Science.gov

Sample records for harli jrgenson ene

  1. The aromatic ene reaction

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dawen; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The ene reaction is a pericyclic process in which an alkene having an allylic hydrogen atom (the ene donor) reacts with a second unsaturated species (the enophile) to form a new product with a transposed π-bond. The aromatic ene reaction, in which the alkene component is embedded in an aromatic ring, has only been reported in a few (four) instances and has proceeded in low yield (≤6%). Here we show efficient aromatic ene reactions in which a thermally generated aryne engages a pendant m-alkylarene substituent to produce a dearomatized isotoluene, itself another versatile but rare reactive intermediate. Our experiments were guided by computational studies that revealed structural features conducive to the aromatic ene process. We proceeded to identify a cascade comprising three reactions: (i) hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (for aryne generation), (ii) intramolecular aromatic ene, and (iii) bimolecular Alder ene. The power of this cascade is evident from the structural complexity of the final products, the considerable scope, and the overall efficiency of these multi-stage, reagent- and byproduct-free, single-pot transformations. PMID:24345944

  2. Safety harness

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, L.W.

    1991-04-08

    A safety harness to be worn by a worker, especially a worker wearing a plastic suit thereunder for protection in a radioactive or chemically hostile environment. The safety harness comprises a torso surrounding portion with at least one horizontal strap for adjustably securing the harness about the torso, two vertical shoulder straps with rings just forward of the of the peak of the shoulders for attaching a life-line and a pair of adjustable leg supporting straps releasibly attachable to the torso surrounding portion. In the event of a fall, the weight of the worker, when his fall is broken and he is suspended from the rings with his body angled slightly back and chest up, will be borne by the portion of the leg straps behind his buttocks rather than between his legs. Furthermore, the supporting straps do not restrict the air supplied through hoses into his suit when so suspended.

  3. Safety harness

    DOEpatents

    Gunter, Larry W.

    1993-01-01

    A safety harness to be worn by a worker, especially a worker wearing a plastic suit thereunder for protection in a radioactive or chemically hostile environment, which safety harness comprises a torso surrounding portion with at least one horizontal strap for adjustably securing the harness about the torso, two vertical shoulder straps with rings just forward of the of the peak of the shoulders for attaching a life-line and a pair of adjustable leg supporting straps releasibly attachable to the torso surrounding portion. In the event of a fall, the weight of the worker, when his fall is broken and he is suspended from the rings with his body angled slightly back and chest up, will be borne by the portion of the leg straps behind his buttocks rather than between his legs. Furthermore, the supporting straps do not restrict the air supplied through hoses into his suit when so suspended.

  4. Harnessing inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2016-09-01

    Living in the era of "big-data" information, we are ubiquitously inundated by overabundances of sizes-non-negative numerical values representing count, score, length, area, volume, duration, mass, energy, etc. Datasets of sizes display numerous types of statistical variability that are commonly quantified either by the standard deviation, or by the Boltzmann-Gibbs-Shannon entropy. The standard deviation measures the sizes' Euclidean divergence from their mean, the Boltzmann-Gibbs-Shannon entropy measures the sizes' informational divergence from the benchmark of pure determinism, and both these gauges are one-dimensional. In this paper we overview a methodology that harnesses inequality in order to quantify statistical variability. The methodology follows a socioeconomic approach of measuring the sizes' inequality-their divergence from the benchmark of pure egalitarianism-and yields frameworks that gauge statistical variability in a multi-dimensional fashion. The aim of this overview is to serve both researchers and practitioners as a crash-introduction to the "harnessing inequality" methodology, and as a crash-manual to the implementation of this methodology.

  5. Computerized Interactive Harness Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billitti, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Computerized interactive harness engineering program inexpensive, interactive system for learning and using engineering approach to interconnection systems. Basically data-base system that stores information as files of individual connectors and handles wiring information in circuit groups stored as records.

  6. Wire harness twisting aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, E. J.; Commadore, C. C.; Ingles, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Long wire bundles twist into uniform spiral harnesses with help of simple apparatus. Wires pass through spacers and through hand-held tool with hole for each wire. Ends are attached to low speed bench motor. As motor turns, operator moves hand tool away forming smooth twists in wires between motor and tool. Technique produces harnesses that generate less radio-frequency interference than do irregularly twisted cables.

  7. NCCS Regression Test Harness

    SciTech Connect

    Tharrington, Arnold N.

    2015-09-09

    The NCCS Regression Test Harness is a software package that provides a framework to perform regression and acceptance testing on NCCS High Performance Computers. The package is written in Python and has only the dependency of a Subversion repository to store the regression tests.

  8. Reliable Wiring Harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, Kenneth C.

    1987-01-01

    New harness for electrical wiring includes plugs that do not loosen from vibration. Ground braids prevented from detaching from connectors and constrained so braids do not open into swollen "birdcage" sections. Spring of stainless steel encircles ground braid. Self-locking connector contains ratchet not only preventing connector from opening, but tightens when vibrated.

  9. Quick-donning backpack harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, D. F., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Harness device permits user to quickly put on or take off load carried in backpack arrangement. It can be attached with one hand; has controlled deformation belt that automatically encircles user upon application of pressure; has rigid shoulder harness elements which move automatically into place; and primary attachment components cannot be displaced while harness is in place.

  10. Harnessing Team Work. Close Call.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Leadership, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Experienced teams competing in multiple adventure activities, several of which involved ropes, kept their harnesses on all day. Safety procedures included an initial check of buckles and harnesses by an instructor, but failed to recognize that participants would remove their harnesses for toilet purposes. Lists other possible safety errors for…

  11. Catalytic Conia-ene and related reactions.

    PubMed

    Hack, Daniel; Blümel, Marcus; Chauhan, Pankaj; Philipps, Arne R; Enders, Dieter

    2015-10-07

    Since its initial inception, the Conia-ene reaction, known as the intramolecular addition of enols to alkynes or alkenes, has experienced a tremendous development and appealing catalytic protocols have emerged. This review fathoms the underlying mechanistic principles rationalizing how substrate design, substrate activation, and the nature of the catalyst work hand in hand for the efficient synthesis of carbocycles and heterocycles at mild reaction conditions. Nowadays, Conia-ene reactions can be found as part of tandem reactions, and the road for asymmetric versions has already been paved. Based on their broad applicability, Conia-ene reactions have turned into a highly appreciated synthetic tool with impressive examples in natural product synthesis reported in recent years.

  12. JWST ISIM Harness Thermal Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobel, Mark; Glazer, Stuart; Tuttle, Jim; Martins, Mario; Ruppel, Sean

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror. Launch is planned for 2013. JWST wl1 be the premier observatory of the next decade serving thousands of astronomers worldwide. The Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) is the unit that will house thc four main JWST instruments. The ISIM enclosure passively cooled to 37 Kelvin and has a tightly managed thermal budget. A significant portion of the ISIM heat load is due to parasitic heat gains from the instrument harnesses. These harnesses provide a thermal path from the Instrument Electronics Control (IEC) to the ISIM. Because of the impact of this load to the ISIM thermal design, understanding the harness parasitic heat gains is critical. To this effect, a thermal test program has been conducted in order to characterize these parasitic loads and verify harness thermal models. Recent parasitic heat loads tests resulted in the addition of a dedicated multiple stage harness radiator. In order for the radiator to efficiently reject heat from the harness, effective thermal contact conductance values for multiple harnesses had to be determined. This presentation will describe the details and the results of this test program.

  13. ENES the European Network for Earth System modelling and its infrastructure projects IS-ENES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmo, Francesca; Joussaume, Sylvie; Parinet, Marie

    2016-04-01

    The scientific community working on climate modelling is organized within the European Network for Earth System modelling (ENES). In the past decade, several European university departments, research centres, meteorological services, computer centres, and industrial partners engaged in the creation of ENES with the purpose of working together and cooperating towards the further development of the network, by signing a Memorandum of Understanding. As of 2015, the consortium counts 47 partners. The climate modelling community, and thus ENES, faces challenges which are both science-driven, i.e. analysing of the full complexity of the Earth System to improve our understanding and prediction of climate changes, and have multi-faceted societal implications, as a better representation of climate change on regional scales leads to improved understanding and prediction of impacts and to the development and provision of climate services. ENES, promoting and endorsing projects and initiatives, helps in developing and evaluating of state-of-the-art climate and Earth system models, facilitates model inter-comparison studies, encourages exchanges of software and model results, and fosters the use of high performance computing facilities dedicated to high-resolution multi-model experiments. ENES brings together public and private partners, integrates countries underrepresented in climate modelling studies, and reaches out to different user communities, thus enhancing European expertise and competitiveness. In this need of sophisticated models, world-class, high-performance computers, and state-of-the-art software solutions to make efficient use of models, data and hardware, a key role is played by the constitution and maintenance of a solid infrastructure, developing and providing services to the different user communities. ENES has investigated the infrastructural needs and has received funding from the EU FP7 program for the IS-ENES (InfraStructure for ENES) phase I and II

  14. Environmental Control Unit Harness Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    Testing four new Environmental Control Unit Harnesses for improved user comfort during SCAPE operations. Phase I, testing in a lab environment, Phase II will continue testing the best candidates in a field environment.

  15. 14 CFR 91.521 - Shoulder harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... combined safety belt and shoulder harnesses that were approved and installed before March 6, 1980, may... belt and shoulder harnesses that were approved and installed before March 6, 1980, may continue to...

