lubricious glaze on the rubbing surface during break in to ensure that low friction and wear are rapidly achieved.

  2. Principles of ESCA and application to metal corrosion, coating and lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The principles of ESCA (electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis) were described by comparison with other spectroscopic techniques. The advantages and disadvantages of ESCA as compared to other surface sensitive analytical techniques were evaluated. The use of ESCA was illustrated by actual applications to oxidation of steel and Rene 41, the chemistry of lubricant additives on steel, and the composition of sputter deposited hard coatings. A bibliography of material that was useful for further study of ESCA was presented and commented upon.

  3. New Generation of MoSx Based Solid Lubricant Coatings: Recent Developments and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Julfikar; Hashmi, M. S. J.

    2011-01-17

    In recent times, there is a growing interest in applying Molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub x}) solid lubricant coatings on components to improve the tribological performance (i.e. lower friction coefficient and wear rate). The tribological performance of MoS{sub x} coating is strongly dependent on coating properties and tribological environment. MoS{sub x} coatings are highly successful in certain applications such as in space/vacuum technology, but its effectiveness is questioned in other terrestrial applications such as in cutting tool industry due to its lower hardness and poor oxidation resistance leading to shorter life. In order to circumvent this drawback, the paper identifies that current research is being concentrated on developing MoS{sub x} based coatings using three different approaches: (1) Metal or compound addition in MoS{sub x} coating (2)MoS{sub x} layer on hard coating and (3)MoS{sub x} addition in hard coating matrix. Although the primary objective is same in all three cases, the third approach is considered to be more effective in improving the tribological properties of the coating. Finally, the potential applications of MoS{sub x} based coatings in different industrial sectors have been briefly outlined.

  4. Wear behavior of electroless Ni-P-W coating under lubricated condition - a Taguchi based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Arkadeb; Duari, Santanu; Barman, Tapan Kumar; Sahoo, Prasanta

    2016-09-01

    The present study aims to investigate the tribological behavior of electroless Ni-P-W coating under engine oil lubricated condition to ascertain its suitability in automotive applications. Coating is deposited onto mild steel specimens by the electroless method. The experiments are carried out on a pin - on - disc type tribo tester under lubrication. Three tribotesting parameters namely the applied normal load, sliding speed and sliding duration are varied at their three levels and their effects on the wear depth of the deposits are studied. The experiments are carried out based on the combinations available in Taguchi's L27 orthogonal array (OA). Optimization of the tribo-testing parameters is carried out using Taguchi's S/N ratio method to minimize the wear depth. Analysis of variance carried out at a confidence level of 99% indicates that the sliding speed is the most significant parameter in controlling the wear behavior of the deposits. Coating characterization is done using scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray diffraction techniques. It is seen that the wear mechanism under lubricated condition is abrasive in nature.

  5. Comparative study of the lubricant performance of Compritol 888 ATO either used by blending or by hot melt coating.

    PubMed

    Jannin, V; Bérard, V; N'Diaye, A; Andrès, C; Pourcelot, Y

    2003-08-27

    Compritol 888 ATO is used as a lubricant in oral solid dosage formulations. It can also be used as a hot melt coating agent sprayed onto a powder. In this study, we compare the lubricant performance of Compritol 888 ATO either used by classical blending or by hot melt coating onto Lactopress by compression tests. In physical mix, the Compritol concentration does not affect the compressibility. The same compressibility is obtained with lactose coated by 0.5 or 1% of Compritol, but a higher compressibility can be observed with 2 and 3%. Cohesiveness of lactose depends on the process: hot melt coating induces a decrease of tablet tensile strength. In terms of forces transmission during compression phase and axial ejection pressures, Compritol used by hot melt coating allows for a concentration of 0.5% to directly obtain the lubricant performance of 3% of Compritol used by blending. These results suggest that the hot melt coating process induces an homogeneous repartition of the lubricant on the lactose surface, contrary to classical blending procedure. Thus, lubrication by hot melt coating seems to be a very efficient procedure. It could be used specifically for large surface area particulate systems producing a lot of friction.

  6. Radiofrequency-sputtered coatings for lubrication system components and other complex surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1972-01-01

    Irregularly shaped surfaces, such as lubrication system components (ball bearings, seals, gears, etc.), can be coated on all surfaces, including irregular shapes, when radiofrequency sputtering is used. When the specimen is properly located with respect to the sputtering target, the sputtered material covers the entire surface of the object irrespective of its geometrical configuration. An adherent, dense film is formed. The film thickness varies from 20 to 50 percent on, for example, a hearing cage or race depending on its geometry. When sputtered solid film lubricants such as molybdenum disulfide are used, a film thickness only of the order of 10 to the minus 7th power m (thousands of angstroms) is required at the contacting areas. It is only essential to determine the required film thickness at the critical areas in need of lubrication. The sections outside the areas to be lubricated fall within the thickness deviation range of 20 to 50 percent, which still constitutes a negligible change respect to tolerance requirements.

  7. Pulse electrodeposition of self-lubricating Ni-W/PTFE nanocomposite coatings on mild steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangeetha, S.; Kalaignan, G. Paruthimal; Anthuvan, J. Tennis

    2015-12-01

    Ni-W/PTFE nanocomposite coatings with various contents of PTFE (polytetafluoroethylene) particles were prepared by pulse current (PC) electrodeposition from the Ni-W plating bath containing self lubricant PTFE particles to be co-deposited. Co-deposited PTFE particulates were uniformly distributed in the Ni-W alloy matrix. The coatings were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX), X-ray Diffractometry (XRD) and Vicker's micro hardness tester. Tafel Polarization and electrochemical Impedance methods were used to evaluate the corrosion resistance behaviour of the nanocomposite coatings in 3.5% NaCl solution. It was found that, the Ni-W/PTFE nanocomposite coating has better corrosion resistance than the Ni-W alloy coating. Surface roughness and friction coefficient of the coated samples were assessed by Mitutoyo Surftest SJ-310 (ISO1997) and Scratch tester TR-101-M4 respectively. The contact angle (CA) of a water droplet on the surface of nanocomposite coating was measured by Optical Contact Goniometry (OCA 35). These results indicated that, the addition of PTFE in the Ni-W alloy matrix has resulted moderate microhardness, smooth surface, less friction coefficient, excellent water repellency and enhanced corrosion resistance of the nanocomposite coatings.

  8. The role of silver in self-lubricating coatings for use at extreme temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of elemental silver as a tribological material are discussed. It is demonstrated that the relatively high melting point of 961 deg C, softness, marked plasticity, and thermochemical stability of silver combine to make this metal useful in thin film solid lubricant coatings over a wide temperature range. Disadvantages of silver during sliding, except when used as a thin film, are shown to be gross ploughing due to plastic deformation under load with associated high friction and excessive transfer to counterface surfaces. This transfer generates an irregular surface topography with consequent undesirable changes in bearing clearance distribution. Research to overcome these disadvantages of element silver is described. A comparison is made of the tribological behavior of pure silver with that of silver formulated with other metals and high-temperature solid lubricants. The composite materials are prepared by co-depositing the powdered components with an airbrush followed by furnace heat treatment or by plasma-spraying. Composite coatings were formulated which are shown to be self-lubricating over repeated, temperature cycles from low temperature to about 900 deg C.

  9. The use of silver in self-lubricating coatings for extreme temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of elemental silver as a tribological material are discussed. It is demonstrated that the relatively high melting point of 961 deg C, softness, marked plasticity, and thermochemical stability of silver combine to make this metal useful in thin film solid lubricant coatings over a wide temperature range. Disadvantages of silver during sliding, except when used as a thin film, are shown to be gross ploughing due to plastic deformation under load with associated high friction and excessive transfer to counterface surfaces. This transfer generates an irregular surface topography with consequent undesirable changes in bearing clearance distribution. Research to overcome these disadvantages of element silver is described. A comparison is made of the tribological behavior of pure silver with that of silver formulated with other metals and high-temperature solid lubricants. The composite materials are prepared by co-depositing the powdered components with an airbrush followed by furnace heat treatment or by plasma-spraying. Composite coatings were formulated which are shown to be self-lubricating over repeated, temperature cycles from low temperature to about 900 deg C.

  10. Self-lubricating, low-friction, wear-resistant Al-based quasicrystalline coatings

    PubMed Central

    Silva Guedes de Lima, Bruno Alessandro; Medeiros Gomes, Rodinei; Guedes de Lima, Severino Jackson; Dragoe, Diana; Barthes-Labrousse, Marie-Geneviève; Kouitat-Njiwa, Richard; Dubois, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract After gas atomization, a quasicrystalline powder based on aluminium was used to prepare a thick coating by high-velocity oxygen-fuel flame torch spraying. This layer was deposited on top of a bond-coat layer on a steel plate. A post-spraying annealing treatment turned the two layers to their stable state, a γ-brass crystal and an icosahedral quasicrystal, respectively. The projection parameters were selected in such a way that the coating behaved like a self-lubricating material, which offered very good wear resistance (duration of pin-on-disk tests superior to 5 km with negligible material loss) and low friction (µ ≤ 6% against sintered tungsten carbide), in contrast to the state of the art. This property was achieved thanks to, on the one hand, excellent bonding to the substrate via the bound coat, and on the other hand, presence at the boundaries between quasicrystalline flakes of a mixture of both threefold and fourfold coordinated carbon originating from spray processing. Application to hard materials used in mechanical devices is appealing, especially because soft, lubricating additives may not be needed, thus considerably increasing the lifetime of the devices and reducing waste of materials. PMID:27877859

  11. Self-lubricating, low-friction, wear-resistant Al-based quasicrystalline coatings.

    PubMed

    Silva Guedes de Lima, Bruno Alessandro; Medeiros Gomes, Rodinei; Guedes de Lima, Severino Jackson; Dragoe, Diana; Barthes-Labrousse, Marie-Geneviève; Kouitat-Njiwa, Richard; Dubois, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    After gas atomization, a quasicrystalline powder based on aluminium was used to prepare a thick coating by high-velocity oxygen-fuel flame torch spraying. This layer was deposited on top of a bond-coat layer on a steel plate. A post-spraying annealing treatment turned the two layers to their stable state, a γ-brass crystal and an icosahedral quasicrystal, respectively. The projection parameters were selected in such a way that the coating behaved like a self-lubricating material, which offered very good wear resistance (duration of pin-on-disk tests superior to 5 km with negligible material loss) and low friction (µ ≤ 6% against sintered tungsten carbide), in contrast to the state of the art. This property was achieved thanks to, on the one hand, excellent bonding to the substrate via the bound coat, and on the other hand, presence at the boundaries between quasicrystalline flakes of a mixture of both threefold and fourfold coordinated carbon originating from spray processing. Application to hard materials used in mechanical devices is appealing, especially because soft, lubricating additives may not be needed, thus considerably increasing the lifetime of the devices and reducing waste of materials.

  12. Evaluation of anti-corrosive lubricating behavior of dicationic ionic liquid coatings for biomedical alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Danyal Alam

    Since their inception, orthopedic implants composed of biomedical alloys have been plagued with failures associated with corrosion and wear processes. Despite current surface treatments and techniques being employed to mitigate corrosion and wear, these failure mechanisms continue to occur as prevalent failure modes. Recently, a novel class of compounds known as ionic liquids has been proposed as a multi-functional coating to protect the surfaces of commercially pure titanium surfaces comprising dental implants. In this study, the goal was to evaluate select formulations of these ionic liquids to serve as anti-corrosive lubricants for titanium and cobalt chromium molybdenum alloys widely used in orthopedic implants. Electrochemical and tribological testing of dicationic imidazolium-based ionic liquids revealed these compounds to be superior candidates as corrosion inhibitors and lubricants of biomedical alloy surfaces.

  13. Durable solid lubricant coatings for foil gas bearings to 315 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. C.; Sliney, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    The durability and friction characteristics of bonded solid lubricant films on compliant gas bearings were measured. Coating compositions, which were judged to be suitable for use to at least 315 C, were selected for this study. Most of the data were obtained with polyimide-bonded graphite fluoride coatings and with silicate-bonded graphite coatings. These coatings were applied to the bore of Inconel 750 foil bearings. The journals were A286 stainless steel, with a rms surface finish of 0.2 microns. The foils were subjected to repeated start/stop cycles under a 14 kPa (2 psi) bearing unit load. Sliding contact occurred during lift-off and coast down at surface velocities less than 6 m/s (3000 rpm). Testing continued until 9000 cycles were accumulated or until a rise in starting torque indicated that the coating had failed. The coatings were evaluated in the temperature range from 25 C to 315 C. Comparisons in coating performance as well as discussions of their properties and methods of application are given.

  14. Start-stop testing of two self-acting air-lubricated spiral groove thrust bearing coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunfee, J. D.; Shapiro, W.

    1974-01-01

    Start-stop tests were conducted on air-lubricated spiral-groove thrust bearings. Application of a matrix-bonded molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) coating over a porous chrome oxide coating resulted in significantly lower friction, compared to bearings coated with chrome oxide only. The MoS2 coated bearing sustained 15,000 start-stop cycles at a maximum of 3600 rpm. Each cycle was 15 seconds on, 30 seconds off. The chrome oxide coated bearing failed by local welding after 2030 cycles. Both types of coatings exhibited early failures under higher thrust loads when operating films were insufficient to sustain the load without overheating.

  15. The Effect of Hard Coated Metals on the Thermo-Oxidative Stability of a Branched Perfluoropolyalklyether Lubricant (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    shown improved performance over those previously mentioned (18). One such research effort deposited a TiN coating on a 440C substrate by cathodic arc... 440C substrate. The interaction of PFPAE lubricant with the 440C surface produced corrosion. This led to an increased specific volume causing...coating fracture and exposure of the 440C substrate. The E- Ni coating was found resistant to PFPAE attack at temperatures up to 370°C. This superior

  16. Lubricant-infused nanoparticulate coatings assembled by layer-by-layer deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Sunny, Steffi; Vogel, Nicolas; Howell, Caitlin; ...

    2014-09-01

    Omniphobic coatings are designed to repel a wide range of liquids without leaving stains on the surface. A practical coating should exhibit stable repellency, show no interference with color or transparency of the underlying substrate and, ideally, be deposited in a simple process on arbitrarily shaped surfaces. We use layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of negatively charged silica nanoparticles and positively charged polyelectrolytes to create nanoscale surface structures that are further surface-functionalized with fluorinated silanes and infiltrated with fluorinated oil, forming a smooth, highly repellent coating on surfaces of different materials and shapes. We show that four or more LbL cycles introducemore » sufficient surface roughness to effectively immobilize the lubricant into the nanoporous coating and provide a stable liquid interface that repels water, low-surface-tension liquids and complex fluids. The absence of hierarchical structures and the small size of the silica nanoparticles enables complete transparency of the coating, with light transmittance exceeding that of normal glass. The coating is mechanically robust, maintains its repellency after exposure to continuous flow for several days and prevents adsorption of streptavidin as a model protein. As a result, the LbL process is conceptually simple, of low cost, environmentally benign, scalable, automatable and therefore may present an efficient synthetic route to non-fouling materials.« less

  17. Lubricant-Infused Nanoparticulate Coatings Assembled by Layer-by-Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sunny, S; Vogel, N; Howell, C; Vu, TL; Aizenberg, J

    2014-09-01

    Omniphobic coatings are designed to repel a wide range of liquids without leaving stains on the surface. A practical coating should exhibit stable repellency, show no interference with color or transparency of the underlying substrate and, ideally, be deposited in a simple process on arbitrarily shaped surfaces. We use layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of negatively charged silica nanoparticles and positively charged polyelectrolytes to create nanoscale surface structures that are further surface-functionalized with fluorinated silanes and infiltrated with fluorinated oil, forming a smooth, highly repellent coating on surfaces of different materials and shapes. We show that four or more LbL cycles introduce sufficient surface roughness to effectively immobilize the lubricant into the nanoporous coating and provide a stable liquid interface that repels water, low-surface-tension liquids and complex fluids. The absence of hierarchical structures and the small size of the silica nanoparticles enables complete transparency of the coating, with light transmittance exceeding that of normal glass. The coating is mechanically robust, maintains its repellency after exposure to continuous flow for several days and prevents adsorption of streptavidin as a model protein. The LbL process is conceptually simple, of low cost, environmentally benign, scalable, automatable and therefore may present an efficient synthetic route to non-fouling materials.

  18. Lubricant-infused nanoparticulate coatings assembled by layer-by-layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sunny, Steffi; Vogel, Nicolas; Howell, Caitlin; Vu, Thy L.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-09-01

    Omniphobic coatings are designed to repel a wide range of liquids without leaving stains on the surface. A practical coating should exhibit stable repellency, show no interference with color or transparency of the underlying substrate and, ideally, be deposited in a simple process on arbitrarily shaped surfaces. We use layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of negatively charged silica nanoparticles and positively charged polyelectrolytes to create nanoscale surface structures that are further surface-functionalized with fluorinated silanes and infiltrated with fluorinated oil, forming a smooth, highly repellent coating on surfaces of different materials and shapes. We show that four or more LbL cycles introduce sufficient surface roughness to effectively immobilize the lubricant into the nanoporous coating and provide a stable liquid interface that repels water, low-surface-tension liquids and complex fluids. The absence of hierarchical structures and the small size of the silica nanoparticles enables complete transparency of the coating, with light transmittance exceeding that of normal glass. The coating is mechanically robust, maintains its repellency after exposure to continuous flow for several days and prevents adsorption of streptavidin as a model protein. As a result, the LbL process is conceptually simple, of low cost, environmentally benign, scalable, automatable and therefore may present an efficient synthetic route to non-fouling materials.

  19. Thermal Effects on a Low Cr Modification of PS304 Solid Lubricant Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Malcolm K.; Yanke, Anne M.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    PS304 is a high temperature composite solid lubricant coating composed of Ni-Cr, Cr2O3, BaF2-CaF2 and Ag. The effect of reducing chromium content on the formation of voids in the Ni-Cr particles after heat treatment in PS304 coating was investigated. Coatings were prepared with Ni-20Cr or Ni-10Cr powder and in various combinations with the other constituents of PS304 (i.e., chromia, silver and eutectic BaF2-CaF2 powders) and deposited on metal substrates by plasma spray. Specimens were exposed to 650 C for 24 hr or 1090 C for 15 hr and then examined for changes in thickness, coating microstructure and adhesion strength. Specimens with Ni-10Cr generally had less thickness increase than specimens with Ni-20Cr, but there was great variance in the data. Reduction of chromium concentration in Ni-Cr powder tended to reduce the appearance of voids in the Ni-Cr phase after heat exposure. The presence of BaF2-CaF2 resulted in a significant increase in coating adhesion strength after heat treatment, while coatings without BaF2-CaF2 had no significant change. Chemical composition analysis suggested that the void formation was due to oxidation of chromium in the Ni-Cr constituent.

  20. Thermal Processing Effects on the Adhesive Strength of PS304 High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Edmonds, Brian J.; Benoy, Patricia A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the effects of post deposition heat treatments on the cohesive and adhesive strength properties of PS304, a plasma sprayed nickel-chrome based, high temperature solid lubricant coating deposited on stainless steel, are studied. Plasma spray deposited coating samples were exposed in air at temperatures from 432 to 650 C for up to 500 hr to promote residual stress relief, enhance particle to particle bonding and increase coating to substrate bond strength. Coating pull-off strength was measured using a commercial adhesion tester that utilizes 13 mm diameter aluminum pull studs attached to the coating surface with epoxy. Pull off force was automatically recorded and converted to coating pull off strength. As deposited coating samples were also tested as a baseline. The as-deposited (untreated) samples either delaminated at the coating-substrate interface or failed internally (cohesive failure) at about 17 MPa. Samples heat treated at temperatures above 540 C for 100 hr or at 600 C or above for more than 24 hr exhibited strengths above 31 MPa, nearly a two fold increase. Coating failure occurred inside the body of the coating (cohesive failure) for nearly all of the heat-treated samples and only occasionally at the coating substrate interface (adhesive failure). Metallographic analyses of heat-treated coatings indicate that the Nickel-Chromium binder in the PS304 appears to have segregated into two phases, a high nickel matrix phase and a high chromium precipitated phase. Analysis of the precipitates indicates the presence of silicon, a constituent of a flow enhancing additive in the commercial NiCr powder. The exact nature and structure of the precipitate phase is not known. This microstructural change is believed to be partially responsible for the coating strength increase. Diffusion bonding between particles may also be playing a role. Increasing the heat treatment temperature, exposure time or both accelerate the heat treatment process. Preliminary

  1. Surface Design and Engineering Toward Wear-Resistant, Self-Lubricating Diamond Films and Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    The tribological properties of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films vary with the environment, possessing a Jekyll-and-Hyde character. CVD diamond has low coefficient of friction and high wear resistance in air but high coefficient of friction and low wear resistance in vacuum. Improving the tribological functionality of materials (such as achieving low friction and good wear resistance) was an aim of this investigation. Three studies on the surface design, surface engineering, and tribology of CVD diamond have shown that its friction and wear are significantly reduced in ultrahigh vacuum. The main criteria for judging whether diamond films are an effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating material were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which must be less than 0.1 and on the order of 10(exp 6) cu mm/N(dot)m, respectively. In the first study the presence of a thin film (less than 1 micron thick) of amorphous, nondiamond carbon (hydrogenated carbon, also called diamondlike carbon or DLC) on CVD diamond greatly decreased the coefficient of friction and the wear rate. Therefore, a thin DLC film on CVD diamond can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating in ultrahigh vacuum. In the second study the presence of an amorphous, nondiamond carbon surface layer formed on CVD diamond by ion implantation significantly reduced the coefficient of friction and the wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. Therefore, such surface layers are acceptable for effective self-lubricating, wear-resistant applications of CVD diamond. In the third study CVD diamond in contact with cubic boron nitride exhibited low coefficient of friction in ultra high vacuum. Therefore, this materials combination can provide an effective self-lubricating, wear-resistant couple in ultrahigh vacuum.

  2. Nanotribological investigations of materials, coatings and lubricants for nanotechnology applications at high sliding velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambe, Nikhil S.

    The advent of micro/nanostructures and the subsequent miniaturization of moving components for various nanotechnology applications, such as micro/nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), have ascribed paramount importance to the tribology and mechanics on the nanoscale. Most of these micro/nanodevices and components operate at very high sliding velocities (of the order of tens of mm/s to few m/s). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies to investigate potential materials, coatings and lubricants for these devices have been rendered inadequate due to the inherent limitations on the highest sliding velocities achievable with commercial AFMs (<250 mum/s). The development of a new AFM based technique, done as part of this research work, has allowed nanotribological investigations over a wide range of velocities (up to 10 mm/s). The impacts of this research on the design and development of nanotechnology applications are profound. Research conducted on various materials, coatings and lubricants reveals a strong velocity dependence of friction, adhesion and wear on the nanoscale. Based on the experimental evidence, theoretical formulations have been conducted for nanoscale friction behavior to design a comprehensive analytical model that explains the velocity dependence. The model takes into consideration the contributions of adhesion at the tip-sample interface, high impact velocity related deformations at the contacting asperities and atomic scale stick-slip. Dominant friction mechanisms are identified and the critical operating parameters corresponding to their transitions are defined. Wear studies are conducted at high sliding velocities for materials, coatings and lubricants to understand the primary failure mechanisms. A novel AFM based nanowear mapping technique is developed to map wear on the nanoscale and the interdependence of normal load and sliding velocity on sample surface wear is studied. This technique helps identify and classify wear mechanisms and

  3. Development of surface coatings for air-lubricated, compliant journal bearings to 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.; Gray, S.

    1978-01-01

    Surface coatings for an air-lubricated, compliant journal for an automotive gas turbine engine were tested to find those capable of withstanding temperatures of either 540 C (1000 F) or 650 C (1200 F). Also, the coatings have to be capable of surviving the start-stop sliding contact cycles prior to rotor lift-off and at touchdown. Selected coating combinations were tested in start-stop tests at 14 kPa (2 psi) loading for 2000 cycles at room and maximum temperatures. Specific coating recommendations are: Cdo and graphite on foil versus chrome carbide on journal up to 370 C (700 F); NASA PS-120 (Tribaloy 400, silver, and CaF2) on journal versus uncoated foil up to 540 C (1000 F); and chemically adherent Cr2O3 on journal and foil up to 650 C (1200 F). The chemically adherent Cr2O3 coating system was further tested successfully at 35 kPa (5 psi) loading for 2000 start-stop cycles.

  4. NASA PS400: A New Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating for High Temperature Wear Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Edmonds, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    A new solid lubricant coating, NASA PS400, has been developed for high temperature tribological applications. This plasma sprayed coating is a variant of the patented PS304 coating and has been formulated to provide higher density, smoother surface finish and better dimensional stability than PS304. PS400 is comprised of a nickel-molybdenum binder that provides strength, creep resistance and extreme oxidative and dimensional stability. Chromium oxide, silver and barium-calcium fluoride eutectic are added to the binder to form PS400.Tribological properties were evaluated with a pin-on-disk test rig in sliding contact to 650 C. Coating material samples were exposed to air, argon and vacuum at 760 C followed by cross section microscopic analysis to assess microstructure stability. Oil-Free microturbine engine hot section foil bearing tests were undertaken to assess PS400 s suitability for hot foil gas bearing applications. The preliminary results indicate that PS400 exhibits tribological characteristics comparable to the PS304 coating but with enhanced creep resistance and dimensional stability suitable for demanding, dynamic applications.

  5. Self-lubricating CrAlN/VN multilayer coatings at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuexiu; Zhang, Sam; Lee, Jyh-Wei; Li, Bo; Wang, Yuxi; Zhao, Dongliang

    2013-08-01

    Vanadium nitride (VN) is easily oxidized to form vanadium oxides and becomes lubricious under stress. CrAlN is hard thus CrAlN/VN multilayer coatings render both hardness and lubricious properties attractive in dry machining of soft metals. This study investigates the effect of multi-layering on the coating's mechanical and tribological properties at room temperature. The CrAlN/VN multilayer coatings are deposited on cemented tungsten carbide and Si wafer (1 0 0) substrates in an in-line magnetron sputtering system. A period contains one layer of CrAlN plus one adjacent layer of VN. The period thickness varies roughly from 3 nm to 30 nm; the total number of the periods varies from 30 to 300. X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron probe micro-analyzer are employed to characterize the microstructures and chemistry. Nanoindentation and ball-on-disk wear test are used in mechanical and tribological studies. The CrAlN/VN multilayer coatings have good lubricant property with lowest coefficient of friction of 0.26. At the period thickness of 20 nm, the multilayer coatings obtained the best mechanical properties (hardness of 32.4 GPa, elastic modulus of 375 GPa, minimum wear rate of 1.1 × 10-7 mm3/Nm).

  6. Tribological composition optimization of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings for foil gas bearings at temperatures to 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1988-01-01

    The determination of the tribilogically optimum composition of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings using a foil gas bearing test apparatus is described. The coatings contain a wear resistant chromium carbide `base stock' with the lubricant additives silver and BaF2-CaF2 eutectic. The coating composition is optimized for air-lubricated foil gas bearings at temperatures ranging from 25 to 650 C. The various compositions were prepared by powder blending, then plasma sprayed onto Inconel 718 test journals and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness and surface finish. The journals were operated against preoxidized Ni-Cr alloy foils, and the test bearings were subjected to repeated start-stop cycles under a bearing unit of 14 kPa. Sliding contact between the coated journal and the smooth foil occurs during bearing start-up before lift-off or hydrodynamic lubrication by the air film and during bearing coast-down. The bearings were tested for 9000 start-stop cycles or until specimen reached a predetermined failure level.

  7. Optimization of Friction and Wear Properties of Electroless Ni-P Coatings Under Lubrication Using Grey Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Arkadeb; Duari, Santanu; Barman, Tapan Kumar; Sahoo, Prasanta

    2017-10-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the friction and wear behaviour of electroless Ni-P coatings sliding against hardened chromium coated steel under lubrication. Tribological tests are carried out on a block-on-roller configuration multi tribotester. The effect of variation of applied normal load, rotation speed of the counterface roller and test duration on the coefficient of friction and wear depth is analyzed using Taguchi's robust design philosophy and design of experiments. Optimal setting of the tribo-testing parameters is evaluated using a hybrid grey fuzzy reasoning analysis in a quest to achieve optimal tribological performance of the coatings under lubrication. Analysis of variance reveals the highest contribution by applied normal load in controlling the tribological behaviour under lubrication. Whereas the interaction effect of load and time is also seen to cast a significant effect. Surface morphology studies reveal a typical nodular structure of the deposits. The coatings are seen to be amorphous in its as-deposited condition which becomes crystalline on heat treatment. Further, the synergistic effects of test parameters, microstructure of the coatings, lubrication, etc. on the tribological behaviour are assessed.

  8. Tribological composition optimization of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings for foil gas bearings at temperatures to 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1988-01-01

    The determination of the tribilogically optimum composition of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings using a foil gas bearing test apparatus is described. The coatings contain a wear resistant chromium carbide `base stock' with the lubricant additives silver and BaF2-CaF2 eutectic. The coating composition is optimized for air-lubricated foil gas bearings at temperatures ranging from 25 to 650 C. The various compositions were prepared by powder blending, then plasma sprayed onto Inconel 718 test journals and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness and surface finish. The journals were operated against preoxidized Ni-Cr alloy foils, and the test bearings were subjected to repeated start-stop cycles under a bearing unit of 14 kPa. Sliding contact between the coated journal and the smooth foil occurs during bearing start-up before lift-off or hydrodynamic lubrication by the air film and during bearing coast-down. The bearings were tested for 9000 start-stop cycles or until specimen reached a predetermined failure level.

  9. Optimization of Friction and Wear Properties of Electroless Ni-P Coatings Under Lubrication Using Grey Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Arkadeb; Duari, Santanu; Barman, Tapan Kumar; Sahoo, Prasanta

    2016-12-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the friction and wear behaviour of electroless Ni-P coatings sliding against hardened chromium coated steel under lubrication. Tribological tests are carried out on a block-on-roller configuration multi tribotester. The effect of variation of applied normal load, rotation speed of the counterface roller and test duration on the coefficient of friction and wear depth is analyzed using Taguchi's robust design philosophy and design of experiments. Optimal setting of the tribo-testing parameters is evaluated using a hybrid grey fuzzy reasoning analysis in a quest to achieve optimal tribological performance of the coatings under lubrication. Analysis of variance reveals the highest contribution by applied normal load in controlling the tribological behaviour under lubrication. Whereas the interaction effect of load and time is also seen to cast a significant effect. Surface morphology studies reveal a typical nodular structure of the deposits. The coatings are seen to be amorphous in its as-deposited condition which becomes crystalline on heat treatment. Further, the synergistic effects of test parameters, microstructure of the coatings, lubrication, etc. on the tribological behaviour are assessed.

  10. Investigation of Potential Thermal Processing Techniques for the Enhancement of PS300 High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoy, Patricia A.

    2000-01-01

    Contemporary trends in rotating machinery development have produced a continuous evolution towards ever increasing speeds and higher operating temperatures. This process has been particularly evident in aerospace and automotive applications such as turbochargers. The combination of high temperature and high speed has exceeded the capacity of mainstream liquid lubrication technology. The NASA Glenn Research Center has been at the forefront in developing innovative solid lubricants for the oil free protection of rotating machinery under these extreme environmental conditions. The most recent of these is the PS 300 series of plasma sprayed solid lubricant coatings. St Louis University and NASA Glenn Research Center entered into this cooperative agreement to investigate potential thermal processing techniques for the enhancement of the PS 304 solid lubricant.

  11. Investigating critical effects of variegated lubricants, glidants and hydrophilic additives on lag time of press coated ethylcellulose tablets.

    PubMed

    Patadia, Riddhish; Vora, Chintan; Mittal, Karan; Mashru, Rajashree

    2016-01-01

    The research envisaged focuses on vital impacts of variegated lubricants, glidants and hydrophilic additives on lag time of press coated ethylcellulose (EC) tablets using prednisone as a model drug. Several lubricants and glidants such as magnesium stearate, colloidal SiO2, sodium stearyl fumarate, talc, stearic acid, polyethylene glycol (6000) and glyceryl behenate were investigated to understand their effects on lag time by changing their concentrations in outer coat. Further, the effects of hydrophilic additives on lag time were examined for hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (E5), hydroxypropylcellulose (EF and SSL), povidone (K30), copovidone, polyethylene glycol (4000), lactose and mannitol. In vitro drug release testing revealed that each selected lubricant/glidant, if present even at concentration of 0.25% w/w, significantly reduced the lag time of press coated tablets. Specifically, colloidal SiO2 and/or magnesium stearate were detrimental while other lubricants/glidants were relatively less injurious. Among hydrophilic additives, freely water soluble fillers had utmost influence in lag time, whereas, comparatively less impact was observed with polymeric binders. Concisely, glidant and lubricant should be chosen to have minimal impact on lag time and further judicious selection of hydrophilic additives should be exercised for modulating lag time of pulsatile release formulations.

  12. Ion beam processing of high-temperature solid-lubricating coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, R.S.; Rai, A.K.; Yust, C.S.

    1993-07-01

    Ion bean assisted deposition (IBAD) and ion beam mixing (IBM) were utilized to fabricate self-lubricating coatings of CaF{sub 2}/Ag and BaF{sub 2}/CaF{sub 2}/Ag composites. In IBAD, a low energy ({approximately}500 eV) Ar{sup +} bombardment was used in combinations with electron beam evaporation of coating materials. In ion beam mixing, magnetron sputter deposition was used to deposit a mixed composite coating of CaF{sub 2} + Ag which was subsequently ion beam mixed with 1 MeV Ag{sup +} at a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}2}. The deposited coatings were characterized for composition and microstructure using Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry (RBS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The friction and wear tests were carried out in a high-temperature controlled-atmosphere test system utilizing pin-on-disc wear test geometry. Uncoated Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (NBD-100) spheres were used as the pin-on coated NBD-100 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Rene 41 Ni-base superalloy discs. Both IBAD and sputtering of BaF{sub 2} and CaF{sub 2} resulted in a near stoichiometric composition with a very fine microstructure. Friction coefficients below 600{degrees}C were approximately 0.2-0.3 in the case of coated Rene 41 alloy, but were reduced to about 0.1-0.15 at 800{degrees}C for coated Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. 13 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Solid lubricant behavior of MoS2 and WSe2-based nanocomposite coatings

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Meister, Santiago; Rojas, Teresa Cristina; Brizuela, Marta; Sánchez-López, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Tribological coatings made of MoS2 and WSe2 phases and their corresponding combinations with tungsten carbide (WC) were prepared by non-reactive magnetron sputtering of individual targets of similar composition. A comparative tribological analysis of these multiphase coatings was done in both ambient air (30–40% relative humidity, RH) and dry nitrogen (RH<7%) environments using the same tribometer and testing conditions. A nanostructural study using advanced transmission electron microscopy of the initial coatings and examination of the counterfaces after the friction test using different analytical tools helped to elucidate what governs the tribological behavior for each type of environment. This allowed conclusions to be made about the influence of the coating microstructure and composition on the tribological response. The best performance obtained with a WSex film (specific wear rate of 2 × 10−8 mm3 N–1m–1 and a friction coefficient of 0.03–0.05) was compared with that of the well-established MoS2 lubricant material. PMID:28458736

  14. Friction and Wear Characteristics of a Modified Composite Solid Lubricant Plasma Spray Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, M. K.; DellaCorte, C.

    2004-01-01

    LCR304 is a solid lubricant coating composed of Ni-10Cr, Cr2O3, BaF2-CaF2 and Ag and developed for dimensional stability in high temperature air. This coating is a modification of PS304, which differs in that the Ni-Cr constituent contains 20wt% Cr. The tribological characteristics of LCR304 were evaluated by pin-on-disk and foil air bearing rig testing from 25 to 650 C and compared to previous test results with PS304. For both tests, the friction coefficient decreased as temperature increased from 25 to 650 C. Wear generally decreased with increasing temperature for all pin-on-disk tests. LCR304 coated components produced the least wear of Inconel X-750 counterface materials at 427 and 650 C. These results indicate that the LCR304 coating has potential as a replacement for PS304 in, for example, low cycle (minimum wear) applications where dimensional stability is imperative.

  15. Complex frictional analysis of self-lubricant W-S-C/Cr coating.

    PubMed

    Polcar, Tomas; Gustavsson, Fredrik; Thersleff, Thomas; Jacobson, Staffan; Cavaleiro, Albano

    2012-01-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides belong to one of the most developed classes of materials for solid lubrication. However, one of the main drawbacks of most of the self-lubricating coatings is their low load-bearing capacity, particularly in terrestrial atmospheres. In our previous work, alloying thin films based on tungsten disulfide with non-metallic interstitial elements, such as carbon or nitrogen, has been studied in order to improve tribological performance in different environments. Excellent results were reached with the deposited coatings hardness, in some cases, more than one order of magnitude higher than single W-S films. In this work, W-S-C films were deposited with increasing Cr contents by co-sputtering chromium and composite WS2-C and targets. Two films were prepared with approx. 7 and 13 at.% of Cr. Alloying with chromium led to dense films with amorphous microstructure; the hardness and adhesion was improved. Sliding tests were carried out in dry and humid air using a pin-on-disc tribometer with 100Cr6 steel balls as a counterpart. To analyse the sliding process, the surfaces in the contact were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (bonding), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Surface and sub-surface structural modification of the coating and composition of the transferred tribolayer are discussed in detail. High friction in humid air was attributed to the absence of a well-ordered WS2 sliding interface. On the other hand, the existence of such an interface explained the very low friction observed in dry air.

  16. Does the Use of Diamond-Like Carbon Coating and Organophosphate Lubricant Additive Together Cause Excessive Tribochemical Material Removal?

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Yan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Meyer, Harry M.; ...

    2015-08-22

    We observe unexpected wear increase on a steel surface that rubbed against diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings only when lubricated by phosphate-based antiwear additives. Contrary to the literature hypothesis of a competition between zinc dialkyldithiophosphate produced tribofilms and DLC-induced carbon transfer, here a new wear mechanism based on carbon-catalyzed tribochemical interactions supported by surface characterization is proposed

  17. Does the Use of Diamond-Like Carbon Coating and Organophosphate Lubricant Additive Together Cause Excessive Tribochemical Material Removal?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Meyer, Harry M.; Luo, Huimin; Qu, Jun

    2015-08-22

    We observe unexpected wear increase on a steel surface that rubbed against diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings only when lubricated by phosphate-based antiwear additives. Contrary to the literature hypothesis of a competition between zinc dialkyldithiophosphate produced tribofilms and DLC-induced carbon transfer, here a new wear mechanism based on carbon-catalyzed tribochemical interactions supported by surface characterization is proposed

  18. Hydrodynamic air lubricated compliant surface bearing for an automotive gas turbine engine. 2: Materials and coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.; Ruscitto, D.; Gray, S.

    1978-01-01

    Material coatings for an air-lubricated, compliant journal bearing for an automotive gas turbine engine were exposed to service test temperatures of 540 C or 650 C for 300 hours, and to 10 temperature cycles from room temperatures to the service test temperatures. Selected coatings were then put on journal and partial-arc foils and tested in start-stop cycle tests at 14 kPa (2 psi) loading for 2000 cycles. Half of the test cycles were performed at a test chamber service temperature of 540 C (1000 F) or 650 C (1200 F); the other half were performed at room temperature. Based on test results, the following combinations and their service temperature limitations are recommended: HL-800 TM (CdO and graphite) on foil versus chrome carbide on journal up to 370 C (700 F); NASA PS 120 (Tribaloy 400, silver and CaF2 on journal versus uncoated foil up to 540 C (1000 F); and Kaman DES on journal and foil up to 640 C (1200 F). Kaman DES coating system was further tested successfully at 35 kPa (5 psi) loading for 2000 start-stop cycles.

  19. Diamond and diamondlike carbon as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings for silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1995-01-01

    Recent work on the friction and wear properties of as-deposited fine-grain diamond, polished coarse-grain diamond, and as-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films in humid air at a relative humidity of approximately 40 percent and in dry nitrogen is reviewed. Two types of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes are used to deposit diamond films on silicon nitride (Si3N4) substrates: microwave-plasma and hot-filament. Ion beams are used to deposit DLC films of Si3N4 substrates. The diamond and DLC films in sliding contact with hemispherical bare Si3N4 pins have low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.2) and low wear rates (less than 10(exp -7) mm(exp 2)/N-m), and thus, can be used effectively as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings for Si3N4 in the aforementioned two environments.

