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Sample records for hardened steel balls

  1. Hardening treatment of friction surfaces of ball journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlenko, A. O.; Davidov, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    The article presents the technology of finishing plasma hardening by the application of the multi-layer nanocoating Si-O-C-N system to harden the friction surfaces of the ball journal bearings. The authors of the paper have studied the applied wear-resistant anti-friction coating tribological characteristics, which determine the increase in wear resistance of the ball journal bearings.

  2. Induction Hardening vs Conventional Hardening of a Heat Treatable Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackl, Stephanie; Leitner, Harald; Zuber, Michael; Clemens, Helmut; Primig, Sophie

    2014-11-01

    This study focuses on the comparison of mechanical and microstructural properties of induction and conventionally heat-treated steels in the as-quenched state. The investigated steel is a heat treatable 42CrMo4 steel. In order to characterize the mechanical properties, tensile tests and Vickers hardness tests are performed. The yield strength and hardness of the induction hardened condition turn out to be slightly lower compared to the conventionally hardened one. Light optical and scanning electron microscopy show no differences in the martensitic structure of the induction and conventionally hardened condition. However, electron back scatter diffraction investigations reveal a smaller block size within the conventionally hardened specimen. Carbon mappings by electron probe micro analysis show a homogenous carbon concentration in the conventionally hardened and a non-uniform distribution in the induction-hardened case. The segregation of the carbon exhibits line-type features in the induction hardened condition, lowering the total amount of carbon in the matrix. Therefore, the carbon content in the matrix of the conventionally hardened condition is slightly higher, which causes a smaller block size. The smaller block size is believed to be the reason for the higher hardness and yield strength.

  3. Strain Hardening of Hadfield Manganese Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. H.; Olson, G. B.; Owen, W. S.

    1986-10-01

    The plastic flow behavior of Hadfield manganese steel in uniaxial tension and compression is shown to be greatly influenced by transformation plasticity phenomena. Changes in the stress-strain (σ-ɛ) curves with temperature correlate with the observed extent of deformation twinning, consistent with a softening effect of twinning as a deformation mechanism and a hardening effect of the twinned microstructure. The combined effects give upward curvature to the σ-ɛ curve over extensive ranges of plastic strain. A higher strain hardening in compression compared with tension appears to be consistent with the observed texture development. The composition dependence of stacking fault energy computed using a thermodynamic model suggests that the Hadfield composition is optimum for a maximum rate of deformation twinning. Comparisons of the Hadfield steel with a Co-33Ni alloy exhibiting similar twinning kinetics, and an Fe-21Ni-lC alloy deforming by slip indicate no unusual strain hardening at low strains where deformation is controlled by slip, but an unusual amount of structural hardening associated with the twin formation in the Hadfield steel. A possible mechanism of anomalous twin hardening is discussed in terms of modified twinning behavior (pseudotwinning) in nonrandom solid solutions.

  4. Study on the limited hardenability steel

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, L.P.; Li, L.; Min, Y.A.; Xu, M.H.; Le, J.P.; Liu, R.H.

    1998-12-31

    A series of measurements were taken in the limited hardenability bearing steel rings which were induction hardened and tempered. Measurements showed several features which strengthened the rings: (1) Compressive residual stress are generated from surface to a depth of 3.2 mm and high residual compressive stress at the location where fatigue fracture initiates. (2) The matrix of the hardened layer was composed mainly of lath martensite with dispersed carbides whose formula was Me{sub 3} according to the X-ray spectrum analysis. The carbon content of martensite was estimated to be lower than 0.58% (by weight). The core was constituted of troostite transformed from spheroidal carbide. (3) The amount of retained austenite in the hardened layer was about 5% (in volume) which ensures the high dimensional stability of bearing.

  5. Laser Surface Hardening of AISI 1045 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruifeng; Jin, Yajuan; Li, Zhuguo; Qi, Kai

    2014-09-01

    The study investigates laser surface hardening in the AISI 1045 steel using two different types of industrial laser: a high-power diode laser (HPDL) and a CO2 laser, respectively. The effect of process parameters such as beam power, travel speed on structure, case depth, and microhardness was examined. In most cases, a heat-affected zone (HAZ) formed below the surface; a substantial increase in surface hardness was achieved. In addition, big differences were found between the hardened specimens after HPDL surface hardening and CO2 laser surface hardening. For HPDL, depths of the HAZ were almost equal in total HAZ o, without surface melting. For CO2 laser, the depths changed a lot in the HAZ, with surface melting in the center. To better understand the difference of laser hardening results when use these two types of laser, numerical (ANSYS) analysis of the heat conduction involved in the process was also studied. For HPDL method, a rectangular beam spot and uniform energy distribution across the spot were assumed, while for CO2 laser, a circular beam spot and Gaussian energy distribution were assumed. The results showed that the energy distribution variety altered the thermal cycles of the HAZ dramatically. The rectangular HPDL laser beam spot with uniform energy distribution is much more feasible for laser surface hardening.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of precipitation-hardening stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerated test program results show which precipitation hardening stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. In certain cases stress corrosion susceptibility was found to be associated with the process procedure.

  7. Weldable, age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, J.A.; Krenzer, R.W.

    1975-07-22

    An age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel having superior weldability properties as well as resistance to degradation of properties in a hydrogen atmosphere is described. It has a composition of from about 24.0 to about 34.0 weight percent (w/o) nickel, from about 13.5 to about 16.0 w/o chromium, from about 1.9 to about 2.3 w/o titanium, from about 1.0 to about 1.5 w/ o molybdenum, from about 0.01 to about 0.05 w/o carbon, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o manganese, from about 0 to about 0.01 w/o phosphorous and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.010 w/o sulfur and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o silicon, from about 0.1 to about 0.35 w/o aluminum, from about 0.10 to about 0.50 w/o vanadium, from about 0 to about 0.0015 w/o boron, and the balance essentially iron. (auth)

  8. Transformation hardening of steel sheet for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takechi, H.

    2008-12-01

    Among high-strength steels, transformation hardening steels such as dual-phase (DP) steel and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel offer a superior relationship between tensile strength (TS) and elongation (El) on a commercial scale. As demand has grown for lighter-weight automobiles, so also has the demand for higher TS, lower yield ratio, and higher hole expansion ratio grown. Recently DP steel has been developed with precipitation hardening and grain refining by TiC. A new TRIP steel composed of 5Mn-2Si and control-rolled with niobium addition suggests the formation of retained austenite ( γ R ) as much as 30% and TS × El = 3,000 kgf/mm2·%.

  9. Elastic constant versus temperature behavior of three hardened maraging steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledbetter, H. M.; Austin, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Elastic constants of three maraging steels were determined by measuring ultrasonic velocities. Annealed steels show slightly lower bulk moduli and considerably lower shear moduli than hardened steels. All the elastic constants (Young's modulus, shear modulus, bulk modulus and Poisson's ratio) show regular temperature behavior between 76 and 400 K. Young's modulus and the shear modulus increase with increasing yield strength, but the bulk modulus and Poisson's ratio are relatively unchanged. Elastic anisotropy is quite small.

  10. Laser-ultrasonic hardening of the surface of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gureev, D M

    1998-03-31

    An investigation was made of the feasibility of laser-ultrasonic hardening of the surface of steel with a controlled change in the structurally stressed state of the surface layer. The advantages of the laser-ultrasonic treatment were demonstrated by the formation of harder and deeper surface hardening zones with simultaneous control of their structure and phase composition and of the formation of residual stresses. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  11. Evolution of cyclic plasticity during rolling contact fatigue of a case-hardened bearing steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Abir

    A combined experimental and numerical methodology is developed for the investigation of progressive evolution of subsurface plasticity during prolonged rolling contact fatigue (RCF) loading of a M50 NiL case hardened steel. Three balls-on-rod RCF tests have been performed on a M50 NiL steel rod a using silicon nitride balls over several hundred million cycles at 5.5 GPa contact stress level. A systematic investigation of the evolution of surface contact area between the ball and the rod reveals that the contact pressure evolves continuously during several hundred million cycles of RCF due to substantial surface and subsurface plasticity. Various stages of plastic deformation has been identified based on the nature of the evolution of contact patch during the first phase of study. In the second phase of research, systematic investigation on the nucleation and the growth of the plastically deformed subsurface regions in a case hardened M-50 NiL steel rod has been done. The microhardness measurements within the RCF affected subsurface regions revealed existence of hardened and softened regions, which grow in size and severity with stress cycles. A mechanistic explanation behind the formation of the hardened and softened regions inside the plastic zone and its growth in size and severity has been proposed in the second phase of the work. In the final phase of the study, we propose a generalized methodology to determine the cyclic constitutive response of the various case layers of M-50 NiL steel. A 3-dimenstional finite element (FE) model of the ball-on-rod test was simulated in ABAQUS and the obtained von Mises stresses were used along with measured microhardness values and Neuber's rule to obtain the cyclic strain amplitudes at various points inside the RCF affected region. The S-N diagram of M-50 NiL steel is constructed and the fatigue limit of the material under RCF loading is determined after considering the effect of compressive mean stress. It has been shown

  12. Description of full-range strain hardening behavior of steels.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Zheng, Jinyang; Chen, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical expression describing plastic behavior of steels allows the execution of parametric studies for many purposes. Various formulas have been developed to characterize stress strain curves of steels. However, most of those formulas failed to describe accurately the strain hardening behavior of steels in the full range which shows various distinct stages. For this purpose, a new formula is developed based on the well-known Ramberg-Osgood formula to describe the full range strain hardening behavior of steels. Test results of all the six types of steels show a three-stage strain hardening behavior. The proposed formula can describe such behavior accurately in the full range using a single expression. The parameters of the formula can be obtained directly and easily through linear regression analysis. Excellent agreements with the test data are observed for all the steels tested. Furthermore, other formulas such as Ludwigson formula, Gardner formula, UGent formula are also applied for comparison. Finally, the proposed formula is considered to have wide suitability and high accuracy for all the steels tested.

  13. Description of full-range strain hardening behavior of steels.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Zheng, Jinyang; Chen, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical expression describing plastic behavior of steels allows the execution of parametric studies for many purposes. Various formulas have been developed to characterize stress strain curves of steels. However, most of those formulas failed to describe accurately the strain hardening behavior of steels in the full range which shows various distinct stages. For this purpose, a new formula is developed based on the well-known Ramberg-Osgood formula to describe the full range strain hardening behavior of steels. Test results of all the six types of steels show a three-stage strain hardening behavior. The proposed formula can describe such behavior accurately in the full range using a single expression. The parameters of the formula can be obtained directly and easily through linear regression analysis. Excellent agreements with the test data are observed for all the steels tested. Furthermore, other formulas such as Ludwigson formula, Gardner formula, UGent formula are also applied for comparison. Finally, the proposed formula is considered to have wide suitability and high accuracy for all the steels tested. PMID:27563511

  14. Secondary hardening steel having improved combination of hardness and toughness

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Earl R.; Zackay, Victor F.; Bhat, Manjeshwar S.; Garrison, Jr., Warren M.

    1979-01-01

    A secondary hardening alloy steel composition consisting essentially of about 0.25-0.5% carbon, about 0.5-1.0% manganese, about 1.5-3.0% nickel, about 0-1.0% chromium, about 1.75-2.5% molybdenum, about 0-0.4% vanadium, and an additive selected from about 1-3% aluminum and a combination of at least about 1% aluminum and at least about 1% silicon for a combined Al+Si content of about 2-4%, the balance being iron and impurity elements. The present steel composition has the following characteristics: it exhibits a flat tempering response, it is hardenable upon tempering to a Rockwell C hardness of at least 50, and it has an improved combination of hardness vs. toughness properties after tempering in the secondary hardening range. A method of preparation is also described.

  15. Fatigue crack growth characteristics of laser-hardened 4130 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, M.Y.; Chen, C. . Inst. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-11-15

    Laser surface hardening of steels is one of many successful applications in laser material processing. The effect of the microstructure on the da/dN of various steels has been reported by several investigators who concluded that tempered martensite has a higher resistance to da/dN than does as-quenched (AQ) martensite. In addition to the microstructure, the residual stress also has a significant influence on da/dN. Importantly, the distribution of residual stresses is not uniform through the depth of the hardened zone and may change as crack propagating takes place in the test. Owing to the complicated nature of residual stresses, it is difficult to quantitatively analyze such an influence on the da/dN of laser-hardened steels. The present study was to investigate the characteristics of da/dN in laser-hardened AISI 4130 steels. Residual stress measurements was performed on distinct laser-treated specimens in the evaluation process.

  16. Mechanism of work hardening in Hadfield manganese steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dastur, Y. N.; Leslie, W. C.

    1981-05-01

    When Hadfield manganese steel in the single-phase austenitic condition was strained in tension, in the temperature range - 25 to 300 °C, it exhibited jerky (serrated) flow, a negative (inverse) strain-rate dependence of flow stress and high work hardening, characteristic of dynamic strain aging. The strain rate-temperature regime of jerky flow was determined and the apparent activation energies for the appearance and disappearance of serrations were found to be 104 kJ/mol and 146 kJ/mol, respectively. The high work hardening cannot be a result of mechanical twinning because at -50 °C numerous twins were produced, but the work hardening was low and no twins were formed above 225 °C even though work hardening was high. The work hardening decreased above 300 °C because of the cessation of dynamic strain aging and increased again above 400 °C because of precipitation of carbides. An apparent activation energy of 138 kJ/mol was measured for static strain aging between 300 and 400 °C, corresponding closely to the activation energies for the disapperance of serrations and for the volume diffusion of carbon in Hadfield steel. Evidence from the present study, together with the known effect of manganese on the activity of carbon in austenite and previous internal friction studies of high-manganese steels, lead to the conclusion that dynamic strain aging, brought about by the reorientation of carbon members of C-Mn couples in the cores of dislocations, is the principal cause of rapid work hardening in Hadfield steel.

  17. Reduction of work hardening rate in low-carbon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalamanchili, Bhaskar Rao

    Low carbon grades of steel rods are used to produce finished products such as fine wire, coat hangers, staples, and roofing nails. These products are subject to ductility failures during production due to excessively high work hardening rates during wire drawing. The high work hardening rates are attributed to the presence of residuals, free nitrogen, or combinations thereof. This research concludes that the most cost-effective way to reduce the work hardening rate during wire drawing is to combine boron with nitrogen to form boron nitride, and thus reducing its work hardening contribution. The results of this study also conclude the following: (1) Boron/Nitrogen ratio is the more significant factor than rod tensile strength, which affects work hardening rate. Higher ratio is better in the 0.79 to 1.19 range. (2) Maintaining this narrow B/N range requires precise process control. (3) Process conditions such as dissolved oxygen (<25 ppm), carbon (≤0.05%) and ladle refining temperature (<2930°F) are necessary for optimizing boron recovery. (4) An average of 89% boron recovery is obtained with the above controlled process conditions. (5) Use of Boron has no adverse effects on the several metallurgical properties tested except with minor difficulty with scale for descaling. North Star Steel Texas (North Star) benefited from this research by being able to provide a competitive edge in both quality and cost of its low carbon boron grades thus making North Star a preferred supplier of wire rod for these products.

  18. Photothermal characterization of grind-hardened steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prekel, H.; Ament, Ch.; Goch, G.

    2003-01-01

    Grind hardening is a promising production process which combines grinding and hardening within one step. Due to the fact that many material and process parameters partially influence the properties of the workpieces in a nonlinear way, it is difficult to predict for instance the surface hardness and hardness penetration depth. In this study, photothermal radiometry is used as an approach to determine the hardness penetration depth. Photothermal phase signals have been measured as a function of frequency. First measurements showed a strong influence of surface roughness, causing phase signal maxima at unexpected high frequencies (f>60 Hz). After finishing of the surfaces, the maxima of phase signals shifted toward lower frequencies (f<10 Hz). In an attempt to extract a preliminary calibration curve, the measured phase values of each sample were added and correlated to the hardness penetration depth. The resulting curve reveals a good correlation between phase sum and the hardness penetration depth. Further research is necessary to collect more experimental data and to support the current results by theoretical models.

  19. Strain Hardening Behavior of Dual-Phase Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colla, V.; de Sanctis, M.; Dimatteo, A.; Lovicu, G.; Solina, A.; Valentini, R.

    2009-11-01

    A detailed qualitative and quantitative examination of the microstructure and mechanical properties of three different classes of DP600 and DP450 dual-phase (DP) steels was carried out. The tested DP steels are characterized by different alloying elements: aluminum, boron, and phosphorus. Among them, aluminum DP steels showed the lowest percentages of hard phases, while phosphorus DP steels exhibited the highest resistance values. The Hollomon, Pickering, Crussard-Jaoul (CJ), and Bergstrom models were used to reproduce the strain hardening behavior of DP steels. Relationships that correlate the fitting parameters with the chemical composition and the thermal cycle parameters were found, and the predictive abilities of different models were evaluated. The Pickering equation, among the tested models, is the best one in the reproduction of the experimental stress-strain data.

  20. Interrelation of Steel Composition, Hardening Route, and Tempering Response of Medium Carbon Low-Alloy Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Abdel-Hamid A.; Abdu, Mahmoud T.; El-Banna, El-Sayed M.; Soliman, Saied E.; Tash, Mahmoud M.

    2016-04-01

    Four medium carbon and low-alloy steels were hardened through oil and forced air cooling. Tempering was then performed in the temperature range 250-600 °C. The martensite content increased with an increased hardenability and/or the rate of cooling. Tempering at T > M s caused a gradual decline in both hardness and strength and an improvement in the Charpy V-notch impact toughness. The low-alloy steels underwent tempered martensite embrittlement (as a result of the formation of carbides at the martensite interlaths and prior austenite grain boundaries) and enhancement of phosphorus segregation (particularly in the presence of Ni). Higher hardenability steels were found to be better hardened via the more recent forced air quenching rather than the conventional oil quenching. In this work, a modest, novel attempt is presented to empirically correlate the impact toughness with the hardness measurements to enable future prediction of impact toughness from hardness measurements.

  1. Dynamic bake hardening of interstitial-free steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, K.; Jonas, J.J.

    2000-05-01

    Two types of dynamic strain aging (DSA) strengthening methods were investigated to determine their potentials for industrial use. They are referred to here as dynamic-static bake hardening (DSBH) and dynamic bake hardening (DBH). For this purpose, a 0.06 pct Ti interstitial-free (IF) steel was reheated to 900 C and cooled at 12 C/s to room temperature. It was then dynamically bake hardened in the temperature range 100 C to 250 C to strains of 2 to 8 pct at a strain rate of 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}. The tensile properties were determined before and after these treatments. It was found that the occurrence of DSA during dynamic baking led to significant increases in work-hardening rate as well as in the final strength. The results indicate that, for a given solute carbon level, the dynamically and then statically aged samples have higher strengths than those that are bake hardened in the conventional way.

  2. Surface hardening of steel by laser and electron beam. (Latest citations from METADEX). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning electron beam hardening of steels and alloys. Among the materials surface hardened are carbon and alloy steels, aircraft spur gears, nitrocarburized steel, turbine blades, titanium-carbon steel, titanium, and rolling bearings. Effect of transformation plasticity on residual stress fields in laser surface hardening treatment is also examined. (Contains a minimum of 93 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Surface hardening of steel by laser and electron beam. (Latest citations from Metadex). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning electron beam hardening of steels and alloys. Among the materials surface hardened are carbon and alloy steels, aircraft spur gears, nitrocarburized steel, turbine blades, titanium-carbon steel, titanium, and rolling bearings. Effect of transformation plasticity on residual stress fields in laser surface hardening treatment is also examined.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  4. Comparative Structural Strength Research of Hardened Carbon Steel and Hot-Rolled Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomolov, A. V.; Zhakupov, A. N.; Kanayev, A. T.; Sikach, I. A.; Tugumov, K. K.

    2016-08-01

    Experiments on quantitative evaluation of fatigue strength showed that St5ps and St5sp carbon steels with A400 strength class can be fully applied for erection of constructions and buildings having cyclical loads during operation. Study of corrosion resistance of hardened carbon steel in comparison with hot-rolled alloy steel consists in difference in structures and hence, difference in intensity of electric and chemical processes featuring presence of steel in concrete. Structure of St5sp steel with A400 strength class in surface area has significantly less corrosion rate than ferritic-perlitic structure of 35GS steel with A400 strength class.

  5. Theoretical Study of the Oxidation Behavior of Precipitation Hardening Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Pistofidis, N.; Vourlias, G.; Chrissafis, K.; Psyllaki, P.

    2010-01-21

    The oxidation of precipitation hardening (PH) steels is a rather unexplored area. In the present work an attempt is made is made to estimate the kinetics of a PH steel. For this purpose specimens of the material under examination were isothermally heated at 850, 900 and 950 deg. C for 15 hr. Kinetics was based on TGA results. During heating a thick scale is formed on the substrate surface, which is composed by different oxides. The layer close to the substrate is compact and as a result it impedes corrosion. The mathematical analysis of the collected data shows that the change of the mass of the substrate per unit area versus time is described by a parabolic law.

  6. Development of a Press-Hardened Steel Suitable for Thin Slab Direct Rolling Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jewoong; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2015-01-01

    The thin slab casting and direct rolling process is a hot-rolled strip production method which has maintained commercial quality steel grades as a major material in many industrial applications due to its low processing cost. Few innovative products have however been developed specifically for production by thin slab direct rolling. Press hardening or hot press forming steel grades which are now widely used to produce structural automotive steel parts requiring ultra-high strength and formability may however offer an opportunity for thin slab direct rolling-specific ultra-high strength products. In this work, a newly designed press hardening steel grade developed specifically for thin slab direct rolling processing is presented. The press hardening steel has a high nitrogen content compared with press hardening steel grades produced by conventional steelmaking routes. Boron and titanium which are key alloying additions in conventional press hardening steel such as the 22MnB5 press hardening steel grade are not utilized. Cr is added in the press hardening steel to obtain the required hardenability. The properties of the new thin slab direct rolling-specific 22MnCrN5 press hardening steel grade are reviewed. The evolution of the microstructure and mechanical properties with increasing amounts of Cr additions from 0.6 to 1.4 wt pct and the effect of the cooling rate during die-quenching were studied by means of laboratory simulations. The selection of the optimum chemical composition range for the thin slab direct rolling-specific 22MnCrN5 steel in press hardening heat treatment conditions is discussed.

  7. Improved impact toughness of 13Cr martensitic stainless steel hardened by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsay, L. W.; Chang, Y. M.; Torng, S.; Wu, H. C.

    2002-08-01

    The impact toughness of AISI 403 martensitic stainless steel plate and laser-hardened specimens tempered at various temperatures were examined. Phosphorus was the primary residual impurity responsible for tempered embrittlement of this alloy. The experimental result also indicated that AISI 403 stainless steel was very sensitive to reverse-temper embrittlement. The improved impact toughness of the laser-hardened specimen was attributed to the refined microstructure in the laser-hardened zone.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  9. Thermoelastoplastic and residual stress analysis during induction hardening of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jahanian, S.

    1995-12-01

    A theoretical model was developed to predict the thermoelastoplastic and residual stresses developed in a round steel bar during induction hardening. For numerical analysis, a quasi-static, uncoupled thermoelastoplastic solution based on the hyperbolic sine law of Tien and Richmond was formulated. The properties of the material were assumed to be temperature dependent. The phase transformation was considered in the numerical calculation, and the results were compared with the case where phase transformation is avoided. The cylinder was heated rapidly; once the temperature of the outer surface exceeded the transformation temperature, the cylinder was rapidly cooled. Accordingly, in the numerical calculation, only the area at the vicinity of the outer surface was assumed to transform to martensite. The results showed that the compressive residual stresses at the vicinity of the outer surface were considerably higher than the tensile stresses at the center.

  10. An Evaluation of the Corrosion and Mechanical Performance of Interstitially Surface-Hardened Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jennifer L.; Koul, Michelle G.; Schubbe, Joel J.

    2014-06-01

    A surface hardening technique called "interstitial hardening" is commercially available, whereby interstitial carbon atoms are introduced into stainless steel surfaces without the formation of carbides. Surface hardening of machine elements such as impellors or fasteners would improve performance regarding cavitation and galling resistance, and has intensified interest in this process. However, there remains a need to characterize and validate the specific performance characteristics of the hardened materials. This paper describes experimental testing conducted on 316L stainless steel that has been surface hardened using available commercial techniques, using carbon as the interstitial atom. The corrosion performance of the hardened surface is assessed using electrochemical potentiodynamic testing to determine the breakdown potential in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution to identify the most promising method. The hardness and thickness of the surface-hardened layer is characterized and compared using metallography and microhardness profiling. Corrosion fatigue and slow strain rate testing of untreated, hardened, and damaged, hardened surfaces exposed to ASTM seawater is conducted. Finally, critical galling stresses are determined and compared. Post-test examination of damage attempts to identify mechanisms of material failure and characterize how corrosion-assisted cracks initiate and grow in surface-hardened materials.

  11. Simulation and experimental verification of induction hardening process for some kinds of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, T.; Inout, H.; Uehara, T.

    1996-12-31

    Structure evolution and stress/distortion by induction hardening process of stationary type are simulated for ring shaped specimen made of several kinds of steel. Applicability of the method of simulation is evaluated by comparing the results of calculation on stress and distortion with the experiments for steels with and without hardenability and also for different geometry. Detail discussions on the distribution of residual stresses and the mode of distortion are made in relation to the material properties.

  12. On the Decomposition of Martensite During Bake Hardening of Thermomechanically Processed TRIP Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pereloma, E. V.; Miller, Michael K; Timokhina, I. B.

    2008-01-01

    Thermomechanically processed (TMP) CMnSi transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels with and without additions of Nb, Mo, or Al were subjected to prestraining and bake hardening. Atom probe tomography (APT) revealed the presence of fine C-rich clusters in the martensite of all studied steels after the thermomechanical processing. After bake hardening, the formation of iron carbides, containing from 25 to 90 at. pct C, was observed. The evolution of iron carbide compositions was independent of steel composition and was a function of carbide size.

  13. On the Decomposition of Martensite during Bake Hardening of Thermomechanically Processed Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereloma, E. V.; Miller, M. K.; Timokhina, I. B.

    2008-12-01

    Thermomechanically processed (TMP) CMnSi transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels with and without additions of Nb, Mo, or Al were subjected to prestraining and bake hardening. Atom probe tomography (APT) revealed the presence of fine C-rich clusters in the martensite of all studied steels after the thermomechanical processing. After bake hardening, the formation of iron carbides, containing from 25 to 90 at. pct C, was observed. The evolution of iron carbide compositions was independent of steel composition and was a function of carbide size.

  14. Deformation and strain hardening of different steels in impact dominated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rojacz, H.; Mozdzen, G.; Winkelmann, H.

    2014-04-01

    Strain hardening is a common technique to exploit the full potential of materials in diverse applications. Single impact studies were performed to evaluate work hardening effects of different steels, correlated to their deformation at different energy and momentum levels. Three different steels were examined regarding their forming behavior and their tendency to strain harden in impact loading conditions, revealing different intensities of hardness increase, deformation and coinciding microstructural changes. Detailed studies in the deformed zone such as micro hardness mappings were performed to reveal the materials hardness increase in the deformed zones. Additionally high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) supported by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to determine microstructural changes. Results indicate, that the influence of different velocities/strain rates at constant energy levels cannot be neglected for the strain hardening behavior of steels and provide data for a better control of the hardness increase in impact dominated materials fabrication operations. - Highlights: • Deformation and strain hardening behaviour of three different steels. • Influence of impact energies and momenta on the strain hardening. • Hardness increase and depth controllable by momentum and energy.

  15. A real-time surface inspection system for precision steel balls based on machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ji; Tsai, Jhy-Cherng; Hsu, Ya-Chen

    2016-07-01

    Precision steel balls are one of the most fundament components for motion and power transmission parts and they are widely used in industrial machinery and the automotive industry. As precision balls are crucial for the quality of these products, there is an urgent need to develop a fast and robust system for inspecting defects of precision steel balls. In this paper, a real-time system for inspecting surface defects of precision steel balls is developed based on machine vision. The developed system integrates a dual-lighting system, an unfolding mechanism and inspection algorithms for real-time signal processing and defect detection. The developed system is tested under feeding speeds of 4 pcs s-1 with a detection rate of 99.94% and an error rate of 0.10%. The minimum detectable surface flaw area is 0.01 mm2, which meets the requirement for inspecting ISO grade 100 precision steel balls.

  16. A real-time surface inspection system for precision steel balls based on machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ji; Tsai, Jhy-Cherng; Hsu, Ya-Chen

    2016-07-01

    Precision steel balls are one of the most fundament components for motion and power transmission parts and they are widely used in industrial machinery and the automotive industry. As precision balls are crucial for the quality of these products, there is an urgent need to develop a fast and robust system for inspecting defects of precision steel balls. In this paper, a real-time system for inspecting surface defects of precision steel balls is developed based on machine vision. The developed system integrates a dual-lighting system, an unfolding mechanism and inspection algorithms for real-time signal processing and defect detection. The developed system is tested under feeding speeds of 4 pcs s‑1 with a detection rate of 99.94% and an error rate of 0.10%. The minimum detectable surface flaw area is 0.01 mm2, which meets the requirement for inspecting ISO grade 100 precision steel balls.

  17. Direct Resistance Joule Heating of Al-10 pct Si-Coated Press Hardening Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Wook; Choi, Won Seok; Cho, Yeol Rae; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-06-01

    Various rapid heating methods have been developed to increase the productivity of press hardening steel. One of these methods is direct resistance Joule heating. This heating method results in the melting of the surface coating and the formation of a persistent liquid trail as a result of the high thermal conductivity and low melting temperature of the Al-10 pct Si alloy coating. This can be addressed by an alloying preheating treatment prior to the press hardening process.

  18. Strain hardening during mechanical twining and dislocation channeling in irradiated 316 stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hashimoto, Naoyuki

    2007-01-01

    Localized deformation mechanisms and strain-hardening behaviors in irradiated 316 and 316LN stainless steels were investigated, and a theoretical model was proposed to explain the linear strain-hardening behavior during the localized deformation. After low temperature irradiation to significant doses the deformation microstructure changed from dislocation tangles to channels or to mechanical twins. It was also observed that irradiation hardening straightened gliding dislocations and increased the tendency for forming pileups. Regardless of these microstructural changes, the strain-hardening behavior was relatively insensitive to the irradiation. This dose-independent strain-hardening rate resulted in dose independence of the true stress parameters such as the plastic instability stress and true fracture stress. In the proposed model, the long-range back stress was formulated as a function of the number of pileup dislocations per slip band and the number of slip bands in a grain. The calculation results confirmed the experimental observation that strain-hardening rate was insensitive to the change in deformation mechanism because the long-range back stress hardening became as high as the hardening by tangled dislocations.

  19. Fractography of induction-hardened steel fractured in fatigue and overload

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, C.G.; Laird, C.

    1997-07-01

    The fracture surfaces of induction-hardened steel specimens obtained from an auto axle were characterized, macroscopically and microscopically, after being fractured in fatigue and monotonic overload. Specimens were tested in cyclic three-point bending under load control, and the S-N curve was established for specimens that had been notched by spark machining to facilitate fractography. Scanning electron microscopy of the fractured surfaces obtained for lives spanning the range 17,000 to 418,000 cycles revealed diverse fracture morphologies, including intergranular fracture and transgranular fatigue fracture. The results are being offered to assist in the analysis of complex field failures in strongly hardened steel.

  20. New steels and methods for induction hardening of bearing rings and rollers

    SciTech Connect

    Ouchakov, B.K.; Shepeljakovsky, K.Z.

    1998-12-31

    The new method of through-surface hardening (TSH) of bearing rings and rollers was developed and used in Russia and former USSR. The principles of the method include the use of special steels of low or controlled hardenability, through-the-section induction of furnace heating and intense quenching of the parts by water stream in special devices. Due to the low hardenability of applied steels, the bearing rings and rollers have high-strength martensitic surface layer, combined with a core strengthened with a troostite and sorbite structure. High compressive residual stresses are formed in the martensitic surface layers. For a long time TSH has been successfully used for inner rings of bearings for railway car boxes, large rings and rollers of bearings for cement furnaces and rolling mills. Recently TSH was used for hollow rollers of railway bearings. For bearing rings made of SAE 52100 type high-carbon, chromium-alloyed steel a new method of low-deformation hardening was developed. The method is based on self-calibration of the rings during the quenching process and is intended for through hardening by induction heating and quenching by rapidly moved water stream.

  1. A Finite Difference-Based Modeling Approach for Prediction of Steel Hardenability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushanthi, Neethi; Maity, Joydeep

    2014-06-01

    In this research work an independent finite difference-based modeling approach was adopted for determination of the hardenability of steels. In this model, at first, cooling curves were generated by solving transient heat transfer equation through discretization with pure explicit finite difference scheme coupled with MATLAB-based programing in view of variable thermo-physical properties of 1080 steel. The cooling curves were solved against 50% transformation nose of TTT diagram in order to predict hardening behavior of 1080 steel in terms of hardenability parameters (Grossmann critical diameter, D C; and ideal critical diameter, D I) and the variation of the unhardened core diameter ( D u) to diameter of steel bar ( D) ratio with diameter of steel bar ( D). The experiments were also performed to determine actual D C value of 1080 steel for still water quenching. The D C value obtained by the developed model was found to match the experimental D C value with only 6% deviation. Therefore, the model developed in the present work can be used for direct determination of D I, D C, and D u without resorting to any rigorous experimentation.

  2. Modification of Grange-Kiefer Approach for Determination of Hardenability in Eutectoid Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushanthi, Neethi; Maity, Joydeep

    2014-09-01

    In this research work, an independent mathematical modeling approach has been adopted for determination of the hardenability of steels. In this model, at first, cooling curves were generated by solving transient heat transfer equation through discretization with pure explicit finite difference scheme coupled with MATLAB-based programming considering variable thermo-physical properties of 1080 steel. Thereafter, a new fundamental approach is proposed for obtaining CCT noses as a function of volume fraction transformed through modification of Grange-Kiefer approach. The cooling curves were solved against 50 pct transformation nose of CCT diagram in order to predict hardening behavior of 1080 steel in terms of hardenability parameters (Grossmann critical diameter, D C; and ideal critical diameter, D I) and the variation of the unhardened core diameter (D u) to diameter of steel bar (D) ratio with diameter of the steel bar (D). The experiments were also performed to ascertain actual D C value of 1080 steel for still water quenching. The D C value obtained by the developed model was found to match the experimental D C value with only 3 pct deviation. Therefore, the model developed in the present work can be used for direct determination of D I, D C and D u without resorting to any rigorous experimentation.

  3. Modification of Grange-Kiefer Approach for Determination of Hardenability in Eutectoid Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushanthi, Neethi; Maity, Joydeep

    2014-12-01

    In this research work, an independent mathematical modeling approach has been adopted for determination of the hardenability of steels. In this model, at first, cooling curves were generated by solving transient heat transfer equation through discretization with pure explicit finite difference scheme coupled with MATLAB-based programming considering variable thermo-physical properties of 1080 steel. Thereafter, a new fundamental approach is proposed for obtaining CCT noses as a function of volume fraction transformed through modification of Grange-Kiefer approach. The cooling curves were solved against 50 pct transformation nose of CCT diagram in order to predict hardening behavior of 1080 steel in terms of hardenability parameters (Grossmann critical diameter, D C; and ideal critical diameter, D I) and the variation of the unhardened core diameter ( D u) to diameter of steel bar ( D) ratio with diameter of the steel bar ( D). The experiments were also performed to ascertain actual D C value of 1080 steel for still water quenching. The D C value obtained by the developed model was found to match the experimental D C value with only 3 pct deviation. Therefore, the model developed in the present work can be used for direct determination of D I, D C and D u without resorting to any rigorous experimentation.

  4. Finite-Element Simulation of Conventional and High-Speed Peripheral Milling of Hardened Mold Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, D. W.; Wang, C. Y.; Hu, Y. N.; Song, Y. X.

    2009-12-01

    A finite-element model (FEM) with the flow stress and typical fracture is used to simulate a hard machining process, which before this work could not adequately represent the constitutive behavior of workpiece material that is usually heat treated to hardness levels above 50 Rockwell C hardness (HRC). Thus, a flow stress equation with a variation in hardness is used in the computer simulation of hard machining. In this article, the influence of the milling speed on the cutting force, chip morphology, effective stress, and cutting temperature in the deformation zones of both conventional and high-speed peripheral milling hardened mold steel is systematically studied by finite-element analysis (FEA). By taking into consideration the importance of material characteristics during the milling process, the similar Johnson-Cook’s constitutive equation with hardened mold steel is introduced to the FEM to investigate the peripheral milling of hardened mold steel. In comparison with the experimental data of the cutting force at various cutting speeds, the simulation result is identical with the measured data. The results indicate that the model can be used to accurately predict the behavior of hardened mold steel in both conventional and high-speed milling.

  5. Cyclic Material Properties Test to Determine Hardening/Softening Characteristics of HY-80 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    S.C. Hodge; J.M. Minicucci; T.F. Trimble

    2003-04-30

    The Cyclic Material Properties Test was structured to obtain and provide experimental data for determining cyclic hardening/softening characteristics of HY-80 steel. The inelastic strain history data generated by this test program and the resulting cyclic stress-strain curve will be used to enhance material models in the finite element codes used to perform nonlinear elastic-plastic analysis.

  6. Fatigue Hardening Behavior of 1.5 GPa Grade Transformation-Induced Plasticity-Aided Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Koh-Ichi; Hojo, Tomohiko

    2016-11-01

    Low cycle fatigue hardening/softening behavior of a 0.2 pct C-1.5 pct Si-1.5 pct Mn-1.0 pct Cr-0.2 pct Mo-0.05 pct Nb transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP)-aided steel consisting of a wide lath martensite structure matrix and a narrow lath martensite-metastable retained austenite mixture was investigated. The steel exhibited notable fatigue hardening in the same way as TRIP-aided bainitic ferrite steel, although conventional martensitic steel such as SCM420 steel with the same tensile strength exhibited fatigue softening. The considerable fatigue hardening of this steel is believed to be associated mainly with the compressive internal stress that results from a difference in flow stress between the matrix and the martensite-austenite-like phase, with a small contribution from the strain-induced transformation and dislocation hardenings.

  7. Mechanical properties evaluations of an age hardenable martensitic steel deformed by equal channel angular pressing.

    PubMed

    Nili-Ahmadabadi, M; Shirazi, H; Iranpour Mobarake, M; Poorganji, B; Hossein Nedjad, S; Furuhara, T

    2010-09-01

    Effect of severe plastic deformation by equal channel angular pressing on the mechanical properties of an age hardenable low carbon martensitic steel was investigated. Equal Channel angular pressing was carried out on the solution-annealed steel up to four passes at room temperature through the route Bc. Aging was carried out at 753 K for 2.4 ks. It was found that after four passes deformation, the microstructure is consist of fine grained high angle grain boundaries and lamellar dislocation cell block. The strength of steel is increased considerably while a increasing in elongation is revealed. PMID:21133170

  8. Experimental insight into the cyclic softening/hardening behavior of austenitic stainless steel using ultrasonic higher harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Xuan, Fu-zhen; Xiang, Yanxun; Zhao, Peng

    2014-11-01

    The correlation of cyclic hardening/softening behavior of 304 stainless steel (SS) was investigated using nonlinear ultrasonic wave technique. Results reveal that primary hardening leads to the increase of acoustic nonlinearity, while secondary hardening causes the reverse tendency. This distinct phenomenon is governed by two competitive mechanisms: in the primary-hardening stage, the ascended acoustic nonlinearity is related to the increase of planar dislocation structures. While in the second-hardening stage, the decrease of acoustic nonlinearity is partly caused by the development of cell structures. In addition, the deformation-induced martensitic transformation also contributes to the increase of acoustic nonlinearity under higher stress amplitudes.

  9. Finite Element Analysis of Deformation Due to Ball Indentation and Evaluation of Tensile Properties of Tempered P92 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbadikar, Dipika R.; Ballal, A. R.; Peshwe, D. R.; Mathew, M. D.

    2015-08-01

    Ball indentation (BI) technique has been effectively used to evaluate the tensile properties with minimal volume of material. In the present investigation, BI test carried out on P92 steel (9Cr-0.5Mo-1.8W), using 0.76 mm diameter silicon nitride ball indenter was modeled using finite element (FE) method and analyzed. The effect of test temperature [300 K and 923 K (27 °C and 650 °C)], tempering temperature [1013 K, 1033 K, and 1053 K (740 °C, 760 °C, and 780 °C)], and coefficient of friction of steel (0.0 to 0.5) on the tensile strength and material pile-up was investigated. The stress and strain distributions underneath the indenter and along the top elements of the model have been studied to understand the deformation behavior. The tensile strength was found to decrease with increase in tempering and test temperatures. The increased pile-up around the indentation was attributed to the decrease in strain hardening exponent ( n) with increase in the test temperature. The pile-up height determined from profilometry studies and FE analysis as well as the load depth curve from BI and FE analysis was in agreement. The maximum strain location below the indentation changes with the test temperature. Stress-strain curves obtained by conventional tensile, BI test, and representative stress-strain concepts of FE model were found exactly matching.

  10. The effect of aluminum on the work hardening and wear resistance of hadfield manganese steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuidema, B. K.; Subramanyam, D. K.; Leslie, W. C.

    1987-09-01

    A study has been made of the work-hardening and wear resistance of aluminum-modified Hadfield manganese steels ranging in composition from 1.00 to 1.75 Pct carbon and from 0.0 to 4.0 Pct aluminum. Aluminum additions reduced carbon activity and diffusivity in austenites of Hadfield’s composition, increasing the metastable solubility of carbon in Hadfield steel. Aluminum additions inhibited mechanical twinning and, by inference, increased the stacking fault energy of austenite. Increasing carbon in solution in austenite expanded the temperature range over which dynamic strain aging and rapid work hardening occurred. Simultaneous aluminum additions and increased carbon content increased the work-hardening rate and high-stress abrasion resistance of Hadfield steel, but there was an optimum aluminum content beyond which both declined. Maximum work-hardening rate was exhibited by an alloy containing nominally 1.75 Pct C, 13.5 Pct Mn, and 1.3 Pct Al. Improved high-stress abrasion resistance was also found in an alloy containing nominally 1.00 Pct C, 13.5 Pct Mn, and 4.0 Pct Al.

  11. Deformation behavior in reactor pressure vessel steels as a clue to understanding irradiation hardening.

    SciTech Connect

    DiMelfi, R. J.; Alexander, D. E.; Rehn, L. E.

    1999-10-25

    In this paper, we examine the post-yield true stress vs true strain behavior of irradiated pressure vessel steels and iron-based alloys to reveal differences in strain-hardening behavior associated with different irradiating particles (neutrons and electrons) and different alloy chernky. It is important to understand the effects on mechanical properties caused by displacement producing radiation of nuclear reactor pressure steels. Critical embrittling effects, e.g. increases in the ductile-to-brittle-transition-temperature, are associated with irradiation-induced increases in yield strength. In addition, fatigue-life and loading-rate effects on fracture can be related to the post-irradiation strain-hardening behavior of the steels. All of these properties affect the expected service life of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. We address the characteristics of two general strengthening effects that we believe are relevant to the differing defect cluster characters produced by neutrons and electrons in four different alloys: two pressure vessel steels, A212B and A350, and two binary alloys, Fe-0.28 wt%Cu and Fe-0.74 wt%Ni. Our results show that there are differences in the post-irradiation mechanical behavior for the two kinds of irradiation and that the differences are related both to differences in damage produced and alloy chemistry. We find that while electron and neutron irradiations (at T {le} 60 C) of pressure vessel steels and binary iron-based model alloys produce similar increases in yield strength for the same dose level, they do not result in the same post-yield hardening behavior. For neutron irradiation, the true stress flow curves of the irradiated material can be made to superimpose on that of the unirradiated material, when the former are shifted appropriately along the strain axis. This behavior suggests that neutron irradiation hardening has the same effect as strain hardening for all of the materials analyzed. For electron irradiated steels, the

  12. Continuous Hardening During Isothermal Aging at 723 K (450 °C) of a Precipitation Hardening Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celada-Casero, Carola; Chao, Jesús; Urones-Garrote, Esteban; San Martin, David

    2016-11-01

    The isothermal aging behavior of a cold-rolled precipitation hardening stainless steel has been studied at 723 K (450 °C) for holding times up to 72 hours. The precipitation hardening has been investigated using microhardness Vickers (Hv), thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements, and tensile testing. Microhardness compared to TEP measurements is more sensitive to detect the initial stages of aging. Two precipitation regimes have been observed: the first one related to the formation of Cu-clusters for aging times below 1 hour and a second one associated with formation of Ni-rich precipitates. The results show that the material exhibits an outstanding continuous age strengthening response over the aging time investigated, reaching a hardness of 710 ± 4 HV1 and an ultimate tensile strength ( σ UTS) of 2.65 ± 0.02 GPa after 72 hours. Engineering stress-plastic strain curves reveal that the strength increases and the ductility decreases as the aging time increases. However, after prolonged holding times (24-72 hours) and, although small, a rise in both the strength and the total elongation is observed. The precipitation kinetics can be well predicted over the entire range of aging times by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation. Finally, a reliable linear hardness-yield strength correlation has been found, which enables a rapid evaluation of the strength from bulk hardness measurements.

  13. Continuous Hardening During Isothermal Aging at 723 K (450 °C) of a Precipitation Hardening Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celada-Casero, Carola; Chao, Jesús; Urones-Garrote, Esteban; San Martin, David

    2016-06-01

    The isothermal aging behavior of a cold-rolled precipitation hardening stainless steel has been studied at 723 K (450 °C) for holding times up to 72 hours. The precipitation hardening has been investigated using microhardness Vickers (Hv), thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements, and tensile testing. Microhardness compared to TEP measurements is more sensitive to detect the initial stages of aging. Two precipitation regimes have been observed: the first one related to the formation of Cu-clusters for aging times below 1 hour and a second one associated with formation of Ni-rich precipitates. The results show that the material exhibits an outstanding continuous age strengthening response over the aging time investigated, reaching a hardness of 710 ± 4 HV1 and an ultimate tensile strength (σ UTS) of 2.65 ± 0.02 GPa after 72 hours. Engineering stress-plastic strain curves reveal that the strength increases and the ductility decreases as the aging time increases. However, after prolonged holding times (24-72 hours) and, although small, a rise in both the strength and the total elongation is observed. The precipitation kinetics can be well predicted over the entire range of aging times by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation. Finally, a reliable linear hardness-yield strength correlation has been found, which enables a rapid evaluation of the strength from bulk hardness measurements.

  14. Prediction of Phase Transformation and Hardness Distribution of AISI 1045 Steel After Spot Continual Induction Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shengxiao; Wang, Zhou; Qin, Xunpeng; Mao, Huajie; Gao, Kai

    2015-10-01

    An numerical and experimental study of spot continual induction hardening (SCIH) for AISI 1045 steel was carried out to gain a better understanding of this non-stationary and transverse flux induction hardening treatment. The SCIH device was set up by assembling the single-turn coil inductor to a five-axis cooperating computer numerical control system. The influence of inductor velocity, input current, and quenching medium on temperature field was estimated via the SCIH model, and the simulated micro-hardness and microstructure were validated by experimental verification. The heating delay phenomenon appearing in the SCIH process had been analyzed.

  15. Short-term hot-hardness characteristics of five case hardened steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, N. E.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    Short-term hot-hardness studies were performed with carburized and hardened AISI 8620, CBS 1000, CBS 1000M, CBS 600, and Vasco X-2 steels. Case and core hardness measurements were made at temperatures from 294 to 811 K (70 to 1000 F). The data were compared with data for high-speed tool steels and AISI 52100. The materials tested can be ranked as follows in order of decreasing hot-hardness retention: (1) Vasco X-2; equivalent to through-hardened tool steels up to 644 K (700 F) above which Vasco X-2 is inferior; (2) CBS 1000, (3) CBS 1000M; (4) CBS 6000; better hardness retention at elevated temperatures than through-hardened AISI 52100; and (5) AISI 8620. For the carburized steels, the change in hardness with temperature of the case and core are similar for a given material. The short-term hot hardness of these materials can be predicted with + or - 1 point Rockwell C.

  16. A detailed investigation of the strain hardening response of aluminum alloyed Hadfield steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canadinc, Demircan

    The unusual strain hardening response exhibited by Hadfield steel single and polycrystals under tensile loading was investigated. Hadfield steel, which deforms plastically through the competing mechanisms slip and twinning, was alloyed with aluminum in order to suppress twinning and study the role of slip only. To avoid complications due to a grained structure, only single crystals of the aluminum alloyed Hadfield steel were considered at the initial stage of the current study. As a result of alloying with aluminum, twinning was suppressed; however a significant increase in the strain hardening response was also present. A detailed microstructural analysis showed the presence of high-density dislocation walls that evolve in volume fraction due to plastic deformation and interaction with slip systems. The very high strain hardening rates exhibited by the aluminum alloyed Hadfield steel single crystals was attributed to the blockage of glide dislocations by the high-density dislocation walls. A crystal plasticity model was proposed, that accounts for the volume fraction evolution and rotation of the dense dislocation walls, as well as their interaction with the active slip systems. The novelty of the model lies in the simplicity of the constitutive equations that define the strain hardening, and the fact that it is based on experimental data regarding the microstructure. The success of the model was tested by its application to different crystallographic orientations, and finally the polycrystals of the aluminum alloyed Hadfield steel. Meanwhile, the capability of the model to predict texture was also observed through the rotation of the loading axis in single crystals. The ability of the model to capture the polycrystalline deformation response provides a venue for its utilization in other alloys that exhibit dislocation sheet structures.

  17. Elastic limit and microplastic response of hardened steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zaccone, M.A. ); Krauss, G. . Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    Tempered martensite-retained austenite microstructures were produced by direct quenching a series of 41XX medium carbon steels, direct quenching and reheating a series of five 0.8C-Cr-Ni-Mo steels and intercritically austenitizing at various temperatures, and quenching a SAE 52100 steel. All specimens were tempered either at 150 C or at 200 C. Specimens were subjected to compression and tension testing in the microstrain regime to determine the elastic limits and microplastic response of the microstructures. The retained austenite and matrix carbon content of the intercritically austenized specimens were measured by X-ray diffraction and Mossbauer spectroscopy. The elastic limit of the microstructures decreases with increasing amounts of retained austenite. Refining of the austenite distribution increases the elastic limit. Low elastic limits are mainly due to low flow stresses in the austenite and not internal stresses. The elastic limit correlates with the largest austenite free-mean path by a Hall-Petch type equation. The elastic limit increases with decreasing intercritical austenitizing temperature in the SAE 52100 due to a lower carbon content in the matrix reducing the retained austenite levels and retained carbides that refine grain size and, therefore, the austenite distribution in quenched specimens. In the microplastic region, the strain is accommodated by successively smaller austenite regions until the flow strength matches that of the martensite. Reheating and quenching refines the microstructure and renders the austenite unstable in the microplastic regime, causing transformation of the austenite to martensite by a strain-induced mechanism. The transformation of austenite to martensite occurs by a stress-assisted mechanism in medium carbon steels. The low elastic limits in medium carbon steels were due to the inability of the strain from the stress-assisted transformation to balance the plastic strain accumulated in the austenite.