  16. Positioning bars for large wire harnesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glessner, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    By tying positioning bars to harness, its configuration can be preserved during transport, thus facilitating installation. Harness can also be showed temporarily by placing hanging hooks on end of bar.

  17. Moving Large Wiring-Harness Boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Samuel D.; Gurman, Isaac

    1990-01-01

    Carrier for wiring-harness fabrication boards enables lone operator to move board easily and safely. Holds harness while operator fabricating, while being stored, and being transported to equipment frame for mounting. When positioned for assembly of wiring harness, board and carrier give operator easy and convenient access to wires and cables, when positioned for transfer of wiring harness to or from storage area, carrier holds board securely while moved by one person.

  18. Microfluidic devices using thiol-ene polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bou, Simon J. M. C.; Ellis, Amanda V.

    2013-12-01

    Here, a new polymeric microfluidic platform using off-stoichiometric thiol-ene (OSTE) polymers was developed. Thiolene polymers were chosen as they afford rapid UV curing, low volume shrinkage and optical transparency for use in microfluidic devices. Three different off-stoichiometric thiol-ene polymers with 30% excess allyl, 50% excess thiol and a 90% excess thiol (OSTE Allyl-30, OSTE-50 and OSTE-90, respectively) were fabricated. Attenuated reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and solid-state cross polarisation-magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy confirmed which functional groups (thiol or allyl) were present in excess in the OSTE polymers. The polymers were shown to have a more hydrophilic surface (water contact angle of 65°+/- 3) compared to polydimethylsiloxane (water contact angle of 105° +/- 5). Testing of the mechanical properties showed the glass transition temperatures to be 15.09 °C, 43.15 °C and, 57.48 °C for OSTE-90, OSTE Allyl-30 and, OSTE-50, respectively. The storage modulus was shown to be less than 10 MPa for the OSTE-90 polymer and approximately 1750 MPa for the OSTE Allyl-30 and OSTE-50 polymers. The polymers were then utilised to fabricate microfluidic devices via soft lithography practices and devices sealed using a one-step UV lamination "click" reaction technique. Finally, gold nanoparticles were used to form gold films on the OSTE-90 and OSTE-50 polymers as potential electrodes. Atomic force microscopy and sheet resistances were used to characterise the films.

  19. Harnessing spin precession with dissipation.

    PubMed

    Crisan, A D; Datta, S; Viennot, J J; Delbecq, M R; Cottet, A; Kontos, T

    2016-01-27

    Non-collinear spin transport is at the heart of spin or magnetization control in spintronics devices. The use of nanoscale conductors exhibiting quantum effects in transport could provide new paths for that purpose. Here we study non-collinear spin transport in a quantum dot. We use a device made out of a single-wall carbon nanotube connected to orthogonal ferromagnetic electrodes. In the spin transport signals, we observe signatures of out of equilibrium spin precession that are electrically tunable through dissipation. This could provide a new path to harness spin precession in nanoscale conductors.

  20. Harnessing spin precession with dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, A. D.; Datta, S.; Viennot, J. J.; Delbecq, M. R.; Cottet, A.; Kontos, T.

    2016-01-01

    Non-collinear spin transport is at the heart of spin or magnetization control in spintronics devices. The use of nanoscale conductors exhibiting quantum effects in transport could provide new paths for that purpose. Here we study non-collinear spin transport in a quantum dot. We use a device made out of a single-wall carbon nanotube connected to orthogonal ferromagnetic electrodes. In the spin transport signals, we observe signatures of out of equilibrium spin precession that are electrically tunable through dissipation. This could provide a new path to harness spin precession in nanoscale conductors.

  1. Oblique view showing western abutment, looking ENE along main line. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view showing western abutment, looking ENE along main line. Septa commuter train in foreground. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Whitford Bridge, Spanning Amtrak tracks at Whitford Road, Whitford, Chester County, PA

  2. Concise Total Synthesis of Lundurines A-C Enabled by Gold Catalysis and a Homodienyl Retro-Ene/Ene Isomerization.

    PubMed

    Kirillova, Mariia S; Muratore, Michael E; Dorel, Ruth; Echavarren, Antonio M

    2016-03-23

    The total synthesis of lundurines A-C has been accomplished in racemic and enantiopure forms in 11-13 and 12-14 steps, respectively, without protection/deprotection of functional groups, by a novel tandem double condensation/Claisen rearrangement, a gold(I)-catalyzed alkyne hydroarylation, a cyclopropanation via formal [3 + 2] cycloaddition/nitrogen extrusion, and a remarkable olefin migration through a vinylcyclopropane retro-ene/ene reaction that streamlines the endgame.

  3. Concise Total Synthesis of Lundurines A–C Enabled by Gold Catalysis and a Homodienyl Retro-Ene/Ene Isomerization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The total synthesis of lundurines A–C has been accomplished in racemic and enantiopure forms in 11–13 and 12–14 steps, respectively, without protection/deprotection of functional groups, by a novel tandem double condensation/Claisen rearrangement, a gold(I)-catalyzed alkyne hydroarylation, a cyclopropanation via formal [3 + 2] cycloaddition/nitrogen extrusion, and a remarkable olefin migration through a vinylcyclopropane retro-ene/ene reaction that streamlines the endgame. PMID:26963149

  4. Spring control of wire harness loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curcio, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    Negator spring control guides wire harness between movable and fixed structure. It prevents electrical wire harness loop from jamming or being severed as wire moves in response to changes in position of aircraft rudder. Spring-loaded coiled cable controls wire loop regardless of rudder movement.

  5. Hexaarylbiimidazoles as Visible Light Thiol–Ene Photoinitiators

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Brian H.; Scott, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to determine if hexaarylbiimidazoles (HABIs) are efficient, visible light-active photoinitiators for thiol–ene systems. We hypothesize that, owing to the reactivity of lophyl radicals with thiols and the necessarily high concentration of thiol in thiol–ene formulations, HABIs will effectively initiate thiol–ene polymerization upon visible light irradiation. Methods UV-vis absorption spectra of photoinitiator solutions were obtained using UV-vis spectroscopy, while EPR spectroscopy was used to confirm radical species generation upon HABI photolysis. Functional group conversions during photopolymerization were monitored using FTIR spectroscopy, and thermomechanical properties were determined using dynamic mechanical analysis. Results The HABI derivatives investigated exhibit less absorptivity than camphorquinone at 469 nm; however, they afford increased sensitivity at this wavelength when compared with bis(2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl)-phenylphosphineoxide. Photolysis of the investigated HABIs affords lophyl radicals. Affixing hydroxyhexyl functional groups to the HABI core significantly improved solubility. Thiol–ene resins formulated with HABI photoinitiators polymerized rapidly upon irradiation with 469 nm. The glass transition temperatures of the thiol–ene resin formulated with a bis(hydroxyhexyl)-functionalized HABI and photopolymerized at room and body temperature were 49.5±0.5°C and 52.2±0.1°C, respectively. Significance Although thiol–enes show promise as continuous phases for composite dental restorative materials, they show poor reactivity with the conventional camphorquinone/tertiary amine photoinitiation system. Conversely, despite their relatively low visible light absorptivity, HABI photoinitiators afford rapid thiol–ene photopolymerization rates. Moreover, minor structural modifications suggest pathways for improved HABI solubility and visible light absorption. PMID:26119702

  6. Fullerenes produced by harnessing sunlight

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Two independent groups of researchers have demonstrated that fullerenes can be produced by harnessing focused sunlight to vaporize carbon. Adapted to a large scale, generation of the carbon-cage molecules in solar furnaces might overcome yield-limiting problems associated with other fullerene production techniques, the researchers suggest. At Rice University, Houston, chemistry professor Richard E. Smalley and graduate students L.P. Felipe Chibante, Andreas Thess, J. Michael Alford, and Michael D. Diener used a parabolic mirror to focus sunlight on a graphite target to produce what appears to be a high yield of fullerenes. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, Colo., Roland R. Pitts, Mary Jane Hale, Carl Bingham, Allan Lewandowski, and David E.King, working in collaboration with Clark L. Fields, a chemistry professor at the University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, used NREL's high-flux solar furnace to produce soot that contains C[sub 60] and C[sub 70]. Papers describing the Rice and NREL results appeared together in last week's Journal of Physical Chemistry (97, 8696 and 8701 (1993)).

  7. The Optical Harness: a light-weight EMI-immune replacement for legacy electrical wiring harnesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Jason B.; Jackson, B. Scott; Trethewey, William

    2006-05-01

    Electrical wiring harnesses have been used to interconnect control and communication equipment in mobile platforms for over a century. Although they have served this function successfully, they have three problems that are inherent in their design: they are mechanically heavy and stiff, and they are prone to electrical faults, including arcing and Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI), and they are difficult to maintain when faults occur. These properties are all aspects of the metallic conductors used to build the harnesses. The Optical Harness TM is a photonic replacement for the legacy electrical wiring harness. The Optical Harness TM uses light-weight optical fiber to replace signal wires in an electrical harness. The original electrical connections to the equipment remain, making the Optical Harness TM a direct replacement for the legacy wiring harness. In the backshell of each connector, the electrical signals are converted to optical, and transported on optical fiber, by a deterministic, redundant and fault-tolerant optical network. The Optical Harness TM: * Provides weight savings of 40-50% and unsurpassed flexibility, relative to legacy signal wiring harnesses; * Carries its signals on optical fiber that is free from arcing, EMI, RFI and susceptibility to HPM weapons; * Is self-monitoring during operation, providing non-intrusive predictive and diagnostic capabilities.