  20. Robust prototypical anti-icing coatings with a self-lubricating liquid water layer between ice and substrate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Dou, Renmei; Cui, Dapeng; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Fujian; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Jianjun; Song, Yanlin; Jiang, Lei

    2013-05-22

    A robust prototypical anti-icing coating with a self-lubricating liquid water layer (SLWL) is fabricated via grafting cross-linked hygroscopic polymers inside the micropores of silicon wafer surfaces. The ice adhesion on the surface with SLWL is 1 order of magnitude lower than that on the superhydrophobic surfaces and the ice formed atop of it can be blown off by an action of strong breeze. The surface with self-lubricating liquid water layer exhibits excellent capability of self-healing and abrasion resistance. The SLWL surface should also find applications in antifogging and self-cleaning by rainfall, in addition to anti-icing and antifrosting.

  1. Surface Design and Engineering Toward Wear-Resistant, Self-Lubricant Diamond Films and Coatings. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes three studies on the surface design, surface engineering, and tribology of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films and coatings toward wear-resistant, self-lubricating diamond films and coatings. Friction mechanisms and solid lubrication mechanisms of CVD diamond are stated. Effects of an amorphous hydrogenated carbon on CVD diamond, an amorphous, nondiamond carbon surface layer formed on CVD diamond by carbon and nitrogen ion implantation, and a materials combination of cubic boron nitride and CVD diamond on the adhesion, friction, and wear behaviors of CVD diamond in ultrahigh vacuum are described. How surface modification and the selected materials couple improved the tribological functionality of coatings, giving low coefficient of friction and good wear resistance, is explained.

  2. Preliminary Evaluation of PS300: A New Self-Lubricating High Temperature Composite Coating for Use to 800 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, C.; Edmonds, B. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces PS300, a plasma sprayed, self-lubricating composite coating for use in sliding contacts at temperatures to 800 C. PS300 is a metal bonded chrome oxide coating with silver and BaF2/CaF2 eutectic solid lubricant additives. PS300 is similar to PS200, a chromium carbide based coating, which is currently being investigated for a variety of tribological applications. In pin-on-disk testing up to 650 C, PS300 exhibited comparable friction and wear properties to PS200. The PS300 matrix, which is predominantly chromium oxide rather than chromium carbide, does not require diamond grinding and polishes readily with silicon carbide abrasives greatly reducing manufacturing costs compared to PS200. It is anticipated that PS300 has potential for sliding bearing and seal applications in both aerospace and general industry.

  3. Coated carbide drill performance under soluble coconut oil lubricant and nanoparticle enhanced MQL in drilling AISI P20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, N. A. M.; Azmi, A. I.; Fairuz, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    This research experimentally investigates the performance of a TiAlN coated carbide drill bit in drilling AISI P20 through two different kinds of lubricants, namely; soluble coconut oil (SCO) and nanoparticle-enhanced coconut oil (NECO) under minimum quantity lubrication system. The tool life and tool wear mechanism were studied using various cutting speeds of 50, 100 and 150 m/min with a constant feed of 0.01 mm/rev. Since the flank wear land was not regular along the cutting edge, the average flank wear (VB) was measured at several points using image analysis software. The drills were inspected using a scanning electron microscope to further elucidate the wear mechanism. The result indicates that drilling with the nanoparticle- enhanced lubricant was better in resisting the wear and improving the drill life to some extent

  4. Transition of PS300 Solid Lubricant Coating Technology to Field Aided by Demonstration on Key Substrate Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    PS300 is a high-temperature solid lubricant coating originally developed to lubricate nickel-based superalloy shafts operating against foil air bearings in Oil-Free turbomachinery applications. PS300 is a plasma-spray-deposited coating developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. It is available for non-exclusive licensing and has found applications in aerospace and industry. PS300 reduces friction and wear from below room temperature to over 650 C in both oxidizing and reducing environments. Early development centered on coating nickel-based shafts for use in turbomachinery. Potential industrial and aerospace customers, however, expressed interest in using the coating on a wide variety of substrates including steels, stainless steels, and nonferrous alloys like aluminum and titanium. To support this interest, a research program was carried out at Glenn in which nine different substrate candidate materials were evaluated for suitability with the PS300 coating. The materials were first coated with PS300 and then tested for coating strength and adhesion both before and after exposure to high-temperature air.

  5. Experimental test program for evaluation of solid lubricant coating as applied to compliant foil gas bearings to 315 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental apparatus and test procedure was developed to compare the performance of two solid lubricant coatings for air lubricated compliant foil gas bearings in the temperature range of 25 to 315 C. Polyimide bonded additive (SBGC) were tested extensively for durability and frictional characteristics. A partial arc bearing constructed of Inconel X-750 was coated on the bore with one of these coatings. The foil was subjected to repeated start/stop cycles. Performance comparisons reveal that although both coatings survive thousands of start/stop cycles, only the PBGF coated bearing achieves the specified 9000 start/stops. There is enough wear on the SBGC coated bearing to warrant termination of the test prior to 9000 start/stop cycles due to coating failure. The frictional characteristics of the PBGF are better at the elevated temperatures than at lower temperatures; a marked increase in sliding friction occurs as the temperature decreases. The SBGC maintains relatively constant frictional characteristics independent of operating temperature.

  6. A study of the formation and self-lubrication mechanisms of boric acid films on boric oxide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.R.; Erck, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was made of the formation and self-lubrication mechanisms of boric acid films on boric oxide coatings prepared by vacuum evaporation. Measured friction coefficients of a steel ball sliding on a boric-oxide-coated-steel disk and a sapphire ball sliding on a boric-oxide-coated-alumina disk were 0.025 to 0.05 at steady state, depending on load and substrate material. This low friction was correlated with the formation of a lubricious boric acid film on boric oxide coatings exposed to open air. For the mechanism of self-lubrication, the layered-triclinic-crystal structure of boric acid was proposed. The atoms constituting each boric acid molecule are arrayed in closely packed and strongly bonded layers that are 0.318 nm apart and held together by weak forces, such as van der Waals. It is hypothesized that during sliding, these layers can align themselves parallel to the direction of relative motion, and once so aligned,, can slide over one another with relative ease to provide low friction. Structural and chemical findings were included to substantiate the proposed solid lubrication mechanism. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Lubricating Properties of Ceramic-Bonded Calcium Fluoride Coatings on Nickel-Base Alloys from 75 to 1900 deg F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1962-01-01

    The endurance life and the friction coefficient of ceramic-bonded calcium fluoride (CaF2) coatings on nickel-base alloys were determined at temperatures from 75 F to 1900 F. The specimen configuration consisted of a hemispherical rider (3/16-in. rad.) sliding against the flat surface of a rotating disk. Increasing the ambient temperature (up to 1500 F) or the sliding velocity generally reduced the friction coefficient and improved coating life. Base-metal selection was critical above 1500 F. For instance, cast Inconel sliding against coated Inconel X was lubricated effectively to 1500 F, but at 1600 F severe blistering of the coatings occurred. However, good lubrication and adherence were obtained for Rene 41 sliding against coated Rene 41 at temperatures up to 1900 F; no blisters developed, coating wear life was fairly good, and the rider wear rate was significantly lower than for the unlubricated metals. Friction coefficients were 0.12 at 1500 F, 0.15 at 1700 F, and 0.17 at 1800 F and 1900 F. Because of its ready availability, Inconel X appears to be the preferred substrate alloy for applications in which the temperature does not exceed 1500 F. Rene 41 would have to be used in applications involving higher temperatures. Improved coating life was derived by either preoxidizing the substrate metals prior to the coating application or by applying a very thin (less than 0.0002 in.) burnished and sintered overlay to the surface of the coating. Preoxidation did not affect the friction coefficient. The overlay generally resulted in a higher friction coefficient than that obtained without the overlay. The combination of both modifications resulted in longer coating life and in friction coefficients intermediate between those obtained with either modification alone.

  8. Effects of Microstructure and Adhesion on Performance of Sputter-Deposited MoS2 Solid Lubricant Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-15

    signatures of missile plumes, sensor out-of-fied-of-view rejection, applied laser spectroscopy, laser chemistry, laser optoelectronics, solar cell ...using atmospheric radiation; solar physics, infrared astronomy, infrared signature analysis; effects of solar activity, magnetic storms and nuclear...and Adhesion on Performance of Sputter-Deposited MoS2 Solid Lubricant Coatings 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Fleischauer, Paul D.; Hilton, Michael R.; and

  9. Indium-Tin-Oxide coated optical fibers for temperature-viscosity sensing applications in synthetic lubricant oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, P.; Mendizabal, D.; R. Zamarreño, C.; Arregui, F. J.; Matias, I. R.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, is presented the fabrication and characterization of optical fiber refractometer based on lossy mode resonances (LMR). Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) thin films deposited on optical fibers are used as the LMR supporting coatings. These resonances shift to the red as a function of the external refractive index. The refractometer has been used to characterize temperature variations related to the viscosity of synthetic industrial gear lubricant.

  10. Surface investigation and tribological mechanism of a sulfate-based lubricant deposited on zinc-coated steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timma, Christian; Lostak, Thomas; Janssen, Stella; Flock, Jörg; Mayer, Christian

    2016-12-01

    Phosphatation is a well-known technique to improve friction and wear behaviour of zinc coated steel, but has a variety of economic and ecologic limitations. In this study an alternative coating based on ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) is applied on skin-passed hot-dip galvanized steel sheets in order to investigate its surface chemical and tribological behaviour in a Pin-on-Disk Tribometer. Raman- and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic results revealed a formation of ammonium zinc sulfate ((NH4)2Zn(SO4)2 * xH2O) on the surface, which is primarily located in the skin-passed areas of the steel material. Sulfate coated samples exhibited a superior friction behaviour in Pin-on-Disk Tests using squalane as a model substance for oil-like lubricated conditions and a formation of a thin lubrication film is obtained in the wear track. Squalane acts as a carrier substance for ammonium zinc sulfate, leading to an effective lubrication film in the wear track.

  11. Effect of triangular texture on the tribological performance of die steel with TiN coatings under lubricated sliding condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ping; Xiang, Xin; Shao, Tianmin; La, Yingqian; Li, Junling

    2016-12-01

    The friction and wear of stamping die surface can affect the service life of stamping die and the quality of stamping products. Surface texturing and surface coating have been widely used to improve the tribological performance of mechanical components. This study experimentally investigated the effect of triangular surface texture on the friction and wear properties of the die steel substrate with TiN coatings under oil lubrication. TiN coatings were deposited on a die steel (50Cr) substrate through a multi-arc ion deposition system, and then triangular surface texturing was fabricated by a laser surface texturing. The friction and wear test was conducted by a UMT-3 pin-on-disk tribometer under different sliding speeds and different applied loads, respectively. The adhesion test was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of triangular texturing on the interfacial bonding strength between the TiN coating and the die steel substrate. Results show that the combination method of surface texturing process and surface coating process has excellent tribological properties (the lowest frictional coefficient and wear volume), compared with the single texturing process or the single coating process. The tribological performance is improved resulting from the high hardness and low elastic modulus of TiN coatings, and the generation of hydrodynamic pressure, function of micro-trap for wear debris and micro-reservoirs for lubricating oil of the triangular surface texture. In addition, the coating bonding strength of the texturing sample is 3.63 MPa, higher than that of the single coating sample (3.48 MPa), but the mechanisms remain to be further researched.

  12. High temperature self-lubricating coatings for air lubricated foil bearings for the automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.

    1980-01-01

    coating combinations were developed for compliant surface bearings and journals to be used in an automotive gas turbine engine. The coatings were able to withstand the sliding start/stops during rotor liftoff and touchdown and occasional short time, high speed rubs under representative loading of the engine. Some dozen coating variations of CdO-graphite, Cr2O3 (by sputtering) and CaF2 (plasma sprayed) were identified. The coatings were optimized and they were examined for stoichiometry, metallurgical condition, and adhesion. Sputtered Cr2O3 was most adherent when optimum parameters were used and it was applied on an annealed (soft) substrate. Metallic binders and interlayers were used to improve the ductility and the adherence.

  13. Plasma-sprayed, self-lubricating coatings for use from cryogenic temperatures to 870 deg C (1600 deg F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    A plasma-sprayed coating is described with good lubricating properties over a wide temperature range. The coating, designated NASA LUBE PS101, contains silver, nichrome, calcium fluoride, and an oxidation protective glass. Oscillating tests were conducted of self-aligning, plain cylindrical bearings, in which the bore was lined with 0.025 cm (0.010 in.) thick coatings of PS101; these were conducted at a radial load of 3.5 x 10 to the 7th power N/sq m (5000 psi) in nitrogen gas at -107 C (-160 F), in vacuum at room temperature, and in air from room temperature to 870 C (1600 F). Friction coefficients were less than 0.25 in all cases and wear rates were low. The coating is not brittle, and it has adequate oxidation resistance in air to at least 870 C.

  14. Composition optimization of self-lubricating chromium-carbide-based composite coatings for use to 760 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Chris; Sliney, Harold E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes new compositions of self-lubricating coatings that contain chromium carbide. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The coating constituents were treated as a ternary system consisting of: (1) the bonded carbide base material, (2) silver, and (3) the eutectic. A study to determine the optimum amounts of each constituent was performed. The various compositions were prepared by powder blending. The blended powders were then plasma sprayed onto superalloy substrates and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. Friction and wear studies were performed at temperatures from 25 to 760 C in helium and hydrogen. A variety of counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines.

  15. Composition optimization of self-lubricating chromium carbide-based composite coatings for use to 760 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, C.; Sliney, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes new compositions of self-lubricating coatings that contain chromium carbide. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The coating constituents were treated as a ternary system consisting of: (1) the bonded carbide base material, (2) silver, and (3) the eutectic. A study to determine the optimum amounts of each constituent was performed. The various compositions were prepared by powder blending. The blended powders were then plasma sprayed onto superalloy substrates and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. Friction and wear studies were performed at temperatures from 25 to 760 C in helium and hydrogen. A variety of counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines.

  16. Composition optimization of self-lubricating chromium-carbide-based composite coatings for use to 760 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Chris; Sliney, Harold E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes new compositions of self-lubricating coatings that contain chromium carbide. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The coating constituents were treated as a ternary system consisting of: (1) the bonded carbide base material, (2) silver, and (3) the eutectic. A study to determine the optimum amounts of each constituent was performed. The various compositions were prepared by powder blending. The blended powders were then plasma sprayed onto superalloy substrates and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. Friction and wear studies were performed at temperatures from 25 to 760 C in helium and hydrogen. A variety of counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines.

  17. Composition optimization of chromium carbide based solid lubricant coatings for foil gas bearings at temperatures to 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    A test program to determine the optimum composition of chromium carbide based solid lubricant coatings for compliant gas bearings is described. The friction and wear properties of the coatings are evaluated using a foil gas bearing test apparatus. The various coatings were prepared by powder blending, then plasma sprayed onto Inconel 718 test journals and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness and surface finish. The journals were operated against preoxidized nickel-chromium alloy foils. The test bearings were subjected to repeated start/stop cycles under a 14 kPa (2 psi) bearing unit load. The bearings were tested for 9000 start/stop cycles or until the specimen wear reached a predetermined failure level. In general, the addition of silver and eutectic to the chromium carbide base stock significantly reduced foil wear and increased journal coating wear. The optimum coating composition, PS212 (70 wt% metal bonded Cr3C2, 15 wt% Ag, 15% BaF2/CaF2 eutectic), reduced foil wear by a factor of two and displayed coating wear well within acceptable limits. The load capacity of the bearing using the plasma-sprayed coating prior to and after a run-in period was ascertained and compared to polished Inconel 718 specimens.

  18. Diamond-like carbon coating under oleic acid lubrication: Evidence for graphene oxide formation in superlow friction

    PubMed Central

    De Barros Bouchet, Maria Isabel; Martin, Jean Michel; Avila, José; Kano, Makoto; Yoshida, Kentaro; Tsuruda, Takeshi; Bai, Shandan; Higuchi, Yuji; Ozawa, Nobuki; Kubo, Momoji; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-01-01

    The achievement of the superlubricity regime, with a friction coefficient below 0.01, is the Holy Grail of many tribological applications, with the potential to have a remarkable impact on economic and environmental issues. Based on a combined high-resolution photoemission and soft X-ray absorption study, we report that superlubricity can be realized for engineering applications in bearing steel coated with ultra-smooth tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) under oleic acid lubrication. The results show that tribochemical reactions promoted by the oil lubrication generate strong structural changes in the carbon hybridization of the ta-C hydrogen-free carbon, with initially high sp3 content. Interestingly, the macroscopic superlow friction regime of moving mechanical assemblies coated with ta-C can be attributed to a few partially oxidized graphene-like sheets, with a thickness of not more than 1 nm, formed at the surface inside the wear scar. The sp2 planar carbon and oxygen-derived species are the hallmark of these mesoscopic surface structures created on top of colliding asperities as a result of the tribochemical reactions induced by the oleic acid lubrication. Atomistic simulations elucidate the tribo-formation of such graphene-like structures, providing the link between the overall atomistic mechanism and the macroscopic experimental observations of green superlubricity in the investigated ta-C/oleic acid tribological systems. PMID:28401962

  19. Diamond-like carbon coating under oleic acid lubrication: Evidence for graphene oxide formation in superlow friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros Bouchet, Maria Isabel; Martin, Jean Michel; Avila, José; Kano, Makoto; Yoshida, Kentaro; Tsuruda, Takeshi; Bai, Shandan; Higuchi, Yuji; Ozawa, Nobuki; Kubo, Momoji; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-04-01

    The achievement of the superlubricity regime, with a friction coefficient below 0.01, is the Holy Grail of many tribological applications, with the potential to have a remarkable impact on economic and environmental issues. Based on a combined high-resolution photoemission and soft X-ray absorption study, we report that superlubricity can be realized for engineering applications in bearing steel coated with ultra-smooth tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) under oleic acid lubrication. The results show that tribochemical reactions promoted by the oil lubrication generate strong structural changes in the carbon hybridization of the ta-C hydrogen-free carbon, with initially high sp3 content. Interestingly, the macroscopic superlow friction regime of moving mechanical assemblies coated with ta-C can be attributed to a few partially oxidized graphene-like sheets, with a thickness of not more than 1 nm, formed at the surface inside the wear scar. The sp2 planar carbon and oxygen-derived species are the hallmark of these mesoscopic surface structures created on top of colliding asperities as a result of the tribochemical reactions induced by the oleic acid lubrication. Atomistic simulations elucidate the tribo-formation of such graphene-like structures, providing the link between the overall atomistic mechanism and the macroscopic experimental observations of green superlubricity in the investigated ta-C/oleic acid tribological systems.

  20. Diamond-like carbon coating under oleic acid lubrication: Evidence for graphene oxide formation in superlow friction.

    PubMed

    De Barros Bouchet, Maria Isabel; Martin, Jean Michel; Avila, José; Kano, Makoto; Yoshida, Kentaro; Tsuruda, Takeshi; Bai, Shandan; Higuchi, Yuji; Ozawa, Nobuki; Kubo, Momoji; Asensio, Maria C

    2017-04-12

    The achievement of the superlubricity regime, with a friction coefficient below 0.01, is the Holy Grail of many tribological applications, with the potential to have a remarkable impact on economic and environmental issues. Based on a combined high-resolution photoemission and soft X-ray absorption study, we report that superlubricity can be realized for engineering applications in bearing steel coated with ultra-smooth tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) under oleic acid lubrication. The results show that tribochemical reactions promoted by the oil lubrication generate strong structural changes in the carbon hybridization of the ta-C hydrogen-free carbon, with initially high sp(3) content. Interestingly, the macroscopic superlow friction regime of moving mechanical assemblies coated with ta-C can be attributed to a few partially oxidized graphene-like sheets, with a thickness of not more than 1 nm, formed at the surface inside the wear scar. The sp(2) planar carbon and oxygen-derived species are the hallmark of these mesoscopic surface structures created on top of colliding asperities as a result of the tribochemical reactions induced by the oleic acid lubrication. Atomistic simulations elucidate the tribo-formation of such graphene-like structures, providing the link between the overall atomistic mechanism and the macroscopic experimental observations of green superlubricity in the investigated ta-C/oleic acid tribological systems.

  1. Friction and wear of self-lubricating TiN-MoS{sub 2} coatings produced by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Yust, C.S.; Bae, Y.W.; Besmann, T.M.; Lee, W.Y.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of the work reported here was to develop special chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods to produce self-lubricating ceramic coatings in which the lubricating and structural phases were co-deposited on Ti-6Al-4V alloy substrates. These novel composite coatings are based on a system containing titanium nitride and molybdenum disulfide. The method for producing these coatings and their sliding behavior against silicon nitride counterfaces, in the temperature range 20--700 C in air, are described. The initial sliding friction coefficients for the composite coatings at room temperature were 0.07--0.30, but longer-term transitions to higher friction occurred, and specimen-to-specimen test variations suggested that further developments of the deposition process are required to assure repeatable friction and wear results. Friction and wear tests at 300 and 700 C produced encouraging results, but tests run at an intermediate temperate of 400 C exhibited friction coefficients of 1.0 or more. Oxidation and a change in the nature of the debris layers formed during sliding are believed to be responsible for this behavior.

  2. Corrosion protection of steel by thin coatings of starch-oil dry lubricants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corrosion of materials is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced worldwide by industry. Dry lubricants reduce friction between two metal surfaces. This research investigated the inhibition of corrosive behavior a dry lubricant formulation consisting of jet-cooked corn starch and soyb...

  3. Friction and fretting wear characteristics of different diamond-like carbon coatings against alumina in water-lubricated fretting conditions.

    PubMed

    Watabe, Tsukasa; Amanov, Auezhan; Tsuboi, Ryo; Sasaki, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings typically show low friction and high wear resistance. In this study, the friction and fretting wear characteristics of PVD, CVD and CVD-Si DLC coatings were investigated against an alumina (Al2O3) ball under water-lubricated fretting conditions. The objective of this study is to investigate and compare the friction and fretting wear characteristics of those DLC coatings at various fretting frequencies. The test results showed that the PVD DLC coating led to a lower friction coefficient and a higher resistance to fretting wear compared to those of the CVD and CVD-Si DLC coatings. However, the CVD DLC coating showed that the fretting wear resistance decreases with increasing frequency, while no significant difference in fretting wear resistances of the PVD and CVD-Si DLC coatings was observed. Quantitative surface analyses of the specimens were performed using an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a laser scanning microscope (LSM), a scanning electron microscope (SEM), an atomic force microscope (AFM) and the Raman spectroscopy.

  4. The Evaluation of a Modified Chrome Oxide Based High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating for Foil Gas Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Chris

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the friction and wear performance of PS304, a modified chrome oxide based coating, for foil gas bearings. PS304 contains 60 wt% NiCr binder, 20 wt% Cr2O3 hardener, and 10 wt% each Ag, and BaF2/CaF2 lubricants. For evaluation, the coating is plasma spray deposited onto test journals which are slid against a superalloy partial arc foil bearing. The test load was 10 KPa (1.5 psi) and the bearings were run under start/stop cyclic conditions. The data show good wear performance of the bearing, especially at temperatures above 25 deg. C. Bearing friction was moderate (micron approx. or equal to 0.4) over the entire temperature range. Based upon the results obtained, the PS304 coating has promise for high temperature, oil-free turbomachinery applications.

  5. The Effect of Compositional Tailoring on the Thermal Expansion and Tribological Properties of PS300: A Solid Lubricant Composite Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Fellenstein, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a research program in which the goal is to alter the thermal expansion coefficient of a composite solid lubricant coating, PS300, by compositional tailoring. PS300 is a plasma sprayed coating consisting of chrome oxide, silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic in NiCr binder. By adjusting the composition, the thermal expansion coefficient can be altered, and hence chosen, to more closely match a selected substrate preventing coating spallation at extreme temperatures. Thermal expansion coefficients (CTE) for a variety of compositions were measured from 25 to 800 C using a commercial dilatometer. The CTE's ranged from 7.0 to 13 x lO(exp -6)/deg C depending on the binder content. Subsequent tribological testing of a modified composition indicated that friction and wear properties were relatively insensitive to compositional tailoring.

  6. Waterborne firm coating for temporary protection of parts, providing controlled lubrication during assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Hayner, R.E.

    1987-03-03

    This patent describes a protective, emulsified oil in water, dispersible, lubricant coating composition having a pH in the range of about 7.0 to 10, and capable of application and flow on a threaded solid substrate consisting essentially of: A. about 65 to 99% by weight of a composition comprising: (1) about 0.5 to 30 parts by weight of organic wax components having a melting point above 50/sup 0/C, the wax container ester groups; (2) about 0.5 to 6 parts of a surfactant comprising 2 to 8% of carboxylic acid and about 1 to 5% of an amine, the acid and the amine forming a salt providing at least a portion of a surfactant; (3) about 10 to 30 parts of a coupling agent comprising a C/sub 5/-C/sub 30/ liquid hydrocarbon coupling component and a C/sub 2/-C/sub 20/ alcohol in the ratio of between 1:1 and 10:1 by weight respectively, selected from the group consisting of: mineral spirits, kerosene, ethylene glycol ether, butyl cellosolve, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, ethylene glycol monopropyl ether, propyl cellosolve, ethyl cellosolve, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, ethylene glycol monoacetate, diethylene glycol monoproprionate, diethylene glycol monoacetate, propylene glycol monoacetate, ethanol, isopropanol and isobutanol; and (4) about 30 to 97 parts of water the sum of all parts being equal to 100; and (B) about 3.5 to 9% total pigment comprising about 0.4 to 4% by weight carbon black.

  7. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  8. Analysis of Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) for Different Coating Tools during Turning of TC11 Titanium Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Sheng; Li, Zhongquan; Guo, Guoqiang; An, Qinglong; Chen, Ming; Ming, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    The tool coating and cooling strategy are two key factors when machining difficult-to-cut materials such as titanium alloy. In this paper, diamond coating was deposited on a commercial carbide insert as an attempt to increase the machinability of TC11 alloy during the turning process. An uncoated carbide insert and a commercial Al2O3/TiAlN-coated tool were also tested as a comparison. Furthermore, MQL was applied to improve the cutting condition. Cutting performances were analyzed by cutting force, cutting temperate and surface roughness measurements. Tool wears and tool lives were evaluated to find a good matchup between the tool coating and cooling strategy. According to the results, using MQL can slightly reduce the cutting force. By applying MQL, cutting temperatures and tool wears were reduced by a great amount. Besides, MQL can affect the tool wear mechanism and tool failure modes. The tool life of an Al2O3/TiAlN-coated tool can be prolonged by 88.4% under the MQL condition. Diamond-coated tools can obtain a good surface finish when cutting parameters and lubrication strategies are properly chosen. PMID:28773926

  9. Fabrication and Wear Behavior Analysis on AlCrFeNi High Entropy Alloy Coating Under Dry Sliding and Oil Lubrication Test Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yipin; Wang, Shouren; Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Qiao, Yang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, AlCrFeNi high entropy alloy coating was fabricated on the surface of Q235 steel using hot pressing sintering process. The coating has the controlled thickness size and excellent mechanical properties. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), XRD and hardness testing method were used to study the morphology, phase structure and hardness of high entropy alloys coating. The lattice distortion plays a significant role in increasing the hardness. Coating formation mechanism caused by the element diffusion under the hot pressing effect is also discussed in the paper. Simultaneously, the dry sliding and oil lubrication wear tests, wear morphology observation and wear mechanism discussion were completed. As the result shows, AlCrFeNi high entropy alloys coating exhibits superior wear resistance either at dry sliding or oil lubrication tests owing to its hard high entropy solid solution structure.

  10. Engine Lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    PS 212, a plasma-sprayed coating developed by NASA, is used to coat valves in a new rotorcam engine. The coating eliminates the need for a liquid lubricant in the rotorcam, which has no crankshaft, flywheel, distributor or water pump. Developed by Murray United Development Corporation, it is a rotary engine only 10 inches long with four cylinders radiating outward from a central axle. Company officials say the engine will be lighter, more compact and cheaper to manufacture than current engines and will feature cleaner exhaust emissions. A licensing arrangement with a manufacturer is under negotiation. Primary applications are for automobiles, but the engine may also be used in light aircraft.

  11. Long-lasting solid lubrication by CNT-coated patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinert, L.; Lasserre, F.; Gachot, C.; Grützmacher, P.; MacLucas, T.; Souza, N.; Mücklich, F.; Suarez, S.

    2017-02-01

    The use of lubricants (solid or liquid) is a well-known and suitable approach to reduce friction and wear of moving machine components. Another possibility to influence the tribological behaviour is the formation of well-defined surface topographies such as dimples, bumps or lattice-like pattern geometries by laser surface texturing. However, both methods are limited in their effect: surface textures may be gradually destroyed by plastic deformation and lubricants may be removed from the contact area, therefore no longer properly protecting the contacting surfaces. The present study focuses on the combination of both methods as an integral solution, overcoming individual limitations of each method. Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), a known solid lubricant, are deposited onto laser surface textured samples by electrophoretic deposition. The frictional behaviour is recorded by a tribometer and resulting wear tracks are analysed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy in order to reveal the acting tribological mechanisms. The combined approach shows an extended, minimum fivefold longevity of the lubrication and a significantly reduced degradation of the laser textures. Raman spectroscopy proves decelerated MWCNT degradation and oxide formation in the contact. Finally, a lubricant entrapping model based on surface texturing is proposed and demonstrated.

  12. Long-lasting solid lubrication by CNT-coated patterned surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, L.; Lasserre, F.; Gachot, C.; Grützmacher, P.; MacLucas, T.; Souza, N.; Mücklich, F.; Suarez, S.

    2017-01-01

    The use of lubricants (solid or liquid) is a well-known and suitable approach to reduce friction and wear of moving machine components. Another possibility to influence the tribological behaviour is the formation of well-defined surface topographies such as dimples, bumps or lattice-like pattern geometries by laser surface texturing. However, both methods are limited in their effect: surface textures may be gradually destroyed by plastic deformation and lubricants may be removed from the contact area, therefore no longer properly protecting the contacting surfaces. The present study focuses on the combination of both methods as an integral solution, overcoming individual limitations of each method. Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), a known solid lubricant, are deposited onto laser surface textured samples by electrophoretic deposition. The frictional behaviour is recorded by a tribometer and resulting wear tracks are analysed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy in order to reveal the acting tribological mechanisms. The combined approach shows an extended, minimum fivefold longevity of the lubrication and a significantly reduced degradation of the laser textures. Raman spectroscopy proves decelerated MWCNT degradation and oxide formation in the contact. Finally, a lubricant entrapping model based on surface texturing is proposed and demonstrated. PMID:28211468

  13. Tribological behaviors of diamond-like carbon coatings on plasma nitrided steel using three BN-containing lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zheng-feng; Wang, Peng; Xia, Yan-qiu; Zhang, Hao-bo; Pang, Xian-juan; Li, Bin

    2009-04-01

    In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were deposited on plasma nitrided AISI 1045 steel by magnetron sputtering. Three BN-containing additives and molybdenum dithiocarbamate (MoDTC) were added to poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) as additives. The additive content (mass fraction) in PAO was fixed at 0.5 wt%. The friction and wear characters of DLC coatings on nitrided steel discs sliding against AISI 52100 steel balls were tested under the lubricated conditions. It was found that borate esters have a higher load carrying capacity and much better anti-wear and friction-reducing ability than that of MoDTC. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to explore the properties of the worn surface and the mechanism of friction and wear. According to the XPS analysis, the adsorbed organic N-containing compounds and BN are, possibly, the primary reason for the novel borate esters to possess a relatively constant coefficient of friction and lower wear rate. On the other hand, possibly, the MoDTC molecules break down during sliding and produce many Mo-oxides, and then the Mo-oxides destroy the DLC coating because of its sharp edge crystalline solid structure. After destroying the DLC coating, the MoDTC react with metals and form MoS 2 tribofilm, and decrease coefficient of friction of rubbing pairs.

  14. Tribological Performance Optimization of Electroless Ni-B Coating under Lubricated Condition using Hybrid Grey Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Arkadeb; Duari, Santanu; Barman, Tapan Kumar; Sahoo, Prasanta

    2016-10-01

    Deposition of nickel coating and its alloys using electroless method has received wide acceptance by researchers and even the industries because of their excellent tribological properties. The present experimental investigation deals with the behaviour of electroless Ni-B coating under lubricated condition on a pin-on-disc tribotester. An attempt is made to minimize the friction and wear characteristics simultaneously by optimizing three test parameters i.e. the applied normal load, speed and time of sliding using grey fuzzy reasoning analysis. The friction and wear tests are carried out based on Taguchi's L27 orthogonal array of experiments. 3D surface and contour plots are generated to analyze the trends in variation of friction and wear of the deposits considering the combined effect of the design variables. Analysis of variance is done to find out the contribution of each test parameter and their interactions in controlling the friction and wear behaviour of electroless Ni-B coating. Surface morphology, phase transformation and coating composition analysis are done with the help of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and energy dispersive X-ray analysis respectively.

  15. The Effect of Tic Coated Balls and Stress on the Lubricant Lifetime of a Synthetic Hydrocarbon (pennzane 2001A) Using a Vacuum Spiral Orbit Tribometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Mark J.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Pepper, Stephen V.; Wheeler, Donald R.; Schroeer, Achim; Fluehmann, Freddy; Loewenthal, Stuart H.; Shogrin, Bradley A.

    2000-01-01

    A vacuum spiral orbit rolling contact tribometer was used to determine effect of varying mean Hertzian stress (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 GPa) and the use of 440C and TiC coated 440C balls on lubricant lifetime of a synthetic hydrocarbon (Pennzane 2001A) on 440C stainless steel. Conditions included 210 rpm, approx. 50 micrograms lubricant, an initial vacuum < 1.3xl0(exp-6) Pa, and room temperature (approx. 23 C). Increasing the mean Hertzian stress resulted in an exponential decrease in lubricant lifetime for both material combinations. Substituting a TiC coated 440C ball showed no increase in lifetime over the 440C ball. The decreasing lifetime with increasing stress level correlated well with energy dissipation calculations.

  16. Corrosion protection of steel by thin coatings of starch-oil dry lubricants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corrosion of materials is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced 3 worldwide by industry. This research investigated the inhibition of corrosive behavior a 4 dry lubricant formulation consisting of jet-cooked corn starch and soybean oil on SAE 5 1010 steel. Electrochemical Impedance ...

  17. Effects of Coating Materials and Processing Conditions on Flow Enhancement of Cohesive Acetaminophen Powders by High-Shear Processing With Pharmaceutical Lubricants.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guoguang; Mangal, Sharad; Denman, John; Gengenbach, Thomas; Lee Bonar, Kevin; Khan, Rubayat I; Qu, Li; Li, Tonglei; Zhou, Qi Tony

    2017-10-01

    This study has investigated the surface coating efficiency and powder flow improvement of a model cohesive acetaminophen powder by high-shear processing with pharmaceutical lubricants through 2 common equipment, conical comil and high-shear mixer. Effects of coating materials and processing parameters on powder flow and surface coating coverage were evaluated. Both Carr's index and shear cell data indicated that processing with the lubricants using comil or high-shear mixer substantially improved the flow of the cohesive acetaminophen powder. Flow improvement was most pronounced for those processed with 1% wt/wt magnesium stearate, from "cohesive" for the V-blended sample to "easy flowing" for the optimally coated sample. Qualitative and quantitative characterizations demonstrated a greater degree of surface coverage for high-shear mixing compared with comilling; nevertheless, flow properties of the samples at the corresponding optimized conditions were comparable between 2 techniques. Scanning electron microscopy images demonstrated different coating mechanisms with magnesium stearate or l-leucine (magnesium stearate forms a coating layer and leucine coating increases surface roughness). Furthermore, surface coating with hydrophobic magnesium stearate did not retard the dissolution kinetics of acetaminophen. Future studies are warranted to evaluate tableting behavior of such dry-coated pharmaceutical powders. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of silver and group II fluoride solid lubricant additions to plasma-sprayed chromium carbide coatings for foil gas bearings to 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. C.; Sliney, Harold E.

    1986-01-01

    A new self-lubricating coating composition of nickel aluminide-bonded chromium carbide formulated with silver and Group II fluorides was developed in a research program on high temperature solid lubricants. One of the proposed applications for this new coating composition is as a wide temperature spectrum solid lubricant for complaint foil gas bearings. Friction and wear properties were obtained using a foil gas bearing start-stop apparatus at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The journals were Inconel 748. Some were coated with the plasma sprayed experimental coating, others with unmodified nickel aluminide/chromium carbide as a baseline for comparison. The additional components were provided to assist in achieving low friction over the temperature range of interest. Uncoated, preoxidized Inconel X-750 foil bearings were operated against these surfaces. The foils were subjected to repeated start/stop cycles under a 14-kPa (2-Psi) bearing unit loading. Sliding contact occurred during lift-off and coastdown at surface velocities less than 6 m/s (3000 rPm). Testing continued until 9000 start/stop cycles were accumulated or until a rise in starting torque indicated the journal/bearing had failed. Comparison in coating performance as well as discussions of their properties and methods of application are given.

  19. Effects of silver and group II fluoride solid lubricant additions to plasma-sprayed chromium carbide coatings for foil gas bearings to 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. C.; Sliney, Harold E.

    1986-01-01

    A new self-lubricating coating composition of nickel aluminide-bonded chromium carbide formulated with silver and Group II fluorides was developed in a research program on high temperature solid lubricants. One of the proposed applications for this new coating composition is as a wide temperature spectrum solid lubricant for complaint foil gas bearings. Friction and wear properties were obtained using a foil gas bearing start-stop apparatus at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The journals were Inconel 748. Some were coated with the plasma sprayed experimental coating, others with unmodified nickel aluminide/chromium carbide as a baseline for comparison. The additional components were provided to assist in achieving low friction over the temperature range of interest. Uncoated, preoxidized Inconel X-750 foil bearings were operated against these surfaces. The foils were subjected to repeated start/stop cycles under a 14-kPa (2-Psi) bearing unit loading. Sliding contact occurred during lift-off and coastdown at surface velocities less than 6 m/s (3000 rPm). Testing continued until 9000 start/stop cycles were accumulated or until a rise in starting torque indicated the journal/bearing had failed. Comparison in coating performance as well as discussions of their properties and methods of application are given.

  20. The tribology of PS212 coatings and PM212 composites for the lubrication of titanium 6Al-4V components of a Stirling engine space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Lukaszewicz, Victor; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The Stirling space power machine incorporates a linear alternator to generate electrical power. The alternator is a reciprocating device that is driven by a solar or nuclear-powered Stirling engine. The power piston and cylinder are made of titanium 6Al-4V (Ti6-4) alloy, and are designed to be lubricated by a hydrodynamically-generated gas film. Rubbing occurs during starts and stops and there is the possibility of an occasional high speed rub. Since titanium is known to have a severe galling tendency in sliding contacts, a 'back-up', self-lubricating coating on the cylinder and/or the piston is needed. This report describes the results of a research program to study the lubrication of Ti6-4 with the following chromium carbide based materials: plasma-sprayed PS212 coatings and sintered PM212 counterfaces. Program objectives are to achieve adherent coatings on Ti6-4 and to measure the friction and wear characteristics of the following sliding combinations under conditions simulative of the Stirling-driven space power linear alternator: Ti6-4/Ti6-4 baseline, Ti6-4/PS212-coated Ti6-4, and PS212-coated Ti6-4/PM212.

  1. Preliminary evaluation of PS300: A new self-lubricating high temperature composite coating for use to 800{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    DellaCorte, C.; Edmonds, B.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper introduces PS300, a plasma sprayed, self-lubricating composite coating for use in sliding contacts at temperatures to 800{degrees}C. PS300 is a metal bonded chrome oxide coating with silver and BaF{sub 2}/CaF{sub 2} eutectic solid lubricant additives. PS300 is similar to PS200, a chromium carbide based coating; which is currently being investigated for a variety of tribological applications. In pin-on-disk testing up to 650{degrees}C, PS300 exhibited comparable friction and wear properties to PS200. The PS300 matrix, which is predominantly chromium oxide rather than chromium carbide, does not require diamond grinding and polishes readily with silicon carbide abrasives greatly reducing manufacturing costs compared to PS200. It is anticipated that PS300 has potential for sliding bearing and seal applications in both aerospace and general industry.