  18. Surface modification of titanium using steel slag ball and shot blasting treatment for biomedical implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifvianto, Budi; Suyitno; Mahardika, Muslim

    2013-08-01

    Surface modification is often performed using grit or shot blasting treatment for improving the performances of biomedical implants. The effects of blasting treatments using steel slag balls and spherical shots on the surface and subsurface of titanium were studied in this paper. The treatments were conducted for 60-300 s using 2-5 mm steel slag balls and 3.18 mm spherical shots. The surface morphology, roughness, and elemental composition of titanium specimens were examined prior to and after the treatments. Irregular and rough titanium surfaces were formed after the treatment with the steel slag balls instead of the spherical shots. The former treatment also introduced some bioactive elements on the titanium surface, but the latter one yielded a harder surface layer. In conclusion, both steel slag ball and shot blasting treatment have their own specialization in modifying the surface of metallic biomaterials. Steel slag ball blasting is potential for improving the osseointegration quality of implants; but the shot blasting is more appropriate for improving the mechanical properties of temporary and load bearing implants, such as osteosynthesis plates.

  19. Hardening and microstructural evolution of A533b steels irradiated with Fe ions and electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, H.; Arase, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Wells, P.; Onishi, T.; Odette, G. R.

    2016-04-01

    Radiation hardening and embrittlement of A533B steels is heavily dependent on the Cu content. In this study, to investigate the effect of copper on the microstructural evolution of these materials, A533B steels with different Cu levels were irradiated with 2.4 MeV Fe ions and 1.0 MeV electrons. Ion irradiation was performed from room temperature (RT) to 350 °C with doses up to 1 dpa. At RT and 290 °C, low dose (<0.1 dpa) hardening trend corresponded with ΔH ∝ (dpa)n, with n initially approximately 0.5 and consistent with a barrier hardening mechanism, but saturating at ≈0.1 dpa. At higher dose levels, the radiation-induced hardening exhibited a strong Cu content dependence at 290 °C, but not at 350 °C. Electron irradiation using high-voltage electron microscopy revealed the growth of interstitial-type dislocation loops and enrichment of Ni, Mn, and Si in the vicinities of pre-existing dislocations at doses for which the radiation-induced hardness due to ion irradiation was prominent.

  20. Effects of induction hardening and prior cold work on a microalloyed medium carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.L. ); Medlin, D.J. ); Krauss, G. )

    1999-08-01

    The torsional strength and microstructural response to induction hardening of a 10V45 steel with prior cold work was evaluated. The vanadium-microalloyed 1045 (10V45) steel was characterized in three conditions: as-hot-rolled, 18% cold-reduced, and 29% cold-reduced. Two of these evaluations, 10V45 as-hot-rolled and 10V45-18%, were subjected to stationary and progressive induction hardening to three nominal case depths: 2, 4, and 6 mm. All specimens were subsequently furnace tempered at 190 C for 1 h. The martensitic case microstructures contained residual lamellar carbides due to incomplete dissolution of the pearlitic carbides in the prior microstructure. Torsional overload strength, as measured by maximum torque capacity, is greatly increased by increasing case depth, and to a lesser extent by increasing prior cold work level. Maximum torque capacity ranges from 2520 to 3170 N[center dot]m, depending upon induction hardening processing. Changing induction hardening processing from stationary (single-shot) to progressive (scan) had little effect on torque capacity.

  1. Mechanism of Secondary Hardening in Rapid Tempering of Dual-Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Dulal Chandra; Nayak, Sashank S.; Biro, Elliot; Gerlich, Adrian P.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Dual-phase steel with ferrite-martensite-bainite microstructure exhibited secondary hardening in the subcritical heat affected zone during fiber laser welding. Rapid isothermal tempering conducted in a Gleeble simulator also indicated occurrence of secondary hardening at 773 K (500 °C), as confirmed by plotting the tempered hardness against the Holloman-Jaffe parameter. Isothermally tempered specimens were characterized by analytic transmission electron microscopy and high-angle annular dark-field imaging. The cementite (Fe3C) and TiC located in the bainite phase of DP steel decomposed upon rapid tempering to form needle-shaped Mo2C (aspect ratio ranging from 10 to 25) and plate-shaped M4C3 carbides giving rise to secondary hardening. Precipitation of these thermodynamically stable and coherent carbides promoted the hardening phenomenon. However, complex carbides were only seen in the tempered bainite and were not detected in the tempered martensite. The martensite phase decomposed into ferrite and spherical Fe3C, and interlath-retained austenite decomposed into ferrite and elongated carbide.

  2. Tensile Properties and Work Hardening Behavior of Laser-Welded Dual-Phase Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farabi, N.; Chen, D. L.; Zhou, Y.

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the microstructural change after laser welding and its effect on the tensile properties and strain hardening behavior of DP600 and DP980 dual-phase steels. Laser welding led to the formation of martensite and significant hardness rise in the fusion zone because of the fast cooling, but the presence of a soft zone in the heat-affected zone was caused by partial vanishing and tempering of the pre-existing martensite. The extent of softening was much larger in the DP980-welded joints than in the DP600-welded joints. Despite the reduction in ductility, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) remained almost unchanged, and the yield strength (YS) indeed increased stemming from the appearance of yield point phenomena after welding in the DP600 steel. The DP980-welded joints showed lower YS and UTS than the base metal owing to the appearance of severe soft zone. The YS, UTS, and strain hardening exponent increased slightly with increasing strain rate. While the base metals had multi-stage strain hardening, the welded joints showed only stage III hardening. All the welded joints failed in the soft zone, and the fracture surfaces exhibited characteristic dimple fracture.

  3. Alternating current potential drop for measuring the case depth of hardened steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quddes, Mohammad R.; Ji, Yuan; Bowler, John R.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-frequency alternate current potential drop measurements have been made to estimate the case depth of case hardened steels using four point probes. The probes have four parallel sprung loaded pins in a line with a 1.5 mm separation between the contact points. A printed circuit board has been used to ensure the electrical connections to the pins are close to the surface of the material. This has the effect of reducing the mutual induction between driver and pick-up pins. The case depth is estimated from measurements at frequencies typically from 10 Hz to 10 kHz. The real part of the voltage phasor representing the AC potential drop is used to evaluate the case depth. The imaginary part includes the contribution due to mutual induction. To estimate the case depth of the hardened samples, the measured potential drop has been fitted to theoretical predictions. The substrate material properties of the hardened samples are extracted from multi-frequency potential drop measurements on non-harden samples. The estimated case hardened depths, deduced from potential drop measurements, are similar to those found from destructive measurements.

  4. Revealing cyclic hardening mechanism of a TRIP steel by real-time in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Dunji; An, Ke; Chen, Yan; Chen, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Real-time in situ neutron diffraction was performed on a transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel under cyclic loading at room temperature. By Rietveld refinement and single peak analysis, the volume fraction and average stress estimates as well as dislocation density of individual phases (austenite and martensite phase) were derived. The results reveal that the volume fraction of martensite phase, instead of individual phase strengthening, should be accounted for the remarkable secondary cyclic hardening.

  5. Effects of alloying on aging and hardening processes of steel with 20% nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogachev, I. N.; Zvigintsev, N. V.; Maslakova, T. M.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of hardness, thermal emf, and electrical resistance were used to study the effects of Co, Mo, Ti and Al contents on aging and hardening processes in Fe 20%Ni steel. It is shown that the effects of these alloying elements differ substantially. Anomalies which arise in the temperature dependence of physical properties due to the presence of cobalt and molybdenum are reduced by the inclusion of titanium and aluminum (and vice versa).

  6. Profiles of Material Properties in Induction-Hardened Steel Determined through Inversion of Resonant Acoustic Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.L.; Kim, S.A.; Norton, S.J.

    2005-04-09

    Electromagnetic-acoustic measurements of resonant frequencies of induction-hardened steel shafts were used in an inverse calculation to determine parameters of the radial variations in the shear constant and density, including the effects of material variations and residual stress. Parameters determined for the profile of the shear constant were consistent with independent measurements on cut specimens and estimates of the acoustoelastic contribution. The profiles determined for material variations were close to those of the measured hardness.

  7. Strain hardening and plastic instability properties of austenitic stainless steels after proton and neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, T. S.; Farrell, K.; Lee, E. H.; Hunn, J. D.; Mansur, L. K.

    2001-10-01

    Strain hardening and plastic instability properties were analyzed for EC316LN, HTUPS316, and AL6XN austenitic stainless steels after combined 800 MeV proton and spallation neutron irradiation to doses up to 10.7 dpa. The steels retained good strain-hardening rates after irradiation, which resulted in significant uniform strains. It was found that the instability stress, the stress at the onset of necking, had little dependence on the irradiation dose. Tensile fracture stress and strain were calculated from the stress-strain curve data and were used to estimate fracture toughness using an existing model. The doses to plastic instability and fracture, the accumulated doses at which the yield stress reaches instability stress or fracture stress, were predicted by extrapolation of the yield stress, instability stress, and fracture stress to higher dose. The EC316LN alloy required the highest doses for plastic instability and fracture. Plastic deformation mechanisms are discussed in relation to the strain-hardening properties of the austenitic stainless steels.

  8. Long-term hot-hardness characteristics of five through-hardened bearing steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, N. E.

    1978-01-01

    Five vacuum-melted bearing steels tempered to various room temperature hardnesses: AISI 52100 and the tool steels AISI M-1, AISI M-50, Halmo, and WB-49 were studied. Hardness measurements were taken on AISI 52100 at room temperature and at elevated temperatures after soaking it at temperatures to 478 K (400 F) for as long as 1000 hours. Hardness measurements were also taken on the tool steels after soaking them at temperatures to 700 K (800 F) for as long at 1000 hours. None of the tool steel tempered during soaking and AISI 52100 did not temper when soaked at 366 K (200 F) for 1000 hours. However, AISI 52100 that was initially hardened to room temperature hardness of 62.5 or 64.5 lost hardness during the first 500 hours of the 1000-hour soak tests at temperatures greater than 394 K (250 F), but it maintained its hardness during the final 500 hours of soaking. Similarly, AISI 52100 initially hardened to room temperature hardness of 60.5 lost hardness during the first 500 hours of the 1000-hour soaking at temperatures greater than 422 K (300 F), but it maintained its hardness during the final 500 hours of soaking.

  9. Occurrence of two-stage hardening in C-Mn steel wire rods containing pearlitic microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Balbir; Sahoo, Gadadhar; Saxena, Atul

    2016-09-01

    The 8 and 10 mm diameter wire rods intended for use as concrete reinforcement were produced/ hot rolled from C-Mn steel chemistry containing various elements within the range of C:0.55-0.65, Mn:0.85-1.50, Si:0.05-0.09, S:0.04 max, P:0.04 max and N:0.006 max wt%. Depending upon the C and Mn contents the product attained pearlitic microstructure in the range of 85-93% with balance amount of polygonal ferrite transformed at prior austenite grain boundaries. The pearlitic microstructure in the wire rods helped in achieving yield strength, tensile strength, total elongation and reduction in area values within the range of 422-515 MPa, 790-950 MPa, 22-15% and 45-35%, respectively. On analyzing the tensile results it was revealed that the material experienced hardening in two stages separable by a knee strain value of about 0.05. The occurrence of two stage hardening thus in the steel with hardening coefficients of 0.26 and 0.09 could be demonstrated with the help of derived relationships existed between flow stress and the strain.

  10. Anisotropic work-hardening behaviour ofstructural steels and aluminium alloys at large strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, S.; Teodosiu, C.; Haddadi, H.; Tabacaru, V.

    2003-03-01

    Sheet metal forming processes may often involve intense forming sequences, leading to large strains and severe strain-path changes. Optimizing such technologies requires a good understanding and description of the anisotropic plastic behaviour of the deformed material, in connection with the evolution of its texture and microstructure. In this paper, we present the predictions provided by a model involving isotropic and kinematioc hardening and by a physically-based microstructural model, which introduces additional internal variables taking into accounthe directional strength of dislocation structures and their polarity. These models have been identified by using sequences of uniaxial traction and simple shear experiments, carried out on various steels (DC06, DP600, HSLA340) and aluminium alloys (AA5182-O, AA6016-T4). The microstructural model proved able predict the complex hardening behaviour displayed, especially by the ferritic steels, namely the transient work-hardening stagnation during reversed deformation in Bauschinger tests, the temporary work-softening during orthogonal tests, and the grain fragmentation at large monotonie strains.

  11. The microstructure of neutron irradiated type-348 stainless steel and its relation to creep and hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, L. E.; Beeston, J. M.

    1982-06-01

    Annealed type-348 stainless steel specimens irradiated to 33 to 39 dpa at 350°C were examined by transmission electron microscopy to determine the cause of pronounced irradiation creep and hardening. The irradiation produced very high densities of 1-2 nm diameter helium bubbles, 2-20 nm diameter faulted (Frank) dislocation loops and 10 nm diameter precipitate particles. These defects account for the observed irradiation hardening but do not explain the creep strains. Too few point defects survive as faulted dislocation loops for significant creep by the stress-induced preferential absorption (SIPA) mechanism and there are not enough unfaulted dislocations for creep by climb-induced glide. Also, the irradiation-induced precipitates are face-centred cubic G-phase (a niobium nickel suicide), and cannot cause creep. It is suggested that the irradiation creep occurs by a grain-boundary movement mechanism such as diffusion accomodated grain-boundary sliding.

  12. A peristaltic micro pump driven by a rotating motor with magnetically attracted steel balls.

    PubMed

    Du, Min; Ye, Xiongying; Wu, Kang; Zhou, Zhaoying

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a membrane peristaltic micro pump driven by a rotating motor with magnetically attracted steel balls for lab-on-a-chip applications. The fabrication process is based on standard soft lithography technology and bonding of a PDMS layer with a PMMA substrate. A linear flow rate range ∼490 μL/min was obtained by simply varying the rotation speed of a DC motor, and a maximum back pressure of 592 Pa was achieved at a rotation speed of 43 rpm. The flow rate of the pump can also be adjusted by using steel balls with different diameters or changing the number of balls. Nevertheless, the micro pump can also work in high speed mode. A high back pressure up to 10 kPa was achieved at 500 rpm using a high speed DC motor, and an utmost flow rate up to 5 mL/min was reached.

  13. Reverse-Martensitic Hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steel upon Up-quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kiminori; Guo, Defeng; Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xiangyi

    2016-08-01

    Reverse-martensitic transformation utilizing up-quenching was demonstrated for austenitic stainless steel. Up-quenching was done following the stress-induced phase modification to martensite and then enrichment of the body-centered-cubic ferrite. Transmission-electron-microscopy observation and Vickers hardness test revealed that the reverse-martensitic transformation yields quench hardening owing to an introduction of highly-concentrated dislocation. It is furthermore found that Cr precipitation on grain boundaries caused by isothermal aging is largely suppressed in the present approach.

  14. Non-vacuum electron-beam carburizing and surface hardening of mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bataev, I. A.; Golkovskii, M. G.; Losinskaya, A. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Popelyukh, A. I.; Hassel, T.; Golovin, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we study the structure, microhardness, and tribological properties of surface layers of mild (0.19% C) steel, which was formed by electron-beam cladding with an iron-graphite powder mixture followed by quenching and tempering. A 1.4 MeV electron beam that was extracted into air was used. Cladding of steel with the iron-graphite mixture at a beam current of 24 and 26 mA formed a hypoeutectic cast iron layer (2.19% C) and a hypereutectoid steel (1.57% C) layer, which were 2.0 and 2.6 mm thick, respectively. The microhardness of the surface-quenched and tempered steel and cast iron layers was 7 and 8 GPa, respectively. Electron-beam quenching of the surface layers of hypoeutectic cast iron was accompanied with multiple cracking. During the quenching of the 1.57% C steel layer, crack formation was not observed. In friction tests against fixed and loose abrasive particles, the surface layers of hypereutectoid steel and hypoeutectic cast iron that were produced by electron-beam cladding and quenching had lower wear rates than mild steel after pack carburizing, quenching, and tempering. In the sliding wear tests, the cast iron clad layer, which was subjected to electron-beam quenching and tempering, exhibited the highest wear resistance. Electron-beam treatment can be used to harden local areas of large workpieces. It is reasonable to treat clad layers of high-carbon steel with electron-beam quenching and tempering. To prevent multiple cracking, white cast iron layers should not be quenched.

  15. Microstructural evolution and the variation of tensile behavior after aging heat treatment of precipitation hardened martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jong-Ho; Jeong, JaeSuk; Lee, Jong-Wook

    2015-01-15

    The effects of aging temperature on the microstructural evolution and the tensile behavior of precipitation hardened martensitic steel were investigated. Microscopic analysis using transmission electron microscope (TEM) was combined with the microstructural analysis using the synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) to characterize the microstructural evolution with aging temperature. Peak hardness was obtained by precipitation of the Ni{sub 3}Al ordered phase. After aging at temperature range from 420 to 590 °C, spherical Ni{sub 3}Al precipitates and ellipsoidal M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides were observed within laths and at lath boundaries, respectively. Strain hardening behavior was analyzed with Ludwik equation. It is observed that the plastic strain regimes can be divided into two different stages by a rapid increase in strain hardening followed by a comparatively lower increase. At the first strain hardening stage, the aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen, and the exponent in the aged specimen was not changed considerably with increasing aging temperature. It is revealed that the strain hardening exponents at the first and the second stages were associated with the Ni{sub 3}Al precipitates and the domain size representing the coherent scattering area, respectively. - Highlights: • All of aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen at the first stage. • The value of strain hardening exponent in the aged specimen was nearly constant with aging temperature. • Ni{sub 3}Al precipitation dominantly influenced to the increase of strain hardening exponent at the first strain hardening stage. • Domain size was associated with strain hardening exponent at the second strain hardening stage.

  16. Atom probe tomography investigation of assisted precipitation of secondary hardening carbides in a medium carbon martensitic steels.

    PubMed

    Danoix, F; Danoix, R; Akre, J; Grellier, A; Delagnes, D

    2011-12-01

    A medium carbon martensitic steel containing nanometer scale secondary hardening carbides and intermetallic particles is investigated by field ion microscopy and atom probe tomography. The interaction between the concomitant precipitations of both types of particles is investigated. It is shown that the presence of the intermetallic phase affects the nucleation mechanism and the spatial distribution of the secondary hardening carbides, which shifts from heterogeneous on dislocations to heterogeneous on the intermetallic particles.

  17. a Study on Damage Behavior of Glass by Oblique Impact of Steel Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Chang-Min; Kim, Dong-Kyun; Lee, Moon-Hwan

    The damage behavior of soda-lime glass was studied by oblique impact test with a steel ball, and in order to investigate the effect of roughness damage on glass, variable damages and strength degradation of smooth and Al2O3 sand blasted for roughness glass was investigated by the ball impact test. After the test, the crack patterns were investigated using a stereo-microscope. In addition, the finite element method was performed to analyze the stress distribution and variation in the glass impacted obliquely by the steel ball. As a result of the impact test, the crack length of 90° impacted glass was the largest and that of 50° impacted glass was the smallest. In particular, as the impact velocity and diameter of the steel ball increased, the difference in crack length was prominent. The finite element analysis showed the maximum principle stresses distribution in the contact area of glass specimen. The result of analysis was accorded with the crack growth behavior by the oblique impact test.

  18. Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of 17-4 Precipitation Hardenable Steel Processed by Selective Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafi, H. Khalid; Pal, Deepankar; Patil, Nachiket; Starr, Thomas L.; Stucker, Brent E.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanical behavior and the microstructural evolution of 17-4 precipitation hardenable (PH) stainless steel processed using selective laser melting have been studied. Test coupons were produced from 17-4 PH stainless steel powder in argon and nitrogen atmospheres. Characterization studies were carried out using mechanical testing, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The results show that post-process heat treatment is required to obtain typically desired tensile properties. Columnar grains of smaller diameters (<2 µm) emerged within the melt pool with a mixture of martensite and retained austenite phases. It was found that the phase content of the samples is greatly influenced by the powder chemistry, processing environment, and grain diameter.

  19. Method of Electrolyte-Plasma Surface Hardening of 65G and 20GL Low-Alloy Steels Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhadilov, Bauyrzhan; Zhurerova, Laila; Pavlov, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    This work is devoted to formation of modified surface layers in 65G and 20GL steels which using for the manufacture of railway transport parts, as well as the study of influence of the parametersof electrolyte-plasma surface hardening methodon the changes in structural-phase states, improving of wear-resistance. The process of electrolyte-plasma surface hardening of 65G and 20GL steels samples conducted in the electrolyte from water solution of 20% sodium carbonate, in the mode ~850°C - 2 seconds, ∼⃒1200°C - 3 seconds. It is established that in the initial state 20GL steel has ferrite-pearlite structure, and the 60G steel consists of pearlite and cement structure. After application of electrolyte-plasma surface hardening is observed the formation of carbides particles and martensite phase components in the structure of 20GL and 60G steels. It is determined that after electrolyte-plasma surface hardening with heating time - 2 seconds, the abrasive wear-resistance of 65G and 20GL steels increased to 1.3 times and 1.2 times, respectively, and the microhardness is increased to 1.6 times and 1.3 times, respectively.

  20. Constitutive equation for hardened SKD11 steel at high temperature and high strain rate using the SHPB technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, D. W.; Wang, C. Y.; Hu, Y. N.; Song, Y. X.

    2010-03-01

    In this present work, dynamic tests have been performed on hardened SKD11 steel (62 Rockwell C hardness) specimens by means of a high temperature split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) test system. Effects of temperature as well as those of strain and strain rate for the hardened steel are taken into account by using two ellipsoidal radiant heating reflectors with two halogen lamps and magnetic valve. The result obtained at high stain rates were compared with those at low strain rates under the different temperature. It was seen that the flow stress curves are found to include a work hardening region and a work softening region and the mechanical behavior of the hardened steel is highly sensitive to both the strain rate and the temperature. To determine the true flow stress- true strain, temperature relationship, specimens are tested from room temperature to 1073K at a strain rate form 0.01 s-1 to 104 s-1: The parameters for a Johnson-Cook constitutive equation and a modified Johnson-Cook constitutive equation are determined from the test results by fitting the data from both quasi-static compression and high temperature-dynamic compression tests. The modified Johnson-Cook constitutive equation is more suitable for expressing the dynamic behavior of the hardened SKD11 steel above the vicinity of the recrystallization temperature.

  1. Constitutive equation for hardened SKD11 steel at high temperature and high strain rate using the SHPB technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, D. W.; Wang, C. Y.; Hu, Y. N.; Song, Y. X.

    2009-12-01

    In this present work, dynamic tests have been performed on hardened SKD11 steel (62 Rockwell C hardness) specimens by means of a high temperature split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) test system. Effects of temperature as well as those of strain and strain rate for the hardened steel are taken into account by using two ellipsoidal radiant heating reflectors with two halogen lamps and magnetic valve. The result obtained at high stain rates were compared with those at low strain rates under the different temperature. It was seen that the flow stress curves are found to include a work hardening region and a work softening region and the mechanical behavior of the hardened steel is highly sensitive to both the strain rate and the temperature. To determine the true flow stress- true strain, temperature relationship, specimens are tested from room temperature to 1073K at a strain rate form 0.01 s-1 to 104 s-1: The parameters for a Johnson-Cook constitutive equation and a modified Johnson-Cook constitutive equation are determined from the test results by fitting the data from both quasi-static compression and high temperature-dynamic compression tests. The modified Johnson-Cook constitutive equation is more suitable for expressing the dynamic behavior of the hardened SKD11 steel above the vicinity of the recrystallization temperature.

  2. Experimental investigations on cryogenic cooling by liquid nitrogen in the end milling of hardened steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, S.; Pradeep Kumar, M.

    2011-09-01

    Milling of hardened steel generates excessive heat during the chip formation process, which increases the temperature of cutting tool and accelerates tool wear. Application of conventional cutting fluid in milling process may not effectively control the heat generation also it has inherent health and environmental problems. To minimize health hazard and environmental problems caused by using conventional cutting fluid, a cryogenic cooling set up is developed to cool tool-chip interface using liquid nitrogen (LN 2). This paper presents results on the effect of LN 2 as a coolant on machinability of hardened AISI H13 tool steel for varying cutting speed in the range of 75-125 m/min during end milling with PVD TiAlN coated carbide inserts at a constant feed rate. The results show that machining with LN 2 lowers cutting temperature, tool flank wear, surface roughness and cutting forces as compared with dry and wet machining. With LN 2 cooling, it has been found that the cutting temperature was reduced by 57-60% and 37-42%; the tool flank wear was reduced by 29-34% and 10-12%; the surface roughness was decreased by 33-40% and 25-29% compared to dry and wet machining. The cutting forces also decreased moderately compared to dry and wet machining. This can be attributed to the fact that LN 2 machining provides better cooling and lubrication through substantial reduction in the cutting zone temperature.

  3. Transmission and scanning electron microscope study on the secondary cyclic hardening behavior of interstitial-free steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Chia-Chang; Ho, New-Jin; Huang, Hsing-Lu

    2009-11-15

    Strain controlled fatigue experiment was employed to evaluate automotive grade interstitial-free ferrite steel. Hundreds of grains were examined by scanning electron microscope under electron channeling contrast image technique of backscattered electron image mode for comprehensive comparison of micrographs with those taken under transmission electron microscope. The cyclic stress responses clearly revealed that rapid hardening occurs at the early stage of cycling as a result of multiplication of dislocations to develop loop patches, dipolar walls and dislocation cells at various total strain amplitudes. After primary rapid hardening, stress responses varied from being saturated to further hardening according to dislocation structure evolution at various strain amplitudes. The fatigue failure was always accompanied with further hardening including secondary hardening. The corresponding dislocation structures with the three types of hardening behaviors are discussed. Once the secondary hardening starts, dislocation cells began to develop along grain boundaries in the low strain region and then extended into grain interiors as strain amplitudes increased and cycling went on. The secondary hardening rates were found to be directly proportional to their strain amplitudes.

  4. Hardening and microstructural evolution in A533B steels under neutron irradiation and a direct comparison with electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Nakata, H.; Fukuya, K.; Ohkubo, T.; Hono, K.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Yoshiie, T.

    2010-05-01

    A533B steels irradiated at 290 °C up to 10 mdpa in the Kyoto University Reactor were examined by hardness, positron annihilation and atom probe measurements. Dose dependent irradiation hardening and formation of Cu-rich clusters were confirmed in medium Cu (0.12% and 0.16%Cu) steels whereas neither hardening nor cluster formation was detected in low Cu (0.03%Cu) steel. No microvoids were formed in any of the steels. Post-irradiation annealing in medium Cu steels revealed that the hardening recovery at temperatures above 350-400 °C could be attributed to compositional changes and dissociation of the Cu-rich clusters. Compared to electron irradiation at almost the same dose and dose rate, KUR irradiation caused almost the same hardening and produced Cu-rich clusters, more solute-enriched with larger size and lower density. Considering lower production of freely-migrating vacancies in neutron irradiation, the results suggested that cascades enhance the formation of Cu-rich clusters.

  5. Shaping of steel mold surface of lens array by electrical discharge machining with spherical ball electrode.

    PubMed

    Takino, Hideo; Hosaka, Takahiro

    2016-06-20

    We propose a method for fabricating a spherical lens array mold by electrical discharge machining (EDM) with a ball-type electrode. The electrode is constructed by arranging conductive spherical balls in an array. To fundamentally examine the applicability of the proposed EDM method to the fabrication of lens array molds, we use an electrode having a single ball to shape a lens array mold made of stainless steel with 16 spherical elements, each having a maximum depth of 0.5 mm. As a result, a mold surface is successfully shaped with a peak-to-valley shape accuracy of approximately 10 μm, and an average surface roughness of 0.85 μm. PMID:27409126

  6. Shaping of steel mold surface of lens array by electrical discharge machining with spherical ball electrode.

    PubMed

    Takino, Hideo; Hosaka, Takahiro

    2016-06-20

    We propose a method for fabricating a spherical lens array mold by electrical discharge machining (EDM) with a ball-type electrode. The electrode is constructed by arranging conductive spherical balls in an array. To fundamentally examine the applicability of the proposed EDM method to the fabrication of lens array molds, we use an electrode having a single ball to shape a lens array mold made of stainless steel with 16 spherical elements, each having a maximum depth of 0.5 mm. As a result, a mold surface is successfully shaped with a peak-to-valley shape accuracy of approximately 10 μm, and an average surface roughness of 0.85 μm.

  7. Rolling-element fatigue life of silicon nitride balls. [as compared to that of steel, ceramic, and cermet materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    The five-ball fatigue tester was used to evaluate silicon nitride as a rolling-element bearing material. Results indicate that hot-pressed silicon nitride running against steel may be expected to yield fatigue lives comparable to or greater than those of bearing quality steel running against steel at stress levels typical rolling-element bearing application. The fatigue life of hot-pressed silicon nitride is considerably greater than that of any ceramic or cermet tested. Computer analysis indicates that there is no improvement in the lives of 120-mm-bore angular--contact ball bearings of the same geometry operating at DN values from 2 to 4 million where hot-pressed silicon nitride balls are used in place of steel balls.

  8. Comparison of tungsten carbide and stainless steel ball bearings for grinding single maize kernels in a reciprocating grinder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reciprocating grinders can grind single maize kernels by shaking the kernel in a vial with a ball bearing. This process results in a grind quality that is not satisfactory for many experiments. Tungesten carbide ball bearings are nearly twice as dense as steel, so we compared their grinding performa...

  9. Application of steel 40Kh surface hardened by high-frequency currents in the production of gate valve parts

    SciTech Connect

    Veliev, T.K.; Arifulin, R.K.; Fataliev, N.S.; Safarov, R.S.

    1986-09-01

    Bench tests were performed to determine the change in roughness, planeness, and hardness of the sealing surfaces of parts of gate valves made with steel 40Kh surface-hardened by high-frequency currents (HFC). Most parts of the gate valves for oil wells are now made of steel 38Kh2MYuA containing molybdenum. It was of interest to conduct tests to find another steel (40Kh) with less precious alloying elements and to increase the hardness of the sealing surfaces. The tests showed that steel 40Kh with HFC surface hardening may be recommended for gate parts of straight-through gate valves with specific contact pressure of up to 70 MPa. The torque for controlling the gate must be 0.8-1kN. Tests were also conducted on an experimental batch of Christmas trees and tubing heads; those results are presented.

  10. Investigation of the Influence Factors on Distortion in Induction-Hardened Steel Shafts Manufactured from Cold-Drawn Rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Juan; Epp, Jeremy; Rocha, Alexandre da Silva; Nunes, Rafael Menezes; Zoch, Hans Werner

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the distortion of steel shafts was investigated before and after induction hardening. Several essential influencing factors in the manufacturing process chain regarding cold drawing, cutting method, notches on the shafts, and induction hardening were analyzed by design of experiment (DoE). Further necessary examinations of microstructures, hardness profile, segregation of chemical composition, and residual stress state were conducted for understanding the distortion behavior. The results of the statistical analysis of the DoE showed that the drawing process is the most important factor influencing distortion. The surface hardening depth of induction hardening is the second main factor. The relationship between inhomogeneities in the work pieces and the distortion was finally discussed.

  11. Assessment of the microstructure and torsional fatigue performance of an induction hardened vanadium microalloyed medium-carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothleutner, Lee M.

    Vanadium microalloying of medium-carbon bar steels is a common practice in industry for a number of hot rolled as well as forged and controlled-cooled components. However, use of vanadium microalloyed steels has expanded into applications beyond their originally designed controlled-cooled processing scheme. Applications such as transmission shafts often require additional heat-treatments such as quench and tempering and/or induction hardening to meet packaging or performance requirements. As a result, there is uncertainty regarding the influence of vanadium on the properties of heat-treated components, specifically the effect of rapid heat-treating such as induction hardening. In the current study, the microstructural evolution and torsional fatigue behavior of induction hardened 1045 and 10V45 (0.08 wt pct V) steels were examined. Torsional fatigue specimens specifically designed for this research were machined from the as-received, hot rolled bars and induction hardened using both scanning (96 kHz/72 kW) and single-shot (31 kHz/128 kW) methods. Four conditions were evaluated, three scan hardened to 25, 32, and 44 pct nominal effective case depths and one single-shot hardened to 44 pct. Torsional fatigue tests were conducted at a stress ratio of 0.1 and shear stress amplitudes of 550, 600, and 650 MPa. Physical simulations using the thermal profiles from select induction hardened conditions were conducted in the GleebleRTM 3500 to augment microstructural analysis of torsional fatigue specimens. Thermal profiles were calculated by a collaborating private company using electro-thermal finite element analysis. Residual stresses were evaluated for all conditions using a strain gage hole drilling technique. The results showed that vanadium microalloying has an influence on the microstructure in the highest hardness region of the induction-hardened case as well as the total case region. Vanadium microalloyed conditions consistently exhibited a greater amount of non

  12. The development of high strength corrosion resistant precipitation hardening cast steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahams, Rachel A.

    Precipitation Hardened Cast Stainless Steels (PHCSS) are a corrosion resistant class of materials which derive their properties from secondary aging after a normalizing heat treatment step. While PHCSS materials are available in austenitic and semi-austenitic forms, the martensitic PHCSS are most widely used due to a combination of high strength, good toughness, and corrosion resistance. If higher strength levels can be achieved in these alloys, these materials can be used as a lower-cost alternative to titanium for high specific strength applications where corrosion resistance is a factor. Although wrought precipitation hardened materials have been in use and specified for more than half a century, the specification and use of PHCSS has only been recent. The effects of composition and processing on performance have received little attention in the cast steel literature. The work presented in these investigations is concerned with the experimental study and modeling of microstructural development in cast martensitic precipitation hardened steels at high strength levels. Particular attention is focused on improving the performance of the high strength CB7Cu alloy by control of detrimental secondary phases, notably delta ferrite and retained austenite, which is detrimental to strength, but potentially beneficial in terms of fracture and impact toughness. The relationship between age processing and mechanical properties is also investigated, and a new age hardening model based on simultaneous precipitation hardening and tempering has been modified for use with these steels. Because the CB7Cu system has limited strength even with improved processing, a higher strength prototype Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo-Ti system has been designed and adapted for use in casting. This prototype is expected to develop high strengths matching or exceed that of cast Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Traditional multicomponent constitution phase diagrams widely used for phase estimation in conventional stainless steels

  13. Application of Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P) Processing to Press Hardening Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun Jung; Cho, Lawrence; De Cooman, Bruno Charles

    2014-08-01

    Press hardening steel (PHS) has been increasingly used for the manufacture of structural automotive parts in recent years. One of the most critical characteristics of PHS is a low residual ductility related to a martensitic microstructure. The present work proposes the application of quenching and partitioning (Q&P) processing to improve the ductility of PHS. Q&P processing was applied to a Si- and Cr-added Q&P-compatible PHS, leading to a press hardened microstructure consisting of a tempered martensite matrix containing carbide-free bainite and retained austenite. The simultaneous addition of Si and Cr was used to increase the retained austenite fraction in the Q&P-compatible PHS. The Q&P processing of the PHS resulted in a high volume fraction of C-enriched retained austenite, and excellent mechanical properties. After a quench at 543 K (270 °C) and a partition treatment at 673 K (400 °C), the PHS microstructure contained a high volume fraction of retained austenite and a total elongation (TE) of 17 pct was achieved. The yield strength (YS) and the tensile strength were 1098 and 1320 MPa, respectively. The considerable improvement of the ductility of the Q&P-compatible PHS should lead to an improved in-service ductility beneficial to the passive safety of vehicle passengers.

  14. Pulsed-laser atom probe studies of a precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel.

    PubMed

    Dmitrieva, O; Choi, P; Gerstl, S S A; Ponge, D; Raabe, D

    2011-05-01

    A precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel was analyzed using a pulsed laser atom probe. The laser pulse energy was varied from 0.3 to 1.9 nJ to study its effect on the measured chemical compositions and spatial resolution. Compositional analyses using proximity histograms did not show any significant variations in the average matrix and precipitate compositions. The only remarkable change in the atom probe data was a decrease in the ++/+ charge state ratios of the elements. The values of the evaporation field used for the reconstructions exhibit a linear dependence on the laser pulse energy. The adjustment of the evaporation fields used in the reconstructions for different laser pulse energies was based on the correlation of the obtained cluster shapes to the TEM observations. No influence of laser pulse energy on chemical composition of the precipitates and on the chemical sharpness of their interfaces was detected.

  15. Influence of Heat Treatment on Mercury Cavitation Resistance of Surface Hardened 316LN Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J; Hsu, Julia

    2010-11-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of carburized 316LN stainless steel was significantly degraded but not destroyed by heat treatment in the temperature range 500-800 C. The heat treatments caused rejection of some carbon from the carburized layer into an amorphous film that formed on each specimen surface. Further, the heat treatments encouraged carbide precipitation and reduced hardness within the carburized layer, but the overall change did not reduce surface hardness fully to the level of untreated material. Heat treatments as short as 10 min at 650 C substantially reduced cavitation-erosion resistance in mercury, while heat treatments at 500 and 800 C were found to be somewhat less detrimental. Overall, the results suggest that modest thermal excursions perhaps the result of a weld made at some distance to the carburized material or a brief stress relief treatment will not render the hardened layer completely ineffective but should be avoided to the greatest extent possible.

  16. Sulfide Stress Cracking and Electrochemical Corrosion of Precipitation Hardening Steel After Plasma Oxy-Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda-Gutiérrez, E. E.; Díaz-Guillén, J. C.; Díaz-Guillén, J. A.; González, M. A.; García-Vázquez, F.; Muñóz, R.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a duplex plasma nitriding followed by an oxidizing stage process (which is also referred as oxy-nitriding) on the corrosion behavior of a 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel. The formation of both, expanded martensite (b.c.t. α'N-phase) and chromium oxide (type Cr2O3) in the subsurface of oxy-nitrided samples at specific controlled conditions, leads in a noticeable increasing in the time-to-rupture during the sulfide stress cracking test, in comparison with an untreated reference sample. Oxy-nitriding improves the corrosion performance of the alloy when it is immersed in solutions saturated by sour gas, which extends the application potential of this type of steel in the oil and gas extraction and processing industry. The presence of the oxy-nitrided layer inhibits the corrosion process that occurs in the near-surface region, where hydrogen is liberated after the formation of iron sulfides, which finally produces a fragile fracture by micro-crack propagation; the obtained results suggest that oxy-nitriding slows this process, thus delaying the rupture of the specimen. Moreover, oxy-nitriding produces a hard, sour gas-resistant surface, but do not significantly affect the original chloride ion solution resistance of the material.

  17. Sulfide Stress Cracking and Electrochemical Corrosion of Precipitation Hardening Steel After Plasma Oxy-Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda-Gutiérrez, E. E.; Díaz-Guillén, J. C.; Díaz-Guillén, J. A.; González, M. A.; García-Vázquez, F.; Muñóz, R.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a duplex plasma nitriding followed by an oxidizing stage process (which is also referred as oxy-nitriding) on the corrosion behavior of a 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel. The formation of both, expanded martensite (b.c.t. α'N-phase) and chromium oxide (type Cr2O3) in the subsurface of oxy-nitrided samples at specific controlled conditions, leads in a noticeable increasing in the time-to-rupture during the sulfide stress cracking test, in comparison with an untreated reference sample. Oxy-nitriding improves the corrosion performance of the alloy when it is immersed in solutions saturated by sour gas, which extends the application potential of this type of steel in the oil and gas extraction and processing industry. The presence of the oxy-nitrided layer inhibits the corrosion process that occurs in the near-surface region, where hydrogen is liberated after the formation of iron sulfides, which finally produces a fragile fracture by micro-crack propagation; the obtained results suggest that oxy-nitriding slows this process, thus delaying the rupture of the specimen. Moreover, oxy-nitriding produces a hard, sour gas-resistant surface, but do not significantly affect the original chloride ion solution resistance of the material.

  18. Impact toughness of a gradient hardened layer of Cr5Mo1V steel treated by laser shock peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Weiguang; Li, Lei; Wei, Yanpeng; Zhao, Aimin; Guo, Yacong; Huang, Chenguang; Yin, Hongxiang; Zhang, Lingchen

    2016-04-01

    Laser shock peening (LSP) is a widely used surface treatment technique that can effectively improve the fatigue life and impact toughness of metal parts. Cr5Mo1V steel exhibits a gradient hardened layer after a LSP process. A new method is proposed to estimate the impact toughness that considers the changing mechanical properties in the gradient hardened layer. Assuming a linearly gradient distribution of impact toughness, the parameters controlling the impact toughness of the gradient hardened layer were given. The influences of laser power densities and the number of laser shots on the impact toughness were investigated. The impact toughness of the laser peened layer improves compared with an untreated specimen, and the impact toughness increases with the laser power densities and decreases with the number of laser shots. Through the fracture morphology analysis by a scanning electron microscope, we established that the Cr5Mo1V steel was fractured by the cleavage fracture mechanism combined with a few dimples. The increase in the impact toughness of the material after LSP is observed because of the decreased dimension and increased fraction of the cleavage fracture in the gradient hardened layer.

  19. The effect of hydrogenation on strain hardening and deformation mechanisms in <113> single crystals of Hadfield steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurova, Elena; Maier, Galina; Melnikov, Eugene; Koshovkina, Vera; Moskvina, Valentina; Smirnov, Alexander; Bataev, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    The effect of hydrogenation on the strain-hardening behavior and the deformation mechanisms of <113>-oriented single crystals of Hadfield steel was investigated under tension at room temperature. The stages of plastic flow and deformation mechanisms for hydrogen-charged specimens are similar to one in hydrogen-free state: slip → slip + single twinning → slip + multiple twinning. Hydrogen alloying favors to mechanical twinning, micro- and macrolocalization of plastic flow.

  20. Rolling-element fatigue lives of AISI 52100 steel balls with several synthetic lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Rolling-element fatigue tests were run with three synthetic lubricants with and without antiwear additives and with a paraffinic mineral oil at race temperatures of 336 to 353 K (146 146 to 175 F). The five-ball fatigue tester was used with steel balls to evaluate the relative fatigue lives with each of six lubricant-additive combinations. The tests were run at 5,520 MPa (800,000psi) maximum Hertz stress, 10,000 rpm shaft speed, and 30 deg contact angle. The lubricants tested have similar kinetic viscosities at 372 K (210 F) ranging from 0.034 to 0.089 sq cm/sec (3.4 to 8.9 cS). At these conditions, the mode of failure in the five-ball fatigue tester was classical subsurface rolling-element fatigue. The baseline for comparison of fatigue life was the paraffinic mineral oil without additives. The effects of the synthetic lubricants and their additives, which are useful for boundary lubrication, oxidation or foam inhibition, were evaluated.

  1. Formation quality optimization of laser hot wire cladding for repairing martensite precipitation hardening stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Peng; Feng, Zhenhua; Zheng, Shiqing

    2015-01-01

    Laser cladding is an advantaged repairing technology due to its low heat input and high flexibility. With preheating wire by resistance heat, laser hot wire cladding shows better process stability and higher deposition efficiency compared to laser cold wire/powder cladding. Multi-pass layer were cladded on the surface of martensite precipitation hardening stainless steel FV520B by fiber laser with ER410NiMo wire. Wire feed rate and preheat current were optimized to obtain stable wire transfer, which guaranteed good formation quality of single pass cladding. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize processing parameters and predict formation quality of multi-pass cladding. Laser power P, scanning speed Vs, wire feed rate Vf and overlap ratio η were selected as the input variables, while flatness ratio, dilution and incomplete fusion value as the responses. Optimal clad layer with flat surface, low dilution and no incomplete fusion was obtained by appropriately reducing Vf, and increasing P, Vs and η. No defect like pore or crack was found. The tensile strength and impact toughness of the clad layer is respectively 96% and 86% of those of the substrate. The clad layer showed nonuniform microstructure and was divided into quenched areas with coarse lath martensite and tempered areas with tempered martensite due to different thermal cycles in adjacent areas. The tempered areas showed similar hardness to the substrate.

  2. Coarsening and Hardening Behaviors of Cu-Rich Precipitates in Super304H Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Ping; Xing, Hui; Wang, Xuanli; Sun, Jian; Cui, Zhengqiang; Yang, Changshun

    2015-09-01

    The coarsening and hardening behaviors of Cu-rich precipitates in Super304H austenitic steel aged at 923 K, 973 K, and 1023 K (650 °C, 700 °C, and 750 °C), respectively, have been investigated through measuring the particle size by transmission electron microscopy and microhardness. The results showed the Cu-rich precipitates have a cubic-to-cubic crystallographic relationship and coherent interface with the austenitic matrix during long-time aging, and that the coarsening behavior of the Cu-rich particles can be predicted with the help of the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner theory. The activation energy for coarsening of the Cu-rich precipitates was evaluated to be 212 ± 3 kJ/mol. The coarsening of Cu-rich precipitates is controlled mainly by the volume diffusion of copper atoms in the austenitic matrix. The contributions to the maximum microhardness occurring at different aging temperatures from precipitation strengthening range from about 17 to 25 pct. The strengthening of the Cu-rich precipitates arises mainly from the coherency strain and partially from stacking-fault strengthening.

  3. Linear Friction Welding Process Model for Carpenter Custom 465 Precipitation-Hardened Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Yavari, R.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2014-06-01

    An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite-element analysis is combined with thermo-mechanical material constitutive models for Carpenter Custom 465 precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel to develop a linear friction welding (LFW) process model for this material. The main effort was directed toward developing reliable material constitutive models for Carpenter Custom 465 and toward improving functional relations and parameterization of the workpiece/workpiece contact-interaction models. The LFW process model is then used to predict thermo-mechanical response of Carpenter Custom 465 during LFW. Specifically, temporal evolutions and spatial distribution of temperature within, and expulsion of the workpiece material from, the weld region are examined as a function of the basic LFW process parameters, i.e., (a) contact-pressure history, (b) reciprocation frequency, and (c) reciprocation amplitude. Examination of the results obtained clearly revealed the presence of three zones within the weld, i.e., (a) Contact-interface region, (b) Thermo-mechanically affected zone, and (c) heat-affected zone. While there are no publicly available reports related to Carpenter Custom 465 LFW behavior, to allow an experiment/computation comparison, these findings are consistent with the results of our ongoing companion experimental investigation.

  4. Investigations on Surface Milling of Hardened AISI 4140 Steel with Pulse Jet MQL Applicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Mahmood Al; Mia, Mozammel; Dhar, Nikhil Ranjan

    2016-06-01

    In this article, an experimental investigation was performed in milling hardened AISI 4140 steel of hardness 40 HRC. The machining was performed in both dry and minimal quantity lubricant (MQL) conditions, as part of neat machining, to make a strong comparison of the undertaken machining environments. The MQL was impinged int the form of pulse jet, by using the specially developed pulse-jet-attachment, to ensure that the cutting fluid can be applied in different timed pulses and quantities at critical zones. The tool wear, cutting force and surface roughness were taken as the quality responses while cutting speed, table feed rate and flow rate of the pulse were considered as influential factors. The depth of cut was kept constant at 1.50 mm because of its less significant effects and the straight oil was adopted as cutting fluid in pulse-jet-MQL. The effects of different factors, on the quality responses, are analyzed using ANOVA. It is observed that MQL applicator system exhibits overall better performance when compared to dry milling by reducing surface roughness, cutting force and prolonging tool life but a flow rate of 150 ml/h has tremendous effects on the responses. This investigation and afterward results are expected to aid the industrial practitioner and researcher to adopt the pulse-MQL in high speed milling to prolong tool life, reduce tool wear, diminish cutting force generation and promote better surface finish.

  5. Structural and microstructural changes in monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} during the ball-milling with stainless steel assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanic, G. . E-mail: stefanic@irb.hr; Music, S.; Gajovic, A.

    2006-04-13

    High-energy ball-milling of monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} was performed in air using the planetary ball mill with a stainless steel milling assembly. Structural and microstructural changes during the ball-milling were monitored using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The results of line broadening analysis indicated a decrease in the crystallite size and an increase in the microstrains with the ball-milling time increased up to {approx}150 min. The results of quantitative phase analysis indicated the presence of a very small amount of tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} phase in this early stage of ball-milling. The onset of m-ZrO{sub 2} {sup {yields}} t-ZrO{sub 2} transition occurred between 10 and 15 h of ball-milling, which resulted in a complete transition after 20 h of ball-milling. Further ball-milling caused a decrease of the t-ZrO{sub 2} lattice parameters followed by a probable transition into c-ZrO{sub 2}. It was concluded that the stabilization of t- and c-ZrO{sub 2} polymorphs at RT can be attributed to the incorporation of aliovalent cations (Fe{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+}) introduced into the sample due to the wear and oxidation of the milling media.

  6. Influence of Thermal Aging on the Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Dual Phase Precipitation Hardened Powder Metallurgy Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    Increasing demand for high strength powder metallurgy (PM) steels has resulted in the development of dual phase PM steels. In this work, the effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels of varying ferrite-martensite content were examined. Quantitative analyses of the inherent porosity and phase fractions were conducted on the steels and no significant differences were noted with respect to aging temperature. Tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation to fracture all increased with increasing aging temperature reaching maxima at 538°C in most cases. Increased strength and decreased ductility were observed in steels of higher martensite content. Nanoindentation of the individual microconstituents was employed to obtain a fundamental understanding of the strengthening contributions. Both the ferrite and martensite hardness values increased with aging temperature and exhibited similar maxima to the bulk tensile properties. Due to the complex non-uniform stresses and strains associated with conventional nanoindentation, micropillar compression has become an attractive method to probe local mechanical behavior while limiting strain gradients and contributions from surrounding features. In this study, micropillars of ferrite and martensite were fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) milling of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels. Compression testing was conducted using a nanoindenter equipped with a flat punch indenter. The stress-strain curves of the individual microconstituents were calculated from the load-displacement curves less the extraneous displacements of the system. Using a rule of mixtures approach in conjunction with porosity corrections, the mechanical properties of ferrite and martensite were combined for comparison to tensile tests of the bulk material, and reasonable agreement was found for the ultimate tensile

  7. Cyclic uniaxial and biaxial hardening of type 304 stainless steel modeled by the viscoplasticity theory based on overstress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, David; Krempl, Erhard

    1988-01-01

    The isotropic theory of viscoplasticity based on overstress does not use a yield surface or a loading and unloading criterion. The inelastic strain rate depends on overstress, the difference between the stress and the equilibrium stress, and is assumed to be rate dependent. Special attention is paid to the modeling of elastic regions. For the modeling of cyclic hardening, such as observed in annealed Type 304 stainless steel, and additional growth law for a scalar quantity which represents the rate independent asymptotic value of the equilibrium stress is added. It is made to increase with inelastic deformation using a new scalar measure which differentiates between nonproportional and proportional loading. The theory is applied to correlate uniaxial data under two step amplitude loading including the effect of further hardening at the high amplitude and proportional and nonproportional cyclic loadings. Results are compared with corresponding experiments.