  8. A TCP-Over-UDP Test Harness

    SciTech Connect

    Dunigan, TH

    2002-10-31

    This report describes an implementation of a TCP-like protocol that runs over UDP. This TCP-like implementation, which does not require kernel modifications, provides a test harness for evaluating variations of the TCP transport protocol over the Internet. The test harness provides a tunable and instrumented version of TCP that supports Reno, NewReno, and SACK/FACK. The test harness can also be used to characterize the TCP-performance of a network path. Several case studies illustrate how one can tune the transport protocol to improve performance.

  9. Reactive superhydrophobic surface and its photoinduced disulfide-ene and thiol-ene (bio)functionalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Junsheng; Li, Linxian; Du, Xin; Feng, Wenqian; Welle, Alexander; Trapp, Oliver; Grunze, Michael; Hirtz, Michael; Levkin, Pavel A

    2015-01-14

    Reactive superhydrophobic surfaces are highly promising for biotechnological, analytical, sensor, or diagnostic applications but are difficult to realize due to their chemical inertness. In this communication, we report on a photoactive, inscribable, nonwettable, and transparent surface (PAINTS), prepared by polycondensation of trichlorovinylsilane to form thin transparent reactive porous nanofilament on a solid substrate. The PAINTS shows superhydrophobicity and can be conveniently functionalized with the photoclick thiol-ene reaction. In addition, we show for the first time that the PAINTS bearing vinyl groups can be easily modified with disulfides under UV irradiation. The effect of superhydrophobicity of PAINTS on the formation of high-resolution surface patterns has been investigated. The developed reactive superhydrophobic coating can find applications for surface biofunctionalization using abundant thiol or disulfide bearing biomolecules, such as peptides, proteins, or antibodies.

  10. Efficient curing of vinyl carbonates by thiol-ene polymerization.

    PubMed

    Mautner, Andreas; Qin, Xiaohua; Kapeller, Barbara; Russmueller, Guenter; Koch, Thomas; Stampfl, Juergen; Liska, Robert

    2012-12-13

    Vinyl carbonates have recently been identified as a suitable alternative to (meth)acrylates, especially due to the low irritancy and cytotoxicity of these monomers. The drawback of some vinyl carbonates containing abstractable hydrogens arises through their moderate reactivity compared with acrylates. Within this paper, we use the thiol-ene concept to enhance the photoreactivity of vinyl carbonates to a large extent to reach the level of those of similar acrylates. Mechanical properties of the final thiol-ene polymers were determined by nanoindentation. Furthermore, low toxicity of all components was confirmed by osteoblast cell culture experiments.

  11. Intelligent electrical harness connector assembly using Bell Helicopter Textron's 'Wire Harness Automated Manufacturing System'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, D. W.

    Bell Helicopter Textron, Incorporated (BHTI) installed two Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-11 computers and an American Can Inc. Ink Jet printer in 1980 as the cornerstone of the Wire Harness Automated Manufacturing System (WHAMS). WHAMS is based upon the electrical assembly philosophy of continuous filament harness forming. This installation provided BHTI with a 3 to 1 return-on-investment by reducing wire and cable identification cycle time by 80 percent and harness forming, on dedicated layout tooling, by 40 percent. Yet, this improvement in harness forming created a bottle neck in connector assembly. To remove this bottle neck, BHTI has installed a prototype connector assembly cell that integrates the WHAMS' data base and innovative computer technologies to cut harness connector assembly cycle time. This novel connector assembly cell uses voice recognition, laser identification, and animated computer graphics to help the electrician in the correct assembly of harness connectors.

  12. Harness: The Next Generation Beyond PVM

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, G.A.

    1998-09-05

    Abstract. Harness is the next generation heterogeneous distributed computing package being developed by the PVM team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Tennessee, and Emory University. This paper describes the changing trends in cluster computing and how Harness is being designed to address the future needs of PVM and MPI application developers. Harness (which will support both PVM and MPI) will allow users to dynamically customize, adapt, and extend a virtual machine's features to more closely match the needs of their application and to optimize for the underlying computer resources. This paper will describe the architecture and core services of this new virtual machine paradgm, our progress on this project, and our experiences with early prototypes of Harness.

  13. Distributed Real-Time Computing with Harness

    SciTech Connect

    Di Saverio, Emanuele; Cesati, Marco; Di Biagio, Christian; Pennella, Guido; Engelmann, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Modern parallel and distributed computing solutions are often built onto a ''middleware'' software layer providing a higher and common level of service between computational nodes. Harness is an adaptable, plugin-based middleware framework for parallel and distributed computing. This paper reports recent research and development results of using Harness for real-time distributed computing applications in the context of an industrial environment with the needs to perform several safety critical tasks. The presented work exploits the modular architecture of Harness in conjunction with a lightweight threaded implementation to resolve several real-time issues by adding three new Harness plug-ins to provide a prioritized lightweight execution environment, low latency communication facilities, and local timestamped event logging.

  14. Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Thiol-ene-Based Photopolymerized Networks

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Kathleen M.; Leung, Diana; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2011-01-01

    The thiol-ene reaction serves as a more oxygen tolerant alternative to traditional (meth)acrylate chemistry for forming photopolymerized networks with numerous desirable attributes including energy absorption, optical clarity, and reduced shrinkage stress. However, when utilizing commercially available monomers, many thiol-ene networks also exhibit decreases in properties such as glass transition temperature (Tg) and crosslink density. In this study, hybrid organic/inorganic thiol-ene resins incorporating silsesquioxane (SSQ) species into the photopolymerized networks were investigated as a route to improve these properties. Thiol- and ene-functionalized SSQs (SH-SSQ and allyl-SSQ, respectively) were synthesized via alkoxysilane hydrolysis/condensation chemistry, using a photopolymerizable monomer [either pentaerythriol tetrakis(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP) or 1,3,5-triallyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (TATATO)] as the reaction solvent. The resulting SSQ-containing solutions (SSQ-PETMP and SSQ-TATATO) were characterized, and their incorporation into photopolymerized networks was evaluated. PMID:21984847

  15. 23. (Credit JTL) View looking ENE at west end of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. (Credit JTL) View looking ENE at west end of station. End addition houses chlorination equipment; to extreme right is north end of filter building built in 1942. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  16. Derivatives of cardanol through the ene reaction with diethyl azodicarboxylate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardanol is an alkyl/alkenyl phenolic material obtained from cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), which is a byproduct of cashew nut processing. In an effort to develop new uses, cardanol was derivatized for the first time with diethyl azodicarboxylate (DEAD) through the ene reaction. The reaction was fa...

  17. Fabrication and bonding of thiol-ene-based microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikanen, Tiina M.; Lafleur, Josiane P.; Moilanen, Maria-Elisa; Zhuang, Guisheng; Jensen, Thomas G.; Kutter, Jörg P.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, the bonding strength of microchips fabricated by thiol-ene free-radical polymerization was characterized in detail by varying the monomeric thiol/allyl composition from the stoichiometric ratio (1:1) up to 100% excess of thiol (2:1) or allyl (1:2) functional groups. Four different thiol-ene to thiol-ene bonding combinations were tested by bonding: (i) two stoichiometric layers, (ii) two layers bearing complementary excess of thiols and allyls, (iii) two layers both bearing excess of thiols, or (iv) two layers both bearing excess of allyls. The results showed that the stiffness of the cross-linked polymer plays the most crucial role regarding the bonding strength. The most rigid polymer layers were obtained by using the stoichiometric composition or an excess of allyls, and thus, the bonding combinations (i) and (iv) withstood the highest pressures (up to the cut-off value of 6 bar). On the other hand, excess of thiol monomers yielded more elastic polymer layers and thus decreased the pressure tolerance for bonding combinations (ii) and (iii). By using monomers with more thiol groups (e.g. tetrathiol versus trithiol), a higher cross-linking ratio, and thus, greater stiffness was obtained. Surface characterization by infrared spectroscopy confirmed that the changes in the monomeric thiol/allyl composition were also reflected in the surface chemistry. The flexibility of being able to bond different types of thiol-enes together allows for tuning of the surface chemistry to yield the desired properties for each application. Here, a capillary electrophoresis separation is performed to demonstrate the attractive properties of stoichiometric thiol-ene microchips.

  18. Evidence for distinct dehydrogenase and isomerase sites within a single 3. beta. -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/5-ene-4-ene isomerase protein

    SciTech Connect

    Luu-The, V.; Takahashi, Masakazu; de Launoit, Y.; Dumont, M.; Lachance, Y.; Labrie, F. )

    1991-09-10

    Complementary DNA encoding human 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/5-ene-4-ene isomerase (3-{beta}-HSD) has been expressed in transfected GH{sub 4}C{sub 1} with use of the cytomegalovirus promoter. The activity of the expressed protein clearly shows that both dehydrogenase and isomerase enzymatic activities are present within a single protein. However, such findings do not indicate whether the two activities reside within one or two closely related catalytic sites. With use of ({sup 3}H)-5-androstenedione, the intermediate compound in dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) transformation into 4-androstenedione by 3{beta}-HSD, the present study shows that 4MA (N,N-diethyl-4-methyl-3-oxo-4-aza-5{alpha}-androstane-17{beta}-carboxamide) and its analogues of 5-androstenedione to 4-androstenedione with an approximately 1,000-fold higher K{sub i} value. The present results thus strongly suggest that dehydrogenase and isomerase activities are present at separate sites on the 3-{beta}-HSD protein. Such data suggest that the irreversible step in the transformation of DHEA to 4-androstenedione is due to a separate site possessing isomerase activity that converts the 5-ene-3-keto to a much more stable 4-ene-3-keto configuration.