  2. Laser cladding for high-temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant composite coatings on γ-TiAl intermetallic alloy Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. B.; Wang, C. M.; Yu, L. G.; Wang, Hua Ming

    2000-02-01

    High-temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant metal matrix composite coatings are fabricated on substrate of a (gamma) - TiAl intermetallic alloy Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb by laser cladding. The hybrid (gamma) -NiCr metal matrix composite coating is mainly reinforced by rapidly solidified wear-resistant phase of hyper-eutectic M7C3 and self-lubricating particles of Ag and CaF2 or CaAgF4. Microstructure and hardness within the whole laser clad composite coating is homogeneous and the bonding to the substrate is purely metallurgical. Both hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the (gamma) -TiAl intermetallic alloy are significantly enhanced after laser cladding treatment.

  3. MS212--A Homogeneous Sputtered Solid Lubricant Coating for Use to 800 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Waters, William J.; Soltis, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Composite coatings containing chromium carbide, stable fluorides and silver were prepared by magnetron sputtering. The microstructure of the coatings is very homogeneous compared to that of plasma sprayed and sintered versions of the same chemical composition. Friction and wear of MS212-coated and baseline uncoated aluminum and Inconel X-750 are compared. At room temperature, the friction and wear of coated aluminum is dramatically better compared to the baseline. The acceptable load is limited by deformation of the soft aluminum substrate. In the case of the nickel alloy, lower friction is observed for the coated alloy at all temperatures up to the maximum test temperature of 800 C. Pin wear factors for sliding against the coated alloy are lower than the baseline at room temperature and 350 C, and comparable to baseline wear at higher test temperatures. Low baseline wear at high temperatures is due to the lubricious nature of the natural oxides formed on nickel-chromium alloys in a hot, oxidizing atmosphere. No load limit was found for coated Inconel X-750 at loads up to five times the load limit for coated aluminum.

  4. Cleaning and lubricating compositions and method of using the same

    SciTech Connect

    Loran, T.

    1980-07-22

    A lubricating composition consisting essentially of: florinated alkyl esters including a chemical structure having a fluorinated alkyl hydrophobic tail terminating in a hydrophilic ester group and having the structure R(Cf/sub 2/)/sub n/CoOR' wherein R is a material selected from the group consisting of H and Cf/sub 3/, R' is short chain alkyl compound, and n is equal to a positive integer such that the fluorinated alkyl esters have a relatively high molecular weight on the order of at least 300 which are normally solid under ambient conditions; and another material selected from the group consisting of at least one of tetrafluoroethylene telomers and compatible anti-static agents. The composition of claim 1 wherein the antistatic agent is an amine. The method of lubricating the surface of a plastic material comprising the steps of: intermixing a fluorinated alkyl ester with a material selected from the group consisting of tetrafluoroethylene telomers and anti-static agents compatible with said fluorinated alkyl esters together with a volatile solvent for the composition, said fluorinated alkyl esters having a fluorinated alkyl hydrophobic tail terminating in a hydrophibic ester group as defined by the structural formula R(Cr/sub 2/)/sub n/CoOR' wherein R is a material selected from the group consisting H and Cf3, R' is a short chain alkyl compound, and n is equal to a positive integer such that the fluorinated alkyl ester has a relatively high molecular weight which is normally solid under ambient conditions; and applying said intermixture in a thin film to the surface to be lubricated whereby when the solvent evaporates a hard, solid wear-resistant lubricant coating is left upon the surface.

  5. Microstructures and tribological properties of plasma sprayed WC-Co-Cu-BaF 2/CaF 2 self-lubricating wear resistant coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jianhui; Zhu, Yingchun; Ji, Heng; Zheng, Xuebing; Ruan, Qichao; Niu, Yaran; Liu, Ziwei; Zeng, Yi

    2010-06-01

    A promising WC-Co-Cu-BaF 2/CaF 2 self-lubricating wear resistant coating was deposited via atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process by using homemade feedstock powders composed of WC-Co, Cu and BaF 2/CaF 2 eutectic. The as-prepared cermet coatings had better frictional behavior comparing with the WC-Co coating. Moreover, the often-occurred decarburization of WC in APS process was noticeably improved due to the binding of copper and BaF 2/CaF 2 phase, which not only offered effective solid lubrication, but also acted as bind phases to mend the microstructure and protected WC from decomposition. The optimized specimen contained 10 wt.% Cu and 10 wt.% BaF 2/CaF 2 in a WC-Co matrix, which had excellent frictional and wear performance. The wear mechanism of the self-lubricating wear resistant coating was discussed with the microstructures, compositions and mechanical properties of the composite materials in detail.

  6. Friction and Wear Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Al2O3-13 wt.%TiO2 Coatings Under the Lubrication of Liquid Paraffin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoqin; An, Yulong; Hou, Guoliang; Zhou, Huidi; Chen, Jianmin

    2014-04-01

    Two types of ceramic composite coatings (denoted as N-AT13 coating and M-AT13 coating) were fabricated on 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel substrate from ultra-fine and coarse Al2O3-13%TiO2 feedstocks by air plasma spraying. The friction and wear behavior of as-prepared coatings sliding against Al2O3 and stainless steel balls under the lubrication of liquid paraffin was evaluated with an SRV friction and wear tester (Optimol, Germany). The fractured and worn surfaces of the coatings were observed using a scanning electron microscope and a field-emission scanning electron microscope; and the wear mechanisms of the coatings were discussed based on scanning electron microscopic analysis and energy dispersive spectrometric analysis. Results show that N-AT13 coating possesses a unique microstructure and strong inter-splat bonding, thereby showing increased microhardness and bonding strength as well as much better friction-reduction and wear resistance than M-AT13 coating. Moreover, there exist differences in the wear mechanisms of N-AT13 and M-AT13 coatings which slide against ceramic and stainless steel balls under the lubrication of liquid paraffin. Namely, with the increase of normal load, the burnishing of N-AT13 coating coupled with Al2O3 ball is gradually transformed to grain-abrasion and deformation, while M-AT13 coating is dominated by grain-pullout and brittle fracture in the whole range of tested normal load.

  7. Effect of microscale texture on cutting performance of WC/Co-based TiAlN coated tools under different lubrication conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kedong; Deng, Jianxin; Xing, Youqiang; Li, Shipeng; Gao, Huanhuan

    2015-01-01

    Commonly known the severe friction between the tool and chip affects the tool life and the quality of the machined surfaces. Introducing a lubricant into the tool-chip interface can be used to alleviate the friction, the effectiveness of which may be improved by surface texturing of the tools. Thus, surface textures were fabricated using laser on the rake of the cemented carbide (WC/Co) inserts, then TiAlN films were coated on the textured tools. The effect of the textures on the cutting performance was investigated using the textured coated tools and conventional coated tools in cutting AISI 1045 hardened steel tests. Two batches of cutting tests were carried out, in regimes of full and starved lubrication. The machining performance was assessed in terms of the cutting forces, friction coefficient at the tool-chip interface, surface roughness of machined workpiece and tool wear on the rake face. Results show that the cutting performance of textured tools was enhanced, especially under the full lubrication condition.

  8. (Ag,Cu)-Ta-O ternaries as high-temperature solid-lubricant coatings.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongyu; Otero-de-la-Roza, Alberto; Gu, Jingjing; Stone, D'Arcy; Aouadi, Samir M; Johnson, Erin R; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-07-22

    Ternary oxides have gained increasing attention due to their potential use as solid lubricants at elevated temperatures. In this work, the tribological properties of three ternary oxides-AgTaO3, CuTaO3, and CuTa2O6-were studied using a combination of density-functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with newly developed empirical potential parameters, and experimental measurements (AgTaO3 and CuTa2O6 only). Our results show that the MD-predicted friction force follows the trend AgTaO3 < CuTaO3 < CuTa2O6, which is consistent with the experimentally measured coefficients of friction. The wear performance from both MD and experiment exhibits the opposite trend, with CuTa2O6 providing the best resistance to wear. The sliding mechanisms are investigated using experimental characterization of the film composition after sliding, quantification of Ag or Cu cluster formation at the interface during the evolution of the film in MD, and DFT energy barriers for atom migration on the material surface. All our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the formation of metal (or metal oxide) clusters on the surface are responsible for the friction and wear behavior of these materials.

  9. Synthesis of High-Temperature Self-lubricating Wear Resistant Composite Coating on Ti6Al4V Alloy by Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jian; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Xiang, Zhan-Feng; Shi, Shi-Hong; Chen, Yao; Shi, Gao-Lian; Wu, Shao-Hua; Wu, Yu-Nan

    2015-05-01

    Laser deposition was adopted to prepare novel Ni-based solid solution (γ-NiCrAlTi)/ TiC/α-Ti/CaF2 high-temperature self-lubricating wear resistant composite coating on Ti6Al4V alloy. Microstructure, micro-hardness, wear behavior, and counter-body effect of the coating were investigated systematically. It can be seen that the coating mainly consists of γ-NiCrAlTi, TiC, α-Ti, and small fine CaF2 particles. Average micro-hardness of the coating is 1023 HV0.3, which is about three-factor higher than that of Ti6Al4V substrate (380 HV0.3). The friction coefficient and wear rate of the coating decrease at all test temperatures to different extents with respect to the substrate. The improvement in wear resistance is believed to be the combined effects of the γ-NiCrAlTi solid solution, the dominating anti-wear capabilities of the reinforced TiC carbides, and the self-lubricating property of CaF2.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of the tribological behaviour of a water-lubricated amorphous carbon-fluorine PECVD coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rullich, Markus; Weiss, Volker C.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Hybrid bearings comprising ceramic balls and steel rings exhibit increased wear-resistance and a reduced coefficient of friction (COF) compared with standard steel bearings. Using plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) coatings to modify the surface properties, the performance of these bearings can be further improved. Fluorine-containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C : F : H) films are well suited to this purpose. To study the influence of such coatings on the friction characteristics of key parts of hybrid bearings, a model of an a-C : F : H film was constructed and employed in molecular dynamics simulations of two slabs sliding past each other, lubricated by water. With one slab being pulled by a virtual spring, the perpendicular force (load) was kept constant using a barostat. For comparison, a system of two silicon dioxide (cristobalite) slabs and a mixed system consisting of a cristobalite slab and an a-C : F : H slab were investigated. Our results indicate a linear dependence of the friction force on the perpendicular force. With an increasing amount of water between the slabs, the COFs decrease. A decrease in temperature leads to an increased COF, while a decrease in the relative velocity of the slabs does not influence the COF between two a-C : F : H slabs, but reduces the COF for the other two systems. Our results for the COF and its dependence on temperature and relative sliding velocity generally agree well both with experiments and with simulations for similar systems reported in the literature.

  11. CVD Diamond, DLC, and c-BN Coatings for Solid Film Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Murakawa, Masao; Watanabe, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Sadao; Miyake, Shojiro; Wu, Richard L. C.

    1998-01-01

    The main criteria for judging coating performance were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.1 and 10(exp -6) cubic MM /(N*m), respectively. Carbon- and nitrogen-ion-implanted, fine-grain, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond and diamondlike carbon (DLC) ion beam deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond met the criteria regardless of environment (vacuum, nitrogen, and air).

  12. Reciprocating Sliding Behaviour of Solid Lubricant Coating over Modified Titanium Alloy Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jothi Prakash, V. M.; Sathish, S.; Gopalakrishnan, T.; Venugopal, S.

    2017-03-01

    Tribological behaviour of contacting surfaces rigid sphere is using flat plate the with influence of normal and tangential loading (shear traction) is analysed using FEA model and surfaces being coated on flat plate by Titanium Alloy, Aluminium Alloy Molybdenum Di-sulphide. The finite element model facilitates to Evaluating the surface variables like contact stress distribution with the surface level and surface, contact pressure, shear stress and displacement. The finite element solution is validated through the hertz solution and on the successful verification.

  13. CVD Diamond, DLC, and c-BN Coatings for Solid Film Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    When the main criteria for judging coating performance were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.1 and 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/N-m, respectively, carbon- and nitrogen-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond and DLC ion beam deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond met the requirements regardless of environment (vacuum, nitrogen, and air).

  14. CVD Diamond, DLC, and c-BN Coatings for Solid Film Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Murakawa, Masao; Watanabe, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Sadao; Miyake, Shojiro; Wu, Richard L. C.

    1998-01-01

    The main criteria for judging coating performance were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.1 and 10(exp -6) cubic MM /(N*m), respectively. Carbon- and nitrogen-ion-implanted, fine-grain, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond and diamondlike carbon (DLC) ion beam deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond met the criteria regardless of environment (vacuum, nitrogen, and air).

  15. Solid lubricant materials for high temperatures: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1985-01-01

    Solid lubricants that can be used above 300 C in air are discussed, including coatings and self-lubricating composite bearing materials. The lubricants considered are representative dichalcogenides, graphite, graphite fluoride, polyimides, soft oxides, oxidatively stable fluorides, and hard coating materials. A few general design considerations revelant to solid lubrication are interspersed.

  16. The Effect of Stress and TiC Coated Balls on Lubricant Lifetimes Using a Vacuum Ball-on-Plate Rolling Contact Tribometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Helmick, Larry H.; Nguyen, QuynhGiao; Wheeler, Donald R.; Voving, Hans J.

    1999-01-01

    A vacuum ball-on-plate rolling contact tribometer was used to determine the relative lifetimes of a perfluoropolyether (Krytox 143 AC) on 440C stainless steel. The effect of mean Hertzian stresses (0.75, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 GPa) and the use of TiC coated balls on lubricant lifetime was studied. Other conditions included: approximately 100 rpm, approximately 50 micrograms of lubricant, an initial vacuum level of less than 1.0 x 1O(exp -8) Torr, and room temperature (approximately 23 C). increasing the mean Hertzian stress from 0.75 to 2.0 GPa results in an exponential decrease in lubricant lifetime for both material combinations. However. substituting a TiC ball for the 440C ball quadrupled lifetime at low stress levels (0.75 and 1.0 GPa) and doubled life at higher stresses (1.5 and 2.0 GPa). The reduced reactivity of the TiC surface with the PFPE lubricant is considered to be the reason for this enhancement. Decreasing lifetime with increasing stress levels correlated well with energy dissipation calculations.

  17. The Effect of Stress and TiC Coated Balls on Lubricant Lifetimes Using a Vacuum Ball-on-Plate Rolling Contact Tribometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Helmick, Larry H.; Nguyen, QuynhGiao; Wheeler, Donald R.; Boving, Hans J.

    1999-01-01

    A vacuum ball-on-plate rolling contact tribometer was used to determine the relative lifetimes of a perfluoropolyether (Krytox 143 AC) on 440C stainless steel. The effect of mean Hertzian stresses (0.75, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 GPa) and the use of TiC-coated balls on lubricant lifetime was studied. Other conditions included: 100 rpm, 50 micro-g of lubricant, an initial vacuum level of less than 1.0 x 10(exp -8) Torr, and room temperature (23 C). Increasing the mean Hertzian stress from 0.75 to 2.0 GPa results in an exponential decrease in lubricant lifetime for both material combinations. However, substituting a TiC ball for the 440C ball quadrupled lifetime at low stress levels (0.75 and 1.0 GPa) and doubled life at higher stresses (1.5 and 2.0 GPa). The reduced reactivity of the TiC surface with the PFPE lubricant is considered to be the reason for this enhancement. Decreasing lifetime with increasing stress levels correlated well with energy dissipation calculations.

  18. The Effect of Stress and TiC Coated Balls on Lubricant Lifetimes Using a Vacuum Ball-on-Plate Rolling Contact Tribometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Helmick, Larry H.; Nguyen, QuynhGiao; Wheeler, Donald R.; Boving, Hans J.

    1999-01-01

    A vacuum ball-on-plate rolling contact tribometer was used to determine the relative lifetimes of a perfluoropolyether (Krytox 143 AC) on 440C stainless steel. The effect of mean Hertzian stresses (0.75, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 GPa) and the use of TiC-coated balls on lubricant lifetime was studied. Other conditions included: 100 rpm, 50 micro-g of lubricant, an initial vacuum level of less than 1.0 x 10(exp -8) Torr, and room temperature (23 C). Increasing the mean Hertzian stress from 0.75 to 2.0 GPa results in an exponential decrease in lubricant lifetime for both material combinations. However, substituting a TiC ball for the 440C ball quadrupled lifetime at low stress levels (0.75 and 1.0 GPa) and doubled life at higher stresses (1.5 and 2.0 GPa). The reduced reactivity of the TiC surface with the PFPE lubricant is considered to be the reason for this enhancement. Decreasing lifetime with increasing stress levels correlated well with energy dissipation calculations.

  19. The Effects of Substrate Material and Thermal Processing Atmosphere on the Strength of PS304: A High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    PS304, a plasma spray deposited solid lubricant coating developed for high temperature sliding contacts was deposited on nine different substrate metals, heat treated at 650C in either air or argon and subsequently tested for strength using a commercially available pull-off adhesion test. Some samples were examined metallographically to help elucidate and explain the results. As deposited coatings exhibit pull-off strengths typically between 16 and 20 MPa with failure occuring (cohesively) within the coating. Heat treatment in argon at 650 C results in a slight increase in coating (cohesive) strength of about 30 percent to 21 to 27 MPa. Heat treatment in air at 650 C results in a dramatic increase in strength to over 30 MPa, exceeding the strength of the epoxy used in the pull test. Cross section metallographic analyses show that no microstructural coating changes occur following the argon heat treatments, however, exposure to air at 650C gives rise to the formation of a second chromium-rich phase precipitate within the PS304 NiCr constituent which provides a strengthening effect and a slight (approximately 5 percent) coating thickness increase. Subsequent heat treatments do not result in any further coating changes. Based upon these studies, PS304 is a suitable coating for use on a wide variety of high temperature substrates and must be heat treated following deposition to enhance strength and ensure dimensional stability.

  20. Self-lubricating Ti-C-N nanocomposite coatings prepared by double magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Martínez, D.; López-Cartes, C.; Justo, A.; Fernández, A.; Sánchez-López, J. C.

    2009-03-01

    This paper is devoted to the development of Ti(C,N)-based nanocomposite protective coatings consisting of nanocrystals of a hard phase (TiN or TiC xN y) embedded in an amorphous carbon-based matrix (a-C or a-CN x). The objective here is the achievement of a good compromise between the mechanical and tribological properties by the appropriate control of the hard/soft phase ratio and the microstructural characteristics of the film. To achieve this purpose, dual magnetron sputtering technique was employed following two different strategies. In the first one, we use Ti and graphite targets and Ar/N 2 gas mixtures, while in the second case, TiN and graphite targets are sputtered in an Ar atmosphere. By changing the sputtering power applied to each magnetron, different sets of samples are prepared for each route. The effect of the bias voltage applied to the substrate is also studied in some selected cases. The mechanical and tribological properties of the films are characterized and correlated with the microstructure, crystallinity and phase composition. The establishment of correlations enables the development of advanced coatings with tailored mechanical and tribological properties for desired applications.

  1. Microstructure and wear behaviors of laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2-WS2 high temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mao-Sheng; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Fan, Ji-Wei; He, Xiang-Ming; Shi, Shi-Hong; Fu, Ge-Yan; Wang, Ming-Di; Chen, Shu-Fa

    2012-02-01

    The high temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant NiCr/Cr3C2-30%WS2 coating and wear-resistant NiCr/Cr3C2 coating were fabricated on 0Cr18Ni9 austenitic stainless steel by laser cladding. Phase constitutions and microstructures were investigated, and the tribological properties were evaluated using a ball-on-disc wear tester under dry sliding condition at room-temperature (17 °C), 300 °C and 600 °C, respectively. Results indicated that the laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2 coating consisted of Cr7C3 primary phase and γ-(Fe,Ni)/Cr7C3 eutectic colony, while the coating added with WS2 was mainly composed of Cr7C3 and (Cr,W)C carbides, with the lubricating WS2 and CrS sulfides as the minor phases. The wear tests showed that the friction coefficients of two coatings both decrease with the increasing temperature, while the both wear rates increase. The friction coefficient of laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2-30%WS2 is lower than the coating without WS2 whatever at room-temperature, 300 °C, 600 °C, but its wear rate is only lower at 300 °C. It is considered that the laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2-30%WS2 composite coating has good combination of anti-wear and friction-reducing capabilities at room-temperature up to 300 °C.

  2. Simulation of automotive wrist pin joint and tribological studies of tin coated Al-Si alloy, metal matrix composites and nitrogen ceramics under mixed lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian

    Development of automotive engines with high power output demands the application of high strength materials with good tribological properties. Metal matrix composites (MMC's) and some nitrogen ceramics are of interest to replace some conventional materials in the piston/pin/connecting rod design. A simulation study has been developed to explore the possibility to employ MMC's as bearing materials and ceramics as journal materials, and to investigate the related wear mechanisms and the possible journal bearing failure mechanisms. Conventional tin coated Al-Si alloy (Al-Si/Sn) have been studied for the base line information. A mixed lubrication model for journal bearing with a soft coating has been developed and applied to the contact and temperature analysis of the Al-Si/Sn bearing. Experimental studies were performed to reveal the bearing friction and wear behavior. Tin coating exhibited great a advantage in friction reduction, however, it suffered significant wear through pitting and debonding. When the tin wore out, the Al-Si/steel contact experienced higher friction. A cast and P/M MMC's in the lubricated contact with case hardened steel and ceramic journals were studied experimentally. Without sufficient material removal in the conformal contact situation, MMC bearings in the MMC/steel pairs gained weight due to iron transfer and surface tribochemical reactions with the lubricant additives and contact failure occurred. However, the MMC/ceramic contacts demonstrated promising tribological behavior with low friction and high wear resistance, and should be considered for new journal bearing design. Ceramics are wear resistant. Ceramic surface roughness is very crucial when the journals are in contact with the tin coated bearings. In contact with MMC bearings, ceramic surface quality and fracture toughness seem to play some important roles in affecting the friction coefficient. The wear of silicon nitride and beta sialon (A) journals is pitting due to grain

  3. Sliding friction and wear behaviors of surface-coated natural serpentine mineral powders as lubricant additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baosen; Xu, Yi; Gao, Fei; Shi, Peijing; Xu, Binshi; Wu, Yixiong

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the friction and wear properties of surface-coated natural serpentine powders (SP) suspended in diesel engine oil using an Optimal SRV oscillating friction and wear tester. The worn surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results indicated that the additives can improve the wear resistance and decrease friction coefficient of carbon steel friction couples. The 0.5 wt% content of serpentine powders is found most efficient in reducing friction and wear at the load of 50 N. The SEM and XPS analysis results demonstrate that a tribofilm forms on the worn surface, which is responsible for the decrease in friction and wear, mainly with iron oxides, silicon oxides, graphite and organic compounds.

  4. Friction and Wear Characteristics of Plasma-Sprayed Self-Lubrication Coating with Clad Powder at Elevated Temperatures up to 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chuanbing; Du, Lingzhong; Zhang, Weigang

    2014-02-01

    NiCr/(Cr3C2-BaF2·CaF2) coating was fabricated by atmospheric plasma spray technology using clad powder. The coating shows low porosity, high microhardness and bonding strength, and it also exhibits good friction reduction and wear resistance at elevated temperatures up to 800 °C which is due to the formation of a kind of continuous BaF2·CaF2 eutectic lubricating film. The excellent mechanical and tribological properties of the coating are partially attributed to the protection of NiCr layer of the composite powders which can decrease oxidation, decarburization of Cr3C2, and ablation of BaF2·CaF2 eutectic during spray and deposition process.

  5. Preparation and tribological properties of self-lubricating TiO2/graphite composite coating on Ti6Al4V alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Ming; Zhou, Xinjian; Xiao, Qian; Liang, Jun; Huo, Xiaodi

    2012-09-01

    One-step plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process in a graphite-dispersed phosphate electrolyte was used to prepare a graphite-containing oxide composite coating on Ti6Al4V alloy. The composition and microstructure of the oxide coatings produced in the phosphate electrolytes with and without addition of graphite were analyzed by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The tribological properties of the uncoated Ti6Al4V alloy and oxide coatings were evaluated using a reciprocating ball-on-disk tribometer. Results showed that the graphite-containing oxide composite coating can be successfully produced on Ti6Al4V alloy in the graphite-dispersed phosphate electrolyte using PEO process. The graphite-containing oxide composite coating registered much lower friction coefficient and wear rate than the uncoated Ti6Al4V alloy and the oxide coating without graphite under dry sliding condition, exhibiting excellent self-lubricating property.

  6. High-temperature tribological properties of NiCoCrAlY-WSe2-BaF2·CaF2 solid lubricant coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. H.; Yuan, X. J.; Xia, J.; Yu, Z. H.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, NiCoCrAlY-WSe2-BaF2·CaF2 solid lubricant coatings were produced on a substrate by plasma spray and investigated at the high temperature, such as 500 °C and 800 °C. The structure of the coatings was characterized using XRD pattern and scanning electron microscopy. The TC1 (83wt% NiCoCrAlY) coating has a low friction coefficient at 500C, where the WSe2 is a good solid lubricant. The TC2 (65wt% NiCoCrAlY) coating has the low friction coefficient (0.279) at 800°C, due to the formation of BaCrO4 on the surfaces. As a result, the TC2 coating has the optimal tribological property in the wide temperature.

  7. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  8. Research on bearing lubricants for use in a high vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. E.; Hass, H.

    1972-01-01

    Work, during the research program, was concentrated on lubricant development, gear lubrication and evaluation, providing coated test specimens, advising NASA contractors about solid lubrication specific applications, and investigation of new method of attaching lubricating solids to bearing surfaces by sputtering technique.

  9. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications description of the adhesion, friction, abrasion, and wear behavior of solid film lubricants and related tribological materials, including diamond and diamond-like solid films. The book details the properties of solid surfaces, clean surfaces, and contaminated surfaces as well as discussing the structures and mechanical properties of natural and synthetic diamonds; chemical-vapor-deposited diamond film; surface design and engineering toward wear-resistant, self-lubricating diamond films and coatings. The author provides selection and design criteria as well as applications for synthetic and natural coatings in the commercial, industrial and aerospace industries..

  10. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications description of the adhesion, friction, abrasion, and wear behavior of solid film lubricants and related tribological materials, including diamond and diamond-like solid films. The book details the properties of solid surfaces, clean surfaces, and contaminated surfaces as well as discussing the structures and mechanical properties of natural and synthetic diamonds; chemical-vapor-deposited diamond film; surface design and engineering toward wear-resistant, self-lubricating diamond films and coatings. The author provides selection and design criteria as well as applications for synthetic and natural coatings in the commercial, industrial and aerospace industries..

  11. Effects of heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of Ni60/h-BN self-lubricating anti-wear composite coatings on 304 stainless steel by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Yu, Peng-Cheng; Zhai, Yong-Jie; Qiao, Shi-Jie; Wang, Ming-Di; Wang, Yong-Guang; Chen, Yao

    2015-11-01

    Laser clad Ni60/h-BN self-lubricating anti-wear composite coating on 304 stainless steel were heat treated at 600 °C (stress relief annealing) for 1 h and 2 h, respectively. Effects of the phase compositions, microstructure, microhardness, nano-indentation and tribological properties of the composite coatings with and without heat treatment had been investigated systemically. Results indicated that three coatings mainly consist of the matrix γ-(Ni, Fe) solid solution, the CrB ceramic phases and the h-BN lubricating phases. The maximum microhardness of the coatings was first increased from 667.7 HV0.5 to 765.0 HV0.5 after heat treatment for 1 h, and then decreased to 698.3 HV0.5 after heat treatment for 2 h. The hardness of γ-(Ni, Fe) solid solution without heat treatment and after heat treatment 1 h and 2 h were 5.09 GPa, 7.20 GPa and 3.77 GPa, respectively. Compared with the coating without heat treatment, the friction coefficients of the coating after heat treatment were decreased obviously. Effects of the heat treatment time on friction coefficient were negligible, but were significant on wear volume loss. Comparatively speaking, the laser clad self-lubricating anti-wear composite coating after heat treatment for 1 h presented the best anti-wear and friction reduction properties.

  12. Boundary lubrication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hills, B A

    2000-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed for the concept that the body employs essentially the same lubrication system in many sites in the body where tissues slide over each other with such ease. This system consists of fluid adjacent to surfaces coated with an oligolamellar lining of surface-active phospholipid (SAPL) acting as a back-up boundary lubricant wherever the fluid film fails to support the load--a likely event at physiological velocities. Particular attention is paid to the load-bearing joints, where the issue of identifying the vital active ingredient in synovial fluid is reviewed, coming down--perhaps predictably--in favour of SAPL. It is also explained how Lubricin and hyaluronic acid (HA) could have 'carrier' functions for the highly insoluble SAPL, while HA has good wetting properties needed to promote hydrodynamic lubrication of a very hydrophobic articular surface by an aqueous fluid wherever the load permits. In addition to friction and wear, release is included as another major role of boundary lubricants, especially relevant in environments where proteins are found, many having adhesive properties. The discussion is extended to a mention of the lubrication of prosthetic implants and to disease states where a deficiency of boundary lubricant is implicated, particular attention being paid to osteoarthritis.

  13. Solid Lubricants for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in gas foil bearing solid lubricants and computer based modeling has enabled the development of revolulionary Oil-Free turbomachinery systems. These innovative new and solid lubricants at low speeds (start-up and shut down). Foil bearings are hydrodynamic, self acting fluid film bearings made from thin, flexible sheet metal foils. These thin foils trap a hydrodynamic lubricating air film between their surfaces and moving shaft surface. For low temperature applications, like ainrafl air cycle machines (ACM's), polymer coatings provide important solid lubrication during start-up and shut down prior to the development of the lubricating fluid film. The successful development of Oil-Free gas turbine engines requires bearings which can operate at much higher temperatures (greater than 300 C). To address this extreme solid lubrication need, NASA has invented a new family of compostie solid lubricant coatings, NASA PS300.

  14. Plasma-sprayed metal-glass and metal-glass fluoride coatings for lubrication to 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed composites, which have good oxidation-resistance and self-lubricating characteritics to 900 C, were developed. The composites are a nichrome matrix containing dispersed glass for oxidation protection and calcium fluoride for lubrication; they are applied to bearing surfaces by plasma spraying layers about 0.050 centimeters thick which are then machined to 0.025 centimeters. Oscillating bearing tests were performed in air to 900 C at unit radial loads up to 3.5 x 10 to the 7th power N/sq M (5000 psi) and a thrust load of 1960N (440 lbs). Bearings with a composite liner in the bore were in good condition after over 50,000 oscillating cycles accumulated during repeated, bearing temperatures cycles between 25 and 900 C.

  15. Plasma-sprayed metal-glass and metal-glass fluoride coatings for lubrication to 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed composites, which have good oxidation resistance and self-lubricating characteristics to 900 C, were developed. The composites are a nichrome matrix containing dispersed glass for oxidation protection and calcium fluoride for lubrication; they are applied to bearing surfaces by plasma spraying layers about 0.050 cm thick which are then machined to 0.025 cm. Oscillating bearing tests were performed in air to 900 C at unit radial loads up to 5000 psi and a thrust load of 440 lb. Bearings with a composite liner in the bore were in good condition after over 50,000 oscillating cycles accumulated during repeated bearing temperature cycles between 25 and 900 C.

  16. Tribological evaluation of PS300: A new chrome oxide based solid lubricant coating sliding against Al2O3 From 25 to 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Laskowski, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the tribological characteristics of Al203 sliding against PS300; a chrome oxide based self lubricating coating. Al203 pins were slid against PS300 coated superalloy disks in air, under a 4.9 N load at velocities of 1 to 8 m/s. At a sliding velocity of 1 m/s, friction ranged from 0.6 at 25 C to 0.2 at 650 C. Wear factors for the Al203 pins were in the 10(exp -7) mm(exp 3)/N-m range and for the PS300 coating was in the 10(exp -5) mm(exp 3)/N-m range. The test results suggest that increased surface temperature resulting from either frictional heating, generated by increased sliding velocity, or ambient heating caused a reduction in friction and wear of the sliding couple. Based upon these results, the tested material combination is a promising candidate for high temperature wear applications.

  17. A Study on Wear Resistance of HVOF-Sprayed Ni-MoS2 Self-Lubricating Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. L.; Jeng, M. C.; Hwang, J. R.; Chang, C. H.

    2015-02-01

    Composite coating techniques are becoming increasingly popular owing to their peculiar performances. In this study, the wear resistance of thermally sprayed Ni-MoS2 composite coatings on an AISI 1020 steel substrate was investigated. Ni-MoS2 composite powder (size: 60-90 μm) containing 25 wt.% of dispersed MoS2 was prepared by electroless plating. Ni-MoS2 composite coatings were then prepared by HVOF thermal spraying. The coatings were characterized by structural, surface morphological, and compositional analyses by means of microhardness tests, SEM/EDS, XRD, and ICP-AES. For the evaluation of their anti-wear properties, the composites were subjected to ball-on-disk dry wear tests based on the ASTM G99 standard at room temperature. Experimental results showed that some of the MoS2 content dispersed in the Ni-based composite coating burnt away during the high-temperature spraying process, thereby reducing the MoS2 concentration in the coating. In the wear test, the weight loss in the Ni-MoS2 composite coating was minimal under a low load (<15 N) but increased rapidly with increasing load (>30 N). The average wear rate of the coatings was found to be ~1/40 times that of a Ni coating, showing that the wear resistance of the composite coatings was significantly improved by MoS2 addition.

  18. Solid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1991-01-01

    The state of knowledge of solid lubricants is reviewed. The results of research on solid lubricants from the 1940's to the present are presented from a historical perspective. Emphasis is placed largely, but not exclusively, on work performed at NASA Lewis Research Center with a natural focus on aerospace applications. However, because of the generic nature of the research, the information presented in this review is applicable to most areas where solid lubricant technology is useful.

  19. Solid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    The state of knowledge of solid lubricants is reviewed. The results of research on solid lubricants from the 1940's to the present are presented from a historical perspective. Emphasis is placed largely, but not exclusively, on work performed at NASA Lewis Research Center with a natural focus on aerospace applications. However, because of the generic nature of the research, the information presented in this review is applicable to most areas where solid lubricant technology is useful.

  20. The tribology of PS212 coatings and PM212 composites for the lubrication of titanium 6A1-4V components of a Stirling engine space power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Lukaszewicz, Victor

    1995-07-01

    The Stirling space power machine incorporates a linear alternator to generate electrical power. The alternator is a reciprocating device that is driven by a solar or nuclear-powered Stirling engine. The power piston and cylinder are made of titanium 6A1-4V (Ti6-4) alloy, and are designed to be lubricated by a hydrodynamically-generated gas film. Rubbing occurs during starts and stops and there is a possibility of an occasional high speed rub. Since titanium is known to have a severe galling tendency in sliding contacts, a 'backup,' self-lubricating coating on the cylinder and/or the piston is needed. This report describes the results of a research program to study the lubrication of Ti6-4 with the following chromium carbide based materials: plasma-sprayed PS212 coatings and sintered PM212 counterfaces. Program objectives are to achieve adherent coatings on Ti6-4 and to measure the friction and wear characteristics of the following sliding combinations under conditions simulative of the Stirling-driven space power linear alternator: Ti6-4/Ti6-4 baseline, Ti6-4/PS212 coated Ti6-4, and Ps212 coated Ti6-4/PM212

  1. The tribology of PS212 coatings and PM212 composites for the lubrication of titanium 6A1-4V components of a Stirling engine space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Lukaszewicz, Victor

    1995-01-01

    The Stirling space power machine incorporates a linear alternator to generate electrical power. The alternator is a reciprocating device that is driven by a solar or nuclear-powered Stirling engine. The power piston and cylinder are made of titanium 6A1-4V (Ti6-4) alloy, and are designed to be lubricated by a hydrodynamically-generated gas film. Rubbing occurs during starts and stops and there is a possibility of an occasional high speed rub. Since titanium is known to have a severe galling tendency in sliding contacts, a 'backup,' self-lubricating coating on the cylinder and/or the piston is needed. This report describes the results of a research program to study the lubrication of Ti6-4 with the following chromium carbide based materials: plasma-sprayed PS212 coatings and sintered PM212 counterfaces. Program objectives are to achieve adherent coatings on Ti6-4 and to measure the friction and wear characteristics of the following sliding combinations under conditions simulative of the Stirling-driven space power linear alternator: Ti6-4/Ti6-4 baseline, Ti6-4/PS212 coated Ti6-4, and Ps212 coated Ti6-4/PM212

  2. The tribology of PS212 coatings and PM212 composites for the lubrication of titanium 6A1-4V components of a Stirling engine space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Lukaszewicz, Victor

    1995-01-01

    The Stirling space power machine incorporates a linear alternator to generate electrical power. The alternator is a reciprocating device that is driven by a solar or nuclear-powered Stirling engine. The power piston and cylinder are made of titanium 6A1-4V (Ti6-4) alloy, and are designed to be lubricated by a hydrodynamically-generated gas film. Rubbing occurs during starts and stops and there is a possibility of an occasional high speed rub. Since titanium is known to have a severe galling tendency in sliding contacts, a 'backup,' self-lubricating coating on the cylinder and/or the piston is needed. This report describes the results of a research program to study the lubrication of Ti6-4 with the following chromium carbide based materials: plasma-sprayed PS212 coatings and sintered PM212 counterfaces. Program objectives are to achieve adherent coatings on Ti6-4 and to measure the friction and wear characteristics of the following sliding combinations under conditions simulative of the Stirling-driven space power linear alternator: Ti6-4/Ti6-4 baseline, Ti6-4/PS212 coated Ti6-4, and Ps212 coated Ti6-4/PM212

  3. High-Temperature Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the early 1980's, Lewis Research Center began a program to develop high-temperature lubricants for use on future aircraft flying at three or more times the speed of sound, which can result in vehicle skin temperatures as high as 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit. A material that emerged from this research is a plasma-sprayed, self-lubricating metal- glass-fluoride coating able to reduce oxidation at very high temperatures. Technology is now in commercial use under the trade name Surf-Kote C-800, marketed by Hohman Plating and Manufacturing Inc. and manufactured under a patent license from NASA. Among its uses are lubrication for sliding contact bearings, shaft seals for turbopumps, piston rings for high performance compressors and hot glass processing machinery; it is also widely used in missile and space applications.

  4. Thin Film Solid Lubricant Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoy, Patricia A.

    1997-01-01

    Tribological coatings for high temperature sliding applications are addressed. A sputter-deposited bilayer coating of gold and chromium is investigated as a potential solid lubricant for protection of alumina substrates during sliding at high temperature. Evaluation of the tribological properties of alumina pins sliding against thin sputtered gold films on alumina substrates is presented.

  5. Evaluation of Thermal Barrier and PS-200 Self-Lubricating Coatings in an Air-Cooled Rotary Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, Paul S.

    1995-01-01

    This project provides an evaluation of the feasibility and desirability of applying a thermal barrier coating overlaid with a wear coating on the internal surfaces of the combustion area of rotary engines. Many experiments were conducted with different combinations of coatings applied to engine components of aluminum, iron and titanium, and the engines were run on a well-instrumented test stand. Significant improvements in specific fuel consumption were achieved and the wear coating, PS-200, which was invented at NASA's Lewis Research Center, held up well under severe test conditions.

  6. Separation of short-chain fatty acids on a gas chromatographic column coated with oxidized lubricating oil.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Nagy Emam

    2007-07-01

    The oxidized lubricating naphthenic base oil was used as a stationary phase for the separation of short-chain free fatty acids (SFFA) either as a pure sample or an aqueous solution containing 0.9-1.2 mg/L of each acid. It is found that the oil oxidation for 20 h improved the separation of SFFA in these two sample forms. This separation improvement represents not only the increase in retention volume intervals and peak symmetries in case of the pure sample but also in acid peak areas in case of the aqueous solution sample.

  7. Lubrication background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Surface topography, including the various physical methods of measuring surfaces, and the various lubrication regimes (hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, boundary, and mixed) are discussed. The historical development of elastohydrodynamic lubrication is outlined. The major accomplishments in four periods, the pre-1950's, the 1950's, the 1960's, and the 1970's are presented.