  8. Hardness-based plasticity and fracture model for quench-hardenable boron steel (22MnB5)

    SciTech Connect

    Greve, L. Medricky, M. Andres, M.; Eller, T. K.

    2013-12-16

    A comprehensive strain hardening and fracture characterization of different grades of boron steel blanks has been performed, providing the foundation for the implementation into the modular material model (MMM) framework developed by Volkswagen Group Research for an explicit crash code. Due to the introduction of hardness-based interpolation rules for the characterized main grades, the hardening and fracture behavior is solely described by the underlying Vickers hardness. In other words, knowledge of the hardness distribution within a hot-formed component is enough to set up the newly developed computational model. The hardness distribution can be easily introduced via an experimentally measured hardness curve or via hardness mapping from a corresponding hot-forming simulation. For industrial application using rather coarse and computationally inexpensive shell element meshes, the user material model has been extended by a necking/post-necking model with reduced mesh-dependency as an additional failure mode. The present paper mainly addresses the necking/post-necking model.

  9. Hardness-based plasticity and fracture model for quench-hardenable boron steel (22MnB5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, L.; Eller, T. K.; Medricky, M.; Andres, M.

    2013-12-01

    A comprehensive strain hardening and fracture characterization of different grades of boron steel blanks has been performed, providing the foundation for the implementation into the modular material model (MMM) framework developed by Volkswagen Group Research for an explicit crash code. Due to the introduction of hardness-based interpolation rules for the characterized main grades, the hardening and fracture behavior is solely described by the underlying Vickers hardness. In other words, knowledge of the hardness distribution within a hot-formed component is enough to set up the newly developed computational model. The hardness distribution can be easily introduced via an experimentally measured hardness curve or via hardness mapping from a corresponding hot-forming simulation. For industrial application using rather coarse and computationally inexpensive shell element meshes, the user material model has been extended by a necking/post-necking model with reduced mesh-dependency as an additional failure mode. The present paper mainly addresses the necking/post-necking model.

  10. The morphology of secondary-hardening carbides in a martensitic steel at the peak hardness by 3DFIM.

    PubMed

    Akré, J; Danoix, F; Leitner, H; Auger, P

    2009-04-01

    The morphology and composition of secondary-hardening M(2)C carbides in a complex steel under non-isothermal tempering condition has been investigated with three-dimensional field ion microscopy and atom-probe tomography. The technical set-up and the condition of investigations have been developed. We will reveal for the first time, a virtually non-biased image of the so-called secondary-hardening microstructure, consisting in a very fine dispersion of nanometer-sized needles, idiomorphs and blocky carbides. Needles precipitate with a large number density at the maximum hardness peak. We have found out that this mixture of shape could be explained by the onset of coarsening, but the role of local factors have been evidenced: variation of composition among the carbides and even local strain effects due to the precipitation of a second phase can play a role in changing the growth conditions.

  11. Results of the radiological survey of the Excelsior Steel Ball Company, Tonawanda, New York (TNY005)

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, S.P.; Brown, K.S.

    1998-07-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted two radiological surveys of property belonging to the Excelsior Steel Ball Company, which is surrounded on three sides by the former site of the Linde Uranium Refinery, Tonawanda, New York. The surveys were performed in September 1997 and February 1998. The purpose of the first survey was to determine if radioactive residuals were present from previous activities at the former Linde site. The Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide Corporation, Tonawanda, New York, had used radioactive materials at that location for work performed under government contract from 1942 through 1948. The purpose of the second survey was to collect additional biased samples from an area of the site where biased sample results showed slightly elevated levels of thorium-232.

  12. Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of the Bake-Hardening Behavior of Transformation-Induced Plasticity and Dual-Phase Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timokhina, I. B.; Hodgson, P. D.; Pereloma, E. V.

    2007-10-01

    The effect of prestraining (PS) and bake hardening (BH) on the microstructures and mechanical properties has been studied in transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) and dual-phase (DP) steels after intercritical annealing. The DP steel showed an increase in the yield strength and the appearance of the upper and lower yield points after a single BH treatment as compared with the as-received condition, whereas the mechanical properties of the TRIP steel remained unchanged. This difference appears to be because of the formation of plastic deformation zones with high dislocation density around the “as-quenched” martensite in the DP steel, which allowed carbon to pin these dislocations, which, in turn, increased the yield strength. It was found for both steels that the BH behavior depends on the dislocation rearrangement in ferrite with the formation of cell, microbands, and shear band structures after PS. The strain-induced transformation of retained austenite to martensite in the TRIP steel contributes to the formation of a complex dislocation structure.

  13. Unveiling the Origin of Work Hardening Behavior in an Ultrafine-Grained Manganese Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steel by Hydrogen Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xu; Li, Wei; Zhao, Hongshan; Han, Qihang; Wang, Li; Jiao, Huisheng; Jin, Xuejun

    2016-09-01

    To reveal the origin of work hardening behavior in an ultrafine-grained manganese transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel, specific experiments were designed with the assistance of hydrogen. Although the effect of hydrogen on the austenite transformation was negligible, the work hardening rate ( Θ) was apparently reduced for hydrogenated samples, indicating that TRIP effect cannot account for the high Θ alone. The collaborative effect of dislocation accumulation in ferrite and austenite transformation is proposed to explain the responsible mechanism.

  14. Conservation Research and Development/ New Ultra-Low Carbon High Strength Steels with Improved Bake Hardenability for Enhanced Stretch Formability and Dent Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony J. DeArdo; C. Isaac Garcia

    2003-12-15

    Conservation Research and Development/New Ultra-Low Carbon High Strength Steels with Improved Bake Hardenability for Enhanced Stretch Formability and Dent Resistance. The experimental work can be divided into four phases. In each phase, the materials were received or designed, processed and tested, to evaluate the BH increment or response, as a function of compositions and processing conditions. Microstructural characterization by various techniques was performed in order to gain insights into the mechanisms of flow stress increment by bake hardening.

  15. Issues associated with the use of Yoshida nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening material model in Advanced High Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ming F.; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Xinhai

    2016-08-01

    The Yoshida nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening material model is often selected in forming simulations where an accurate springback prediction is required. Many successful application cases in the industrial scale automotive components using advanced high strength steels (AHSS) have been reported to give better springback predictions. Several issues have been raised recently in the use of the model for higher strength AHSS including the use of two C vs. one C material parameters in the Armstrong and Frederick model (AF model), the original Yoshida model vs. Original Yoshida model with modified hardening law, and constant Young's Modulus vs. decayed Young's Modulus as a function of plastic strain. In this paper, an industrial scale automotive component using 980 MPa strength materials is selected to study the effect of two C and one C material parameters in the AF model on both forming and springback prediction using the Yoshida model with and without the modified hardening law. The effect of decayed Young's Modulus on the springback prediction for AHSS is also evaluated. In addition, the limitations of the material parameters determined from tension and compression tests without multiple cycle tests are also discussed for components undergoing several bending and unbending deformations.

  16. Double Sided Irradiation for Laser-assisted Shearing of Ultra High Strength Steels with Process Integrated Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Eckert, Markus; Weinbach, Matthias

    Most small or medium sized parts produced in mass production are made by shearing and forming of sheet metal. This technology is cost effective, but the achievable quality and geometrical complexity are limited when working high and highest strength steel. Based on the requirements for widening the process limits of conventional sheet metal working the Fraunhofer IPT has developed the laser-assisted sheet metal working technology. With this enhancement it is possible to produce parts made of high and highest strength steel with outstanding quality, high complexity and low tool wear. Additionally laser hardening has been implemented to adjust the mechanical properties of metal parts within the process. Currently the process is limited to lower sheet thicknesses (<2 mm) to maintain short cycle times. To enable this process for larger geometries and higher sheet thicknesses the Fraunhofer IPT developed a system for double sided laser-assisted sheet metal working within progressive dies.

  17. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Development of Appropriate Resistance Spot Welding Practice for Transformation-Hardened Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Chuko; Jerry Gould

    2002-07-08

    This report describes work accomplished in the project, titled ''Development of Appropriate Resistance Spot Welding Practice for Transformation-Hardened Steels.'' The Phase 1 of the program involved development of in-situ temper diagrams for two gauges of representative dual-phase and martensitic grades of steels. The results showed that tempering is an effective way of reducing hold-time sensitivity (HTS) in hardenable high-strength sheet steels. In Phase 2, post-weld cooling rate techniques, incorporating tempering, were evaluated to reduce HTS for the same four steels. Three alternative methods, viz., post-heating, downsloping, and spike tempering, for HTS reduction were investigated. Downsloping was selected for detailed additional study, as it appeared to be the most promising of the cooling rate control methods. The downsloping maps for each of the candidate steels were used to locate the conditions necessary for the peak response. Three specific downslope conditions (at a fix ed final current for each material, timed for a zero-, medium-, and full-softening response) were chosen for further metallurgical and mechanical testing. Representative samples, were inspected metallographically, examining both local hardness variations and microstructures. The resulting downslope diagrams were found to consist largely of a C-curve. The softening observed in these curves, however, was not supported by subsequent metallography, which showed that all welds made, regardless of material and downslope condition, were essentially martensitic. CCT/TTT diagrams, generated based on microstructural modeling done at Oak Ridge National Laboratories, showed that minimum downslope times of 2 and 10 s for the martensitic and dual-phase grades of steels, respectively, were required to avoid martensite formation. These times, however, were beyond those examined in this study. These results show that downsloping is not an effective means of reducing HTS for production resistance spot

  18. Quantification of age hardening in maraging steels and an Ni-base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.

    2000-02-01

    Age hardening process in metallic alloys due to precipitation can be quantified using phase transformation theories. Two ageing stages are of particular interest, for both theory and practice. The early stage of precipitation hardening is under the description of the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation. Wilson has recently provided a detailed theoretical analysis for early stages of ageing. Wilson successfully used equations in the quantification of early and over-ageing stages of hardening in an Fe-12Ni-6Mn maraging-type alloy. In the present work, these were applied to further alloys. All the hardness data were taken from published literature. Original references should be consulted for details of materials, testing and characterization.

  19. Concomitant formation of different nature clusters and hardening in reactor pressure vessel steels irradiated by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Fukuya, K.; Hojo, T.

    2013-11-01

    Specimens of A533B steels containing 0.04, 0.09 and 0.21 wt%Cu were irradiated at 290 °C to 3 dpa with 3 MeV Fe ions and subjected to atom probe analyses, transmission electron microscopy observations and hardness measurements. The atom probe analysis results showed that two types of solute clusters were formed: Cu-enriched clusters containing Mn, Ni and Si atoms as irradiation-enhanced solute atom clusters and Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters as irradiation-induced solute atom clusters. Both cluster types occurred in the highest Cu-content steel and the ratio of Mn/Ni/Si-enriched clusters to Cu-enriched clusters increased with irradiation doses. It was confirmed that the cluster formation was a key factor in the microstructure evolution until the high dose irradiation was reached even in the low Cu content steels though the dislocation loops with much lower density than that of the clusters were observed as matrix damage. The difference in the hardening efficiency due to the difference in the nature of the clusters was small. The irradiation-induced clustering of undersized Si atoms suggested that a clustering driving force other than vacancy-driven diffusion, probably an interstitial mechanism, may become important at higher dose rates.

  20. Error assessment in post-necking strain hardening behaviour identification of mild steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppieters, S.; Hakoyama, T.; Denys, K.; Debruyne, D.; Kuwabara, T.

    2016-08-01

    The information hidden in the diffuse neck of a tensile test on a thin metal sheet can be extracted using a special case of the non-linear virtual fields method yielding the so-called post-necking strain hardening behaviour. The method, however, requires a number of assumptions which are scrutinized in this paper. To eliminate experimental errors which could potentially hamper the assessment, virtual test data (i.e. strain fields at different load steps) is generated using a FE model of the tensile test. The identification strategy is then used to retrieve the reference strain hardening behaviour used in the FE simulation. This approach is used to study the necessity of incorporating rate-dependent plasticity in the identification procedure. Additionally, the necessary plane stress condition in the diffuse neck is studied.

  1. Tensile stress-strain and work hardening behaviour of P9 steel for wrapper application in sodium cooled fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, J.; Choudhary, B. K.; Isaac Samuel, E.; Mathew, M. D.; Jayakumar, T.

    2012-01-01

    Tensile flow behaviour of P9 steel with different silicon content has been examined in the framework of Hollomon, Ludwik, Swift, Ludwigson and Voce relationships for a wide temperature range (300-873 K) at a strain rate of 1.3 × 10 -3 s -1. Ludwigson equation described true stress ( σ)-true plastic strain ( ɛ) data most accurately in the range 300-723 K. At high temperatures (773-873 K), Ludwigson equation reduces to Hollomon equation. The variations of instantaneous work hardening rate ( θ = dσ/ dɛ) and θσ with stress indicated two-stage work hardening behaviour. True stress-true plastic strain, flow parameters, θ vs. σ and θσ vs. σ with respect to temperature exhibited three distinct temperature regimes and displayed anomalous behaviour due to dynamic strain ageing at intermediate temperatures. Rapid decrease in flow stress and flow parameters, and rapid shift in θ- σ and θσ- σ towards lower stresses with increase in temperature indicated dominance of dynamic recovery at high temperatures.

  2. Optimization of machining and vibration parameters for residual stresses minimization in ultrasonic assisted turning of 4340 hardened steel.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Varun; Pandey, Pulak M

    2016-08-01

    The residual stresses generated in the machined work piece have detrimental effect on fatigue life, corrosion resistance and tribological properties. However, the effect of cutting and vibration parameters on residual stresses in Ultrasonic Assisted Turning (UAT) has not been dealt with. The present paper highlights the effect of feed rate, depth of cut, cutting velocity and percentage intensity of ultrasonic power on residual stress generation. XRD analysis has been carried out to measure the residual stress while turning 4340 hardened steel using UAT. The experiments were performed based on response surface methodology to develop statistical model for residual stress. The outcome of ANOVA revealed that percentage intensity and feed rate significantly affect the residual stress generation. The significant interactions between process parameters have also been presented tin order to understand the thermo-mechanical mechanism responsible for residual stress generation. PMID:27179142

  3. Optimization of machining and vibration parameters for residual stresses minimization in ultrasonic assisted turning of 4340 hardened steel.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Varun; Pandey, Pulak M

    2016-08-01

    The residual stresses generated in the machined work piece have detrimental effect on fatigue life, corrosion resistance and tribological properties. However, the effect of cutting and vibration parameters on residual stresses in Ultrasonic Assisted Turning (UAT) has not been dealt with. The present paper highlights the effect of feed rate, depth of cut, cutting velocity and percentage intensity of ultrasonic power on residual stress generation. XRD analysis has been carried out to measure the residual stress while turning 4340 hardened steel using UAT. The experiments were performed based on response surface methodology to develop statistical model for residual stress. The outcome of ANOVA revealed that percentage intensity and feed rate significantly affect the residual stress generation. The significant interactions between process parameters have also been presented tin order to understand the thermo-mechanical mechanism responsible for residual stress generation.

  4. EBSD for analysing the twinning microstructure in fine-grained TWIP steels and its influence on work hardening.

    PubMed

    Barbier, D; Gey, N; Bozzolo, N; Allain, S; Humbert, M

    2009-07-01

    A 22 Mn-0.6 C twinning induced plasticity steel with an average grain size of 2.6 mum was deformed in tension at room temperature. The electron backscattered diffraction technique was used to characterize the twinning structure in relation with the local texture evolution. For nanoscale analysis, additional transmission electron microscopy analysis was performed. Nanotwins were activated in the largest grains from the beginning of the deformation. They interacted with a well-developed dislocation structure that induced detectable intragranular orientation variations. With increasing deformation, dense bundles of nanotwins preferentially developed in grains oriented close to the <111>//tensile direction fibre (promoted by the deformation) as well as medium to high angle sub-boundaries. These key features of the twinned microstructure were finally related to the remarkably high strain hardening, which evolved according to different stages. PMID:19566628

  5. The effect of hydrogen on strain hardening and fracture mechanism of high-nitrogen austenitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, G. G.; Astafurova, E. G.; Melnikov, E. V.; Moskvina, V. A.; Vojtsik, V. F.; Galchenko, N. K.; Zakharov, G. N.

    2016-07-01

    High-nitrogen austenitic steels are perspective materials for an electron-beam welding and for producing of wear-resistant coatings, which can be used for application in aggressive atmospheres. The tensile behavior and fracture mechanism of high-nitrogen austenitic steel Fe-20Cr-22Mn-1.5V-0.2C-0.6N (in wt.%) after electrochemical hydrogen charging for 2, 10 and 40 hours have been investigated. Hydrogenation of steel provides a loss of yield strength, uniform elongation and tensile strength. The degradation of tensile properties becomes stronger with increase in charging duration - it occurs more intensive in specimens hydrogenated for 40 hours as compared to ones charged for 2-10 hours. Fracture analysis reveals a hydrogen-induced formation of brittle surface layers up to 6 μm thick after 40 hours of saturation. Hydrogenation changes fracture mode of steel from mixed intergranular-transgranular to mainly transgranular one.

  6. Rapid measurement of fibrinogen concentration in whole blood using a steel ball coagulometer

    PubMed Central

    Schlimp, Christoph J.; Khadem, Anna; Klotz, Anton; Solomon, Cristina; Hochleitner, Gerald; Ponschab, Martin; Redl, Heinz; Schöchl, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fibrinogen plays a key role in hemostasis and is the first coagulation factor to reach critical levels in bleeding patients. Current European guidelines on the management of traumatic or perioperative bleeding recommend fibrinogen supplementation at specific threshold levels. Whole blood viscoelastic tests provide fast evaluation of fibrin deficits. Fast measurement of plasma fibrinogen concentration is not yet available. We investigated a method to rapidly determine whole blood fibrinogen concentration using standard Clauss assays and a steel ball coagulometer and provide an estimate of the “plasma-equivalent” fibrinogen concentration within minutes by adjustment of the measured whole blood fibrinogen concentration with a quickly measureable hemoglobin-derived hematocrit. METHODS The feasibility of this approach was tested with a Clauss assay using multiple porcine fresh blood samples obtained during in vivo bleeding, hemodilution, and after treatment with hemostatic therapy. Two different Clauss assays were then tested using multiple human volunteers’ blood samples diluted in vitro and supplemented with fibrinogen concentrate. Comparative measurements with fibrin-based thromboelastometry tests were performed. RESULTS Regression and Bland-Altman analyses of derived “plasma-equivalent” fibrinogen and measured plasma fibrinogen concentration was excellent in porcine and human blood samples, especially in the ranges relevant to traumatic or perioperative bleeding. CONCLUSION Fast whole blood fibrinogen measurements could be considered as an alternative to plasma fibrinogen measurement for acute bleeding management in trauma and perioperative care settings. Further studies are needed to prove this concept and determine the turnaround times for its clinical application in emergency departments and operating theaters. PMID:25742256

  7. Microstructure characterization based on the type of deformed grains in cold-rolled, Cu-added, bake-hardenable steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.; Kim, S.I.; Choi, S.-H.

    2014-06-01

    The electron backscatter diffraction technique has been used to characterize the microstructure of deformed grains in cold-rolled, Cu-added, bake-hardenable steel. A new scheme based on the kind and number of average orientations, as determined from a unique grain map of the deformed grains, was developed in order to classify deformed grains by type. The α-fiber components, γ-fiber components and random orientations, those which could not be assigned to either γ-fiber or α-fiber components, were used to define the average orientation of unique grains within individual deformed grains. The microstructures of deformed grains in as-rolled specimens were analyzed based on the Taylor factor, stored energy, and misorientation. The relative levels and distributions of the Taylor factor, the stored energy and the misorientation were examined in terms of the types of deformed grains. - Highlights: • We characterized the microstructure of Cu-added BH steel using EBSD. • A new scheme was developed in order to classify deformed grains by type. • Stored energy and misorientation are strongly dependent on the type of deformed grains. • Microstructure was examined in terms of the types of deformed grains.

  8. Radiation hardening and radiation-induced chromium depletion effects on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Simonen, E.P.

    1993-03-01

    Available data on neutron-irradiated materials have been analyzed and correlations developed between fluence, yield strength, grain boundary chromium concentration and cracking susceptibility in high-temperature water environments. Large heat-to-heat differences in critical fluence (0.2 to 2.5 n/cm[sup 2]) for IGSCC are documented.In many cases, this variability is consistent with yield strength differences among irradiated materials. IGSCC correlated better to yield strength than to fluence for most heats suggesting a possible role of the radiation-induced hardening (and microstructure) on cracking. However, isolatedheats reveal a wide range of yield strengths from 450 to 800 MPa necessary to promote IGSCC which cannot be understood by strength effects alone. Grain boundary Cr depletion explain differences in IGSCC susceptibility for irradiated stainless steels. Cr contents versus SCC shows that all materials showing IG cracking have some grain boundary depletion ([ge]2%). Grain boundary Cr concentrations for cracking (below [approximately]16 wt %) are in good agreement with similar SCC tests on unirradiated 304 SS with controlled depletion profiles. Heats that prompt variability in the yield strength correlation, are accounted for bydifferences in their interfacial Cr contents. Certain stainless steels are more resistant to cracking even though they have significant radiation-induced Cr depletion. It is proposed that Cr depletion is required for IASCC, but observed susceptibility is modified by other microchemical and microstructural components.

  9. Radiation hardening and radiation-induced chromium depletion effects on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Simonen, E.P.

    1993-03-01

    Available data on neutron-irradiated materials have been analyzed and correlations developed between fluence, yield strength, grain boundary chromium concentration and cracking susceptibility in high-temperature water environments. Large heat-to-heat differences in critical fluence (0.2 to 2.5 n/cm{sup 2}) for IGSCC are documented.In many cases, this variability is consistent with yield strength differences among irradiated materials. IGSCC correlated better to yield strength than to fluence for most heats suggesting a possible role of the radiation-induced hardening (and microstructure) on cracking. However, isolatedheats reveal a wide range of yield strengths from 450 to 800 MPa necessary to promote IGSCC which cannot be understood by strength effects alone. Grain boundary Cr depletion explain differences in IGSCC susceptibility for irradiated stainless steels. Cr contents versus SCC shows that all materials showing IG cracking have some grain boundary depletion ({ge}2%). Grain boundary Cr concentrations for cracking (below {approximately}16 wt %) are in good agreement with similar SCC tests on unirradiated 304 SS with controlled depletion profiles. Heats that prompt variability in the yield strength correlation, are accounted for bydifferences in their interfacial Cr contents. Certain stainless steels are more resistant to cracking even though they have significant radiation-induced Cr depletion. It is proposed that Cr depletion is required for IASCC, but observed susceptibility is modified by other microchemical and microstructural components.

  10. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Surface hardening of steels with a strip-shaped beam of a high-power CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovskii, P. E.; Kovsh, Ivan B.; Strekalova, M. S.; Sisakyan, I. N.

    1994-12-01

    A comparative analysis was made of the surface hardening of steel 45 by high-power CO2 laser beams with a rectangular strip-like cross section and a traditional circular cross section. This was done under various conditions. The treatment with the strip-like beam ensured a higher homogeneity of the hardened layer and made it possible to increase the productivity by a factor of 2-4 compared with the treatment by a beam of the same power but with a circular cross section.

  11. Comparative Tensile Flow and Work-Hardening Behavior of 9 Pct Chromium Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in the Framework of the Estrin-Mecking Internal-Variable Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, B. K.; Christopher, J.

    2016-06-01

    The comparative tensile flow and work-hardening behavior of P9 steel in two different product forms, normalized and tempered plate and thick section tube plate forging, and P91 steel were investigated in the framework of the dislocation dynamics based Estrin-Mecking (E-M) one-internal-variable approach. The analysis indicated that the flow behavior of P9 and P91 steels was adequately described by the E-M approach in a wide range of temperatures. It was suggested that dislocation dense martensite lath/cell boundaries and precipitates together act as effective barriers to dislocation motion in P9 and P91 steels. At room and intermediate temperatures, the evolution of the internal-state variable, i.e., the dislocation density with plastic strain, exhibited insignificant variations with respect to temperature. At high temperatures, a rapid evolution of dislocation density with plastic strain toward saturation with increasing temperature was observed. The softer P9 steel tube plate forging exhibited higher work hardening in terms of larger gains in the dislocation density and flow stress contribution from dislocations than the P9 steel plate and P91 steel at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 873 K (27 °C to 600 °C). The evaluation of activation energy suggests that the deformation is controlled by cross-slip of dislocations at room and intermediate temperatures, and climb of dislocations at high temperatures. The relative influence of initial microstructure on flow and work-hardening parameters associated with the E-M approach was discussed in the three temperature regimes displayed by P9 and P91 steels.

  12. Precipitation-hardening stainless steels with a shape-memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagaradze, V. V.; Afanasiev, S. V.; Volkova, E. G.; Zavalishin, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of obtaining the shape-memory effect as a result of the γ → ɛ → γ transformations in aging stainless steels strengthened by VC carbides has been investigated. Regimes are given for strengthening aging (at 650 and 720°C) for stainless steels that predominantly contain (in wt %) 0.06-0.45C, 1-2V, 2-5Si, 9 and 13-14Cr. The values of reversible deformation e (amount of shape-memory effect) determined after heating to 400°C in samples preliminarily deformed to 3.5-4% vary from 0.15 to 2.7%, depending on the composition of the steels and regimes of stabilizing and destabilizing aging.

  13. Mechanical behavior of precipitation hardenable steels exposed to highly corrosive environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1994-01-01

    Unexpected occurrences of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15 - 5 PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a 3.5 percent NaCl aqueous solution. The material selected for the study was 15 - 5 PH steel in the H 900 condition. The Slow Strain Rate technique was used to test the metallic specimens.

  14. Surface hardening of steel by boriding in a cold rf plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finberg, I.; Avni, R.; Grill, A.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    Scanning electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, and microhardness measurements, are used to study the surfaces of 4340-steel samples that have been borided in a cold RF plasma which had been initiated in a gas mixture of 2.7 percent diborane in Ar. As a result of the dislocation of the diborane in the plasma, boron is deposited on the surface of the steel substrate and two crystalline phases, tetragonal Fe2B and orthorhombic FeB, are formed. The formation of boride phases then increases the surface microhardness from 2650 MPa to a maximum value of 7740 MPa.

  15. General Motors Corporation and Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff exchange: Inspection of case hardened steels and metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Good, M.S.; Rogers, D.D.

    1993-10-01

    Staff exchanges, such as the one described in this report, are intended to facilitate communication and collaboration among scientists and engineers at Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, in US industry, and academia. Funding support for these exchanges is provided by the DOE, Office of Energy Research, Laboratory Technology Transfer Program. The exchanges offer the opportunity for the laboratories to transfer technology and expertise to industry, gain a perspective on industry`s problems, and develop the basis for further cooperative efforts through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) or other mechanisms. The objectives of this report were as follows: for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff to present technology to General Motors (GM) staff on nondestructive measurement of hardened steel components and uniformity of particle dispersion in metal-matrix composites for evaluation for possible application in GM`s manufacturing processes; for GM staff to discuss with PNL staff common manufacturing processes, metallurgy, and flaw criteria for hardening of various components and manufacturing of metal-matrix composites; to provide an initial step in building a long-term collaborative relationship between PNL and GM. Information in this report on the staff exchange of PNL staff with GM Corporation includes the purpose and objectives, a summary of activities, significant accomplishments, significant problems, industry benefits realized, recommended follow-on work and potential benefits from that work, and three appendixes. Appendix A is a description of ultrasonic backscatter technology and its applications to the two nondestructive inspection interests defined by GM. Appendix B is a list of key contacts and the schedule of activities pertaining to the staff exchange. Appendix C is an article from American Society for Metals News relating to sensor needs.

  16. Laser surface pretreatment of 100Cr6 bearing steel - Hardening effects and white etching zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buling, Anna; Sändker, Hendrik; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Krupp, Ulrich; Hamann-Steinmeier, Angela

    2016-08-01

    In order to achieve a surface pretreatment of the bearing steel 100Cr6 (1-1.5 wt.% Cr) a laser-based process was used. The obtained modification may result in an optimization of the adhesive properties of the surface with respect to an anticorrosion polymer coating on the basis of PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone), which is applied on the steel surface by a laser melting technique. This work deals with the influence of the laser-based pretreatment regarding the surface microstructure and the micro-hardness of the steel, which has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy and automated micro-hardness testing. The most suitable parameter set for the laser-based pretreatment leads to the formation of very hard white etching zones (WEZ) with a thickness of 23 μm, whereas this pretreatment also induces topographical changes. The occurrence of the white etching zones is attributed to near-surface re-austenitization and rapid quenching. Moreover, dark etching zones (DEZ) with a thickness of 32 μm are found at the laser path edges as well as underneath the white etching zones (WEZ). In these areas, the hardness is decreased due to the formation of oxides as a consequence of re-tempering.

  17. Surface hardening of austenitic stainless steels via low-temperature colossal supersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yan

    The Swagelok Company has recently developed a low-temperature (470°C) carburization technology for austenitic stainless steels, that increases the surface hardness from 200 to 1200 HV25 without sacrificing corrosion resistance. In order to investigate the microstructural changes responsible for these outstanding properties, bulk specimens, thin foils, and powder specimens of several different low-temperature carburized 316 stainless steels have been studied. XRD studies revealed that the low-temperature carburization of 316 austenitic stainless steels lead to a colossal supersaturation of interstitial carbon in the austenite. While the equilibrium solubility of carbon is 0.03 at% at the carburization temperature of 470°C, high-precision XRD determination of the lattice parameter after carburization indicated a carbon concentration of >10at% in solid solution---a colossal supersaturation! This astonishing result was confirmed by a completely independent experimental method, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). Residual stress measurements indicated that low-temperature carburization caused an enormous compressive residual stress of 2 GPa at the surface. The enormous compressive residual stress and a high density of stacking faults caused broadening and shifting of the austenite peaks in X-ray diffraction scans. Analysis of the underlying thermodynamics and kinetics indicate that the key to colossal supersaturation is to kinetically suppress the formation of M23C6. The colossal supersaturation of carbon in the austenite is the dominant feature responsible for the unusual hardness. Only during the extended (>40h) carburization times, M5C 2 carbide (Hagg carbide), instead of M23C6, was observed to form. In addition, TEM studies indicated the presence of a small amount of a second carbide phase, M7C3. The particles of both carbides have the shape of long needles, containing a high density of planar defects normal to the long axis of the needles. The concept of "low

  18. Radiation hardening and deformation behavior of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Shiba, K.

    1998-03-01

    Tensile data from several 8--12% Cr alloys irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses up to 34 dpa at temperatures ranging from 90 to 600 C are discussed in this paper. One of the critical questions surrounding the use of ferritic-martensitic steels in a fusion environment concerns the loss of uniform elongation after irradiation at low temperatures. Irradiation and testing at temperatures below 200--300 C results in uniform elongations less than 1% and stress-strain curves in which plastic instability immediately follows yielding, implying dislocation channeling and flow localization. Reductions in area and total elongations, however, remain high.

  19. Microstructure-Property Relationship in the Thermomechanically Processed C-Mn-Si-Nb-Al-(Mo) Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steels Before and After Prestraining and Bake Hardening Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timokhina, I. B.; Enomoto, M.; Miller, M. K.; Pereloma, E. V.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of prestraining and bake hardening (PS/BH) on the development of microstructures and mechanical properties in thermomechanically processed transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels with additions of Nb, Mo, and Al was studied by atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). An increase in number density and sizes of clusters and nanoscale precipitates was observed in both steels but was more significant in the Nb-Al-Mo steel than in the Nb-Al steel. This increase could be explained by the possible fast diffusion of Nb and Mo atoms at low temperatures, as was observed for surface diffusivity. The contributions of cluster strengthening and precipitation strengthening to the yield strength increment after PS/BH were estimated.

  20. Intergranular cracking in high-strength, cold-rolled, and precipitation-hardened austenitic stainless steel UNS S35500

    SciTech Connect

    Pednekar, S.P.; Champagne, V.K.; Pepi, M.S.; Grendahl, S.

    1999-11-01

    When quench annealed, stainless steel UNS35500 (C 0.12, Cr 15.5, Ni 4.5, Mo 3, N O.1%) is austenitic and soft. In cold-rolled-and-tempered condition heavy cold rolling followed by precipitation hardening considerably strengthens the material (UTS 220 ksi (1517 MPa), elongation 10%). Its strength combined with good corrosion resistance make the material attractive for use in critical load-bearing applications. In one application, rotor blades of a helicopter are attached to the drive shaft with a component, strap pack, assembled from 0.014 inch (O.36 mm) thick material. Premature fatigue failures of strap packs have occurred starting from intergranular cracks in single laminae. Chloride salts were detected at crack origins. This intergranular stress corrosion cracking was reproduced under crevices in slow strain rate tests conducted in 3.5% NaCl solution at 0.1 V (Ag/AgCl 4M Kcl). The potential is typical of those attained by the material under thin, chloride-bearing condensate films exposed to air. Cracking did not occur when crevices were absent. Electrolytic polishing in chloride-free acids combined with a standard overpassivation treatment in nitric acid improved the resistance to crevice corrosion. This treatment slowed, but did not prevent, the onset of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in slow strain rate tests conducted with an artificial crevice on the specimen surface.

  1. A New XRD Method to Quantify Plate and Lath Martensites of Hardened Medium-Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Quanshun

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a new technique to separately measure the volume fraction and tetragonal ratio of co-existing lath and plate martensites in ultrahigh strength steel, and to calculate their different carbon contents. First, the two martensites are assumed to have body-centered tetragonal lattice structures of different tetragonal ratios. X-ray diffraction is then applied to obtain the overlapping {200} diffraction peak, which is subsequently separated as four sub-peaks using a self-made multiple Gaussian peak-fitting method to allow the measurement of the individual lattice parameters c and a. Finally, a modified equation is applied to calculate the carbon contents from the obtained tetragonal ratios. The new technique is then applied to investigate the effect of subsequent tempering on the decarbonization of the as-quenched martensites.

  2. The bounce of a ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    1999-03-01

    In this paper, the dynamics of a bouncing ball is described for several common ball types having different bounce characteristics. Results are presented for a tennis ball, a baseball, a golf ball, a superball, a steel ball bearing, a plasticene ball, and a silly putty ball. The plasticene ball was studied as an extreme case of a ball with a low coefficient of restitution (in fact zero, since the collision is totally inelastic) and the silly putty ball was studied because it has unusual elastic properties. The first three balls were studied because of their significance in the physics of sports. For each ball, a dynamic hysteresis curve is presented to show how energy is lost during and after the collision. The measurement technique is quite simple, it is suited for undergraduate laboratory experiments, and it may provide a useful method to test and approve balls for major sporting events.

  3. Stainless-Steel Ball-Milling Method for Hydro-/Deutero-genation using H2O/D2O as a Hydrogen/Deuterium Source.

    PubMed

    Sawama, Yoshinari; Kawajiri, Takahiro; Niikawa, Miki; Goto, Ryota; Yabe, Yuki; Takahashi, Tohru; Marumoto, Takahisa; Itoh, Miki; Kimura, Yuuichi; Monguchi, Yasunari; Kondo, Shin-ichi; Sajiki, Hironao

    2015-11-01

    A one-pot continuous-flow method for hydrogen (deuterium) generation and subsequent hydrogenation (deuterogenation) was developed using a stainless-steel (SUS304)-mediated ball-milling approach. SUS304, especially zero-valent Cr and Ni as constituents of the SUS304, and mechanochemical processing played crucial roles in the development of the reactions. PMID:26493945

  4. Foreign Object Damage Behavior of Two Gas-turbine Grade Silicon Nitrides by Steel Ball Projectiles at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Pereira, J. Michael; Janosik, Lesley A.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2002-01-01

    Foreign object damage (FOD) behavior of two commercial gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides, AS800 and SN282, was determined at ambient temperature through strength testing of flexure test specimens impacted by steel-ball projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm in a velocity range from 220 to 440 m/s. AS800 silicon nitride exhibited a greater FOD resistance than SN282, primarily due to its greater value of fracture toughness (K(sub IC)). Additionally, the FOD response of an equiaxed, fine-grained silicon nitride (NC132) was also investigated to provide further insight. The NC132 silicon nitride exhibited the lowest fracture toughness of the three materials tested, providing further evidence that K(sub IC) is a key material parameter affecting FOD resistance. The observed damage generated by projectile impact was typically in the forms of well- or ill-developed ring or cone cracks with little presence of radial cracks.

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hot wire laser clad layers for repairing precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Peng; Cai, Zhipeng; Feng, Zhenhua; Wang, Gang

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel (PH-MSS) is widely used as load-bearing parts because of its excellent overall properties. It is economical and flexible to repair the failure parts instead of changing new ones. However, it is difficult to keep properties of repaired part as good as those of the substrate. With preheating wire by resistance heat, hot wire laser cladding owns both merits of low heat input and high deposition efficiency, thus is regarded as an advantaged repairing technology for damaged parts of high value. Multi-pass layers were cladded on the surface of FV520B by hot wire laser cladding. The microstructure and mechanical properties were compared and analyzed for the substrate and the clad layer. For the as-cladded layer, microstructure was found non-uniform and divided into quenched and tempered regions. Tensile strength was almost equivalent to that of the substrate, while ductility and impact toughness deteriorated much. With using laser scanning layer by layer during laser cladding, microstructure of the clad layers was tempered to fine martensite uniformly. The ductility and toughness of the clad layer were improved to be equivalent to those of the substrate, while the tensile strength was a little lower than that of the substrate. By adding TiC nanoparticles as well as laser scanning, the precipitation strengthening effect was improved and the structure was refined in the clad layer. The strength, ductility and toughness were all improved further. Finally, high quality clad layers were obtained with equivalent or even superior mechanical properties to the substrate, offering a valuable technique to repair PH-MSS.

  6. The effect of 17-4PH stainless steel on the lifetime of a Pennzane lubricated Microwave Limb Sounder Antenna Actuator Assembly ball screw for the AURA spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Lam, Jonathan; Balzer, Mark; Lo, John; Anderson, Mark; Schepis, Joseph P.

    2005-07-01

    During ground based life testing of a Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Antenna Actuator Assembly (AAA) ball-screw assembly, lubricant darkening and loss were noted when approximately 10% of required lifetime was completed. The MLS-AAA ball screw and nut are made from 17-4 PH steel, the nut has 440C stainless steel balls, and the assembly is lubricated with a Pennzane formulation containing a three weight percent lead naphthenate additive. Life tests were done in dry nitrogen at 50°C. To investigate the MLS-AAA life test anomaly, Spiral Orbit Tribometer (SOT) accelerated tests were performed. SOT results indicated greatly reduced relative lifetimes of Pennzane formulations in contact with 17-4 PH steel compared to 440C stainless steel. Also, dry nitrogen tests yielded longer relative lifetimes than comparable ultrahigh vacuum tests. Generally, oxidized Pennzane formulations yielded shorter lifetimes than non-oxidized lubricant. This study emphasizes surface chemistry effects on the lubricated lifetime of moving mechanical assemblies.

  7. Use of Homogeneously-Sized Carbon Steel Ball Bearings to Study Microbially-Influenced Corrosion in Oil Field Samples.

    PubMed

    Voordouw, Gerrit; Menon, Priyesh; Pinnock, Tijan; Sharma, Mohita; Shen, Yin; Venturelli, Amanda; Voordouw, Johanna; Sexton, Aoife

    2016-01-01

    Microbially-influenced corrosion (MIC) contributes to the general corrosion rate (CR), which is typically measured with carbon steel coupons. Here we explore the use of carbon steel ball bearings, referred to as beads (55.0 ± 0.3 mg; Ø = 0.238 cm), for determining CRs. CRs for samples from an oil field in Oceania incubated with beads were determined by the weight loss method, using acid treatment to remove corrosion products. The release of ferrous and ferric iron was also measured and CRs based on weight loss and iron determination were in good agreement. Average CRs were 0.022 mm/yr for eight produced waters with high numbers (10(5)/ml) of acid-producing bacteria (APB), but no sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Average CRs were 0.009 mm/yr for five central processing facility (CPF) waters, which had no APB or SRB due to weekly biocide treatment and 0.036 mm/yr for 2 CPF tank bottom sludges, which had high numbers of APB (10(6)/ml) and SRB (10(8)/ml). Hence, corrosion monitoring with carbon steel beads indicated that biocide treatment of CPF waters decreased the CR, except where biocide did not penetrate. The CR for incubations with 20 ml of a produced water decreased from 0.061 to 0.007 mm/yr when increasing the number of beads from 1 to 40. CRs determined with beads were higher than those with coupons, possibly also due to a higher weight of iron per unit volume used in incubations with coupons. Use of 1 ml syringe columns, containing carbon steel beads, and injected with 10 ml/day of SRB-containing medium for 256 days gave a CR of 0.11 mm/yr under flow conditions. The standard deviation of the distribution of residual bead weights, a measure for the unevenness of the corrosion, increased with increasing CR. The most heavily corroded beads showed significant pitting. Hence the use of uniformly sized carbon steel beads offers new opportunities for screening and monitoring of corrosion including determination of the distribution of corrosion rates, which allows

  8. Use of Homogeneously-Sized Carbon Steel Ball Bearings to Study Microbially-Influenced Corrosion in Oil Field Samples

    PubMed Central

    Voordouw, Gerrit; Menon, Priyesh; Pinnock, Tijan; Sharma, Mohita; Shen, Yin; Venturelli, Amanda; Voordouw, Johanna; Sexton, Aoife

    2016-01-01

    Microbially-influenced corrosion (MIC) contributes to the general corrosion rate (CR), which is typically measured with carbon steel coupons. Here we explore the use of carbon steel ball bearings, referred to as beads (55.0 ± 0.3 mg; Ø = 0.238 cm), for determining CRs. CRs for samples from an oil field in Oceania incubated with beads were determined by the weight loss method, using acid treatment to remove corrosion products. The release of ferrous and ferric iron was also measured and CRs based on weight loss and iron determination were in good agreement. Average CRs were 0.022 mm/yr for eight produced waters with high numbers (105/ml) of acid-producing bacteria (APB), but no sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Average CRs were 0.009 mm/yr for five central processing facility (CPF) waters, which had no APB or SRB due to weekly biocide treatment and 0.036 mm/yr for 2 CPF tank bottom sludges, which had high numbers of APB (106/ml) and SRB (108/ml). Hence, corrosion monitoring with carbon steel beads indicated that biocide treatment of CPF waters decreased the CR, except where biocide did not penetrate. The CR for incubations with 20 ml of a produced water decreased from 0.061 to 0.007 mm/yr when increasing the number of beads from 1 to 40. CRs determined with beads were higher than those with coupons, possibly also due to a higher weight of iron per unit volume used in incubations with coupons. Use of 1 ml syringe columns, containing carbon steel beads, and injected with 10 ml/day of SRB-containing medium for 256 days gave a CR of 0.11 mm/yr under flow conditions. The standard deviation of the distribution of residual bead weights, a measure for the unevenness of the corrosion, increased with increasing CR. The most heavily corroded beads showed significant pitting. Hence the use of uniformly sized carbon steel beads offers new opportunities for screening and monitoring of corrosion including determination of the distribution of corrosion rates, which allows

  9. Experience of high-nitrogenous steel powder application in repairs and surface hardening of responsible parts for power equipment by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpakov, A. S.; Kardonina, N. I.

    2016-02-01

    The questions of the application of novel diffusion-alloying high-nitrogenous steel powders for repair and surface hardening of responsible parts of power equipment by plasma spraying are considered. The appropriateness of the method for operative repair of equipment and increasing its service life is justified. General data on the structure, properties, and manufacture of nitrogen-, aluminum-, and chromium-containing steel powders that are economically alloyed using diffusion are described. It is noted that the nitrogen release during the decomposition of iron nitrides, when heating, protects the powder particles from oxidation in the plasma jet. It is shown that the coating retains 50% of nitrogen that is contained in the powder. Plasma spraying modes for diffusion-alloying high-nitrogenous steel powders are given. The service properties of plasma coatings based on these powders are analyzed. It is shown that the high-nitrogenous steel powders to a nitrogen content of 8.9 wt % provide the necessary wear resistance and hardness of the coating and the strength of its adhesion to the substrate and corrosion resistance to typical aggressive media. It is noted that increasing the coating porosity promotes stress relaxation and increases its thickness being limited with respect to delamination conditions in comparison with dense coatings on retention of the low defectiveness of the interface and high adhesion to the substrate. The examples of the application of high-nitrogenous steel powders in power engineering during equipment repairs by service companies and overhaul subdivisions of heat power plants are given. It is noted that the plasma spraying of diffusion-alloyed high-nitrogenous steel powders is a unique opportunity to restore nitrided steel products.

  10. Foreign Object Damage in Disks of Two Gas-turbine-grade Silicon Nitrides by Steel Ball Projectiles at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Pereira, J. Michael; Janosik, Lesley A.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2003-01-01

    Foreign object damage (FOD) behavior of two commercial gas-turbine-grade silicon nitrides, AS800 and SN282, was determined at ambient temperature through postimpact strength testing of disks impacted by steel ball projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm in a velocity range from 115 to 440 m/s. AS800 silicon nitride exhibited a greater FOD resistance than SN282, primarily due to its greater value of fracture toughness (k(sub Ic)). The critical impact velocity V(sub c) for which the corresponding postimpact strength was the lowest was V(sub c) approximately equal to 440 and 300 m/s AS800 and SN282, respectively. A unique lower strength regime was typified for both silicon nitrides depending on impact velocity and was attributed to significant radial cracking. The damage generated by projectile impact was typically in the form of ring, radial, and cone cracks with their severity and combination being dependent on impact velocity. Unlike the thick (4 millimeters) flexure bar specimens used in our previous studies, the thin (2 millimeter) disk target specimen exhibited a unique back-side radial cracking on the reverse side just beneath the impact sites at and above impact velocities of 160 meters per second for SN282 and 220 meters per second AS800.

  11. Silicon Nitride Balls For Cryogenic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, Myles F.; Ng, Lillian W.

    1990-01-01

    Resistance to wear greater than that of 440C steel. Experiments show lives of ball bearings immersed in liquid nitrogen or liquid oxygen increased significantly when 440C steel balls (running on 440C steel races) replaced by balls of silicon nitride. Developed for use at high temperatures, where lubrication poor or nonexistent. Best wear life of any bearing tested to date and ball material spalls without fracturing. Plans for future tests call for use of liquid oxygen as working fluid.

  12. In-air and pressurized water reactor environment fatigue experiments of 316 stainless steel to study the effect of environment on cyclic hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Natesan, Krishnamurti

    2016-05-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), under the sponsorship of Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program, is trying to develop a mechanistic approach for more accurate life estimation of LWR components. In this context, ANL has conducted many fatigue experiments under different test and environment conditions on type 316 stainless steel (316 SS) material which is widely used in the US reactors. Contrary to the conventional S ∼ N curve based empirical fatigue life estimation approach, the aim of the present DOE sponsored work is to develop an understanding of the material ageing issues more mechanistically (e.g. time dependent hardening and softening) under different test and environmental conditions. Better mechanistic understanding will help develop computer-based advanced modeling tools to better extrapolate stress-strain evolution of reactor components under multi-axial stress states and hence help predict their fatigue life more accurately. Mechanics-based modeling of fatigue such as by using finite element (FE) tools requires the time/cycle dependent material hardening properties. Presently such time-dependent material hardening properties are hardly available in fatigue modeling literature even under in-air conditions. Getting those material properties under PWR environment, are even harder. Through this work we made preliminary attempt to generate time/cycle dependent stress-strain data both under in-air and PWR water conditions for further study such as for possible development of material models and constitutive relations for FE model implementation. Although, there are open-ended possibility to further improve the discussed test methods and related material estimation techniques we anticipate that the data presented in this paper will help the metal fatigue research community particularly, the researchers who are dealing with mechanistic modeling of metal fatigue such as using FE tools. In this paper the fatigue experiments

  13. Atom probe study of the carbon distribution in a hardened martensitic hot-work tool steel X38CrMoV5-1.

    PubMed

    Lerchbacher, Christoph; Zinner, Silvia; Leitner, Harald

    2012-07-01

    The microstructure of the hardened common hot-work tool steel X38CrMoV5-1 has been characterized by atom probe tomography with the focus on the carbon distribution. Samples quenched with technically relevant cooling parameters λ from 0.1 (30 K/s) to 12 (0.25 K/s) have been investigated. The parameter λ is an industrially commonly used exponential cooling parameter, representing the cooling time from 800 to 500 °C in seconds divided with hundred. In all samples pronounced carbon segregation to dislocations and cluster formation could be observed after quenching. Carbon enriched interlath films with peak carbon levels of 6-10 at.%, which have been identified to be retained austenite by TEM, show a thickness increase with increasing λ. Therefore, the fraction of total carbon staying in the austenite grows. This carbon is not available for the tempering induced precipitation of secondary carbides in the bulk. Through all samples no segregation of any substitutional elements takes place. Charpy impact testing and fracture surface analysis of the hardened samples reveal the cooling rate induced microstructural distinctions.

  14. The Effect of Microstructural Evolution on Hardening Behavior of 2205 Stainless Steel in Long-Term Aging at 500 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shukun; Ma, Guodong; Guo, Bo; Fang, Kuanjun; Wang, Jun

    2014-06-01

    The effect of microstructural evolution on hardening behavior of 2205 stainless steel in long-term aging at 500 °C was studied by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. The results showed that the hardness of ferrite phase in matrix steadily increased with the aging time at the first stage of 4 months, presented a peak of hardness at about 5 months, and showed a downward trend for the aging time from 6 to 8 months, while the hardness of the austenitic phase remained constant. Analysis showed that the iron-rich α phase and the Cr-rich α' phase generated by spinodal decomposition, Cr2N precipitations, and Fe2Mn (R-phase) were the main reasons for the generation of peak in hardness of ferrite phase. Further studies showed that some dislocation structure (changing with the aging time) in δ-ferrite of matrix is related to the microstructural evolution.

  15. Effect of Strain-Induced Age Hardening on Yield Strength Improvement in Ferrite-Austenite Duplex Lightweight Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hyejin; Lee, Seok Gyu; Sohn, Seok Su; Kwak, Jai-Hyun; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-11-01

    Ferrite-austenite lightweight steels showing TRansformation-induced plasticity were developed by varying the aging temperature with or without prestraining, and their effects on tensile properties were investigated in relation with microstructural evolution of carbide formation. The aged steels contained austenite, pearlite, and martensite in the ferrite matrix, and the austenite volume fraction decreased with the increasing aging temperature because some austenite grains decomposed to pearlites. This austenite decomposition to pearlite was favorable for the improvement of yield strength, but negatively influenced overall tensile properties. The prestraining promoted the austenite decomposition by a diffusion-controlled phase transformation, and changed the morphology of the cementite from a long lamellar shape to a densely agglomerated particle shape. In order to obtain the large increase in yield strength as well as excellent combination of strength and ductility, the strain-induced aging treatment, i.e., prestraining followed by aging, is important like in the prestrained and 673 K (400 °C)-aged steel. This large increase in yield strength, in spite of a reduction of elongation (65 to 43 pct), was basically attributed to an appropriate amount of decomposition of austenite to pearlite ( e.g., 4 vol pct), while having sufficient austenite to martensite transformation ( e.g., 14.5 vol pct martensite).