  19. Syntheses and fully diastereospecific photochromic reactions of thiophenophan-1-enes with chiral bridges.

    PubMed

    Jin-nouchi, Hirotsugu; Takeshita, Michinori

    2012-07-27

    Thiophenophan-1-enes with chiral polyether bridges were prepared and their diastereospecific photochromic reactions were studied. The coupling reaction of substituted dithienylethenes and various chiral synthons afforded thiophenophan-1-enes, namely, bridged dithienylethenes, as single enantiomers without optical resolution, thus indicating that these reactions occurred diastereoselectively. Upon UV irradiation, each optically active thiophenophan-1-ene isomerized to the corresponding enantiomer of the closed form and returned to the initial enantiomer of the open form upon visible irradiation. Because thiophenophan-1-enes never isomerized to other diastereomers even at a high temperature, they underwent diastereospecific photochromic reactions. Large changes were observed in the measurement of the optical rotations of the solutions of thiophenophan-1-enes at 588 nm according to their photochromic reactions. As there was no absorption at this wavelength for both isomers of each thiophenophan-1-enes, the nondestructive readout of the photochromic reaction could be carried out by using these chiral thiophenophan-1-enes.

  20. Thiol–ene click hydrogels for therapeutic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kharkar, Prathamesh M.; Rehmann, Matthew S.; Skeens, Kelsi M.; Maverakis, Emanual; Kloxin, April M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogels are of growing interest for the delivery of therapeutics to specific sites in the body. For use as a delivery vehicle, hydrophilic precursors are usually laden with bioactive moieties and then directly injected to the site of interest for in situ gel formation and controlled release dictated by precursor design. Hydrogels formed by thiol–ene click reactions are attractive for local controlled release of therapeutics owing to their rapid reaction rate and efficiency under mild aqueous conditions, enabling in situ formation of gels with tunable properties often responsive to environmental cues. Herein, we will review the wide range of applications for thiol–ene hydrogels, from the prolonged release of anti-inflammatory drugs in the spine to the release of protein-based therapeutics in response to cell-secreted enzymes, with a focus on their clinical relevance. We will also provide a brief overview of thiol–ene click chemistry and discuss the available alkene chemistries pertinent to macromolecule functionalization and hydrogel formation. These chemistries include functional groups susceptible to Michael type reactions relevant for injection and radically-mediated reactions for greater temporal control of formation at sites of interest using light. Additionally, mechanisms for the encapsulation and controlled release of therapeutic cargoes are reviewed, including i) tuning the mesh size of the hydrogel initially and temporally for cargo entrapment and release and ii) covalent tethering of the cargo with degradable linkers or affinity binding sequences to mediate release. Finally, myriad thiol–ene hydrogels and their specific applications also are discussed to give a sampling of the current and future utilization of this chemistry for delivery of therapeutics, such as small molecule drugs, peptides, and biologics. PMID:28361125

  1. SRB Altitude Switch Assembly Wire Harness Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanche, Jim

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of two wire harness failures that had occurred in Solid Rocket Booster Altitude Switch Assemblies S/N 200001 and S/N 20002. A list of modifications to EDU #4 and modification of qualification units 2000001 and 2000002 are also presented.

  2. Harnessing Collective Knowledge Inherent in Tag Clouds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cress, U.; Held, C.

    2013-01-01

    Tagging systems represent the conceptual knowledge of a community. We experimentally tested whether people harness this collective knowledge when navigating through the Web. As a within-factor we manipulated people's prior knowledge (no knowledge vs. prior knowledge that was congruent/incongruent to the collective knowledge inherent in the tags).…

  3. Harnessing Collaborative Annotations on Online Formative Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jian-Wei; Lai, Yuan-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This paper harnesses collaborative annotations by students as learning feedback on online formative assessments to improve the learning achievements of students. Through the developed Web platform, students can conduct formative assessments, collaboratively annotate, and review historical records in a convenient way, while teachers can generate…

  4. Properties of methacrylate-thiol-ene formulations as dental restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Neil B.; Couch, Charles L.; Schreck, Kathleen M.; Boulden, Jordan E.; Wydra, Robert; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate ternary methacrylate-thiol-ene systems, with varying thiol-ene content and thiol:ene stoichiometry, as dental restorative resin materials. It was hypothesized that an off-stoichiometric thiol-ene component would enhance interactions between the methacrylate and thiol-ene processes to reduce shrinkage stress while maintaining equivalent mechanical properties. Methods Polymerization kinetics and functional group conversions were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Cured resin mechanical properties were evaluated using a three-point flexural test, carried out with a hydraulic universal test system. Polymerization shrinkage stress was measured with a tensometer coupled with simultaneous real-time conversion monitoring. Results The incorporation of thiol-ene mixtures as reactive diluents into conventional dimethacrylate resins previously was shown to combine synergistically advantageous methacrylate mechanical properties with the improved polymerization kinetics and reduced shrinkage stress of thiol-ene systems. In these systems, due to thiol consumption resultant from both the thiol-ene reaction and chain transfer involving the methacrylate polymerization, the optimum thiol:ene stoichiometry deviates from the traditional 1:1 ratio. Increasing the thiol:ene stoichiometry up to 3:1 results in systems with equivalent flexural modulus, 6 – 20 % reduced flexural strength, and 5 – 33 % reduced shrinkage stress relative to 1:1 stoichiometric thiol:ene systems. Significance Due to their improved overall functional group conversion, and shrinkage stress reduction while maintaining equivalent flexural modulus, methacrylate-thiol-ene resins, particularly those with excess thiol, beyond the conventional 1:1 thiol:ene molar ratio, yield superior dental restorative materials compared with purely dimethacrylate resins. PMID:20553973

  5. Oxygen-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerization of Thiol–Ene Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, S.R.; McHardy, N. R.; Scott, T. F.

    2014-01-01

    Materials that solidify in response to an initiation stimulus are currently utilized in several biomedical and surgical applications; however, their clinical adoption would be more widespread with improved physical properties and biocompatibility. One chemistry that is particularly promising is based on the thiol–ene addition reaction, a radical-mediated step-growth polymerization that is resistant to oxygen inhibition and thus is an excellent candidate for materials that polymerize upon exposure to aerobic conditions. Here, thiol–ene-based hydrogels are polymerized by exposing aqueous solutions of multi-functional thiol and allyl ether PEG monomers, in combination with enzymatic radical initiating systems, to air. An initiating system based on glucose oxidase, glucose, and Fe2+ is initially investigated where, in the presence of glucose, the glucose oxidase reduces oxygen to hydrogen peroxide which is then further reduced by Fe2+ to yield hydroxyl radicals capable of initiating thiol–ene polymerization. While this system is shown to effectively initiate polymerization after exposure to oxygen, the polymerization rate does not monotonically increase with raised Fe2+ concentration owing to inhibitory reactions that retard polymerization at higher Fe2+ concentrations. Conversely, replacing the Fe2+ with horseradish peroxidase affords an initiating system is that is not subject to the iron-mediated inhibitory reactions and enables increased polymerization rates to be attained. PMID:24995128

  6. 46 CFR 197.324 - Diver's safety harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.324 Diver's safety harness. Each safety harness used in surface-supplied diving must have— (a) A positive buckling device; and (b) An...

  7. Functional Microcapsules via Thiol-Ene Photopolymerization in Droplet-Based Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Amato, Douglas V; Lee, Hyomin; Werner, Jörg G; Weitz, David A; Patton, Derek L

    2017-02-01

    Thiol-ene chemistry was exploited in droplet-based microfluidics to fabricate advanced microcapsules with tunable encapsulation, degradation, and thermal properties. In addition, by utilizing the thiol-ene photopolymerization with tunable cross-link density, we demonstrate the importance of monomer conversion on the retention of omniphilic cargo in double emulsion templated microcapsules. Furthermore, we highlight the rapid cure kinetics afforded by thiol-ene chemistry in a continuous flow photopatterning device for hemispherical microparticle production.

  8. 42 CFR 84.151 - Harness test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) The arrangement and suitability of all harness accessories and fittings will be considered. (b)(1) The... and suitability of all harness accessories and fittings will be considered. (c) The harness employed... of a simple arrangement for attaching the hose to a part of the wearer's clothing in a...

  9. 42 CFR 84.1138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.1138... Gas Masks § 84.1138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an even...

  10. 42 CFR 84.178 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.178... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.178 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension...

  11. 42 CFR 84.138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.138... Respirators § 84.138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses which are designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use, and...

  12. 42 CFR 84.1138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.1138... Gas Masks § 84.1138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an even...

  13. 42 CFR 84.121 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.121... § 84.121 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses, designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an...

  14. 42 CFR 84.178 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.178... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.178 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension...

  15. 42 CFR 84.138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.138... Respirators § 84.138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses which are designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use, and...

  16. 42 CFR 84.78 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.78 Section...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.78 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate...

  17. 42 CFR 84.178 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.178... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.178 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension...

  18. 42 CFR 84.1138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.1138... Gas Masks § 84.1138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an even...