  8. Influence of trimethylsilane flow on the microstructure, mechanical and tribological properties of CrSiCN coatings in water lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiwei; Zhou, Fei; Wang, Qianzhi; Zhou, Zhifeng; Yan, Jiwang; Li, Lawrence Kwok-Yan

    2015-11-01

    CrSiCN coatings with different silicon and carbon contents were deposited on silicon wafers and 316L stainless steels using unbalanced magnetron sputtering via adjusting trimethylsilane (TMS) flow, and their microstructure and mechanical properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy(SEM), X-ray photoelectrons spectroscopy(XPS) and nano-indenter, respectively. The tribological properties of CrSiCN coatings sliding against SiC balls in water were investigated using ball-on-disk tribometer. The results showed that the CrSiCN coatings had fine composite microstructure consisting of nanocrystallites of Cr(C, N) crystal and amorphous phases such as a-Si3N4 and a-C(a-CNx). The typical columnar structures changed from fine cluster to coarse ones when the Si content was beyond 3.4 at.%. With an increase in the TMS flow, the hardness and Young's modulus of Corsican coatings all first increased, and then rapidly decreased, but the compressive stress in the coatings varied in the range of 2.8-4.8 GPa. When the TMS flow was 10 sccm, the CrSiCN coatings exhibited the highest hardness of 21.3 GPa and the lowest friction coefficient (0.11) and wear rate (8.4 × 10-8 mm3/N m). But when the TMS flow was beyond 15 sccm, the tribological properties of CrSiCN coatings in water became poor.

  9. Metallic Films with Fullerene-Like WS2 (MoS2) Nanoparticles: Self-Lubricating Coatings with Potential Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelman, O.; Friedman, H.; Tenne, R.

    Metallic films impregnated with fullerene-like-WS2 (MoS2) nanoparticles were fabricated on stainless steel and Ti-Ni substrates using galvanic and electroless deposition. The coatings were obtained from aqueous suspensions containing the metallic salts as well as the dispersed nanoparticles. Tribological tests showed that the films have low friction and wear. Such coatings could be useful for numerous civilian and defense-related applications.

  10. SYNTHETIC LUBRICANTS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    azelaic , and sebacic acids are the most readily available dibasic acids suitable for ester lubricant production, while the petroleum derived Oxo alcohols...of synthetic lubricants for use at low and high temperatures. The diesters of straight-chain dibasic acids lead the field of esters mutable as...dibasic acid esters in all the characteristics studied so far, and this type of ester therefore represents a promising source of synthetic oil. Mono

  11. Marine Lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B. H.; Green, D.

    Marine diesel engines are classified by speed, either large (medium speed) or very large (slow speed) with high efficiencies and burning low-quality fuel. Slow-speed engines, up to 200 rpm, are two-stroke with separate combustion chamber and sump connected by a crosshead, with trunk and system oil lubricants for each. Medium-speed diesels, 300-1500 rpm, are of conventional automotive design with one lubricant. Slow-speed engines use heavy fuel oil of much lower quality than conventional diesel with problems of deposit cleanliness, acidity production and oxidation. Lubricants are mainly SAE 30/40/50 monogrades using paraffinic basestocks. The main types of additives are detergents/dispersants, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, anti-wear/load-carrying/ep, pour-point depressants and anti-foam compounds. There are no simple systems for classifying marine lubricants, as for automotive, because of the wide range of engine design, ratings and service applications they serve. There are no standard tests; lubricant suppliers use their own tests or the Bolnes 3DNL, with final proof from field tests. Frequent lubricant analyses safeguard engines and require standard sampling procedures before determination of density, viscosity, flash point, insolubles, base number, water and wear metal content.

  12. Influence of boron content on the microstructure and tribological properties of Cr-B-N coatings in water lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiang; Zhou, Fei; Gao, Song; Wu, Zhiwei; Wang, Qianzhi; Chen, Kangmin; Zhou, Zhifeng; Li, Lawrence Kwok-Yan

    2016-07-01

    Cr-B-N coatings with different boron contents were deposited on Si(1 0 0) wafers and 316 L stainless steels using unbalanced magnetron sputtering system by way of adjusting the CrB2 target currents. The microstructure and mechanical properties of Cr-B-N coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), white light interferometric three dimensional profilometer and nano-indentation tester, respectively. The tribological properties of Cr-B-N/SiC tribopairs in water were studied using ball-on-disk tribometer. The results showed that the Cr-B-N coatings showed a fine nanocomposite structure consisted of CrN nanograins and amorphous BN phase regardless of boron contents, and the typical columnar structure became featureless with increasing the CrB2 target current. The hardness and reduced elastic modulus first increased to 28.9 GPa and 330 GPa at the CrB2 target current of 2 A, and then decreased gradually with further increasing the CrB2 target current to 4 A. As compared with the CrN/SiC tribopairs, the lowest friction coefficient of Cr-B-N/SiC ball tribopairs in water was 0.15, and the wear resistance of Cr-B-N coatings was effectively enhanced.

  13. Liquid Lubricants for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, S.; Rowntree, A.

    Liquid lubricants used for spacecraft have advantages over solid lubricants but there are also disadvantages to consider. The challenge is to ensure that the liquid lubricant does not disappear from the mechanism by evaporation or creep. Lubricants can be used as fluids or formulated as greases. The liquids can be highly refined hydrocarbons, PAOs, silicones, polyol esters (POEs), multiply alkylated cycloparaffins, (MACs) or various perfluoropolyethers (PFPEs). Greases are made from these liquids using thickeners such as lithium, calcium or sodium soaps, PTFE, graphite or lead. Operational temperatures range from - 45°C to over 100°C. Low vapour pressures are crucial, below 10-8 mbar at 20°C and total weight loss must be <1% for general applications, <0.1% for optical applications. 'Surface creep rates' must be low, temperature gradients and surface Ra are important factors. The wear rates for standard tests using different lubricants vary over several orders of magnitude for different lubricants, surface coatings and rpm. Unexpected effects, such as PTFE 'plating out' at low rpm, occur. The main issues are to prevent the lubricant escaping from working areas and to protect it from degradation by chemical reactions or radiation.

  14. Cost-Cutting Powdered Lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Scientists at NASA's Glenn Research Center developed a high-temperature, solid lubricant coating material that is saving the manufacturing industry millions of dollars. The material came out of 3 decades of tribological research, work studying high-temperature friction, lubrication, and the wearing of interacting surfaces that are in relative motion. It was developed as a shaft coating deposited by thermal spraying to protect foil air bearings used in oil-free turbomachinery, like gas turbines, and is meant to be part of a larger project: an oil-free aircraft engine capable of operating at high temperatures with increased reliability, lowered weight, reduced maintenance requirements, and increased power. This advanced coating, PS300, is a self-lubricating bearing material containing chromium oxide, with additions of a low-temperature start up lubricant (silver) and a high-temperature lubricant, making it remarkably stable at high temperatures, and better suited than previously available materials for high-stress conditions. It improves efficiency, lowers friction, reduces emissions, and has been used by NASA in advanced aeropropulsion engines, refrigeration compressors, turbochargers, and hybrid electrical turbogenerators. PS300 is ideal in any application where lowered weight and reduced maintenance are desired, and high-temperature uses and heavy operating speeds are expected. It has notable uses for the Space Agency, but it has even further-reaching potential for the industrial realm.

  15. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    This chapter describes powerful analytical techniques capable of sampling tribological surfaces and solid-film lubricants. Some of these techniques may also be used to determine the locus of failure in a bonded structure or coated substrate; such information is important when seeking improved adhesion between a solid-film lubricant and a substrate and when seeking improved performance and long life expectancy of solid lubricants. Many examples are given here and through-out the book on the nature and character of solid surfaces and their significance in lubrication, friction, and wear. The analytical techniques used include the late spectroscopic methods.

  16. Composition versus friction and wear behavior of plasma sprayed WC-(W,Cr)2C-Ni/Ag/BaF2-CaF2 self-lubricating composite coatings for use up to 600 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianmin; Hou, Guoliang; Chen, Jie; An, Yulong; Zhou, Huidi; Zhao, Xiaoqin; Yang, Jie

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports the composition optimization of self-lubricating composite coatings containing WC-(W,Cr)2C-Ni, silver and fluoride eutectics. Various ingredients obtained by powder blending were studied to determine their optimum content in as-prepared composite coatings. An atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) system was used to deposit promising WC-(W,Cr)2C-Ni/Ag/BaF2-CaF2 self-lubricating composite coatings. The friction and wear behavior of the composite coatings sliding against Si3N4 ball was investigated from room temperature to 600 °C. Results show that silver and fluoride eutectics can effectively reduce the friction coefficient of the coatings and the wear volume loss of counterpart balls over the whole temperature range. Thanks to the highest hardness, WC-(W,Cr)2C-Ni coating without silver and fluoride eutectics has the lowest wear rate at room temperature and 600 °C. However, it has a high friction coefficient and a very high wear rate at 200 and 400 °C, due to severe adhesion wear and fatigue wear thereat. Fortunately, introducing appropriate amount of silver and fluoride eutectics contributes to effectively reduce the wear rate of the composite coatings at 200 and 400 °C. The optimized composite coating consists of 70 wt.% WC-(W,Cr)2C-Ni, 15 wt.% Ag and 15 wt.% BaF2/CaF2, and it has excellent friction and wear performance over a wide range of temperature.

  17. Lubricating compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.J.; Campbell, C.B.

    1993-08-03

    A lubricating composition is described comprising a major amount of oil of lubricating viscosity and a minor amount of an oil-soluble composition selected from the group consisting of: (A) an alkali metal salt of a polyalkenyl succinimide which is the reaction product of (a) a polyalkenyl succinic acid or polyalkenyl succinic anhydride, with (b) an amine selected from the group consisting of polyamines and hydroxy-substituted polyamines; and (B) a mixture comprising: (1) an oil-soluble alkali metal compound; and (2) a polyalkenyl succinimide which is the reaction product of (a) a polyalkenyl succinic acid or polyalkenyl succinic anhydride, with (b) an amine selected from the group consisting of polyamines and hydroxy-substituted polyamines; wherein the polyalkenyl succinic acid and polyalkenyl succinic anhydride are prepared by a thermal reaction, and the lubricating composition has a sufficient amount of basic nitrogen content so that the use of from 7.91 to about 50 mmoles of alkali metal/kg lubricant composition provides for reductions in the lower piston deposits as compared to the lubricant composition not containing alkali.

  18. High temperature solid lubricants - When and where to use them.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art of solid lubrication for moderate to extremely high temperature lubrication (to 1600 F). Lubricating characteristics, stability in various environments, and relevant machine design considerations are discussed. Lubricating materials discussed include MoS2, WS2, graphite, graphite fluoride, the high temperature polymide polymer, and calcium fluoride based coatings and composites. The scope of the information includes results from wear testers, ball bearings, and journal bearings.

  19. Tethered Lubricants for Small Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lynden A. Archer

    2006-01-09

    The objective of this research project is two-fold. First, to fundamentally understand friction and relaxation dynamics of polymer chains near surfaces; and second, to develop novel self-lubricated substrates suitable for MEMS devices. During the three-year performance period of this study the PI and his students have shown using theory and experiments that systematic introduction of disorder into tethered lubricant coatings (e.g. by using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) mixtures or SAMs with nonlinear, branched architectures) can be used to significantly reduce the friction coefficient of a surface. They have also developed a simple procedure based on dielectric spectroscopy for quantifying the effect of surface disorder on molecular relaxation in lubricant coatings. Details of research accomplishments in each area of the project are described in the body of the report.

  20. Metal Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, General Magnaplate Corporation developed process techniques for bonding dry lubricant coatings to space metals. The coatings were not susceptible to outgassing and offered enhanced surface hardness and superior resistance to corrosion and wear. This development was necessary because conventional lubrication processes were inadequate for lightweight materials used in Apollo components. General Magnaplate built on the original technology and became a leader in development of high performance metallurgical surface enhancement coatings - "synergistic" coatings, - which are used in applications from pizza making to laser manufacture. Each of the coatings is designed to protect a specific metal or group of metals to solve problems encountered under operating conditions.

  1. Advanced Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Three Sun Coast Chemicals (SCC) of Daytona, Inc. products were derived from NASA technology: Train Track Lubricant, Penetrating Spray Lube, and Biodegradable Hydraulic Fluid. NASA contractor Lockheed Martin Space Operations contacted SCC about joining forces to develop an environmentally safe spray lubricant for the Shuttle Crawler. The formula was developed over an eight-month period resulting in new products which are cost effective and environmentally friendly. Meeting all Environmental Protection Agency requirements, the SCC products are used for applications from train tracks to bicycle chains.

  2. Lubricant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.L.; Lawson, R.D.; Root, J.C.

    1981-12-15

    Lubricant compositions adapted for use under extreme pressure conditions are disclosed. They comprise a major proportion of a lubricating grease, and a minor proportion of an additive consisting essentially of a solid, oil insoluble arylene sulfide polymer, and a metal salt, particularly an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt, particularly an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt of a phosphorus acid, for example, mono- or dicalcium phosphate, or an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal carbonate exemplified by calcium carbonate, or a mixture of such a phosphate salt and carbonate.

  3. Solid lubrication design methodology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallini, R. A.; Wedeven, L. D.; Ragen, M. A.; Aggarwal, B. B.

    1986-01-01

    The high temperature performance of solid lubricated rolling elements was conducted with a specially designed traction (friction) test apparatus. Graphite lubricants containing three additives (silver, phosphate glass, and zinc orthophosphate) were evaluated from room temperature to 540 C. Two hard coats were also evaluated. The evaluation of these lubricants, using a burnishing method of application, shows a reasonable transfer of lubricant and wear protection for short duration testing except in the 200 C temperature range. The graphite lubricants containing silver and zinc orthophosphate additives were more effective than the phosphate glass material over the test conditions examined. Traction coefficients ranged from a low of 0.07 to a high of 0.6. By curve fitting the traction data, empirical equations for slope and maximum traction coefficient as a function of contact pressure (P), rolling speed (U), and temperature (T) can be developed for each lubricant. A solid lubricant traction model was incorporated into an advanced bearing analysis code (SHABERTH). For comparison purposes, preliminary heat generation calculations were made for both oil and solid lubricated bearing operation. A preliminary analysis indicated a significantly higher heat generation for a solid lubricated ball bearing in a deep groove configuration. An analysis of a cylindrical roller bearing configuration showed a potential for a low friction solid lubricated bearing.

  4. Lubrication Flows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanastasiou, Tasos C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses fluid mechanics for undergraduates including the differential Navier-Stokes equations, dimensional analysis and simplified dimensionless numbers, control volume principles, the Reynolds lubrication equation for confined and free surface flows, capillary pressure, and simplified perturbation techniques. Provides a vertical dip coating…

  5. Lubrication Flows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanastasiou, Tasos C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses fluid mechanics for undergraduates including the differential Navier-Stokes equations, dimensional analysis and simplified dimensionless numbers, control volume principles, the Reynolds lubrication equation for confined and free surface flows, capillary pressure, and simplified perturbation techniques. Provides a vertical dip coating…

  6. Solid lubricants: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    A survey is presented of the most recent developments and trends in the field of solid lubrication. Topics discussed include: a history of solid lubrication, lubricating solids, bonded lubricants, new developments, methods of evaluation, environmental effects, application methods, novel materials, and designs for the use of solid lubricants. Excerpts of solid lubricant specifications and a discussion of contact stresses imposed on specimens in three types of test machines used for the evaluation of solid lubricants are presented.

  7. Ultrahigh-vacuum linear-rotary transfer mechanism utilizing a bakable self-lubricating bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, G. J.; Garwin, E. L.; Kirby, R. E.

    1987-03-01

    An in vacuo translational-rotational motion based on a ball bearing package is described. Lubrication is accomplished by making the ball retainer from a solid dry lubricant, boron nitride (BN). This eliminates the need to separately coat the balls with lubricant prior to assembly; however, the balls are continuously coated while the bearing is in use.

  8. The PM-200 lubrication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma sprayed composite coating of metal-bonded chromium carbide with additions of silver and thermochemically stable fluorides were previously reported to be lubricative in pin on desk bench tests from room temperature to 900 C. An early coating formulation of this type, designated as PS-200, was successfully tested as a cylinder coating in a Stirling engine at a TRRT of 760 C in a hydrogen atmosphere, and as a backup lubricant for gas bearings to 650 C. A subsequent optimization program has shown that tribological properties are further improved by increasing the solid lubricant content. The improved coating is designated as PS-212. The same powder formulation was used to make free-standing powder metallurgy (PM-212) parts by sintering or hot isostatic pressing. The process is very attractive for making parts that cannot be readily plasma sprayed such as bushings and cylinders that have small bore diameters and/or high length to diameter ratios. The properties of coatings and free-standing parts fabricated from these powders are reviewed.

  9. Robust and Drain Resistant Lubricated Omniphobic Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Cassidee; Damle, Viraj; Sun, Xiaoda; Roopesh, Ajay; Doudrick, Kyle; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2014-11-01

    The implications of omniphobic fabrics range from stainproof clothing to civilian and military protection from chemical weapons. The challenge comes in developing a product that remains effective in repelling droplets of liquids with a wide range of surface tensions even after being subjected to various stimuli imposed by human use. Omniphobic fabrics can be made by infusing hydrophobic nanoparticle coated fibers with a low surface energy lubricant. These types of lubricant impregnated surfaces can shed large deposited droplets as well as condensed microdroplets of variety of low surface tension liquids. However, here we show that lubricated omniphobic fabrics can easily lose their properties due to degradation of the nanostructure coating or drainage of the lubricant upon contact with a porous surface. We also demonstrate that this issue can be resolved with use of cross-linked polymer coated fibers that are swollen with the lubricant. Use of flexible polymers avoids structure degradation due to fabric deformation, while swelling of the polymer with lubricant minimizes lubricant drainage upon contact maintaining the omniphobic characteristics of the fabric. KR acknowledges startup funding from ASU and collaborative effort with Dr. Tim Burgin and James R. Lee from Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division.

  10. Tethered Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Lynden

    2010-09-15

    We have performed extensive experimental and theoretical studies of interfacial friction, relaxation dynamics, and thermodynamics of polymer chains tethered to points, planes, and particles. A key result from our tribology studies using lateral force microscopy (LFM) measurements of polydisperse brushes of linear and branched chains densely grafted to planar substrates is that there are exceedingly low friction coefficients for these systems. Specific project achievements include: (1) Synthesis of three-tiered lubricant films containing controlled amounts of free and pendent PDMS chains, and investigated the effect of their molecular weight and volume fraction on interfacial friction. (2.) Detailed studies of a family of hairy particles termed nanoscale organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) and demonstration of their use as lubricants.

  11. Spectroscopic Analysis of Perfluoropolyether Lubricant Degradation During Boundary Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jones, William R., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The degradation of a branched perfluoropolyether (PFPE) under boundary lubrication conditions was studied using mu-FTIR and mu-Raman spectroscopies. Stainless steel (440C) discs coated with thin (600A), uniform films of the PFPE were tested in a ball-on-disc apparatus until various levels of friction coefficient were attained. Discs were then examined using the above techniques. When the friction coefficient surpassed the value obtained with an un-lubricated control, the lubricant film had either been physically displaced or partially transformed in to a 'friction polymer'. Infrared analysis of this 'friction polymer' indicated the presence of a polymeric fluorinated acid species (R(sub f)COOH). Raman spectroscopy indicated the presence of amorphous carbon in the wear track and in the friction polymer. Some reaction mechanisms are suggested to explain the results.

  12. Testing and Lubrication for Single Race Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1998-03-04

    Three ES and H-compatible lubricants (Environment, Safety and Health) for single race bearing applications and one hybrid-material single race bearings were evaluated and compared against single race bearings with trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon), which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Vydax has been used as a bearing lubricant in stronglink mechanisms since 1974. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls and molded glass-nylon-Teflon retainers, bearings lubricated with titanium carbide (TiC) on the balls, bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on races and retainers, and bearings lubricated with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} were evaluated. The bearings were maintained in a preloaded state in bearing cartridges during cycling and vibration tests. Bearings with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} performed as well as bearings lubricated with Vydax and were the best performing candidate. All candidates were suitable for low preload applications. Bearings with TiC coated balls and bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers performed well at high preloads, though not as well as bearings lubricated with electrophoretic deposition of MoS{sub 2}. Bearings with silicon nitride balls were not suitable for high preload applications.

  13. Tribological properties of amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) and hydrogen-free tetrahedral (ta-C) diamond-like carbon coatings under jatropha biodegradable lubricating oil at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobarak, H. M.; Masjuki, H. H.; Mohamad, E. Niza; Kalam, M. A.; Rashedul, H. K.; Rashed, M. M.; Habibullah, M.

    2014-10-01

    The application of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on automotive components is emerging as a favorable strategy to address the recent challenges in the industry. DLC coatings can effectively lower the coefficient of friction (CoF) and wear rate of engine components, thereby improving their fuel efficiency and durability. The lubrication of ferrous materials can be enhanced by a large amount of unsaturated and polar components of oils. Therefore, the interaction between nonferrous coatings (e.g., DLC) and vegetable oil should be investigated. A ball-on-plate tribotester was used to run the experiments. Stainless steel plates coated with amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) DLC and hydrogen-free tetrahedral (ta-C) DLC that slide against 440C stainless steel ball were used to create a ball-on-plate tribotester. The wear track was investigated through scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies were used to analyze the tribofilm inside the wear track. Raman analysis was performed to investigate the structural changes in the coatings. At high temperatures, the CoF in both coatings decreased. The wear rate, however, increased in the a-C:H but decreased in the ta-C DLC-coated plates. The CoF and the wear rate (coated layer and counter surface) were primarily influenced by the graphitization of the coating. Tribochemical films, such as polyphosphate glass, were formed in ta-C and acted as protective layers. Therefore, the wear rate of the ta-C DLC was lower than that of the-C:H DLC.

  14. Liquid lubrication for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Khonsari, Michael M.

    1992-01-01

    Reviewed here is the state of the art of liquid lubrication for space applications. The areas discussed are types of liquid lubrication mechanisms, space environmental effects on lubrication, classification of lubricants, liquid lubricant additives, grease lubrication, mechanism materials, bearing anomalies and failures, lubricant supply techniques, and application types and lubricant needs for those applications.

  15. Liquid lubrication for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Khonsari, Michael M.

    1993-01-01

    Reviewed here is the state of the art of liquid lubrication for space applications. The areas discussed are types of liquid lubrication mechanisms, space environmental effects on lubrication, classification of lubricants, liquid lubricant additives, grease lubrication, mechanism materials, bearing anomalies and failures, lubricant supply techniques, and application types and lubricant needs for those applications.

  16. Liquid cryogenic lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, M. W.; Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1970-01-01

    Fluorinated polyethers are suitable lubricants for rolling-element bearings in cryogenic systems. Lubrication effectiveness is comparable to that of super-refined mineral oil lubricants operating at room temperature.

  17. New nanotechnology solid lubricants for superior dry lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, N.; Genut, M.; Rapoport, L.; Tenne, R.

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents a new commercial breakthrough for advanced anti-friction materials based on unique inorganic nanospheres that can be used as dry lubricants, coatings, and for impregnating parts. The new material reduces friction and wear significantly better than other layered solid lubricants and is especially useful in self-lubricating, maintenance-free, and oil-free applications of the types encountered in aerospace markets. The material, NanoLubTM, is the world's first commercial lubricant based on spherical inorganic nanoparticles. NanoLub's particles have a unique structure of hollow nested spheres of about only 0.1 micron in diameter. This paper presents tribological evaluations of tungsten and molybdenum disulphide NanoLubTM. The material reduces friction and wear under conditions that are especially relevant for space such as ultra-high vacuum, UV radiation, and high loads. Suitable applications could include rotors, bearings, robots, planetary rovers, space vehicles and transport devices. Extensive testing by a number of independent groups clearly shows that these special nanoparticles improve considerably the tribological properties of different contact pairs in comparison to other solid lubricants.

  18. Rheology in lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    The rheological effects on lubrication are discussed. The types of lubrication considered are thick film hydrodynamic lubrication and thin film elastohydrodynamic lubrication. The temperature-viscosity, viscoelastic, shear-thinning, and normal stess effects on the lubrication of journal bearings are analyzed. A graph of the pressure distribution of viscoelastic liquids in journal bearings is provided. Mathematical models are developed to define the effects of various properties of the lubricants on friction reduction.

  19. Synergistic lubricating compositions

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.

    1980-07-08

    A synergistic lubricating composition a lubricant selected from the group consisting of base lubricating oils and greases having admixed with the lubricant a friction reducing amount of a synergistic mixture of 1 to 99% weight molybdenum disulfide and 99 to 1% weight of a polymer of thiadiazoledithiols. The lubricant is a base lubricating grease selected from the group consisting of lithium grease, clay grease, silicone grease and aluminum complex grease.

  20. Rheology in lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    The rheological effects on lubrication are discussed. The types of lubrication considered are thick film hydrodynamic lubrication and thin film elastohydrodynamic lubrication. The temperature-viscosity, viscoelastic, shear-thinning, and normal stess effects on the lubrication of journal bearings are analyzed. A graph of the pressure distribution of viscoelastic liquids in journal bearings is provided. Mathematical models are developed to define the effects of various properties of the lubricants on friction reduction.

  1. Lubricant composition

    SciTech Connect

    Baile, G.H.

    1980-12-16

    Lubricating compositions and shaped articles composed thereof are described which consist essentially of about 30 to about 60% by weight of an oil of lubricating viscosity, about 20 to about 50% by weight of a high molecular weight polymer, and about 20 about 50% by weight of a heat conductive agent capable of conducting heat away from a bearing surface where it is generated. The high molecular weight polymer may, for example, be polyethylene, having average molecular weights in the range from about 1.0 X 105 to about 5.0 X 106. The oil may be a mineral oil, a diester oil or preferably a synthetic hydrocarbon oil having a viscosity in the range from about 13 to about 1200 mm''/s (Mm2/s) at 38/sup 0/C. (100/sup 0/F.) the heat conductive agent may be powdered zinc oxide, aluminum powder, or equivalents thereof in this invention. The compositions are semi-rigid gels which may be formed in a mold and used as is, or which may be shaped further after molding. The gels are formed by blending the heat conductive agent and polymer and then blending that mixture with the oil and heating to a temperature above the softening temperature of the polymer for a period of time (About 5 to about 75 minutes) sufficient that the mixture will form a firm, tough solid gel on cooling having an oily surface provided by oil exuding from the gel thus producing a lubricative mass operable for extended periods of time. The heat conductive substance dispersed in the gel aids in dissipating heat produced at the bearing surfaces during use thus improving the performance of the gel both in withstanding higher bulk operating temperatures and in resisting breakdown of the gel under prolonged use.

  2. Lubrication Of Nonconformal Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Yeau-Ren

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses advances in knowledge of lubrication of nonconformal contacts in bearings and other machine elements. Reviews previous developments in theory of lubrication, presents advances in theory of lubrication to determine minimum film thickness, and describes experiments designed to investigate one of regimes of lubrication for ball bearings.

  3. Testing and evaluation of solid lubricants for gas bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, P. R.; Fischer, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    The testing and results of testing solid film lubricants for gas lubricated bearing applications are reported. The tests simulated operational hazards of tilting pad gas bearings. The presence of a low coefficient of friction and the endurance of the solid film lubricant were the criteria for judging superior performance. All solid lubricants tested were applied to a plasma sprayed chrome oxide surface. Molybdenum disulfide and graphite fluoride were the solid lubricants tested; other test parameters included the method of application of the solid lubricant and the surface finish of the plasma sprayed coating. In general, the application of a solid film lubricant was found to significantly improve the coefficient of friction of the rubbing surfaces.

  4. Nano-porous layer on steel surface as lubricant carrier.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Hiroshi; Kawajiri, Shogo; Takahira, Nobuyuki; Sakai, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2011-02-01

    In cold forging of steels, metal soap on zinc-phosphate coating is excellent lubrication system. However, the system is not only less productive, but produces hazardous wastes. In this study, an alternative lubrication system using surface porous layer is proposed. Surface oxide on low carbon steel turns into porous layer by chemical reduction using hydrogen. It is found that liquid lubricant decreases the friction coefficient in compression greatly. The porous surface enhances the decrease, especially in the cases of heavy deformation.

  5. Glycol ether/siloxane polymer penetrating and lubricating composition

    SciTech Connect

    MacIntosh, D.H.

    1981-02-03

    A penetrating and lubricating composition consists of a silicone lubricant dissolved in a glycol ether carrier having a very low surface tension. The glycol ether gives the composition the ability to penetrate into the cracks between two seized or corroded elements and dissolve any rust or corrosion present. The glycol ether then volitalizes leaving a coating of silicone on the parts to serve as a lubricant and prevent further corrosion.

  6. Lubricant Evaluation and Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    Changes on COBRA Response 313 c. Nature of Charge Carrier in COBRA Active Lubricants 313 (I) Adsorption Chromatography of Degraded Lubricants 316 (2...Lubricant 0-67-1 160 (5) Summary 162 b. Micro Carbon Residue Tester (MCRT) 163 (1) Introduction 163 (2) Test Apparatus and Procedure 164 (3) Test...Other COBRA Active Compounds 326 d. Conclusions 329 4. DIELECTRIC BREAKDOWN STRENGTH OF MIL-L-7808 LUBRICANTS 330 V LUBRICANT LOAD CARRYING

  7. A Systems Approach to the Solid Lubrication of Foil Air Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Zaldana, Antonio R.; Radil, Kevin C.

    2002-01-01

    Foil air bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings which rely upon solid lubricants to reduce friction and minimize wear during sliding which occurs at start-up and shut-down when surface speeds are too low to allow the formation of a hydrodynamic air film. This solid lubrication is typically accomplished by coating the non-moving foil surface with a thin, soft polymeric film. The following paper introduces a systems approach in which the solid lubrication is provided by a combination of self lubricating shaft coatings coupled with various wear resistant and lubricating foil coatings. The use of multiple materials, each providing different functions is modeled after oil-lubricated hydrodynamic sleeve bearing technology which utilizes various coatings and surface treatments in conjunction with oil lubricants to achieve optimum performance. In this study, room temperature load capacity tests are performed on journal foil air bearings operating at 14,000 rpm. Different shaft and foil coating technologies such as plasma sprayed composites, ceramic, polymer and inorganic lubricant coatings are evaluated as foil bearing lubricants. The results indicate that bearing performance is improved through the individual use of the lubricants and treatments tested. Further, combining several solid lubricants together yielded synergistically better results than any material alone.

  8. Boundary lubrication under water.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Wuge H; Titmuss, Simon; Tiberg, Fredrik; Thomas, Robert K; McGillivray, Duncan J; Klein, Jacob

    2006-11-09

    Boundary lubrication, in which the rubbing surfaces are coated with molecular monolayers, has been studied extensively for over half a century. Such monolayers generally consist of amphiphilic surfactants anchored by their polar headgroups; sliding occurs at the interface between the layers, greatly reducing friction and especially wear of the underlying substrates. This process, widespread in engineering applications, is also predicted to occur in biological lubrication via phospholipid films, though few systematic studies on friction between surfactant layers in aqueous environments have been carried out. Here we show that the frictional stress between two sliding surfaces bearing surfactant monolayers may decrease, when immersed in water, to as little as one per cent or less of its value in air (or oil). We attribute this to the shift of the slip plane from between the surfactant layers, to the surfactant/substrate interface. The low friction would then be due to the fluid hydration layers surrounding the polar head groups attached to the substrate. These results may have implications for future technological and biomedical applications.

  9. Lubrication in tablet formulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jennifer; Wen, Hong; Desai, Divyakant

    2010-05-01

    Theoretical aspects and practical considerations of lubrication in tablet compression are reviewed in this paper. Properties of the materials that are often used as lubricants, such as magnesium stearate, in tablet dosage form are summarized. The manufacturing process factors that may affect tablet lubrication are discussed. As important as the lubricants in tablet formulations are, their presence can cause some changes to the tablet physical and chemical properties. Furthermore, a detailed review is provided on the methodologies used to characterize lubrication process during tablet compression with relevant process analytical technologies. Finally, the Quality-by-Design considerations for tablet formulation and process development in terms of lubrication are discussed.

  10. Carbide/Fluoride/Silver Self-Lubricating Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1987-01-01

    Bearing coatings survive at operating temperatures up to 870 degrees C. PS200 composite self-lubricating coating for bearing applications operating at temperatures above failure points of traditional solid lubricants. Excellent friction and wear performance in oxidizing atmospheres up to 1,600 degrees F and reducing atmospheres up to 1,400 degrees F. Performance needed for development of advanced heat engines as adiabatic diesel and Stirling engine.

  11. Carbide/Fluoride/Silver Self-Lubricating Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1987-01-01

    Bearing coatings survive at operating temperatures up to 870 degrees C. PS200 composite self-lubricating coating for bearing applications operating at temperatures above failure points of traditional solid lubricants. Excellent friction and wear performance in oxidizing atmospheres up to 1,600 degrees F and reducing atmospheres up to 1,400 degrees F. Performance needed for development of advanced heat engines as adiabatic diesel and Stirling engine.

  12. Lubrication with solids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Johnson, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Brief discussion of the historical background, variety range, chemistry, physics, and other properties of solid lubricants, and review of their current uses. The widespread use of solid lubricants did not occur until about 1947. At present, they are the object of such interest that a special international conference on their subject was held in 1971. They are used at temperatures beyond the useful range of conventional lubricating oils and greases. Their low volatility provides them with the capability of functioning effectively in vacuum and invites their use in space applications. Their high load carrying ability makes them useful with heavily loaded components. Solid lubricants, however, do lack some of the desirable properties of conventional lubricants. Unlike oils and greases, which have fluidity and can continuously be carried back into contact with lubricated surfaces, solid lubricants, because of their immobility, have finite lives. Also, oils and greases can carry away frictional heat from contacting surfaces, while solid lubricants cannot.

  13. Electrophoretically-deposited solid film lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, M.T.; Panitz, J.K.J.; Vanecek, C.W.

    1995-04-01

    An aqueous-based process that uses electrophoresis to attract powdered lubricant in suspension to a charged target was developed. The deposition process yields coatings with low friction, complies with environmental safety regulations, requires minimal equipment, and has several advantages over processes involving organic binders or vacuum techniques. This work focuses on development of the deposition process, includes an analysis of the friction coefficient of the material in sliding contact with stainless steel under a range of conditions, and a functional evaluation of coating performance in a precision mechanical device application. Results show that solid lubricant films with friction coefficients as low as 0.03 can be produced. A 0.03 friction coefficient is superior to solid lubricants with binder systems and is comparable to friction coefficients generated with more costly vacuum techniques.

  14. The effect of incorporated self-lubricated BN(h) particles on the tribological properties of Ni-P/BN(h) composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-I.; Hou, Kung-Hsu; Ger, Ming-Der; Wang, Gao-Liang

    2015-12-01

    Ni-P/BN(h) composite coatings are prepared by means of the conventional electroless plating from the bath containing up to 10.0 g/l of hexagonal boron nitride particles with size 0.5 μm. The Ni-P coating is also prepared as a comparison. Cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) is used to stabilize the electrolyte, and the optimum CTAB concentration resulting in a nonagglomerated dispersion of particles is obtained using a dispersion stability analyzer. Morphology of the coatings and the effect of incorporated particles on coating structure and composition are investigated via scanning electron microscopy, field emission electron probe micro-analyzer and X-ray diffraction analysis. Hardness, roughness, friction coefficient and wear resistance of the coatings are also evaluated using Vickers microhardness tester, atomic force microscopy and ball-on disk machine. The presence of CTAB in the depositing bath has a positive effect on the surface roughness and performance of Ni-P/BN(h) composite coatings. The friction and wear tests results show that incorporation of 14.5 vol% BN(h) particles into the Ni-P coating lowers the coating friction coefficient by about 75% and the wear resistance of the Ni-P composites is approximately 10 times higher than Ni-P coating.

  15. Environmentally Acceptable Lubricants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-30

    referred to as environmentally friendly lubricants ( EFLs ) or biolubricants. EPA, wastewater, lubricants, oil, biolubricants, VGP, vessels U U U UU 27...qualities, but have not been demonstrated to meet these standards, are referred to as environmentally friendly lubricants ( EFLs ) or biolubricants...clarify the difference between EAL and EFL products in the marketplace. Because the majority of a lubricant is composed of the base oil, the base oil

  16. Coatings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  17. Coatings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  18. Process Sprays Uniforms Plasma Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.; Walther, G. C.; Nakamura, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    Composite-powder processing procedure developed along with plasma-spray parameters to achieve homogeneous, well-bonded, low-porosity, self-lubricating coatings. Multicomponent plasma coatings are applied without segretation of components.

  19. Solid Lubricant For Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Pepper, Stephen V.; Honecy, Frank S.

    1993-01-01

    Outer layer of silver lubricates, while intermediate layer of titanium ensures adhesion. Lubricating outer films of silver deposited on thin intermediate films of titanium on alumina substrates found to reduce sliding friction and wear. Films provide effective lubrication for ceramic seals, bearings, and other hot sliding components in advanced high-temperature engines.

  20. CVD method of forming self-lubricating composites

    DOEpatents

    Besmann, T.M.; Blau, P.J.; Lee, W.Y.; Bae, Y.W.

    1998-12-01

    An article having a multiphase composite lubricant coating of a hard refractory matrix phase of titanium nitride dispersed with particles of a solid lubricating phase of molybdenum disulfide is prepared by heating the article to temperatures between 350 and 850 C in a reaction vessel at a reduced pressure and passing a gaseous mixture of Ti((CH{sub 3}){sub 2}N){sub 4}, MoF{sub 6}, H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} over the heated article forming a multiphase composite lubricant coating on the article. 1 fig.

  1. CVD method of forming self-lubricating composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M.; Blau, Peter J.; Lee, Woo Y.; Bae, Yong W.

    1998-01-01

    An article having a multiphase composite lubricant coating of a hard refractory matrix phase of titanium nitride dispersed with particles of a solid lubricating phase of molybdenum disulfide is prepared by heating the article to temperatures between 350.degree. and 850.degree. C. in a reaction vessel at a reduced pressure and passing a gaseous mixture of Ti((CH.sub.3).sub.2 N).sub.4, MoF.sub.6, H.sub.2 S and NH.sub.3 over the heated article forming a multiphase composite lubricant coating on the article.

  2. Enhancement of Perfluoropolyether Boundary Lubrication Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Ajayi, O. O.; Wedeven, L. D.

    1996-01-01

    A ball bearing simulator operating under starved conditions was used to perform screening tests to evaluate the boundary lubrication performance of a branched perfluoropolyether (PFPE), K-143 AB. Several approaches to enhance boundary lubrication were studied. These included: (1) soluble boundary additives, (2) bearing surface modifications, (3) 'run-in' surface films, and (4) ceramic bearing components. In addition, results were compared with two non-perfluorinated liquid lubricant formulations. Based on these tests, the following tentative conclusions can be made: (1) Substantial improvements in boundary lubrication performance were observed with a beta-diketone boundary additive and a tricresyl phosphate (TCP) liquid surface pretreatment, (2) the use of rough Si3N4 balls (R(sub a) = 40 micro-inch) also provided increases in test duration, but with concomitant abrasive wear, (3) moderate improvements were seen with two boundary additives (a phosphine and a phosphatriazine) and a neat (100%) fluid (a carboxylic acid terminated PFPE); and small improvements with surface pretreatments with synthetic hydrocarbons, a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coating, and TiC coated 440 C and smooth Si3N4 balls (R(sub a) = 1 micro-inch), and (4) two non-PFPE lubricant formulations (a polyalphaolefin (PAO) and synthetic hydrocarbon) yielded substantial improvements.

  3. Lubricant rheology applied to elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winer, W. O.; Sanborn, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    Viscosity measurements in a high pressure rheometer, elastohydrodynamic simulator studies (including the development of a temperature measuring technique), and analytical fluid modeling for elastohydrodynamic contacts are described. The more recent research which is described concerns infrared temperature measurements in elastohydrodynamic contacts and the exploration of the glassy state of lubricants. A correlation, of engineering significance, was made between transient surface temperature measurements and surface roughness profiles. Measurements of glass transitions of lubricants and the study of the effect of rate processes on materials lead to the conclusion that typical lubricants go into the glassy state as they pass through the contact region of typical elastohydrodynamic contacts.

  4. Industry Needs Fulfilled by Patented NASA PS300 Solid Lubricant Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    In 1999, the NASA Glenn Research Center was awarded a patent (#5866518) for a new high-temperature solid lubricant coating material, PS300. A combination of wear-resistant metals and ceramics with solid lubricant additives, PS300 reduces friction and wear in sliding contacts from below ambient to over 650 C. This lubricant is an outgrowth of over three decades of high-temperature tribological research and was specifically developed as a shaft lubricant to protect foil air bearings used in Oil-Free turbomachinery, like gas turbines. Foil bearings are lubricated by air at high speeds but experience sliding and wear during initial startup and shut down when a lubricating film of air has not yet developed. PS300 shaft coatings have successfully lubricated foil bearings for over 100 000 cycles without wearing out.