  16. Characterization of the effect of cryogenic treatment on the tempering behavior of a secondary hardening high Co-Ni steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, M.; Ressel, G.; Ploberger, S.; Marsoner, S.; Ebner, R.

    2016-03-01

    For high Co-Ni steels sub-zero treatments are conducted to reduce the retained austenite phase fraction for obtaining excellent fracture toughness properties, but in general, cryogenic treatment has a great impact on the microstructural evolution of steels during tempering. Hence, the aim of this work was to analyze the influence of cryogenic treatments on the microstructural evolution of high Co-Ni steels, including carbide precipitation kinetics and austenite phase fraction evolution, during heating to elevated temperatures. In order to study the formation properties of carbides, the heating processes of cryogenically and non- cryogenically treated specimens were analyzed by dilatometer measurements. Furthermore, for determining the evolution of austenite phase fraction and hardness due to tempering, dilatometer investigations were combined with X-ray diffraction analyses and hardness measurements. It is revealed that sub-zero treated samples exhibit much stronger carbide precipitation signals. This was ascribed to the lower phase fraction of retained austenite, as more carbon is available for carbide precipitation.

  17. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  18. Numerical-experimental analysis of the effect of surface oxidation on the laser transformation hardening of Cr-Mo steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordovilla, Francisco; García-Beltrán, Ángel; Dominguez, Jesús; Sancho, Paula; Ocaña, José L.

    2015-12-01

    Laser surface hardening is a technology that enables important advantages to be obtained in comparison with conventional techniques in terms of accuracy of the heat affected zone and productivity. Nevertheless, the development of realistic and flexible models has to be fulfilled in order to control the effects of every set of process conditions. Despite many different models having been developed, very few of them deal with the increment of absorption related with the instantaneous value of the layer of oxide growth during the process in a non-protective atmosphere. This work analyzes the problem of oxide formation at the external surface using kinetic relations, whose parameters have been related with the process variables, considering non-equilibrium conditions. Then, the oxide thickness was associated with a value of absorption through an innovative formula that considers the path of the laser radiation in the interface oxide-base material. The thermal calculations obtained by this method have allowed phase changes to be predicted using Avrami law. Both thermal and metallurgical results for different process conditions have been compared with experimental data showing an excellent agreement.

  19. Laser assisted conical spin forming of dual phase automotive steel. Experimental demonstration of work hardening reduction and forming limit extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, P.; Otero, N.; Cabrera, J. M.; Masagué, D.

    Laser Assisted Spin Forming is investigated for improving the poor formability of Advanced High Strength Steel DP-800 and Aeronautic Grade Titanium alloy, with minor or no change in microstructure, final properties improvements and no damage to coating, thanks to controlled energy input and fast thermal cycles. IR imaging and force-torque monitoring are used to characterise the forming process. Residual stress measurement, microstructure, microhardness and EBSD are used to study the formed parts under the combined action of laser and mechanical force. A micromechanism of laser assisted spinning is proposed, as well as advantages and limitations of the technique.

  20. Comparative Stress Corrosion Cracking and General Corrosion Resistance of Annealed and Hardened 440 C Stainless Steel - New Techniques in Stress Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendreck, M. J.; Hurless, B. E.; Torres, P. D.; Danford, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) characteristics of annealed and hardened 440C stainless steel were evaluated in high humidity and 3.5-percent NaCl solution. Corrosion testing consisted of an evaluation of flat plates, with and without grease, in high humidity, as well as electrochemical testing in 3.5-percent NaCl. Stress corrosion testing consisted of conventional, constant strain, smooth bar testing in high humidity in addition to two relatively new techniques under evaluation at MSFC. These techniques involve either incremental or constant rate increases in the load applied to a precracked SE(B) specimen, monitoring the crack-opening-displacement response for indications of crack growth. The electrochemical corrosion testing demonstrated an order of magnitude greater general corrosion rate in the annealed 440C. All techniques for stress corrosion testing showed substantially better SCC resistance in the annealed material. The efficacy of the new techniques for stress corrosion testing was demonstrated both by the savings in time and the ability to better quantify SCC data.

  1. The separate roles of subgrains and forest dislocations in the isotropic hardening of type 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassner, M. E.; Miller, A. K.; Sherby, O. D.

    1982-11-01

    Tests on 304 stainless steel were conducted involving first warm working in torsion, then cold working in torsion, and finally measurement of the elevated-temperature yield strength in compression. These tests permitted separation of the effects of subgrain size and forest dislocation density on the isotropic part of the flow stress. Forest dislocation strengthening appears to dominate in this material. The results are best fitted by a root-mean-square summation of strength terms representing the contributions of solutes, forest dislocations, and subgrain boundaries. The same equation successfully predicts the flow stress during elevated-temperature transient deformation (under both constant strain rate and variable strain rate) from the transient dislocation substructure.

  2. Multiscale Modeling of Inclusions and Precipitation Hardening in Metal Matrix Composites: Application to Advanced High-Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Askari, Hesam A.; Zbib, Hussein M.; Sun, Xin

    2013-06-30

    In this study, the strengthening effect of inclusions and precipitates in metals is investigated within a multiscale approach that utilizes models at various length scales, namely, Molecular Mechanics (MM), discrete Dislocation Dynamics (DD), and an Eigenstrain Inclusion Method (EIM). Particularly, precipitates are modeled as hardsoft particles whose stress fields interact with dislocations. The stress field resulting from the elastic mismatch between the particles and the matrix is accounted for through the EIM. While the MM method is employed for the purpose of developing rules for DD for short range interaction between a single dislocation and an inclusion, the DD method is used to predict the strength of the composite resulting from the interaction between ensembles of dislocations and particles. As an application to this method, the mechanical behavior of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) is investigated and the results are then compared to the experimental data. The results show that the finely dispersive precipitates can strengthen the material by pinning the dislocations up to a certain shear stress and retarding the recovery, as well as annihilation of dislocations. The DD results show that strengthening due to nano sized particles is a function of the density and size of the precipitates. This size effect is then explained using a mechanistic model developed based on dislocation-particle interaction.

  3. Long-term Results in 1375 Patients Undergoing Valve Replacement with the Starr-Edwards Cloth-covered Steel Ball Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Isom, O. Wayne; Spencer, Frank C.; Glassman, Ephraim; Teiko, Phyllis; Boyd, Arthur D.; Cunningham, Joseph N.; Reed, George E.

    1977-01-01

    The two principal considerations with prosthetic valves are durability and thromboembolism. With the widespread interest in recently developed prosthetic valves (porcine, tilting disc, Cooley), the long-term results at one institution with a single prosthesis were considered of particular importance. Accordingly, a 97% follow-up has been completed on 1375 patients (pts) undergoing prosthetic valve replacement with the Starr-Edwards cloth-covered steel ball prosthesis at New York University between October 1967 and December 1975. Operative procedures were as follows: aortic valve replacement (AVR): 470 pts; mitral valve replacement (MVR): 362 pts; combined AVR and MVR: 129 pts; other combined procedures: 414 pts. Overall operative deaths were 13.7%, 9% for AVR, 10.8% for MVR, and 18.6% for combined AVR and MVR. At seven years, AVR survival was 64%, and MVR survival 64.5%. There has been widespread pessimism, usually without significant data, about the cloth-covered prosthesis, because of concern of cloth wear, hemolysis and other complications. Therefore, a particularly significant finding by actuarial analysis was that 85% of surviving patients with isolated AVR remained free of emboli for five years. In pts surviving isolated MVR, 80% remained free of emboli for five years. Of those having embolic episodes, 33% were not on anticoagulants. Fatal hemorrhage from anticoagulants occurred in 0.8% of pts. Endocarditis occurred in 5.7% of the entire group, with 1.3% requiring reoperation. Clinically significant hemolysis occurred in 5.1% of the group, with only 0.2% requiring reoperation. Hence, the total frequency of clinically significant cloth-wear was less than 0.5%. These data indicate both the reliability and the limitations of the Starr-Edwards cloth-covered steel ball valve and can be used in comparing experiences with the more recently developed prostheses. PMID:889374

  4. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of ball clay in 2009 and presents an outlook for its 2010 performance. Several companies mined ball call in the country including Old Hickey Clay Co., Kentucky-Tennessee Clay Co., and H.C. Spinks Clay Co. Information on the decline in ball clay imports and exports is also presented.

  5. The Effect of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel on the Lifetime of a Pennzane(Trademark) Lubricated Microwave Limb Sounder Antenna Actuator Assembly Ball Screw for the AURA Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Lam, Jonathan; Balzer, Mark; Anderson, Mark; Lo, John; Schepis, Joseph P.

    2005-01-01

    During ground based life testing of a Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Antenna Actuator Assembly (AAA) ball-screw assembly, lubricant darkening and loss were noted when approximately 10 percent of required lifetime was completed. The MLS-AAA ball screw and nut are made from 17-4 PH steel, the nut has 440C stainless steel balls, and the assembly is lubricated with a Pennzane formulation containing a three weight percent lead naphthenate additive. Life tests were done in dry nitrogen at 50 C. To investigate the MLS-AAA life test anomaly, Spiral Orbit Tribometer (SOT) accelerated tests were performed. SOT results indicated greatly reduced relative lifetimes of Pennzane formulations in contact with 17-4 PH steel compared to 440C stainless steel. Also, dry nitrogen tests yielded longer relative lifetimes than comparable ultrahigh vacuum tests. Generally, oxidized Pennzane formulations yielded shorter lifetimes than non-oxidized lubricant. This study emphasizes surface chemistry effects on the lubricated lifetime of moving mechanical assemblies.

  6. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global ball clay mining industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It cites several firms that are involved in ball clay mining in the U.S., including HC Spins Clay Co. Inc., the Imerys Group and Old Hickory Clay Co. Among the products made from ball clay are ceramic tiles, sanitaryware, as well as fillers, extenders and binders.

  7. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys, Old Hickory Clay Co. and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in five U.S. states in 2012. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 900 kt (992,000 st), with an estimated value of $42.3 million. This was a slight increase in tonnage from 886 kt (977,000 st), with a value of $40.9 million in 2011. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producing state, with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi, Kentucky and Indiana. Reported ball clay production from Indiana probably was fire clay rather than ball clay. About 69 percent of total ball clay production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  8. Ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenhoff, Mark

    Ball lightning is alleged by some to be a rare atmospheric phenomenon usually associated with thunderstorms, while others hold that it does not exist. This controversy has continued for centuries. This study comprises a critical evaluation of evidence for the existence of ball lightning. An historical review of the controversy is first presented, giving a chronological account of developments in ball lightning theories and of important observations alleged to be of the phenomenon. Other phenomena which might be mistaken for ball lightning are then subjected to a more detailed study than has hitherto been published, and the means by which such misidentifications could be recognized areestablished. A discussion of psychological and perceptual aspects indicates that descriptions could not always be taken at face value, and that many accounts of alleged ball lightning would be expected to contain substantial inaccuracies. The original intention to evaluate cases of alleged ball lightning already published in scientific journals was abandoned because there was no standardisation of information content, and because the majority of reports contained insufficient information for evaluation. Many reports had been written in a style which indicated an assumption that ball lightning was the cause of the event. Approximately 200 unpublished reports were therefore collected and subjected to evaluation. It was found that the majority of reports of alleged ball lightning could be explained by other means, and there was only a very small residue of reports which could not easily be thus explained. A large proportion of the reports could be attributed to corona discharge effects such as St Elmo's fire, or by familiar effects of conventional linear lightning. The validity of many previously published statistical studies of ball lightning was shown to be doubtful. The thesis concludes with a comparitive discussion of the merits and demerits of some of the diverse physical models

  9. Limit Analysis of Geometrically Hardening Composite Steel-Concrete Systems / Stany Graniczne Geometrycznie Wzmacniających Się Konstrukcji Zespolonych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawdin, Piotr; Urbańska, Krystyna

    2015-03-01

    The paper considers some results of creating load-carrying composite systems that have uprated strength, rigidity and safety, and therefore are called geometrically (self-) hardening systems. The optimization mathematic models of structures as discrete mechanical systems withstanding dead load, monotonic or low cyclic static and kinematic actions are proposed. To find limit parameters of these actions the extreme energetic principle is suggested what result in the bilevel mathematic programming problem statement. The limit parameters of load actions are found on the first level of optimization. On the second level the power of the constant load with equilibrium preloading is maximized and/or system cost is minimized. The examples of using the proposed methods are presented and geometrically hardening composite steel-concrete system are taken into account. W pracy przedstawiono sposoby projektowania konstrukcji, które ze względu na swoją geometrię oraz topologię posiadają podwyższoną nośność, sztywność i bezpieczeństwo. Systemy takie nazwano geometrycznie (samo-) wzmacniającymi się. Zaproponowano optymalizacyjne modele matematyczne konstrukcji jako dyskretne systemy mechaniczne będące pod obciążeniem stałym, zmiennym monotoniczne lub niskocyklowym, statycznym lub kinematycznym. Dla znalezienia granicznych parametrów obciążeń wprowadzona została ekstremalna zasada energetyczna, przedstawiona jako problem dwupoziomowego programowania matematycznego. Graniczne parametry obciążeń szukane są na pierwszym poziomie optymalizacji. Na drugim poziomie minimalizowany jest koszt systemu i/lub maksymalizowana jest moc stałego równoważącego obciążenia z dociążeniem. Ponadto w pracy przeanalizowano numerycznie i analitycznie zachowanie konstrukcji geometrycznie wzmacniających się na przykładzie konstrukcji zespolonych stalowobetonowych. Pierwszy przykład dotyczy konstrukcji belkowo-prętowej z podciągiem, belkę stanowi stalowy dwuteownik

  10. Golf Ball

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Ultra 500 Series golf balls, introduced in 1995 by Wilson Sporting Goods Company, has 500 dimples arranged in a pattern of 60 spherical triangles. The design employs NASA's aerodynamics technology analysis of air loads of the tank and Shuttle orbiter that was performed under the Space Shuttle External Tank program. According to Wilson, this technology provides 'the most symmetrical ball surface available, sustaining initial velocity longer and producing the most stable ball flight for unmatched accuracy and distance.' The dimples are in three sizes, shapes and depths mathematically positioned for the best effect. The selection of dimples and their placement optimizes the interaction of opposing forces of lift and drag. Large dimples reduce air drag, enhance lift, and maintain spin for distance. Small dimples prevent excessive lift that destabilizes the ball flight and the medium size dimples blend the other two.

  11. Holy balls!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Tadd; Belden, Jesse

    2011-11-01

    Why can some balls walk on water while others cannot? We investigate the rebound dynamics of elastic spheres impacting on a free-surface. Several variables determine whether or not a sphere will bounce when impacting a free-surface including velocity, impact angle, size and elasticity. Stiff elastic spheres, such as a racquetball, successfully skip at low impact angles and high velocities, but tend not to bounce when the impact angle becomes too large. However, the more compliant Waboba (WAter BOuncing BAll) bounces marvelously even at very high impact angles. Unlike a stiffer ball, the Waboba flattens out quickly as it is forming a cavity. The cavity lip forms a ramp and the flattened ball then skips off the water surface. We demonstrate how this phenomenon surprisingly resembles a skipping stone. Using high-speed video we explore the rebound dynamics for various values of elasticity, velocity, angle and size and determine when an object will bounce off the water surface.

  12. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    The article offers information on ball clay. Among the companies that mine ball clay in the U.S. are H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay and Old Hickory Clay. In 2006, an estimated 1.2 million tons of the mineral was sold or used domestically and exported. Forty-percent of the total sales is accounted for ceramic floor and wall tile followed by sanitaryware and miscellaneous ceramics. Its average value was $ 45 per ton in 2006.

  13. Water ball collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimoto, K.

    1986-01-01

    What happens if a stainless steel ball hits a water ball in the weightless space ot the Universe? In other words, it was the objective of our experiments in the Space to observe the surface tension of liquid by means of making a solid collide with a liquid. Place a small volume of water between 2 glass sheets to make a thin water membrane: the 2 glass sheets cannot be separated unless an enormous force is applied. It is obvious from this phenomenom that the surface tension of water is far greater than presumed. On Earth, however, it is impossible in most cases to observe only the surface tension of liquid, because gravity always acts on the surface tension. Water and stainless steel balls were chosen the liquid and solids for the experiments. Because water is the liquid most familiar to us, its properties are well known. And it is also of great interest to compare its properties on the Earth with those in the weightless space.

  14. The Tribological Performance of Surface Treated Ti6A14V as Sliding Against Si3N4 Ball and 316L Stainless Steel Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, W. H.; Su, Y. L.; Horng, J. H.; Huang, H. C.

    2016-10-01

    Closed field unbalanced magnetron sputtering was used to deposit diamond-like carbon (Ti-C:H) coatings on Ti6Al4V alloy and gas nitrided Ti6Al4V alloy. Four different specimens were prepared, namely untreated Ti6Al4V alloy (Ti6Al4V), gas nitrided Ti6Al4V alloy (N-Ti6Al4V), Ti-C:H-coated Ti6Al4V alloy (Ti-C:H/Ti6Al4V) and Ti-C:H-coated gas nitrided Ti6Al4V alloy (Ti-C:H/N-Ti6Al4V). The tribological properties of the four specimens were evaluated using a reciprocating wear tester sliding against a Si3N4 ball (point contact mode) and 316L stainless steel cylinder (line contact mode). The wear tests were performed in a 0.89 wt.% NaCl solution. The results showed that the nitriding treatment increased the surface roughness and hardness of the Ti6Al4V alloy and improved the wear resistance as a result. In addition, the Ti-C:H coating also improved the tribological performance of Ti6Al4V. For example, compared to the untreated Ti6Al4V sample, the Ti-C:H coating reduced the wear depth and friction coefficient by 340 times and 10 times, respectively, in the point contact wear mode, and 151 times and 9 times, respectively, in the line contact wear mode. It is thus inferred that diamond-like carbon coatings are of significant benefit in extending the service life of artificial biomedical implants.

  15. Science of Ball Lightning (Fire Ball)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuki, Yoshi-Hiko

    1989-08-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Organizing Committee * Preface * Ball Lightning -- The Continuing Challenge * Hungarian Ball Lightning Observations in 1987 * Nature of Ball Lightning in Japan * Phenomenological and Psychological Analysis of 150 Austrian Ball Lightning Reports * Physical Problems and Physical Properties of Ball Lightning * Statistical Analysis of the Ball Lightning Properties * A Fluid-Dynamical Model for Ball Lightning and Bead Lightning * The Lifetime of Hill's Vortex * Electrical and Radiative Properties of Ball Lightning * The Candle Flame as a Model of Ball Lightning * A Model for Ball Lightning * The High-Temperature Physico-Chemical Processes in the Lightning Storm Atmosphere (A Physico-Chemical Model of Ball Lightning) * New Approach to Ball Lightning * A Calculation of Electric Field of Ball Lightning * The Physical Explanation to the UFO over Xinjiang, Northern West China * Electric Reconnection, Critical Ionization Velocity, Ponderomotive Force, and Their Applications to Triggered and Ball Lightning * The PLASMAK™ Configuration and Ball Lightning * Experimental Research on Ball Lightning * Performance of High-Voltage Test Facility Designed for Investigation of Ball Lightning * List of Participants

  16. An improved effective microorganism (EM) soil ball-making method for water quality restoration.

    PubMed

    Park, Gun-Seok; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Kwak, Yunyoung; Hong, Sung-Jun; Jung, ByungKwon; Ullah, Ihsan; Kim, Jong-Guk; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Soil balls containing the so-called effective microorganisms (EM) have been applied to improve water quality of small ponds, lakes, and streams worldwide. However, neither the physical conditions facilitating their proper application nor the diversity of microbial community in such soil balls have been investigated. In this study, the application of 0.75% of hardener to the soil balls exerted almost neutral pH (pH 7.3) which caused up to a fourfold increased hardness of the soil ball. Moreover, the 0.75% of hardener in the soil ball also improved the water quality due to a significant reduction in dissolved oxygen, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen contents. Metagenomic analysis of the microbial community in the soil ball with 0.75% hardener was compared with control (traditional soil ball) through next-generation sequencing. The traditional soil ball microbial community comprised 96.1% bacteria, 2.7% eukaryota, and 1% archaea, whereas the soil ball with 0.75% hardener comprised 71.4% bacteria, 27.9% eukaryota, and 0.2% viruses. Additionally, metagenomic profiles for both traditional and improved soil balls revealed that the various xenobiotic biodegradation, such as those for caprolactam, atrazine, xylene, toluene, styrene, bisphenol, and chlorocyclohexane might be responsible for organic waste cleanup. PMID:26498821

  17. An improved effective microorganism (EM) soil ball-making method for water quality restoration.

    PubMed

    Park, Gun-Seok; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Kwak, Yunyoung; Hong, Sung-Jun; Jung, ByungKwon; Ullah, Ihsan; Kim, Jong-Guk; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Soil balls containing the so-called effective microorganisms (EM) have been applied to improve water quality of small ponds, lakes, and streams worldwide. However, neither the physical conditions facilitating their proper application nor the diversity of microbial community in such soil balls have been investigated. In this study, the application of 0.75% of hardener to the soil balls exerted almost neutral pH (pH 7.3) which caused up to a fourfold increased hardness of the soil ball. Moreover, the 0.75% of hardener in the soil ball also improved the water quality due to a significant reduction in dissolved oxygen, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen contents. Metagenomic analysis of the microbial community in the soil ball with 0.75% hardener was compared with control (traditional soil ball) through next-generation sequencing. The traditional soil ball microbial community comprised 96.1% bacteria, 2.7% eukaryota, and 1% archaea, whereas the soil ball with 0.75% hardener comprised 71.4% bacteria, 27.9% eukaryota, and 0.2% viruses. Additionally, metagenomic profiles for both traditional and improved soil balls revealed that the various xenobiotic biodegradation, such as those for caprolactam, atrazine, xylene, toluene, styrene, bisphenol, and chlorocyclohexane might be responsible for organic waste cleanup.

  18. Laser hardening of diesel engine valve

    SciTech Connect

    Androsov, A.P.; Aleksenko, S.I.; Boyarkin, M.V.; Kusidis, V.G.; Petrov, V.I.

    1988-07-01

    Results are presented of a complex investigation of the effect of laser treatment on the structure and properties of steel 40Kh10S2M and of engine tests with diesel engine valves hardened by the newly devised technology. Results of the investigation of the microstructure of steel 40Kh10S2M, heat-treated by a laser beam, showed that when a specimen is hardened with fusion of the surface layer, it contains two distinct zones of laser action. Results of the effect of laser treatment on the fatigue limit and the wear resistance of the steel and engine tests permit the conclusion that the suggested method of treating valves of internal engine valve gear has good prospects.

  19. Use of the tritium trick for analysis of the influence that hydrogen and helium exert on the mechanical properties of radiation-resistant precipitation-hardening FCC steels

    SciTech Connect

    Goshchitskii, B.N.; Sagaradze, V.V.; Arbuzov, V.L.; Zuev, Y.N.; Markelov, N.N.; Zimin, A.V.

    1995-10-01

    The aging austenitic stainless steel Crl6Nil5Mo3Til is shown to possess a high resistance to the radiation void formation under irradiation with fast neutrons (60 dpa, 753K). The influence of tritium introduced from the gaseous phase and radiogenic helium on the mechanical properties is analysed. 3 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Influence of Subsurface Structure on the Linear Reciprocating Sliding Wear Behavior of Steels with Different Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Sangal, S.; Mondal, K.

    2014-12-01

    The present work investigates the influence of subsurface microstructure on the linear reciprocating sliding wear behavior of a number of steels with ferrite-pearlitic, pearlitic, bainitic, and martensitic microstructures under dry unlubricated condition. The change in the underlying microstructure with depth from worn-out surface of steel sample intimately relates to the associated hardness variation and wear volume. The present paper is not about comparison of wear resistance of steels with different structures; rather it is on mutual influence of wear and substructure for individual microstructure. Inherent toughness of the matrix and ability of microstructural components to get deformed under the reciprocating action of the ball decide the wear resistance of the steels. Bainite has good amount of stability to plastic deformation. Ferrite shows severe banding due to wear action. Work hardening renders pearlite to be wear resistant. Temperature rise and associated tempering of martensite are observed during wear.

  1. Influence of Subsurface Structure on the Linear Reciprocating Sliding Wear Behavior of Steels with Different Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Sangal, S.; Mondal, K.

    2014-09-01

    The present work investigates the influence of subsurface microstructure on the linear reciprocating sliding wear behavior of a number of steels with ferrite-pearlitic, pearlitic, bainitic, and martensitic microstructures under dry unlubricated condition. The change in the underlying microstructure with depth from worn-out surface of steel sample intimately relates to the associated hardness variation and wear volume. The present paper is not about comparison of wear resistance of steels with different structures; rather it is on mutual influence of wear and substructure for individual microstructure. Inherent toughness of the matrix and ability of microstructural components to get deformed under the reciprocating action of the ball decide the wear resistance of the steels. Bainite has good amount of stability to plastic deformation. Ferrite shows severe banding due to wear action. Work hardening renders pearlite to be wear resistant. Temperature rise and associated tempering of martensite are observed during wear.

  2. Effect of Plastic Pre-straining on Residual Stress and Composition Profiles in Low-Temperature Surface-Hardened Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottoli, Federico; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Winther, Grethe; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-08-01

    The present work deals with the evaluation of the residual stress profiles in expanded austenite by applying grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD) combined with successive sublayer removal. Annealed and deformed ( ɛ eq=0.5) samples of stable stainless steel EN 1.4369 were nitrided or nitrocarburized. The residual stress profiles resulting from the thermochemical low-temperature surface treatment were measured. The results indicate high-residual compressive stresses of several GPa's in the nitrided region, while lower-compressive stresses are produced in the carburized case. Plastic deformation in the steel prior to thermochemical treatment has a hardly measurable influence on the nitrogen-rich zone, while it has a measurable effect on the stresses and depth of the carbon-rich zone.

  3. [Hardening of dental instruments].

    PubMed

    Gerasev, G P

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of prolonging the service life of stomatological instruments by the local hardening of their working parts is discussed. Such hardening should be achieved by using hard and wear-resistant materials. The examples of hardening dental elevators and hard-alloy dental drills are given. New trends in the local hardening of instruments are the treatment of their working parts with laser beams, the application of coating on their surface by the gas-detonation method. The results of research work and trials are presented.

  4. An Anisotropic Hardening Model for Springback Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Danielle; Xia, Z. Cedric

    2005-08-01

    As more Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) are heavily used for automotive body structures and closures panels, accurate springback prediction for these components becomes more challenging because of their rapid hardening characteristics and ability to sustain even higher stresses. In this paper, a modified Mroz hardening model is proposed to capture realistic Bauschinger effect at reverse loading, such as when material passes through die radii or drawbead during sheet metal forming process. This model accounts for material anisotropic yield surface and nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening behavior. Material tension/compression test data are used to accurately represent Bauschinger effect. The effectiveness of the model is demonstrated by comparison of numerical and experimental springback results for a DP600 straight U-channel test.

  5. Microstructure-strength relations in a hardenable stainless steel with 16 pct Cr, 1.5 pct Mo, and 5 pct Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobner, P. J.; Blšs, V.

    1984-07-01

    Metallographic studies have been conducted on a 0.024 pct C-16 pct Cr-1.5 pct Mo-5 pct Ni stainless steel to study the phase reactions associated with heat treatments and investigate the strengthening mechanisms of the steel. In the normalized condition, air cooled from 1010 °C, the microstructure consists of 20 pct ferrite and 80 pct martensite. Tempering in a temperature range between 500 and 600 °C results in a gradual transformation of martensite to a fine mixture of ferrite and austenite. At higher tempering temperatures, between 600 and 800 °C, progressively larger quantities of austenite form and are converted during cooling to proportionally increasing amounts of fresh martensite. The amount of retained austenite in the microstructure is reduced to zero at 800 °C, and the microstructure contains 65 pct re-formed martensite and 35 pct total ferrite. Chromium rich M23C6 carbides precipitate in the single tempered microstructures. The principal strengthening is produced by the presence of martensite in the microstructure. Additional strengthening is provided by a second tempering treatment at 400 °C due to the precipitation of ultrafine (Cr, Mo) (C,N) particles in the ferrite.

  6. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys Group, Old Hickory Clay Co., and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in four states in 2011. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 940 kt (1.04 million st) with an estimated value of $44.2 million. This is a 3-percent increase in tonnage from 912 kt (1.01 million st) with a value of $41.3 million that was produced in 2010. Tennessee was the leading producing state with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi and Kentucky. About 69 percent of production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  7. Pulsed laser surface hardening of ferrous alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Reed, C. B.; Leong, K. H.; Hunter, B. V.

    1999-09-30

    A high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser and special optics were used to produce surface hardening on 1045 steel and gray cast iron by varying the process parameters. Unlike CO{sub 2} lasers, where absorptive coatings are required, the higher absorptivity of ferrous alloys at the Nd:YAG laser wavelength eliminates the necessity of applying a coating before processing. Metallurgical analysis of the treated tracks showed that very fine and hard martensitic microstructure (1045 steel) or inhomogeneous martensite (gray cast iron) were obtained without surface melting, giving maximum hardness of HRC 61 and HRC 40 for 1045 steel and gray cast iron respectively. The corresponding maximum case depths for both alloys at the above hardness are 0.6 mm. Gray cast iron was more difficult to harden without surface melting because of its lower melting temperature and a significantly longer time-at-temperature required to diffuse carbon atoms from the graphite flakes into the austenite matrix during laser heating. The thermal distortion was characterized in term of flatness changes after surface hardening.

  8. Bouncing Balls that Spin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knipp, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When a ball bounces elastically against a floor, the vertical component (v[subscript y]) of the velocity of the ball's mass-center changes sign. This is a special case of the elastic collision of two balls (i.e., two objects, neither of which is much more massive than the other), in which case the balls' post-collision relative velocity (=…

  9. Hardening of the arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis; Arteriosclerosis; Plaque buildup - arteries; Hyperlipidemia - atherosclerosis; Cholesterol - atherosclerosis ... Hardening of the arteries often occurs with aging. As you grow older, ... narrows your arteries and makes them stiffer. These changes ...

  10. Method and equipment for induction surface hardening of the leading edges of turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokina, T.M.; Dymchenko, V.V.

    1988-01-01

    Methodology and equipment for hardening the leading edges of blades for large nuclear reactor steam turbines was investigated using blades made of 15Kh11MF hardened and tempered steel. A machine was designed and built for hardening the blade leading edges with a vacuum-tube oscillator and 66,000 Hz frequency. The electrical parameters of the induction heating were recorded. Hardening of the actual blades made it possible to obtain a hardened case with a depth of 1-3 mm and up to 5 mm in the lower portion of the blade and increased erosion resistance.

  11. Cold Hardening in Citrus Stems

    PubMed Central

    Yelenosky, George

    1975-01-01

    Stem cold hardening developed to different levels in citrus types tested in controlled environments. Exotherms indicated ice spread was more uniform and rapid in unhardened than in cold-hardened stems. All attempts to inhibit the functioning of citrus leaves resulted in less cold hardening in the stems. Citrus leaves contribute a major portion of cold hardening in the wood. PMID:16659340

  12. Deformation in metals after low temperature irradiation: Part II - Irradiation hardening, strain hardening, and stress ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Li, Meimei

    2008-03-01

    Effects of irradiation at temperatures 200oC on tensile stress parameters are analyzed for dozens of bcc, fcc, and hcp pure metals and alloys, focusing on irradiation hardening, strain hardening, and relationships between the true stress parameters. Similar irradiation-hardening rates are observed for all the metals irrespective of crystal type; typically, the irradiation-hardening rates are large, in the range 100 - 1000 GPa/dpa, at the lowest dose of <0.0001 dpa and decrease with dose to a few tens of MPa/dpa or less at about 10 dpa. However, average irradiation-hardening rates over the dose range of 0 dpa − (the dose to plastic instability at yield) are considerably lower for stainless steels due to their high uniform ductility. It is shown that whereas low temperature irradiation increases the yield stress, it does not significantly change the strain-hardening rate of metallic materials; it decreases the fracture stress only when non-ductile failure occurs. Such dose independence in strain hardening behavior results in strong linear relationships between the true stress parameters. Average ratios of plastic instability stress to unirradiated yield stress are about 1.4, 3.9, and 1.3 for bcc metals (and precipitation hardened IN718 alloy), annealed fcc metals (and pure Zr), and Zr-4 alloy, respectively. Ratios of fracture stress to plastic instability stress are calculated to be 2.2, 1.7, and 2.1, respectively. Comparison of these values confirms that the annealed fcc metals and other soft metals have larger uniform ductility but smaller necking ductility when compared to other materials.

  13. The Asymmetrical "Sticking" Behavior of Two Balls on an Incline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallinckrodt, A. John

    1999-01-01

    Offers a relatively simple analysis of the asymmetrical "sticking" and rolling behavior of two balls, one steel and one rubber, on an incline. Describes an Interactive Physics (TM) simulation designed to study the problem and gives rough experimental results. (WRM)

  14. Effect of friction stir processing on the tribological performance of high carbon steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Aldajah, S. H.; Ajayi, O. O.; Fenske, G. R.; David, S.

    2009-06-15

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was applied to 1080 carbon steel as a means to enhance the near-surface material properties. The process transformed the original pearlite microstructure to martensite, resulting in significant increase in surface hardness. This surface hardening produced a significant benefit for friction and wear behavior of the steel as measured by unidirectional sliding ball-on-flat testing. Under dry sliding, FSP reduced friction coefficient by approximately 25% and wear rate by an order of magnitude. Under oil lubrication, FSP had only a marginal effect on friction, but it reduced wear rates by a factor of 4. The improvement in tribological performance of 1080 steel by FSP technique is attributed to reduced plasticity of the near-surface material during sliding contact

  15. Fatigue life of high-speed ball bearings with silicon nitride balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    Hot-pressed silicon nitride was evaluated as a rolling-element bearing material. The five-ball fatigue tester was used to test 12.7-mm- diameter silicon nitride balls at maximum Hertz stresses ranging from 4.27 x 10 to the 9th power n/sq m to 6.21 x 10 to the 9th power n/sq m at a race temperature of 328K. The fatigue life of NC-132 hot-pressed silicon nitride was found to be equal to typical bearing steels and much greater than other ceramic or cermet materials at the same stress levels. A digital computer program was used to predict the fatigue life of 120-mm- bore angular-contact ball bearings containing either steel or silicon nitride balls. The analysis indicates that there is no improvement in the lives of bearings of the same geometry operating at DN values from 2 to 4 million where silicon nitride balls are used in place of steel balls.

  16. When Two Balls Are Just One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulp, Christopher W.; Biermann, Mark L.; Howard, Timothy; Klingenberg, Kurtis; Ramsey, Paul

    2008-01-01

    A camcorder can be a powerful tool in pedagogical settings, such as in an introductory physics course or in introducing undergraduates to data collection. In this paper, we discuss our experience using a Panasonic PV-GS150 digital camcorder to analyze the motion of a falling steel ball, with the goal of determining the acceleration due to gravity,…

  17. Ball valve extractor

    DOEpatents

    Herndon, Charles; Brown, Roger A.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and process for removing a ball valve is provided. The ball valve removal tool provides a handle sliding along the length of a shaft. One end of the shaft is secured within an interior cavity of a ball valve while the opposite end of the shaft defines a stop member. By providing a manual sliding force to the handle, the handle impacts the stop member and transmits the force to the ball valve. The direction of the force is along the shaft of the removal tool and disengages the ball valve from the ball valve housing.

  18. Effect of Ceramic Ball and Hybrid Stainless Steel Bearing/Wheel Combinations on the Lifetime of a Precision Translation Stage for the SIM Flight Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, C. John; Klein, Kerry; Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Wemhoner, Jens

    2009-01-01

    A study of hybrid material couples using the Spiral Orbit Tribometer (SOT) was initiated to investigate both lubricated (Pennzane X2000 and Brayco 815Z) and unlubricated Si3N4, 440C SS, Rex 20, Cronidur X30 and X40 plates with Cerbec SN-101-C (Si3N4) and 440C balls. The hybrid wheel/bearing assembly will be used on the Linear Optical Delay Line (LODL) stage as an element of the NASA Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). SIM is an orbiting interferometer linking a pair of telescopes within the spacecraft and, by using an interferometry technique and several precision optical stages, is able to measure the motions of known stars much better than current ground or space based systems. This measurement will provide the data to "infer" the existence of any plants, undetectable by other methods, orbiting these known stars.

  19. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  20. Having a Ball with Fitness Balls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNulty, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Fitness programs can be greatly enhanced with the addition of fitness balls. They are a fun, challenging, economical, and safe way to incorporate a cardiovascular, strength, and stretching program for all fitness levels in a physical education setting. The use of these balls has become more popular during the last decade, and their benefits and…

  1. The Goldenrod Ball Gall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Richard B.

    1974-01-01

    The paper presents a generalized life history of the goldenrod ball gall, a ball-shaped swelling found almost exclusively on the Canada goldenrod, Solidago canadensis, and caused by a peacock fly know as Eurosta soldiaginis. (KM)

  2. 42. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE NAIL HARDENER USED TO HARDEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE NAIL HARDENER USED TO HARDEN AND TEMPER THE NAILS; WEST TUBES IN FOREGRPUND AND DRAWBACK TUBE IN THE CENTER - LaBelle Iron Works, Thirtieth & Wood Streets, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  3. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  4. Fizz-Ball Fizzics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moinester, Murray; Gerland, Lars; Liger-Belair, Gerard; Ocherashvili, Aharon

    2012-01-01

    We describe the fluid dynamics principles governing the up-down oscillatory cycling of a bubble-covered, low-density, low-mass ball of material (referred to henceforth as a "fizz-ball") immersed inside a glass of bubbling (super-saturated) carbonated liquid. The bubbles serve to desaturate the liquid of excess CO[subscript 2]. The fizz-ball acts…

  5. Development of pulsed gas discharge lasers for shock hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Gerd; Tkotz, R.; Keusch, C.; Negendanck, Matthias; Christiansen, Jens; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    1996-08-01

    Shock hardening of metals (e.g. Ti, stainless steel) by pulsed lasers offers the possibility of large hardening depth (several millimeters) without serious damage to the surface of the workpiece. Previous investigations for shock hardening have mainly been performed with high power solid state lasers. The adaptation of commercial, high power gas discharge lasers to the shock hardening process could make this process relevant for industrial applications, as high repetition rates may be used. Two different laser systems have been investigated: a TEA carbon-dioxide laser and a XeCl laser. Both systems have pulse energies of some joule, a pulse length of several ten nanoseconds, and pulse repetition rates of up to 10 Hertz. The divergence of the beam was minimized to improve focusing properties. Systematic measurements of the laser induced pressure by means of piezo probes have been performed. An enhancement of the hardness of illuminated Ti(RT15) targets has been found and is reported.

  6. Tailored work hardening descriptions in simulation of sheet metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vegter, Henk; Mulder, Hans.; van Liempt, Peter; Heijne, Jan

    2013-12-01

    In the previous decades much attention has been given on an accurate material description, especially for simulations at the design stage of new models in the automotive industry. Improvements lead to shorter design times and a better tailored use of material. It also contributed to the design and optimization of new materials. The current description of plastic material behaviour in simulation models of sheet metal forming is covered by a hardening curve and a yield surface. In this paper the focus will be on modelling of work hardening for advanced high strength steels considering the requirements of present applications. Nowadays work hardening models need to include the effect of hard phases in a soft matrix and the effect of strain rate and temperature on work hardening. Most material tests to characterize work hardening are only applicable to low strains whereas many practical applications require hardening data at relatively high strains. Therefore, physically based hardening descriptions are needed allowing reliable extensions to high strain values.

  7. Balls on the Lawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallows, Colin L.; Shapiro, Lou

    1999-03-01

    In the "tennis ball" problem we are given successive pairs of balls numbered (1,2), (3,4),... At each stage we throw one ball out of the window. After n stages some set of n balls is on the lawn. We find a generating function and a closed formula for the sequence 3, 23, 131, 664, 3166, 14545, 65187, 287060, 1247690,..., the n-th term of which gives the sum over all possible arrangements of the total of the numbers on the balls on the lawn. The problem has connections with "bicolored Motzkin paths" and the ballot problem.

  8. Process design of press hardening with gradient material property influence

    SciTech Connect

    Neugebauer, R.; Schieck, F.; Rautenstrauch, A.

    2011-05-04

    Press hardening is currently used in the production of automotive structures that require very high strength and controlled deformation during crash tests. Press hardening can achieve significant reductions of sheet thickness at constant strength and is therefore a promising technology for the production of lightweight and energy-efficient automobiles. The manganese-boron steel 22MnB5 have been implemented in sheet press hardening owing to their excellent hot formability, high hardenability, and good temperability even at low cooling rates. However, press-hardened components have shown poor ductility and cracking at relatively small strains. A possible solution to this problem is a selective increase of steel sheet ductility by press hardening process design in areas where the component is required to deform plastically during crash tests. To this end, process designers require information about microstructure and mechanical properties as a function of the wide spectrum of cooling rates and sequences and austenitizing treatment conditions that can be encountered in production environments. In the present work, a Continuous Cooling Transformation (CCT) diagram with corresponding material properties of sheet steel 22MnB5 was determined for a wide spectrum of cooling rates. Heating and cooling programs were conducted in a quenching dilatometer. Motivated by the importance of residual elasticity in crash test performance, this property was measured using a micro-bending test and the results were integrated into the CCT diagrams to complement the hardness testing results. This information is essential for the process design of press hardening of sheet components with gradient material properties.

  9. Precipitation hardening austenitic superalloys

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation hardening, austenitic type superalloys are described. These alloys contain 0.5 to 1.5 weight percent silicon in combination with about 0.05 to 0.5 weight percent of a post irradiation ductility enhancing agent selected from the group of hafnium, yttrium, lanthanum and scandium, alone or in combination with each other. In addition, when hafnium or yttrium are selected, reductions in irradiation induced swelling have been noted.

  10. RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D.

    1997-10-01

    A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

  11. Nuclear effects hardened shelters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindke, Paul

    1990-11-01

    The Houston Fearless 76 Government Projects Group has been actively engaged for more than twenty-five years as a sub-contractor and currently as a prime contractor in the design, manufacture, repair and logistics support of custom mobile ground stations and their equipment accommodations. Other associated products include environmental control units (ECU's), mobilizers for shelters and a variety of mobile power generation units (MPU's). Since 1984, Houston Fearless 76 has designed and manufactured four 8' x 8' x 22' nuclear hardened mobile shelters. These shelters were designed to contain electronic data processing/reduction equipment. One shelter is currently being operated by the Air Force as a Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) approved and certified Special Corrpartmented Information Facility (SCIF). During the development and manufacturing process of the shelters, we received continual technical assistance and design concept evaluations from Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Operations Analysis and Logistics Engineering Division and the Nondestructive Inspection Lab at McClellan AFB. SAIC was originally employed by the Air Force to design the nuclear hardening specifications applied to these shelters. The specific levels of hardening to which the shelters were designed are classified and will not be mentioned during this presentation.

  12. The Effect of Hardenability Variation on Phase Transformation of Spiral Bevel Gear in Quenching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingtao; Shi, Wankai; Yang, Lin; Gu, Zhifei; Li, Zhichao

    2016-07-01

    The hardenability of gear steel is dependent on the composition of alloying elements and is one of important criteria to assess process of phase transformation. The variation of hardenability has to be considered in control of the microstructures and distortion during gear quenching. In this paper, the quantitative effect of hardenability has been investigated on phase transformations of spiral bevel gears in die quenching. The hardenability deviation of 22CrMoH steel was assessed by using Jominy test. The dilatometry experiments were conducted to build phase transformation kinetic models for steels with low and high hardenability, respectively. The complete die quenching process of spiral bevel gear was modeled to reveal the significant difference on microstructures and temperature history with variation of hardenability. The final microstructures of the gear are martensite in surface layer after quenching process. There are bainite inside the gear tooth and the mixture of bainite and ferrite inside gear for the gear with low hardenability. The microstructure is bainite inside the gear with high hardenability.

  13. Synthesis of SnFe2O4 Nanomaterials Via High Energy Ball Milling of SnO (Stannous) and α-Fe2O3 (Hematite) Solid Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwakweh, Oswald N. C.; Más, Rita; Morales, Carolyn; Vargas, Pedro; Silva, Josue; Rosa, Angel; Lopez, Neshma; Moyet, Richard Perez; Cardona, Yenny

    2011-10-01

    The synthesis of single phase tin-ferrite, SnFe2O4, from tin (II) oxide or stannous oxide (SnO), and hematite (α-Fe2O3) solid precursors was carried out via high energy ball milling (HEBM) under wet condition involving the addition of controlled amounts of acetone. The stoichiometric amounts of the precursor materials were ball milled continuously for up to 22 h in a Spex-8000D mill using a ball-to-powder ratio of 40:1, with hardened stainless steel balls in WC-lined jars. The time-dependent formation of the SnFe2O4 based on combined X-ray diffraction and room temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) measurements revealed reaction enhancements associated with particles size reduction. The 22 h milled material indicated that synthesized SnFe2O4 had a particle size of 10.91 nm, coercivity of 4.44 mT, magnetic saturation/remanent ratio ( M r/ M s) of 0.085, while its superparamagnetic behavior was confirmed based on the combined MS and vibrating sample magnetometer measurements.

  14. Evaluation of Springback for DP980 S Rail Using Anisotropic Hardening Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jisik; Lee, Jinwoo; Bae, Gihyun; Barlat, Frederic; Lee, Myoung-Gyu

    2016-07-01

    The effect of anisotropic hardening models on springback of an S-rail part was investigated. Two advanced constitutive models based on distortional and kinematic hardening, which captured the Bauschinger effect, transient hardening, and permanent softening during strain path change, were implemented in a finite element (FE) code. In-plane compression-tension tests were performed to identify the model parameters. The springback of the S-rail after forming a 980 MPa dual-phase steel sheet sample was measured and analyzed using different hardening models. The comparison between experimental and FE results demonstrated that the advanced anisotropic hardening models, which are particularly suitable for non-proportional loading, significantly improved the springback prediction capability of an advanced high strength steel.

  15. Stemless ball valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Kevin (Inventor); Yakos, David (Inventor); Walthall, Bryan (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A stemless ball valve comprising: a right flange; left flange; ball with an axis pin and two travel pins; ball seal on either side of the ball; guide sleeve with inner walls comprising two channels; cartridge guide holder; inner magnetic cartridge; and outer magnetic cartridge. The ball is situated inside of the guide sleeve, and a travel pin is located in each of the two channels. The guide sleeve is situated inside of the cartridge guide holder, which is located adjacent to and outside of the inner magnetic cartridge and secured to the inner magnetic cartridge such that when the inner magnetic cartridge rotates, the cartridge guide holder also rotates. The cartridge guide holder is secured to the guide sleeve such that when the cartridge guide holder rotates, the travel pins move within the channels in the inner walls of the guide sleeve, thereby causing the ball to rotate.

  16. Intelligent systems for induction hardening processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, J.B.; Adkins, D.R.; Robino, C.V.

    1994-12-31

    Induction hardening is widely used to provide enhanced strength, wear resistance, and toughness in components made from medium and high carbon steels. Current limitations of the process include the lack of closed-loop process control, previously unidentified process and material variations which cause continual adjustment of the process parameters, coil and process development by trial and error, and an instability to monitor coil condition. Improvement of the induction hardening process is limited by an inadequate understanding of process fundamentals and material/process interactions. A multidisciplinary team from Sandia National Laboratories and Delphi Saginaw Steering Systems is investigating the induction hardening process under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The application of intelligent control algorithms has led to the development of a closed-loop process controller for the combination of one material, one geometry, single frequency, single shot, process that controls to {plus_minus} 0.1mm. This controller will be demonstrated on the production floor this year. Our approach and the opportunities for expanding the usefulness of this technology will be described.

  17. Surface hardening thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamuta, K.

    1984-09-11

    A steel product, particularly a heavy-duty gear, having a case of martensite and a core of lower bainite with a Vickers hardness of not less than Hv 600 is obtained by subjecting a medium carbon alloy steel comprising, by weight, 0.45 to 0.60% C, up to 0.50 Si, 0.40 to 1.30% Mn, up to 4.00 Ni, 0.35 to 0.55% Cr, up to 0.70 Mo, balance Fe and incidental impurities to a carbonitriding treatment at a temperature of 800/sup 0/ to 900/sup 0/ C., austempering the carboritrided steel by quenching it in a hot bath of 230/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/ C. and retaining the steel in the hot bath of the aforementioned temperature for a suitable duration enough to transform the core of the steel into lower bainite and not enough to cause any transformation of the case of the steel, and subsequently cooling the steel.

  18. Physics of ball sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, C.; Clanet, C.

    2016-06-01

    Ball sports have been part of human history for thousands of years [1]. Nowadays, 13 of them are part of the Olympic games (badminton, basketball, beach volley, football/soccer, golf, handball, hockey, rugby, table tennis, tennis, volleyball, water polo, ice hockey). All these games differ by launcher (hand, club, racket, bat), ball (size, shape and mass), pitch size and number of players. These differences induce different ball velocities. Apart from the velocities and the way to maximize them, we discuss in this article the ball trajectories and their impact on the size of sports fields.

  19. Ball Bearing Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Load-deflection relationships for different types of elliptical contacts such as those found in a ball bearing are developed. Simplified expressions that allow quick calculations of deformation to be made simply from a knowledge of the applied load, the material properties, and the geometry of the contacting elements are presented. Ball bearings subjected to radial, thrust and combined ball loads are analyzed. A design criterion for fatigue life of ball bearings is developed. The section of a satisfactory lubricant, as well as describing systems that provide a constant flow of lubricant to the contact, is considered.

  20. Birth of ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowke, J. J.; Smith, D.; Nelson, K. E.; Crompton, R. W.; Murphy, A. B.

    2012-10-01

    Many observations of ball lightning report a ball of light, about 10 cm in diameter, moving at about walking speed, lasting up to 20 s and frequently existing inside of houses and even aeroplanes. The present paper reports detailed observations of the initiation or birth of ball lightning. In two cases, navigation crew of aircraft saw ball lightning form at the windscreen inside the cockpit of their planes. In the first case, the ball lightning occurred during a thunderstorm, with much lightning activity outside of the plane. In the second case, large "horns" of electrical corona were seen outside of the plane at the surface of the radome, just prior to the formation of the ball lightning. A third case reports ball lightning formed inside of a house, during a thunderstorm, at a closed glass window. It is proposed, based on two-dimensional calculations of electron and ion transport, that ball lightning in these cases is driven and formed by atmospheric ions impinging and collecting on the insulating surface of the glass or Perspex windows. This surface charge can produce electric fields inside of the cockpit or room sufficient to sustain an electric discharge. Charges of opposite sign to those outside of the window accumulate on the inside surface of the glass, leaving a ball of net charge moving inside of the cockpit or room to produce a pulsed discharge on a microsecond time scale.