  19. 42 CFR 84.138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.138... Respirators § 84.138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses which are designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use, and...

  20. 42 CFR 84.201 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.201... Cartridge Respirators § 84.201 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Facepieces for chemical... head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an even...

  1. 42 CFR 84.178 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.178... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.178 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension...

  2. 42 CFR 84.1138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.1138... Gas Masks § 84.1138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an even...

  3. 42 CFR 84.201 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.201... Cartridge Respirators § 84.201 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Facepieces for chemical... head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an even...

  4. 42 CFR 84.138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.138... Respirators § 84.138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses which are designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use, and...

  5. 42 CFR 84.178 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.178... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.178 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension...

  6. 42 CFR 84.121 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.121... § 84.121 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses, designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an...

  7. 42 CFR 84.201 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.201... Cartridge Respirators § 84.201 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Facepieces for chemical... head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an even...

  8. 42 CFR 84.1138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.1138... Gas Masks § 84.1138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an even...

  9. 42 CFR 84.78 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.78 Section...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.78 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate...

  10. 42 CFR 84.201 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.201... Cartridge Respirators § 84.201 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Facepieces for chemical... head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an even...

  11. 42 CFR 84.121 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.121... § 84.121 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses, designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an...

  12. 42 CFR 84.121 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.121... § 84.121 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses, designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an...

  13. 42 CFR 84.78 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.78 Section...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.78 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate...

  14. 42 CFR 84.78 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.78 Section...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.78 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate...

  15. 42 CFR 84.121 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.121... § 84.121 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses, designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an...

  16. 42 CFR 84.201 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.201... Cartridge Respirators § 84.201 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Facepieces for chemical... head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an even...

  17. 42 CFR 84.78 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.78 Section...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.78 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate...

  18. 42 CFR 84.138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.138... Respirators § 84.138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses which are designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use, and...

  19. Harnessing the wisdom of the inner crowd.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Stefan M; Hertwig, Ralph

    2014-10-01

    Ever since Galton's classic demonstration of the wisdom of crowds in estimating the weight of a slaughtered ox, scholars of the mind and the public alike have been fascinated by the counterintuitive accuracy achieved by simply averaging a number of people's estimates. Surprisingly, individuals can, to some extent, harness the wisdom of crowds within the confines of their own mind by averaging self-generated, nonredundant estimates.

  20. Harnessing Light: the study and an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Arthur H.

    2002-05-01

    The completion of the report 'Harnessing Light: Optical Science and Engineering for the 21st Century' by COSE (Committee on Optical Science and Engineering) by the National Academy in 1998 has had a profound effect on optics related activities and the recognition of optics as a most pervasive and enabling field of technology. After a brief summary of the report - an update on its principal recommendations and other significant U.S. and global activities will be highlighted.

  1. Manufacturing and quality control of FCC harnesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malohm, W. L.; Vandergriff, J.

    1972-01-01

    The Saturn 5 program contractors encountered many technological challenges and problems relative to inter-connecting wiring and cabling during the development stages of the Saturn program. The knowledge gained from solving these problems, plus recently developed state-of-the-art techniques, materials, and processes were documented in a report prepared for NASA/MSFC. The portions of that report which deal with FCC harnesses are presented.

  2. Behavior of sandhill cranes harnessed with different satellite transmitters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Ellis, D.H.; Landfried, S.E.; Miller, L.H.; Klugman, S.S.; Fuller, M.R.; Vermillion, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of various attachment methods and designs of platform transmitting terminals (PTT's) was tested on captive sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland, during 1989-91. Combinations of attachment and transmitter designs included neoprene cord harness with batteries separate from the transmitter (2 harness designs), Teflon ribbon harness with batteries incorporated into the transmitter package (4 transmitter models), and a package attached directly to the bird with epoxy glue only. Physical effects seen on cranes wearing PTT's ranged from skin lacerations (caused by rubbing of harness material) to no observed effects (other than feather wear). The most successful harness material and design utilized a Teflon ribbon harness with the 4 ribbon ends from the transmitter forming a neck loop and a body loop joined at the sternum. Time spent by sandhill cranes performing most activities did not change after transmitter attachment using this harness method.

  3. Functional Conducting Polymers via Thiol-ene Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Kathleen E.; Martin, David C.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate here that thiol-ene chemistry can be used to provide side-chain functionalized monomers based on 3,4-propylenedioxythiophene (ProDOT) containing ionic, neutral, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic side chains. All reactions gave high yields and purification could generally be accomplished through precipitation. These monomers were polymerized either chemically or electro-chemically to give soluble materials or conductive films, respectively. This strategy provides for facile tuning of the solubility, film surface chemistry, and film morphology of this class of conducting polymers. PMID:25585932

  4. Biotransformation of 7alpha-hydroxy- and 7-oxo-ent-atis-16-ene derivatives by the fungus Gibberella fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Braulio M; Gonzalez, Pedro; Gonzalez-Vallejo, Victoria; Guillermo, Ricardo; Diaz, Luz N

    2010-08-01

    The microbiological transformation of 7alpha,19-dihydroxy-ent-atis-16-ene by the fungus Gibberella fujikuroi gave 19-hydroxy-7-oxo-ent-atis-16-ene, 13(R),19-dihydroxy-7-oxo-ent-atis-16-ene, 7alpha,11beta,19-trihydroxy-ent-atis-16-ene and 7alpha,16beta,19-trihydroxy-ent-atis-16-ene, while the incubation of 19-hydroxy-7-oxo-ent-atis-16-ene afforded 13(R),19-dihydroxy-7-oxo-ent-atis-16-ene and 16beta,17-dihydroxy-7-oxo-ent-atisan-19-al. The biotransformation of 7-oxo-ent-atis-16-en-19-oic acid gave 6beta-hydroxy-7-oxo-ent-atis-16-en-19-oic acid, 6beta,16beta,17-trihydroxy-7-oxo-19-nor-ent-atis-4(18)-ene and 3beta,7alpha-dihydroxy-6-oxo-ent-atis-16-en-19-oic acid.

  5. Stereochemistry of bistricyclic aromatic enes and related polycyclic systems.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, P Ulrich; Agranat, Israel

    2014-01-01

    Bistricyclic aromatic enes (BAEs) and related polycyclic systems are a class of molecular materials that display a rich variety of conformations, dynamic stereochemistry and switchable chirality, color, and spectroscopic properties. This is due to the a subtle interplay of the inherent preference for planarity of aromatic systems and the competing necessity of non-planarity due to intramolecular overcrowding in the fjord regions built into the general molecular structure of BAEs. The conformational, dynamic, and spectroscopic properties may be designed and fine-tuned, e.g., by variation of the bridging groups X and Y, the overcrowding in the fjord regions, extensions of the aromatic system, or other modifications of the general BAE structure, based on the fundamental understanding of the structure-property relationships (SPR). The present review provides an analysis of the conformational spaces and the dynamic stereochemistry of overcrowded bistricyclic aromatic enes applying fundamental symmetry considerations. The symmetry analysis presented here allows deeper insight into the conformations, chirality, and the mechanisms of the dynamic stereochemistry, and will be instrumental in future computational studies.

  6. Sizing and fit of fall-protection harnesses.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hongwei; Bradtmiller, Bruce; Whitestone, Jennifer

    2003-10-10

    Full-body fall-protection harnesses have been a critical work-practice control technology for reducing the number of fall-related injuries and fatalities among construction workers; yet, very little is known about the fit of these harnesses to the population that wears them. This study evaluated the fit and sizing efficacy of a harness system. Seventy-two male and 26 female construction workers participated in the study. Their body size-and-shape information was measured while they were suspended (with a harness) and standing (with and without a harness), using a 3-D full-body laser scanner and traditional anthropometric calipers. Fisher's discriminant analysis results did not point to the need for a change in the current sizing selection scheme by body height and weight for end users. However, an integrated redesign of harness components is needed because 40% of subjects did not pass fit-performance criteria in either the standing or suspended condition. A multivariate accommodation analysis has identified 15 representative body models for the 'standard-size' harness design. These models can serve as a useful population to test harness design until a larger survey of the nation's construction workers can be done. Finally, further developments in 3-D shape quantification methods are recommended to improve the harness design process; the point-to-point anthropometric information currently used seems to be insufficient for harness design.

  7. Rapid photochemical surface patterning of proteins in thiol-ene based microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Lafleur, Josiane P; Kwapiszewski, Radoslaw; Jensen, Thomas G; Kutter, Jörg P

    2013-02-21

    The suitable optical properties of thiol-ene polymers combined with the ease of modifying their surface for the attachment of recognition molecules make them ideal candidates in many biochip applications. This paper reports the rapid one-step photochemical surface patterning of biomolecules in microfluidic thiol-ene chips. This work focuses on thiol-ene substrates featuring an excess of thiol groups at their surface. The thiol-ene stoichiometric composition can be varied to precisely control the number of surface thiol groups available for surface modification up to an average surface density of 136 ± 17 SH nm(-2). Biotin alkyne was patterned directly inside thiol-ene microchannels prior to conjugation with fluorescently labelled streptavidin. The surface bound conjugates were detected by evanescent wave-induced fluorescence (EWIF), demonstrating the success of the grafting procedure and its potential for biochip applications.