  5. A commentary on solid lubricants and wear resistant solids for use in extreme environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    The need for high temperature tribological coatings and self-lubricating materials in advanced technology is discussed. A qualitative model for the mechanism of solid lubrication is proposed. The model is based upon microscopic observations of the dynamics of third-body solids in lubricated contacts. In this model, the rheology of plastic flow is suggested as a more general criterion for predicting the lubricating potential of a solid material than, for example, a specific crystal structure. Some examples of layer-lattice and nonlayer-lattice solids that lubricate by virtue of their extreme plasticity, film coherence, and adhesion to the lubricated metal are described. Circumstantial evidence for the model is presented for low shear-strength solids at room temperature and for solids such as calcium fluoride that become lubricative only when their brittle-to-ductile transition temperature is exceeded. Some materials considerations in the selection of hard-coat materials for wear control are also presented.

  6. Lubrication of Nitinol 60

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Glennon, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of Nitinol 60, 60 wt% Ni, 40 wt% Ti (55 at.% Ni, 45 at.% Ti) are sufficiently attractive to warrant its consideration as a lubricated triboelement. Triboelements are always run lubricated. The ability to lubricate Nitinol 60 by the oils usually used on spacecraft mechanisms--Pennzane 2001A, Krytox 143AC and Castrol 815Z--was experimentally determined. These oils were run in the boundary lubrication regime for Nitinol 60 balls running against Nitinol 60 counterfaces in the vacuum spiral orbit tribometer. Test results consisting of the coefficient of friction versus time (friction traces) and relative degradation rates of the oils are presented. Contrary to the inability to successfully lubricate other metal alloys with high titanium content, it was found that Nitinol 60 is able to be lubricated by these oils. Overall, the results presented here indicate that Nitinol 60 is a credible candidate material for bearing applications.

  7. Boundary lubrication: Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the various lubrication regimes, with particular, emphasis on boundary lubrication, is presented. The types of wear debris and extent of surface damage is illustrated for each regime. The role of boundary surface films along with their modes of formation and important physical properties are discussed. In addition, the effects of various operating parameters on friction and wear in the boundary lubrication regime are considered.

  8. Lubrication of Machine Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    The understanding of hydrodynamic lubrication began with the classical experiments of Tower and Petrov. Reynolds used a reduced form of the Navier-Stokes equations and the continuity equation to generate a second order differential equation for the pressure in the narrow, converging gap of a bearing contact. Such a pressure enables a load to be transmitted between the surfaces with very low friction since the surfaces are completely separated by a film of fluid. In such a situation it is the physical properties of the lubricant, notably the dynamic viscosity, that dictate the behavior of the contact. The understanding of boundary lubrication is normally attributed to Hardy and Doubleday. In boundary lubrication it is the physical and chemical properties of thin films of molecular proportions and the surfaces to which they are attached that determine contact behavior. The lubricant viscosity is not an influential parameter. Research is devoted to a better understanding and more precise definition of other lubrication regimes between these extremes. One such regime, elastohydrodynamic lubrication, occurs in nonconformal contacts, where the pressures are high and the bearing surfaces deform elastically. In this situation the viscosity of the lubricant may raise considerably, and this further assists the formation of an effective fluid film. The science of these three lubrication regimes (hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, and boundary) are described and the manner in which this science is used in the design of machine elements is examined.

  9. Fundamentals of fluid lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, Bernard J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim is to coordinate the topics of design, engineering dynamics, and fluid dynamics in order to aid researchers in the area of fluid film lubrication. The lubrication principles that are covered can serve as a basis for the engineering design of machine elements. The fundamentals of fluid film lubrication are presented clearly so that students that use the book will have confidence in their ability to apply these principles to a wide range of lubrication situations. Some guidance on applying these fundamentals to the solution of engineering problems is also provided.

  10. DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

  11. Worldwide lubricant trends

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on lubricating oils for internal combustion engines. Topics considered at the conference included worldwide environmental regulations and their impact on lubricant additives, passenger car gasoline engine oils in Japan, valve train wear, the field performance of super premium engine oils, wear resistance, deposits, scale control, oil thickening, low-phosphorus engine oils, bore polishing, the Tornado test, the coordination of international needs for lubricant quality,and the corrosive wear of cast iron under reciprocating lubrication.

  12. Assessment of Introital Lubrication.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Samantha J; Sawatsky, Megan L; Lalumière, Martin L

    2015-08-01

    Vaginal vasocongestion and lubrication serve to prepare the vaginal lumen for sexual activity. Lubrication is important for sexual functioning and difficulties with lubrication are one of the most commonly reported symptoms of sexual dysfunction. Few studies have empirically examined how vasocongestion and lubrication relate to one another and there are currently no well-established measures of lubrication. In this study, we designed and tested a simple method to assess lubrication at the vaginal introitus in 19 healthy women, using litmus test strips. We examined the relationship between lubrication and vaginal vasocongestion (measured with a photoplethysmograph) when elicited by audiovisual sexual stimuli (male-female sexual interactions). Lubrication was elicited by the sexual stimuli and was strongly correlated with reports of sexual arousal. Unexpectedly, lubrication was not correlated with vasocongestion, even though the latter was also elicited by the sexual stimuli. We discuss the implications of these findings for informing our understanding of the female sexual response and the potential clinical and scientific utility of this new measure.

  13. Carbon-based tribofilms from lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, Ali; Ramirez, Giovanni; Eryilmaz, Osman L.; Narayanan, Badri; Liao, Yifeng; Kamath, Ganesh; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.

    2016-08-03

    Moving mechanical interfaces are commonly lubricated and separated by a combination of fluid films and solid 'tribofilms', which together ensure easy slippage and long wear life(1). The efficacy of the fluid film is governed by the viscosity of the base oil in the lubricant; the efficacy of the solid tribofilm, which is produced as a result of sliding contact between moving parts, relies upon the effectiveness of the lubricant's anti-wear additive (typically zinc dialkyldithiophosphate)(2). Minimizing friction and wear continues to be a challenge, and recent efforts have focused on enhancing the anti-friction and anti-wear properties of lubricants by incorporating inorganic nanoparticles and ionic liquids(3,4). Here, we describe the in operando formation of carbon-based tribofilms via dissociative extraction from base-oil molecules on catalytically active, sliding nanometre-scale crystalline surfaces, enabling base oils to provide not only the fluid but also the solid tribofilm. We study nanocrystalline catalytic coatings composed of nitrides of either molybdenum or vanadium, containing either copper or nickel catalysts, respectively. Structurally, the resulting tribofilms are similar to diamond-like carbon(5). Ball-on-disk tests at contact pressures of 1.3 gigapascals reveal that these tribofilms nearly eliminate wear, and provide lower friction than tribofilms formed with zinc dialkyldithiophosphate. Reactive and ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations show that the catalytic action of the coatings facilitates dehydrogenation of linear olefins in the lubricating oil and random scission of their carbon-carbon backbones; the products recombine to nucleate and grow a compact, amorphous lubricating tribofilm.

  14. Carbon-based tribofilms from lubricating oils.

    PubMed

    Erdemir, Ali; Ramirez, Giovanni; Eryilmaz, Osman L; Narayanan, Badri; Liao, Yifeng; Kamath, Ganesh; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S

    2016-08-04

    Moving mechanical interfaces are commonly lubricated and separated by a combination of fluid films and solid 'tribofilms', which together ensure easy slippage and long wear life. The efficacy of the fluid film is governed by the viscosity of the base oil in the lubricant; the efficacy of the solid tribofilm, which is produced as a result of sliding contact between moving parts, relies upon the effectiveness of the lubricant's anti-wear additive (typically zinc dialkyldithiophosphate). Minimizing friction and wear continues to be a challenge, and recent efforts have focused on enhancing the anti-friction and anti-wear properties of lubricants by incorporating inorganic nanoparticles and ionic liquids. Here, we describe the in operando formation of carbon-based tribofilms via dissociative extraction from base-oil molecules on catalytically active, sliding nanometre-scale crystalline surfaces, enabling base oils to provide not only the fluid but also the solid tribofilm. We study nanocrystalline catalytic coatings composed of nitrides of either molybdenum or vanadium, containing either copper or nickel catalysts, respectively. Structurally, the resulting tribofilms are similar to diamond-like carbon. Ball-on-disk tests at contact pressures of 1.3 gigapascals reveal that these tribofilms nearly eliminate wear, and provide lower friction than tribofilms formed with zinc dialkyldithiophosphate. Reactive and ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations show that the catalytic action of the coatings facilitates dehydrogenation of linear olefins in the lubricating oil and random scission of their carbon-carbon backbones; the products recombine to nucleate and grow a compact, amorphous lubricating tribofilm.

  15. Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    General Magnaplate Corporation's pharmaceutical machine is used in the industry for high speed pressing of pills and capsules. Machine is automatic system for molding glycerine suppositories. These machines are typical of many types of drug production and packaging equipment whose metal parts are treated with space spinoff coatings that promote general machine efficiency and contribute to compliance with stringent federal sanitation codes for pharmaceutical manufacture. Collectively known as "synergistic" coatings, these dry lubricants are bonded to a variety of metals to form an extremely hard slippery surface with long lasting self lubrication. The coatings offer multiple advantages; they cannot chip, peel or be rubbed off. They protect machine parts from corrosion and wear longer, lowering maintenance cost and reduce undesired heat caused by power-robbing friction.

  16. Micro-Tribological Performance of MoS2 Lubricants with Varying Au Content

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-05

    observed between the two coatings . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Solid lubrication . Molybdenum disulfide, M0S2, Sputter- deposition , Mocro-electromechanical...ABSTRACT Microtribological testing with a spherical diamond tip (radius=100 |itn) was conducted on two AU-M0S2 coatings with 32 at.% and 84 at.% Au...ScienceDirect Surface & Coatings Technology journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/surfcoat Micro-tribological performance of IVI0S2 lubricants with

  17. Innovative Die Material and Lubrication Strategies for Clean and Energy Conserving Forging Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Rajiv Shivpuri; Sailesh Babu; Lin Yang; Yijun Zhu

    2007-01-08

    The objective of this project was to develop and implement innovative die material and surface coating strategies such as composite dies and lubricated coatings to increase die lives and to reduce environmental pollution. In this project approaches and software were developed for die life optimization and optimal design of lubrication systems for hot forging. In addition, LENS applied nickel-aluminide coatings were developed and validated in the industrial environment for significant improvements in die life.

  18. Ocean Spray Lubricates Winds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    According to a new study by two University of California, Berkeley, mathematicians and their Russian colleague, the water droplets kicked up by rough seas serve to lubricate the swirling winds of hurricanes and cyclones, letting them build to speeds approaching 200 miles per hour. Without the lubricating effect of the spray, the mathematicians…

  19. Ocean Spray Lubricates Winds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    According to a new study by two University of California, Berkeley, mathematicians and their Russian colleague, the water droplets kicked up by rough seas serve to lubricate the swirling winds of hurricanes and cyclones, letting them build to speeds approaching 200 miles per hour. Without the lubricating effect of the spray, the mathematicians…

  20. Lubricant replacement in rolling element bearings for weapon surety devices

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.; Dugger, M.T.; Varga, K.S.

    1996-05-01

    Stronglink switches are a weapon surety device that is critical to the nuclear safety theme in modem nuclear weapons. These stronglink switches use rolling element bearings which contain a lubricant consisting of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) fragments. Ozone-depleting solvents are used in both the manufacture and application of this lubricant. An alternate bearing lubrication for stronglink switches is needed that will provide long-term chemical stability, low migration and consistent performance. Candidates that were evaluated include bearings with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers, bearings with TiC-coated balls, and bearings with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls and steel races. These candidates were compared to the lubricants currently used which are bearings lubricated with PTFE fragments of low molecular weight in a fluorocarbon solvent. The candidates were also compared to bearings lubricated with a diester oil which is representative of bearing lubricants used in industrial applications. Evaluation consisted of cycling preloaded bearings and subjecting them to 23 gRMS random vibration. All of the candidates are viable substitutes for low load application where bearing preload is approximately 1 pound. For high load applications where the bearing preload is approximately 10 pounds, bearings with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers appear to be the best substitutes. Bearings with TiC-coated balls also appear to be a viable candidate but these bearings did not perform as well as the sputtered MoS{sub 2}.

  1. Fabrication of surface self-lubricating composites of aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Zhang, Dong; Le, Yongkang; Li, Lian; Ou, Bin

    2008-12-01

    Porous aluminum anodic oxide films fabricated by anodizing in phosphoric acid electrolyte containing organic acid were investigated. By controlling its microstructure, a macroporous and thick alumina template were obtained. Surface self-lubricating composites were prepared by taking ultra-sonic impregnation in PTFE latex and the relative subsequent heat treatment technology. The studies on the tribological behavior of the surface self-lubricating composite indicated that the tribological properties of aluminum surface can be improved obviously. Compared with the surface coating of hard-anodization, the friction coefficient of self-lubricating composite can be effectively reduced from the 0.575 to 0.166.

  2. Sporting Good Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Sun Coast Chemicals was originally contracted by Lockheed Martin Space Operations to formulate a spray lubricant free of environmental drawbacks for the Mobile Launch Platform used to haul the Space Shuttle from the Kennedy Space Center Vehicle Assembly Building to a launch pad. From this work, Sun Coast introduced Train Track Lubricant, Penetrating Spray Lube, and Biodegradable Hydraulic Fluid. Based on the original lubricant work, two more products have also been introduced. First, the X-1R Super Gun Cleaner and Lubricant protects guns from rust and corrosion caused by environmental conditions. Second, the X-1R Tackle Pack, endorsed by both fresh and saltwater guides and certain reel manufacturers, penetrates, cleans, reduces friction, lubricates, and provides extra protection against rust and corrosion.

  3. High temperature lubricating process

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Robert W.; Shell, Thomas E.

    1982-01-01

    It has been difficult to provide adaquate lubrication for load bearing, engine components when such engines are operating in excess of about 475.degree. C. The present invention is a process for providing a solid lubricant on a load bearing, solid surface (14), such as in an engine (10) being operated at temperatures in excess of about 475.degree. C. The process comprises contacting and maintaining steps. A gas phase (42) is provided which includes at least one component reactable in a temperature dependent reaction to form a solid lubricant. The gas phase is contacted with the load bearing surface. The load bearing surface is maintained at a temperature which causes reaction of the gas phase component and the formation of the solid lubricant. The solid lubricant is formed directly on the load bearing surface. The method is particularly suitable for use with ceramic engines.

  4. High temperature lubricating process

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, R.W.; Shell, T.E.

    1979-10-04

    It has been difficult to provide adequate lubrication for load bearing, engine components when such engines are operating in excess of about 475/sup 0/C. The present invention is a process for providing a solid lubricant on a load bearing, solid surface, such as in an engine being operated at temperatures in excess of about 475/sup 0/C. The process comprises contacting and maintaining the following steps: a gas phase is provided which includes at least one component reactable in a temperature dependent reaction to form a solid lubricant; the gas phase is contacted with the load bearing surface; the load bearing surface is maintained at a temperature which causes reaction of the gas phase component and the formation of the solid lubricant; and the solid lubricant is formed directly on the load bearing surface. The method is particularly suitable for use with ceramic engines.

  5. Microfriction studies of model self-lubricating surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Yust, C.S.

    1993-05-06

    Self-lubricating composites consist of at least one structural (matrix) phase and at least one phase to provide lubrication. Modeling the behavior of such composites involves ascertaining the frictional contributions of each constituent phase under varying conditions of lubricating films coverage. The ORNL friction microprobe (FMP), a specialized microcontact tribometer, was used to investigate the frictional behavior of both matrix and lubricant phases to support the development of self-lubricating, surfaces. Polished CVD-silicon carbide deposits and silicon wafers were used as substrates. The wafers were intended to simulate the thin silica films present on SiC surfaces at elevated temperature. Molybdenum disulfide, in both sputtered and burnished forms, was used as the model lubricant. The effects of CVD-SiC substrate surface roughness and method of lubricant film deposition on the substrate were studied for single passes of a spherical silicon nitride slider (NBD 200 material). In contrast to the smooth sliding exhibit by burnished, films, sputtered MoS{sub 2} surfaces exhibited marked stick-slip behavior, indicating that the frictional behavior of solid lubricating coatings can be quite erratic on a microscale, especially when asperity contacts are elastically compliant.

  6. Lifetime Lubricated Engines Using Triboreactive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    polyglycol blend as crank case oil. An unlubricated internal combustion engine is of interest, because it will be more compact in its basic...wear debris/particles [34] (piston group, valve guide and cam). The enormous improvement of the internal combustion engine is due mainly to the many...AG For life-time lubrication [43], DaimlerChrysler investigates „Lubricious Oxides“ (LO) as coatings for tribosystems of internal combustion engines

  7. Dynamic-reservoir lubricating device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ficken, W. H.; Schulien, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dynamic-reservoir lubricating device supplies controlled amounts of lubricating oil to ball bearings during operation of the bearings. The dynamic reservoir lubricating device includes a rotating reservoir nut, a hollow cylinder filled with lubricating oil, flow restrictors and a ball bearing retainer.

  8. Dairy Equipment Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Lake To Lake Dairy Cooperative, Manitowoc, Wisconsin, operates four plants in Wisconsin for processing milk, butter and cheese products from its 1,300 member farms. The large co-op was able to realize substantial savings by using NASA information for improved efficiency in plant maintenance. Under contract to Marshall Space Flight Center, Midwest Research Institute compiled a handbook consolidating information about commercially available lubricants. The handbook details chemical and physical properties, applications, specifications, test procedures and test data for liquid and solid lubricants. Lake To Lake's plant engineer used the handbook to effect savings in maintenance labor and materials costs by reducing the number of lubricants used on certain equipment. Strict U.S. Department of Agriculture and Food and Drug Administration regulations preclude lubrication changes n production equipment, but the co-op's maintenance chief was able to eliminate seven types of lubricants for ancillary equipment, such as compressors and high pressure pumps. Handbook data enabled him to select comparable but les expensive lubricants in the materials consolidation process, and simplified lubrication schedules and procedures. The handbook is in continuing use as a reference source when a new item of equipment is purchased.

  9. Environmentally friendly lubricating oil candidate.

    PubMed

    Ozgülsün, A; Karaosmanoğlu, F

    1999-01-01

    Synthetic lubricating oils based on renewable sources, excluding petroleum, have a great importance among all of the lubricating oil alternatives that are included in the research field about clean and environmentally friendly lubricating oil technologies. One of the environmentally friendly lubricating oils is a vegetable oil-based product. In this study, the esterification product of oleic acid with a fraction of molasses fusel oil as a lubricating oil candidate was determined according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard tests. The results indicate that the ester product can be used as an environmental friendly lubricating oil or lubricating oil additive.

  10. Positive lubrication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dennis W.; Hooper, Fred L.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the development of an autonomous lubrication system for spin bearings, a system was developed to deliver oil to grease-lubricated bearings upon demand. This positive oil delivery system (PLUS) consists of a pressurized reservoir with a built-in solenoid valve that delivers a predictable quantity of oil to the spin bearing through a system of stainless steel tubes. Considerable testing was performed on the PLUS to characterize its performance and verify its effectiveness, along with qualifying it for flight. Additional development is underway that will lead to the fully autonomous active lubrication system.

  11. Micro-elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, H. S.

    1984-01-01

    Conventional elastohydrodynamics, which is based on assumption of smooth surfaces, is reviewed to show its insufficiency for explaining the failure processes in these contacts. For conditions approaching failure, lubrication breakdown occurs locally at asperity contacts where the lubrication behavior is controlled by microelastohydrodynamic lubrication (micro-EHL). The film formation mechanisms in micro-EHL conjunctions is described. The level of film thickness due to normal approach and sliding of a single asperity and due to asperity-asperity collision between two asperities is assessed. Possible influence of the micro-EHL to incipient scuffing failure, surface crack propagation and wear are discussed.

  12. Driveline Fundamentals and Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, I.

    The various gear types and automotive transmissions in drive trains are described. The need for automotive differential axle gears is demonstrated. SAE gear lubricant classifications are related to performance specifications. Automatic transmission fluids, ATFs, are described together with agricultural and off-highway fluids. Generic formulations of driveline fluids are discussed in terms of their tribology and performance and also the contribution of various additive classes to that performance. The main functions of manual gearbox, automatic transmission and axle lubricants are described. General trends and emerging technologies in drive train components are discussed in terms of the requirements placed on the lubricant, evolution in transmission technologies and relative market penetration.

  13. A self-lubricating bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An improved bearing structure is described which includes a permanently magnetized porous body filled with an interstitial magnetic lubricant for extending the operational life of self-lubricating bearings. The bearing structure is characterized by a permanently magnetized retainer formed of a porous material and filled with an interstitial magnetic lubricant, whereby the pores serve as lubricant reservoirs from which the lubricant continuously is delivered to a film disposed between contiguous bearing surfaces.

  14. Carbon-based tribofilms from lubricating oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdemir, Ali; Ramirez, Giovanni; Eryilmaz, Osman L.; Narayanan, Badri; Liao, Yifeng; Kamath, Ganesh; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.

    2016-08-01

    Moving mechanical interfaces are commonly lubricated and separated by a combination of fluid films and solid ‘tribofilms’, which together ensure easy slippage and long wear life. The efficacy of the fluid film is governed by the viscosity of the base oil in the lubricant; the efficacy of the solid tribofilm, which is produced as a result of sliding contact between moving parts, relies upon the effectiveness of the lubricant’s anti-wear additive (typically zinc dialkyldithiophosphate). Minimizing friction and wear continues to be a challenge, and recent efforts have focused on enhancing the anti-friction and anti-wear properties of lubricants by incorporating inorganic nanoparticles and ionic liquids. Here, we describe the in operando formation of carbon-based tribofilms via dissociative extraction from base-oil molecules on catalytically active, sliding nanometre-scale crystalline surfaces, enabling base oils to provide not only the fluid but also the solid tribofilm. We study nanocrystalline catalytic coatings composed of nitrides of either molybdenum or vanadium, containing either copper or nickel catalysts, respectively. Structurally, the resulting tribofilms are similar to diamond-like carbon. Ball-on-disk tests at contact pressures of 1.3 gigapascals reveal that these tribofilms nearly eliminate wear, and provide lower friction than tribofilms formed with zinc dialkyldithiophosphate. Reactive and ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations show that the catalytic action of the coatings facilitates dehydrogenation of linear olefins in the lubricating oil and random scission of their carbon-carbon backbones; the products recombine to nucleate and grow a compact, amorphous lubricating tribofilm.

  15. Electrical conductive composite lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarchuk, Bruce J.; Wehrman, Ken A.; Yang Zhang, Teh-Shing Lee, Krishnagopalan, Gopal A.

    1995-01-01

    In power and electronic systems, electrical contact resistance is a major issue. For mechanical connections and sliding contacts, power losses and electrical noise are critical concerns. These issues are of particular interest to all industrial members of the Auburn CCDS. Research has been conducted to develop a variety of contact materials, both for solid lubricant films and composite paper lubricants. A combination of low electrical resistance, good lubricating properties, long wear-life, and low sliding electrical noise was achieved using a metal-cellulose composite paper with dichalcogenide powders entrapped in the porous paper matrix. Advancements in developing these conductive lubricants can increase contact lifetime and reliability in many space and terrestrial applications.

  16. Solid lubrication design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, B. B.; Yonushonis, T. M.; Bovenkerk, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A single element traction rig was used to measure the traction forces at the contact of a ball against a flat disc at room temperature under combined rolling and sliding. The load and speed conditions were selected to match those anticipated for bearing applications in adiabatic diesel engines. The test program showed that the magnitude of traction forces were almost the same for all the lubricants tested; a lubricant should, therefore, be selected on the basis of its ability to prevent wear of the contact surfaces. Traction vs. slide/roll ratio curves were similar to those for liquid lubricants but the traction forces were an order of magnitude higher. The test data was used to derive equations to predict traction force as a function of contact stress and rolling speed. Qualitative design guidelines for solid lubricated concentrated contacts are proposed.

  17. Liquid lubrication in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1990-01-01

    The requirement for long-term, reliable operation of aerospace mechanisms has, with a few exceptions, pushed the state of the art in tribology. Space mission life requirements in the early 1960s were generally 6 months to a year. The proposed U.S. space station schedule to be launched in the 1990s must be continuously usable for 10 to 20 years. Liquid lubrication systems are generally used for mission life requirements longer than a year. Although most spacecraft or satellites have reached their required lifetimes without a lubrication-related failure, the application of liquid lubricants in the space environment presents unique challenges. The state of the art of liquid lubrication in space as well as the problems and their solutions are reviewed.

  18. Lubrication of Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Sabrina; Seror, Jasmine; Klein, Jacob

    2016-07-11

    The major synovial joints such as hips and knees are uniquely efficient tribological systems, able to articulate over a wide range of shear rates with a friction coefficient between the sliding cartilage surfaces as low as 0.001 up to pressures of more than 100 atm. No human-made material can match this. The means by which such surfaces maintain their very low friction has been intensively studied for decades and has been attributed to fluid-film and boundary lubrication. Here, we focus especially on the latter: the reduction of friction by molecular layers at the sliding cartilage surfaces. In particular, we discuss such lubrication in the light of very recent advances in our understanding of boundary effects in aqueous media based on the paradigms of hydration lubrication and of the synergism between different molecular components of the synovial joints (namely hyaluronan, lubricin, and phospholipids) in enabling this lubrication.

  19. Lubrication characteristics of rolling bearings lubricated by self-lubricating composite retainers (Part 1) - Selection of retainers for earth sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Makoto; Seki, Katsumi; Miyakawa, Yukio

    The paper describes the process and results of the selection tests carried out for the ball bearings used in the earth sensors which were operated from February 1981 to April 1982 on the Engineering Test Satellite IV. Among eight candidate materials tested in a form of a retainer, the combination of sputtered MoS2 films and retainers composed of PTFE, glass fiber and molybdenum showed by far the best tribological response. When applied to angular-contact type ball bearings(#7204), this combination lubricated them for more than 10,000 hours at 2,000 rpm under an axial load of 50 N in 10(exp -6) Pa. The ball bearings(#7007) were also successfully run for 10,000 hours at 200 rpm under an axial load of 20 N in 10(exp -6) approximately 10(exp -7) Pa. The bearings actually used in flight were lubricated by PTFE coatings and retainers made from PTFE, glass fiber, and lead oxide for fear than an MoS2 film would be worn off during tests conducted on earth before the launch. Test results indicated this particular combination is more effective in air than in a vacuum. The addition of MoS2 to composites did not improve their lubricating ability, suggesting that PTFE performs the main role in transfer film lubrication.

  20. Lubrication and cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, V; Dowson, D

    1976-01-01

    Mechanisms of lubrication of human synovial joints have been analysed in terms of the operating conditions of the joint, the synovial fluid and articular cartilage. In the hip and knee during a walking cycle the load may rise up to four times body weight. In the knee on dropping one metre the load may go up to 25 time body weight. The elastic modulus of cartilage is similar to that of the synthetic rubber of a car tyre. The cartilage surface is rough and in elderly specimens the centre line average is 2-75 mum. The friction force generated in reciprocating tests shows that both cartilage and synovial fluid are important in lubrication. The viscosity-shear rate relationships of normal synovial fluid show that it is non-Newtonian. Osteoarthrosic fluid is less so and rheumatoid fluid is more nearly Newtonian. Experiments with hip joints in a pendulum machine show that fluid film lubrication obtains at some phases of joint action. Boundary lubrication prevails under certain conditions and has been examined with a reciprocating friction machine. Digestion of hyaluronate does not alter the boundary lubrication, but trypsin digestion does. Surface active substances (lauryl sulphate and cetyl 3-ammonium bromide) give a lubricating ability similar to that of synovial fluid. The effectiveness of the two substances varies with pH. Images Fig. 10 PMID:3490

  1. Methods to improve lubricity of fuels and lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, Ali

    2009-06-16

    A method for providing lubricity in fuels and lubricants includes adding a boron compound to a fuel or lubricant to provide a boron-containing fuel or lubricant. The fuel or lubricant may contain a boron compound at a concentration between about 30 ppm and about 3,000 ppm and a sulfur concentration of less than about 500 ppm. A method of powering an engine to minimize wear, by burning a fuel containing boron compounds. The boron compounds include compound that provide boric acid and/or BO.sub.3 ions or monomers to the fuel or lubricant.

  2. The usage of lubricants in a vacuum environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Don R.; Weilbach, August O.

    1989-10-01

    Lubrication systems which show substantially improved performance in a vacuum environment are the result of continuing development efforts. The availability of a variety of surface coatings and a better selection of high-tech ceramic and plastic materials with excellent wear and low friction qualities have permitted significant advances in the state of the art. The proper use of some wet lubricants, exhibiting very low vapor pressure, still can provide a viable vacuum lubrication system alternative. Hybrid bearings, consisting of metal races and ceramic balls, may provide the answer to extended life and extreme temperature problems. Bearing friction can further be reduced through the deposit of certain solid lubricants. Some of the materials and lubricant combinations will permit the use of plain sleeve bearings Combinations of a solid lubricant and a minimum amount of a wet lubricant have been chosen for a substantial number of spaceborne instrument actuators, rolling element and friction bearings. A continuing effort to essentially eliminate particulate and vapor contamination is essential for low friction mechanisms operating in a vacuum environment dedicated to the production of micro-circuitry. Examples of such efforts are described. The significance of surface hardness, surface finish and other characteristics of a selection of rolling and sliding element materials is discussed.

  3. Power system with an integrated lubrication circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, Brian D.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Johnson, Kris W.; Lane, William H.

    2009-11-10

    A power system includes an engine having a first lubrication circuit and at least one auxiliary power unit having a second lubrication circuit. The first lubrication circuit is in fluid communication with the second lubrication circuit.

  4. Lubrication of Space Systems (c)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the current state-of-the-art tribology, some current and future perceived space lubrication problem areas, and some potential new lubrication technologies. It is the author's opinion that tribology technology, in general, has not significantly advanced over the last 20 to 30 years, even though some incremental improvements in the technology have occurred. There is a better understanding of elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication, some new lubricating and wear theories have been developed, and some new liquid and solid lubricants have been formulated. However, the important problems of being able to lubricate reliably at high temperatures or at cryogenic temperatures have not been adequately address.

  5. Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, R.J.

    1993-04-01

    Synthesis and testing was begun on a number of new classes of lubricants: perfluoropolyethers (branching effects), perfluoromethylene oxide ethers, chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyethers, fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants, glycerine- based perfluoropolyesters, perfluoro epoxy ether chains, etc.

  6. Space Coatings for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Ball Aerospace developed entirely new space lubrication technologies. A new family of dry lubricants emerged from Apollo, specifically designed for long life in space, together with processes for applying them to spacecraft components in microscopically thin coatings. Lubricants worked successfully on seven Orbiting Solar Observatory flights over the span of a decade and attracted attention to other contractors which became Ball customers. The company has developed several hundred variations of the original OSO technology generally designed to improve the quality and useful life of a wide range of products or improve efficiency of the industrial processes by which such products are manufactured.

  7. The experimental evaluation and application of high-temperature solid lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    DellaCorte, C.

    1990-01-01

    This dissertation describes a research program meant to develop an understanding of high-tenperature solid lubrication and experimental techniques through the development of a composite lubricant coating system. The knowledge gained through this research was then applied to a specific engineering challenge, the tribology of a sliding seal for hypersonic flight vehicles. The solid lubricant coating is a chromium carbide based composite combined with silver, which acts as a low temperature lubricant, and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic, which acts as a high temperature lubricant. This composite coating provides good wear resistance and low friction for sliding contacts from room temperature to over 900{degree}C in reducing or oxidative environments. The specific research on this coating included a composition screening using a foil gas bearing test rig and the use of thin silver films to reduce initial wear using a pin-on-disk test rig. The chemical stability of the materials used was also addressed. This research indicated that soft metallic films and materials which become soft at elevated temperatures are potentially good lubricants. The general results from the experiments with the model solid lubricant coating were then applied to a sliding seal design concept. This seal design requires that a braided ceramic fabric slide against a variety of metal counterface materials at temperatures from 25 to 850{degree}C in an oxidative environment. A pin-on-disk tribometer was used to evaluate the tribological properties of these materials and to develop lubrication techniques. The results of this work indicate that these seal materials must be lubricated to prevent wear and reduce fiction. Thin films of silver, gold and calcium fluoride provided lubrication to the sliding materials. 22 refs., 33 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Computational Chemistry and Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehe, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Members of NASA Lewis Research Center's Tribology and Surface Science Branch are applying high-level computational chemistry techniques to the development of new lubrication systems for space applications and for future advanced aircraft engines. The next generation of gas turbine engines will require a liquid lubricant to function at temperatures in excess of 350 C in oxidizing environments. Conventional hydrocarbon-based lubricants are incapable of operating in these extreme environments, but a class of compounds known as the perfluoropolyether (PFAE) liquids (see the preceding illustration) shows promise for such applications. These commercially available products are already being used as lubricants in conditions where low vapor pressure and chemical stability are crucial, such as in satellite bearings and composite disk platters. At higher temperatures, however, these compounds undergo a decomposition process that is assisted (catalyzed) by metal and metal oxide bearing surfaces. This decomposition process severely limits the applicability of PFAE's at higher temperatures. A great deal of laboratory experimentation has revealed that the extent of fluid degradation depends on the chemical properties of the bearing surface materials. Lubrication engineers would like to understand the chemical breakdown mechanism to design a less vulnerable PFAE or to develop a chemical additive to block this degradation.

  9. Space Station lubrication considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, Lubert J.; Dufrane, Keith

    1987-01-01

    Future activities in space will require the use of large structures and high power availability in order to fully exploit opportunities in Earth and stellar observations, space manufacturing and the development of optimum space transportation vehicles. Although these large systems will have increased capabilities, the associated development costs will be high, and will dictate long life with minimum maintenance. The Space Station provides a concrete example of such a system; it is approximately one hundred meters in major dimensions and has a life requirement of thirty years. Numerous mechanical components will be associated with these systems, a portion of which will be exposed to the space environment. If the long life and low maintenance goals are to be satisfied, lubricants and lubrication concepts will have to be carefully selected. Current lubrication practices are reviewed with the intent of determining acceptability for the long life requirements. The effects of exposure of lubricants and lubricant binders to the space environment are generally discussed. Potential interaction of MoS2 with atomic oxygen, a component of the low Earth orbit environment, appears to be significant.

  10. Fluid lubricated bearing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.; Menke, John R.

    1976-01-01

    1. A support for a loaded rotatable shaft comprising in combination on a housing having a fluid-tight cavity encasing an end portion of said shaft, a thrust bearing near the open end of said cavity for supporting the axial thrust of said shaft, said thrust bearing comprising a thrust plate mounted in said housing and a thrust collar mounted on said shaft, said thrust plate having a central opening the peripheral portion of which is hermetically sealed to said housing at the open end of said cavity, and means for supplying a fluid lubricant to said thrust bearing, said thrust bearing having a lubricant-conducting path connecting said lubricant supplying means with the space between said thrust plate and collar intermediate the peripheries thereof, the surfaces of said plate and collar being constructed and arranged to inhibit radial flow of lubricant and, on rotation of said thrust collar, to draw lubricant through said path between the bearing surfaces and to increase the pressure therebetween and in said cavity and thereby exert a supporting force on said end portion of said shaft.

  11. High-temperature bearing lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1968-01-01

    Synthetic paraffinic oil lubricates ball bearings at temperatures in the 600 degrees F range. The lubricant contains antiwear and antifoam additives, is thermally stable in the high temperature range, but requires protection from oxygen.

  12. Magnetically-controlled bearing lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed magnetic-lubricant ball-bearing assembly has permanently-magnetized bearing retainer fabricated of porous material. Pores of retainer are filled with ferrolubricant. Surface tension causes retainer to deliver sufficient lubricant to nonmagnetic ball bearings.

  13. Lubrication for high load duplex bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1997-08-01

    Three ES and H-compatible lubricants (Environment, Safety and Health) for high load duplex bearing applications were evaluated and compared against trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Bearings with Supercritical CO{sub 2} deposition of PTFE extracted from Vydax AR/IPA, bearings with titanium carbide coated balls, and bearings with diamond-like carbon races and retainers were evaluated. Bearings with Supercritical CO{sub 2} deposition of PTFE from Vydax AR/IPA performed as well as bearings with Freon deposition of PTFE from Freon-based Vydax.

  14. The dynamics of texture perception of hard solid food: A review of the contribution of the temporal dominance of sensations technique.

    PubMed

    Fiszman, Susana; Tarrega, Amparo

    2017-05-04

    The present paper reviews the use of temporal dominance of sensations (TDS) sensory methodology in relation to texture evaluation. From more than 100 papers initially screened, 28 dealing with the texture of hard solid foods that require mastication were selected. The attributes evaluated by TDS were comprehensively analyzed and the phases of the mastication period in which they occurred were studied. The relation between these attributes and the initial mechanical food properties, the particle size, shape, and aggregation of the increasingly destroyed food structure, and the evolving properties of the bolus through to swallowing were also examined. Results from complementary techniques used alongside TDS, both sensory and nonsensory, were also analyzed. The contribution of TDS methodology to understanding the texture construct is shown to be reliable and suggestions are made for future lines of research. The literature on the temporal dominance of sensations method is constantly increasing. The present review examines the application of this method to the dynamics of texture perception of hard solid foods. The key texture attributes perceived in each phase of mastication, together with their relation to the initial food structure, gradual comminution, and bolus formation, will shed light on the usefulness of this methodology for food texture appraisal. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Reducing Run-In Wear Of Ceramic-Based Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.; Deadmore, Daniel L.

    1990-01-01

    Silver surface layer helps rough ceramic slide smoothly. Thin film is magnetron-sputtered onto PS200, self-lubricating composite coating containing mixture of chromium carbide, silver, and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. Carbide provides wear resistance, while silver and fluorides provide lubrication. Because both silver top coat and PS200 thermally and chemically stable oxidizing and reducing environments to 900 degrees C, combination appropriate as lubrication for cylinder-wall/piston-ring contacts in Stirling engines and for backup lubrication for gas lubricated journal bearings.

  16. Basic lubrication equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Lubricants, usually Newtonian fluids, are assumed to experience laminar flow. The basic equations used to describe the flow are the Navier-Stokes equation of motion. The study of hydrodynamic lubrication is, from a mathematical standpoint, the application of a reduced form of these Navier-Stokes equations in association with the continuity equation. The Reynolds equation can also be derived from first principles, provided of course that the same basic assumptions are adopted in each case. Both methods are used in deriving the Reynolds equation, and the assumptions inherent in reducing the Navier-Stokes equations are specified. Because the Reynolds equation contains viscosity and density terms and these properties depend on temperature and pressure, it is often necessary to couple the Reynolds with energy equation. The lubricant properties and the energy equation are presented. Film thickness, a parameter of the Reynolds equation, is a function of the elastic behavior of the bearing surface. The governing elasticity equation is therefore presented.

  17. Fluid lubricated bearing construction

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John R.; Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-01-01

    1. A fluid lubricated thrust bearing assembly comprising, in combination, a first bearing member having a plain bearing surface, a second bearing member having a bearing surface confronting the bearing surface of said first bearing member and provided with at least one spiral groove extending inwardly from the periphery of said second bearing member, one of said bearing members having an axial fluid-tight well, a source of fluid lubricant adjacent to the periphery of said second bearing member, and means for relatively rotating said bearing members to cause said lubricant to be drawn through said groove and to flow between said bearing surfaces, whereby a sufficient pressure is built up between said bearing surfaces and in said well to tend to separate said bearing surfaces.

  18. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A.; Wepasnick, Kevin A.; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  19. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A; Wepasnick, Kevin A; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  20. Environmental Capability of Liquid Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beerbower, A.

    1973-01-01

    The methods available for predicting the properties of liquid lubricants from their structural formulas are discussed. The methods make it possible to design lubricants by forecasting the results of changing the structure and to determine the limits to which liquid lubricants can cope with environmental extremes. The methods are arranged in order of their thermodynamic properties through empirical physical properties to chemical properties.

  1. Additional aspects of elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1978-01-01

    An up-to-date review of the varying aspects of elastohydrodynamic lubrication is presented.. Some recent work on elastohydrodynamic lubrication of materials of low elastic modulus as well as on hydrodynamic lubrication is included. Both these topics are applicable for contacts with any ellipticity parameter (ranging from a circular contact to a line contact).