  1. Quartz ball valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, C.; Ingle, W. M. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A ball valve particularly suited for use in the handling of highly corrosive fluids is described. It is characterized by a valve housing formed of communicating segments of quartz tubing, a pair of communicating sockets disposed in coaxial alignment with selected segments of tubing for establishing a pair of inlet ports communicating with a common outlet port, a ball formed of quartz material supported for displacement between the sockets and configured to be received alternately thereby, and a valve actuator including a rod attached to the ball for selectively displacing the ball relative to each of the sockets for controlling fluid flow through the inlet ports.

  2. Grain boundary hardening and triple junction hardening in polycrystalline molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Shigeaki . E-mail: skoba@ashitech.ac.jp; Tsurekawa, Sadahiro; Watanabe, Tadao

    2005-02-01

    The grain boundary and triple junction hardenings in molybdenum with different carbon content were studied in connection with the character and the connectivity of grain boundaries at triple junctions by the micro-indentation test. The triple junction hardening is smaller at the junctions composed of low-angle and {sigma} boundaries than at the junctions composed of random boundaries. This difference in the hardening depending on the grain boundary connectivity becomes more significant with a decrease in carbon content in molybdenum.

  3. Relation between Hertz Stress-Life Exponent, Ball-Race Conformity, and Ball Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.; Root, Lawrence E.

    2006-01-01

    ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards based on Lundberg-Palmgren bearing life theory are normalized for ball bearings having inner- and outer-race conformities of 52 percent (0.52) and made from pre-1940 bearing steel. The Lundberg-Palmgren theory incorporates an inverse 9th power relation between Hertz stress and fatigue life for ball bearings. The effect of race conformity on ball set life independent of race life is not incorporated into the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. In addition, post-1960 vacuum-processed bearing steel exhibits a 12th power relation between Hertz stress and life. The work reported extends the previous work of Zaretsky, Poplawski, and Root to calculate changes in bearing life, that includes the life of the ball set, caused by race conformity, Hertz stress-life exponent, ball bearing type and bearing series. The bearing fatigue life in actual application will usually be equal to or greater than that calculated using the ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards that incorporate the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The relative fatigue life of an individual race is more sensitive to changes in race conformity for Hertz stress-life exponent n of 12 than where n = 9. However, when the effects are combined to predict actual bearing life for a specified set of conditions and bearing geometry, the predicted life of the bearing will be greater for a value of n = 12 than n = 9.

  4. Relation Between Hertz Stress-Life Exponent, Ball-Race Conformity, and Ball Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.; Root, Lawrence E.

    2008-01-01

    ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards based on Lundberg-Palmgren bearing life theory are normalized for ball bearings having inner- and outerrace conformities of 52 percent (0.52) and made from pre-1940 bearing steel. The Lundberg-Palmgren theory incorporates an inverse 9th power relation between Hertz stress and fatigue life for ball bearings. The effect of race conformity on ball set life independent of race life is not incorporated into the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. In addition, post-1960 vacuum-processed bearing steel exhibits a 12th power relation between Hertz stress and life. The work reported extends the previous work of Zaretsky, Poplawski, and Root to calculate changes in bearing life--that includes the life of the ball set--caused by race conformity, Hertz stress-life exponent, ball bearing type and bearing series. The bearing fatigue life in actual application will usually be equal to or greater than that calculated using the ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards that incorporate the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The relative fatigue life of an individual race is more sensitive to changes in race conformity for Hertz stress-life exponent n of 12 than where n = 9. However, when the effects are combined to predict actual bearing life for a specified set of conditions and bearing geometry, the predicted life of the bearing will be greater for a value of n = 12 than n = 9.

  5. Practical aspects of systems hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Applications of hardening technology in a practical system require a balance between the factors governing affordability, producibility, and survivability of the finished design. Without careful consideration of the top-level system operating constraints, a design engineer may find himself with a survivable but overweight, unproductive, expensive design. This paper explores some lessons learned in applying hardening techniques to several laser communications programs and is intended as an introductory guide to novice designers faced with the task of hardening a space system.

  6. Ball Collision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  7. Great balls of fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenhoff, Mark; reader01; jjherrera

    2014-03-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news article “Burning soil fuels ball lightning” (9 January, http://ow.ly/tl8aO) on evidence that a burning core of soil acts as an energy source for ball lightning.

  8. Stemless ball valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Kevin (Inventor); Yakos, David (Inventor); Walthall, Bryan (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A stemless ball valve comprising two flanges and a ball with a channel, two axis pins and two travel pins. One end of each axis and travel pin is fixedly attached to the ball, and the other end of each axis pin is lodged into a notch in the first or second flange such that the axis pin is allowed to rotate in the notch. The guide sleeve comprises two channels, and one end of each travel pin is situated within one of the two channels in the guide sleeve. An outer magnetic cartridge causes the inner magnetic cartridge and guide sleeve to rotate, and when the guide sleeve rotates, the travel pins move up and down within the channels in the guide sleeve. The movement of the travel pins within the channels in the guide sleeve causes the ball to rotate, thereby opening and closing the ball valve.

  9. Observations on the Nonlinear Unloading Behavior of Advanced High Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlina, Erik J.; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Barlat, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The unloading behavior was compared for three different steel grades: a dual-phase steel, a transformation-induced plasticity steel, and a twinning-induced plasticity steel. Steels that harden by phase transformation or deformation twinning exhibited a smaller component of microplastic strain during unloading and a smaller reduction in the chord modulus compared to the conventional hardening steel. As a result, unloading is closer to pure elastic unloading when the TRIP effect or TWIP effect is active.

  10. Happy Balls, Unhappy Balls, and Newton's Cradle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, David

    2010-01-01

    The intricacies of Newton's Cradle are well covered in the literature going as far back as the time of Newton! These discussions generally center on the highly elastic collisions of metal spheres. Thanks to the invention of happy and unhappy balls, you can build and study the interaction of less elastic systems (see Fig. 1).

  11. Happy Balls, Unhappy Balls, and Newton's Cradle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, David

    2010-03-01

    The intricacies of Newton's Cradle are well covered in the literature2-4 going as far back as the time of Newton!5 These discussions generally center on the highly elastic collisions of metal spheres. Thanks to the invention of happy and unhappy balls,6 you can build and study the interaction of less elastic systems (see Fig. 1).

  12. Determination of Anisotropic Hardening of Sheet Metals by Shear Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schikorra, Marco; Brosius, Alexander; Kleiner, Matthias

    2005-08-01

    With regard to the increasing necessity of accurate material data determination for the prediction of springback, a material testing equipment has been developed and set up for the measurement of material hardening within cyclic loading. One reason for inaccurate springback predictions can be seen in a missing consideration of load reversal effects in a realistic material model description. Due to bending and unbending while the material is drawn from the flange over a radius of a deep drawing tool, a hardening takes place which leads to an expanding or shifting of the elastic area and yield locus known as isotropic, kinematic, or combined hardening. Since springback is mainly influenced by the actual stress state and a correct distinction between elastic and elastic-plastic regions, an accurate prediction of these stress and strain components is basically required to simulate springback accurately, too. The presented testing method deals with shearing of sheet metal specimens in one or more load cycles to analyze the change of yield point and yield curve. The experimental set up is presented and discussed and the results are shown for different materials such as aluminum A199.5, stainless steel X5CrNi18.10, dual phase steel DP600, and copper Cu99.99. To guarantee a wide experimental range, different sheet thicknesses were used additionally. Simulations using the finite element method were carried out to compare the measured results with calculated results from different yield criterions and different hardening laws mentioned above. It was possible to show that commonly used standard material hardening laws like isotropic and kinematic hardening laws often do not lead to accurate stress state predictions when load reversals occur. The work shows the range of occurring differences and strategies to obtain to a more reliable prediction.

  13. Compact Q-balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.; da Rocha, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space-time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  14. Inserts Automatically Lubricate Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Inserts on ball-separator ring of ball bearings provide continuous film of lubricant on ball surfaces. Inserts are machined or molded. Small inserts in ball pockets provide steady supply of lubricant. Technique is utilized on equipment for which maintenance is often poor and lubrication interval is uncertain, such as household appliances, automobiles, and marine engines.

  15. Innovative Structural Materials and Sections with Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Vikram

    The motivation of this work is based on development of new construction products with strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) geared towards sustainable residential applications. The proposed research has three main objectives: automation of existing manufacturing systems for SHCC laminates; multi-level characterization of mechanical properties of fiber, matrix, interface and composites phases using servo-hydraulic and digital image correlation techniques. Structural behavior of these systems were predicted using ductility based design procedures using classical laminate theory and structural mechanics. SHCC sections are made up of thin sections of matrix with Portland cement based binder and fine aggregates impregnating continuous one-dimensional fibers in individual or bundle form or two/three dimensional woven, bonded or knitted textiles. Traditional fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) use random dispersed chopped fibers in the matrix at a low volume fractions, typically 1-2% to avoid to avoid fiber agglomeration and balling. In conventional FRC, fracture localization occurs immediately after the first crack, resulting in only minor improvement in toughness and tensile strength. However in SHCC systems, distribution of cracking throughout the specimen is facilitated by the fiber bridging mechanism. Influence of material properties of yarn, composition, geometry and weave patterns of textile in the behavior of laminated SHCC skin composites were investigated. Contribution of the cementitious matrix in the early age and long-term performance of laminated composites was studied with supplementary cementitious materials such as fly ash, silica fume, and wollastonite. A closed form model with classical laminate theory and ply discount method, coupled with a damage evolution model was utilized to simulate the non-linear tensile response of these composite materials. A constitutive material model developed earlier in the group was utilized to characterize and

  16. Super Ball Bot

    NASA Video Gallery

    Tensegrity Robot: Child's Play or Space Tech? Super Ball Bot is an all-in-one landing and mobility platform based on tensegrity structures, allowing for lower-cost, and more reliable planetary miss...

  17. Introduction to ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of a ball bearing is to provide a relative positioning and rotational freedom while transmitting a load between two structures, usually a shaft and a housing. For high rotational speeds (e.g., in gyroscope ball bearings) the purpose can be expanded to include rotational freedom with practically no wear in the bearing. This condition can be achieved by separating the bearing parts with a coherent film of fluid known as an elastohydrodynamic film. This film can be maintained not only when the bearing carries the load on a shaft, but also when the bearing is preloaded to position the shaft to within micro- or nano-inch accuracy and stability. Background information on ball bearings is provided, different types of ball bearings and their geometry and kinematics are defined, bearing materials, manufacturing processes, and separators are discussed. It is assumed, for the purposes of analysis, that the bearing carries no load.

  18. Passive Ball Capture Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloyd, Richard A. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A passive ball capture joint has a sleeve with a plurality of bores distributed about a circumference thereof and formed therethrough at an acute angle relative to the sleeve's longitudinal axis. A spring-loaded retainer is slidingly fitted in each bore and is biased such that, if allowed, will extend at least partially into the sleeve to retain a ball therein. A ring, rotatably mounted about the bores, has an interior wall defining a plurality of shaped races that bear against the spring-loaded retainers. A mechanized rotational force producer is coupled to the ring. The ring can be rotated from a first position (that presses the retainers into the sleeve to lock the ball in place) to a second position (that allows the retainers to springback out of the sleeve to release the ball).

  19. Quartz ball value

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, C.; Ingle, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Quartz ball valve consisting of two quartz joints sealed back-to-back and seated in quartz sockets perform at temperatures of up to 1,250 C and in corrosive chemical environments without contamination or degradation.

  20. Impact behavior of hollow balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2014-03-01

    Measurements are presented of the force acting on ping-pong and squash balls impacting on a force plate. Both ball types are hollow and have the same diameter but deform in very different ways. Ping pong balls are relatively stiff and buckle inwards at high impact speeds, while squash balls are softer and tend to squash or flatten. The buckling process generates a large-amplitude, high-frequency oscillation of the force acting on a ping-pong ball. Squash balls are initially very stiff before they soften, with the result that the force on the ball rises to about half its maximum value in the first 20 μs. Ping-pong balls have a high coefficient of restitution (COR), while squash balls have a low COR. Results for both ball types are interpreted in terms of additional experimental observations.

  1. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  2. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  3. Anisotropic hardening model based on non-associated flow rule and combined nonlinear kinematic hardening for sheet materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taherizadeh, Aboozar; Green, Daniel E.; Yoon, Jeong W.

    2013-12-01

    A material model for more effective analysis of plastic deformation of sheet materials is presented in this paper. The model is capable of considering the following aspects of plastic deformation behavior of sheet materials: the anisotropy in yielding stresses in different directions by using a quadratic yield function (based on Hill's 1948 model and stress ratios), the anisotropy in work hardening by introducing non-constant flow stress hardening in different directions, the anisotropy in plastic strains in different directions by using a quadratic plastic potential function and non-associated flow rule (based on Hill's 1948 model and plastic strain ratios, r-values), and finally some of the cyclic hardening phenomena such as Bauschinger's effect and transient behavior for reverse loading by using a coupled nonlinear kinematic hardening (so-called Armstrong-Frederick-Chaboche model). Basic fundamentals of the plasticity of the model are presented in a general framework. Then, the model adjustment procedure is derived for the plasticity formulations. Also, a generic numerical stress integration procedure is developed based on backward-Euler method (so-called multi-stage return mapping algorithm). Different aspects of the model are verified for DP600 steel sheet. Results show that the new model is able to predict the sheet material behavior in both anisotropic hardening and cyclic hardening regimes more accurately. By featuring the above-mentioned facts in the presented constitutive model, it is expected that more accurate results can be obtained by implementing this model in computational simulations of sheet material forming processes. For instance, more precise results of springback prediction of the parts formed from highly anisotropic hardened materials or that of determining the forming limit diagrams is highly expected by using the developed material model.

  4. Wear-resistant ball bearings for space applications. [coated with titanium carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boving, H.; Hintermann, H. E.; Haenni, W.; Bondivenne, E.; Boeto, M.; Conde, M.

    1977-01-01

    Ball bearings for hostile environments were developed. They consist of normal ball bearing steel parts of which the rings are coated with hard, wear-resistant, chemical vapor deposited (C.V.D) TiC. Experiments in ultrahigh vacuum, using cages of various materials with self-lubricating properties, have shown that such bearings are suitable for space applications.

  5. Ball-milled sulfur-doped graphene materials contain metallic impurities originating from ball-milling apparatus: their influence on the catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Chua, Chun Kiang; Sofer, Zdeněk; Khezri, Bahareh; Webster, Richard D; Pumera, Martin

    2016-07-21

    Graphene materials have found applications in a wide range of devices over the past decade. In order to meet the demand for graphene materials, various synthesis methods are constantly being improved or invented. Ball-milling of graphite to obtain graphene materials is one of the many versatile methods to easily obtain bulk quantities. In this work, we show that the graphene materials produced by ball-milling are spontaneously contaminated with metallic impurities originating from the grinding bowls and balls. Ball-milled sulfur-doped graphene materials obtained from two types of ball-milling apparatus, specifically made up of stainless steel and zirconium dioxide, were investigated. Zirconium dioxide-based ball-milled sulfur-doped graphene materials contain a drastically lower amount of metallic impurities than stainless steel-based ball-milled sulfur-doped graphene materials. The presence of metallic impurities is demonstrated by their catalytic effects toward the electrochemical catalysis of hydrazine and cumene hydroperoxide. The general impression toward ball-milling of graphite as a versatile method for the bulk production of 'metal-free' graphene materials without the need for post-processing and the selection of ball-milling tools should be cautioned. These findings would have wide-reaching implications for graphene research. PMID:27314607

  6. Ball-milled sulfur-doped graphene materials contain metallic impurities originating from ball-milling apparatus: their influence on the catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Chua, Chun Kiang; Sofer, Zdeněk; Khezri, Bahareh; Webster, Richard D; Pumera, Martin

    2016-07-21

    Graphene materials have found applications in a wide range of devices over the past decade. In order to meet the demand for graphene materials, various synthesis methods are constantly being improved or invented. Ball-milling of graphite to obtain graphene materials is one of the many versatile methods to easily obtain bulk quantities. In this work, we show that the graphene materials produced by ball-milling are spontaneously contaminated with metallic impurities originating from the grinding bowls and balls. Ball-milled sulfur-doped graphene materials obtained from two types of ball-milling apparatus, specifically made up of stainless steel and zirconium dioxide, were investigated. Zirconium dioxide-based ball-milled sulfur-doped graphene materials contain a drastically lower amount of metallic impurities than stainless steel-based ball-milled sulfur-doped graphene materials. The presence of metallic impurities is demonstrated by their catalytic effects toward the electrochemical catalysis of hydrazine and cumene hydroperoxide. The general impression toward ball-milling of graphite as a versatile method for the bulk production of 'metal-free' graphene materials without the need for post-processing and the selection of ball-milling tools should be cautioned. These findings would have wide-reaching implications for graphene research.

  7. Single event upset hardening techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, H.T.; Corbett, W.T.

    1990-01-01

    Integrated circuit logic states are maintained by virtue of specific transistor combinations being either on'' (conducting) or off'' (nonconducting). High energy ion strikes on the microcircuit generate photocurrents whose primary detrimental effect is to make off'' transistors appear on,'' confusing the logic state and leading to single event upset (SEU). Protection against these soft errors is accomplished using either technology or circuit techniques, actions that generally impact yield and performance relative to unhardened circuits. We describe, and using circuit simulations analyze, a technique for hardening latches which requires combinations of technology and circuit modifications, but which provides SEU immunity without loss of speed. Specifically, a single logic state is hardened against SEU using technology methods and the information concerning valid states is then used to simplify hardened circuit design. The technique emphasizes some basic hardening concepts, ideas for which will be reviewed. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  8. System-Level Radiation Hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Although system-level radiation hardening can enable the use of high-performance components and enhance the capabilities of a spacecraft, hardening techniques can be costly and can compromise the very performance designers sought from the high-performance components. Moreover, such techniques often result in a complicated design, especially if several complex commercial microcircuits are used, each posing its own hardening challenges. The latter risk is particularly acute for Commercial-Off-The-Shelf components since high-performance parts (e.g. double-data-rate synchronous dynamic random access memories - DDR SDRAMs) may require other high-performance commercial parts (e.g. processors) to support their operation. For these reasons, it is essential that system-level radiation hardening be a coordinated effort, from setting requirements through testing up to and including validation.

  9. Ball lightning burn.

    PubMed

    Selvaggi, Gennaro; Monstrey, Stan; von Heimburg, Dennis; Hamdi, Mustapha; Van Landuyt, Koen; Blondeel, Phillip

    2003-05-01

    Ball lightning is a rare physical phenomenon, which is not yet completely explained. It is similar to lightning but with different, peculiar characteristics. It can be considered a mix of fire and electricity, concentrated in a fireball with a diameter of 20-cm that most commonly appears suddenly, even in indoor conditions, during a thunderstorm. It moves quickly for several meters, can change direction, and ultimately disappears. During a great storm, a 28-year-old man and his 5-year-old daughter sustained burn wounds after ball lightning came from the outdoors through a chimney. These two patients demonstrated signs of fire and electrical injuries. The father, who lost consciousness, sustained superficial second-degree burn wounds bilaterally on the zygomatic area and deep second-degree burn wounds on his right hand (total body surface area, 4%). His daughter demonstrated superficial second-degree burn wounds on the left part of the face and deep second-degree and third-degree burn wounds (total body surface area, 30%) on the left neck, both upper arms, and the back. In this article, the authors report the first two cases of burn injuries resulting from ball lightning contact indoors. The literature on this rare phenomenon is reviewed to elucidate the nature of ball lightning. Emphasis is placed on the nature of injuries after ball lightning contact, the therapy used, and the long-term complications.

  10. Ball lightning burn.

    PubMed

    Selvaggi, Gennaro; Monstrey, Stan; von Heimburg, Dennis; Hamdi, Mustapha; Van Landuyt, Koen; Blondeel, Phillip

    2003-05-01

    Ball lightning is a rare physical phenomenon, which is not yet completely explained. It is similar to lightning but with different, peculiar characteristics. It can be considered a mix of fire and electricity, concentrated in a fireball with a diameter of 20-cm that most commonly appears suddenly, even in indoor conditions, during a thunderstorm. It moves quickly for several meters, can change direction, and ultimately disappears. During a great storm, a 28-year-old man and his 5-year-old daughter sustained burn wounds after ball lightning came from the outdoors through a chimney. These two patients demonstrated signs of fire and electrical injuries. The father, who lost consciousness, sustained superficial second-degree burn wounds bilaterally on the zygomatic area and deep second-degree burn wounds on his right hand (total body surface area, 4%). His daughter demonstrated superficial second-degree burn wounds on the left part of the face and deep second-degree and third-degree burn wounds (total body surface area, 30%) on the left neck, both upper arms, and the back. In this article, the authors report the first two cases of burn injuries resulting from ball lightning contact indoors. The literature on this rare phenomenon is reviewed to elucidate the nature of ball lightning. Emphasis is placed on the nature of injuries after ball lightning contact, the therapy used, and the long-term complications. PMID:12792547

  11. 6. FF coal pulverizer (ball mill inside). GG building in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. FF coal pulverizer (ball mill inside). GG building in background did preliminary crushing; pulverizer to left, coal conveyor and air cleaning towers to right; conveyor on left brought crushed coal to FF. Looking north/northeast - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  12. Whitey SCHe Ball Valves Provide Test Port Isolation

    SciTech Connect

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-10-19

    These valves are 1/4-inch ball valves fabricated of 316 stainless steel. Packing is TFE (standard). They are used as normally closed isolation valves for test ports in the SCHe System between the gage root valve and the pressure indicator.

  13. Whitey SCHe Ball Valves Provide Test Port Isolation

    SciTech Connect

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-09-15

    These valves are 1/4 inch ball valves fabricated of 316 stainless steel. Packing is TFE (standard). They are used as normally closed isolation valves for test ports in the SCHe System between the gage root valve and the pressure indicator.

  14. Wear and Adhesive Failure of Al2O3 Powder Coating Sprayed onto AISI H13 Tool Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanov, Auezhan; Pyun, Young-Sik

    2016-07-01

    In this study, an alumina (Al2O3) ceramic powder was sprayed onto an AISI H13 hot-work tool steel substrate that was subjected to sanding and ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification (UNSM) treatment processes. The significance of the UNSM technique on the adhesive failure of the Al2O3 coating and on the hardness of the substrate was investigated. The adhesive failure of the coating sprayed onto sanded and UNSM-treated substrates was investigated by a micro-scratch tester at an incremental load. It was found, based on the obtained results, that the coating sprayed onto the UNSM-treated substrate exhibited a better resistance to adhesive failure in comparison with that of the coating sprayed onto the sanded substrate. Dry friction and wear property of the coatings sprayed onto the sanded and UNSM-treated substrates were assessed by means of a ball-on-disk tribometer against an AISI 52100 steel ball. It was demonstrated that the UNSM technique controllably improved the adhesive failure of the Al2O3 coating, where the critical load was improved by about 31%. Thus, it is expected that the application of the UNSM technique to an AISI H13 tool steel substrate prior to coating may delay the adhesive failure and improve the sticking between the coating and the substrate thanks to the modified and hardened surface.

  15. Hex ball torque test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, B. A.; Foster, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    A series of torque tests were performed on four flight-type hex ball universal joints in order to characterize and determine the actual load-carrying capability of this device. The universal joint is a part of manual actuation rods for scientific instruments within the Hubble Space Telescope. It was found that the hex ball will bind slightly during the initial load application. This binding did not affect the function of the universal joint, and the units would wear-in after a few additional loading cycles. The torsional yield load was approximately 50 ft-lb, and was consistent among the four test specimens. Also, the torque required to cause complete failure exceeded 80 ft-lb. It is concluded that the hex ball universal joint is suitable for its intended applications.

  16. Bearing steels: Into the 21. century

    SciTech Connect

    Hoo, J.J.C.; Green, W.B. Jr.

    1998-12-31

    The symposium was organized in 9 separate categories, some sessions updating information previously presented, and some presenting brand new materials and processing to advance bearing technology. Subjects covered include steel cleanliness and measuring methods, bearing fatigue life, and advanced steel processing. Also covered are advances in both thru-hardening and carburizing heat treatments, progress in aerospace and corrosion resistant materials, and surface modifying processes, such as induction hardening and coating methods. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  17. When Two Balls Are Just One

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, Christopher W.; Biermann, Mark L.; Howard, Timothy; Klingenberg, Kurtis; Ramsey, Paul

    2008-03-01

    A camcorder can be a powerful tool in pedagogical settings, such as in an introductory physics course or in introducing undergraduates to data collection. In this paper, we discuss our experience using a Panasonic PV-GS150 digital camcorder to analyze the motion of a falling steel ball, with the goal of determining the acceleration due to gravity, g = 9.80 m/s2. When performing this simple experiment, an interesting technical issue arose that led to an excellent teaching opportunity that is based on an unexpected and intriguing method of computing g.

  18. Balls and Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an art lesson that allows students to set up and collect sphere canvases. Spheres move art away from a rectangular canvas into a dimension that requires new planning and painting. From balls to many other spherical canvases that bounce, roll, float and fly, art experiences are envisioned by students. Even if adults recognize…

  19. Influence of steel type on the propensity for tribochemical wear in boundary lubrication with a wind turbine gear oil

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Ryan D.; Doll, Gary L.; Hager, C H; Howe, Jane Y

    2010-01-01

    Tribochemical wear may occur at the interface between a surface and a lubricant as a result of chemical and mechanical interactions in a tribological contact. Understanding the onset of tribochemical wear damage on component surfaces requires the use of high resolution techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In this study, two steel types, case carburized AISI 3310 and through-hardened AISI 52100, were wear tested using a ball-on-disk rolling/sliding contact tribometer in fully formulated commercial wind turbine gearbox oil under boundary lubrication conditions with 10% slip. With the exception of steel type, all other test conditions were held constant. Conventional tribofilm analysis in the wear tracks was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and no significant composition differences were detected in the tribofilms for the different steel disk types. However, TEM analysis revealed significant tribochemical wear differences between the two steel types at multiple length scales, from the near-surface material microstructure (depth < 500 nm) to the tribofilm nanostructure. Nanometer-scale interfacial cracking and surface particle detachment was observed for the AISI 52100 case, whereas the tribofilm/substrate interface was abrupt and undamaged for the AISI 3310 case. Differences in tribofilm structure, including the location and orientation of MoS{sub 2} single sheet inclusions, were observed as a function of steel type as well. It is suggested that the tribochemical wear modes observed in these experiments may be origins of macroscopic surface-initiated damage such as micropitting in bearings and gears.

  20. Evaluation of the nucleation and coarsening kinetic behavior of the secondary hardening carbide of Fe-HCo-10Ni-1Mo-0.16C steel at two chromium levels, using an analytical and modeling approach: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Y.; Machmeier, P. M.; Matuszewski, T.; Ayer, R.

    1997-06-01

    The effect of 1 % Cr addition on the resistivity during preaging and peak aging of an AF1410 based steel was examined by analytical and modeling approaches. The increased kinetics of aging resulting from a chromium addition, due to a variety of complex microstructural changes,was analyzed by Avrami-Mehl and Wert-Zener formulations, which were modified so that the exponent was a function of time. Using a eneralized Avrami equation, it was shown that the nucleation rate, N(t), at short aging times was large but became a rapidly declining function as N(t) approaches zero in a supersaturated system. A mathematical solution, using AF1410 steel carbide growth data at 510 °C, confirmed reported experimental evidence of second-stage carbide nucleation at 1 to 2 h.

  1. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOEpatents

    McWilliams, R.A.; Holle, W.G. von.

    1983-08-16

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300[mu] seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture. 3 figs.

  2. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOEpatents

    McWilliams, Roy A.; von Holle, William G.

    1983-01-01

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300.mu. seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture.

  3. Visual Skills: Watch the Ball?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, Sue

    1989-01-01

    In tennis as well as in other racket/paddle sports, simply watching the ball does not guarantee success in hitting the ball to the desired location. Teachers and coaches should teach players to integrate available visual, spatial, and kinesthetic information. Several drills for good ball contact are outlined. (IAH)

  4. Stemless Ball Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Robert K.; Yakos, David; Walthall, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This invention utilizes a new method of opening and closing a ball valve. Instead of rotating the ball with a perpendicular stem (as is the case with standard ball valves), the ball is rotated around a fixed axis by two guide pins. This innovation eliminates the leak point that is present in all standard ball valves due to the penetration of an actuation stem through the valve body. The VOST (Venturi Off-Set-Technology) valve has been developed for commercial applications. The standard version of the valve consists of an off-set venturi flow path through the valve. This path is split at the narrowest portion of the venturi, allowing the section upstream from the venturi to be rotated. As this rotation takes place, the venturi becomes restricted as one face rotates with respect to the other, eventually closing off the flow path. A spring-loaded seal made of resilient material is embedded in the upstream face of the valve, making a leak-proof seal between the faces; thus a valve is formed. The spring-loaded lip seal is the only seal that can provide a class six, or bubble-tight, seal against the opposite face of the valve. Tearing action of the seal by high-velocity gas on this early design required relocation of the seal to the downstream face of the valve. In the stemless embodiment of this valve, inner and outer magnetic cartridges are employed to transfer mechanical torque from the outside of the valve to the inside without the use of a stem. This eliminates the leak path caused by the valve stems in standard valves because the stems penetrate through the bodies of these valves.

  5. Study on the Influence of the Work Hardening Models Constitutive Parameters Identification in the Springback Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. C.; Alves, J. L.; Chaparro, B. M.; Menezes, L. F.

    2005-08-01

    The main goal of this work is to determine the influence of the work hardening model in the numerical prediction of springback. This study will be performed according with the specifications of the first phase of the "Benchmark 3" of the Numisheet'2005 Conference: the "Channel Draw". Several work hardening constitutive models are used in order to allow a better description of the different material mechanical behavior. Two are classical pure isotropic hardening models described by a power law (Swift) or a Voce type saturation equation. Those two models were also combined with a non-linear (Lemaître and Chaboche) kinematic hardening rule. The final one is the Teodosiu microstructural hardening model. The study is performed for two commonly used steels of the automotive industry: mild (DC06) and dual phase (DP600) steels. The mechanical characterization, as well as the constitutive parameters identification of each work hardening models, was performed by LPMTM, based on an appropriate set of experimental data such as uniaxial tensile tests, monotonic and Bauschinger simple shear tests and orthogonal strain path tests, all at various orientations with respect to the rolling direction. All the simulations were carried out with the CEMUC's home code DD3IMP (contraction of `Deep Drawing 3-D IMPlicit code').

  6. Life on the Hardened Border

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Bruce Granville

    2012-01-01

    The many Coast Salish groups distributed on both sides of the United States-Canada border on the Pacific coast today face significant obstacles to cross the international border, and in some cases are denied passage or intimidated into not attempting to cross. The current situation regarding travel by Aboriginal people reflects the "hardening" of…

  7. Model Identification and FE Simulations: Effect of Different Yield Loci and Hardening Laws in Sheet Forming

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, P.; Lelotte, T.; Bouffioux, C.; El Houdaigui, F.; Habraken, A.M.; Duchene, L.; Bael, A. van; He, S.; Duflou, J.

    2005-08-05

    The bi-axial experimental equipment developed by Flores enables to perform Baushinger shear tests and successive or simultaneous simple shear tests and plane-strain tests. Such experiments and classical tensile tests investigate the material behavior in order to identify the yield locus and the hardening models. With tests performed on two steel grades, the methods applied to identify classical yield surfaces such as Hill or Hosford ones as well as isotropic Swift type hardening or kinematic Armstrong-Frederick hardening models are explained. Comparison with the Taylor-Bishop-Hill yield locus is also provided. The effect of both yield locus and hardening model choice will be presented for two applications: Single Point Incremental Forming (SPIF) and a cup deep drawing.

  8. Model Identification and FE Simulations: Effect of Different Yield Loci and Hardening Laws in Sheet Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, P.; Duchêne, L.; Lelotte, T.; Bouffioux, C.; El Houdaigui, F.; Van Bael, A.; He, S.; Duflou, J.; Habraken, A. M.

    2005-08-01

    The bi-axial experimental equipment developed by Flores enables to perform Baushinger shear tests and successive or simultaneous simple shear tests and plane-strain tests. Such experiments and classical tensile tests investigate the material behavior in order to identify the yield locus and the hardening models. With tests performed on two steel grades, the methods applied to identify classical yield surfaces such as Hill or Hosford ones as well as isotropic Swift type hardening or kinematic Armstrong-Frederick hardening models are explained. Comparison with the Taylor-Bishop-Hill yield locus is also provided. The effect of both yield locus and hardening model choice will be presented for two applications: Single Point Incremental Forming (SPIF) and a cup deep drawing.

  9. Ball Lightning Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, V. L.; Nikitin, A. I.; Dijkhuis, G. C.

    Ball lightning (BL) researches' review and theoretical models of three different authors are presented. The general review covers investigations from 1838 until the present day, and includes a discussion on observation data, experimental modeling, and theoretical approaches. Section 6.1 is written by Bychkov and Nikitin; authors of the sections 6.2, 6.3 and 6.4 are, respectively, Bychkov, Nikitin and Dijkhuis.

  10. Induction heat treatment of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Semiatin, S.L.; Stutz, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the induction heating. After reviewing heat treating operations for steel and the principles of the heat treatment of steel, an overview of induction heat treating is provided. Next, consideration is given to equipment and equipment selection, coil design, power requirements and temperature control. A discussion of surface and through hardening of steel is provided, including information on frequency and power selection and quenching apparatus. Tempering is considered, followed by information on control of residual stresses, cracking, temper brittleness and the important metallurgical and hardness differences between induction and furnace treated steel.

  11. Solution hardening and strain hardening at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kocks, U.F.

    1982-10-01

    Solutes can significantly increase the rate of strain hardening; as a consequence, the saturation stress, at which strain hardening tends to cease for a given temperature and strain rate, is increased more than the yield stress: this is the major effect of solutes on strength at elevated temperatures, especially in the regime where dynamic strain-aging occurs. It is shown that local solute mobility can affect both the rate of dynamic recovery and the dislocation/dislocation interaction strength. The latter effect leads to multiplicative solution strengthening. It is explained by a new model based on repeated dislocation unlocking, in a high-temperature limit, which also rationalizes the stress dependence of static and dynamic strain-aging, and may help explain the plateau of the yield stress at elevated temperatures. 15 figures.

  12. Comparison of lead attenuation and lead hardening equivalence of materials used in respect of diagnostic X-ray shielding.

    PubMed

    Okunade, Akintunde Akangbe

    2002-12-01

    Present interest is in the shielding of diagnostic X-ray units. Numerical comparison has been made of the attenuation and hardening properties of lead and some particular alternative materials: steel, plate glass and gypsum wallboard. Results show, for particular choices of thickness, that lead and steel can be made to provide closely similar attenuation and spectral hardening, values of lead attenuation equivalent (LAE) and lead hardening equivalent (LHE) thicknesses being nearly the same. Significant differences in the attenuation and hardening properties of lead are found in comparison with plate glass and gypsum wallboard. LAE produces better matching of exposure for lead-plate glass and lead-gypsum wallboard than LHE. PMID:12406622

  13. Rolling contact fatigue of low hardness steel for slewing ring application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Jason A.

    This thesis discusses the rolling contact fatigue of steel utilized in anti-friction bearings, also referred to as slewing bearings. These slewing bearings are utilized in cranes, excavators, wind turbines and other similar applications. Five materials composed of two different material types were tested. The two material types were high carbon steel and medium carbon alloy steel. The test specimens were processed from forged rolled rings. Two machines were evaluated a ZF-RCF and 3-Ball test machine. The evaluation was to determine which machine can best simulate the application in which the slewing bearing is utilized. Initially, each specimen will be pretested to determine the appropriate testing direction from within the forged rolled rings. Pretesting is needed in order to establish consistent failure modes between samples. The primary goal of the test is to understand the life differences and failure modes between high carbon steel and medium carbon alloy steel. The high carbon steel ring was cut into two sections, one of which was stress relieved and the other was quenched and tempered. The medium carbon alloy steel was cut into three sections, all of which were quenched and tempered to different hardness levels. The test program was dynamically adjusted based upon the previous sample's life and load. An S-N curve was then established from the 5 materials tested at two target loads. The samples were run until the first sign of a crack was detected by an eddy current. At the completion of the rolling contact test, select sample's microstructure was evaluated for crack initiation location. The selected samples were divided into four groups which represent different maximum shear stress levels. These samples displayed indications of material deformation in which the high carbon steel experienced an increased amount of cold work when compared to medium carbon alloy steel. The life of the high carbon steel was nearly equivalent to the expected life of the medium

  14. Kinematic hardening in creep of Zircaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedláček, Radan; Deuble, Dietmar

    2016-10-01

    Results of biaxial creep tests with stress changes on Zircaloy-2 tube samples are presented. A Hollomon-type viscoplastic strain hardening model is extended by the Armstrong-Frederic nonlinear kinematic hardening law, resulting in a mixed (i.e. isotropic and kinematic) strain hardening model. The creep tests with stress changes and similar tests published in the literature are simulated by the models. It is shown that introduction of the kinematic strain hardening in the viscoplastic strain hardening model is sufficient to describe the creep transients following stress drops, stress reversals and stress removals.

  15. Polyurethane retainers for ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation of a new ball bearing retainer material is reported. A special composite polyurethane foam ball retainer has been developed that has virtually zero wear, is chemically inert to hydrocarbon lubricants, and stores up to 60 times as much lubricant per unit volume as the most commonly used retainer material, cotton phenolic. This new retainer concept shows promise of years of ball bearing operation without reoiling, based on life testing in high vacuum.

  16. Physics in a Glitter Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trikosko, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Maui Toys' Water Bouncer (Fig. 1) is a water-filled ball containing glitter. Buy one and put it on your desk and students can't keep their hands off of it. Pitch the ball in the air giving it a quick spin. When you catch it you will see a sparkling vortex. Twist the ball around different ways and the angular momentum of the fluid keeps the axis of…

  17. Surface Fatigue Resistance with Induction Hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis; Turza, Alan; Chapman, Mike

    1996-01-01

    Induction hardening has been used for some years to harden the surface and improve the strength and service life of gears and other components. Many applications that employ induction hardening require a relatively long time to finish the hardening process and controlling the hardness of the surface layer and its depth often was a problem. Other surface hardening methods, ie., carbonizing, take a very long time and tend to cause deformations of the toothing, whose elimination requires supplementary finishing work. In double-frequency induction hardening, one uses a low frequency for the preheating of the toothed wheel and a much higher frequency for the purpose of rapidly heating the surface by way of surface hardening.

  18. PEPC LRU: Ball Support Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, T

    1999-05-14

    The PEPC LRU upper ball support assembly consists of a ball and a pneumatic air cylinder/conical seat latching mechanism to be attached to the optics support frame,and a ball attached to the PEPC LRU. Both components are designed to allow manual positioning in three axes. Upon insertion of the PEPC LRU into the structure, the upper pneumatic cylinder is actuated to latch the two assemblies together through the conical seat device to grab the lower ball to support the LRU weight. To be conservative, the design load for the assembly is 1500 pounds (the prototype PEPC LRU weight was measured to be near 1380 pounds).

  19. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  20. Evolution of mechanical properties of M50 bearing steel due to rolling contact fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Bryan D.

    balls after RCF was developed. Using this method, it is possible to determine the full stress-strain response of material after material that has undergone RCF. The micro-hardness of the material within the RCF affected region was found to increase by nearly 10% and yield strength increased 13% when high contact stress levels were employed in fatigue experiments. It was demonstrated that the number of cycles does contribute to hardness increase, but the applied Hertzian stress is the dominant factor. Mechanical processing was found to significantly retard the rate of mechanical property evolution, implying that it would also significantly improve the life. Similarly, it was observed that the rate of hardening is slower when silicon nitride is used to interact with the M50 specimen than another M50 component. This supports the idea that hybrid bearings last longer than more traditional all-steel bearings. Finally, an empirical model of the evolution of the constitutive response of the bearing material within the RCF affected region was developed based on the results of these analyses. This model can be used to predict the constitutive response of the material within the RCF affected region of an M50 steel ball, given the initial hardness, number of RCF cycles, and applied Hertzian stress. Further, it is now possible to solve the local yield strength as a function of depth within the RCF affected region given these same parameters.

  1. The "Policy Cycle": A Ball by Ball Account.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Richard; Troyna, Barry

    1994-01-01

    Concerned with Stephen Ball's theoretical and empirical contribution to contemporary "education policy sociology," this article examines the efficacy of his theoretical eclecticism, highlighting incompatibilities in his interpretation and application of certain social and political theorists. Ball's representation of the policy cycle, as applied…

  2. Evaluation of load-life relation with ball bearings at 500 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of the literature suggests that a stress-life exponent of approximately 12 is typical of vacuum-processed steels for ball bearings rather than the exponent of 9 which has been generally accepted by the bearing industry and bearing users. Tests run with vacuum-degassed AISI 52100 balls in the five-ball fatigue tester at four maximum Hertz stress levels in the range from 650,000 to 875,000 psi showed good agreement with the literature. However, tests run with consumable-electrode vacuum melted AISI M-50 steel angular-contact ball bearings at 500 F at three thrust loads did not show significant deviation from the accepted ninth power stress-life relation.

  3. Holy Balls!: Part Deux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belden, Jesse; Jandron, Michael; Truscott, Tadd

    2012-11-01

    A Waboba® (WAter BOuncing BAll) demonstrates remarkable water skipping behavior, even at relatively large impact angles. The highly compliant nature of these elastic spheres results in significant deformation into a disk-like shape upon impact. The increased wetted area and force coefficient generates a large hydrodynamic force that more readily lifts the ball off the water surface. However, elasticity introduces some surprising phenomena, such as material waves that propagate on the sphere and interact with the water cavity. Depending upon impact conditions, material waves may propagate in various directions combining to create multiple modes of deformation and complicated fluid-structure interactions. Furthermore, the timescales of deformation and wave propagation depend on the material properties and impact conditions. In this talk, we will discuss skipping regimes in terms of impact parameters and material properties and relate failed skipping behavior to the structure-fluid interaction caused by deformation. The critical timescales for deformation, wave propagation and collision will be related to the relevant physical parameters of the problem.

  4. Atmospheric Ball Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurden, C. J. V.; Wurden, G. A.

    2008-11-01

    Free-floating atmospheric pressure copper hydroxyl ball plasmas have been studied in air and helium atmospheres, using still and high speed photography (up to 20,000 fps), collimated photodiodes, and spectroscopy. A fine boundary layer between the greenish Cu-OH cloud, and the air, is orange in color. However, when the discharge is initiated into a helium atmosphere, the boundary layer is no longer visible, suggesting that the visible boundary was caused by interactions with oxygen. We have studied scaling of the 10-cm diameter ball plasmas with both the size of the water bucket, and the applied discharge voltage, over the range of 500-5000 volts. When looking at the initial spider-leg breakdown above the water surface, the ratio of H-alpha to H-beta lines suggests a temperature of ˜0.3 eV. This is also consistent with the presence of molecular lines of OH, and perhaps CuOH2 in the rising cloud. The cloud is affected by, but can penetrate through an aluminum window screen mesh.

  5. Hardening and welding with high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Bodo; Herfurth, Hans-Joachim; Heinemann, Stefan

    2000-03-01

    Commercially available high power diode lasers (HPDLs) with output powers of up to 6 kW have been recognized as an interesting tool for industrial applications. In certain fields of application they offer many advantages over Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers because of their low maintenance, compact design and low capital costs. Examples of successful industrial implementation of HPDLs include plastic welding, surface hardening and heat conduction welding of stainless steel and aluminum. The joining of plastics with an HPDL offers the advantages of producing a weld seam with high strength, high consistency and superior appearance. One example is the keyless entry system introduced with the Mercedes E-class where the microelectronic circuits are embedded in a plastic housing. Other applications include instrument panels, cell phones, headlights and tail lights. Applications in the field of surface treatment of metals profit from the HPDL's inherent line-shaped focus and the homogeneous intensity distribution across this focus. An HPDL system is used within the industry to harden rails for coordinate measurement machines. This system contains a customized zoom optic to focus the laser light onto the rails. With the addition of a temperature control, even complex shapes can be hardened with a constant depth and minimum distortion.

  6. Wear-resistant ball bearings for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boving, H.; Hintermann, H. E.; Hanni, W.; Bondivenne, E.; Boeto, M.; Conde, E.

    1977-01-01

    Ball bearings consisting of steel parts of which the rings are coated with hard, wear resistant, chemical vapor deposited TiC are described. Experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum, using cages of various materials with self-lubricating properties, show that such bearings are suitable for space applications. The results of laboratory tests on the ESA Meteosat Radiometer Focalizing mechanism, which contains six coated bearings, are summarized.

  7. Nucleation and growth of rolling contact failure of 440C bearing steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, V.; Bastias, P. C.; Hahn, G. T.; Rubin, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    . Elastic-linear-kinematic hardening-plastic (ELKP) material constitutive relations produce less net plastic deformation in the initial stages for a given stress, than seen in experiments. A new set of constitutive relations: non-linear-kinematic hardening-plastic (NLKP) was used. This material model produces more plasticity than the ELKP model and shows promise for treating the net distortions in the early stages. Techniques for performing experimental measurements that can be compared with the finite element calculations were devised. The measurements are being performed on 9mm-diameter, 440C steel cylindrical rolling elements in contact with 12.5 mm-diameter, 52100 steel balls in a 3-ball-rod fatigue test machine operating at 3600 RPM. Artificial, 7 microns deep, indents were inserted on the running track of the cylindrical rolling elements and profilometer measurements of these indents made, before and after the rolling. These preliminary measurements show that the indents are substantially deformed plastically in the process of rolling. The deformations of the groove calculated with the finite element model are comparable to those measured experimentally.

  8. Effects of welding and post-weld heat treatments on nanoscale precipitation and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel hardened by NiAl and Cu nanoparticles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jiao, Z. B.; Luan, J. H.; Guo, W.; Poplawsky, J. D.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-09-01

    The effects of welding and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on nanoscale co-precipitation, grain structure, and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel were studied through a combination of atom probe tomography (APT) and mechanical tests. Our results indicate that the welding process dissolves all pre-existing nanoparticles and causes grain coarsening in the fusion zone, resulting in a soft and ductile weld without any cracks in the as-welded condition. A 550 °C PWHT induces fine-scale re-precipitation of NiAl and Cu co-precipitates with high number densities and ultra-fine sizes, leading to a large recovery of strength but a loss of ductility withmore » intergranular failure, whereas a 600 °C PWHT gives rise to coarse-scale re-precipitation of nanoparticles together with the formation of a small amount of reverted austenite, resulting in a great recovery in both strength and ductility. Our analysis indicates that the degree of strength recovery is dependent mainly upon the re-precipitation microstructure of nanoparticles, together with grain size and reversion of austenite, while the ductility recovery is sensitive to the grain-boundary structure. In conclusion, APT reveals that the grain-boundary segregation of Mn and P may be the main reason for the 550 °C embrittlement, and the enhanced ductility at 600 °C is ascribed to a possible reduction of the segregation and reversion of austenite.« less

  9. Precision machining of steel decahedrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, W. J.; Sealy, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Production of highly accurate decahedron prisms from hardened stainless steel is discussed. Prism is used to check angular alignment of mounting pads of strapdown inertial guidance system. Accuracies obtainable using recommended process and details of operation are described. Photographic illustration of production device is included.

  10. Behaviour of a Bouncing Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2015-01-01

    The bounce of a ball is a seemingly innocuous event that can be used to illustrate many aspects of elementary and even advanced mechanics. Both normal and oblique bounces on a rigid surface are considered in this article, emphasizing qualitative features of the bounce process. If the ball bounces at an oblique angle then it can slide throughout…

  11. High-Performance Ball Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bursey, Roger W., Jr.; Haluck, David A.; Olinger, John B.; Owen, Samuel S.; Poole, William E.

    1995-01-01

    High-performance bearing features strong, lightweight, self-lubricating cage with self-lubricating liners in ball apertures. Designed to operate at high speed (tens of thousands of revolutions per minute) in cryogenic environment like liquid-oxygen or liquid-hydrogen turbopump. Includes inner race, outer race, and cage keeping bearing balls equally spaced.

  12. Structure of laboratory ball lightning.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Tamura, Tomoya; Cappelli, Mark A; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2009-12-01

    Trajectories of self-sustained laboratory ball lightning, generated by arc discharges with silicon, are investigated for understanding the possibility of buoyant flight. Extremely low apparent densities are found, nearly approaching that of standard air. The freely buoyant balls are observed to survive for about 0.1 s, with significantly buoyant balls surviving for several seconds. These ball lightning objects are found to have a density and size that can easily allow them to be carried by a gentle breeze of a few meters per second. The results are interpreted by a model that is an extension of that first proposed by Abrahamson and Dinniss [J. Abrahamson and J. Dinniss, Nature (London) 403, 519 (2000)]. The buoyant behavior of ball lightning seen in our experiments is believed to arise as a result of the formation of a nanoparticle oxide network growing from a molten silicon core.

  13. Structure of laboratory ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Tamura, Tomoya; Cappelli, Mark A.; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2009-12-01

    Trajectories of self-sustained laboratory ball lightning, generated by arc discharges with silicon, are investigated for understanding the possibility of buoyant flight. Extremely low apparent densities are found, nearly approaching that of standard air. The freely buoyant balls are observed to survive for about 0.1 s, with significantly buoyant balls surviving for several seconds. These ball lightning objects are found to have a density and size that can easily allow them to be carried by a gentle breeze of a few meters per second. The results are interpreted by a model that is an extension of that first proposed by Abrahamson and Dinniss [J. Abrahamson and J. Dinniss, Nature (London) 403, 519 (2000)]. The buoyant behavior of ball lightning seen in our experiments is believed to arise as a result of the formation of a nanoparticle oxide network growing from a molten silicon core.

  14. Reflections on a Bouncing Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, Jim; Lopez, Veronica; Rohr, Tyler

    2014-12-01

    While observing the bounce heights of various kinds of sports balls dropped from different heights onto a variety of surfaces, we thought of the following question: Could measurements of drop and bounce heights of balls of different diameters, but of the same material, falling from different heights, but on the same surface, be expressed by a simple mathematical formula? Our objective was to provide a simple classroom ball-drop experiment that produced robust and interesting data sets from which students could address this question. With a suitable choice of variables, all the ball drop data could be collapsed to a single curve, so that given the mass and drop height of the ball, the bounce height could be reasonably estimated (±10% of measured values).

  15. Structure of laboratory ball lightning.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Tamura, Tomoya; Cappelli, Mark A; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2009-12-01

    Trajectories of self-sustained laboratory ball lightning, generated by arc discharges with silicon, are investigated for understanding the possibility of buoyant flight. Extremely low apparent densities are found, nearly approaching that of standard air. The freely buoyant balls are observed to survive for about 0.1 s, with significantly buoyant balls surviving for several seconds. These ball lightning objects are found to have a density and size that can easily allow them to be carried by a gentle breeze of a few meters per second. The results are interpreted by a model that is an extension of that first proposed by Abrahamson and Dinniss [J. Abrahamson and J. Dinniss, Nature (London) 403, 519 (2000)]. The buoyant behavior of ball lightning seen in our experiments is believed to arise as a result of the formation of a nanoparticle oxide network growing from a molten silicon core. PMID:20365306

  16. Characterization of Lubricants on Ball Bearings by FT-IR Using an Integrating Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, K. W.; Pepper, S. V.; Wright, A. A.; Grady, B.