  8. Harnessing microbial activities for environmental cleanup.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Frank E; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2006-06-01

    Human activities have released large amounts of toxic organic and inorganic chemicals into the environment. Toxic waste streams threaten dwindling drinking water supplies and impact terrestrial, estuarine and marine ecosystems. Cleanup is technically challenging and the costs based on traditional technologies are exceeding the economic capabilities of even the richest countries. Recent advances in our understanding of the microbiology contributing to contaminant transformation and detoxification has led to successful field demonstrations. Hence, harnessing the activity of naturally occurring bacteria, particularly the power of anaerobic reductive processes, is a promising approach to restore contaminated subsurface environments, protect drinking water reservoirs and to safeguard ecosystem health.

  9. Harnessing the Microbiome to Enhance Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michelle H.; Diven, Marshall A.; Huff, Logan W.; Paulos, Chrystal M.

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota plays a key role in regulating the innate and adaptive immune system. Herein, we review the immunological aspects of the microbiota in tumor immunity in mice and man, with a focus on toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, vaccines, checkpoint modulators, chemotherapy, and adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) therapies. We propose innovative treatments that may safely harness the microbiota to enhance T cell-based therapies in cancer patients. Finally, we highlight recent developments in tumor immunotherapy, particularly novel ways to modulate the microbiome and memory T cell responses to human malignancies. PMID:26101781

  10. Thiol-ene clickable hyaluronans: from macro-to nanogels.

    PubMed

    Hachet, Emilie; Sereni, Nicolas; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Ravaine, Valérie; Szarpak-Jankowska, Anna; Auzély-Velty, Rachel

    2014-04-01

    The fabrication of hyaluronic acid (HA) nanogels using a thiol-ene reaction has been demonstrated. HA was modified with pentenoate groups and then cross-linked with poly(ethylene glycol)-bis(thiol) by exposure to UV light. The cross-linking density and thereby the rigidity of the obtained gels were precisely controlled by the degree of substitution of pentenoate-modified HA. Their swelling properties also depended on cross-linking density. To produce hydrogels at the nanoscale, hyaluronic acid precursors were solely confined inside liposomes before cross-linking and purified after cross-linking. The size of the resulting nanogels followed their swelling properties and was also affected by their cross-linking density. Such bionanogels with tunable mechanical and swelling properties have potential in drug delivery.

  11. Tetramethyl-1-silacycloprop-2-ene: its characterization and reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cornett, B.J.

    1980-05-01

    The object of this research is to fully characterize and study some of the reactions of tetramethyl-1-silacycloprop-2-ene. The final characterization of this compound was accomplished by obtaining both Si29 and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. The reactions studied included those with fluorenone, acetone, styrene, phenylacetylene, acetonitrile, t-butylcyanide, methyl isocyanate, phenyl azide, and azobenzene. Product analyses suggest that aside from addition reactions tetramethylsilacyclopropene can react either via a radical chain polymerization or an anionic chain polymerization mechanism with the latter being the more prevalent. Other reactions studied included the photolysis of tetramethylsilacyclopropene and its reactions in the presence of Pd(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/. An appendix includes a study of trimethylsilyl radical disproportionation in the liquid phase to a sila olefin. Trimethylsilyl radicals in solution undergo disproportionation as well as recombination in a 1:5 ratio. The sila olefin formed by disproportionation was trapped by alcohols.

  12. Ester-free Thiol-ene Dental Restoratives – Part A: Resin Development

    PubMed Central

    Podgórski, Maciej; Becka, Eftalda; Claudino, Mauro; Flores, Alexander; Shah, Parag K.; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To detail the development of ester-free thiol-ene dental resins with enhanced mechanical performance, limited potential for water uptake/leachables/degradation and low polymerization shrinkage stress. Methods Thiol-terminated oligomers were prepared via a thiol-Michael reaction and a bulky tetra-allyl monomer containing urethane linkages was synthesized. The experimental oligomers and/or monomers were photopolymerized using visible light activation. Several thiol-ene formulations were investigated and their performance ranked by comparisons of the thermo-mechanical properties, polymerization shrinkage stress, water sorption/solubility, and reactivity with respect to a control comprising a conventional BisGMA/TEGDMA dental resin. Results The ester-free thiol-ene formulations had significantly lower viscosities, water sorption and solubility than the BisGMA/TEGDMA control. Depending on the resin, the limiting functional conversions were equivalent to or greater than that of BisGMA/TEGDMA. At comparable conversions, lower shrinkage stress values were achieved by the thiol-ene systems. The polymerization shrinkage stress was dramatically reduced when the tetra-allyl monomer was used as the ene in ester-free thiol-ene mixtures. Although exhibiting lower Young’s modulus, flexural strength, and glass transition temperatures, the toughness values associated with thiol-ene resins were greater than that of the BisGMA/TEGDMA control. In addition, the thiol-ene polymerization resulted in highly uniform polymer networks as indicated by the narrow tan delta peak widths. Significance Employing the developed thiol-ene resins in dental composites will reduce shrinkage stress and moisture absorption and form tougher materials. Furthermore, their low viscosities are expected to enable higher loadings of functionalized micro/nano-scale filler particles relevant for practical dental systems. PMID:26360013

  13. Readout fidelity of coaxial holographic digital data page recording in nanoparticle-(thiol-ene) polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, Kohta; Hata, Eiji; Tomita, Yasuo

    2016-09-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of nanoparticle-concentration and thiol-to-ene stoichiometric ratio dependences of symbol error rates (SERs) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of digital data pages recorded at a wavelength of 532 nm in thiol-ene based nanoparticle-polymer composite (NPC) films by using a coaxial holographic digital data storage method. We show that SERs and SNRs at the optimized material condition can be lower than 1 × 10-4 and higher than 10, respectively, without error correction coding. These results show the usefulness of thiol-ene based NPCs as coaxial holographic data storage media.

  14. Harnessing supramolecular peptide nanotechnology in biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kiat Hwa; Lee, Wei Hao; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The harnessing of peptides in biomedical applications is a recent hot topic. This arises mainly from the general biocompatibility of peptides, as well as from the ease of tunability of peptide structure to engineer desired properties. The ease of progression from laboratory testing to clinical trials is evident from the plethora of examples available. In this review, we compare and contrast how three distinct self-assembled peptide nanostructures possess different functions. We have 1) nanofibrils in biomaterials that can interact with cells, 2) nanoparticles that can traverse the bloodstream to deliver its payload and also be bioimaged, and 3) nanotubes that can serve as cross-membrane conduits and as a template for nanowire formation. Through this review, we aim to illustrate how various peptides, in their various self-assembled nanostructures, possess great promise in a wide range of biomedical applications and what more can be expected. PMID:28223805

  15. Harnessing supramolecular peptide nanotechnology in biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kiat Hwa; Lee, Wei Hao; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The harnessing of peptides in biomedical applications is a recent hot topic. This arises mainly from the general biocompatibility of peptides, as well as from the ease of tunability of peptide structure to engineer desired properties. The ease of progression from laboratory testing to clinical trials is evident from the plethora of examples available. In this review, we compare and contrast how three distinct self-assembled peptide nanostructures possess different functions. We have 1) nanofibrils in biomaterials that can interact with cells, 2) nanoparticles that can traverse the bloodstream to deliver its payload and also be bioimaged, and 3) nanotubes that can serve as cross-membrane conduits and as a template for nanowire formation. Through this review, we aim to illustrate how various peptides, in their various self-assembled nanostructures, possess great promise in a wide range of biomedical applications and what more can be expected.

  16. 46 CFR 197.324 - Diver's safety harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Diver's safety harness. 197.324 Section 197.324 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.324 Diver's safety harness. Each...

  17. Body-fitted harness provides safe and easy component handling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. G.; Rothwell, G. E.

    1966-01-01

    Body-fitted restraint harness enables workers to safely and conveniently handle critical components during their installation or removal. Since the harness supports the components, the worker is able to maneuver through restricted areas with his hands free. It is easily put on, adjusted, and removed, or comfortably worn without interfering with normal activities.

  18. Accessory child safety harnesses: do the risks outweigh the benefits?

    PubMed

    Brown, Julie; Wainohu, Derek; Aquilina, Peter; Suratno, Basuki; Kelly, Paul; Bilston, Lynne E

    2010-01-01

    Accessory child safety harnesses are available in some countries as alternative restraints for young children or as an accessory restraint used with booster seats. Their use, in Australia at least, is becoming more common. There have been concerns that the risk of misuse of these restraints outweighs any potential benefit this system might have over a retractable lap-shoulder belt system used with a booster seat. However to date there is no evidence to confirm or deny this. This study used laboratory simulated frontal crash tests to examine the performance of accessory child safety harness systems compared to the lap-shoulder belt when used alone and when used with two common designs of Australian booster seat. The performance of the child safety harness system when misused was also investigated. The results demonstrate that the correctly used child safety harness system performed no better than the lap-shoulder system, and in fact allows for a greater risk of submarining. Furthermore, one common form of child safety harness misuse, where the harness is over-tightened causing the lap belt to be positioned high over the abdomen, allowed extremely undesirable dummy motion. This involved gross submarining and direct contact between the harness system and the dummy's neck. These findings suggest that the risks associated with accessory child safety harness systems most likely outweigh any potential benefits, in frontal impacts at least.

  19. Manufacturing and quality control of interconnecting wire harnesses, Volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The document covers interconnecting wire harnesses defined in the design standard, including type 8, flat conductor cable. Volume breadth covers installations of groups of harnesses in a major assembly and the associated post installation inspections and electrical tests. Knowledge gained through experience on the Saturn 5 program coupled with recent advances in techniques, materials, and processes was incorporated into this document.