  2. Lubrication of rolling element bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is a broad survey of the lubrication of rolling-element bearings. Emphasis is on the critical design aspects related to speed, temperature, and ambient pressure environment. Types of lubrication including grease, jets, mist, wick, and through-the-race are discussed. The paper covers the historical development, present state of technology, and the future problems of rolling-element bearing lubrication.

  3. Fuel-efficient lubricating oil

    SciTech Connect

    Erdman, T.R.

    1986-04-22

    A method is described of improving the fuel economy of an internal combustion engine comprising lubricating the crankcase of the engine with a lubricating composition consisting of a hydrocarbon oil of lubricating viscosity and from 15 to 25 millimols per kilogram of zinc O,O-di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphorodithioate and from 0.25 to 2 weight percent of pentaerythritol monooleate.

  4. Use of Lubricants in the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W; Biltoft, P

    2006-07-06

    There are two principal concerns that govern the use of lubricants in NIF: (1) Airborne molecular contaminants (AMCs)--AMCs are known to seriously degrade the performance of sol-gel coated optics. AMCs are produced by the slow outgassing of residues (non-volatile residues or ''NVRs'') of high molecular weight compounds left on surfaces. Lubricants, particularly hydrocarbon lubricants, are a primary source of such NVRs. (2) Particulates--Particulates that accumulate on optical surfaces can cause permanent physical damage when exposed to high energy density laser light. Lubricant residues exposed to high energy density light will pyrolyze or decompose and produce carbon particulates. The NIF Approved Materials Database lists several lubricants that have been tested for use in NIF environments. Many of these lubricants were tested according to MELs 99-006 (oven outgassing test) or 99-007 (vacuum outgassing test). In these tests, the change in percent transmission of light through a sol-gel coated optic placed next to the sample under evaluation is used as the diagnostic. Samples that cause less than 0.1% change in optical transmission are deemed suitable for use inside beam enclosures. This testing, however, addresses only the concern associated with AMCs. To assess the issue of particle generation, a flashlamp or ''aerosol'' test is used. In this test a sample with residues is subjected to intense light from the main amplifier flashlamps. The number density of particles per unit volume is measure after each flash. A measurement of an average of fewer than 1000 particles >0.5{micro}m in diameter produced per square foot of exposed surface per flash for each of the last ten flashes in a series of 60 flashes of light is deemed to be acceptable for polymers. A measurement of an average of fewer than 100 particles >0.5{micro}m in diameter produced per square foot of exposed surface per flash for each of the last ten flashes in a series of 60 flashes of light is deemed to

  5. A study of lubrication, processing conditions, and material combinations that affect the wear of micro-textured-carbide coated cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy surfaces used for artificial joints implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettienne-Modeste, Geriel A.

    Total joint replacement remains one of the most successful treatments for arthritis. The most common materials used for artificial joints are metals (e.g., cobalt-chrome alloys or titanium alloys), which articulate against ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Wear related failures of artificial joints may be reduced with the use of novel micro-textured carbide surfaces. The micro-textured carbide surfaces were deposited on a CoCrMo alloy using microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Wear tests were conducted to determine wear mechanisms and properties of the micro-textured surfaces. The research presented in this thesis addresses: (1) rheolgoical behavior of bovine calf serum with and without antibacterial agents to determine whether they can be used as appropriate models for synovial fluid, (2) the wear behavior of the micro-textured CoCrMo surface system, and (3) the mechanical and material properties of the micro-textured CoCrMo alloy surface relevant to wear performance. The rheological studies showed that the apparent viscosity of bovine calf serum increased with an increase in concentration before and after the serum was used for wear testing. The wear analysis showed that the processing conditions (2hr deposition vs. 4hr deposition times) affected the wear properties. The 2hr carbide-on-carbide lubricated in 50% BCS produced the lowest wear factor and rate for the five wear couple systems containing the carbide disk or plate material. Greater wear was produced in serum without penicillin/streptomycin (P/S) compared to the serum containing P/S. A greater carbide coating thickness 10 (micrometers) was produced during the 4hr deposition time than for the 2hr deposition (˜3mum). The nano-hardness value was higher than the micro-hardness for both the 4hr and 2hr carbide surfaces. The micro-hardness results of the worn carbide surfaces showed that an increase in BCS concentration from 0% to 100% increased the micro-hardness (HV) for carbide

  6. Dry Lubricant Smooths the Way for Space Travel, Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Reviving industry standards for coating parts in tungsten disulfide, a dry lubricant developed for the Mariner space probes managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the 1960s and '70s, Applied Tungstenite, a relatively new Temecula, California-based company, has found a client base in the mushrooming commercial space industry, as well as other manufacturers.

  7. Lead oxide ceramic makes excellent high-temperature lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. L.; Sliney, H. E.

    1964-01-01

    A dry lubricant coating in ceramic form consisting of 95 percent lead monoxide and 5 percent silicon dioxide withstood a temperature of 1200 deg F, with a bearing operating at various atmospheric pressures. From this testing, there was no galling or metal transfer of the bearing.

  8. Preparation and Tribological Study of Biodegradable Lubrication Films on Si Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shih-Chen; Huang, Teng-Feng; Wu, Jhen-Yu

    2015-01-01

    A novel method for preparing eco-biodegradable lubricant based on hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) via hydration process is demonstrated. The smooth and homogeneous HPMC coating has a uniform thickness (~35 μm). It has been demonstrated that the preparation parameters play a critical role in controlling the lubricating behavior of the coating; in addition, excess HPMC and water concentration suppress the tribology properties. Nevertheless, a remarkable friction-reduction and anti-wear performance has been obtained. Impressively, the preparation parameter of 5% HPMC + 30 mL water significantly improves lubricant performance and durability. A simple approach for the water-degradability evaluation of HPMC is proposed. PMID:28788029

  9. Railway diesel crankcase lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, R.L.; Zoleski, B.H.; O'Rourke, R.L.

    1987-06-30

    A railway diesel crankcase lubricant composition is described comprising a diesel lubricating oil and from about 0.25 to 2.0 weight percent of minor amount of oxidation and corrosion inhibiting agent. The reaction product is of a polyoxyisopropylene diamine, diabasic acid anhydride and polyalkylene polyamine wherein: (i) reacting a dibasic acid anhydride with a polyoxyisopropylenediamine where x is a numeral of about 2 to about 50, forming a maleamic acid; (ii) reacting the maleamic acid with a polyalkylene polyamine, forming a condensate product and; (iii) recovering the condensate product.

  10. Lubricants in conveyor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Paton, C.G.; Bland, S.B.; Melley, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper looks at four critical lubricants used in the conveyor systems of the northern Albertan oil sand facility. The requirements for the lubricants used in the electric motors and gear boxes of the drive systems, the pulley bearings and the idler bearings are discussed in terms of the application and the environment. A number of developments that have occurred in recent years are presented. Data from the field and from custom designed testing in the laboratory are used to support the role of simulation testing in problem solving in this area of technology. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  11. Natural oils as lubricants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is currently an availability of vegetable oil lubricants, with the exception of engine oils. Vegetable oils are environmentally friendly, renewable, contribute to the reduction of our dependence on imported petroleum, and add value to the farmer. However, there are inherent weaknesses in veg...

  12. Biobased lubricant additives

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  13. Lubricating oil composition

    SciTech Connect

    Malec, R.E.

    1980-01-29

    The reaction product of (A) high molecular weight hydrocarbon-substituted phenols, (B) aldehydes, (C) ammonia or amines having a reactive hydrogen atom, and (D) alkylene oxides are effective dispersants for lubricating oil and impart detergent properties to liquid hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline.

  14. SURFACTANTS IN LUBRICATION

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surfactants are one of the most widely applied materials by consumers and industry. The application areas for surfactants span from everyday mundane tasks such as cleaning, to highly complex processes involving the formulation of pharmaceuticals, foods, pesticides, lubricants, etc. Even though sur...

  15. Fundamentals of Solid Lubrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT During this program, we have worked to develop a fundamental understanding of the chemical and tribological issues related to...approach, tribological measurements performed over a range of length scales, and the correlation of the two classes of information. Research activities...correlated measurements of surface composition and environmentally specific tribological performance of thin film solid lubricants. • Correlate shear

  16. Glass microsphere lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, Michelle; Goode, Henry; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Sorrells, Cindy; Willette, Chris

    1991-01-01

    The harsh lunar environment eliminated the consideration of most lubricants used on earth. Considering that the majority of the surface of the moon consists of sand, the elements that make up this mixture were analyzed. According to previous space missions, a large portion of the moon's surface is made up of fine grained crystalline rock, about 0.02 to 0.05 mm in size. These fine grained particles can be divided into four groups: lunar rock fragments, glasses, agglutinates (rock particles, crystals, or glasses), and fragments of meteorite material (rare). Analysis of the soil obtained from the missions has given chemical compositions of its materials. It is about 53 to 63 percent oxygen, 16 to 22 percent silicon, 10 to 16 percent sulfur, 5 to 9 percent aluminum, and has lesser amounts of magnesium, carbon, and sodium. To be self-supporting, the lubricant must utilize one or more of the above elements. Considering that the element must be easy to extract and readily manipulated, silicon or glass was the most logical choice. Being a ceramic, glass has a high strength and excellent resistance to temperature. The glass would also not contaminate the environment as it comes directly from it. If sand entered a bearing lubricated with grease, the lubricant would eventually fail and the shaft would bind, causing damage to the system. In a bearing lubricated with a solid glass lubricant, sand would be ground up and have little effect on the system. The next issue was what shape to form the glass in. Solid glass spheres was the only logical choice. The strength of the glass and its endurance would be optimal in this form. To behave as an effective lubricant, the diameter of the spheres would have to be very small, on the order of hundreds of microns or less. This would allow smaller clearances between the bearing and the shaft, and less material would be needed. The production of glass microspheres was divided into two parts, production and sorting. Production includes the

  17. Enhancement of perfluoropolyether boundary lubrication performance: I. Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Ajayi, O. O.; Goodell, A. J.; Wedeven, L. D.; Devine, E.; Premore, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    A ball bearing simulator operating under starved conditions was used to evaluate the boundary lubrication performance of a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) Krytox 143 AB. Several approaches to enhance boundary lubrication were studied. These included: (1) soluble boundary additives, (2) bearing surface modifications, (3) 'run-in' surface films, and (4) ceramic bearing components. In addition, results were compared with two non-perfluorinated liquid lubricant formulations. Based on these preliminary tests, the following tentative conclusions can be made: (1) substantial improvements in boundary lubrication performance were observed with a beta-diketone boundary additive and a tricresyl phosphate (TCP) liquid surface pretreatment; (2) the use of rough Si3N4 balls (Ra = 40 micro-in) also provided substantial improvement but with concomitant abrasive wear; (3) marginal improvements were seen with two boundary additives (a phosphine and a phosphatriazine) and a neat (100%) fluid (a carboxylic acid terminated PFPE); and surface pretreatments with a synthetic hydrocarbon, a PTFE coating, and TiC coated 440C and smooth Si3N4 balls (R(sub a) less than 1 micro-in); and (4) two non-PFPE lubricant formulations (a PAO and a synthetic hydrocarbon) yielded substantial improvements.

  18. A New Antiwear Additive/Surface Pretreatment for PFPE Liquid Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo; Fusaro, Robert L.; Siebert, Mark; Keith, Theo; Jansen, Ralph; Herrera-Fierro, Pilar

    1995-01-01

    Pin-on-disk tribology experiments were conducted on a perfluoroalkylelher (PFPE) liquid lubricant with and without a new PFPE lubricant antiwear additive material, a silane. It was found that the silane provided moderate improvement in the antiwear performance of the PFPE lubricant when applied to the metallic surface as a surface coating or when added to the PFPE as a dispersion (emulsion). Slightly better results were obtained by using the combination of a surface coating and an emulsion of the silane. The silane emulsions or coatings did not affect the friction properties of the lubricant. Micro-Fourier transformation infrared (muFTIR) spectroscopy analysis was performed to study silane transfer films and the degradation of the PFPE. The silane was found to mitigate degradation of the PFPE which may have been the major reason for the improved antiwear performance observed.

  19. ES and H-compatible lubrication for duplex bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1997-10-01

    Two ES and H-compatible lubricants (environment, safety, and health) for duplex bearing applications and one hybrid material duplex bearing were evaluated and compared against duplex bearings with trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon), which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Vydax has been used as a bearing lubricant in strong link mechanisms since 1974. Hybrid duplex bearings with silicon nitride balls and molded glass-nylon-Teflon retainers, duplex bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on races and retainers, and duplex bearings lubricated with electrophoretic deposited MoS{sub 2} were evaluated. Bearings with electrophoretic deposited MoS{sub 2} performed as well as bearings with Freon deposition of PTFE from Freon-based Vydax. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls performed worse than bearings lubricated with Vydax, but their performance would still be acceptable for most applications. Bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers had varying amounts of film on the bearings. This affected the performance of the bearings. Bearings with a uniform coating performed to acceptable levels, but bearings with no visible MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers did not perform as well as bearings with the other coatings. Unless process controls are incorporated in the sputtering process or the bearings are screened, they do not appear to be acceptable for duplex bearing applications.

  20. Quality control of the tribological coating PS212

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Deadmore, Daniel L.

    1989-01-01

    PS212 is a self-lubricating, composite coating that is applied by the plasma spray process. It is a functional lubricating coating from 25 C (or lower) to 900 C. The coating is prepared from a blend of three different powders with very dissimilar properties. Therefore, the final chemical composition and lubricating effectiveness of the coatings are very sensitive to the process variables used in their preparation. Defined here are the relevant variables. The process and analytical procedures that will result in satisfactory tribological coatings are discussed.

  1. Self-Lubricating-Diamond Like Coatings Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    wear parameter, K, can be derived for the ball following Archard : (40) K - 3H(A V)/Ns where H, A V, N and s are respectively the hardness of the ball...Stonybrook (EELS); David Smith, Chomerics (IR). The work presented here has been supported by the following Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR...1986 (North Holland), 31. 24. Doolittle, L.R.: Nucl. Inst. Meth., 1985, R29, 344. 25. Amsel, G.; Nadai, T.P.; D’Artemare, E.; David , D.; Girard, E.; and

  2. Lubrication handbook for the space industry. Part A: Solid lubricants. Part B: Liquid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtrey, E. L.

    1985-01-01

    This handbook is intended to provide a ready reference for many of the solid and liquid lubricants used in the space industry. Lubricants and lubricant properties are arranged systematically so that designers, engineers, and maintenance personnel can conveniently locate data needed for their work. This handbook is divided into two major parts (A and B). Part A is a compilation of solid lubricant suppliers information on chemical and physical property of data of more than 250 solid lubricants, bonded solid lubricants, dispersions, and composites. Part B is a compilation of chemical and physical porperty data of more then 250 liquid lubricants, greases, oils, compounds, and fluids. The listed materials cover a broad spectrum from manufacturing and ground support to hardware applications of spacecraft.

  3. Liposomes as lubricants: beyond drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Ronit; Klein, Jacob

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we review recent work (Goldberg et al., 2011a,b) on a new use for phosphatidylcholine liposomes: as ultra-efficient boundary lubricants at up to the highest physiological pressures. Using a surface force balance, we have measured the normal and shear interactions as a function of surface separation between layers of hydrogenated soy phophatidylcholine (HSPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) adsorbed from dispersion, at both pure water and physiologically high salt concentrations of 0.15 M NaNO(3). Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy shows each surface to be coated by a close-packed HSPC-SUV layer with an over-layer of liposomes on top. The shear forces reveal strikingly low friction coefficients down to 2×10(-5) in pure water system or 6×10(-4) in the 150 mM salt system, up to contact pressures of at least 12 MPa (pure water) or 6 MPa (high salt), comparable with those in the major joints. This low friction is attributed to the hydration lubrication mechanism arising from rubbing of the highly hydrated phosphocholine-headgroup layers exposed at the outer surface of each liposome, and provides support for the conjecture that phospholipids may play a significant role in biological lubrication.

  4. Enhanced slippery behavior and stability of lubricating fluid infused nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Reeta; Ujjain, Sanjeev Kumar; Nagarajan, Arun Kumar; Khare, Krishnacharya

    2016-07-01

    Stability of lubricating fluid infused slippery surfaces is a concern for scientists and engineers and attempts are being made for its improvement. Lubricating oil coated slippery surface for aqueous drops is one of the important candidates in this class and their stability needs be improved to make them useful for practical applications. Cloaking of water drops with thin lubricant layer results in the loss of lubricant leading to deterioration of slippery behavior. Surface roughness or porosity provides larger surface area to the lubricating fluid and would to affect the stability of the lubricating film. Here we report the effect of surface roughness, from tens of nanometer to few microns, on the stability of slippery surface. Samples with small nanoscale roughness show improved performance in terms of contact angle hysteresis, critical tilt angle and slip velocity. Whereas large roughness samples show poorer performance compared to small nanoscale roughness and smooth samples. Small nanoscale roughness samples also show relatively slower deterioration against loss of lubricant during water flow. Once completely lost, the slippery behavior can be restored again simply by coating the sample again by the lubricating fluid.

  5. Lubrication Handbook For The Space Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtrey, Ernest L.

    1988-01-01

    A 458-page handbook covers many of solid and liquid lubricants used in space industry. Also useful reference in industrial and military applications of lubricants. Part A of handbook compilation of data on chemical and physical properties of over 250 solid lubricants, including bonded solid lubricants, dispersions, and composites. Part B covers over 250 liquid lubricants, greases, oils, compounds, and fluids.

  6. 41 CFR 101-26.602-1 - Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. 101-26.602-1 Section 101-26.602-1 Public Contracts and...-26.602-1 Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. (a) The Defense Fuel Supply Center will make annual procurements of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants for ground type...

  7. 41 CFR 101-26.602-1 - Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. 101-26.602-1 Section 101-26.602-1 Public Contracts and...-26.602-1 Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. (a) The Defense Fuel Supply Center will make annual procurements of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants for ground type...

  8. 41 CFR 101-26.602-1 - Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. 101-26.602-1 Section 101-26.602-1 Public Contracts and...-26.602-1 Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. (a) The Defense Fuel Supply Center will make annual procurements of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants for ground type...

  9. 41 CFR 101-26.602-1 - Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. 101-26.602-1 Section 101-26.602-1 Public Contracts and...-26.602-1 Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. (a) The Defense Fuel Supply Center will make annual procurements of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants for ground type...

  10. 41 CFR 101-26.602-1 - Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. 101-26.602-1 Section 101-26.602-1 Public Contracts and...-26.602-1 Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. (a) The Defense Fuel Supply Center will make annual procurements of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants for ground type...

  11. Lubrication of space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    NASA has many high-technology programs plannned for the future, such as the space station, Mission to Planet Earth (a series of Earth-observing satellites), space telescopes, and planetary orbiters. These missions will involve advanced mechanical moving components, space mechanisms that will need wear protection and lubrication. The tribology practices used in space today are primarily based on a technology that is more than 20 years old. The question is the following: Is this technology base good enough to meet the needs of these future long-duration NASA missions? This paper examines NASA's future space missions, how mechanisms are currently lubricated, some of the mechanism and tribology challenges that may be encountered in future missions, and some potential solutions to these future challenges.

  12. Shearing stability of lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  13. Lubricant Performance and Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    responds to changes in concentration of ferromagnetic wear debris. A 5-gallon capacity microfiltration test rig was constructed to simulate fine filtration ...in turbine engine lubrication systems. A wear test machine was used to generate wear particles in order to study the impact of fine filtration on...Chromatogram of 0-79-17E from Squires Oxidative Test at 2050C after 24 Hours 76 29 Log Molecular Weight of Compounds I, II, III, and PANA vs Gel Permeation

  14. Coating of plasma polymerized film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morita, S.; Ishibashi, S.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma polymerized thin film coating and the use of other coatings is suggested for passivation film, thin film used for conducting light, and solid body lubrication film of dielectrics of ultra insulators for electrical conduction, electron accessories, etc. The special features of flow discharge development and the polymerized film growth mechanism are discussed.

  15. Selective Surface Modification on Lubricant Retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2016-11-01

    While surface patterns are effective in improving tribological properties, nevertheless they alter the surface wettability, which will in turn affect the surface-lubricant interactions. When there is a shortage of lubricant on a patterned surface, the lubricant stored inside the cavities will be extracted to compensate the surface lubricant dissipation. Additionally, the lubricant retention effect provided by the cavities is competing with the release of the lubricant. With weak surface-lubricant interaction, the retention is limited. Therefore, the lubrication will have a sudden failure, giving a dramatic transition to abrasive wear. To improve the performance of polar lubricants on hydrophobic polymer surfaces, both topographical and selective surface modifications were incorporated on injection molded polypropylene surfaces. Distinctive lubrication improvement was observed when the surface structure density for the lubricant storage was high, and the release of the lubricant was controlled by the interaction with the selectively modified surfaces.

  16. Preventing mussel adhesion using lubricant-infused materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Shahrouz; Kolle, Stefan; Petrone, Luigi; Ahanotu, Onyemaechi; Sunny, Steffi; Sutanto, Clarinda N.; Hoon, Shawn; Cohen, Lucas; Weaver, James C.; Aizenberg, Joanna; Vogel, Nicolas; Miserez, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Mussels are opportunistic macrofouling organisms that can attach to most immersed solid surfaces, leading to serious economic and ecological consequences for the maritime and aquaculture industries. We demonstrate that lubricant-infused coatings exhibit very low preferential mussel attachment and ultralow adhesive strengths under both controlled laboratory conditions and in marine field studies. Detailed investigations across multiple length scales—from the molecular-scale characterization of deposited adhesive proteins to nanoscale contact mechanics to macroscale live observations—suggest that lubricant infusion considerably reduces fouling by deceiving the mechanosensing ability of mussels, deterring secretion of adhesive threads, and decreasing the molecular work of adhesion. Our study demonstrates that lubricant infusion represents an effective strategy to mitigate marine biofouling and provides insights into the physical mechanisms underlying adhesion prevention.

  17. Mechanism of frost formation on lubricant-impregnated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Anand, Sushant; Subramanyam, Srinivas Bengaluru; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2013-04-30

    Frost formation is a major problem affecting a variety of industries including transportation, power generation, construction, and agriculture. Currently used active chemical, thermal, and mechanical techniques of ice removal are time-consuming and costly. The use of nanotextured coatings infused with perfluorinated oil has recently been proposed as a simple passive antifrosting and anti-icing method. However, we demonstrate that the process of freezing subcooled condensate and frost formation on such lubricant-impregnated surfaces is accompanied by the migration of the lubricant from the wetting ridge and from within the textured substrate to the surface of frozen droplets. For practical applications, this mechanism can comprise the self-healing and frost-repelling characteristics of lubricant impregnated-surfaces, regardless of the underlying substrate's topography. Thus, further research is necessary to develop liquid-texture pairs that will provide a sustainable frost suppression method.

  18. Lubrication handbook for use in the space industry. Part A: Solid lubricants. Part B: Liquid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. E.; Thompson, M. B.

    1972-01-01

    This handbook provides a ready reference for many of the solid and liquid lubricants used in the space industry. Lubricants and lubricant properties are arranged systematically so that designers, engineers, and maintenance personnel in the space industry can conveniently locate data needed for their work. The handbook is divided into two major parts. Part A is a compilation of chemical and physical property data of more than 250 solid lubricants, bonded solid lubricants, dispersions and composites. Part B is a compilation of chemical and physical property data of more than 250 liquid lubricants, greases, oils, compounds and fluids. The listed materials cover a broad spectrum, from manufacturing and ground support to hardware applications for missiles and spacecraft.

  19. Physical Mechanisms of Failure, Ultralow Partial Pressure Lubrication, and the Reservoir Effect in MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, David Adam

    The aim of this work is to examine the effectiveness of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) coatings as long term lubrication coatings in microsystems, to examine the failure regimes of SAM coated devices, to examine the role of mobility in adsorbed lubricating films, and to examine evolution of the coefficient of friction of devices surrounded by ultralow partial pressures of alcohols up to saturation. Finally the role of self assembled monlayers in vapor phase lubrication is examined. Self-assembled monolayers are ubiquitous in fabrication of free-standing microdevices because of their ability to prevent release related and dormancy related stiction. However their ability to lubricate under sliding and normal contact conditions is not well documented. It can be shown that the energy dissipated per unit area in one sliding cycle due to friction is significant under general loading conditions. Therefore from an energy dissipated standpoint the bond energies of the silane molecules should not be enough to withstand even a short number of cycles. An extension of this is the energy imparted to the surface through a normal loading cycle through a loss of kinetic energy. It can also be shown that this is enough to break the silicon oxygen bonds however this is over a longer time scale than in sliding. Also there is an open question on the role of mobile and non-mobile adsorbed species on friction. Is the mobility of a molecule/layer on a surface an indicator of the effectiveness of the lubrication potential of the layer? Do submonolayer coverages of alcohols "lock-up" to contacting surfaces by disrupting non-corrogated potentials? Is there a distinct lowering of frictional forces at the formation of a monolayer? Controlled adsorption of mobile and non-mobile species on rubbing contacts is necessary to elucidate this physical relationship. To accomplish this one must take into account that friction measurements are highly scale dependant. Therefore to ensure the accuracy of

  20. How to evaluate solid lubricant films using a pin-on-disk tribometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Over the years, the author has evaluated and compared hundreds of solid lubricant films using a pin-on-disk tribometer. The intent of this paper is to describe to the reader experimental techniques and some of parameters that have been observed to be important for the evaluation and development of new solid lubricant films. Pin-on-disk tribometers will be described and discussed as will experimental methods for evaluating solid lubricant materials. Methods of preparing surfaces for the coating of the thin films and different methods for applying the films will be reviewed. Factors that affect solid lubricant performance will also be discussed. Two different macroscopic mechanisms of solid lubricant film wear exist. These will be characterized schematically, and methods of measuring wear will be examined.

  1. Molecular Study of Dynamic Behavior between Head and Ultrathin Lubricant Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangjun; Amemiya, Kensuke; Wong, Chee How; Yu, Shengkai; Liu, Bo

    The lubricant, perfluoropolyethers (PFPEs), has been modeled and analyzed using molecular dynamics simulations based on a coarse-grained bead-spring model. An ultrathin lubricant film with a thickness of 1-2 nm is coated on a disk to lubricate the head disk interface (HDI) of hard disk drives (HDDs). The retention performance of the lubricant film is studied, which is important to avoid a direct contact between the head and disk. The replenishment performance is also studied, which is essential to repair the lubricant film ruptured by a contact of the head. Finally, the typical phenomenon of touch down-take off hysteresis during the contact between head and disk is confirmed and analyzed because of the nanoscopic interactions in the HDI.

  2. KSC lubricant testing program. [lubrication characteristics and corrosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, B. J.; Bryan, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate the performance of various lubricants in use and considered for use at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The overall objectives of the program were to: (1) determine the lubrication characteristics and relative corrosion resistance of lubricants in use and proposed for use at KSC; (2) identify materials which may be equivalent to or better than KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC greases; and (3) identify or develop an improved lubricating oil suitable for use in liquid oxygen (LOX) pumps at KSC. It was concluded that: (1) earth gel thickened greases are very poor corrosion preventive materials in the KSC environment; (2) Halocarbon 25-5S and Braycote 656 were suitable substiutes for KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC respectively; and (3) none of the oils evaluated possessed the necessary inertness, lubricity, and corrosion prevention characteristics for the KSC LOX pumping systems in their present configuration.

  3. Process for preparing lubricating oil from used waste lubricating oil

    DOEpatents

    Whisman, Marvin L.; Reynolds, James W.; Goetzinger, John W.; Cotton, Faye O.

    1978-01-01

    A re-refining process is described by which high-quality finished lubricating oils are prepared from used waste lubricating and crankcase oils. The used oils are stripped of water and low-boiling contaminants by vacuum distillation and then dissolved in a solvent of 1-butanol, 2-propanol and methylethyl ketone, which precipitates a sludge containing most of the solid and liquid contaminants, unspent additives, and oxidation products present in the used oil. After separating the purified oil-solvent mixture from the sludge and recovering the solvent for recycling, the purified oil is preferably fractional vacuum-distilled, forming lubricating oil distillate fractions which are then decolorized and deodorized to prepare blending stocks. The blending stocks are blended to obtain a lubricating oil base of appropriate viscosity before being mixed with an appropriate additive package to form the finished lubricating oil product.

  4. A Preliminary Study on the Vapor/Mist Phase Lubrication of a Spur Gearbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo; Handschuh, Robert F.

    1999-01-01

    Organophosphates have been the primary compounds used in vapor/mist phase lubrication studies involving ferrous bearing material. Experimental results have indicated that the initial formation of an iron phosphate film on a rubbing ferrous surface, followed by the growth (by cationic diffusion) of a lubricious pyrophosphate-type coating over the iron phosphate, is the reason organophosphates work well as vapor/mist phase lubricants. Recent work, however, has shown that this mechanism leads to the depletion of surface iron atoms and to eventual lubrication failure. A new organophosphate formulation was developed which circumvents surface iron depletion. This formulation was tested by generating an iron phosphate coating on an aluminum surface. The new formulation was then used to vapor/mist phase lubricate a spur gearbox in a preliminary study.

  5. Combined solid and liquid lubrication of silicon nitride under boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayi, O. O.; Erdemir, A.; Hsieh, J. H.; Erck, R. A.; Fenske, G. R.

    1992-07-01

    The present study showed that an effective way of lubricating ceramic surfaces under boundary conditions both at room temperature and at high temperatures of 150 and 250 C was the combined effect of solid, i.e., soft metal-Ag, and liquid lubricants, i.e., polyol-ester-based synthetic oil. Compared to dry sliding of uncoated materials, oil-lubricated sliding of silver-coated silicon nitride surfaces resulted, for the conditions tested, in a decrease of the friction coefficient by a factor of 18 and of specific wear rate by more than four orders of magnitude. The Ag coating, which was formed in part by ion-beam-assisted deposition, was effective in preventing ceramic-to-ceramic contact under boundary-lubricated regimes. The only observed drawback was the occurrence of a chemical interaction between the Ag film and sulfur from the oil, which reduced the durability of the Ag film.

  6. Strain-tolerant ceramic coated seal

    DOEpatents

    Schienle, James L.; Strangman, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. An array of discontinuous grooves is laser machined into the outer surface of the solid lubricant surface layer making the coating strain tolerant.

  7. Friction of self-lubricating surfaces by ion beam techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, R. S.; Rai, A. K.

    1992-05-01

    UES, Inc. conducted a research and development program designed to establish conditions for ion implantation/mixing of suitable additives into the surfaces of bulk ceramics and metals for obtaining self-lubricating low friction and wear characteristics. The substrates considered were ZrO2, Al2O3, Si3N4, steel, and Ni-base superalloy. The lubricant additives chosen were BaF2/CaF2Ag, MoS2, WS2, and B2O3. The initial tasks of the program were to synthesis these lubricant compounds by co-implantation of constituent elements if sufficient beams of desired elements were obtained. The final tasks were to investigate high energy (MeV) ion mixing of deposited coatings as well as to investigate ion beam assisted deposition using low energy ion beams. It was shown that MoS2 can be synthesized by co-implantation of Mo(+) and S(+) in ceramic materials with appropriate choice of energies to obtain nearly overlapping depth profiles. The sliding life of DC magnetron sputtered MoS(2) films of thicknesses approximately 7500 A on ceramic materials such as sapphire, Si3N4 and ZrO3 were improved by ten to thousand fold after 2 Mev Ag(+) ion mixing. Ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) and ion beam mixing were utilized to fabricate self-lubricating coatings of CaF2/Ag and BaF/CaF2/Ag composites.

  8. Development and Implementation of Environmentally Compatible Solid Film Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.; Hall, Phillip B.

    1998-01-01

    Multi-body launch vehicles require the use of Solid Film Lubricants (SFLS) to allow for unrestricted relative motion between structural assemblies and components during lift-off and ascent into orbit. The Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), uses a dual coat, ceramic-bonded high temperature SFL in several locations such as restraint hardware between the SRB aft skirt and the Mobile Launch Platform (MLP), the aft SRB/External Tank (ET) attach struts, and the forward skirt SRB/ET attach ball assembly. Future launch systems may require similar applications of SFLs for attachment and restraint hardware. A family of environmentally compatible non-lead/antimony bearing alternative SFLs have been developed including a compatible repair material. In addition, commercial applications for SFLs on transportation equipment, all types of lubricated fasteners, and energy related equipment allow for wide usage's of these new lubricants. The new SFLs trade named BOOSTERLUBE is a family of single layer thin film (0.001 inch maximum) coatings that are a unique mixture of non-hazardous pigments in a compatible resin system that allows for low temperature curing (450F). Significant savings in energy and processing time as well as elimination of hazardous material usage and disposal would result from the non-toxic one-step SFL application. Compatible air-dry field repair lubricants will help eliminate disassembly of launch vehicle restraint hardware during critical time sensitive assembly operations.

  9. Development and Implementation of Environmentally Compatible Solid Film Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.; Hall, Phillip B.

    1997-01-01

    Multi-body launch vehicles require the use of Solid Film Lubricants (SFLs) to allow for unrestricted relative motion between structural assemblies and components during lift off and ascent into orbit. The Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), uses a dual coat, ceramic-bonded high temperature SFL in several locations such as restraint hardware between the SRB aft skirt and the Mobile Launch Platform (MLP), the aft SRB/External Tank (ET) attach struts, and the forward skirt SRB/ET attach ball assembly. The proposed National Launch System (NLS) may require similar applications of SFLs for attachment and restraint hardware. A family of environmentally compatible nonlead/antimony bearing alternative SFLs have been developed including a compatible repair material. In addition, commercial applications for SFLs on transportation equipment, all types of lubricated fasteners, and energy related equipment allow for wide usage of these new lubricants. The new SFLs named BOOSTERLUBE is a family of single layer thin film (0.001 inch maximum) coatings that are a unique mixture of non-hazardous pigments in a compatible resin system that allows for low temperature curing (450 F). Significant savings in energy and processing time as well as elimination of hazardous material usage and disposal would result from the non-toxic onestep SFL application. Compatible air-dry field repair lubricants will help eliminate disassembly of launch vehicle restraint hardware during critical time sensitive assembly operations.

  10. Development and Implementation of Environmentally Compatible Solid Film Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.; Hall, Phillip B.

    1999-01-01

    Multi-body launch vehicles require the use of Solid Film Lubricants (SFLs) to allow for unrestricted relative motion between structural assemblies and components during lift-off and ascent into orbit. The Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), uses a dual coat, ceramic-bonded high temperature SFL in several locations such as restraint hardware between the SRB aft skirt and the Mobile Launch Platform (MLP), the aft SRB/External Tank (ET) attach struts, and the forward skirt SRB/ET attach ball assembly. Future launch systems may require similar applications of SFLs for attachment and restraint hardware. A family of environmentally compatible non-lead/antimony bearing alternative SFLs have been developed including a compatible repair material. In addition, commercial applications for SFLs on transportation equipment, all types of lubricated fasteners, and energy related equipment allow for wide usage's of these new lubricants. The new SFLs trade named BOOSTERLUBE is a family of single layer thin film (0.001 inch maximum) coatings that are a unique mixture of non-hazardous pigments in a compatible resin system that allows for low temperature curing (450 F). Significant savings in energy and processing time as well as elimination of hazardous material usage and disposal would result from the non-toxic one-step SFL application. Compatible air-dry field repair lubricants will help eliminate disassembly of launch vehicle restraint hardware during critical time sensitive assembly operations.

  11. Development and Implementation of Environmentally Compatible Solid Film Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.; Hall, Phillip B.

    1998-01-01

    Multi-body launch vehicles require the use of Solid Film Lubricants (SFLS) to allow for unrestricted relative motion between structural assemblies and components during lift-off and ascent into orbit. The Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), uses a dual coat, ceramic-bonded high temperature SFL in several locations such as restraint hardware between the SRB aft skirt and the Mobile Launch Platform (MLP), the aft SRB/External Tank (ET) attach struts, and the forward skirt SRB/ET attach ball assembly. Future launch systems may require similar applications of SFLs for attachment and restraint hardware. A family of environmentally compatible non-lead/antimony bearing alternative SFLs have been developed including a compatible repair material. In addition, commercial applications for SFLs on transportation equipment, all types of lubricated fasteners, and energy related equipment allow for wide usage's of these new lubricants. The new SFLs trade named BOOSTERLUBE is a family of single layer thin film (0.001 inch maximum) coatings that are a unique mixture of non-hazardous pigments in a compatible resin system that allows for low temperature curing (450F). Significant savings in energy and processing time as well as elimination of hazardous material usage and disposal would result from the non-toxic one-step SFL application. Compatible air-dry field repair lubricants will help eliminate disassembly of launch vehicle restraint hardware during critical time sensitive assembly operations.

  12. Development and Implementation of Environmentally Compatible Solid Film Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.; Hall, Phillip B.

    1997-01-01

    Multi-body launch vehicles require the use of Solid Film Lubricants (SFLs) to allow for unrestricted relative motion between structural assemblies and components during lift off and ascent into orbit. The Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), uses a dual coat, ceramic-bonded high temperature SFL in several locations such as restraint hardware between the SRB aft skirt and the Mobile Launch Platform (MLP), the aft SRB/External Tank (ET) attach struts, and the forward skirt SRB/ET attach ball assembly. The proposed National Launch System (NLS) may require similar applications of SFLs for attachment and restraint hardware. A family of environmentally compatible nonlead/antimony bearing alternative SFLs have been developed including a compatible repair material. In addition, commercial applications for SFLs on transportation equipment, all types of lubricated fasteners, and energy related equipment allow for wide usage of these new lubricants. The new SFLs named BOOSTERLUBE is a family of single layer thin film (0.001 inch maximum) coatings that are a unique mixture of non-hazardous pigments in a compatible resin system that allows for low temperature curing (450 F). Significant savings in energy and processing time as well as elimination of hazardous material usage and disposal would result from the non-toxic onestep SFL application. Compatible air-dry field repair lubricants will help eliminate disassembly of launch vehicle restraint hardware during critical time sensitive assembly operations.

  13. Metal-containing lubricant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, M.W.; Kennedy, S.

    1987-05-12

    A lubricating oil composition is described comprising: a major amount of a lubricating oil; from 1 to 10 (wt)% of an ashless dispersant compound; or from 0.3 to 10 (wt)% of a nitrogen or ester containing polymeric viscosity index improver dispersant.

  14. Engine sealing and lubrication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1975-01-01

    Engine sealing programs are discussed which are directed toward the two major classes of engine seals: engine shaft seals and primary gas path seals. In addition, some concepts and results from fundamental lubrication research, as it pertains to the lubrication of bearings, are presented.

  15. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1982-01-01

    The isothermal elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) of a point contact was analyzed numerically by simultaneously solving the elasticity and Reynolds equations. In the elasticity analysis the contact zone was divided into equal rectangular areas, and it was assumed that a uniform pressure was applied over each area. In the numerical analysis of the Reynolds equation, a phi analysis (where phi is equal to the pressure times the film thickness to the 3/2 power) was used to help the relaxation process. The EHL point contact analysis is applicable for the entire range of elliptical parameters and is valid for any combination of rolling and sliding within the contact.

  16. Surface potential and resistance measurements for detecting wear of chemically-bonded and unbonded molecularly-thick perfluoropolyether lubricant films using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Palacio, Manuel; Bhushan, Bharat

    2007-11-01

    The wear of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) lubricants applied on Si(100) and an Au film on Si(100) substrate at ultralow loads was investigated by using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based surface potential and resistance measurements. Surface potential data is used in detecting lubricant removal and the initiation of wear on the silicon substrate. The surface potential change is attributed to the change in the work function of the silicon after wear, and electrostatic charge build-up of debris in the lubricant. It was found that coatings that are partially bonded, i.e., containing a mobile lubricant fraction, were better able to protect the silicon substrate from wear compared to the fully bonded coating. This enhanced protection is attributed to a lubricant replenishment mechanism. However, an untreated lubricant coating exhibited considerable wear as it contains a smaller amount of lubricant bonded to the substrate relative to the partially bonded and fully bonded coatings. A sample subjected to shear is shown to have improved wear resistance, and this enhancement is attributed to chain reorientation and alignment of the lubricant molecules. The detection of wear of PFPE lubricants on Au by an AFM-based resistance measurement method is demonstrated for the first time. This technique provides complementary information to surface potential data in detecting substrate exposure after wear and is a promising method for studying the wear of conducting films.

  17. Characterization of Lubricants on Ball Bearings by FT-IR Using an Integrating Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, K. W.; Pepper, S. V.; Wright, A. A.; Grady, B.