    2007-01-01

    Fourier Transform-Infrared reflectance microspectroscopy has been used extensively for the examination of coatings on nonplanar surfaces such as ball bearings. While this technique offers considerable advantages, practical application has many drawbacks, some of which are easily overcome by the use of integrating sphere technology. This paper describes the use of an integrating sphere for the quantification of thin layers of lubricant on the surface of ball bearings and the parameters which require optimization in order to obtain reliable data. Several applications of the technique are discussed including determination of lubricant load on 12.7 mm steel ball bearings and the examination of degraded lubricant on post mortem specimens.

  17. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  18. Control technology for surface treatment of materials using induction hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, J.B.; Skocypec, R.D.

    1997-04-01

    In the industrial and automotive industries, induction case hardening is widely used to provide enhanced strength, wear resistance, and toughness in components made from medium and high carbon steels. The process uses significantly less energy than competing batch process, is environmentally benign, and is a very flexible in-line manufacturing process. As such, it can directly contribute to improved component reliability, and the manufacture of high-performance lightweight parts. However, induction hardening is not as widely used as it could be. Input material and unexplained process variations produce significant variation in product case depth and quality. This necessitates frequent inspection of product quality by destructive examination, creates higher than desired scrap rates, and causes de-rating of load stress sensitive components. In addition, process and tooling development are experience-based activities, accomplished by trial and error. This inhibits the use of induction hardening for new applications, and the resultant increase in energy efficiency in the industrial sectors. In FY96, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement under the auspices of the Technology Transfer Initiative and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles was completed. A multidisciplinary team from Sandia National Labs and Delphi Saginaw Steering Systems investigated the induction hardening by conducting research in the areas of process characterization, computational modeling, materials characterization, and high speed data acquisition and controller development. The goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of closed-loop control for a specific material, geometry, and process. Delphi Steering estimated annual savings of $2-3 million per year due to reduced scrap losses, inspection costs, and machine down time if reliable closed-loop control could be achieved. A factor of five improvement in process precision was demonstrated and is now operational on the factory floor.

  19. idRHa+ProMod - Rail Hardening Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, L.

    2016-03-01

    idRHa+ProMod is the process control system developed by Primetals Technologies to foresee the thermo-mechanical evolution and micro-structural composition of rail steels subjected to slack quenching into idRHa+ Rail Hardening equipments in a simulation environment. This tool can be used both off-line or in-line, giving the user the chance to test and study the best cooling strategies or letting the automatic control system free to adjust the proper cooling recipe. Optimization criteria have been tailored in order to determine the best cooling conditions according to the metallurgical requirements imposed by the main rail standards and also taking into account the elastoplastic bending phenomena occurring during all stages of the head hardening process. The computational core of idRHa+ProMod is a thermal finite element procedure coupled with special algorithms developed to work out the main thermo-physical properties of steel, to predict the non-isothermal austenite decomposition into all the relevant phases and subsequently to evaluate the amount of latent heat of transformation released, the compound thermal expansion coefficient and the amount of plastic deformation in the material. Air mist and air blades boundary conditions have been carefully investigated by means of pilot plant tests aimed to study the jet impingement on rail surfaces and the cooling efficiency at all working conditions. Heat transfer coefficients have been further checked and adjusted directly on field during commissioning. idRHa+ is a trademark of Primetals Technologies Italy Srl

  20. 76 FR 12322 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate From India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... ASTM A710 and A736 or their proprietary equivalents; (4) abrasion-resistant steels (i.e., USS AR 400... equivalents; (6) ball bearing steels; (7) tool steels; and (8) silicon manganese steel or silicon electric... International Trade Administration Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate From India, Indonesia,...

  1. The ISOLDE Silicon Ball

    SciTech Connect

    Fraile, L.M.

    2003-09-16

    The investigation of weakly bound nuclei close to the particle driplines makes necessary the development of new spectroscopy devices with the capability of detecting charged particles and precisely determining their energy, angular distribution and nature. With this aim the ISOLDE Silicon Ball is under construction. It is a charged particle spectroscopy device with the requirements of high geometrical efficiency and broad energy range coverage, designed for the investigation of the exotic nuclei produced at ISOLDE and at other similar facilities. In order to allow for particle identification the simultaneous use of the Time of Flight (TOF) and Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) techniques is intended. Recoil tagging capabilities, suitable for transfer reactions to be performed at REX-ISOLDE, should be foreseen for a future development. The design and realization of the first prototype, together with the first tests are reported.

  2. Cracked cue ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    The latest images sent by the Galileo spacecraft reveal that the surface of Jupiter's moon Europa may have contained a layer of “warm ice” or even liquid water. In fact, planetologists are wondering if perhaps it still does.Photos taken earlier this summer show Europa to have a crust of smooth white and brown-tinted ice scarred by long, jagged cracks; some scientists have said the moon looks like a cracked cue ball. “The scale of fracture patterns—extending a distance equivalent to the width of the western United States—dwarf the San Andreas fault in length and width,” said Ronald Greeley, a geologist from Arizona State University and a member of the Galileo imaging team. The cracks are believed to have been caused by the stress of tidal forces created by Jupiter's gravity. Warmth generated by tidal heating also may have been sufficient to soften or liquefy some of the ice.

  3. DISPERSION HARDENING OF URANIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Arbiter, W.

    1963-01-15

    A method of hardening U metal involves the forming of a fine dispersion of UO/sub 2/. This method consists of first hydriding the U to form a finely divided powder and then exposing the powder to a very dilute O gas in an inert atmosphere under such pressure and temperature conditions as to cause a thin oxide film to coat each particle of the U hydride, The oxide skin prevents agglomeration of the particles as the remaining H is removed, thus preserving the small particle size. The oxide skin coatings remain as an oxide dispersion. The resulting product may be workhardened to improve its physical characteristics. (AEC)

  4. Advanced sheet steels for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, James R.; Strugala, Donald C.; Yao, Zhicong

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum degassing has recently been used by sheet steel producers to improve their products' ductility and strength. Carbon contents can be reduced by an order of magnitude to less than 0.0030 wt.%. Through careful alloying and processing, a range of new steel products has been developed for the automotive industry. These products include interstitial-free, deep-drawing-quality steels; formable, high-strength, interstitial-free steels; and bake-hardenable steels. This article summarizes the chemistry and processing needed to produce these products.

  5. Radiation Hardened Electronics for Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Watson, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project consists of a series of tasks designed to develop and mature a broad spectrum of radiation hardened and low temperature electronics technologies. Three approaches are being taken to address radiation hardening: improved material hardness, design techniques to improve radiation tolerance, and software methods to improve radiation tolerance. Within these approaches various technology products are being addressed including Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), Field Programmable Analog Arrays (FPAA), MEMS Serial Processors, Reconfigurable Processors, and Parallel Processors. In addition to radiation hardening, low temperature extremes are addressed with a focus on material and design approaches.

  6. Energy-Efficient Thermomagnetic and Induction Hardening

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will develop and test a hybrid thermomagnetic and induction hardening technology to replace conventional heat treatment processes in forging applications.

  7. COSMIC-RAY HELIUM HARDENING

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Ioka, Kunihito

    2011-03-01

    Recent observations by the CREAM and ATIC-2 experiments suggest that (1) the spectrum of cosmic-ray (CR) helium is harder than that of CR protons below the knee energy, 10{sup 15}eV, and (2) all CR spectra become hard at {approx}>10{sup 11}eV nucleon{sup -1}. We propose a new idea, that higher energy CRs are generated in a more helium-rich region, to explain the hardening without introducing different sources for CR helium. The helium-to-proton ratio at {approx}100 TeV exceeds the Big Bang abundance Y = 0.25 by several times, and the different spectrum is not reproduced within the diffusive shock acceleration theory. We argue that CRs are produced in a chemically enriched region, such as a superbubble, and the outward-decreasing abundance naturally leads to the hard spectrum of CR helium if CRs escape from the supernova remnant shock in an energy-dependent way. We provide a simple analytical spectrum that also fits well the hardening due to the decreasing Mach number in the hot superbubble with {approx}10{sup 6} K. Our model predicts hard and concave spectra for heavier CR elements.

  8. Unsolved Mystery of Ball Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, V. L.

    Ball lightning is an unusual phenomenon always drawing attention of people. There are still questions about its origination, features, interaction with environment, and phenomena related to it. On a way of studying this phenomenon, there are a lot of difficulties, the basic of them is insufficiency of authentic, scientific data. The chapter sets as the purpose to interest the reader in the problem, to describe conditions of ball lightning occurrence, theories, and its hypotheses explanation, to include readers in a circle of experimental searches in creation of a ball lightning and its analogues, and to describe fascination of a problem and difficulty of its solution.

  9. The coefficient of restitution for collisions of happy balls, unhappy balls, and tennis balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2000-11-01

    A perfectly happy ball is one that bounces to its original height when dropped on a massive, rigid surface. A completely unhappy ball does not bounce at all. In the former case, the coefficient of restitution (COR) is unity. In the latter case, the COR is zero. It is shown that when an unhappy ball collides with a happy ball, the COR increases from zero to unity as the stiffness of the happy ball decreases from infinity to zero. The COR is independent of the mass of each ball. The implication of reducing the COR of a tennis ball, as a possible means of slowing the serve in tennis, is also considered. It is shown that (a) the COR for a collision with a racket varies with the impact point and is a maximum at the vibration node near the center of the strings, and (b) the serve speed is reduced by only about 20% if the COR for a bounce on the court is reduced to zero.

  10. Enhancing the Bounce of a Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2010-01-01

    In sports such as baseball, softball, golf, and tennis, a common objective is to hit the ball as fast or as far as possible. Another common objective is to hit the ball so that it spins as fast as possible, since the trajectory of the ball through the air is strongly affected by ball spin. In an attempt to enhance both the coefficient of…

  11. Precipitation Reactions in Age-Hardenable Alloys During Laser Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jägle, Eric A.; Sheng, Zhendong; Wu, Liang; Lu, Lin; Risse, Jeroen; Weisheit, Andreas; Raabe, Dierk

    2016-03-01

    We describe and study the thermal profiles experienced by various age-hardenable alloys during laser additive manufacturing (LAM), employing two different manufacturing techniques: selective laser melting and laser metal deposition. Using scanning electron microscopy and atom probe tomography, we reveal at which stages during the manufacturing process desired and undesired precipitation reactions can occur in age-hardenable alloys. Using examples from a maraging steel, a nickel-base superalloy and a scandium-containing aluminium alloy, we demonstrate that precipitation can already occur during the production of the powders used as starting material, during the deposition of material (i.e. during solidification and subsequent cooling), during the intrinsic heat treatment effected by LAM (i.e. in the heat affected zones) and, naturally, during an ageing post-heat treatment. These examples demonstrate the importance of understanding and controlling the thermal profile during the entire additive manufacturing cycle of age-hardenable materials including powder synthesis.

  12. Improved hardening theory for cyclic plasticity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Armstrong, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    A temperature-dependent version of a combined hardening theory, including isotropic and kinematic hardening, is presented within the framework of recent plasticity formulations. This theory has been found to be especially useful in finite-element analysis of aerospace vehicle engines under conditions of large plastic strain and low-cycle fatigue.

  13. Behaviour of a bouncing ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2015-05-01

    The bounce of a ball is a seemingly innocuous event that can be used to illustrate many aspects of elementary and even advanced mechanics. Both normal and oblique bounces on a rigid surface are considered in this article, emphasizing qualitative features of the bounce process. If the ball bounces at an oblique angle then it can slide throughout the bounce, or just at the start of the bounce, and may even slide backwards at the end of the bounce. A ball can also grip the surface after a short sliding phase, or it can grip right from the start. When the ball grips, static friction rather than sliding friction determines the rebound speed, spin and angle.

  14. Self-tempering of stepped shafts in water-air hardening by a continuous step-by-step method

    SciTech Connect

    Kunmashov, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    One of the advantages of water-air hardening is the possibility of conducting controlled self-tempering, which in surface induction hardening provides hardening without tempering in a furnace andexclamationthe creation of the optimum conditions for heat treatment in a single production line with full automation of the process. In addition, there are no hardening craccs on the treated parts. Investigation of the influence of the quenching and self-tempering times on the surface hardness was made on shaft model samples of 45 steel. The results of the inwestigations made show that a self-tempering time in the range from 10 to 60 seconds has little influence on the change in surface layer hardness. To obtain equal hardness in self-tempering (HRC 57-58), it is necessary to use higher temperatures than in furnace tempering. For 45 steel this difference is 75-85/sup 0/C with a tempering temperature up to 300/sup 0/C and 100-250/sup 0/C at higher temperatures. A comparison of the self-tempering and furnace tempering temperatures after hardening with a water-air mixture providing equal hardnesses of 45 steel are shown.

  15. History of ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowson, D.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    The familiar precision rolling-element bearings of the twentieth century are products of exacting technology and sophisticated science. Their very effectiveness and basic simplicity of form may discourage further interest in their history and development. Yet the full story covers a large portion of recorded history and surprising evidence of an early recognition of the advantages of rolling motion over sliding action and progress toward the development of rolling-element bearings. The development of rolling-element bearings is followed from the earliest civilizations to the end of the eighteenth century. The influence of general technological developments, particularly those concerned with the movement of large building blocks, road transportation, instruments, water-raising equipment, and windmills are discussed, together with the emergence of studies of the nature of rolling friction and the impact of economic factors. By 1800 the essential features of ball and rolling-element bearings had emerged and it only remained for precision manufacture and mass production to confirm the value of these fascinating machine elements.

  16. MODIFIED BALL AND SOCKET COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Kalen, D.D.

    1961-05-23

    A ball and socket coupling arrangement is described in which the male and female members may be engaged or disengaged without visual aid. The female member has an internal spherical seat through which slots are provided to accommodate appropriately arranged and shaped ribs in the ball member. After engagement of the members, one or both are rotated to lock them together to prevent accidental disengagement. (AEC)

  17. Modified Ball and Socket Coupling

    DOEpatents

    Conley, Jr, W. R.; Pitman, R. W.

    1961-05-23

    A ball and socket coupling arrangement is given in which the male and female members may be engaged or disengaged without visual aid. The female member has an internal spherical seat through which slots are provided to accommodate appropriately arranged and shaped ribs in the male ball member. After engagement of the members, one or both are rotated to lock them together to prevent accidental disengagement.

  18. Ball-joint grounding ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aperlo, P. J. A.; Buck, P. A.; Weldon, V. A.

    1981-01-01

    In ball and socket joint where electrical insulator such as polytetrafluoroethylene is used as line to minimize friction, good electrical contact across joint may be needed for lightning protection or to prevent static-charge build-up. Electrical contact is maintained by ring of spring-loaded fingers mounted in socket. It may be useful in industry for cranes, trailers, and other applications requiring ball and socket joint.

  19. 10. KIDNER BRIDGE STRUCTURAL STEEL DETAIL SHEET (original plan sheet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. KIDNER BRIDGE STRUCTURAL STEEL DETAIL SHEET (original plan sheet is in possession of Ball State University, Drawings and Documents Archive, COllege of Architecture and Planing, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana, 47306 - Kidner Bridge, Spanning Mississinewa River at County Road 700 South, Upland, Grant County, IN

  20. Laser Hardening Prediction Tool Based On a Solid State Transformations Numerical Model

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.; Ukar, E.; Lamikiz, A.

    2011-01-17

    This paper presents a tool to predict hardening layer in selective laser hardening processes where laser beam heats the part locally while the bulk acts as a heat sink.The tool to predict accurately the temperature field in the workpiece is a numerical model that combines a three dimensional transient numerical solution for heating where is possible to introduce different laser sources. The thermal field was modeled using a kinetic model based on Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation. Considering this equation, an experimental adjustment of transformation parameters was carried out to get the heating transformation diagrams (CHT). With the temperature field and CHT diagrams the model predicts the percentage of base material converted into austenite. These two parameters are used as first step to estimate the depth of hardened layer in the part.The model has been adjusted and validated with experimental data for DIN 1.2379, cold work tool steel typically used in mold and die making industry. This steel presents solid state diffusive transformations at relative low temperature. These transformations must be considered in order to get good accuracy of temperature field prediction during heating phase. For model validation, surface temperature measured by pyrometry, thermal field as well as the hardened layer obtained from metallographic study, were compared with the model data showing a good adjustment.

  1. Laser Hardening Prediction Tool Based On a Solid State Transformations Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, S.; Ukar, E.; Lamikiz, A.; Liebana, F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a tool to predict hardening layer in selective laser hardening processes where laser beam heats the part locally while the bulk acts as a heat sink. The tool to predict accurately the temperature field in the workpiece is a numerical model that combines a three dimensional transient numerical solution for heating where is possible to introduce different laser sources. The thermal field was modeled using a kinetic model based on Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation. Considering this equation, an experimental adjustment of transformation parameters was carried out to get the heating transformation diagrams (CHT). With the temperature field and CHT diagrams the model predicts the percentage of base material converted into austenite. These two parameters are used as first step to estimate the depth of hardened layer in the part. The model has been adjusted and validated with experimental data for DIN 1.2379, cold work tool steel typically used in mold and die making industry. This steel presents solid state diffusive transformations at relative low temperature. These transformations must be considered in order to get good accuracy of temperature field prediction during heating phase. For model validation, surface temperature measured by pyrometry, thermal field as well as the hardened layer obtained from metallographic study, were compared with the model data showing a good adjustment.

  2. Development of solid-lubricated ball-screws for use in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiba, Masatoshi; Gyougi, Toru; Nishimura, Makoto; Seki, Katsumi

    1991-01-01

    Ball-screws lubricated by solid lubricant films containing molybdenum disulphide are developed. The ball-screws (shaft diameter: phi 25 mm, length: 667 mm) were operated under a load of 40 to 120 N at a speed of 1.5 to 200 rpm at 10(exp -5) Pa. First, ball-screws made of stainless steel SUS 440C were studied using test equipment originally designed for this study. To reduce weight, the next step taken was to develop a ball-screw made of 6Al-4V-titanium. Long wear-life of more than 1 x 10(exp 7) revolutions was achieved with solid lubricated ball-screws made of SUS 440C and 6Al-4V-titanium in a hard vacuum. According to the surface profile of the shaft measured after 1 x 10(exp 7) revolutions, more solid lubricant remained on the surface of 6Al-4V-titanium than that of stainless steel. Auger and EPMA analysis confirmed lubrication was maintained by solid lubricant on nuts and screws after the lubricant films on the balls were worn off.

  3. Mechanisms of Neutron Irradiation Hardening in Impurity-Doped Ferritic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Y.; Liu, X. Y.; Kameda, J.

    2008-05-01

    Mechanisms of neutron irradiation hardening in phosphorus (P)-doped, sulfur (S)-doped, and copper (Cu)-doped ferritic alloys have been studied by applying a rate theory to the temperature dependence of the yield strength. Hardening behavior induced by neutron irradiation at various temperatures (473 to 711 K) is characterized in terms of the variations in athermal stress and activation energy for plasticity controlled by precipitation or solid solution, and kink-pair formation with the content and type of impurities. In P-doped alloys, neutron irradiation below 563 K brings about a remarkable increase in the athermal stress and activation energy, due to the dispersion of fine (˜1.7-nm) P-rich precipitates that is more extensive than that for the Cu-rich precipitates reported in irradiated steel. During neutron irradiation above 668 K, precipitation hardening occurs to some extent in Cu-doped and S-doped alloys, compared to small or negligible hardening in the P-doped alloys. In alloys with a low to moderate content of various dissolved impurities subjected to high-temperature irradiation, the formation of kink pairs becomes considerably difficult. Differing dynamic interactions of dissolved and precipitated impurities, i.e., P and Cu, with the nucleation and growth of dislocations are discussed, giving rise to irradiation hardening.

  4. 75 FR 10207 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... ASTM A710 and A736 or their proprietary equivalents; (4) abrasion-resistant steels (i.e., USS AR 400... equivalents; (6) ball bearing steels; (7) tool steels; and (8) silicon manganese steel or silicon electric... International Trade Administration Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate From the Republic of...

  5. Enhancing the Bounce of a Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2010-10-01

    In sports such as baseball, softball, golf, and tennis, a common objective is to hit the ball as fast or as far as possible. Another common objective is to hit the ball so that it spins as fast as possible, since the trajectory of the ball through the air is strongly affected by ball spin. In an attempt to enhance both the coefficient of restitution (COR) and the spin of a golf ball, I conducted several experiments to see what would happen when a 45-g, 42.8-mm diameter golf ball bounced on: (a) a 58-mm diameter, 103-g Super Ball®; (b) an 8-mm thick, 56-mm diameter circular disk of Super Ball material cut from a large Super Ball and glued to a 3.4-kg lead brick; and (c) a 3-mm thick sheet of rubber glued to a 3.4-kg lead brick. (See Fig. 1.)

  6. Mössbauer study on the deformed surface of high-manganese steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasu, S.; Tanimoto, H.; Fujita, F. E.

    1990-07-01

    Conversion electron, X-ray backscattering and conventional transmission57Fe Mössbauer measurements have been performed to investigate the origin of the remarkable work hardening at the surface of a high-manganese steel which is called Hadfield steel. Mössbauer results show that α' martensite has no relation to work hardening. From the comparison of conversion electron to X-ray backscattering spectra, the occurrence of decarbonization is suggested at the surface. The transmission Mössbauer spectrum at 20 K for deformed specimen shows the existence of ɛ martensite which could be related to the work hardening of Hadfield steel.

  7. Cyclic hardening mechanisms in Nimonic 80A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, B. A.; Gerold, V.

    1987-01-01

    A nickel base superalloy was fatigued under constant plastic strain range control. The hardening response was investigated as a function of plastic strain range and particle size of the gamma prime phase. Hardening was found to be a function of the slip band spacing. Numerous measurements of the slip band spacing and other statistical data on the slip band structures were obtained. Interactions between intersecting slip systems were shown to influence hardening. A Petch-Hall model was found to describe best this relationship between the response stress and the slip band spacing.

  8. Attempts to create ball lightning with triggered lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Jonathan D.; Uman, Martin A.; Stapleton, Michael; Jordan, Douglas M.; Chebaro, Alexander M.; Biagi, Christopher J.

    2010-08-01

    We describe attempts to create ball lightning by directing lightning, triggered from natural thunderclouds using the rocket-and-wire technique, through a variety of materials. Some of the observed phenomena have features in common with natural ball lightning or with laboratory attempts to create it: flame-like luminosity for up to 0.5 s above salt water; constant-luminosity silicon fragments falling for about 1 s under the influence of gravity; a 0.7 m region of stationary luminosity whose bottom was 0.3 m above a stainless steel surface to which arcing had occurred; and a glow for about 0.5 s above pine tree sections.

  9. Two Magnets and a Ball Bearing: A Simple Demonstration of the Methods of Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, W. C. K.

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the behavior of a bar magnet with a steel ball bearing on one pole as it approaches another bar magnet. Maps the problem onto electrostatics and explains observations based on the behavior of point charges near an isolated, uncharged sphere. Offers a simple demonstration of the method of images in electrostatics. (Author/NB)

  10. Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippold, John C.; Kotecki, Damian J.

    2005-03-01

    Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels, the first book in over twenty years to address welding metallurgy and weldability issues associated with stainless steel, offers the most up-to-date and comprehensive treatment of these topics currently available. The authors emphasize fundamental metallurgical principles governing microstructure evolution and property development of stainless steels, including martensistic, ferric, austenitic, duplex, and precipitation hardening grades. They present a logical and well-organized look at the history, evolution, and primary uses of each stainless steel, including detailed descriptions of the associated weldability issues.

  11. Remediation of oil-contaminated sand by coal agglomeration using ball milling.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yu-Jen; Shen, Yun-Hwei

    2011-10-01

    The mechanical shear force provided by a less energy intensive device (usually operating at 20-200 rpm), a ball mill, was used toperform coal agglomeration and its effects on remediation of a model fuel oil-contaminated sand were evaluated. Important process parameters such as the amount of coal added, milling time, milling speed and the size of milling elements are discussed. The results suggested that highly hydrophobic oil-coal agglomerates, formed by adding suitable amounts of coal into the oil-contaminated sand, could be mechanically liberated from cleaned sand during ball milling and recovered as a surface coating on the steel balls. Over 90% removal of oil from oil-contaminated sand was achieved with 6 wt% of coal addition and an optimum ball milling time of 20 min and speed of 200 rpm. This novel process has considerable potential for cleaning oil-contaminated sands.

  12. Radiation-hardened asphaltite composites

    SciTech Connect

    Persinen, A.A.; Trubyatchinskaya, V.N.; Tolmacheva, T.P.

    1981-07-20

    A method is proposed for the production of an asphaltite block material with good physical and mechanical properties. The composite contains epoxide resin, acrylic acid, and asphaltite and radiation or radiation - thermal hardening was used. ED-16 epoxide resin with 490 molecular weight and 17.6% epoxide groups or EBF-23 epoxide resin produced from water-soluble shale phenols with 750 to 800 molecular weight and 21 to 22% epoxide groups was used as the epoxide resin. Analysis of the IR spectra showed that a rapid reaction of acrylic acid with epoxide resin occurs upon the action of ionizing radiation. The mechanical testing showed that the uniform samples obtained had rather high strength and hardness; high heat resistance and low water absorption was noted. The composites are chemically resistant towards concentrated HCl, water, acetone, and benzene. The studies indicated cross-linking occurs as a consequence of the reaction of the epoxide ring with acrylic acid. Asphaltite adds by means of the short alkyl substituents and guinoid structures. 4 tables. (DP)

  13. MIPP Plastic Ball electronics upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Baldin, Boris; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    An upgrade electronics design for Plastic Ball detector is described. The Plastic Ball detector was a part of several experiments in the past and its back portion (proposed to be used in MIPP) consists of 340 photomultipliers equipped with a sandwich scintillator. The scintillator sandwich has fast and slow signal component with decay times 10 ns and 1 {micro}s respectively. The upgraded MIPP experiment will collect up to 12,000 events during each 4 second spill and read them out in {approx}50 seconds between spills. The MIPP data acquisition system will employ deadtime-less concept successfully implemented in Muon Electronics of Dzero experiment at Fermilab. An 8-channel prototype design of the Plastic Ball Front End (PBFE) implementing these requirements is discussed. Details of the schematic design, simulation and prototype test results are discussed.

  14. Dynamics of a bouncing ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastaing, J.-Y.; Bertin, E.; Géminard, J.-C.

    2015-06-01

    We describe an experiment dedicated to the study of the trajectories of a ball bouncing on a vibrating plate. Using an experimental device of our own design, it is possible to impose arbitrary trajectories on the plate and we show that the entire trajectory of the ball can be reconstructed solely from measurement of the times the ball hits the plate. In this paper, we make use of our apparatus to introduce the notion of dissipative collisions and to propose three different ways to measure the associated restitution coefficient. We then report on correlations in the chaotic regime and theoretically discuss the complex patterns that are exhibited in the case of a sinusoidal vibration. Lastly, we show that the use of an aperiodic driving vibration makes it possible to minimize part of these correlations.

  15. Alloy solution hardening with solute pairs

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, John W.

    1976-08-24

    Solution hardened alloys are formed by using at least two solutes which form associated solute pairs in the solvent metal lattice. Copper containing equal atomic percentages of aluminum and palladium is an example.

  16. Process for hardening the surface of polymers

    DOEpatents

    Mansur, L.K.; Lee, E.H.

    1992-07-14

    Hard surfaced polymers and the method for making them is generally described. Polymers are subjected to simultaneous multiple ion beam bombardment, that results in a hardening of the surface and improved wear resistance. 1 figure.

  17. Extraordinary strain hardening by gradient structure.

    PubMed

    Wu, XiaoLei; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Liu; Yuan, Fuping; Zhu, Yuntian T

    2014-05-20

    Gradient structures have evolved over millions of years through natural selection and optimization in many biological systems such as bones and plant stems, where the structures change gradually from the surface to interior. The advantage of gradient structures is their maximization of physical and mechanical performance while minimizing material cost. Here we report that the gradient structure in engineering materials such as metals renders a unique extra strain hardening, which leads to high ductility. The grain-size gradient under uniaxial tension induces a macroscopic strain gradient and converts the applied uniaxial stress to multiaxial stresses due to the evolution of incompatible deformation along the gradient depth. Thereby the accumulation and interaction of dislocations are promoted, resulting in an extra strain hardening and an obvious strain hardening rate up-turn. Such extraordinary strain hardening, which is inherent to gradient structures and does not exist in homogeneous materials, provides a hitherto unknown strategy to develop strong and ductile materials by architecting heterogeneous nanostructures.

  18. Process for hardening the surface of polymers

    DOEpatents

    Mansur, Louis K.; Lee, Eal H.

    1992-01-01

    Hard surfaced polymers and the method for making them is generally described. Polymers are subjected to simultaneous multiple ion beam bombardment, that results in a hardening of the surface and improved wear resistance.

  19. Fatigue hardening in niobium single crystals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doner, M.; Diprimio, J. C.; Salkovitz, E. I.

    1973-01-01

    Nb single crystals of various orientations were cyclically deformed in tension-compression under strain control. At low strain amplitudes all crystals oriented for single slip and some oriented for multiple slip showed a two stage hardening. When present, the first stage was characterized with almost no cyclic work hardening. The rate of hardening in the second stage increased with strain amplitude and the amount of secondary slip. In crystals oriented for single slip kink bands developed on their side faces during rapid hardening stage which resulted in considerable amount of asterism in Laue spots. A cyclic stress-strain curve independent of prior history was found to exist which was also independent of crystal orientation. Furthermore, this curve differed only slightly from that of polycrystalline Nb obtained from data in literature.

  20. Imaging characteristics of ball lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qinghui; Shao, Xiaopeng

    2014-05-01

    In most digital imaging applications, high-resolution imaging or videos are usually desired for later processing and analysis. The desire for high-resolution stems from two principal application areas: improvement of pictorial information for human interpretation, and helping representation for automatic machine preception. While the image sensors limit the spatial resolution of the image, the image details are also limited by the optical system, due to diffraction, and aberration1. Monocentric lens are an attractive option for gigapixel camera because the symmetrical design focuses light identically coming from any direction. Marks and Brady proposed a monocentric lens design imaging 40 gigapixels with an f-number of 2.5 and resolving 2 arcsec over a 120 degrees field of view2. Recently, Cossairt, Miau, and Nayer proposed a proof-of-concept gigapixel computational camera consisting of a large ball lens shared by several small planar sensors coupled with a deblurring step3. The design consists of a ball element resulting in a lens that is both inexpensive to produce and easy to align. Because the resolution of spherical lens is fundamentally limited by geometric aberrations, the imaging characteristics of the ball lens is expressed by the geometrical aberrations, in which the general equations for the primary aberration of the ball lens are given. The effect of shifting the stop position on the aberrations of a ball lens is discussed. The variation of the axial chromatic aberration with the Abbe V-number when the refraction index takes different values is analyzed. The variation of the third-order spherical aberration ,the fifth-order spherical aberration and the spherical aberration obtained directly from ray tracing with the f-number is discussed. The other imaging evaluation merits, such as the spot diagram, the modulation transfer function(MTF) and the encircled energy are also described. Most of the analysis of the ball lens is carried out using OSLO optics

  1. An index of beam hardening artifact for two-dimensional cone-beam CT tomographic images: establishment and preliminary evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fusong; Lv, Peijun; Yang, Huifang; Wang, Yong; Sun, Yuchun

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: Based on the pixel gray value measurements, establish a beam-hardening artifacts index of the cone-beam CT tomographic image, and preliminarily evaluate its applicability. Methods: The 5mm-diameter metal ball and resin ball were fixed on the light-cured resin base plate respectively, while four vitro molars were fixed above and below the ball, on the left and right respectively, which have 10mm distance with the metal ball. Then, cone beam CT was used to scan the fixed base plate twice. The same layer tomographic images were selected from the two data and imported into the Photoshop software. The circle boundary was built through the determination of the center and radius of the circle, according to the artifact-free images section. Grayscale measurement tools were used to measure the internal boundary gray value G0, gray value G1 and G2 of 1mm and 20mm artifacts outside the circular boundary, the length L1 of the arc with artifacts in the circular boundary, the circumference L2. Hardening artifacts index was set A = (G1 / G0) * 0.5 + (G2 / G1) * 0.4 + (L2 / L1) * 0.1. Then, the A values of metal and resin materials were calculated respectively. Results: The A value of cobalt-chromium alloy material is 1, and resin material is 0. Conclusion: The A value reflects comprehensively the three factors of hardening artifacts influencing normal oral tissue image sharpness of cone beam CT. The three factors include relative gray value, the decay rate and range of artifacts.

  2. 7 CFR 58.641 - Hardening and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hardening and storage. 58.641 Section 58.641... Procedures § 58.641 Hardening and storage. Immediately after the semifrozen product is placed in its intended container it shall be placed in a hardening tunnel or hardening room to continue the freezing process....

  3. 7 CFR 58.641 - Hardening and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hardening and storage. 58.641 Section 58.641... Procedures § 58.641 Hardening and storage. Immediately after the semifrozen product is placed in its intended container it shall be placed in a hardening tunnel or hardening room to continue the freezing process....

  4. 7 CFR 58.641 - Hardening and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hardening and storage. 58.641 Section 58.641... Procedures § 58.641 Hardening and storage. Immediately after the semifrozen product is placed in its intended container it shall be placed in a hardening tunnel or hardening room to continue the freezing process....

  5. 7 CFR 58.641 - Hardening and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hardening and storage. 58.641 Section 58.641... Procedures § 58.641 Hardening and storage. Immediately after the semifrozen product is placed in its intended container it shall be placed in a hardening tunnel or hardening room to continue the freezing process....

  6. 7 CFR 58.641 - Hardening and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hardening and storage. 58.641 Section 58.641... Procedures § 58.641 Hardening and storage. Immediately after the semifrozen product is placed in its intended container it shall be placed in a hardening tunnel or hardening room to continue the freezing process....

  7. [Beam hardening correction method for X-ray computed tomography based on subsection beam hardening curves].

    PubMed

    Huang, Kui-dong; Zhang, Ding-hua

    2009-09-01

    After researching the forming principle of X-ray beam hardening and analyzing the usual methods of beam hardening correction, a beam hardening correction model was established, in which the independent variable was the projection gray, and so the computing difficulties in beam hardening correction can be reduced. By considering the advantage and disadvantage of fitting beam hardening curve to polynomial, a new expression method of the subsection beam hardening curves based on polynomial was proposed. In the method, the beam hardening data were fitted firstly to a polynomial curve which traverses the coordinate origin, then whether the got polynomial curve surged in the fore-part or back-part of the fitting range was judged based on the polynomial curvature change. If the polynomial fitting curve surged, the power function curve was applied to replace the surging parts of the polynomial curve, and the C1 continuity was ensured at the joints of the segment curves. The experimental results of computed tomography (CT) simulation show that the method is well stable in the beam hardening correction for the ideal CT images and CT images with added noises, and can mostly remove the beam hardening artifact at the same time.

  8. Ball lightning risk to aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, R.; Keul, A.

    2009-04-01

    Lightning is a rare but regular phenomenon for air traffic. Aircraft are designed to withstand lightning strikes. Research on lightning and aircraft can be called detailed and effective. In the last 57 years, 18 reported lightning aviation disasters with a fatality figure of at least 714 persons occurred. For comparison, the last JACDEC ten-year average fatality figure was 857. The majority encountered lightning in the climb, descent, approach and/or landing phase. Ball lightning, a metastable, rare lightning type, is also seen from and even within aircraft, but former research only reported individual incidents and did not generate a more detailed picture to ascertain whether it constitutes a significant threat to passenger and aircraft safety. Lacking established incident report channels, observations were often only passed on as "air-travel lore". In an effort to change this unsatisfactory condition, the authors have collected a first international dataset of 38 documented ball lightning aircraft incidents from 1938 to 2001 involving 13 reports over Europe, 13 over USA/Canada, and 7 over Russia. 18 (47%) reported ball lightning outside the aircraft, 18 (47%) inside, 2 cases lacked data. 8 objects caused minor damage, 8 major damage (total: 42%), only one a crash. No damage was reported in 18 cases. 3 objects caused minor crew injury. In most cases, ball lightning lasted several seconds. 11 (29%) incidents ended with an explosion of the object. A cloud-aircraft lightning flash was seen in only 9 cases (24%) of the data set. From the detailed accounts of air personnel in the last 70 years, it is evident that ball lightning is rarely, but consistently observed in connection with aircraft and can also occur inside the airframe. Reports often came from multiple professional witnesses and in several cases, damages were investigated by civil or military authorities. Although ball lightning is no main air traffic risk, the authors suggest that incident and accident

  9. Billiard-ball echo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, R.; Hartmann, S. R.; Friedberg, R.

    1982-05-01

    Photon echoes in gaseous media are explained with the use of a simple heuristic model in which the atoms behave like composite billiard balls. The laser providing the excitation pulses becomes an atom smasher which "splits" the atoms and then by judicious programming puts them back together again. The most general photon-echo reordering process is explained without recourse to formal analysis so that an intuitive feeling is obtained which works equally well for the ordinary two-pulse photon echo, the Raman echo, the trilevel echo, the grating echo, etc. A formal analysis of the billiard-ball echo model is presented in its support.

  10. Decline in Radiation Hardened Microcircuit Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Two areas of radiation hardened microcircuit infrastructure will be discussed: 1) The availability and performance of radiation hardened microcircuits, and, and 2) The access to radiation test facilities primarily for proton single event effects (SEE) testing. Other areas not discussed, but are a concern include: The challenge for maintaining radiation effects tool access for assurance purposes, and, the access to radiation test facilities primarily for heavy ion single event effects (SEE) testing. Status and implications will be discussed for each area.

  11. 76 FR 12702 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate From India, Indonesia, Italy, and the Republic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ...) abrasion-resistant steels (i.e., USS AR 400, USS AR 500); (5) products made to ASTM A202, A225, A514 grade S, A517 grade S, or their proprietary equivalents; (6) ball bearing steels; (7) tool steels; and (8... International Trade Administration Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate From India, Indonesia,...

  12. 75 FR 47777 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate Products From Italy: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... steels (i.e., USS AR 400, USS AR 500); (5) products made to ASTM A202, A225, A514 grade S, A517 grade S, or their proprietary equivalents; (6) ball bearing steels; (7) tool steels; and (8) silicon manganese... International Trade Administration Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate Products From Italy:...

  13. 77 FR 2032 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate Products From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-13

    ...) abrasion-resistant steels (i.e., USS AR 400, USS AR 500); (5) products made to ASTM A202, A225, A514 grade S, A517 grade S, or their proprietary equivalents; (6) ball bearing steels; (7) tool steels; and (8... Duty Administrative Review, 73 FR 45708, 45714 (August 6, 2008), unchanged in Stainless Steel Sheet...

  14. Nonlinear ball chain waveguides for acoustic emission and ultrasound sensing of ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Stephen H.

    Harsh environment acoustic emission and ultrasonic wave sensing applications often benefit from placing the sensor in a remote and more benign physical location by using waveguides to transmit elastic waves between the structural location under test and the transducer. Waveguides are normally designed to have high fidelity over broad frequency ranges to minimize distortion -- often difficult to achieve in practice. This thesis reports on an examination of using nonlinear ball chain waveguides for the transmission of acoustic emission and ultrasonic waves for the monitoring of thermal protection systems undergoing severe heat loading, leading to ablation and similar processes. Experiments test the nonlinear propagation of solitary, harmonic and mixed harmonic elastic waves through a copper tube filled with steel and elastomer balls and various other waveguides. Triangulation of pencil lead breaks occurs on a steel plate. Data are collected concerning the usage of linear waveguides and a water-cooled linear waveguide. Data are collected from a second water-cooled waveguide monitoring Atmospheric Reentry Materials in UVM's Inductively-Coupled Plasma Torch Facility. The motion of the particles in the dimer waveguides is linearly modeled with a three ball and spring chain model and the results are compared per particle. A theoretical nonlinear model is presented which is capable of exactly modeling the motion of the dimer chains. The shape of the waveform propagating through the dimer chain is modeled in a sonic vacuum. Mechanical pulses of varying time widths and amplitudes are launched into one end of the ball chain waveguide and observed at the other end in both time and frequency domains. Similarly, harmonic and mixed harmonic mechanical loads are applied to one end of the waveguide. Balls of different materials are analyzed and discriminated into categories. A copper tube packed with six steel particles, nine steel or marble particles and a longer copper tube

  15. Analysis of plasma-nitrided steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Ferrante, J.; Honecy, F.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of plasma nitrided steels can be divided to two main categories - structural and chemical. Structural analysis can provide information not only on the hardening mechanisms but also on the fundamental processes involved. Chemical analysis can be used to study the kinetics for the nitriding process and its mechanisms. In this paper preliminary results obtained by several techniques of both categories are presented and the applicability of those techniques to the analysis of plasma-nitrided steels is discussed.

  16. 2012 Problem 15: Frustrating Golf Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shan; Zhu, Zheyuan; Gao, Wenli; Wang, Sihui

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies the condition for a golf ball to escape from a hole. The two determining factors are the ball's initial velocity v0 and its deviation from the center of the hole d. There is a critical escaping velocity vc for every deviation d. The ball's motion is analyzed by calculating the change of velocity whenever the ball collides with the hole. The critical conditions predicted by our theory are verified through experiment.

  17. Vertical bounce of two vertically aligned balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2007-11-01

    When a tennis ball rests on top of a basketball and both drop to the floor together, the tennis ball is projected vertically at high speed. A mass-spring model of the impact, as well as air track data, suggest that the tennis ball should be projected at relatively low speed. Measurements of the forces on each ball and the bounce of vertically aligned superballs are used to resolve the discrepancy.

  18. Effect of Pre-intercritical Annealing Treatments on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 0.33% Carbon Dual-Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Neha; Das, Suvajeet; Maji, Sumanta; Chowdhury, Subhro Roy; Show, Bijay Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The present study is aimed at understanding the effect of different prior heat treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 0.33% carbon dual-phase (DP) steel. For this purpose, different dual-phase steels were produced by subjecting the as-received steel to `hardening' (DP-H), `hardening + tempering' (DP-HT), and `austempering' (DP-AT) treatments prior to the intercritical annealing treatment. The study reveals that the prior hardening treatment in DP-H steel results in significant refinement of ferrite grains and formation of fine elongated martensite plates having an aspect ratio = 6.1 ± 3. These fine elongated martensites are responsible for poor ductility in DP-H steel. Although DP steel without any prior treatment (DP-AR) and DP-AT steel exhibit high strength and hardness, their ductility is limited by the presence of very hard martensite islands which act as the failure initiation sites in these steels. On the other hand, prior `hardening + tempering' treatment in DP-HT steel results in the formation of nearly spherical-shaped martensite (aspect ratio = 1.24 ± 0.13) along with coarse martensite laths. In addition, the presence of fine carbides is also found along the lath boundaries. These fine spherical martensites and fine carbides provide higher strain hardening to DP-HT steel. Accordingly, DP-HT steel exhibits adequate ductility as well as strength. Therefore, prior `hardening + tempering' treatment was found to the best prior treatment in the present study.

  19. Does Ease to Block a Ball Affect Perceived Ball Speed? Examination of Alternative Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Jessica K.; Sugovic, Mila

    2012-01-01

    According to an action-specific account of perception, the perceived speed of a ball can be a function of the ease to block the ball. Balls that are easier to stop look like they are moving slower than balls that are more difficult to stop. This was recently demonstrated with a modified version of the classic computer game Pong (Witt & Sugovic,…

  20. Tensile behavior of irradiated manganese-stabilized stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on seven experimental, high-manganese austenitic stainless steels after irradiation up to 44 dpa in the FFTF. An Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C base composition was used, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, B, and P were added to improve strength. Nominal amounts added were 0.1% Ti, 1% W, 0.1% V, 0.005% B, and 0.03% P. Irradiation was carried out at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C on the steels in the solution-annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Tensile tests were conducted at the irradiation temperature. Results were compared with type 316 SS. Neutron irradiation hardened all of the solution-annealed steels at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C, as measured by the increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. The steel to which all five elements were added to the base composition showed the least amount of hardening. It also showed a smaller loss of ductility (uniform and total elongation) than the other steels. The total and uniform elongations of this steel after irradiation at 420{degrees}C was over four times that of the other manganese-stabilized steels and 316 SS. There was much less difference in strength and ductility at the two higher irradiation temperatures, where there was considerably less hardening, and thus, less loss of ductility. In the cold-worked condition, hardening occured only after irradiation at 420{degrees}C, and there was much less difference in the properties of the steels after irradiation. At the 420{degrees}C irradiation temperature, most of the manganese-stabilized steels maintained more ductility than the 316 SS. After irradiation at 420{degrees}C, the temperature of maximum hardening, the steel to which all five of the elements were added had the best uniform elongation.

  1. Secrets of the Crystal Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croucher, John S.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how a crystal ball known as "The Flash Mind Reader" is played. "The Flash Mind Reader" is a mathematics game in which the player is invited to select any-two digit number and then subtract the sum of these two digits from the original number. A chart is provided in which the (adjusted) number they obtained will have a symbol…

  2. Laboratory-produced ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golka, Robert K., Jr.

    1994-05-01

    For 25 years I have actively been searching for the true nature of ball lightning and attempting to reproduce it at will in the laboratory. As one might expect, many unidentified lights in the atmosphere have been called ball lightning, including Texas Maffa lights (automobile headlights), flying saucers (UFOs), swamp gas in Ann Arbor, Michigan, etc. For 15 years I thought ball lightning was strictly a high-voltage phenomenon. It was not until 1984 when I was short-circuiting the electrical output of a diesel electric railroad locomotive that I realized that the phenomenon was related more to a high current. Although I am hoping for some other types of ball lightning to emerge such as strictly electrostatic-electromagnetic manifestations, I have been unlucky in finding laboratory provable evidence. Cavity-formed plasmodes can be made by putting a 2-inch burning candle in a home kitchen microwave oven. The plasmodes float around for as long as the microwave energy is present.

  3. The correct "ball bearings" data.

    PubMed

    Caroni, C

    2002-12-01

    The famous data on fatigue failure times of ball bearings have been quoted incorrectly from Lieblein and Zelen's original paper. The correct data include censored values, as well as non-fatigue failures that must be handled appropriately. They could be described by a mixture of Weibull distributions, corresponding to different modes of failure.

  4. Idea Bank: Wiffle Ball Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancor, Rachael

    2009-01-01

    Projectile motion, a cornerstone topic of introductory physics, is usually a student's first exposure to the problem-solving techniques used in this subject. Often, this is an inactive learning experience--students work with pencil and paper to read and solve projectile motion problems (e.g., diagrams and descriptions of balls being hit, kicked,…

  5. Eddy-Current Inspection of Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, B.

    1985-01-01

    Custom eddy-current probe locates surface anomalies. Low friction air cushion within cone allows ball to roll easily. Eddy current probe reliably detects surface and near-surface cracks, voids, and material anomalies in bearing balls or other spherical objects. Defects in ball surface detected by probe displayed on CRT and recorded on strip-chart recorder.

  6. Playing Ball in a Space Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    How does artificial gravity affect the path of a thrown ball? This paper contrasts ball trajectories on the Little Prince's asteroid planet B-612 and Arthur C. Clarke's rotating-drum spacecraft of 2001, and demonstrates curve balls with multiple loops in the latter environment.

  7. Predicting steady-state temperature, life, skid, and film thickness in a greased preloaded hybrid ball bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Poplawski, J.V.; Atwell, D.R.; Lubas, M.J.; Odessky, V. |

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the use of the SHABERTH computer program supplemented with experimental temperature and skid data to quantify steady-state bearing operation. Parametric studies on ball diameter and number, contact angle, curvature, grease type, and preload are presented with their influence on contact stress, fatigue life, skid load, film thickness, and inner and outer race temperatures. These results are compared for a steel versus hybrid bearing set in a DB and DFSL mounting. The method presented can be applied to the design of other steel and hybrid ball thrust bearing systems.

  8. How to catch a cricket ball.

    PubMed

    Dienes, Z; McLeod, P

    1993-01-01

    A cricket or baseball fielder can run so as to arrive at just the right place at just the right time to catch a ball. It is shown that if the fielder runs so that d2(tan alpha)/dt2 = 0, where alpha is the angle of elevation of gaze from fielder to ball, then the ball will generally be intercepted before it hits the ground. This is true whatever the aerodynamic drag experienced by the ball. The only exception is if the ball is not approaching the fielder before he starts to run.

  9. Fate of thermal log type Q balls

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Kamada, Kohei; Kasuya, Shinta; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2010-11-15

    We study time evolution of the Q ball in thermal logarithmic potential using lattice simulations. As the temperature decreases due to the cosmic expansion, the thermal logarithmic term in the potential is eventually overcome by a mass term, and we confirm that the Q ball transforms from the thick-wall type to the thin-wall type for a positive coefficient of radiative corrections to the mass term, as recently suggested. Moreover, we find that the Q ball finally ''melts down'' when the Q-ball solution disappears. We also discuss the effects of this phenomenon on the detectability of gravitational waves from the Q-ball formation.

  10. New electrosurgical ball electrode with nonstick properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondinone, Joseph; Brassell, James; Miller, Scott A., III; Thorne, Jonathan O.; Rondinone, David M.; Safabash, Jason; Vega, Felix

    1998-04-01

    A new electrosurgical ball electrode (SilverBulletTM) has been developed for applying radiofrequency (RF) energy to fuse biological and other materials to tissue surfaces. Specifically, the electrode was developed for use in conjunction with the Fusion Medical Technologies, Inc. gelatin patch (RapiSealTM) for use in pulmonary surgery to seal air leaks, and in solid abdominal organ surgeries to provide hemostatic tamponade. The new electrode allows for the application of RF energy in contact mode without the problems of the electrode sticking to the gelatin patch or the underlying tissue. Designed for use with commercially available electrosurgical handpieces, the electrode consists of a stainless steel connector that fits into the hand- piece, and an electrode assembly made from silver that includes a shank region, and a tip extension extending distally from the shank region. The distal tip of the tip extension is rounded and has a length of about 10 mm. The uniqueness of this electrode is the shank region which has a cross sectional area that is larger than the tip extension. The shank region acts as a heat sink to draw away heat from the tip extension while the tip extension itself remains sufficiently small to access desired target sites and display the desired energy transfer properties. In addition to the physical design, the use of silver as the core element provides a material with high electrical and thermal conductivities. The bulk of the electrode is appropriately insulated.

  11. Ceramic Rail-Race Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balzer, Mark A.; Mungas, Greg S.; Peters, Gregory H.