  20. Dynamic Testing and Automatic Repair of Reconfigurable Wiring Harnesses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-27

    made it possible to consider the construction of reconfigurable manifolds - essentially, wiring harnesses that behave like macroscopic FPGA routing...must withstand extreme temperatures, hard vacuum and high levels of radiation for years without maintenance. Conventionally, spacecraft wiring ... harnesses are built with architectures that are fixed at the time of manufacture. They must therefore be designed to endure the lifetime of the mission

  1. Registration of two confection sunflower germplasm Lines, HA-R10 and HA-R11, Resistant to sunflower rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two confection sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) germplasm lines, HA-R10 (Reg. No.xxx, PI670043) and HA-R11 (Reg. No.xxx, PI670044) were developed by the USDA-ARS Sunflower and Plant Biology Research Unit in collaboration with the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station and released December, 20...

  2. Registration of two double rust resistant germplasms, HA-R12 and HA-R13 for confection sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The confection sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) germplasms HA-R12 (Reg. No. ______, PI 673104) and HA-R13 (Reg. No. ______, PI 673105) were developed by the USDA-ARS, Sunflower and Plant Biology Research Unit in collaboration with the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station, and released in Jul...

  3. 16-Ene-steroids in the human testis.

    PubMed

    Smals, A G; Weusten, J J

    1991-01-01

    Incubation of human testicular homogenates with [4-14C]pregnenolone gave substantial amounts of an unknown metabolite within 1 min, reaching plateau values of 17-23% of total radioactivity added within 5 min. Mass spectrometry of the metabolite showed it to be identical to the boar sex pheromone precursor androsta-5, 16-diene-3 beta-ol (ADL). In cell cultures the major source of ADL and its dehydrogenated metabolite androsta-4, 16-diene-3-one (ADN) was the Leydig cell. In rat and monkey testicular homogenates 16-ene-synthetase activity, a prerequisite for the synthesis of ADL and ADN, was completely lacking, limiting the presence of 16-androstenes to boars and men. In contrast to boars, however, in the human testis no 5 alpha-reductase activity was found and consequently no 5 alpha-reduced-16-androstenes, e.g. androstenol (AL, musk like) and androstenone (AN, urine like), known sex pheromones in pigs. As both sex pheromones have been identified in urine, plasma, sweat and saliva of men and (especially hirsute) women we hypothesize that AL and AN are synthesized from ADL via ADN peripherically in tissues rich in 5 alpha-reductase, i.e. skin, axillary sweat glands and probably also the salivary glands. So far, there is some evidence that both sex pheromones may have similar functions in humans as in boars.

  4. Thiol-ene Clickable Poly(glycidol) Hydrogels for Biofabrication.

    PubMed

    Stichler, Simone; Jungst, Tomasz; Schamel, Martha; Zilkowski, Ilona; Kuhlmann, Matthias; Böck, Thomas; Blunk, Torsten; Teßmar, Jörg; Groll, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    In this study we introduce linear poly(glycidol) (PG), a structural analog of poly(ethylene glycol) bearing side chains at each repeating unit, as polymer basis for bioink development. We prepare allyl- and thiol-functional linear PG that can rapidly be polymerized to a three-dimensionally cross-linked hydrogel network via UV mediated thiol-ene click reaction. Influence of polymer concentration and UV irradiation on mechanical properties and swelling behavior was examined. Thiol-functional PG was synthesized in two structural variations, one containing ester groups that are susceptible to hydrolytic cleavage, and the other one ester-free and stable against hydrolysis. This allowed the preparation of degradable and non-degradable hydrogels. Cytocompatibility of the hydrogel was demonstrated by encapsulation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Rheological properties of the hydrogels were adjusted for dispense plotting by addition of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid. The optimized formulation enabled highly reproducible plotting of constructs composed of 20 layers with an overall height of 3.90 mm.

  5. Harnessing Regulatory T cells to Suppress Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Thorburn, Alison N.; Hansbro, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an essential role in maintaining the homeostatic balance of immune responses. Asthma is an inflammatory condition of the airways that is driven by dysregulated immune responses toward normally innocuous antigens. Individuals with asthma have fewer and less functional Tregs, which may lead to uncontrolled effector cell responses and promote proasthmatic responses of T helper type 2, T helper 17, natural killer T, antigen-presenting, and B cells. Tregs have the capacity to either directly or indirectly suppress these responses. Hence, the induced expansion of functional Tregs in predisposed or individuals with asthma is a potential approach for the prevention and treatment of asthma. Infection by a number of micro-organisms has been associated with reduced prevalence of asthma, and many infectious agents have been shown to induce Tregs and reduce allergic airways disease in mouse models. The translation of the regulatory and therapeutic properties of infectious agents for use in asthma requires the identification of key modulatory components and the development and trial of effective immunoregulatory therapies. Further translational and clinical research is required for the induction of Tregs to be harnessed as a therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:20097830

  6. Harnessing adolescent values to motivate healthier eating

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Christopher J.; Yeager, David S.; Hinojosa, Cintia P.; Chabot, Aimee; Bergen, Holly; Kawamura, Mari; Steubing, Fred

    2016-01-01

    What can be done to reduce unhealthy eating among adolescents? It was hypothesized that aligning healthy eating with important and widely shared adolescent values would produce the needed motivation. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled experiment with eighth graders (total n = 536) evaluated the impact of a treatment that framed healthy eating as consistent with the adolescent values of autonomy from adult control and the pursuit of social justice. Healthy eating was suggested as a way to take a stand against manipulative and unfair practices of the food industry, such as engineering junk food to make it addictive and marketing it to young children. Compared with traditional health education materials or to a non–food-related control, this treatment led eighth graders to see healthy eating as more autonomy-assertive and social justice-oriented behavior and to forgo sugary snacks and drinks in favor of healthier options a day later in an unrelated context. Public health interventions for adolescents may be more effective when they harness the motivational power of that group’s existing strongly held values. PMID:27621440

  7. SSME Electrical Harness and Cable Development and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Russ; Heflin, Johnny; Burns, Bob; Camper, Scott J.; Hill, Arthur J.

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) electrical harness and cable system consists of the various interconnecting devices necessary for operation of complex rocket engine functions. Thirty seven harnesses incorporate unique connectors, backshell adapters, conductors, insulation, shielding, and physical barriers for a long maintenance-free life while providing the means to satisfy performance requirements and to mitigate adverse environmental influences. The objective of this paper is to provide a description of the SSME electrical harness and cable designs as well as the development history and lessons learned.

  8. High Performance Computing with Harness over InfiniBand

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Alessandro; Di Biagio, Christian; Batino, Fabrizio; Pennella, Guido; Palma, Fabrizio; Engelmann, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Harness is an adaptable and plug-in-based middleware framework able to support distributed parallel computing. By now, it is based on the Ethernet protocol which cannot guarantee high performance throughput and real time (determinism) performance. During last years, both, the research and industry environments have developed new network architectures (InfiniBand, Myrinet, iWARP, etc.) to avoid those limits. This paper concerns the integration between Harness and InfiniBand focusing on two solutions: IP over InfiniBand (IPoIB) and Socket Direct Protocol (SDP) technology. They allow the Harness middleware to take advantage of the enhanced features provided by the InfiniBand Architecture.

  9. Harnessing Earth Observations for Disaster Application Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Earth observations have made substantive contributions to the understanding of natural hazards, answering key science questions on the mechanisms, processes and dynamics of changes in the land, air and water. This has been achieved through the ability to advance models and interpret the results through maps and assessments. Disaster application science is focused on the two-way flow of data and information between hazard understanding and the knowledge required for disaster response, relief and recovery. This presentation will examine the integration of results from mature science and technology development in areas including optical imagery, synthetic-aperture radar and geodetic sensors, which together provide new levels of situational awareness. Specific examples will be highlighted from the recent Nepal "Gorkha" earthquake. Optical imagery from a host of satellite missions was used to create a comprehensive mosaic across the region, which when analyzed by a global network of volunteer scientists yielded insight into the extent of induced hazards and impacts. In some cases unique day/night band images provided guidance on areas where energy-dependent infrastructure of livelihoods were disrupted. Earthquake modeling and historical trend analysis revealed areas of potential vulnerability and combined with aftershock analysis to guide areas for urgent analysis and action. The combination of SAR and GPS data, innovative integration and processing approaches and nontraditional data integration approaches resulted in damage proxy maps or where combination with airborne photography, field sightings and crowd sourced reports to assess susceptibility to induced hazards (floods and landslides). Opportunities and challenges to build the science and community relationships, harness the earth observations from multiple agencies and institutions and co-develop timely applications to users will be areas for ongoing collaboration and study.Earth observations have made

  10. Harnessing quantum transport by transient chaos.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso; Pecora, Louis M

    2013-03-01

    Chaos has long been recognized to be generally advantageous from the perspective of control. In particular, the infinite number of unstable periodic orbits embedded in a chaotic set and the intrinsically sensitive dependence on initial conditions imply that a chaotic system can be controlled to a desirable state by using small perturbations. Investigation of chaos control, however, was largely limited to nonlinear dynamical systems in the classical realm. In this paper, we show that chaos may be used to modulate or harness quantum mechanical systems. To be concrete, we focus on quantum transport through nanostructures, a problem of considerable interest in nanoscience, where a key feature is conductance fluctuations. We articulate and demonstrate that chaos, more specifically transient chaos, can be effective in modulating the conductance-fluctuation patterns. Experimentally, this can be achieved by applying an external gate voltage in a device of suitable geometry to generate classically inaccessible potential barriers. Adjusting the gate voltage allows the characteristics of the dynamical invariant set responsible for transient chaos to be varied in a desirable manner which, in turn, can induce continuous changes in the statistical characteristics of the quantum conductance-fluctuation pattern. To understand the physical mechanism of our scheme, we develop a theory based on analyzing the spectrum of the generalized non-Hermitian Hamiltonian that includes the effect of leads, or electronic waveguides, as self-energy terms. As the escape rate of the underlying non-attracting chaotic set is increased, the imaginary part of the complex eigenenergy becomes increasingly large so that pointer states are more difficult to form, making smoother the conductance-fluctuation pattern.