    2007-01-01

    Fourier Transform-Infrared reflectance microspectroscopy has been used extensively for the examination of coatings on nonplanar surfaces such as ball bearings. While this technique offers considerable advantages, practical application has many drawbacks, some of which are easily overcome by the use of integrating sphere technology. This paper describes the use of an integrating sphere for the quantification of thin layers of lubricant on the surface of ball bearings and the parameters which require optimization in order to obtain reliable data. Several applications of the technique are discussed including determination of lubricant load on 12.7 mm steel ball bearings and the examination of degraded lubricant on post mortem specimens.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of Ni60-hBN high temperature self-lubricating anti-wear composite coatings on Ti6Al4V alloy by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Yu, Peng-Cheng; Qiao, Shi-Jie; Zhai, Yong-Jie; Wang, Ming-Di; Chen, Yao; Xu, Dong

    2016-04-01

    Ni60-hBN composite coatings with varying hBN content were prepared on Ti6Al4V substrates by laser cladding. The composite coatings with no cracks and few pores are bonded metallurgically with the substrates. The phase composition and microstructure of the composite coatings were investigated. The tribological properties of the composite coatings were evaluated under dry sliding wear test conditions at 20 °C, 300 °C and 600 °C, respectively. The microhardness gradually increased from the bottom to the top of the coating and increased with increasing of hBN content. The laser clad Ni60-10%hBN coating exhibits excellent tribological behavior at high temperatures (300 °C and 600 °C).

  19. Research on Solid Lubrication Technologies for the Knuckles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z.; Ni, N.; Zhao, Z.

    The work in this paper focuses on the structure design and plating mechanism of the solid lubrication technologies for the knuckles of space exploring robots New types of coatings along with the optimal deposition processes and tribological performances on MoS 2 -based nanostructured lubrication are researched in-depth Furthermore the tribological performances physical and chemical characteristics are investigated deeply The main achievements are the following 1 According to the special space surroundings and other conditions including launch storage etc the tribological performances of MoS 2 -based nano-composite coatings prevailing presently all over the world are investigated and compared 2 A new type deposit technology-nano-composite unbalanced plasma plating NCUPP technology is developed successfully And the design ideas and techniques up to date international including nanometer technology multiphase composite materials functionally gradient materials reactive ion-beam depositing and unbalance conception are dissertated in detail Meanwhile the system and principles of NCUPP technology are studied concretely 3 The additives and structures of MoS 2 -based composite coatings and the materials of substrate are designed and optimized Based on the improvement of deposit processes and parameters the TiN-MoS 2 Ti multilayer coatings TiN-MoS 2 Ti TiN-MoS 2 TiN and TiAlN- MoS 2 TiAlN quasi-noncrystal coatings are deposited successfully And a set of deposit processes and coatings materials of the solid

  20. Lubrication of space systems: Challenges and potential solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    Future space missions will all require advanced mechanical moving components which will require wear protection and lubrication. The tribology practices used today are primarily based upon a technology base that is more than 20 years old. This paper will discuss NASA's future space missions and some of the mechanism tribology challenges that will be encountered. Potential solutions to these challenges using coatings technology will be assessed.

  1. Lubrication in the Drawing of Steel Cartridge Cases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1945-11-01

    end there was no necessity for etching in those cases. This technique had boon employed in wire drawing and at least one instance had been reported...another technique was borrowed from the wire drawing industry. Thoro had boon dovoloped a coppor dis- placement bath that gave a bright, adherent...Rust Coatings The use of rust as a drawing lubricant dates back several. centuries to the early days of development of the wire drawing art, V4 The

  2. Interdisciplinary Approach to Liquid Lubricant Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, P. M. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference of liquid lubricant technology are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) requirements and functions of liquid lubricants, (2) mineral oils, (3) greases, (4) theory of rheology, (5) mechanics and thermodynamics in lubrication, (6) environmental capability of liquid lubricants, and (7) wear corrosion and erosion.

  3. Automotive gear oil lubricant from soybean oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of lubricants that are based on renewable materials is rapidly increasing. Vegetable oils have good lubricity, wear protection and low volatility which are desired properties for automotive gear lubricant applications. Soybean oil is used widely in the lubricant industry due to its properti...

  4. 7 CFR 2902.46 - Forming lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Forming lubricants. 2902.46 Section 2902.46... Items § 2902.46 Forming lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication during... forming lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing...

  5. 7 CFR 3201.46 - Forming lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Forming lubricants. 3201.46 Section 3201.46... Designated Items § 3201.46 Forming lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication... preference for qualifying biobased forming lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the...

  6. 7 CFR 3201.46 - Forming lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Forming lubricants. 3201.46 Section 3201.46... Designated Items § 3201.46 Forming lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication... preference for qualifying biobased forming lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the...

  7. 7 CFR 3201.46 - Forming lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Forming lubricants. 3201.46 Section 3201.46... Designated Items § 3201.46 Forming lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication... preference for qualifying biobased forming lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the...

  8. Lubricant Rheology in Concentrated Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.

    1984-01-01

    Lubricant behavior in highly stressed situtations shows that a Newtonian model for lubricant rheology is insufficient for explanation of traction behavior. The oil film build up is predicted by using a Newtonian lubricant model except at high slide to roll ratios and at very high loads, where the nonNewtonian behavior starts to be important already outside the Hertzian contact area. Static and dynamic experiments are reported. In static experiments the pressure is applied to the lubricant more than a million times longer than in an EHD contact. Depending on the pressure-temperature history of the experiment the lubricant will become a crystallized or amorphous solid at high pressures. In dynamic experiments, the oil is in an amorphous solid state. Depending on the viscosity, time scale, elasticity of the oil and the bearing surfaces, the oil film pressure, shear strain rate and the type of lubricant, different properties of the oil are important for prediction of shear stresses in the oil. The different proposed models for the lubricant, which describe it to a Newtonian liquid, an elastic liquid, a plastic liquid and an elastic-plastic solid.

  9. Comparison of Ocular Lubricant Osmolalities.

    PubMed

    Bitton, Etty; Perugino, Carolyn; Charette, Stéphanie

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the osmolality of commercially available ocular tear lubricants. Thirty-seven (n = 37) ocular lubricants, measured three times each, were evaluated for osmolality using a vapor pressure osmometer (Wescor VAPRO 5520). The osmometer was calibrated before each use, and the order of the lubricants was randomized. Ambient temperature and humidity were monitored for stability. Of the 37 ocular lubricants tested, 35 (94.6%) had an osmolality of less than 295 mmol/kg, one (2.7%) had between 295 and 308 mmol/kg, and one (2.7%) had more than 308 mmol/kg. The ambient room temperature was stable and ranged from 21.9°C to 22.0°C, and the relative humidity ranged from 21.2% to 25.6% during experimentation. When ocular lubricants were grouped by ingredient (carboxymethylcellulose and hydroxylpropyl methylcellulose, hyaluronic acid, and hydroxypropyl guar), no significant difference in osmolality was noted between groups (Mann-Whitney U test, P > .05). The majority of the ocular lubricants tested had low osmolalities, mimicking the osmolarity of newly formed tears (295 to 300 mOsm/L). Several factors need to be considered when choosing a tear lubricant, which have more complex formulations than ever. Knowledge of their osmolality may be an added parameter to consider when choosing therapeutic options for dry eye.

  10. Carbon nanotube-MoS2 composites as solid lubricants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianfeng; Luster, Brandon; Church, Amelia; Muratore, Christopher; Voevodin, Andrey A; Kohli, Punit; Aouadi, Samir; Talapatra, Saikat

    2009-03-01

    Solid lubricants (SLs) characterized by low coefficients of friction (mu) and wear rates (w) drastically improve the life span of instruments that undergo extreme frictional wear. However, the performance of SLs such as sputtered or nanoparticulate molybdenum disulfide (MoS(2)), tungsten disulfide (WS(2)), or graphite deteriorates heavily under extreme operational conditions such as elevated temperatures and high humidity. Here, we present our preliminary results, which demonstrate that composites of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and MoS(2) produced by electrodeposition of MoS(2) on vertically aligned CNT films have low mu ( approximately 0.03) and w (approximately 10(-13) mm(3)/N.mm) even at 300 degrees C, which are about 2 orders of magnitude better than those of nanoparticulate MoS(2)-based coatings. The high load-bearing capacity of CNTs provides a strong enduring support to MoS(2) nanoclusters and is responsible for their ultralow w. The incorporation of these composites in liquid lubricants reduces the friction coefficient of the liquid lubricants by approximately 15%. The technique described here to produce SL coatings with extremely appealing frictional properties will provide valuable solutions for a variety of tribological applications where the coatings encounter high temperature, reduced pressure, and/or low- and high-humidity conditions.

  11. Green waxes, adhesives and lubricants.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Kong, X H; Ruan, M; Ma, F M; Jiang, Y F; Liu, M Z; Chen, Y; Zuo, X H

    2010-10-28

    General characteristics of waxes, adhesives and lubricants as well as the recent fundamental investigations on their physical and mechanical behaviour are introduced. The current R&D status for new type/generation of waxes, adhesives and lubricants from natural products is reviewed, with an emphasis on their tribological applications. In particular, some crucial issues and challenges relating to technological improvement and materials development are discussed. Based on the current predicted shortage of energy resources and environmental concerns, prospective research on the development of green waxes, adhesives and lubricants is suggested.

  12. Automotive Lubricant Specification and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, M. F.

    This chapter concerns commercial lubricant specification and testing, drawing together the many themes of previous chapters. Military lubricant standards were a very strong initial influence during World War II and led to the separate historical development of the North American and European specification systems. The wide range of functions that a successful lubricant must satisfy is discussed, together with issues of balancing special or universal applications, single or multiple engine tests, the philosophy of accelerated testing and the question of 'who sets the standards?' The role of engine tests and testing organisations is examined.

  13. Lubricant effects on bearing life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1986-01-01

    Lubricant considerations for rolling-element bearings have within the last two decades taken on added importance in the design and operation of mechanical systems. The phenomenon which limits the useful life of bearings is rolling-element or surface pitting fatigue. The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thickness which separates the ball or roller surface from those of the raceways of the bearing directly affects bearing life. Chemical additives added to the lubricant can also significantly affect bearings life and reliability. The interaction of these physical and chemical effects is important to the design engineer and user of these systems. Design methods and lubricant selection for rolling-element bearings are presented and discussed.

  14. Investigations of lubricant rheology as applied to elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, S.; Turchina, V.; Jakobsen, J.; Sanborn, D. M.; Winer, W. O.

    1973-01-01

    The pressure viscometer was modified to permit the measurement of viscosity at elevated pressures and shear stresses up to 5 x 10 to the 6th power N/sq m (720 psi). This shear stress is within a factor of three of the shear stress occurring in a sliding ehd point contact such as occurs in the ehd simulator. Viscosity data were taken on five lubricant samples, and it was found that viscous heating effects on the viscosity were predominant and not non-Newtonian behavior at the high shear stresses. The development of the infrared temperature measuring technique for the ehd simulator was completed, and temperature data for a set of operating conditions and one lubricant are reported. The numerical analysis of the behavior of nonlinear lubricants in the lubrication of rollers is reported.

  15. Piezoviscosity In Lubrication Of Nonconformal Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Yeau-Ren; Hamrock, Bernard J.; Brewe, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Developments in theory of lubrication. Analysis of piezoviscous-rigid regime of lubrication of two ellipsoidal contacts. Begins with Reynolds equation for point contact. Equation nondimensionalized using Roelands empirical formula and Dowson and Higginson formula. Equation solved numerically. Solutions obtained for full spectrum of conditions to find effects of dimensionless load, speed, parameters of lubricated and lubricating materials, and angle between direction of rolling and direction of entrainment of lubricant.

  16. Oil-mist lubrication handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book gives one sound working knowledge of the design, specifications, applications, and implementation of oil-mist lubrication systems for machine tools, pumps, electric motors, and other rotating equipment in the paper, pharmaceutical, steel, petrochemical, and similar process industries.

  17. Structural lubricity under ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cihan, Ebru; İpek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2016-01-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, physical mechanisms that govern friction are poorly understood. While a state of ultra-low friction, termed structural lubricity, is expected for any clean, atomically flat interface consisting of two different materials with incommensurate structures, some associated predictions could only be quantitatively confirmed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions so far. Here, we report structurally lubric sliding under ambient conditions at mesoscopic (∼4,000–130,000 nm2) interfaces formed by gold islands on graphite. Ab initio calculations reveal that the gold–graphite interface is expected to remain largely free from contaminant molecules, leading to structurally lubric sliding. The experiments reported here demonstrate the potential for practical lubrication schemes for micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, which would mainly rely on an atomic-scale structural mismatch between the slider and substrate components, via the utilization of material systems featuring clean, atomically flat interfaces under ambient conditions. PMID:27350035

  18. Self-lubricating composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two types of self lubricating composites (polymer matrix composites and inorganic composites) are discussed. Specific emphasis is given to the applicability of these composites in the aerospace industry.

  19. Environmentally friendly and biobased lubricants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biobased and environmentally friendly lubricants are finding applications in many areas ranging from hydraulic fluids to grease. They offer excellent biodegradability and very low ecotoxicity; high viscosity index; improved tribological properties; lower volatility and flash points relative to petro...

  20. Structural lubricity under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, Ebru; Ipek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2016-06-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, physical mechanisms that govern friction are poorly understood. While a state of ultra-low friction, termed structural lubricity, is expected for any clean, atomically flat interface consisting of two different materials with incommensurate structures, some associated predictions could only be quantitatively confirmed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions so far. Here, we report structurally lubric sliding under ambient conditions at mesoscopic (~4,000-130,000 nm2) interfaces formed by gold islands on graphite. Ab initio calculations reveal that the gold-graphite interface is expected to remain largely free from contaminant molecules, leading to structurally lubric sliding. The experiments reported here demonstrate the potential for practical lubrication schemes for micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, which would mainly rely on an atomic-scale structural mismatch between the slider and substrate components, via the utilization of material systems featuring clean, atomically flat interfaces under ambient conditions.

  1. Combination Thermal Barrier And Wear Coatings For Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weingart, Mike; Moller, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Thermal-barrier layers covered with self-lubricating surface layers. Zirconia thermal-barrier coat applied to surface of combustion chamber in engine by plasma-arc spraying. Then PS-200 plasma-arc sprayed onto zirconia. Self-lubricating coat prevents sliding contact between thermal barrier and piston ring, effectively preventing both wear and production of additional heat via friction. Other combinations of thermal-barrier and self-lubricating, wear-resistant coating materials used as long as two materials adhere to each other, applied by use of similar or compatible processes, have similar coefficients of thermal expansion, sufficiently strong at high temperatures, and affordable.

  2. Method for lubricating contacting surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Dugger, Michael T [Tijeras, NM; Ohlhausen, James A [Albuquerque, NM; Asay, David B [Boalsburg, PA; Kim, Seong H [State College, PA

    2011-12-06

    A method is provided for tribological lubrication of sliding contact surfaces, where two surfaces are in contact and in motion relative to each other, operating in a vapor-phase environment containing at least one alcohol compound at a concentration sufficiently high to provide one monolayer of coverage on at least one of the surfaces, where the alcohol compound continuously reacts at the surface to provide lubrication.

  3. Lubricant Evaluation and Performance 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    POWER DIRECTORATE WRIGHT LABORATORY AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND WRIGHT-PATrERSON AIR FORCE BASE , OHIO 45433-7103 94 5 10 011 NOTICE When government...INTRODUCTION I R DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED METHODS FOR MEASURING LUBRICANT PERFORMANCE 3 1 OXIDATIVE STABILITY OF ESTER BASE LUBRICANTS 3 a. Introduction 3 b...7) Conclusions 134 i. Stability Testing of Cyclophosphazene Based Fluids 134 (1) Introduction 134 (2) Effect of Metal Specimens 134 (3) Effect of a

  4. Miscibility of lubricants with refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    Pate, M.B.; Zoz, S.C.; Berkenbosch, L.J.

    1992-07-01

    Miscibility data is being obtained for a variety of non-CFC refrigerants and their potential lubricants. Ten different refrigerants and seven different lubricants are being investigated. Experiments are being performed in two phases: Phase I focuses on performing screening tests and Phase II consists of developing miscibility plots. The miscibility tests are being performed in a test facility consisting of a series of miniature test cells submerged in a constant temperature bath. The bath temperature can be precisely controlled over a temperature range of -50{degrees}C to 100{degrees}C. The test cells are constructed to allow for complete visibility of lubricant-refrigerant mixtures under all test conditions. Early in this reporting period, new procedures for charging the lubricant and refrigerant into the cells for testing were adopted. All of the refrigerants and all but one of the lubricants have been received from the manufacturers. Data obtained to date includes that for R-134a, R142b, R-32, R-134, R-125, and R-143a with four lubricants, namely, two esters and two polypropylene glycols.

  5. Effect of vaginal lubricants on natural fertility.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Anne Z; Long, D Leann; Tanner, Catherine; Herring, Amy H

    2012-07-01

    Over-the-counter vaginal lubricants have been shown to negatively affect in vitro sperm motility. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of vaginal lubricant use during procreative intercourse on natural fertility. Women aged 30-44 years with no history of infertility who had been trying to conceive for less than 3 months completed a baseline questionnaire on vaginal lubricant use. Subsequently, women kept a diary to record menstrual bleeding, intercourse, and vaginal lubricant use and conducted standardized pregnancy testing for up to 6 months. Diary data were used to determine the fertile window and delineate lubricant use during the fertile window. A proportional hazards model was used to estimate fecundability ratios with any lubricant use in the fertile window considered as a time-varying exposure. Of the 296 participants, 75 (25%) stated in their baseline questionnaire that they use vaginal lubricants while attempting to conceive. Based on daily diary data, 57% of women never used a lubricant, 29% occasionally used a lubricant, and 14% used a lubricant frequently. Women who used lubricants during the fertile window had similar fecundability to those women who did not use lubricants (fecundability ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 0.59-1.85) after adjusting for age, partner race, and intercourse frequency in the fertile window. Lubricants are commonly used by couples during procreative intercourse. Lubricant use during procreative intercourse does not appear to reduce the probability of conceiving.

  6. Effect of Vaginal Lubricants on Natural Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Anne Z.; Long, D. Leann; Tanner, Catherine; Herring, Amy H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Over-the-counter vaginal lubricants have been shown to negatively affect in vitro sperm motility. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of vaginal lubricant use during procreative intercourse on natural fertility. Methods Women aged 30–44 years with no history of infertility who had been trying to conceive for less than 3 months completed a baseline questionnaire on vaginal lubricant use. Subsequently, women kept a diary to record menstrual bleeding, intercourse, and vaginal lubricant use and conducted standardized pregnancy testing for up to 6 months. Diary data were used to determine the fertile window and delineate lubricant use during the fertile window. A proportional hazards model was used to estimate fecundability ratios with any lubricant use in the fertile window considered as a time-varying exposure. Results Of the 296 participants, 75 (25%) stated in their baseline questionnaire that they use vaginal lubricants while attempting to conceive. Based on daily diary data, 57% of women never used a lubricant, 29% occasionally used a lubricant, and 14% used a lubricant frequently. Women who used lubricants during the fertile window had similar fecundability to those women who did not use lubricants (fecundability ratio 1.05, 95% CI: 0.59, 1.85) after adjusting for age, partner race, and intercourse frequency in the fertile window. Conclusion Lubricants are commonly used by couples during procreative intercourse. Lubricant use during procreative intercourse does not appear to reduce the probability of conceiving. PMID:22914390

  7. Frictional anisotropy under boundary lubrication: effect of surface texture.

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O. O.; Erck, R. A.; Lorenzo-Martin, C.; Fenske, G. R.; Energy Systems

    2009-06-15

    The friction coefficient was measured under boundary lubrication with a ball-on-flat contact configuration in unidirectional sliding. The ball was smooth and hardened 52100 steel. Discs were made from case-carburized and hardened 4620, annealed 1080, and 1018 steels with directionally ground surfaces. A synthetic lubricant of stock polyalphaolefin was used for testing. During testing with each material, a frictional spike was observed whenever the ball slid parallel to the grinding ridge on the disc surface. The average friction coefficient for all tests was about 0.1, which is typical for the boundary lubrication regime. The magnitude of the frictional spikes, which reached as high as a friction coefficient of 0.25, and their persistence depended on the hardness of the disc surface. On the basis of elastohydrodynamic theory, coupled with the observation of severe plastic deformation on the ridges parallel to the sliding direction, the frictional spike could be due to localized plastic deformation on the disc surface at locations of minimal thickness for the lubricant fluid film. This hypothesis was further supported by lack of frictional spikes in tests using discs coated with a thin film of diamond-like carbon, in which plastic deformation is minimal.

  8. "Insensitive" to touch: fabric-supported lubricant-swollen polymeric films for omniphobic personal protective gear.

    PubMed

    Damle, Viraj G; Tummala, Abhishiktha; Chandrashekar, Sriram; Kido, Cassidee; Roopesh, Ajay; Sun, Xiaoda; Doudrick, Kyle; Chinn, Jeff; Lee, James R; Burgin, Timothy P; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2015-02-25

    The use of personal protective gear made from omniphobic materials that easily shed drops of all sizes could provide enhanced protection from direct exposure to most liquid-phase biological and chemical hazards and facilitate the postexposure decontamination of the gear. In recent literature, lubricated nanostructured fabrics are seen as attractive candidates for personal protective gear due to their omniphobic and self-healing characteristics. However, the ability of these lubricated fabrics to shed low surface tension liquids after physical contact with other objects in the surrounding, which is critical in demanding healthcare and military field operations, has not been investigated. In this work, we investigate the depletion of oil from lubricated fabrics in contact with highly absorbing porous media and the resulting changes in the wetting characteristics of the fabrics by representative low and high surface tension liquids. In particular, we quantify the loss of the lubricant and the dynamic contact angles of water and ethanol on lubricated fabrics upon repeated pressurized contact with highly absorbent cellulose-fiber wipes at different time intervals. We demonstrate that, in contrast to hydrophobic nanoparticle coated microfibers, fabrics encapsulated within a polymer that swells with the lubricant retain the majority of the oil and are capable of repelling high as well as low surface tension liquids even upon multiple contacts with the highly absorbing wipes. The fabric supported lubricant-swollen polymeric films introduced here, therefore, could provide durable and easy to decontaminate protection against hazardous biological and chemical liquids.

  9. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 1; Introduction and Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1996-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction and historical background to the field of tribology, especially solid lubrication and lubricants and sets them in the perspective of techniques and materials in lubrication. Also, solid and liquid lubrication films are defined and described.

  10. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications: Introduction and Background. Revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction and historical background to the field of tribology, especially solid lubrication and lubricants and sets them in the perspective of techniques and materials in lubrication. Also, solid and liquid lubrication films are defined and described.

  11. Pulsed Plasma Lubrication Device and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor); Bickler, Donald B. (Inventor); D'Agostino, Saverio A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a lubrication device comprising a solid lubricant disposed between and in contact with a first electrode and a second electrode dimensioned and arranged such that application of an electric potential between the first electrode and the second electrode sufficient to produce an electric arc between the first electrode and the second electrode to produce a plasma in an ambient atmosphere at an ambient pressure which vaporizes at least a portion of the solid lubricant to produce a vapor stream comprising the solid lubricant. Methods to lubricate a surface utilizing the lubrication device in-situ are also disclosed.

  12. Boundary cartilage lubrication: review of current concepts.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Matej

    2014-03-01

    Effective lubrication of synovial joints is important to prevent cartilage degeneration and to keep the joints healthy. This paper sets out the basics of engineering lubrication with respect to the composition and properties of synovial fluid constituents. Two basic types of boundary lubrication are discussed: the presence of highly hydrophilic proteoglycans that provide a water liquid film, and the existence of multilamellar phospholipids lubricating layers at the surface ofarticular cartilage. Based on current knowledge, we may conclude that no single mechanism of boundary lubrication exists, and that effective boundary lubrication of synovial joints is maintained by the synergic effect of all synovial fluid constituents.

  13. Equations For Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication Of Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1993-01-01

    Equation for thickness of elastohydrodynamic (EHD) lubricant film in rolling-element bearing reduced to simplified form involving only inside and outside diameters of bearing, speed of rotation, parameter related to type of lubricant, and viscosity of lubricant at temperature of bearing. In addition, experimentally derived graph of EHD-film-thickness-reduction factor as function of contact-lubricant-flow number. Accounts for lubricant starvation within Hertzian contact. Graph relating ratio of minimum film thickness to composite roughness of bearing surfaces and to lubrication-life correction factor also provided. Life-correction factor used to determine resultant life of bearing.

  14. Equations For Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication Of Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1993-01-01

    Equation for thickness of elastohydrodynamic (EHD) lubricant film in rolling-element bearing reduced to simplified form involving only inside and outside diameters of bearing, speed of rotation, parameter related to type of lubricant, and viscosity of lubricant at temperature of bearing. In addition, experimentally derived graph of EHD-film-thickness-reduction factor as function of contact-lubricant-flow number. Accounts for lubricant starvation within Hertzian contact. Graph relating ratio of minimum film thickness to composite roughness of bearing surfaces and to lubrication-life correction factor also provided. Life-correction factor used to determine resultant life of bearing.

  15. Binding and lubrication of biomimetic boundary lubricants on articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Samaroo, Kirk J; Tan, Mingchee; Putnam, David; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2017-03-01

    The glycoprotein, lubricin, is the primary boundary lubricant of articular cartilage and has been shown to prevent cartilage damage after joint injury. In this study, a library of eight bottle-brush copolymers were synthesized to mimic the structure and function of lubricin. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) grafted onto a polyacrylic acid (pAA) core mimicked the hydrophilic mucin-like domain of lubricin, and a thiol terminus anchored the polymers to cartilage surfaces much like lubricin's C-terminus. These copolymers, abbreviated as pAA-g-PEG, rapidly bound to cartilage surfaces with binding time constants ranging from 20 to 39 min, and affected lubrication under boundary mode conditions with coefficients of friction ranging from 0.140 ± 0.024 to 0.248 ± 0.030. Binding and lubrication were highly correlated (r(2)  = 0.89-0.99), showing that boundary lubrication in this case strongly depends on the binding of the lubricant to the surface. Along with time-dependent and dose-dependent behavior, lubrication and binding of the lubricin-mimetics also depended on copolymer structural parameters including pAA backbone length, PEG side chain length, and PEG:AA brush density. Polymers with larger backbone sizes, brush sizes, or brush densities took longer to bind (p < 0.05). Six of the eight polymers reduced friction relative to denuded cartilage plugs (p < 0.05), suggesting their potential to lubricate and protect cartilage in vivo. In copolymers with shorter pAA backbones, increasing hydrodynamic size inhibited lubrication (p < 0.08), while the opposite was observed in copolymers with longer backbones (p < 0.05). These polymers show similar in vitro lubricating efficacy as recombinant lubricins and as such have potential for in vivo treatment of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:548-557, 2017.

  16. High temperature solid lubricant materials for heavy duty and advanced heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    DellaCorte, C.; Wood, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature sterling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. The following paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis to heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  17. Evaluation of replacement thread lubricants for red lead and graphite in mineral oil

    SciTech Connect

    Jungling, T.L.; Rauth, D.R.; Goldberg, D.

    1998-04-30

    Eight commercially available thread lubricants were evaluated to determine the best replacement for Red Lead and Graphite in Mineral Oil (RLGMO). The evaluation included coefficient of friction testing, high temperature anti-seizing testing, room temperature anti-galling testing, chemical analysis for detrimental impurities, corrosion testing, off-gas testing, and a review of health and environmental factors. The coefficient of friction testing covered a wide variety of factors including stud, nut, and washer materials, sizes, manufacturing methods, surface coatings, surface finishes, applied loads, run-in cycles, and relubrication. Only one lubricant, Dow Corning Molykote P37, met all the criteria established for a replacement lubricant. It has a coefficient of friction range similar to RLGMO. Therefore, it can be substituted directly for RLGMO without changing the currently specified fastener torque values for the sizes, materials and conditions evaluated. Other lubricants did not perform as well as Molykote P37 in one or more test or evaluation categories.

  18. Mechanically Tunable Slippery Behavior on Soft Poly(dimethylsiloxane)-Based Anisotropic Wrinkles Infused with Lubricating Fluid.

    PubMed

    Roy, Pritam Kumar; Pant, Reeta; Nagarajan, Arun Kumar; Khare, Krishnacharya

    2016-06-14

    We demonstrate a novel technique to fabricate mechanically tunable slippery surfaces using one-dimensional (anisotropic) elastic wrinkles. Such wrinkles show tunable topography (amplitude) on the application of mechanical strain. Following Nepenthes pitcher plants, lubricating fluid infused solid surfaces show excellent slippery behavior for test liquid drops. Therefore, combining the above two, that is, infusing suitable lubricating fluid on elastic wrinkles, would enable us to fabricate mechanically tunable slippery surfaces. Completely stretched (flat) wrinkles have uniform coating of lubricating fluid, whereas completely relaxed (full amplitude) wrinkles have most of the lubricating oil in the wrinkle grooves. Therefore, water drops on completely stretched surface show excellent slippery behavior, whereas on completely relaxed surface they show reduced slippery behavior. Therefore, continuous variation of wrinkle stretching provides reversibly tunable slippery behavior on such a system. Because the wrinkles are one-dimensional, they show anisotropic tunability of slippery behavior depending upon whether test liquid drops slip parallel or perpendicular to the wrinkles.

  19. High Temperature Solid Lubricant Materials for Heavy Duty and Advanced Heat Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, C.; Wood, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature Stirling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines, and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. This paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis on heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  20. Interferometry study of aqueous lubrication on the surface of polyelectrolyte brush.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Motoyasu; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Minn, Myo; Sugimura, Joichi; Takahara, Atsushi

    2014-11-26

    The water lubrication behavior of a polyelectrolyte brush was investigated by using double-spacer-layer ultra-thin-film interferometry to determine the thickness of the aqueous lubrication layer present at the interface between the brush and a spherical glass lens. A hydrophilic poly{[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride} brush was prepared on an optical glass disk coated with layers of semireflective chromium and silica. The thickness of the hydrodynamic lubrication layer was estimated interferometrically. On increasing the sliding velocity from 10(-5) to 10(-1) m·s(-1), the gap between the rotating disk and loading sphere glass lens showed a marked increase to 130 nm at 2×10(-2) m·s(-1), and the friction coefficient simultaneously decreased to 0.01-0.02, indicating that the polyelectrolyte brush promoted the formation of a fluid lubrication layer that separates the rubbing surfaces, preventing direct contact and providing a low friction coefficient.

  1. Lubricator valve apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, R. T.

    1984-10-16

    A lubricator valve assembly comprises a reciprocably rotatable ball valve which is operated between open and closed positions solely through the selective application of control pressures and/or tubing pressure above the valve to a double acting sleeve type actuating piston. One end of the actuating piston has a valving piston formed thereon which cooperates with a seal bore in the housing to effect the opening or closing of a bypass fluid passage extending from a region below the ball valve to a region above the ball valve. Such valving piston also functions as part of a lost motion connection between the actuating sleeve piston and a reciprocable actuator for rotating the ball valve. In opening the ball valve, the valving piston first moves upwardly to establish a fluid bypass around the closed ball valve and then establishes contact with the actuator to rotate the ball valve to an open position. The same fluid bypass may be utilized to pump through fluid around the closed ball valve by applying fluid pressure above the ball valve. Improved sealing elements for the ball valve are also provided.

  2. The experimental evaluation and application of high-temperature solid lubricants. Ph.D. Thesis - Case Western Reserve Univ., 1989 Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    A research program is described which developes an understanding of high-temperature solid lubrication and experimental techniques through the development of a composite lubricant coating system. The knowledge gained through this research was then applied to a specific engineering challenge, the tribology of a sliding seal for hypersonic flight vehicles. The solid lubricant coating is a chromium carbide based composite combined with silver, which acts as a low temperature lubricant, and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic, which acts as a high-temperature lubricant. This composite coating provides good wear resistance and low friction for sliding contacts from room temperature to over 900 C in reducing or oxidative environments. The specific research on this coating included a composition screening using a foil gas bearing test rig and the use of thin silver films to reduce initial wear using a pin-on-disk test rig. The chemical stability of the materials used was also addressed. This research indicated that soft metallic films and materials which become soft at elevated temperatures are potentially good lubricants. The general results from the experiments with the model solid lubricant coating were then applied to a sliding seal design concept. This seal design requires that a braided ceramic fabric slide against a variety of metal counterface materials at temperatures from 25 to 850 C in an oxidative environment. A pin-on-disk tribometer was used to evaluate the tribological properties of these materials and to develop lubrication techniques. The results indicate that these seal materials must be lubricated to prevent wear and reduce friction. Thin films of silver, gold and calcium fluoride provided lubrication to the sliding materials.

  3. Nanocomposite Antifriction Coatings for Innovative Tribotechnical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtanskii, D. V.; Bondarev, A. V.; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, F. V.; Levashov, E. A.

    2015-11-01

    Different approaches to formation of hard multicomponent coatings with improved tribological characteristics in a wide temperature range are considered. It is shown that deposition of a thin surface layer or introduction of additional structural components into nanocomposite coatings, which play the role of a solid lubricant, lowers substantially the friction factor and increases the wear resistance

  4. Silica Lubrication in Faults (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. D.; Rempe, M.; Lamothe, K.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; White, J. C.; Mitchell, T. M.; Andrews, M.; Di Toro, G.

    2013-12-01

    Silica-rich rocks are common in the crust, so silica lubrication may be important for causing fault weakening during earthquakes if the phenomenon occurs in nature. In laboratory friction experiments on chert, dramatic shear weakening has been attributed to amorphization and attraction of water from atmospheric humidity to form a 'silica gel'. Few observations of the slip surfaces have been reported, and the details of weakening mechanism(s) remain enigmatic. Therefore, no criteria exist on which to make comparisons of experimental materials to natural faults. We performed a series of friction experiments, characterized the materials formed on the sliding surface, and compared these to a geological fault in the same rock type. Experiments were performed in the presence of room humidity at 2.5 MPa normal stress with 3 and 30 m total displacement for a variety of slip rates (10-4 - 10-1 m/s). The friction coefficient (μ) reduced from >0.6 to ~0.2 at 10-1 m/s, but only fell to ~0.4 at 10-2 - 10-4 m/s. The slip surfaces and wear material were observed using laser confocal Raman microscopy, electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Experiments at 10-1 m/s formed wear material consisting of ≤1 μm powder that is aggregated into irregular 5-20 μm clumps. Some material disaggregated during analysis with electron beams and lasers, suggesting hydrous and unstable components. Compressed powder forms smooth pavements on the surface in which grains are not visible (if present, they are <100 nm). Powder contains amorphous material and as yet unidentified crystalline and non-crystalline forms of silica (not quartz), while the worn chert surface underneath shows Raman spectra consistent with a mixture of quartz and amorphous material. If silica amorphization facilitates shear weakening in natural faults, similar wear materials should be formed, and we may be able to identify them through microstructural studies. However, the sub

  5. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOEpatents

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  6. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, J.; Viola, M. B.

    2013-10-31

    This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

  7. Top-of-Rail lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Alzoubi, M. F.; Fenske, G. R.; Erck, R. A.; Boparai, A. S.

    2000-07-14

    Analysis of the volatile and semivolatile fractions collected after use of the TOR lubricant indicated that other than contaminants in the collection laboratory, no compounds on the EPA's Target Compound Lists (Tables 2 and 5) were detected in these fractions. The data of these qualitative analyses, given in the various tables in the text, indicate only the relative amounts of the tentatively identified compounds. The authors recommend that quantitative analysis be performed on the volatile and semivolatile fractions to allow confirmation of the tentatively identified compounds and to obtain absolute amounts of the detected compounds. Additionally, the semivolatile fraction should be analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify compounds that are not chromatographable under the temperature program used for determination of semivolatile compounds. Introducing the top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant into the wheel/rail interface results in a reduction of almost 60% of lateral friction force over the forces encountered under dry conditions. This reveals good potential for energy savings, as well as wear reduction, for railroad companies. In TOR lubrication, an increase in the angle of attack and axle load results in increased lateral friction and rate of lubricant consumption. The most efficient TOR lubricant quantity to be used in the wheel/rail interface must be calculated precisely according to the number of cars, axle loads, train speed, and angle of attack.

  8. Investigations of lubricant rheology as applied to elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, S.; Winer, W. O.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of lubricant shear rheological behavior in the amorphous solid region and near the liquid-solid transition are reported. Elastic, plastic and viscous behavior was observed. A shear rheological model based on primary laboratory data is proposed for concentrated contact lubrication. The model is a Maxwell model modified with a limiting shear stress. Three material properties are required: low shear stress viscosity, limiting elastic shear modulus, and the limiting shear stress the material can withstand. All three are functions of temperature and pressure. In applying the model to EHD contacts the predicted response possesses the characteristics expected from several experiments reported in the literature.

  9. Bio-based lubricants for numerical solution of elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupu, Dedi Rosa Putra; Sheriff, Jamaluddin Md; Osman, Kahar

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a programming code to provide numerical solution of elastohydrodynamic lubrication problem in line contacts which is modeled through an infinite cylinder on a plane to represent the application of roller bearing. In this simulation, vegetable oils will be used as bio-based lubricants. Temperature is assumed to be constant at 40°C. The results show that the EHL pressure for all vegetable oils was increasing from inlet flow until the center, then decrease a bit and rise to the peak pressure. The shapes of EHL film thickness for all tested vegetable oils are almost flat at contact region.

  10. Tribological performance evaluation of oil mist lubrication

    SciTech Connect

    Shamim, A.; Kettleborough, C.F. )

    1994-09-01

    In this research work, the tribological performance of oil mist lubrication (pure mist), as applied to rolling element bearings, was investigated. In the first part of this research, tests were conducted to compare the performances of oil mist and conventional oil sump lubrication in terms of operating temperature and friction with variation of load and speed. In the second part, the two methods of lubrication were compared directly under endurance test conditions. The oil mist lubricated high-precision angular contact test bearings ran cooler by about 10 C. Also, the oil mist lubricated bearings had about 25 percent less friction. In the third part, endurance tests were conducted to investigate the influence of oil mist lubrication on the life of rolling element bearings. Weibull and maximum likelihood analysis of the endurance test data indicated that, in addition to savings in energy, oil mist lubrication provides better wear and fatigue protection to the test bearings compared to conventional sump lubrication.

  11. Method For Testing Properties Of Corrosive Lubricants

    DOEpatents

    Ohi, James; De La Cruz, Jose L.; Lacey, Paul I.

    2006-01-03

    A method of testing corrosive lubricating media using a wear testing apparatus without a mechanical seal. The wear testing apparatus and methods are effective for testing volatile corrosive lubricating media under pressure and at high temperatures.

  12. Metalworking corrosion inhibition/drawing lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, H.F.; Wantling, S.J.

    1980-05-06

    A metalworking lubricant composition is disclosed which is effective as both a corrosion inhibitor and drawing lubricant and comprises a mineral oil and an additive combination of barium lanolate soap and barium sulfonate.

  13. 14 CFR 33.39 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... operate. In wet sump engines, this requirement must be met when only one-half of the maximum lubricant... allow installing a means of cooling the lubricant. (c) The crankcase must be vented to the atmosphere to...

  14. 14 CFR 33.39 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... operate. In wet sump engines, this requirement must be met when only one-half of the maximum lubricant... allow installing a means of cooling the lubricant. (c) The crankcase must be vented to the atmosphere to...

  15. 14 CFR 33.39 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... operate. In wet sump engines, this requirement must be met when only one-half of the maximum lubricant... allow installing a means of cooling the lubricant. (c) The crankcase must be vented to the atmosphere to...

  16. Effect of vaginal lubricants on natural fertility.

    PubMed

    Mesen, Tolga B; Steiner, Anne Z

    2014-06-01

    Vaginal lubricants are commonly utilized to facilitate more comfortable and enjoyable intercourse. The impact of these lubricants on fertility is unclear. The aim of this review is to summarize the current in-vitro and clinical data pertaining to lubricants' effect on natural conception. In-vitro studies suggest lubricants can be toxic to sperm in the artificial laboratory environment. Lubricants formulated to be nontoxic to sperm have no effect on sperm motility or viability in vitro compared to controls. However, a recent longitudinal cohort study suggests lubricant use and choice has no effect of fecundity. As a result of the conflicting in-vitro and clinical data, the effect of vaginal lubricants on fertility is still unresolved. A randomized controlled trial is needed to determine the effects of vaginal lubricants on fertility.