    2010-01-01

    Non-lubricated ball bearings featuring rail races have been proposed for use in mechanisms that are required to function in the presence of mineral dust particles in very low-pressure, dry environments with extended life. Like a conventional ball bearing, the proposed bearing would include an inner and an outer ring separated by balls in rolling contact with the races. However, unlike a conventional ball bearing, the balls would not roll in semi-circular or gothic arch race grooves in the rings: instead, the races would be shaped to form two or more rails (see figure). During operation, the motion of the balls would push dust particles into the spaces between the rails where the particles could not generate rolling resistance for the balls

  12. Investigation on femto-second laser irradiation assisted shock peening of medium carbon (0.4% C) steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta; Gurevich, Evgeny L.; Kumari, Renu; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, the effect of femtosecond laser irradiation on the peening behavior of 0.4% C steel has been evaluated. Laser irradiation has been conducted with a 100 μJ and 300 fs laser with multiple pulses under varied energy. Followed by laser irradiation, a detailed characterization of the processed zone was undertaken by scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction technique. Finally, the residual stress distribution, microhardness and wear resistance properties of the processed zone were also evaluated. Laser processing leads to shock peening associated with plasma formation and its expansion, formation of martensite and ferrito-pearlitic phase in the microstructure. Due to laser processing, there is introduction of residual stress on the surface which varies from high tensile (140 MPa) to compressive (-335 MPa) as compared to 152 MPa of the substrate. There is a significant increase in microhardness to 350-500 VHN as compared to 250 VHN of substrate. The fretting wear behavior against hardened steel ball shows a significant reduction in wear depth due to laser processing. Finally, a conclusion of the mechanism of wear has been established.

  13. Influence of slip system hardening assumptions on modeling stress dependence of work hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Matthew; Dawson, Paul

    1997-11-01

    Due to the discrete directional nature of processes such as crystallographic slip, the orientation of slip planes relative to a fixed set of loading axes has a direct effect on the magnitude of the external load necessary to induce dislocation motion (yielding). The effect such geometric or textural hardening has on the macroscopic flow stress can be quantified in a polycrystal by the average Taylor factor M¯. Sources of resistance to dislocation motion such as interaction with dislocation structures, precipitates, and grain boundaries, contribute to the elevation of the critically resolved shear strength τcrss. In continuum slip polycrystal formulations, material hardening phenomena are reflected in the slip system hardness equations. Depending on the model, the hardening equations and the mean field assumption can both affect geometric hardening through texture evolution. In this paper, we examine continuum slip models and focus on how the slip system hardening model and the mean field assumption affect the stress-strain response. Texture results are also presented within the context of how the texture affects geometric hardening. We explore the effect of employing slip system hardnesses averaged over different size scales. We first compare a polycrystal simulation employing a single hardness per crystal to one using a latent hardening formulation producing distinct slip system hardnesses. We find little difference between the amplitude of the single hardness and a crystal-average of the latent hardening values. The geometric hardening is different due to the differences in the textures predicted by each model. We also find that due to the high degree of symmetry in an fcc crystal, macroscopic stress-strain predictions using simulations employing crystal- and aggregateaveraged hardnesses are nearly identical. We find this to be true for several different mean field assumptions. An aggregate-averaged hardness may be preferred in light of the difficulty

  14. Effect of Fiber Orientation on Ball Failures Under Rolling-contact Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Robert H; Bear, H Robert; Carter, Thomas L

    1957-01-01

    The rolling-contact fatigue spin rig was used to test bails of a bearing steel at maximum Hertz stresses of 600,000 to 750,000 psi. The effect of fiber orientation was observed with the ball track restricted to passing directly over the poles, coincident with the equator, or randomly around the ball. The polar areas were found to be weaker in fatigue than the nonpolar areas. This resulted in a much greater portion of the failures occurring in the polar areas than would be expected from a homogeneous material. The early failures are discussed.

  15. Design Features and Initial RF Performance of a Gradient Hardened 17 GHz TW Linac Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.

    2009-01-22

    To avoid surface erosion damage and to assist in studying RF breakdown thresholds in 17 GHz TW linac structures, a gradient hardened structure has been fabricated with high temperature brazed and machined stainless steel surfaces located in the peak E-field region of the beam apertures and the peak H-field regions of the input coupler cavity. The microwave design parameters and physical dimensions of this 22 cavity, 120 degree phase advance structure were chosen to allow the high gradient performance to be compared against a similar design all-copper structure that has been tested in a dual ring, power recirculating amplifier system. The final design parameters of the gradient hardened structure are discussed; the influence of stainless steel RF losses on the power buildup of the resonant ring and on the structure gradient distribution are described; waveforms are shown of the unique ability of the power amplifier to rapidly quench RF breakdown discharges in the linac structure by automatically sensing and redirecting the RF source power to a matched load; and preliminary test results during high power RF processing of the gradient hardened linac structure are presented.

  16. Optimization of the transition path of the head hardening with using the genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, Joanna; Kulawik, Adam

    2016-06-01

    An automated method of choice of the transition path of the head hardening in heat treatment process for the plane steel element is proposed in this communication. This method determines the points on the path of moving heat source using the genetic algorithms. The fitness function of the used algorithm is determined on the basis of effective stresses and yield point depending on the phase composition. The path of the hardening tool and also the area of the heat affected zone is determined on the basis of obtained points. A numerical model of thermal phenomena, phase transformations in the solid state and mechanical phenomena for the hardening process is implemented in order to verify the presented method. A finite element method (FEM) was used for solving the heat transfer equation and getting required temperature fields. The moving heat source is modeled with a Gaussian distribution and the water cooling is also included. The macroscopic model based on the analysis of the CCT and CHT diagrams of the medium-carbon steel is used to determine the phase transformations in the solid state. A finite element method is also used for solving the equilibrium equations giving us the stress field. The thermal and structural strains are taken into account in the constitutive relations.

  17. Modeling of Irradiation Hardening of Polycrystalline Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Zbib, Hussein M.; Garmestani, Hamid; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-09-14

    High energy particle irradiation of structural polycrystalline materials usually produces irradiation hardening and embrittlement. The development of predict capability for the influence of irradiation on mechanical behavior is very important in materials design for next generation reactors. In this work a multiscale approach was implemented to predict irradiation hardening of body centered cubic (bcc) alpha-iron. The effect of defect density, texture and grain boundary was investigated. In the microscale, dislocation dynamics models were used to predict the critical resolved shear stress from the evolution of local dislocation and defects. In the macroscale, a viscoplastic self-consistent model was applied to predict the irradiation hardening in samples with changes in texture and grain boundary. This multiscale modeling can guide performance evaluation of structural materials used in next generation nuclear reactors.

  18. Ultrasound treatment of centrifugally atomized 316 stainless steel powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawers, James C.; McCune, Robert A.; Dunning, John S.

    1991-12-01

    The Bureau of Mines is studying the surface characteristics of rapidly solidified powders and the potential for surface modification of fine powders prior to consolidation. The surface modification and work hardening of fine powders were accomplished by applying high-energy ultrasound to centrifugally atomized austenitic 316 stainless steel powders suspended in liquid media. Cavitation implosion changed the surface morphology, hammering the surface and occasionally fretting off microchips of work-hardened metal. Ultrasound-cavitation work-hardened metal powder surfaces producing a strained, duplex austenite face-centered cubic (fcc)-martensite body-centered tetragonal (bct) phase structure. The amount of work hardening depended upon the quantity of ultrasound energy used, considering both power level and experimental time. Work hardening was relatively independent of the liquid media used.

  19. Cold-rolled, high-strength sheet steels for auto applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleck, Wolfgang

    1996-07-01

    Several groups of cold-rolled, high-strength sheet steels have been developed to optimize the required strength and formability levels for automotive applications. Multiphase steels offer new opportunities where high-strength levels are demanded. The future in steel development will be determined by the physical modeling of properties and by adapting new process routes such as thin slab casting and in-line rolling. In this article, developments in traditional strengthening concepts (e.g., microalloying and substitutional hardening with phosphorus) and more recently developed concepts (e.g., bake hardening and strengthening of interstitial-free steels) are reviewed.

  20. Phenomenological modeling of hardening and thermal recovery in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.; Lindholm, U. S.; Bodner, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    Modeling of hardening and thermal recovery in metals is considered within the context of unified elastic-viscoplastic theories. Specifically, the choices of internal variables and hardening measures, and the resulting hardening response obtained by incorporating saturation-type evolution equations into two general forms of the flow law are examined. Based on the analytical considerations, a procedure for delineating directional and isotropic hardening from uniaxial hardening data has been developed for the Bodner-Partom model and applied to a nickel-base superalloy, B1900 + Hf. Predictions based on the directional hardening properties deduced from the monotonic loading data are shown to be in good agreement with results of cyclic tests.

  1. Polymer-composite ball lightning.

    PubMed

    Bychkov, V L

    2002-01-15

    Investigations into the state of ball lightning (BL) have been made, and both theory and experiments, related to so-called "polymer-composite" ball lightning, are presented. The properties of such a polymeric BL have been described and are that of a long-lived object capable of storing high energy. Results of experiments, starting with polymeric components in erosive gas discharge experiments, are described and discussed. The model of BL as a highly charged polymer-dielectric structure is described. According to this model BL appears as the result of the aggregation of natural polymers, such as lignin and cellulose, soot, polymeric silica and other natural dust particles. Its ability to glow is explained by the appearance over its perimeter of gas discharges near the highly charged BL surface, and electrical breakdown of some regions on the surface, consisting of polymerized and aggregated threads.

  2. Polymer-composite ball lightning.

    PubMed

    Bychkov, V L

    2002-01-15

    Investigations into the state of ball lightning (BL) have been made, and both theory and experiments, related to so-called "polymer-composite" ball lightning, are presented. The properties of such a polymeric BL have been described and are that of a long-lived object capable of storing high energy. Results of experiments, starting with polymeric components in erosive gas discharge experiments, are described and discussed. The model of BL as a highly charged polymer-dielectric structure is described. According to this model BL appears as the result of the aggregation of natural polymers, such as lignin and cellulose, soot, polymeric silica and other natural dust particles. Its ability to glow is explained by the appearance over its perimeter of gas discharges near the highly charged BL surface, and electrical breakdown of some regions on the surface, consisting of polymerized and aggregated threads. PMID:16210170

  3. Keeping your eyes continuously on the ball while running for catchable and uncatchable fly balls.

    PubMed

    Postma, Dees B W; den Otter, A Rob; Zaal, Frank T J M

    2014-01-01

    When faced with a fly ball approaching along the sagittal plane, fielders need information for the control of their running to the interception location. This information could be available in the initial part of the ball trajectory, such that the interception location can be predicted from its initial conditions. Alternatively, such predictive information is not available, and running to the interception location involves continuous visual guidance. The latter type of control would predict that fielders keep looking at the approaching ball for most of its flight, whereas the former type of control would fit with looking at the ball during the early part of the ball's flight; keeping the eyes on the ball during the remainder of its trajectory would not be necessary when the interception location can be inferred from the first part of the ball trajectory. The present contribution studied visual tracking of approaching fly balls. Participants were equipped with a mobile eye tracker. They were confronted with tennis balls approaching from about 20 m, and projected in such a way that some balls were catchable and others were not. In all situations, participants almost exclusively tracked the ball with their gaze until just before the catch or until they indicated that a ball was uncatchable. This continuous tracking of the ball, even when running close to their maximum speeds, suggests that participants employed continuous visual control rather than running to an interception location known from looking at the early part of the ball flight. PMID:24670972

  4. Keeping Your Eyes Continuously on the Ball While Running for Catchable and Uncatchable Fly Balls

    PubMed Central

    Postma, Dees B. W.; den Otter, A. Rob; Zaal, Frank T. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    When faced with a fly ball approaching along the sagittal plane, fielders need information for the control of their running to the interception location. This information could be available in the initial part of the ball trajectory, such that the interception location can be predicted from its initial conditions. Alternatively, such predictive information is not available, and running to the interception location involves continuous visual guidance. The latter type of control would predict that fielders keep looking at the approaching ball for most of its flight, whereas the former type of control would fit with looking at the ball during the early part of the ball's flight; keeping the eyes on the ball during the remainder of its trajectory would not be necessary when the interception location can be inferred from the first part of the ball trajectory. The present contribution studied visual tracking of approaching fly balls. Participants were equipped with a mobile eye tracker. They were confronted with tennis balls approaching from about 20 m, and projected in such a way that some balls were catchable and others were not. In all situations, participants almost exclusively tracked the ball with their gaze until just before the catch or until they indicated that a ball was uncatchable. This continuous tracking of the ball, even when running close to their maximum speeds, suggests that participants employed continuous visual control rather than running to an interception location known from looking at the early part of the ball flight. PMID:24670972

  5. How to create ball lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golka, Robert K., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Procedures are given on how to produce ball lightning. Necessary equipment includes a transformer of 150,000 watts capable of providing approximately 10,000 amperes at 15 volts, 60 cycles; thick one inch cables of stranded wire leading into a 3 by 4 by 1 foot plastic tank; a quarter inch thick 4 by 6 inch aluminum plate to be used as one of the discharge electrodes; and another electrode of heavy copper wire with the insulation stripped back 6 inches.

  6. Falling Sticks and Falling Balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, M. E.; Harpst, Michael R.; Nakazawa, Ryohei

    2002-09-01

    The behavior of a falling stick, pivoted at one end, and a ball released from the same height as the end of the stick, is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The study is made possible through the use of the computer to perform the numerical computations and analysis of the experimental data. The study provides undergraduates with an opportunity to carry out a relatively simple project with interesting results.

  7. Thermoelastic constitutive equations for chemically hardening materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, B. W.; Levitsky, M.

    1974-01-01

    Thermoelastic constitutive equations are derived for a material undergoing solidification or hardening as the result of a chemical reaction. The derivation is based upon a two component model whose composition is determined by the degree of hardening, and makes use of strain-energy considerations. Constitutive equations take the form of stress rate-strain rate relations, in which the coefficients are time-dependent functions of the composition. Specific results are developed for the case of a material of constant bulk modulus which undergoes a transition from an initial liquidlike state into an isotropic elastic solid. Potential applications are discussed.

  8. Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Adams, James H.; Frazier, Donald O.; Patrick, Marshall C.; Watson, Michael D.; Johnson, Michael A.; Cressler, John D.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation Environmental Modeling is crucial to proper predictive modeling and electronic response to the radiation environment. When compared to on-orbit data, CREME96 has been shown to be inaccurate in predicting the radiation environment. The NEDD bases much of its radiation environment data on CREME96 output. Close coordination and partnership with DoD radiation-hardened efforts will result in leveraged - not duplicated or independently developed - technology capabilities of: a) Radiation-hardened, reconfigurable FPGA-based electronics; and b) High Performance Processors (NOT duplication or independent development).

  9. 'Work-Hardenable' Ductile Bulk Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Jayanta; Eckert, Juergen; Tang Meibo; Wang Weihua; Kim, Ki Buem; Baier, Falko; Theissmann, Ralf

    2005-05-27

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (<1%) at room temperature. We present a new class of bulk metallic glass, which exhibits high strength of up to 2265 MPa together with extensive 'work hardening' and large ductility of 18%. Significant increase in the flow stress was observed during deformation. The 'work-hardening' capability and ductility of this class of metallic glass is attributed to a unique structure correlated with atomic-scale inhomogeneity, leading to an inherent capability of extensive shear band formation, interactions, and multiplication of shear bands.

  10. 2013 Problem 3: Bouncing Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Du, Li; Wang, Sihui; Gao, Wenli

    2015-10-01

    In this solution, we study the rebound of a liquid-filled Ping-Pong ball after a free-fall motion. We classify the collision into "rigid-like motion" or "liquid-involved" motion. The most significant parameter is the amount of water. The rebounding height is suppressed most as the amount of water is about half of the total volume, exhibiting a typical "liquid-involved" motion. As the amount of water increases further, the rebounding height gradually recovers, and the ball becomes rigid again. We build a theoretical model to interpret the phenomenon. The model describes the formation of the flow field during the collision stage based on the momentum propagation and flux conservation of the liquid. An effective mass is introduced to describe the confinement effect on water by the sphere. Our model successfully predicts the bouncing height with respect to the amount of water. Releasing height is also an important parameter in determining the "nature of collision". As the releasing height increases, the whole system tends to become more and more "rigid". We classify the nature of collision above a certain releasing height as "rigid-like" regardless of the amount of water inside the ball.

  11. Surface Strength of Silicon Nitride in Relation to Rolling Contact Performance Measured on Ball-on-Rod and Modified Four-Ball Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Hadfield, M.; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) has been used in various rolling contact applications in turbomachinery, automotive and power industry. It is favoured to replace conventional steel due to its low density, low friction, corrosion resistance and good performance under extreme condition. However, a major limitation of its wider application is its high material and machining cost, especially the cost associated with the finishing process. In the present study, a low cost sintered and reaction bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN) is used to study the surface machining effects on its rolling contact performance. Attempt has been made to link the surface strengths of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} derived from half-rod and C-sphere flexure strength specimens to the rolling contact lifetimes of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} rod and ball specimens. The rolling contact fatigue tests are carried out on ball-on-rod and modified four ball machines. Three types of surfaces with coarse, fine and conventional finishing conditions are examined. Flexure strength tests on half-rod and C-sphere show an increasing surface strength from specimens with coarse, fine to conventionally machined conditions. During rolling contact fatigue test of as-machined specimens, there are no failures observed on both ball-on-rod and four ball tests after 100 million stress cycles. However, there is a trend of decreasing wear volumes measured on the contact path of rods and balls with coarse, fine and conventional conditions. In four ball test, spall failures are observed on pre-crack specimens. There is a trend of increasing rolling contact fatigue lifetime from pre-cracked specimens with coarse, fine to conventional machining conditions.

  12. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  13. Precise timing when hitting falling balls.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Eli; Driesen, Ben; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2014-01-01

    People are extremely good at hitting falling balls with a baseball bat. Despite the ball's constant acceleration, they have been reported to time hits with a standard deviation of only about 7 ms. To examine how people achieve such precision, we compared performance when there were no added restrictions, with performance when looking with one eye, when vision was blurred, and when various parts of the ball's trajectory were hidden from view. We also examined how the size of the ball and varying the height from which it was dropped influenced temporal precision. Temporal precision did not become worse when vision was blurred, when the ball was smaller, or when balls falling from different heights were randomly interleaved. The disadvantage of closing one eye did not exceed expectations from removing one of two independent estimates. Precision was higher for slower balls, but only if the ball being slower meant that one saw it longer before the hit. It was particularly important to see the ball while swinging the bat. Together, these findings suggest that people time their hits so precisely by using the changing elevation throughout the swing to adjust the bat's movement to that of the ball. PMID:24904380

  14. Precise timing when hitting falling balls

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Eli; Driesen, Ben; Smeets, Jeroen B. J.

    2014-01-01

    People are extremely good at hitting falling balls with a baseball bat. Despite the ball's constant acceleration, they have been reported to time hits with a standard deviation of only about 7 ms. To examine how people achieve such precision, we compared performance when there were no added restrictions, with performance when looking with one eye, when vision was blurred, and when various parts of the ball's trajectory were hidden from view. We also examined how the size of the ball and varying the height from which it was dropped influenced temporal precision. Temporal precision did not become worse when vision was blurred, when the ball was smaller, or when balls falling from different heights were randomly interleaved. The disadvantage of closing one eye did not exceed expectations from removing one of two independent estimates. Precision was higher for slower balls, but only if the ball being slower meant that one saw it longer before the hit. It was particularly important to see the ball while swinging the bat. Together, these findings suggest that people time their hits so precisely by using the changing elevation throughout the swing to adjust the bat's movement to that of the ball. PMID:24904380

  15. Precise timing when hitting falling balls.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Eli; Driesen, Ben; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2014-01-01

    People are extremely good at hitting falling balls with a baseball bat. Despite the ball's constant acceleration, they have been reported to time hits with a standard deviation of only about 7 ms. To examine how people achieve such precision, we compared performance when there were no added restrictions, with performance when looking with one eye, when vision was blurred, and when various parts of the ball's trajectory were hidden from view. We also examined how the size of the ball and varying the height from which it was dropped influenced temporal precision. Temporal precision did not become worse when vision was blurred, when the ball was smaller, or when balls falling from different heights were randomly interleaved. The disadvantage of closing one eye did not exceed expectations from removing one of two independent estimates. Precision was higher for slower balls, but only if the ball being slower meant that one saw it longer before the hit. It was particularly important to see the ball while swinging the bat. Together, these findings suggest that people time their hits so precisely by using the changing elevation throughout the swing to adjust the bat's movement to that of the ball.

  16. Experimental study of self-compacted concrete in hardened state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra Costa, Carlos Jose

    The main aim of this work is to investigate the hardened behaviour of Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC). Self compacting Concrete is a special concrete that can flow in its gravity and fill in the formwork alone to its self-weight, passing through the bars and congested sections without the need of any internal or external vibration, while maintaining adequate homogeneity. SCC avoids most of the materials defects due to bleeding or segregation. With regard to its composition, SCC consists of the same components as traditional vibrated concrete (TC), but in different proportions. Thus, the high amount of superplasticizer and high powder content have to taken into account. The high workability of SCC does not allow to use traditional methods for measuring the fresh state properties, so new tests has developed (slump-flow, V-funnel, L-box, and others). The properties of the hardened SCC, which depend on the mix design, should be different from traditional concrete. In order to study the possible modifications of SCC hardened state properties, a review of the bibliography was done. The state of art was focused on the mechanical behaviour (compressive strength, tension strength and elastic modulus), on bond strength of reinforcement steel, and on material durability. The experimental program consisted in the production of two types of concretes: Self-Compacting Concrete and Traditional Concrete. Four different dosages was made with three different water/cement ratio and two strength types of Portland cement, in order to cover the ordinary strength used in construction. Based on this study it can be concluded that compressive strength of SCC and TC are similar (the differences are lesser than 10%), whereas the tensile strength of TC are up to 18% higher. The values of elastic modulus of both concrete are similar. On the other hand, in the ultimate state the bond strength of SCC and TC is similar, although SCC shows higher bond stiffness in the serviceability state (initial

  17. Fluid Mechanics of Cricket and Tennis Balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.

    2009-11-01

    Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in defining the flight of a ball that is struck or thrown through the air in almost all ball sports. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can often deviate from its initial straight path, resulting in a curved, or sometimes an unpredictable, flight path. It is particularly fascinating that that not all the parameters that affect the flight of a ball are always under human influence. Lateral deflection in flight, commonly known as swing, swerve or curve, is well recognized in cricket and tennis. In tennis, the lateral deflection is produced by spinning the ball about an axis perpendicular to the line of flight, which gives rise to what is commonly known as the Magnus effect. It is now well recognized that the aerodynamics of sports balls are strongly dependent on the detailed development and behavior of the boundary layer on the ball's surface. A side force, which makes a ball curve through the air, can also be generated in the absence of the Magnus effect. In one of the cricket deliveries, the ball is released with the seam angled, which trips the laminar boundary layer into a turbulent state on that side. The turbulent boundary layer separates relatively late compared to the laminar layer on the other side, thereby creating a pressure difference and hence side force. The fluid mechanics of a cricket ball become very interesting at the higher Reynolds numbers and this will be discussed in detail. Of all the round sports balls, a tennis ball has the highest drag coefficient. This will be explained in terms of the contribution of the ``fuzz" drag and how that changes with Reynolds number and ball surface wear. It is particularly fascinating that, purely through historical accidents, small disturbances on the ball surface, such as the stitching on cricket balls and the felt cover on tennis balls are all about the right size to affect boundary layer transition and development in the Reynolds numbers of interest. The fluid

  18. SEU hardening of CMOS memory circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, S.; Canaris, J.; Liu, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports a design technique to harden CMOS memory circuits against Single Event Upset (SEU) in the space environment. A RAM cell and Flip Flop design are presented to demonstrate the method. The Flip Flop was used in the control circuitry for a Reed Solomon encoder designed for the Space Station.

  19. Extraordinary strain hardening by gradient structure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, XiaoLei; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Liu; Yuan, Fuping; Zhu, Yuntian T.

    2014-01-01

    Gradient structures have evolved over millions of years through natural selection and optimization in many biological systems such as bones and plant stems, where the structures change gradually from the surface to interior. The advantage of gradient structures is their maximization of physical and mechanical performance while minimizing material cost. Here we report that the gradient structure in engineering materials such as metals renders a unique extra strain hardening, which leads to high ductility. The grain-size gradient under uniaxial tension induces a macroscopic strain gradient and converts the applied uniaxial stress to multiaxial stresses due to the evolution of incompatible deformation along the gradient depth. Thereby the accumulation and interaction of dislocations are promoted, resulting in an extra strain hardening and an obvious strain hardening rate up-turn. Such extraordinary strain hardening, which is inherent to gradient structures and does not exist in homogeneous materials, provides a hitherto unknown strategy to develop strong and ductile materials by architecting heterogeneous nanostructures. PMID:24799688

  20. 'Fire hardening' spear wood does slightly harden it, but makes it much weaker and more brittle.

    PubMed

    Ennos, Antony Roland; Chan, Tak Lok

    2016-05-01

    It is usually assumed that 'fire hardening' the tips of spears, as practised by hunter-gatherers and early Homo spp., makes them harder and better suited for hunting. This suggestion was tested by subjecting coppiced poles of hazel to a fire-hardening process and comparing their mechanical properties to those of naturally seasoned poles. A Shore D hardness test showed that fire treatment slightly increased the hardness of the wood, but flexural and impact tests showed that it reduced the strength and work of fracture by 30% and 36%, respectively. These results suggest that though potentially slightly sharper and more durable, fire-hardened tips would actually be more likely to break off when used, as may have been the case with the earliest known wooden tool, the Clacton spear. Fire might first have been used to help sharpen the tips of spears, and fire-hardening would have been a mostly negative side effect, not its primary purpose.

  1. 'Fire hardening' spear wood does slightly harden it, but makes it much weaker and more brittle.

    PubMed

    Ennos, Antony Roland; Chan, Tak Lok

    2016-05-01

    It is usually assumed that 'fire hardening' the tips of spears, as practised by hunter-gatherers and early Homo spp., makes them harder and better suited for hunting. This suggestion was tested by subjecting coppiced poles of hazel to a fire-hardening process and comparing their mechanical properties to those of naturally seasoned poles. A Shore D hardness test showed that fire treatment slightly increased the hardness of the wood, but flexural and impact tests showed that it reduced the strength and work of fracture by 30% and 36%, respectively. These results suggest that though potentially slightly sharper and more durable, fire-hardened tips would actually be more likely to break off when used, as may have been the case with the earliest known wooden tool, the Clacton spear. Fire might first have been used to help sharpen the tips of spears, and fire-hardening would have been a mostly negative side effect, not its primary purpose. PMID:27194289

  2. Mechanical Behavior and Microstructure Characteristics of Directionally Solidified TWIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Kun; Man, Jianfeng; Yang, Jianzhong; Han, Fusheng

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical behavior and microstructure characteristics of three high Mn austenitic steels prepared by directional solidification at withdrawal rates of 60, 120, and 240 μm s-1 were investigated and compared with common TWIP steel with equiaxed grains. For each steel, the Hollomon analysis, differential C-J analysis, and modified C-J analysis as an alternative method to describe the work-hardening behavior were studied. The directionally solidified samples (DS samples) exhibited higher mechanical properties along the axis, five stages (A, B, C, D, and E) divided on the plot of stain hardening rate vs true strain, and a more stable and uniform deformation feature with larger strain-hardening coefficients when the true strain is over 0.25, in comparison with the common TWIP steel. The modified C-J analysis was found to be the best one for revealing the strain-hardening behavior characterized by several different stages with a definite work-hardening exponent n. In the case of DS samples, the dendrite spacings increase but the morphology becomes simple when decreasing the withdrawal rate. The larger volume fraction of twins and prevalent activation of twin systems, together with the fragmentations of the original grains in a sample solidified at a withdrawal rate of 120 μm s-1, lead to the best mechanical behavior in a medium-to-large strain range.

  3. He and H irradiation effects on the nanoindentation hardness of CLAM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Siben; Peng, Lei; Ge, Hongen; Huang, Qunying; Xin, Jingping; Zhao, Ziqiang

    2014-12-01

    In this study, He and H ion irradiation induced hardening behavior of China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel was investigated, and the influence of Si on irradiation hardening was also examined. CLAM steel with different Si contents, Heat 0912 and Heat 0408D, were irradiated with single He (He concentration range from 0 to 2150 appm) ion beam and He/H dual ion beams. Then nanoindentation tests were applied to evaluate the ion irradiation induced hardening effect. The result of Heat 0912 showed hardening effect would be more serious with higher He concentration, and the trend saturated when He concentration reach 1000 appm. Comparing the result of Heat 0912 and Heat 0408D, higher Si content might improve the resistance to hardening.

  4. Electric charge of a lightning ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigor'ev, A. I.; Shiryaeva, S. O.; Petrushov, N. A.

    2016-09-01

    The electric charge of a lightning ball is found by comparing the electrohydrodynamic stabilities of a charged drop in an electrostatic suspension and a lightning ball floating in a superposition of the gravitational field and the surface electric field. It has been assumed that the electric field strength at the surface is limited by a breakdown value. For a lightning ball radius of 15 cm, its charge is estimated as several microcoulombs. Accordingly, the density of electrostatic energy accumulated in the lightning ball is on the order of one-hundredth of a joule per square centimeter. The density of the material that constitutes the lightning ball has been estimated for the case when the electric field strength at the site of its origination is several times higher than that in fine weather. The density of the lightning ball turns out to differ from that of air by only a few percents.

  5. Ball feeder for replenishing evaporator feed

    DOEpatents

    Felde, David K.; McKoon, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    Vapor source material such as uranium, which is to be dropped into a melt in an evaporator, is made into many balls of identical diameters and placed inside a container. An elongated sloping pipe is connected to the container and leads to the evaporator such that these balls can travel sequentially therealong by gravity. A metering valve in this pipe for passing these balls one at a time is opened in response to a signal when it is ascertained by a detector that there is a ball ready to be passed. A gate in the pipe near the evaporator momentarily stops the motion of the traveling ball and is then opened to allow the ball drop into the melt at a reduced speed.

  6. Structural dynamic analysis of a ball joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Kwon-Hee

    2012-11-01

    Ball joint is a rotating and swiveling element that is typically installed at the interface between two parts. In an automobile, the ball joint is the component that connects the control arms to the steering knuckle. The ball joint can also be installed in linkage systems for motion control applications. This paper describes the simulation strategy for a ball joint analysis, considering manufacturing process. Its manufacturing process can be divided into plugging and spinning. Then, the interested responses is selected as the stress distribution generated between its ball and bearing. In this paper, a commercial code of NX DAFUL using an implicit integration method is introduced to calculate the response. In addition, the gap analysis is performed to investigate the fitness, focusing on the response of the displacement of a ball stud. Also, the optimum design is suggested through case studies.

  7. Ball feeder for replenishing evaporator feed

    DOEpatents

    Felde, D.K.; McKoon, R.H.

    1993-03-23

    Vapor source material such as uranium, which is to be dropped into a melt in an evaporator, is made into many balls of identical diameters and placed inside a container. An elongated sloping pipe is connected to the container and leads to the evaporator such that these balls can travel sequentially therealong by gravity. A metering valve in this pipe for passing these balls one at a time is opened in response to a signal when it is ascertained by a detector that there is a ball ready to be passed. A gate in the pipe near the evaporator momentarily stops the motion of the traveling ball and is then opened to allow the ball drop into the melt at a reduced speed.

  8. Adiabatic invariance of oscillons/I -balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Takeda, Naoyuki

    2015-11-01

    Real scalar fields are known to fragment into spatially localized and long-lived solitons called oscillons or I -balls. We prove the adiabatic invariance of the oscillons/I -balls for a potential that allows periodic motion even in the presence of non-negligible spatial gradient energy. We show that such a potential is uniquely determined to be the quadratic one with a logarithmic correction, for which the oscillons/I -balls are absolutely stable. For slightly different forms of the scalar potential dominated by the quadratic one, the oscillons/I -balls are only quasistable, because the adiabatic charge is only approximately conserved. We check the conservation of the adiabatic charge of the I -balls in numerical simulation by slowly varying the coefficient of logarithmic corrections. This unambiguously shows that the longevity of oscillons/I -balls is due to the adiabatic invariance.

  9. Fabrication of nanocrystalline surface composite layer on Cu plate under ball collisions.

    PubMed

    Romankov, S; Park, Y C; Yoon, J M

    2014-10-01

    It was demonstrated that the severe plastic deformation of a surface induced by repeated ball collisions can be effectively used for fabrication of the nanocrystalline surface composite layers. The Cu disk was fixed at the top of a vibration chamber and ball treated. Al, Zr, Ni, Co and Fe were introduced into a Cu plate as contaminants from the grinding media one after the other by 15-min ball treatment. The composite structure was formed as a result of mechanical intermixing of the components. The particle size in as-fabricated layer ranged from 2 nm to 20 nm, with average values of about 7 nm. As-fabricated layer contained non-equilibrium multicomponent solid solution based on FCC Cu crystal structure, Zr-based phase, nanosized steel debris and amorphous phase. The hardness of the as-fabricated composite was almost ten times that of the initial Cu plate. PMID:25942932

  10. A Study on the Effects of Ball Defects on the Fatigue Life in Hybrid Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Ching-Yao; Foerster, Chad E.; O'Brien, Michael J.; Hardy, Brian S.; Goyal, Vinay K.; Nelson, Benjamin A.; Robinson, Ernest Y.; Ward, Peter C.; Hilton, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid ball bearings using silicon nitride ceramic balls with steel rings are increasingly being used in space mechanism applications due to their high wear resistance and long rolling contact fatigue life. However, qualitative and quantitative reports of the effects of ball defects that cause early fatigue failure are rare. We report on our approach to study these effects. Our strategy includes characterization of defects encountered in use, generation of similar defects in a laboratory setting, execution of full-scale bearing tests to obtain lifetimes, post-test characterization, and related finite-element modeling to understand the stress concentration of these defects. We have confirmed that at least one type of defect of appropriate size can significantly reduce fatigue life. Our method can be used to evaluate other defects as they occur or are encountered.

  11. Multifractal properties of ball milling dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Budroni, M. A. Pilosu, V.; Rustici, M.; Delogu, F.

    2014-06-15

    This work focuses on the dynamics of a ball inside the reactor of a ball mill. We show that the distribution of collisions at the reactor walls exhibits multifractal properties in a wide region of the parameter space defining the geometrical characteristics of the reactor and the collision elasticity. This feature points to the presence of restricted self-organized zones of the reactor walls where the ball preferentially collides and the mechanical energy is mainly dissipated.

  12. NEW APPROACHES: The way balls bounce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, N. James

    1998-05-01

    The bounce of a ball is a good topic for investigation at either GCSE or A-level. At King's School Canterbury pupils have experimented with both squash balls and inflatable play balls, varying the drop height, pressure and temperature and measuring the effect on bounce height, contact area and contact time. Worthwhile predictions can be made from quite simple theory and the experimental results provide ample opportunities for discussion and evaluation.

  13. 7 CFR 58.622 - Hardening and storage rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hardening and storage rooms. 58.622 Section 58.622 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....622 Hardening and storage rooms. Hardening and storage rooms for frozen desserts shall be...

  14. 7 CFR 58.622 - Hardening and storage rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hardening and storage rooms. 58.622 Section 58.622 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....622 Hardening and storage rooms. Hardening and storage rooms for frozen desserts shall be...

  15. 7 CFR 58.622 - Hardening and storage rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hardening and storage rooms. 58.622 Section 58.622 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....622 Hardening and storage rooms. Hardening and storage rooms for frozen desserts shall be...

  16. 7 CFR 58.622 - Hardening and storage rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hardening and storage rooms. 58.622 Section 58.622 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....622 Hardening and storage rooms. Hardening and storage rooms for frozen desserts shall be...

  17. 7 CFR 58.622 - Hardening and storage rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hardening and storage rooms. 58.622 Section 58.622 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....622 Hardening and storage rooms. Hardening and storage rooms for frozen desserts shall be...

  18. Simplified identification of material parameters for Yoshida-Uemori kinematic hardening model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phongsai, T.; Uthaisangsuk, V.; Chongthairungruang, B.; Suranuntchai, S.; Jirathearanat, S.

    2014-06-01

    In sheet metal forming process of Advanced High Strength (AHS) steels, springback effect is one of the most critical problems for manufacturer. The springback of a formed part occurs due to residual stress released after deformation. FE simulations were often used to describe both forming and springback behavior of steel sheets. Recently, the Yoshida- Uemori (Y-U) kinematic hardening model has been successfully applied for the springback simulation. The model is capable of reproducing the transient Bauschinger effect, permanent softening and work hardening stagnation during a large deformation. In this work, method for determining materials parameter of the Y-U model was briefly presented. Initially, cyclic tests were performed under both tension and compression loads for the high strength steel grade JSC780Y and JSC980Y. FE simulations of 1-element model were carried in order to investigate predicted cyclic stress strain curves. Both Y-U model and a mixed isotropic-kinematic Barlat2000 model were used in the simulations. Stamping tests of hat shape sample were carried out for verifying the experimental and numerical results. It was found that the Y-U model provided more accurate springback results than the other model.

  19. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, J.B.

    1982-03-15

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengagable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  20. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, J.B.

    1984-03-13

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengageable servo drives which cannot be clutched out is disclosed. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine. 3 figs.

  1. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, James B.

    1984-01-01

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengageable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls (10, 12) are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit (14) and a rigid member (16, 18, 20, 22, 24). One gage ball (10) is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly (34) which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball (12) is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly (38) which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball (12) is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball (10). As the moving ball (12) executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls (10, 12) caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly (50, 52, 54, 56, 58, 60) actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit (14). Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball (10) locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  2. Analysis and experiment of random ball test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Liming; Wu, Fan; Hou, Xi; Zhang, Can

    2012-10-01

    Robert E.Parks from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), America, first reported Random Ball Test (RBT), which is used to measure the absolute error of the reference surface of the interferometer. The basic course of this technology as followed: first, assemble the Random Ball in the confocal position of the interferometer system; then, measure the surface of the Random Ball and record the result; rotate the Random Ball to another position, meanwhile make sure that the Random Ball is in the confocal position all the time; In the new position, measure the surface of the Random Ball and record it again; repeat enough times as above, calculate the mean result of the measuring results, and this mean result is just the absolute error of the reference surface of the interferometer. Since 1998, other scholars have continued Robert E.Parks's research, and created a new type of the RBT. In this new technology, Random Ball is sustained by high pressure airflow, suspending in the air, and rotating around sphere center. This technology is called Dynamic Random Ball Test (DRBT), because the Random Ball is rotating during measurement. This article mainly reported the experiment study about the DRBT.

  3. Effect of ball geometry on endurance limit in bending of drilled balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Four designs of drilled (cylindrically hollow) balls were tested for resistance to bending fatigue. Bending fatigue has been demonstrated to be a limiting factor in previous evaluations of the drilled ball concept. A web reinforced drilled ball was most successful in resisting bending fatigue. Another design of through drilled design, involving a heavier wall than the standard reference ball, also showed significant improvement in resistance to bending fatigue.

  4. The Soccer-Ball Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossenfelder, Sabine

    2014-07-01

    The idea that Lorentz-symmetry in momentum space could be modified but still remain observer-independent has received quite some attention in the recent years. This modified Lorentz-symmetry, which has been argued to arise in Loop Quantum Gravity, is being used as a phenomenological model to test possibly observable effects of quantum gravity. The most pressing problem in these models is the treatment of multi-particle states, known as the 'soccer-ball problem'. This article briefly reviews the problem and the status of existing solution attempts.

  5. Two-ball Newton's cradle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendinning, Paul

    2011-12-01

    Newton's cradle for two balls with Hertzian interactions is considered as a hybrid system, and this makes it possible to derive return maps for the motion between collisions in an exact form despite the fact that the three-halves interaction law cannot be solved in closed form. The return maps depend on a constant whose value can only be determined numerically, but solutions can be written down explicitly in terms of this parameter, and we compare this with the results of simulations. The results are in fact independent of the details of the interaction potential.

  6. 75 FR 22384 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... Sales at Less Than Fair Value: Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon Steel Plate From South Africa, 62 FR 61731... the antidumping duty orders on ball bearings and parts thereof from France (54 FR 20902), Germany (54 FR 20900), Italy (54 FR 20903), Japan (54 FR 20904), and the United Kingdom (54 FR 20910) in...

  7. Hardness of Carburized Surfaces in 316LN Stainless Steel after Low Temperature Neutron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, TS

    2005-01-31

    A proprietary surface carburization treatment is being considered to minimize possible cavitation pitting of the inner surfaces of the stainless steel target vessel of the SNS. The treatment gives a large supersaturation of carbon in the surface layers and causes substantial hardening of the surface. To answer the question of whether such a hardened layer will remain hard and stable during neutron irradiation, specimens of the candidate materials were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to an atomic displacement level of 1 dpa. Considerable radiation hardening occurred in annealed 316LN stainless steel and 20% cold rolled 316LN stainless steel, and lesser radiation hardening in Kolsterised layers on these materials. These observations coupled with optical microscopy examinations indicate that the carbon-supersaturated layers did not suffer radiation-induced decomposition and softening.

  8. Mössbauer study of EUROFER and VVER steel reactor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmann, E.; Horváth, Á.; Alves, L.; Silva, J. F.; Gomes, U.; Souza, C.; Homonnay, Z.

    2013-04-01

    57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry were used to study EUROFER or VVER ferritic reactor steels mechanically alloyed with TaC or NbC. Significant changes were found in the Mössbauer spectra and in the corresponding hyperfine field distributions between the ball milled pure steel and that alloyed with TaC or NbC. Spectral differences were also found in the case of use of same carbides with different origin, too. The observed spectral changes as an effect of ball milling of the reactor material steels with carbides can be associated with change in short range order of the constituents of steel.

  9. 77 FR 21527 - Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate Products From the Republic of Korea: Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... proprietary equivalents; (4) abrasion-resistant steels (i.e., USS AR 400, USS AR 500); (5) products made to ASTM A202, A225, A514 grade S, A517 grade S, or their proprietary equivalents; (6) ball bearing steels... International Trade Administration Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate Products From the...

  10. 77 FR 13545 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Notice of Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Antidumping Duty Administrative Review 76 FR 67407 (November 1, 2011) (Preliminary Results). \\2\\ We determined... Changed Circumstances Review: Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Mexico, 76 FR 45509 (July 29...) high nickel steel; (d) ball bearing steel; and (e) concrete reinforcing bars and rods. Also...

  11. Effects of process control agent on the synthesis of AIN-carbon nanotube by ball-milling.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hye Rim; Kim, Young Jin; Ahn, Jung-Ho

    2013-09-01

    Aluminum and its alloy are of importance due to high specific strength. In particular, aluminum matrix composites have good corrosion resistance and mechanical property at high temperatures. However, enhanced mechanical strength and wear resistance via proper heat treatments are strongly required for many structural applications. For this purpose, we synthesized carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced aluminum matrix composites by employing a new method. We employed controlled ball-milling and sintering: the use of some specific process control agents (PCAs) for ball-milling and sintering in a specific atmosphere. The use of our PCAs was beneficial both for homogeneous mixing and for the formation of hard dispersoids. Hardened layers was formed at the surface of the present aluminum-CNT composites as a result of reaction of aluminum with PCAs and nitrogen in the processing atmosphere. The resulting materials after sintering showed interesting mechanical properties, combined with surface hardening. The hardening mainly stems from the formation of Al-N-O phase at the surface of specimens. PMID:24205586

  12. Radiation-hardened transistor and integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ma, Kwok K.

    2007-11-20

    A composite transistor is disclosed for use in radiation hardening a CMOS IC formed on an SOI or bulk semiconductor substrate. The composite transistor has a circuit transistor and a blocking transistor connected in series with a common gate connection. A body terminal of the blocking transistor is connected only to a source terminal thereof, and to no other connection point. The blocking transistor acts to prevent a single-event transient (SET) occurring in the circuit transistor from being coupled outside the composite transistor. Similarly, when a SET occurs in the blocking transistor, the circuit transistor prevents the SET from being coupled outside the composite transistor. N-type and P-type composite transistors can be used for each and every transistor in the CMOS IC to radiation harden the IC, and can be used to form inverters and transmission gates which are the building blocks of CMOS ICs.

  13. Construction procedures using self hardening fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, S. I.; Parker, D. G.

    1980-07-01

    Fly ash produced in Arkansas from burning Wyoming low sulfur coal is self-hardening and can be effective as a soil stabilizing agent for clays and sands. The strength of soil-self hardening fly ash develops rapidly when compacted immediately after mixing. Seven day unconfined compressive strengths up to 1800 psi were obtained from 20% fly ash and 80% sand mixtures. A time delay between mixing the fly ash with the soil and compaction of the mixture reduced the strength. With two hours delay, over a third of the strength was lost and with four hours delay, the loss was over half. Gypsum and some commercial concrete retarders were effective in reducing the detrimental effect of delayed compaction. Adequate mixing of the soil and fly ash and rapid compaction of the mixtures were found to be important parameters in field construction of stabilized bases.

  14. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  15. Using Ruby Balls As Fiducial Marks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, Nance M.

    1990-01-01

    Combination of basic and advanced techniques yields new capability for inspection. In new technique, surface first inspected with fluorescent penetrant dye to reveal flaws. Ruby ball of known diameter placed near flaw having to be measured. Flaw and ball observed through magnifying video system that can "freeze" image.

  16. NCI and Leidos Play Ball | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The ping of an aluminum bat off a ball or the thump of a pop-up fly ball caught in a glove are two sounds familiar to baseball fans. Slow-pitch softball sounds—like those in the August game between mixed teams of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research (formerly SAIC-Frederick) players—are similar.

  17. Mathematical Modeling and Simulation of Hardness of Quenched and Tempered Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoljan, Božo; Iljkić, Dario; Totten, George E.

    2015-12-01

    A mathematical model and expressions for hardness prediction were established, where quenched and tempered steel hardness is predicted based on as-quenched hardness of steel. Hardenability properties of steel are included in the model to achieve a more precise prediction of quenched and tempered steel hardness. Prediction of the as-quenched hardness of steel is based on the relationship between as-quenched hardness and the characteristic cooling time from 1073 K to 773 K (800 °C to 500 °C) ( t 8/5). The model was used to simulate the hardness of a quenched and tempered steel workpieces.

  18. Bending stresses in spherically hollow ball bearing and fatigue experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Coe, H. H.; Parker, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Spherically hollow balls of 21.7, 50.0, and 56.5 percent mass reduction were operated in ball bearings and in a five-ball fatigue tester with differing outcomes. Available theoretical and experimental treatments of stresses in spherically hollow balls are reviewed and compared. Bending stresses are estimated for these spherically hollow balls to better understand the differences in ball bearing and fatigue test experience.

  19. Bending stresses in spherically hollow ball bearing and fatigue experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Coe, H. H.; Parker, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Spherically hollow balls of 21.7, 50.0 and 56.5 per cent mass reduction have been operated in ball bearings and in a 5-ball fatigue tester with differing outcomes. Available theoretical and experimental treatments of stresses in spherically hollow balls are reviewed and compared. Bending stresses are estimated for these spherically hollow balls to better understand the differences in ball bearing and fatigue test experience.

  20. Strain Hardening in Bidisperse Polymer Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark O.; Hoy, Robert S.

    2009-03-01

    The connections between glassy and rubbery strain hardening have been a matter of great controversy in recent years. Recent experiments and our earlier simulations have suggested that the hardening modulus GR is proportional to the entanglement density in glasses, as it is to the crosslink density in rubbers. In this work we present more extensive studies of strain hardening in bidisperse glasses and its relation to microscopic conformational changes. The mixtures contain chains of very different lengths but equivalent chemistry. GR does not scale simply with the entanglement density. Instead it obeys a simple mixing rule, with GR equal to the volume fraction weighted average of the moduli of the two pure components. As in recent studies of monodisperse systems (R. S. Hoy and M. O. Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 117801 (2007)), the stress is directly correlated to the degree of chain orientation. Chains of a given length undergo almost the same degree of alignment in pure systems and mixtures, explaining why the simple mixing rule applies. The connection to recent analytic theories by K. Chen and K. S. Schweizer (PRL, in press) will be discussed.

  1. Work hardening: occupational therapy in industrial rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Matheson, L N; Ogden, L D; Violette, K; Schultz, K

    1985-05-01

    Work hardening, presented in this paper as a "new" service for the industrially injured, is actually well grounded in the traditional models and practices of occupational therapy. From the profession's early roots in industrial therapy to the development of a variety of programs for the industrially injured through the 1950s and 1960s, the historical and philosophical bases of occupational therapy support the use of work as an evaluative and therapeutic medium. What is actually new is the adoption of terminology, technology, and a program format that fits in with the needs of consumers in the 1980s. Recent developments that created the need for the specialized services that occupational therapists are uniquely qualified to provide include growth of private sector vocational rehabilitation, changes in workers' compensation laws, and increasing costs of vocational rehabilitation. This paper describes work hardening in its present form. A case example is given that demonstrates how work hardening can be a cost-effective and time-saving bridge which spans the gap between curative medicine and the return to work. PMID:4014411

  2. The Effect of Stress and TiC Coated Balls on Lubricant Lifetimes Using a Vacuum Ball-on-Plate Rolling Contact Tribometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Helmick, Larry H.; Nguyen, QuynhGiao; Wheeler, Donald R.; Boving, Hans J.

    1999-01-01

    A vacuum ball-on-plate rolling contact tribometer was used to determine the relative lifetimes of a perfluoropolyether (Krytox 143 AC) on 440C stainless steel. The effect of mean Hertzian stresses (0.75, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 GPa) and the use of TiC-coated balls on lubricant lifetime was studied. Other conditions included: 100 rpm, 50 micro-g of lubricant, an initial vacuum level of less than 1.0 x 10(exp -8) Torr, and room temperature (23 C). Increasing the mean Hertzian stress from 0.75 to 2.0 GPa results in an exponential decrease in lubricant lifetime for both material combinations. However, substituting a TiC ball for the 440C ball quadrupled lifetime at low stress levels (0.75 and 1.0 GPa) and doubled life at higher stresses (1.5 and 2.0 GPa). The reduced reactivity of the TiC surface with the PFPE lubricant is considered to be the reason for this enhancement. Decreasing lifetime with increasing stress levels correlated well with energy dissipation calculations.

  3. The Effect of Stress and TiC Coated Balls on Lubricant Lifetimes Using a Vacuum Ball-on-Plate Rolling Contact Tribometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Helmick, Larry H.; Nguyen, QuynhGiao; Wheeler, Donald R.; Voving, Hans J.

    1999-01-01

    A vacuum ball-on-plate rolling contact tribometer was used to determine the relative lifetimes of a perfluoropolyether (Krytox 143 AC) on 440C stainless steel. The effect of mean Hertzian stresses (0.75, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 GPa) and the use of TiC coated balls on lubricant lifetime was studied. Other conditions included: approximately 100 rpm, approximately 50 micrograms of lubricant, an initial vacuum level of less than 1.0 x 1O(exp -8) Torr, and room temperature (approximately 23 C). increasing the mean Hertzian stress from 0.75 to 2.0 GPa results in an exponential decrease in lubricant lifetime for both material combinations. However. substituting a TiC ball for the 440C ball quadrupled lifetime at low stress levels (0.75 and 1.0 GPa) and doubled life at higher stresses (1.5 and 2.0 GPa). The reduced reactivity of the TiC surface with the PFPE lubricant is considered to be the reason for this enhancement. Decreasing lifetime with increasing stress levels correlated well with energy dissipation calculations.

  4. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  5. Ready for the Cosmic Ball

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Something appears to be peering through a shiny red mask, in this new false-colored image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The mysterious blue eyes are actually starlight from the cores of two merging galaxies, called NGC 2207 and IC 2163. The mask is the galaxies' dusty spiral arms.

    NGC 2207 and IC 2163 recently met and began a sort of gravitational tango about 40 million years ago. The two galaxies are tugging at each other, stimulating new stars to form. Eventually, this cosmic ball will come to an end, when the galaxies meld into one. The dancing duo is located 140 million light-years away in the Canis Major constellation.

    The Spitzer image reveals that the galactic mask is adorned with strings of pearl-like beads. These dusty clusters of newborn stars, called 'beads on a string' by astronomers, appear as white balls throughout the arms of both galaxies. They were formed when the galaxies first interacted, forcing dust and gas to clump together into colonies of stars.

    This type of beading has been seen before in other galaxies, but it took Spitzer's infrared eyes to identify them in NGC 2207 and IC 2163. Spitzer was able to see the beads because the stars inside heat up surrounding dust, which then radiates with infrared light.

    The biggest bead lighting up the left side of the mask is also the densest. In fact, some of its central stars might have merged to form a black hole. (Now, that would be quite the Mardi Gras mask!)

    This picture, taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera, is a four-channel composite. It shows light with wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue); 4.5 microns (green); and 5.8 and 8.0 microns (red). The contribution from starlight (measured at 3.6 microns) has been subtracted from the 5.8- and 8-micron channels to enhance the visibility of the dust features.

  6. Empirical beam hardening correction (EBHC) for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Meyer, Esther; Prell, Daniel; Kachelriess, Marc

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Due to x-ray beam polychromaticity and scattered radiation, attenuation measurements tend to be underestimated. Cupping and beam hardening artifacts become apparent in the reconstructed CT images. If only one material such as water, for example, is present, these artifacts can be reduced by precorrecting the rawdata. Higher order beam hardening artifacts, as they result when a mixture of materials such as water and bone, or water and bone and iodine is present, require an iterative beam hardening correction where the image is segmented into different materials and those are forward projected to obtain new rawdata. Typically, the forward projection must correctly model the beam polychromaticity and account for all physical effects, including the energy dependence of the assumed materials in the patient, the detector response, and others. We propose a new algorithm that does not require any knowledge about spectra or attenuation coefficients and that does not need to be calibrated. The proposed method corrects beam hardening in single energy CT data. Methods: The only a priori knowledge entering EBHC is the segmentation of the object into different materials. Materials other than water are segmented from the original image, e.g., by using simple thresholding. Then, a (monochromatic) forward projection of these other materials is performed. The measured rawdata and the forward projected material-specific rawdata are monomially combined (e.g., multiplied or squared) and reconstructed to yield a set of correction volumes. These are then linearly combined and added to the original volume. The combination weights are determined to maximize the flatness of the new and corrected volume. EBHC is evaluated using data acquired with a modern cone-beam dual-source spiral CT scanner (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), with a modern dual-source micro-CT scanner (TomoScope Synergy Twin, CT Imaging GmbH, Erlangen, Germany), and with a modern

  7. Performance of hybrid ball bearings in oil and jet fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Stephen M.; Pfaffenberger, Eugene E.

    1992-07-01

    A 308-size hybrid ball bearing, with ceramic balls and steel rings, was tested using a diester oil and gas turbine fuel as lubricants at several speeds and loads. Heat generation data from this test work was then correlated with the heat generation model from a widely used computer code. The ability of this hybrid split inner ring bearing design to endure thrust reversals, which are expected in many turbine applications, was demonstrated. Finally, the bearing was successfully endurance tested in JP-10 fuel for 25 hours at 7560 N axial load and 36,000 rpm. This work has successfully demonstrated the technology necessary to use fuel-lubricated hybrid bearings in limited-life gas turbine engine applications such as missiles, drones, and other unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). In addition, it has provided guidance for use in designing such bearing systems. As a result, the benefits of removing the conventional oil lubricant system, i.e., design simplification and reduced maintenance, can be realized.

  8. Performance of hybrid ball bearings in oil and jet fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Schrader, S.M.; Pfaffenberger, E.E. )

    1992-07-01

    A 308-size hybrid ball bearing, with ceramic balls and steel rings, was tested using a diester oil and gas turbine fuel as lubricants at several speeds and loads. Heat generation data from this test work was then correlated with the heat generation model from a widely used computer code. The ability of this hybrid split inner ring bearing design to endure thrust reversals, which are expected in many turbine applications, was demonstrated. Finally, the bearing was successfully endurance tested in JP-10 fuel for 25 hours at 7560 N axial load and 36,000 rpm. This work has successfully demonstrated the technology necessary to use fuel-lubricated hybrid bearings in limited-life gas turbine engine applications such as missiles, drones, and other unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). In addition, it has provided guidance for use in designing such bearing systems. As a result, the benefits of removing the conventional oil lubricant system, i.e., design simplification and reduced maintenance, can be realized. 6 refs.

  9. Porosity in collapsible Ball Grid Array solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, C.A. |

    1998-05-01

    Ball Grid Array (BGA) technology has taken off in recent years due to the increased need for high interconnect density. Opposite to all the advantages BGA packages offer, porosity in collapsible BGA solder joints is often a major concern in the reliability of such packages. The effect of pores on the strength of collapsible BGA solder-joints was studied by manufacturing samples with different degrees of porosity and testing them under a shear load. It was found that the shear strength of the solder joints decreased in a linear fashion with increasing porosity. Failure occurred by internal necking of the interpore matrix. It was confirmed that entrapment of flux residues leads to porosity by manufacturing fluxless samples in a specially made furnace, and comparing them with samples assembled using flux. Also, contamination of Au electrodeposits (in substrate metallization) was determined to cause significant porosity. It was found that hard-Au (Co hardened Au) electrodeposits produce high degrees of porosity even in the absence of flux. Finally, increasing the time the solder spends in the molten state was proven to successfully decrease porosity.

  10. Grinding Wear Behaviour of Stepped Austempered Ductile Iron as Media Material During Comminution of Iron Ore in Ball Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavendra, H.; Bhat, K. L.; Udupa, K. Rajendra; Hegde, M. M. Rajath

    2011-01-01

    An attempt has been made to evaluate the suitability of austempered ductile iron (ADI) as media material for grinding iron ore in a ball mill. Spheroidal graphite (S.G) iron balls are austenitised at 900° C for 60 minutes and given stepped austempering treatment at 280° C for 30 minutes and 60 minutes followed by 380° C for 60 minutes in each case. These materials are characterised by measuring hardness, analysing X-ray diffraction (X-RD), studying microstructure using optical and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Grinding wear behaviour of these materials was assessed for wear loss in wet condition at different pH value of the mineral slurry and found that the wear rate of grinding media material decreases with increase in pH of the slurry. The wear resistance of ADI balls were compared with forged En31 steel balls and found that the stepped austempered ductile iron is superior to forged En31 steel balls.

  11. Grinding Wear Behaviour of Stepped Austempered Ductile Iron as Media Material During Comminution of Iron Ore in Ball Mills

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavendra, H.; Bhat, K. L.; Udupa, K. Rajendra; Hegde, M. M. Rajath

    2011-01-17

    An attempt has been made to evaluate the suitability of austempered ductile iron (ADI) as media material for grinding iron ore in a ball mill. Spheroidal graphite (S.G) iron balls are austenitised at 900 deg. C for 60 minutes and given stepped austempering treatment at 280 deg. C for 30 minutes and 60 minutes followed by 380 deg. C for 60 minutes in each case. These materials are characterised by measuring hardness, analysing X-ray diffraction (X-RD), studying microstructure using optical and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Grinding wear behaviour of these materials was assessed for wear loss in wet condition at different pH value of the mineral slurry and found that the wear rate of grinding media material decreases with increase in pH of the slurry. The wear resistance of ADI balls were compared with forged En31 steel balls and found that the stepped austempered ductile iron is superior to forged En31 steel balls.

  12. Dolphin underwater bait-balling behaviors in relation to group and prey ball sizes.

    PubMed

    Vaughn-Hirshorn, Robin L; Muzi, Elisa; Richardson, Jessica L; Fox, Gabriella J; Hansen, Lauren N; Salley, Alyce M; Dudzinski, Kathleen M; Würsig, Bernd

    2013-09-01

    We characterized dusky dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) feeding behaviors recorded on underwater video, and related behaviors to variation in prey ball sizes, dolphin group sizes, and study site (Argentina versus New Zealand, NZ). Herding behaviors most often involved dolphins swimming around the side or under prey balls, but dolphins in Argentina more often swam under prey balls (48% of passes) than did dolphins in NZ (34% of passes). This result may have been due to differences in group sizes between sites, since groups are larger in Argentina. Additionally, in NZ, group size was positively correlated with proportion of passes that occurred under prey balls (p<0.001). Prey-capture attempts most often involved capturing fish from the side of prey balls, but dolphins in Argentina more often swam through prey balls (8% of attempts) than did dolphins in NZ (4% of attempts). This result may have been due to differences in prey ball sizes between sites, since dolphins fed on larger prey balls in Argentina (>74m(2)) than in NZ (maximum 33m(2)). Additionally, in NZ, dolphins were more likely to swim through prey balls to capture fish when they fed on larger prey balls (p=0.025).

  13. Numerical simulation of ball-racket impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingpang

    The collision of a ball with a tennis racket is usually modeled in terms of rigid body dynamics or an elastic system involving only a few springs. In this paper, we study the impact between a tennis ball and racket, by modeling the tennis ball in two different yaws. One method models the tennis ball as a Hertz elastic body and the other one models the ball by a more accurate finite element analysis. In the first model, we assume that the elastic properties of the ball obeys Hertz's law. In the finite element model, we consider the tennis ball as a shell witch is a elastic system constructed out of many isotropic small linear flat, elements, witch have both elastic and damping properties. The damping in each way is approximated as viscous term. In both methods, we study the static condition of deformation against a rigid surface before applying these models to dynamical processes. We compare these two methods and eventually determine how the racket parameters effect the performance of the racket, using numerical simulations. Comparison with experiment are show to confirm the general conclusion of the model.

  14. Viscoelastic modelling of tennis ball properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissler, L.; Jones, R.; Leaney, P. G.; Harland, A.

    2010-06-01

    An explicit finite element (FE) tennis ball model which illustrates the effects of the viscoelastic materials of a tennis ball on ball deformation and bounce during normal impacts is presented. A tennis ball is composed of a rubber core and a fabric cover comprised of a wool-nylon mix which exhibit non-linear strain rate properties during high velocity impacts. The rubber core model was developed and validated using low strain rate tensile tests on rubber samples as well as high velocity normal impacts of pressurised cores at velocities ranging from 15 m/s to 50 m/s. The impacts were recorded using a high speed video (HSV) camera to determine deformation, impact time and coefficient of restitution (COR). The material properties of the core model were tuned to match the HSV results. A two component anisotropic fabric model was created which included artificial Rayleigh damping to account for hysteresis effects, and the core model 'tuning' process was used to refine the cloth layer. The ball model's parameters were in good agreement with experimental data at all velocities for both cores and complete balls, and a time sequenced comparison of HSV ball motion and FE model confirmed the validity of the model.

  15. Cricket Ball Aerodynamics: Myth Versus Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.; Koga, Demmis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in the flight of a cricket ball released by a bowler. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can follow a curved flight path that is not always under the control of the bowler. ne basic aerodynamic principles responsible for the nonlinear flight or "swing" of a cricket ball were identified several years ago and many papers have been published on the subject. In the last 20 years or so, several experimental investigations have been conducted on cricket ball swing, which revealed the amount of attainable swing, and the parameters that affect it. A general overview of these findings is presented with emphasis on the concept of late swing and the effects of meteorological conditions on swing. In addition, the relatively new concept of "reverse" swing, how it can be achieved in practice and the role in it of ball "tampering", are discussed in detail. A discussion of the "white" cricket ball used in last year's World Cup, which supposedly possesses different swing properties compared to a conventional red ball, is also presented.

  16. Slurry Erosion Studies on Surface Modified 13Cr-4Ni Steels: Effect of Angle of Impingement and Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manisekaran, T.; Kamaraj, M.; Sharrif, S. M.; Joshi, S. V.

    2007-10-01

    Hydroturbine steels, such as 13Cr-4Ni martensitic steels, are generally subjected to heavy-erosive wear and loss of efficiency due to solid particulate entrainment in the water. Surface-modified steels have proven to give better performance in terms of erosive wear resistance. In the present study, an attempt is made to investigate the effect of angle of impingement and particle size on slurry-jet erosion behavior of pulsed plasma nitrided and laser hardened 13Cr-4Ni steels. Laser hardening process has shown good performance at all angles of impingement due to martensitic transformation of retained austenite. Plastic deformation mode of material removal was also an evident feature of all laser-hardened surface damage locations. However, pulsed-plasma nitrided steels have exhibited chip formation and micro-cutting mode of erosive wear. Erosion with 150-300 μm size was twice compared to 150 μm size slurry particulates.

  17. Mechanical behaviour of TWIP steel under shear loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincze, G.; Butuc, M. C.; Barlat, F.

    2016-08-01

    Twinning induced plasticity steels (TWIP) are very good candidate for automotive industry applications because they potentially offer large energy absorption before failure due to their exceptional strain hardening capability and high strength. However, their behaviour is drastically influenced by the loading conditions. In this work, the mechanical behaviour of a TWIP steel sheet sample was investigated at room temperature under monotonic and reverse simple shear loading. It was shown that all the expected features of load reversal such as Bauschinger effect, transient strain hardening with high rate and permanent softening, depend on the prestrain level. This is in agreement with the fact that these effects, which occur during reloading, are related to the rearrangement of the dislocation structure induced during the predeformation. The homogeneous anisotropic hardening (HAH) approach proposed by Barlat et al. (2011) [1] was successfully employed to predict the experimental results.

  18. Efficient simulation of press hardening process through integrated structural and CFD analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Palaniswamy, Hariharasudhan; Mondalek, Pamela; Wronski, Maciek; Roy, Subir

    2013-12-16

    Press hardened steel parts are being increasingly used in automotive structures for their higher strength to meet safety standards while reducing vehicle weight to improve fuel consumption. However, manufacturing of sheet metal parts by press hardening process to achieve desired properties is extremely challenging as it involves complex interaction of plastic deformation, metallurgical change, thermal distribution, and fluid flow. Numerical simulation is critical for successful design of the process and to understand the interaction among the numerous process parameters to control the press hardening process in order to consistently achieve desired part properties. Until now there has been no integrated commercial software solution that can efficiently model the complete process from forming of the blank, heat transfer between the blank and tool, microstructure evolution in the blank, heat loss from tool to the fluid that flows through water channels in the tools. In this study, a numerical solution based on Altair HyperWorks® product suite involving RADIOSS®, a non-linear finite element based structural analysis solver and AcuSolve®, an incompressible fluid flow solver based on Galerkin Least Square Finite Element Method have been utilized to develop an efficient solution for complete press hardening process design and analysis. RADIOSS is used to handle the plastic deformation, heat transfer between the blank and tool, and microstructure evolution in the blank during cooling. While AcuSolve is used to efficiently model heat loss from tool to the fluid that flows through water channels in the tools. The approach is demonstrated through some case studies.

  19. Efficient simulation of press hardening process through integrated structural and CFD analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniswamy, Hariharasudhan; Mondalek, Pamela; Wronski, Maciek; Roy, Subir

    2013-12-01

    Press hardened steel parts are being increasingly used in automotive structures for their higher strength to meet safety standards while reducing vehicle weight to improve fuel consumption. However, manufacturing of sheet metal parts by press hardening process to achieve desired properties is extremely challenging as it involves complex interaction of plastic deformation, metallurgical change, thermal distribution, and fluid flow. Numerical simulation is critical for successful design of the process and to understand the interaction among the numerous process parameters to control the press hardening process in order to consistently achieve desired part properties. Until now there has been no integrated commercial software solution that can efficiently model the complete process from forming of the blank, heat transfer between the blank and tool, microstructure evolution in the blank, heat loss from tool to the fluid that flows through water channels in the tools. In this study, a numerical solution based on Altair HyperWorks® product suite involving RADIOSS®, a non-linear finite element based structural analysis solver and AcuSolve®, an incompressible fluid flow solver based on Galerkin Least Square Finite Element Method have been utilized to develop an efficient solution for complete press hardening process design and analysis. RADIOSS is used to handle the plastic deformation, heat transfer between the blank and tool, and microstructure evolution in the blank during cooling. While AcuSolve is used to efficiently model heat loss from tool to the fluid that flows through water channels in the tools. The approach is demonstrated through some case studies.

  20. Weldability charts for constructional steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, J. C.; Ashby, M. F.

    2012-02-01

    The weldability of materials is still a poorly understood concept; a quantitative assessment remains elusive. The variables associated with welding are reduced here into two groups - processing parameters and material properties - from which two characteristic indices are defined and used as the basis of weldability charts. For the case of constructional steels, a carbon equivalent characterises both heat affected zone hardenability and the maximum hardness developed after solid state phase transformations. The welding process is characterised by its energy input. A mathematical model is used to establish relationships between the indices, which are displayed on charts as contours of microstructure and hardness.

  1. Designing Hollow Nano Gold Golf Balls

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hollow/porous nanoparticles, including nanocarriers, nanoshells, and mesoporous materials have applications in catalysis, photonics, biosensing, and delivery of theranostic agents. Using a hierarchical template synthesis scheme, we have synthesized a nanocarrier mimicking a golf ball, consisting of (i) solid silica core with a pitted gold surface and (ii) a hollow/porous gold shell without silica. The template consisted of 100 nm polystyrene beads attached to a larger silica core. Selective gold plating of the core followed by removal of the polystyrene beads produced a golf ball-like nanostructure with 100 nm pits. Dissolution of the silica core produced a hollow/porous golf ball-like nanostructure. PMID:24937196

  2. Horizontal stability of a bouncing ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBennett, Brendan G.; Harris, Daniel M.

    2016-09-01

    We present an investigation of a partially elastic ball bouncing on a vertically vibrated concave parabolic surface in two dimensions. In particular, we demonstrate that simple vertical motion, wherein the ball bounces periodically at the parabola's vertex, is unstable to horizontal perturbations when the parabolic coefficient defining the surface shape exceeds a critical value. The result is a new periodic solution where the ball bounces laterally over the vertex. As the parabola is further steepened, this new solution also becomes unstable which gives rise to other complex periodic and chaotic bouncing states, all characterized by persistent lateral motion.

  3. Different Techniques For Producing Precision Holes (>20 mm) In Hardened Steel—Comparative Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, R. T.; Tanikawa, S. T.

    2009-11-01

    High speed machining (HSM), or high performance machining, has been one of the most recent technological advances. When applied to milling operations, using adequate machines, CAM programs and tooling, it allows cutting hardened steels, which was not feasible just a couple of years ago. The use of very stiff and precision machines has created the possibilities of machining holes in hardened steels, such as AISI H13 with 48-50 HRC, using helical interpolations, for example. Such process is particularly useful for holes with diameter bigger than normal solid carbide drills commercially available, around 20 mm, or higher. Such holes may need narrow tolerances, fine surface finishing, which can be obtained just by end milling operations. The present work compares some of the strategies used to obtain such holes by end milling, and also some techniques employed to finish them, by milling, boring and also by fine grinding at the same machine. Results indicate that it is possible to obtain holes with less than 0.36 m in circularity, 7.41 m in cylindricity and 0.12 m in surface roughness Ra. Additionally, there is less possibilities of obtaining heat affected layers when using such technique.

  4. Constitutive modelling of evolving flow anisotropy including distortional hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Pietryga, Michael P.; Vladimirov, Ivaylo N.; Reese, Stefanie

    2011-05-04

    The paper presents a new constitutive model for anisotropic metal plasticity that takes into account the expansion or contraction (isotropic hardening), translation (kinematic hardening) and change of shape (distortional hardening) of the yield surface. The experimentally observed region of high curvature ('nose') on the yield surface in the loading direction and flattened shape in the reverse loading direction are modelled here by means of the concept of directional distortional hardening. The modelling of directional distortional hardening is accomplished by means of an evolving fourth-order tensor. The applicability of the model is illustrated by fitting experimental subsequent yield surfaces at finite plastic deformation. Comparisons with test data for aluminium low and high work hardening alloys display a good agreement between the simulation results and the experimental data.

  5. Specialized induction machines for deep surface and surface hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Andryushchenko, V.T.

    1988-01-01

    Designs of specialized hardening equipment for electrothermal hardening of parts using induction heating are described. These designs include induction machines for deep surface hardening of truck axle shafts, the outer and inner rings of railroad car axle roller bearings, camshafts, axle parts, and the side members of truck frames. This study and others help develop and transmit the technology for producing and introducing specialized induction machines which are effective in heat treatment of heavily loaded machine parts and consume less amounts of metal.

  6. Enabling Strain Hardening Simulations with Dislocation Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenlis, A; Cai, W

    2006-12-20

    Numerical algorithms for discrete dislocation dynamics simulations are investigated for the purpose of enabling strain hardening simulations of single crystals on massively parallel computers. The algorithms investigated include the /(N) calculation of forces, the equations of motion, time integration, adaptive mesh refinement, the treatment of dislocation core reactions, and the dynamic distribution of work on parallel computers. A simulation integrating all of these algorithmic elements using the Parallel Dislocation Simulator (ParaDiS) code is performed to understand their behavior in concert, and evaluate the overall numerical performance of dislocation dynamics simulations and their ability to accumulate percents of plastic strain.

  7. Expecting the Unexpected: Radiation Hardened Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penix, John; Mehlitz, Peter C.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation induced Single Event Effects (SEEs) are a serious problem for spacecraft flight software, potentially leading to a complete loss of mission. Conventional risk mitigation has been focused on hardware, leading to slow, expensive and outdated on-board computing devices, increased power consumption and launch mass. Our approach is to look at SEEs from a software perspective, and to explicitly design flight software so that it can detect and correct the majority of SEES. Radiation hardened flight software will reduce the significant residual residual risk for critical missions and flight phases, and enable more use of inexpensive and fast COTS hardware.

  8. Technology Developments in Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Howell, Joe T.

    2008-01-01

    The Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project consists of a series of tasks designed to develop and mature a broad spectrum of radiation hardened and low temperature electronics technologies. Three approaches are being taken to address radiation hardening: improved material hardness, design techniques to improve radiation tolerance, and software methods to improve radiation tolerance. Within these approaches various technology products are being addressed including Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), Field Programmable Analog Arrays (FPAA), MEMS, Serial Processors, Reconfigurable Processors, and Parallel Processors. In addition to radiation hardening, low temperature extremes are addressed with a focus on material and design approaches. System level applications for the RHESE technology products are discussed.

  9. Production of Ball-Lightning-Like Luminous Balls by Electrical Discharges in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, Gerson Silva; Pavão, Antonio Carlos; Alpes de Vasconcelos, Elder; Mendes, Odim, Jr.; Felisberto da Silva, Eronides, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    We performed electric arc discharges in pure Si to generate luminous balls with lifetime in the order of seconds and several properties usually reported for natural ball lightning. This simple experiment does not rely on energy sources and excitation mechanisms that are improbable in the natural phenomenon and clearly demonstrates the role of vaporization and oxidation of Si, as proposed by the Abrahamson-Dinniss theory for ball-lightning formation.

  10. Production of ball-lightning-like luminous balls by electrical discharges in silicon.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Gerson Silva; Pavão, Antonio Carlos; Alpes de Vasconcelos, Elder; Mendes, Odim; da Silva, Eronides Felisberto

    2007-01-26

    We performed electric arc discharges in pure Si to generate luminous balls with lifetime in the order of seconds and several properties usually reported for natural ball lightning. This simple experiment does not rely on energy sources and excitation mechanisms that are improbable in the natural phenomenon and clearly demonstrates the role of vaporization and oxidation of Si, as proposed by the Abrahamson-Dinniss theory for ball-lightning formation.

  11. Production of ball-lightning-like luminous balls by electrical discharges in silicon.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Gerson Silva; Pavão, Antonio Carlos; Alpes de Vasconcelos, Elder; Mendes, Odim; da Silva, Eronides Felisberto

    2007-01-26

    We performed electric arc discharges in pure Si to generate luminous balls with lifetime in the order of seconds and several properties usually reported for natural ball lightning. This simple experiment does not rely on energy sources and excitation mechanisms that are improbable in the natural phenomenon and clearly demonstrates the role of vaporization and oxidation of Si, as proposed by the Abrahamson-Dinniss theory for ball-lightning formation. PMID:17358820

  12. Flexible timing of eye movements when catching a ball.

    PubMed

    López-Moliner, Joan; Brenner, Eli

    2016-01-01

    In ball games, one cannot direct ones gaze at the ball all the time because one must also judge other aspects of the game, such as other players' positions. We wanted to know whether there are times at which obtaining information about the ball is particularly beneficial for catching it. We recently found that people could catch successfully if they saw any part of the ball's flight except the very end, when sensory-motor delays make it impossible to use new information. Nevertheless, there may be a preferred time to see the ball. We examined when six catchers would choose to look at the ball if they had to both catch the ball and find out what to do with it while the ball was approaching. A catcher and a thrower continuously threw a ball back and forth. We recorded their hand movements, the catcher's eye movements, and the ball's path. While the ball was approaching the catcher, information was provided on a screen about how the catcher should throw the ball back to the thrower (its peak height). This information disappeared just before the catcher caught the ball. Initially there was a slight tendency to look at the ball before looking at the screen but, later, most catchers tended to look at the screen before looking at the ball. Rather than being particularly eager to see the ball at a certain time, people appear to adjust their eye movements to the combined requirements of the task.

  13. Flexible timing of eye movements when catching a ball.

    PubMed

    López-Moliner, Joan; Brenner, Eli

    2016-01-01

    In ball games, one cannot direct ones gaze at the ball all the time because one must also judge other aspects of the game, such as other players' positions. We wanted to know whether there are times at which obtaining information about the ball is particularly beneficial for catching it. We recently found that people could catch successfully if they saw any part of the ball's flight except the very end, when sensory-motor delays make it impossible to use new information. Nevertheless, there may be a preferred time to see the ball. We examined when six catchers would choose to look at the ball if they had to both catch the ball and find out what to do with it while the ball was approaching. A catcher and a thrower continuously threw a ball back and forth. We recorded their hand movements, the catcher's eye movements, and the ball's path. While the ball was approaching the catcher, information was provided on a screen about how the catcher should throw the ball back to the thrower (its peak height). This information disappeared just before the catcher caught the ball. Initially there was a slight tendency to look at the ball before looking at the screen but, later, most catchers tended to look at the screen before looking at the ball. Rather than being particularly eager to see the ball at a certain time, people appear to adjust their eye movements to the combined requirements of the task. PMID:26982371

  14. Hydrogen compatibility handbook for stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    This handbook compiles data on the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of stainless steels and discusses this data within the context of current understanding of hydrogen compatibility of metals. All of the tabulated data derives from continuing studies of hydrogen effects on materials that have been conducted at the Savannah River Laboratory over the past fifteen years. Supplementary data from other sources are included in the discussion. Austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation hardenable stainless steels have been studied. Damage caused by helium generated from decay of tritium is a distinctive effect that occurs in addition to the hydrogen isotopes protium and deuterium. The handbook defines the scope of our current knowledge of hydrogen effects in stainless steels and serves as a guide to selection of stainless steels for service in hydrogen.

  15. Improve pumping efficiency with PSZ ceramic balls

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, J. )

    1989-04-01

    partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) ceramic balls used today in downhole pumps improve both the efficiency and run time of sucker rod pumping systems. Recent field tests showed the balls increased the average run time of downhole pumps by 440%. While there are other types of stabilizers, only magnesia PSZ is appropriate for downhole pumps. The more commonly found alloy balls and carbide balls have been found to deform and not seal under these conditions. PSZ is most notable for its resistance to breaking from impact. A nonductile material, it will make a perfect seal on the seat despite any impact, enhancing its use in fluid pound situations. Other PSZ applications in downhole pumps and related equipment include plunger inserts, discharge inserts, plunger rings, choke parts, pressure relief valve components, and triplex pump plungers.

  16. Laryngeal Fracture Caused by a Lacrosse Ball.

    PubMed

    Trinidade, Aaron; Shakeel, Muhammad; Stickle, Brian; Ah-See, Kim W

    2015-11-01

    Neck injuries in lacrosse are rare and mostly involve the musculoskeletal system. The lacrosse ball is a solid rubber ball of approximately 20 cm in diameter and the fastest shot recorded in professional lacrosse is over 100 mph. Despite wearing full protection, the neck remains prone to blunt trauma by this ball. A 23-year man sustained a direct blow to his left neck by a lacrosse ball during play, resulting in immediate aphonia and stridor. CT scan confirmed a left thyroid lamina fracture. The patient was treated conservatively and his airway was monitored for 24 hours. He made a full recovery. It is important that lacrosse players should be aware of this potential injury and appropriate precautions should be taken to avoid this trauma.

  17. Laryngeal Fracture Caused by a Lacrosse Ball.

    PubMed

    Trinidade, Aaron; Shakeel, Muhammad; Stickle, Brian; Ah-See, Kim W

    2015-11-01

    Neck injuries in lacrosse are rare and mostly involve the musculoskeletal system. The lacrosse ball is a solid rubber ball of approximately 20 cm in diameter and the fastest shot recorded in professional lacrosse is over 100 mph. Despite wearing full protection, the neck remains prone to blunt trauma by this ball. A 23-year man sustained a direct blow to his left neck by a lacrosse ball during play, resulting in immediate aphonia and stridor. CT scan confirmed a left thyroid lamina fracture. The patient was treated conservatively and his airway was monitored for 24 hours. He made a full recovery. It is important that lacrosse players should be aware of this potential injury and appropriate precautions should be taken to avoid this trauma. PMID:26577976

  18. Reexamination of Ball-Race Conformity Effects on Ball Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.; Root, Lawrence E.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis in this report considers the life of the ball set as well as the respective lives of the races to reassess the effect of ball-race conformity on ball bearing life. The related changes in ball bearing life are incorporated in life factors that can be used to modify the bearing predicted life using the Lundberg-Palmgren equations and the ANSI/ABMA and ISO Standards. Two simple algebraic relationships were established to calculate life factors LF(sub c) to determine the effect of inner- and outer-race conformity combinations on bearing L(sub 10) life for deepgroove and angular-contact ball bearings, respectively. Depending on the bearing type and series as well as conformity combinations, the calculated life for deep-groove ball bearings can be over 40 percent less than that calculated by the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. For angular-contact ball bearings, the life can vary between +16 and -39 percent from that calculated by the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. Comparing the two ball bearing types, the life factors LF(sub c) for the deep-groove bearings can be as much as 40 percent lower than that for angular-contact ball bearings.

  19. The characterization of Vicker`s microhardness indentations and pile-up profiles as a strain-hardening microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, C. Jr.; Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.; Schroeter, B.; Klinginsmith, D.; Yamamoto, T.

    1998-04-01

    Microhardness measurements have long been used to examine strength properties and changes in strength properties in metals, for example, as induced by irradiation. Microhardness affords a relatively simple test that can be applied to very small volumes of material. Microhardness is nominally related to the flow stress of the material at a fixed level of plastic strain. Further, the geometry of the pile-up of material around the indentation is related to the strain-hardening behavior of a material; steeper pile-ups correspond to smaller strain-hardening rates. In this study the relationship between pile-up profiles and strain hardening is examined using both experimental and analytical methods. Vickers microhardness tests have been performed on a variety of metal alloys including low alloy, high Cr and austenitic stainless steels. The pile-up topology around the indentations has been quantified using confocal microscopy techniques. In addition, the indentation and pile-up geometry has been simulated using finite element method techniques. These results have been used to develop an improved quantification of the relationship between the pile-up geometry and the strain-hardening constitutive behavior of the test material.

  20. Bouncing ball problem: numerical behavior characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macau, E. E. N.; Carneiro, M. V.; Barroso, J. J.

    2010-09-01

    This paper gives an overview of the simple yet fundamental bouncing ball problem, which consists of a ball bouncing vertically on a sinusoidally vibrating table under the action of gravity. The dynamics is modeled on the basis of a discrete map of difference equations, which numerically solved fully reveals a rich variety of nonlinear behaviors, encompassing irregular non-periodic orbits, subharmonic and chaotic motions, chattering mechanisms, and also unbounded non-periodic orbits.

  1. Gravitational waves from Q-ball formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Kamada, Kohei; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2010-04-15

    We study the detectability of the gravitational waves (GWs) from the Q-ball formation associated with the Affleck-Dine (AD) mechanism, taking into account both the dilution effects due to Q-ball domination and to finite temperature. The AD mechanism predicts the formation of nontopological solitons, Q-balls, from which GWs are generated. Q-balls with large conserved charge Q can produce a large amount of GWs. On the other hand, the decay rate of such Q-balls is so small that they may dominate the energy density of the Universe, which implies that GWs are significantly diluted and that their frequencies are redshifted during the Q-ball dominated era. Thus, the detectability of the GWs associated with the formation of Q-balls is determined by these two competing effects. We find that there is a finite but small parameter region where such GWs may be detected by future detectors such as DECIGO or BBO, only in the case when the thermal logarithmic potential dominates the potential of the AD field. Otherwise GWs from Q-balls would not be detectable even by these futuristic detectors: {Omega}{sub GW}{sup 0}<10{sup -21}. Unfortunately, for such parameter region the present baryon asymmetry of the Universe can hardly be explained unless one fine-tunes A-terms in the potential. However the detection of such a GW background may give us an information about the early Universe, for example, it may suggest that the flat directions with B-L=0 are favored.

  2. Fractal aggregates in tennis ball systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, J.; Bandín, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-09-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the images of the cluster of balls, following Forrest and Witten's pioneering studies on the aggregation of smoke particles, to estimate their fractal dimension.

  3. Effects of bushings characteristics on suspension ball joint travels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaobo

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, a short-long arm type front suspension is represented using multi-body dynamics model established with ADAMS®, where the suspension bushings modelled as linear and nonlinear elements, respectively, are integrated with a flexible cradle and other suspension components. A ball joint travel, defined as the angular displacement between the two parts connected with the ball joint, is calculated, where the measured wheel loads and spindle accelerations from a proving ground severe durability test schedule serve as the input data. The ball joints considered in this study include lower ball joints, upper ball joints, outer tierod ball joints, and inner tierod ball joints. The results clearly illustrate that the bushing stiffness and nonlinearity are important for an accurate prediction of ball joint travels and the ball joint travel sensitivities to considered design variables are important for engineers to understand and ensure reliable designs of ball joints.

  4. 76 FR 78882 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Affirmative Preliminary Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... FR 65945 (October 29, 2002) (Wire Rod Order). DATES: Effective Date: December 20, 2011. FOR FURTHER... Order, 76 FR 33218 (June 8, 2011) (Initiation). On July 22, 2011, Deacero submitted its response to the...; (c) high nickel steel; (d) ball bearing steel; and (e) concrete reinforcing bars and rods....

  5. Hardened Client Platforms for Secure Internet Banking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchi, C.; Zakhidov, S.

    We review the security of e-banking platforms with particular attention to the exploitable attack vectors of three main attack categories: Man-in-the-Middle, Man-in-the-PC and Man-in-the-Browser. It will be shown that the most serious threats come from combination attacks capable of hacking any transaction without the need to control the authentication process. Using this approach, the security of any authentication system can be bypassed, including those using SecureID Tokens, OTP Tokens, Biometric Sensors and Smart Cards. We will describe and compare two recently proposed e-banking platforms, the ZTIC and the USPD, both of which are based on the use of dedicated client devices, but with diverging approaches with respect to the need of hardening the Web client application. It will be shown that the use of a Hardened Browser (or H-Browser) component is critical to force attackers to employ complex and expensive techniques and to reduce the strength and variety of social engineering attacks down to physiological fraud levels.

  6. Hardness variability in commercial and hardened technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Winokur, P.S.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Sexton, F.W.; Roeske, S.B.; Knoll, M.G.

    1994-03-01

    Over the past 10 years, there have been a number of advances in methods to assess and assure the radiation hardness of microelectronics in military and space applications. At the forefront of these is the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology, in which the hardness of product is ``built-in`` through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to varying radiation scenarios. At the same time, there has been renewed interest in the use of commercial technology -- with its enhanced performance, reduced cost, and higher reliability -- in military and space systems. In this paper, we initially demonstrate the application of QML techniques to assure and control the radiation response of hardened technologies. Through several examples, we demonstrate intra-die, wafer-to-wafer, and lot-to-lot variations in a hardened technology. We observe 10 to 30% variations in key technology parameters that result from variability in geometry, process, and design layout. Radiation-induced degradation is seen to mirror preirradiation characteristics. We then evaluate commercial technologies and report considerably higher variability in radiation hardness, i.e., variations by a factor of two to five. This variability is shown to arise from a lack of control of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, which a commercial manufacturer has no interest in controlling in a normal process flow.

  7. Hardness variability in commercial and hardened technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaneyfelt, M. R.; Winokur, P. S.; Meisenheimer, T. L.; Sexton, F. W.; Roeske, S. B.; Knoll, M. G.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, there have been a number of advances in methods to assess and assure the radiation hardness of microelectronics in military and space applications. At the forefront of these is the Qualified Manufacturers List (QML) methodology, in which the hardness of product is 'built-in' through statistical process control (SPC) of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, test structure to integrated circuit (IC) correlations, and techniques for extrapolating laboratory test results to varying radiation scenarios. At the same time, there has been renewed interest in the use of commercial technology -- with its enhanced performance, reduced cost, and higher reliability -- in military and space systems. In this paper, we initially demonstrate the application of QML techniques to assure and control the radiation response of hardened technologies. Through several examples, we demonstrate intra-die, wafer-to-wafer, and lot-to-lot variations in a hardened technology. We observe 10 to 30% variations in key technology parameters that result from variability in geometry, process, and design layout. Radiation-induced degradation is seen to mirror preirradiation characteristics. We then evaluate commercial technologies and report considerably higher variability in radiation hardness, i.e., variations by a factor of two to five. This variability is shown to arise from a lack of control of technology parameters relevant to the radiation response, which a commercial manufacturer has no interest in controlling in a normal process flow.

  8. The ball SITE sign: Ball sports-induced targetoid erythema in a racquetball player

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous injury following impact of a high velocity ball to the skin may result in either erythema or purpura or both. The lesion typically appears as an annular ring of erythema with or without accompanying ecchymosis when the skin is contacted by a paintball, a ping pong ball, a racquetball or a squash ball. Purpose: To describe a girl with targetoid erythema following impact of a racquetball on her flank and back and to review other sports associated with this response to skin injury. Methods: PubMed was used to search the following terms, separately and in combination: ball, erythema, paint, ping pong, purpura, racquetball, sign, site, sports, squash, targetoid. All papers were reviewed and relevant manuscripts, along with their reference citations, were evaluated. Results: A 13-year-old girl developed an annular red ring surrounding a central area of normal appearing skin on her right flank and upper back where a racquetball traveling at a high velocity contacted her skin. Similar appearing lesions of targetoid erythema have been described at the cutaneous impact sites of either paintballs, ping pong balls, squash balls; in addition to erythema, purpura may also concurrently appear or subsequently develop at the contact location of the ball with the skin. Conclusions: Targetoid erythema is a pathognomonic cutaneous presentation resulting from the impact of either a paintball, ping pong ball, racquetball or squash ball—that is traveling at a high velocity—with a sport participant’s skin. The ball SITE (sports-induced targetoid erythema) sign is suggested as a unifying nomenclature to designate this unique, ball sport-associated, cutaneous dermatosis in athletes participating in sports in which high velocity impact of the ball with the skin may occur. PMID:26336625

  9. Nonlinear ball chain waveguides for acoustic emission and ultrasound sensing of ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Stephen H.; Huston, Dryver

    2014-03-01

    Harsh-environment acoustic emission and ultrasonic wave sensing applications often benefit from placing the sensor in a remote and more benign physical location, using waveguides to transmit elastic waves between the structural location under test and the transducer. Waveguides are normally designed with linear properties to have high fidelity over broad frequency ranges to minimize distortion - often difficult to achieve in practice. This paper reports on an examination of using nonlinear ball chain waveguides for the transmission of acoustic emission and ultrasonic waves for the monitoring of thermal protection systems undergoing severe heat loading, such as ablation and similar processes. Experiments test the nonlinear propagation of solitary, harmonic and mixed harmonic elastic waves through a copper tube filled with steel and elastomer balls. Mechanical pulses of varying time widths and amplitudes are launched into one end of the ball chain waveguide and observed at the other end in both time and frequency domains. A nonlinear mechanical model describes the motion of the ball chains. Based on the results of these studies it is anticipated that a nonlinear waveguide will be designed, built and tested as a possible replacement for the high-fidelity waveguides presently being using in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch facility for high heat flux thermal protection system testing. The design is intended to accentuate acoustic emission signals of interest, while suppressing other forms elastic wave noise.

  10. KEY COMPARISON: CCL-K5: CMM 1D: Step gauge and ball bars: Final report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusko, Otto; Brown, Nicholas; Thalmann, Rudolf; Arizmendi Reyes, Edgar; Phillips, Steven; Eom, Cheon Il; Shaoxi, Shen; Takatsuji, Toshiyuki; Prieto, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    The results of the CCL key comparison on the calibration of a step gauge and ball bars are reported (CCL-K5). Nine NMIs participated in the comparison. The measured artifacts were a step gauge of 1000 mm length and three ball bars: two made from steel (400 mm and 800 mm in length) and one from Super Invar (800 mm long). The Key Comparison Reference Value (KCRV) for the step gauge was the mean of four laboratories, and the mean of all participants for the ball bars. The data for the step gauge have been analysed into constant and proportional components to reduce the quantity of data and separate out the random variation in measurements from proportional errors which generally have a different cause. All participating NMIs measured the step gauge and were generally in good agreement. Some results revealed problems with this measurement, and as such, helped to improve the measurement procedures of these NMIs for the future. Only a few NMIs delivered data for the ball bars and these results were in good agreement. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCL, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  11. Water Lubrication of Stainless Steel using Reduced Graphene Oxide Coating

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae-Jin; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Lubrication of mechanical systems using water instead of conventional oil lubricants is extremely attractive from the view of resource conservation and environmental protection. However, insufficient film thickness of water due to low viscosity and chemical reaction of water with metallic materials have been a great obstacle in utilization of water as an effective lubricant. Herein, the friction between a 440 C stainless steel (SS) ball and a 440 C stainless steel (SS) plate in water lubrication could be reduced by as much as 6-times by coating the ball with reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The friction coefficient with rGO coated ball in water lubrication was comparable to the value obtained with the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. Moreover, the wear rate of the SS plate slid against the rGO coated ball in water lubrication was 3-times lower than that of the SS plate slid against the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. These results clearly demonstrated that water can be effectively utilized as a lubricant instead of oil to lower the friction and wear of SS components by coating one side with rGO. Implementation of this technology in mechanical systems is expected to aid in significant reduction of environmental pollution caused by the extensive use of oil lubricants. PMID:26593645

  12. Preparation and characterization of nanocrystalline ZrO2-7%Y2O3 powders for thermal barrier coatings by high-energy ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Zhao, Lidong; Schlaefer, Thomas; Warda, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    High-energy ball milling is an effective method to produce nanocrystalline oxides. In this study, a conventional ZrO2-7%Y2O3 spray powder was ball-milled to produce nanocrystalline powders with high levels of crystalline disorders for deposition of thermal barrier coatings. The powder was milled both with 100Cr6 steel balls and with ZrO2-3%Y2O3 ceramic balls as grinding media. The milling time was varied in order to investigate the effect of the milling time on the crystallite size. The powders were investigated in terms of their crystallite sizes and morphologies by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that under given milling conditions the powder was already nanostructured after 40 min milling. The crystallite size decreased significantly with increasing milling time within first 120 min. After that, a further increase of milling time did not lead to a significant reduction of the crystallite size. Ball-milling led to lattice microstrains. Milling with the steel balls resulted in finer nano-sized crystal grains, but caused the contamination of the powder. The nano-sized crystal grains coarsened during the heat-treatment at 1250°C.

  13. Radiation-Hardened Electronics for the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Watson, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    RHESE covers a broad range of technology areas and products. - Radiation Hardened Electronics - High Performance Processing - Reconfigurable Computing - Radiation Environmental Effects Modeling - Low Temperature Radiation Hardened Electronics. RHESE has aligned with currently defined customer needs. RHESE is leveraging/advancing SOA space electronics, not duplicating. - Awareness of radiation-related activities through out government and industry allow advancement rather than duplication of capabilities.

  14. [Hardening of dental tissue by CO2 laser radiation].

    PubMed

    Aboites, V; Díaz, O; Cuevas, F

    1989-03-01

    A study was conducted to test the effects of CO2 laser irradiation on dental tissue. It was found that hardening of the dental tissue occurs. This was observed qualitatively by direct observation and by X-ray radiography. The hardening produced was also quantitatively measured using a hardness-meter on Rockwell scale.

  15. Aerodynamic drag of modern soccer balls.

    PubMed

    Asai, Takeshi; Seo, Kazuya

    2013-12-01

    Soccer balls such as the Adidas Roteiro that have been used in soccer tournaments thus far had 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels. Recently, the Adidas Teamgeist II and Adidas Jabulani, respectively having 14 and 8 panels, have been used at tournaments; the aerodynamic characteristics of these balls have not yet been verified. Now, the Adidas Tango 12, having 32 panels, has been developed for use at tournaments; therefore, it is necessary to understand its aerodynamic characteristics. Through a wind tunnel test and ball trajectory simulations, this study shows that the aerodynamic resistance of the new 32-panel soccer ball is larger in the high-speed region and lower in the middle-speed region than that of the previous 14- and 8-panel balls. The critical Reynolds number of the Roteiro, Teamgeist II, Jabulani, and Tango 12 was ~2.2 × 10(5) (drag coefficient, C d  ≈ 0.12), ~2.8 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.13), ~3.3 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.13), and ~2.4 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.15), respectively. The flight trajectory simulation suggested that the Tango 12, one of the newest soccer balls, has less air resistance in the medium-speed region than the Jabulani and can thus easily acquire large initial velocity in this region. It is considered that the critical Reynolds number of a soccer ball, as considered within the scope of this experiment, depends on the extended total distance of the panel bonds rather than the small designs on the panel surfaces.

  16. Effect of Silicon Nitride Balls and Rollers on Rolling Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Three decades have passed since the introduction of silicon nitride rollers and balls into conventional rolling-element bearings. For a given applied load, the contact (Hertz) stress in a hybrid bearing will be higher than an all-steel rolling-element bearing. The silicon nitride rolling-element life as well as the lives of the steel races were used to determine the resultant bearing life of both hybrid and all-steel bearings. Life factors were determined and reported for hybrid bearings. Under nominal operating speeds, the resultant calculated lives of the deep-groove, angular-contact, and cylindrical roller hybrid bearings with races made of post-1960 bearing steel increased by factors of 3.7, 3.2, and 5.5, respectively, from those calculated using the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. An all-steel bearing under the same load will have a longer life than the equivalent hybrid bearing under the same conditions. Under these conditions, hybrid bearings are predicted to have a lower fatigue life than all-steel bearings by 58 percent for deep-groove bearings, 41 percent for angular-contact bearings, and 28 percent for cylindrical roller bearings.

  17. The hardening phenomenon in irritant contact dermatitis: an interpretative update.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Shannon A; Maibach, Howard I

    2009-03-01

    Irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) is common and poses a significant problem in high-risk populations. In most cases, ICD resolves despite continued exposure in a process known as 'hardening', allowing individuals to continue with their work. Those who cannot clear ICD develop chronic ICD, which is a significant source of emotional, physical, and financial distress for affected individuals. While hardening is well known among labourers and clinicians, its mechanism remains to be elucidated. Much can be learned from the study of self-healing processes like the hardening phenomenon. This overview briefly documents the pathogenesis of ICD, focuses on the latest advances pertaining to the hardening phenomenon in ICD, and then highlights potential avenues of productive research. A better understanding of the 'hardening' process in the skin will hopefully lead to advances for the treatment of ICD.

  18. New analytical approach for neutron beam-hardening correction.

    PubMed

    Hachouf, N; Kharfi, F; Hachouf, M; Boucenna, A

    2016-01-01

    In neutron imaging, the beam-hardening effect has a significant effect on quantitative and qualitative image interpretation. This study aims to propose a linearization method for beam-hardening correction. The proposed method is based on a new analytical approach establishing the attenuation coefficient as a function of neutron energy. Spectrum energy shift due to beam hardening is studied on the basis of Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) simulated data and the analytical data. Good agreement between MCNP and analytical values has been found. Indeed, the beam-hardening effect is well supported in the proposed method. A correction procedure is developed to correct the errors of beam-hardening effect in neutron transmission, and therefore for projection data correction. The effectiveness of this procedure is determined by its application in correcting reconstructed images.

  19. New analytical approach for neutron beam-hardening correction.

    PubMed

    Hachouf, N; Kharfi, F; Hachouf, M; Boucenna, A

    2016-01-01

    In neutron imaging, the beam-hardening effect has a significant effect on quantitative and qualitative image interpretation. This study aims to propose a linearization method for beam-hardening correction. The proposed method is based on a new analytical approach establishing the attenuation coefficient as a function of neutron energy. Spectrum energy shift due to beam hardening is studied on the basis of Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) simulated data and the analytical data. Good agreement between MCNP and analytical values has been found. Indeed, the beam-hardening effect is well supported in the proposed method. A correction procedure is developed to correct the errors of beam-hardening effect in neutron transmission, and therefore for projection data correction. The effectiveness of this procedure is determined by its application in correcting reconstructed images. PMID:26609685

  20. Effect of double vacuum melting and retained austenite on rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5749 bearing steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Hodder, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    AMS 5749 steel combines the tempering, hot hardness, and hardness retention characteristics of AISI M-50 steel with the corrosion and oxidation resistance of AISI 440C stainless steel. The five-ball fatigue tester was used to evaluate the rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5749. Double vacuum melting (vacuum induction melting plus vacuum arc remelting, VIM-VAR) produced AMS 5749 material with a rolling-element fatigue life at least 14 times that of vacuum induction melting alone. The VIM-VAR AMS 5749 steel balls gave lives from 6 to 12 times greater than VIM-VAR AISI M-50 steel balls. The highest level of retained austenite, 14.6 percent, was significantly detrimental to rolling-element fatigue life relative to the intermediate level of 11.1 percent.