  17. 14 CFR 33.39 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... operate. In wet sump engines, this requirement must be met when only one-half of the maximum lubricant... allow installing a means of cooling the lubricant. (c) The crankcase must be vented to the atmosphere to...

  18. Preliminary Results of Cleaning Process for Lubricant Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenmann, D.; Brasche, L.; Lopez, R.

    2006-03-06

    Fluorescent penetrant inspection (FPI) is widely used for aviation and other components for surface-breaking crack detection. As with all inspection methods, adherence to the process parameters is critical to the successful detection of defects. Prior to FPI, components are cleaned using a variety of cleaning methods which are selected based on the alloy and the soil types which must be removed. It is also important that the cleaning process not adversely affect the FPI process. There are a variety of lubricants and surface coatings used in the aviation industry which must be removed prior to FPI. To assess the effectiveness of typical cleaning processes on removal of these contaminants, a study was initiated at an airline overhaul facility. Initial results of the cleaning study for lubricant contamination in nickel, titanium and aluminum alloys will be presented.

  19. Preliminary Results of Cleaning Process for Lubricant Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenmann, D.; Brasche, L.; Lopez, R.

    2006-03-01

    Fluorescent penetrant inspection (FPI) is widely used for aviation and other components for surface-breaking crack detection. As with all inspection methods, adherence to the process parameters is critical to the successful detection of defects. Prior to FPI, components are cleaned using a variety of cleaning methods which are selected based on the alloy and the soil types which must be removed. It is also important that the cleaning process not adversely affect the FPI process. There are a variety of lubricants and surface coatings used in the aviation industry which must be removed prior to FPI. To assess the effectiveness of typical cleaning processes on removal of these contaminants, a study was initiated at an airline overhaul facility. Initial results of the cleaning study for lubricant contamination in nickel, titanium and aluminum alloys will be presented.

  20. Compilation of diamond-like carbon properties for barriers and hard coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Outka, D.A.; Hsu, Wen L.; Boehme, D.R.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Ottesen, D.K.; Johnsen, H.A.; Clift, W.M.; Headley, T.J.

    1994-02-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is an amorphous form of carbon which resembles diamond in its hardness, lubricity, and interest for hardness, lubricity, and resistance to chemical attack. Such properties make DLC of use in barrier and hard coating technology. This report examines a variety of properties of DLC coatings which are relevant to its use as a protective coating. This includes examining substrates on which DLC coatings can be deposited; the resistance of DLC coatings to various chemical agents; adhesion of DLC coatings; and characterization of DLC coatings by electron microscopy, FTIR, sputter depth profiling, stress measurements, and nanoindentation.

  1. Grit Blasting Scribes Coats For Tests Of Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.

    1991-01-01

    Grit-blasting technique for cutting line gaps in paints, hard coats, lubricants, and other coating films undergoing development. Line gaps cut in chevron patterns, groups of parallel lines, or other prescribed patterns, in preparation for testing adhesions of coats to substrates by attempting to peel patterned areas off with adhesive tapes. Damage to substrate reduced.

  2. Grit Blasting Scribes Coats For Tests Of Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.

    1991-01-01

    Grit-blasting technique for cutting line gaps in paints, hard coats, lubricants, and other coating films undergoing development. Line gaps cut in chevron patterns, groups of parallel lines, or other prescribed patterns, in preparation for testing adhesions of coats to substrates by attempting to peel patterned areas off with adhesive tapes. Damage to substrate reduced.

  3. Coatings for high-temperature bearings and seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1987-01-01

    Criteria are discussed for predicting the probable lubricating ability of candidate solid materials from a consideration of their basic chemical and physical properties. The properties considered to be important in the model are thermochemical potential, adhesion, low hardness, plasticity, yield strength in shear, and brittle-to-ductile transition characteristics. A review of the selection and tribological testing of materials, which were selected for use in self-lubricating composite coatings by employing this model, is given. Two series of plasma-sprayed coatings with good tribological properties over a wide temperature spectrum are described. The PS 100 series of coatings contain oxidatively stable solid lubricants in a nichrome matrix. The PS 200 series contains the same solid lubricants in a very wear resistant metal-bonded chromium carbide matrix. Examples are given of applications of these coatings in high speed shaft seals, sliding contact bearings, and Stirling engine cylinder liners.

  4. Materials: A compilation. [considering metallurgy, polymers, insulation, and coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Technical information is provided for the properties and fabrication of metals and alloys, as well as for polymeric materials, such as lubricants, coatings, and insulation. Available patent information is included in the compilation.

  5. Lubricants for High-Vacuum Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-15

    systems. Thus, contacting metal surfaces that might not require lubrication in atmospheric conditions may require antiseize lubricants to prevent cold ...not as susceptible to the " cold -welding" phenomenon as are metals. There are two categories of systems in which ultrahigh- vacuum lubricants are...requires proper consideration of lubricant specification to prevent cold -welding, to promote low torque noise performance, and to ensure adequate

  6. Cationic polymer lubricant (CPL): A new bond and mobile boundary lubricant with self-healing capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Erik Hsiao

    The boundary film formation and lubrication effects of low-molecular-weight silicone molecules with cationic side groups were studied. Poly-(N,N,N-trimethylamine-3- propylmethylsiloxane-co-dimethylsiloxane) iodide was synthesized and deposited on silicon oxide surfaces to form a bound-and-mobile lubricant film. The effects of the ionically bound layer and mobile multilayers were investigated. Both nano- and macro-scale tribological tests revealed superior lubrication performance of the silicon molecule with cationic side chains over the neutral silicon molecule (which was modeled with polydimethylsiloxane with the same molecule weight). The multilayer films exhibited characteristic topographic features due to ionic interactions within the polymeric film. In the macro-scale, the effects of ionic content, environmental condition, and advantage of the bound layer on self-healing will be discussed to demonstrate the wear resistance and selfhealing capability. The multilayer spreading rates were estimated to be ~10-11 m2/s. In the nanoscale, the results of disjoining pressure and viscosity measurements help understand the lateral spreading of the mobile layer and identify the mobile species. The mobile species are the reduced tertiary amine form of CPL. The hydrophobic but hygroscopic properties of CPL are also investigated with SFG and ATR-IR. The CPL-coated surfaces are hydrophobic which prevents the detrimental effects of humidity on wear of silicon. In addition, the hygroscopic nature of CPL allows humidity to be absorbed into the film, which enhances the self-healing capabilities. Finally, by texturing the silicon surface with nanowells, self-healing is enhanced when the nanowells are filled with CPL. The nanowells serve as CPL reservoirs that are readily available for self-healing within the wear track for faster cycle intervals. However, the nanowells deteriorate the self-healing from surrounding the contact region due to the refilling of the empty nanowells.

  7. Lubricants and Their Environmental Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betton, C. I.

    Environmental considerations have increased in importance in the last two decades and lubricants are part of that. The REACH Regulations apply to the components of lubricants. About 50% of a lubricant can be reclaimed using refining processes ranging from acid/clay treatment through to distillation/hydrogenation to produce up to Gp. II quality re-refined base oils. The major possible contaminants are the PAHs, which are effectively removed by optimised distillation/hydrogenation, metals, remnants of VI improvers, water and untreated acids. Sulphur contents of these base oils must be viewed differently from those of virgin mineral base oils. Certain PAHs are recognised carcinogens and pose a health and safety risk and must be controlled. The use of re-refined base oils is driven by the concept of 'sustainability', to minimise pollution and maximise the use of resources.

  8. Engineering Lubrication in Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  9. Engineering lubrication in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    McNary, Sean M; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-04-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  10. Lubrication of rolling-element bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The lubrication of rolling element bearings is surveyed. Emphasis is on the critical design aspects related to speed, temperature, and ambient pressure environment. Types of lubrication including grease, jets, mist, wick, and through the race are discussed. The historical development, present state of technology, and the future problems of rolling element bearing lubrication are discussed.

  11. 14 CFR 33.39 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lubrication system. 33.39 Section 33.39... system. (a) The lubrication system of the engine must be designed and constructed so that it will... supply is in the engine. (b) The lubrication system of the engine must be designed and constructed to...

  12. Research on Liquid Lubricants for Space Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jansen, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Four research areas at the NASA Glenn Research Center involving the tribology of space mechanisms are highlighted. These areas include: soluble boundary lubrication additives for perfluoropolyether liquid lubricants, a Pennzane dewetting phenomenon, the effect of ODC-free bearing cleaning processes on bearing lifetimes and the development of a new class of liquid lubricants based on silahydrocarbons.

  13. 7 CFR 3201.38 - Firearm lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Firearm lubricants. 3201.38 Section 3201.38... Designated Items § 3201.38 Firearm lubricants. (a) Definition. Lubricants that are designed for use in firearms to reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, and to keep the weapon...

  14. 7 CFR 2902.38 - Firearm lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Firearm lubricants. 2902.38 Section 2902.38... Items § 2902.38 Firearm lubricants. (a) Definition. Lubricants that are designed for use in firearms to reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, and to keep the weapon clean and...

  15. 7 CFR 3201.38 - Firearm lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Firearm lubricants. 3201.38 Section 3201.38... Designated Items § 3201.38 Firearm lubricants. (a) Definition. Lubricants that are designed for use in firearms to reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, and to keep the weapon...

  16. 7 CFR 3201.38 - Firearm lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Firearm lubricants. 3201.38 Section 3201.38... Designated Items § 3201.38 Firearm lubricants. (a) Definition. Lubricants that are designed for use in firearms to reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, and to keep the weapon...

  17. 7 CFR 2902.38 - Firearm lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Firearm lubricants. 2902.38 Section 2902.38... Items § 2902.38 Firearm lubricants. (a) Definition. Lubricants that are designed for use in firearms to reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, and to keep the weapon clean and...

  18. Research on liquid lubricants for space mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jansen, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    Four research areas at the NASA Lewis Research Center involving the tribology of space mechanisms are highlighted. These areas include: soluble boundary lubrication additives for perfluoropolyether liquid lubricants, a Pennzane dewetting phenomenon, the effect of ODC-free bearing cleaning processes on bearing lifetimes, and the development of a new class of liquid lubricants based on silahydrocarbons.

  19. New Vapor/Mist Phase Lubricant Formulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo; Handschuh, Robert F.

    1999-01-01

    To meet the increased thermal stresses of future advanced aircraft engines, new lubricants will have to be developed to replace the currently used ester-based liquid lubricants. If a suitable conventional replacement cannot be found, a different lubrication method will have to be used. The conventional method circulates bulk lubricant (stored in a sump) through a lubricating system containing cooling and filtering elements. Solid lubricants have been studied as a replacement for bulk liquid lubricants, and have been found to provide reasonable lubrication for lightly loaded systems. Solid lubricants, however, have proved inadequate for highly loaded, high-speed applications. Vapor/mist phase lubrication (VMPL), on the other hand, may be a viable alternative. VMPL has been used successfully to lubricate high-temperature bearings or gears. It can be used as an emergency backup system or as the primary source of lubrication. With VMPL, minimal weight is added to the system and minimal debris is formed. It works over a wide temperature range.

  20. New Vapor/Mist Phase Lubricant Formulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo; Handschuh, Robert F.

    1999-01-01

    To meet the increased thermal stresses of future advanced aircraft engines, new lubricants will have to be developed to replace the currently used ester-based liquid lubricants. If a suitable conventional replacement cannot be found, a different lubrication method will have to be used. The conventional method circulates bulk lubricant (stored in a sump) through a lubricating system containing cooling and filtering elements. Solid lubricants have been studied as a replacement for bulk liquid lubricants, and have been found to provide reasonable lubrication for lightly loaded systems. Solid lubricants, however, have proved inadequate for highly loaded, high-speed applications. Vapor/mist phase lubrication (VMPL), on the other hand, may be a viable alternative. VMPL has been used successfully to lubricate high-temperature bearings or gears. It can be used as an emergency backup system or as the primary source of lubrication. With VMPL, minimal weight is added to the system and minimal debris is formed. It works over a wide temperature range.

  1. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for medical...

  2. Research on liquid lubricants for space mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jansen, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    Four research areas at the NASA Lewis Research Center involving the tribology of space mechanisms are highlighted. These areas include: soluble boundary lubrication additives for perfluoropolyether liquid lubricants, a Pennzane dewetting phenomenon, the effect of ODC-free bearing cleaning processes on bearing lifetimes, and the development of a new class of liquid lubricants based on silahydrocarbons.

  3. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for medical...

  4. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for medical...

  5. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for medical...

  6. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for medical...

  7. Multifunctional lubricant additives and compositions thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Farng, L.O.; Horodysky, A.G.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses an antioxidant/ antiwear/extreme pressure/load carrying lubricant composition. It comprises a major proportion of an oil of lubricating viscosity or grease or other solid lubricant prepared therefrom and a minor amount of an ashless multifunctional antioxidant/antiwear/extreme pressure/load carrying additive product comprising a thiophosphate derived from a dihydrocarbyl dithiocarbamate.

  8. Properties of dry film lubricants prepared by spray application of aqueous starch-oil composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aqueous dispersions of starch-soybean oil (SBO) and starch-jojoba oil (JO) composites, prepared by excess steam jet cooking, form effective dry film lubricants when applied as thick coatings to metal surfaces by doctor blade. This application method necessitates long drying times, is wasteful, requ...

  9. Problems in Bearings and Lubrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    tj +1.75 :6 6 el..7 224.6 +k.tk 7 12 235.2 236.0 +.34. .-. 06 .4405x10- 3 0.05139 0.4276 131.8 133.7 +1.e44 Speed plus J1 .J54, ’ 8.1 .94 𔃻.96 caso 5...Lubricants Re- search Laboratory, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio , TX, Report AFLRL No. 102, (AD-A062792), 1978. S S 20-5 Tabie 1 Test lubricant

  10. High-Temperature Solid Lubricants Developed by NASA Lewis Offer Virtually "Unlimited Life" for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is capitalizing on breakthroughs in foil air bearing performance, tribological coatings, and computer analyses to formulate the Oil-free Turbomachinery Program. The program s long-term goal is to develop an innovative, yet practical, oil-free aeropropulsion gas turbine engine that floats on advanced air bearings. This type of engine would operate at higher speeds and temperatures with lower weight and friction than conventional oil-lubricated engines. During startup and shutdown, solid lubricant coatings are required to prevent wear in such engines before the self-generating air-lubrication film develops. NASA s Tribology Branch has created PS304, a chrome-oxide-based plasma spray coating specifically tailored for shafts run against foil bearings. PS304 contains silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic (BaF2/CaF2) lubricant additives that, together, provide lubrication from cold start temperatures to over 650 C, the maximum use temperature for foil bearings. Recent lab tests show that bearings lubricated with PS304 survive over 100 000 start-stop cycles without experiencing any degradation in performance due to wear. The accompanying photograph shows a test bearing after it was run at 650 C. The rubbing process created a "polished" surface that enhances bearing load capacity.

  11. Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, Richard J.

    1993-04-08

    In our second year of funding we began the testing phase of a number of new classes of lubricants. Three different testing collaborations have already begun and a fourth one is In the works with Dr. Stephen Hsu of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Dr. Hsu also plans to test some of the same materials for us that Shell Development is studying. With Dr. Bill Jones of NASA, we are studying the effects of branching an high temperature lubricant properties in perfluoropolyethers, Initially Bill Jones is comparing the lubrication and physical properties of perfluorotetraglyme and the following two spherical perfluoropolyethers, Note that one contains a fluorocarbon chain and the other one contains a fluorocarbon ether chain. The synthesis of these was reported in the last progress report. With Professor Patricia Thiel of Iowa State University, we are working on studies of perfluoromethylene oxide ethers and have prepared a series of four of these polyethers to study in collaboration with her research group. These perfluoromethylene oxide ethers have the best low temperature properties of any known lubricants. Thiel's group is studying their interactions with metals under extreme conditions. Thirdly, we have also begun an Interaction with W. August Birke of Shell Development Company in Houston for whom we have already prepared samples of the chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyether lubricants whose structures appear on page 54 of our research proposal. Each of these four structures is thought to have potential as lubricant additives to motor oils. We also have underway syntheses of other fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants. These new materials which are also promising as antifriction additives for motor oils appear ahead of the perfluoro additives as Appendix I to the progress report. Additionally for Birke and Shell Development we have at their request prepared the novel compound perfluoro salicylic acid. This synthesis was suggested by the

  12. Tribology and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The future use of fuel-efficient, low-emission, advanced transportation systems (for example, those using low-heat-rejection diesel engines or advanced gas turbines) presents new challenges to tribologists and materials scientists. High service temperatures, corrosive environments, and extreme contact pressures are among the concerns that make necessary new tribological designs, novel materials, and effective lubrication concepts. Argonne is working on methods to reduce friction, wear and corrosion, such as soft metal coatings on ceramics, layered compounds, diamond coatings, and hard surfaces.

  13. Experimental Analysis of Damping and Tribological Characteristics of Nano-CuO Particle Mixed Lubricant in Ball Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, E.; Sivakumar, K.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental analysis of damping capacity and tribological characteristics of nano CuO added Servosystem 68 lubricant is attempted. CuO nano particles were synthesized by aqueous precipitation method and characterized. Prior to dispersion into lubricant, CuO nano particles were coated with 0.2 wt.% surfactant (Span-80) to stabilize the nano fluid. Tribological characteristics of particle added lubricant were tested in ASTM D 4172 four ball wear tester. Scanning electron microscopy test results of worn surfaces of nano CuO particle added lubricant were smoother than base lubricant. The particle added lubricant was applied in a new ball bearing and three defected ball bearings. When particle added lubricant was used, the ball defected bearing's vibration amplitude was reduced by 21.94% whereas it was 16.46% for new bearing and was ≤ 11% for other defected bearings. The formation of protection film of CuO over ball surface and regime of full film lubrication near the ball zone were observed to be reason for improved damping of vibrations.

  14. Self lubrication of bitumen froth in pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, D.D.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper I will review the main properties of water lubricated pipelines and explain some new features which have emerged from studies of self-lubrication of Syncrudes` bitumen froth. When heavy oils are lubricated with water, the water and oil are continuously injected into a pipeline and the water is stable when in a lubricating sheath around the oil core. In the case of bitumen froth obtained from the Alberta tar sands, the water is dispersed in the bitumen and it is liberated at the wall under shear; water injection is not necessary because the froth is self-lubricating.

  15. The plasma generated and photons emitted in an oil-lubricated sliding contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Keiji

    2007-02-01

    Intensive work has long been going on to find out the unknown origin that sets off curious tribo-physicochemical phenomena and that causes various kinds of problems in oil-lubricated sliding contacts in mechanical and processing systems. The strange tribochemical reaction is one of the such curious chemical phenomena observed in the degradation of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) lubricating oil film in a hard disk drive. Plasma (triboplasma) (Nakayama and Mirza 2006 Tribol. Trans. 49 17) would be one of the most probable origins of the problems if it were generated sufficiently intensely in oil-lubricated sliding contacts, as it is in such a highly energetic state. The generation of plasma was predicted in both dry and oil-lubricated sliding (Nakayama 1997 Japan. J. Tribol. 42 1077, Nakayama 2004 Surf. Coat. Technol. 188-189 599). However, plasma generation in industrially important oil-lubricated contacts has not yet been proven, though it has been found in dry sliding (Nakayama and Nevshupa 2002 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 35 L53). Here the author reports the discovery of the predicted plasma generated in the rear part of an oil-lubricated sliding contact, together with a new finding on photon emission phenomena from inside and outside of the sliding contact in the tribosystem of a diamond pin sliding against a sapphire disc. The plasma in oil-lubricated sliding has a simple ellipse shape, while that in dry sliding has a horseshoe pattern. Visible and infrared (IR) photons are emitted from oil-lubricated sliding contact, while ultraviolet (UV), visible and IR photons are emitted from the region of plasma generation as well as from dry sliding. The UV photon spectra emitted under oil-lubrication completely coincided with those in dry sliding and air discharge, demonstrating that plasma is generated by air discharge even under oil-lubrication. Two kinds of new concepts have been proposed. One is plasma generation by discharge of air through bubble formation in decompressed

  16. Lubricant Selection Manual, Phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Lowry, J. A.; Dufrane, K. F.

    1991-01-01

    Future spacecraft must be designated to operate for very long time periods in space. For example, a target goal for the Space Station is 30 years of operation. Although the actual life may be significantly less than this optimistic goal, the life will certainly be a critical issue in design. The bearings on primary components such as the alpha and beta joints must obviously be designed and lubricated with the objective of optimum performance life. In addition to these joints, there will be numerous other tribological (rubbing or rolling) interfaced that will be required to function for the life of the spacecraft. A major key to adequate performance of tribological interface is proper lubrication. Lubricants can be divided into two basic classes: solid films and liquids. Both types have been used extensively in space applications. Both have advantages and disadvantages that must be carefully considered in their selection. The purpose here is to summarize selection criteria for liquid and solid lubricants applied to long-life spacecraft.

  17. Perfluorinated polyalkylether based lubricant composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, T.I.; Kaufman, J.; Kratzer, R.H.; Nakahara, J.H.; Paciorek, K.J.

    1980-03-25

    A description is given of a lubricant composition comprising a perfluorinated polyalkylether base fluid and a minor amount of a diphospha-striazine in which the two phosphorus atoms are substituted by aromatic groups and the carbon atom is substituted by a perfluoroalkyl or perfluoroalkylether moiety.

  18. Biobased lubricants via ruthenium catalysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The development of effective lubricants from natural oils is an ongoing mission. A few of the efforts have led to some promise, but many others have led elsewhere. An alternative approach to the direct use of natural oils may be needed. The drop-in replacement strategy allows industry to utilize mon...

  19. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  20. Longevity Of Dry Film Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Stockwell, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes evaluation of dry film lubricants candidate for use in rotary joints of proposed Space Station. Study included experiments and theoretical analyses focused on longevity of sputtered molybdenum disulfide films and ion-plated lead films under conditions partially simulating rolling contact.

  1. Automotive Cooling and Lubricating Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This correspondence course, originally developed for the Marine Corps, is designed to provide new mechanics with a source of study materials to assist them in becoming more proficient in their jobs. The course contains four study units covering automotive cooling system maintenance, cooling system repair, lubricating systems, and lubrication…

  2. Analysis and self-lubricating treatment of porous anodic alumina film formed in a compound solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Yi, Hongzhan; Wang, Haowei

    2005-12-01

    A porous anodic film on aluminum was prepared in a mixed electrolyte of phosphoric acid and organic acid and cerium salt, and ultrasonic impregnation technology was applied on it to form self-lubricating surface composite. The structure and chemical composition of the film and its lubricity after self-lubricating treatment were investigated in detail. EPMA indicates the cross-section of anodized film has two distinct oxide layers. Al, O and P are found in the film with different distribution in the two layers. XPS analysis on the electron binding energy of the component elements show the chemical composition of film surface are Al 2O 3, Ce(OH) and some phosphates. The structure of anodized film is amorphous with XRD analysis. The tribological tests shows the frictional coefficient of the self-lubricating surface composite coating is 0.25, much lower than anodized aluminum and aluminum substrate, which is about 0.55 and 0.85, respectively, and it is also durable for a long period of time in comparison with the lubricating coating fabricated by hot-dipping method. SEM images show some PTFE particles are added into the nanoholes of anodic oxide film.

  3. Applying robotic technology to the solid film lubricant burnishing operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fureigh, M.L.

    1984-02-01

    The PUMA 260, a programmable robot, has been used to burnish up to 22 different parts coated with solid film lubricant in the Painting Department. Some other parts also are potential candidates for robotic applications. Robot technology can reduce the burnishing operation standard hours and relieve workers' fatigue and strain as well as produce more uniform part-to-part quality. Using VAL, the versatile computer program language for PUMA 260, the process engineer can define the optimum robot burnishing actions and speeds for each part.

  4. Torque characteristics of solid lubricated precision bearings during oscillatory motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Reinhold; Fleischauer, Paul D.

    1994-01-01

    MoS2 sputter-coated as well as uncoated (bare) angular-contact ball bearings were tested with various cage materials in a low-speed regime. Various self-lubricating polymers either neat or with additives and metallic cages were tested. The emphasis of this paper is to report on significant torque increases torque bumps observed during non-ball overlap, oscillatory motion for some race/cage combinations. In some race/cage combinations torque bumps can be minimized by proper run-in. No attempt was made to run the bearings to failure, although certain race/cage combinations did in fact fail before the end of test.

  5. Lubricant evaluation of the alpha and beta joints, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Stockwell, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    A research study was conducted to evaluate dry film lubrication of long life space components such as the alpha and beta joints of the Space Station. The problem addressed in the report pertains to the longevity of sputtered MoS2 or ion plated lead films in a rolling contact environment. A special technique was devised for the experiments, which incorporated a coated ball cyclically loaded against a flat plate. At fixed intervals the surface of the coating was photographed at 100X magnification. By computer scanning the photographs, the rate of coating loss was determined. Experimental variables include load and surface finish of the plate. A theory was developed to analyze the state of stress between ball and flat. The stress condition in the ball apparatus was related to the state of stress under rolling contact conditions. Based on the experiments life appeared to decrease with increasing load and increasing surface roughness. An ion plated lead film gave better life than a sputtered MoS2 film. However, by keeping the interfacial shear stress at a low level, adequate coating life was achieved for either coating. For the lead film, the critical stress was about 0.19 GPa (28 ksi). The study dealt only with mechanical wear. Before a coating is selected for a critical space application, other factors such as reaction with atomic oxygen must also be considered.

  6. Investigations of lubricant rheology as applied to elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, R. K.; Nagaraj, H. S.; Sanborn, D. M.; Winer, W. O.

    1975-01-01

    Traction prediction in sliding elastohydrodynamic (EHD) contacts was examined along with an elastohydrodynamic lubrication simulation of the effects of load and speed on temperatures in the EHD contact. An existing shear stress theory and lubricant rheological model were studied and evaluated by applying them to traction prediction. Results obtained using measured film thickness and surface temperature data, were compared with measured traction values. The infrared technique for measuring temperatures in an EHD contact was further developed and ball surface and fluid temperatures are reported for sliding speeds of 0.35 to 5.08 m/s at 0.52 to 2.03 GN/sq m maximum pressure and surface roughnesses of .011 to .381 micrometers c.1.a. The relationship between asperity interaction, as measured by relocation surface profilimetry and high frequency temperature measurements, and the ratio of film thickness to surface roughness was also studied.

  7. USDOE Top-of-Rail Lubricant Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mohumad F. Alzoubi; George R. Fenske; Robert A. Erck; Amrit S. Boparai

    2002-02-01

    Lubrication of wheel/rail systems has been recognized for the last two decades as a very important issue for railroads. Energy savings and less friction and wear can be realized if a lubricant can be used at the wheel/rail interface. On the other hand, adverse influences are seen in operating and wear conditions if improper or excessive lubrication is used. Also, inefficiencies in lubrication need to be avoided for economic and environmental reasons. The top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant concept was developed by Texaco Corporation to lubricate wheels and rails effectively and efficiently. Tranergy Corporation has been developing its SENTRAEN 2000{trademark} lubrication system for the last ten years, and this revolutionary new high-tech on-board rail lubrication system promises to dramatically improve the energy efficiency, performance, safety, and track environment of railroads. The system is fully computer-controlled and ensures that all of the lubricant is consumed as the end of the train passes. Lubricant quantity dispensed is a function of grade, speed, curve, and axle load. Tranergy also has its LA4000{trademark} wheel and rail simulator, a lubrication and traction testing apparatus. The primary task of this project was collecting and analyzing the volatile and semivolatile compounds produced as the lubricant was used. The volatile organic compounds were collected by Carbotrap cartridges and analyzed by adsorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The semivolatile fraction was obtained by collecting liquid that dripped from the test wheel. The collected material was also analyzed by GC/MS. Both of these analyses were qualitative. The results indicated that in the volatile fraction, the only compounds on the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund List of Analytes detected were contaminants either in the room air or from other potential contamination sources in the laboratory. Similarly, in the semivolatile fraction none of the detected

  8. Lubricant Supply from Crystal Boundaries of Perpendicular Magnetic Disk Evaluated by Lateral Modulation Friction Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Shojiro; Takahashi, Yuuzi; Wang, Mei; Saitoh, Tadashi; Matsunuma, Satoshi

    2004-11-01

    The tribological behavior of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) films attached to perpendicular recording magnetic disks coated with diamondlike carbon (DLC) was studied in lateral vibration wear tests using lateral modulus friction force microscopy (LM-FFM). The viscoelastic and frictional properties of these PFPE films without heat cure were improved due to the lubricant supply by tip sliding. However, the PFPE films were easily removed with increasing load and lateral vibration amplitude following heat treatment since the free lubricants on the films solidified resulting in the lost of fluidity.

  9. Identifying lubricant options for compressor bearing designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnaz, J.; Seeton, C.; Dixon, L.

    2017-08-01

    Today’s refrigeration and air conditioning market is not only driven by the environmental aspects of the refrigerants, but also by the energy efficiency and reliability of system operation. Numerous types of compressor designs are used in refrigeration and air conditioning applications which means that different bearings are used; and in some cases, multiple bearing types within a single compressor. Since only one lubricant is used, it is important to try to optimize the lubricant to meet the various demands and requirements for operation. This optimization entails investigating different types of lubricant chemistries, viscosities, and various formulation options. What makes evaluating these options more challenging is the refrigerant which changes the properties of the lubricant delivered to the bearing. Once the lubricant and refrigerant interaction are understood, through various test methods, then work can start on collaborating with compressor engineers on identifying the lubricant chemistry and formulation options. These interaction properties are important to the design engineer to make decisions on the adequacy of the lubricant before compressor tests are started. This paper will discuss the process to evaluate lubricants for various types of compressors and bearing design with focus on what’s needed for current refrigerant trends. In addition, the paper will show how the lubricant chemistry choice can be manipulated through understanding of the bearing design and knowledge of interaction with the refrigerant to maximize performance. Emphasis will be placed on evaluation of synthetic lubricants for both natural and synthetic low GWP refrigerants.

  10. Optimum Me-DLC coatings and hard coatings for tribological performance[Diamond-Like Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.L.; Kao, W.H.

    2000-02-01

    In this study, hard coatings (TiN, TiCN, CrN, and CrCN) and Me-DLC coatings (Ti{sub x%}-C:H and Cr{sub x%}-C:H) were deposited on tungsten carbide (WC) substrate by multiarc physical vapor deposition (MAPVD) and unbalanced magnetron (UBM) sputtering, respectively. Counterbodies of the AISI 1045 steel cylinder and the AA7075T65l aluminum cylinder were used in the cylinder-on-disk, line-contact wear mode under dry condition; a counterbody of the AISI 51200 steel ball was used in the ball-on-disk, point-contact wear mode, under both dry and lubricated conditions. All wear tests were conducted with a reciprocating machine. After the tests, the most suitable coating for various counterbodies and test environments was selected. For the coating/1045 steel cylinder, the Ti{sub 10%}-C:H coating possesses excellent tribological characteristics. For the coating/7075T651 aluminum cylinder, hard coatings display excellent wear resistance. For the coating/steel ball, CrCN and CrN coatings display very little wear under both dry and lubricated conditions. On TiN and TiCN coatings, special wear mechanisms of material transfer, adhesion wear, and fatigue fracture occurred during initial tests under kerosene lubrication.

  11. Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants. Progress report, April 1992--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, R.J.

    1993-04-01

    Synthesis and testing was begun on a number of new classes of lubricants: perfluoropolyethers (branching effects), perfluoromethylene oxide ethers, chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyethers, fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants, glycerine- based perfluoropolyesters, perfluoro epoxy ether chains, etc.

  12. Effect of lubricant on the reliability of dental implant abutment screw joint: An in vitro laboratory and three-dimension finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Fan, Hongyi; Ma, Ruiyang; Chen, Hongyu; Li, Zhi; Yu, Haiyang

    2017-06-01

    Biomechanical factors play a key role in the success of dental implants. Fracture and loosening of abutment screws are major issues. This study investigated the effect of lubricants on the stability of dental implant-abutment connection. As lubricants, graphite and vaseline were coated on the abutment screw surface, respectively, and a blank without lubricant served as the control. The total friction coefficient (μtot), clamping force, fatigue behavior and detorque of the joint combined with dynamic cyclic loading were measured under different lubricating conditions. Further, a three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to investigate stress distribution, in conjunction with experimental images. The results showed that the lubricant reduced μtot, which in turn led to an increase in clamping force. Decrease in loading increased the fatigue life of the screw. However, use of lubricant at high load reduced the fatigue life. Ductile fracture at the first thread of the screw was the chief failure mode, which was due to maximum von Mises stress. Higher stress levels occurred in the lubricant groups. Lubricated screws resulted in lower detorque which made the joint easier to loosen. In conclusion, the lubricant cannot effectively improve the reliability of dental implant-abutment connection. Keeping the interfaces of implant-screw uncontaminated and strengthening the surface of the screw may be recommend for clinical operation and future design. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Environmental assessment of ester-based lubricants after application.

    PubMed

    Erlenkaemper, Bibiane; Bugiel, Christoph; Brecher, Christian; Werth, Sabrina; Eisentraeger, Adolf

    2008-01-01

    Lubricants based on renewable resources are an environmentally friendly alternative to petrochemical products due to their better ecotoxicological performance and their excellent biodegradability. To improve the technical performance of lubricants, and to reduce friction and wear, the use of additives is nowadays obligatory. The collaborative research center SFB 442 aims at developing environmentally acceptable lubricants that facilitate the avoidance of these additives by transferring their function to suitable coatings. For a complete assessment of the ecological performance of these newly developed lubricants, the whole life cycle including production, application as well as disposal and fate in the environment is studied. In the following study the focus was on the application and its influence on the environmental behavior of the lubricant. The application of lubricants leads, among other things, to the intake of metals due to abrasion from tools, work pieces or mechanical components. Previous examinations indicated a possible influence of metals on the toxicity of eluates prepared from used lubricants (Erlenkaemper et al. 2005). To clarify if the apparent toxicity of used lubricants solely results from the intake of metals, the extractability of these metals from the oil matrix is determined. By combining chemical analyses with bioassays, the bioavailability of metals that are present in the extract is estimated. To further investigate the relevance of metals on toxicity, toxic units (TU) were calculated and related to the results of the bioassays. Interactions between the metals were investigated with aqueous mixtures of metal chlorides and calculations based on the concept of concentration addition and independent action. A lubricant mixture was applied to a tribological test bench that simulates real conditions of use and extremely short time load, respectively. Samples were taken at particular times, water soluble fractions (WSF) of these fluids were

  14. Biofluid lubrication for artificial joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendleton, Alice Mae

    This research investigated biofluid lubrication related to artificial joints using tribological and rheological approaches. Biofluids studied here represent two categories of fluids, base fluids and nanostructured biofluids. Base fluids were studied through comparison of synthetic fluids (simulated body fluid and hyaluronic acid) as well as natural biofluids (from dogs, horses, and humans) in terms of viscosity and fluid shear stress. The nano-structured biofluids were formed using molecules having well-defined shapes. Understanding nano-structured biofluids leads to new ways of design and synthesis of biofluids that are beneficial for artificial joint performance. Experimental approaches were utilized in the present research. This includes basic analysis of biofluids' property, such as viscosity, fluid shear stress, and shear rate using rheological experiments. Tribological investigation and surface characterization were conducted in order to understand effects of molecular and nanostructures on fluid lubrication. Workpiece surface structure and wear mechanisms were investigated using a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. The surface topography was examined using a profilometer. The results demonstrated that with the adding of solid additives, such as crown ether or fullerene acted as rough as the other solids in the 3-body wear systems. In addition, the fullerene supplied low friction and low wear, which designates the lubrication purpose of this particular particle system. This dissertation is constructed of six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction to body fluids, as mentioned earlier. After Chapter II, it examines the motivation and approach of the present research, Chapter III discusses the experimental approaches, including materials, experimental setup, and conditions. In Chapter IV, lubrication properties of various fluids are discussed. The tribological properties and performance nanostructured biofluids are

  15. Performance Of Perfluoropolyalkylether Lubricant System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K.; Masuda, S.; Lin, Wen-Huey; Bierschenk, T.; Kawa, H.; Juhlke, T.; Lagow, R.

    1995-01-01

    Perfluoro-polyalkylethers (PFPAE) constitute class of fluids having characteristics of high thermal oxidative stability, good vicosity-temperature characteristics, good elastohydrodynamic film-forming capabilities, low volatility, and non-flammability. One unfortunate drawback PFPAE causes severe metal corrosion and fluid degradation when used in oxidizing atmosphere. Reports of interest deal with synthesis of PFPAE-type liquids and development of additive to reduce oxidizing atmosphere degradation. Properties and molecular structures reported in detail. Also lubricant performance over range of conditions.

  16. Solid Lubricated Rolling Element Bearings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-02-15

    where L coefficient of friction Sf = film shear strength Pf = film yield pressure 0 P = substrate yield pressure 5 S becomes the...as supported by known facts. , In addition to reducing the coefficient of friction and, therefore, controlling the traction of a solid lubricated...appropriate friction coefficients . For a much closer simulation, 40 it will be necessary to make certain modifications to the program. These required

  17. Consider synthetic lubricants for process machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, H.P. , Montgomery, TX ); Pate, A.R. Jr. )

    1995-01-01

    Judicious application of properly formulated synthetic lubricants can benefit a wide spectrum of process machinery. This informed usage is very likely to drive down overall maintenance and downtime expenditures and can markedly improve plant efficiency. The paper describes the origin of synthetic lubricants, then explains the principal features and attributes of the six base fluids: synthetic hydrocarbon fluids; organic esters; polyglycols; phosphate esters; silicones; and blends of the synthetic lubricants. The paper discusses the properties and advantages and gives brief highlights of successful case histories of the use of synthetic lubricants. These include: circulating oil system for furnace air preheaters; Right angle gear drives for fin fan coolers; plant-wide oil mist systems; and pulverizing mills in coal-fired generating plant. In the last case, an economic analysis is done to point out the savings possible in lubricant consumption cost, reduced maintenance cost, lubricant disposal cost, and reduction in power consumption.

  18. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication of elliptical contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    The determination of the minimum film thickness within contact is considered for both fully flooded and starved conditions. A fully flooded conjunction is one in which the film thickness is not significantly changed when the amount of lubricant is increased. The fully flooded results presented show the influence of contact geometry on minimum film thickness as expressed by the ellipticity parameter and the dimensionless speed, load, and materials parameters. These results are applied to materials of high elastic modulus (hard EHL), such as metal, and to materials of low elastic modulus(soft EHL), such as rubber. In addition to the film thickness equations that are developed, contour plots of pressure and film thickness are given which show the essential features of elastohydrodynamically lubricated conjunctions. The crescent shaped region of minimum film thickness, with its side lobes in which the separation between the solids is a minimum, clearly emerges in the numerical solutions. In addition to the 3 presented for the fully flooded results, 15 more cases are used for hard EHL contacts and 18 cases are used for soft EHL contacts in a theoretical study of the influence of lubricant starvation on film thickness and pressure. From the starved results for both hard and soft EHL contacts, a simple and important dimensionless inlet boundary distance is specified. This inlet boundary distance defines whether a fully flooded or a starved condition exists in the contact. Contour plots of pressure and film thickness in and around the contact are shown for conditions.

  19. A Review of Tribological Coatings for Control Drive Mechanisms in Space Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    CJ Larkin; JD Edington; BJ Close

    2006-02-21

    Tribological coatings must provide lubrication for moving components of the control drive mechanism for a space reactor and prevent seizing due to friction or diffusion welding to provide highly reliable and precise control of reflector position over the mission lifetime. Several coatings were evaluated based on tribological performance at elevated temperatures and in ultrahigh vacuum environments. Candidates with proven performance in the anticipated environment are limited primarily to disulfide materials. Irradiation data for these coatings is nonexistent. Compatibility issues between coating materials and structural components may require the use of barrier layers between the solid lubricant and structural components to prevent deleterious interactions. It would be advisable to consider possible lubricant interactions prior to down-selection of structural materials. A battery of tests was proposed to provide the necessary data for eventual solid lubricant/coating selection.

  20. Laboratory Based Axle Lubricant Efficiency Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED LABORATORY BASED AXLE LUBRICANT EFFICIENCY EVALUATION INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 459 by Robert W. Warden...Edwin A. Frame Adam C. Brandt Scott J. Tedesco U.S. Army TARDEC Fuels and Lubricants Research Facility Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI... LUBRICANT EFFICIENCY EVALUATION INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 459 by Robert W. Warden Edwin A. Frame Adam C. Brandt Scott J. Tedesco U.S. Army