  11. Harnessing Scientific Literature Reports for Pharmacovigilance

    PubMed Central

    Ripple, Anna; Tonning, Joseph; Munoz, Monica; Hasan, Rashedul; Ly, Thomas; Francis, Henry; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Summary Objectives We seek to develop a prototype software analytical tool to augment FDA regulatory reviewers’ capacity to harness scientific literature reports in PubMed/MEDLINE for pharmacovigilance and adverse drug event (ADE) safety signal detection. We also aim to gather feedback through usability testing to assess design, performance, and user satisfaction with the tool. Methods A prototype, open source, web-based, software analytical tool generated statistical disproportionality data mining signal scores and dynamic visual analytics for ADE safety signal detection and management. We leveraged Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) indexing terms assigned to published citations in PubMed/MEDLINE to generate candidate drug-adverse event pairs for quantitative data mining. Six FDA regulatory reviewers participated in usability testing by employing the tool as part of their ongoing real-life pharmacovigilance activities to provide subjective feedback on its practical impact, added value, and fitness for use. Results All usability test participants cited the tool’s ease of learning, ease of use, and generation of quantitative ADE safety signals, some of which corresponded to known established adverse drug reactions. Potential concerns included the comparability of the tool’s automated literature search relative to a manual ‘all fields’ PubMed search, missing drugs and adverse event terms, interpretation of signal scores, and integration with existing computer-based analytical tools. Conclusions Usability testing demonstrated that this novel tool can automate the detection of ADE safety signals from published literature reports. Various mitigation strategies are described to foster improvements in design, productivity, and end user satisfaction. PMID:28326432

  12. Harnessing Energy from the Sun for Six Billion People

    ScienceCinema

    Daniel Nocera

    2016-07-12

    Daniel Nocera, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor whose recent research focuses on solar-powered fuels, presents a Brookhaven Science Associates Distinguished Lecture, titled "Harnessing Energy from the Sun for Six Billion People -- One at a Time."

  13. Harnessing Power from Tides: State of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the current, world-wide status of tidal energy as a potential power source. Potential sites and global tidal power prospects are identified. New engineering concepts relevant to the harnessing of tidal power are identified and described. (BT)

  14. Manufacturing and quality control of interconnecting wire harnesses, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Interconnecting wire harnesses defined in the design standard are considered, including type 4, open bundle (not enclosed). Knowledge gained through experience on the Saturn 5 program coupled with recent advances in techniques, materials, and processes was incorporated into the document.

  15. Army Social Media: Harnessing the Power of Networked Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    9/1/2011 Army Social Media : harnessing the power of networked communications Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Army Social Media : harnessing the power of networked communications 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...the Chief of Public Affairs,Online and Social Media Division,1500 Pentagon,Washington,DC,20301 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9

  16. Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Sequential and Simultaneous Thiol-Ene-Isocyanate Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNair, Olivia; Brent, Davis; Savin, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Ternary networks containing having stoichiometrically balanced thiol /(ene+isocyanate) ranging from 0 to 20 mol% isocyanate were synthesized via sequential or simultaneous thiol/ene and thiol/isocyanate click reactions. The effects of cross-link density were studied using three thiols, GDMP (difunctional), 3T (trifunctional) and 4T (tetrafunctional) respectively. TEA catalyzes the isocyanate-thiol coupling and chain extension, while the photoinitiator DMPA initiates a radical thiol-ene crosslinking process. Real-time FTIR was used to study kinetics of both light and dark reactions utilizing thiol, ene and isocyanate peaks which appear independently. It was found that difunctional thiols and isocyanates reacted initially, forming chain extended prepolymers end-capped with thiol functionalities. Upon UV irradiation, thiol functionalized prepolymers reacted with TTT, a trifunctional ene, forming networks containing incorporated thiourethane linkages. Initial DSC results indicated higher Tgs for higher cross-linked networks; however, isocyanate content has significant effects on each system. Films were also be thermally characterized via DMA and mechanical properties measured using MTS.

  17. Pore surface engineering in a zirconium metal–organic framework via thiol-ene reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gui, Bo; Hu, Guiping; Zhou, Tailin; Wang, Cheng

    2015-03-15

    A porous olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework, denoted as UiO-68-allyl, has been constructed. Our results clearly demonstrated that the surface of UiO-68-allyl could be decorated with organic molecule (ethanethiol) via thiol-ene reaction. More importantly, the crystallinity of the framework were maintained during the post-synthetic modification process. However, the microporosity of the framework is retained but the surface area decreased, due to the grafting of ethylthio groups into the pores. From our studies, we can conclude that the strategy of post-synthetic modification of UiO-68-allyl via thiol-ene reaction may be general. Furthermore, we may anchor other desired functional group onto the pore walls in Zr-MOFs via thiol-ene reaction, enabling more potential applications. - graphical abstract: In this manuscript, we reported the post-synthetic modification of an olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework via thiol-ene reaction. - Highlights: • A porous olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework has been constructed. • The surface of olefin-functionalized Zr-MOF could be decorated with organic molecules via thiol-ene reaction. • The crystallinity and permanent porosity of the framework were maintained during the post-synthetic modification process.

  18. Pore surface engineering in a zirconium metal-organic framework via thiol-ene reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Bo; Hu, Guiping; Zhou, Tailin; Wang, Cheng

    2015-03-01

    A porous olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal-organic framework, denoted as UiO-68-allyl, has been constructed. Our results clearly demonstrated that the surface of UiO-68-allyl could be decorated with organic molecule (ethanethiol) via thiol-ene reaction. More importantly, the crystallinity of the framework were maintained during the post-synthetic modification process. However, the microporosity of the framework is retained but the surface area decreased, due to the grafting of ethylthio groups into the pores. From our studies, we can conclude that the strategy of post-synthetic modification of UiO-68-allyl via thiol-ene reaction may be general. Furthermore, we may anchor other desired functional group onto the pore walls in Zr-MOFs via thiol-ene reaction, enabling more potential applications.

  19. Determination and potential importance of diterpene (kaur-16-ene) emitted from dominant coniferous trees in Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Sou N; Chatani, Satoru; Nakatsuka, Seiji; Kusumoto, Dai; Kubota, Katsuyoshi; Utsumi, Yasuhiro; Enoki, Tsutomu; Tani, Akira; Hiura, Tsutom

    2012-05-01

    Reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are known to affect atmospheric chemistry. Biogenic VOCs (BVOCs) have a significant impact on regional air quality due to their large emission rates and high reactivities. Diterpenes (most particularly, kaur-16-ene) were detected in all of the 205 enclosure air samples collected over multiple seasons at two different sites from Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa trees, the dominant coniferous trees in Japan,. The emission rate of kaur-16-ene, was determined to be from 0.01 to 7.1 μg dwg(-1) h(-1) (average: 0.61 μg dwg(-1) h(-1)) employing branch enclosure measurements using adsorbent sampling followed by solid phase-liquid extraction techniques. The emission rate was comparable to that of monoterpenes, which is known major BVOC emissions, collected from the same branches. In addition, total emission of kaur-16-ene at 30°C was estimated to exceed that of total anthropogenic VOC emissions.

  20. Thiol-Ene functionalized siloxanes for use as elastomeric dental impression materials

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Megan A.; Jankousky, Katherine C.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Thiol- and allyl-functionalized siloxane oligomers are synthesized and evaluated for use as a radical-mediated, rapid set elastomeric dental impression material. Thiol-ene siloxane formulations are crosslinked using a redox-initiated polymerization scheme, and the mechanical properties of the thiol-ene network are manipulated through the incorporation of varying degrees of plasticizer and kaolin filler. Formulations with medium and light body consistencies are further evaluated for their ability to accurately replicate features on both the gross and microscopic levels. We hypothesize that thiol-ene functionalized siloxane systems will exhibit faster setting times and greater detail reproduction than commercially available polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) materials of comparable consistencies. Methods Thiol-ene functionalized siloxane mixtures formulated with varying levels of redox initiators, plasticizer, and kaolin filler are made and evaluated for their polymerization speed (FTIR), consistency (ISO4823.9.2), and surface energy (goniometer). Feature replication is evaluated quantitatively by SEM. The Tg, storage modulus, and creep behavior are determined by DMA. Results Increasing redox initiation rate increases the polymerization rate but at high levels also limits working time. Combining 0.86 wt% oxidizing agent with up to 5 wt% plasticizer gave a working time of 3 min and a setting time of 2 min. The selected medium and light body thiol-ene formulations also achieved greater qualitative detail reproduction than the commercial material and reproduced micrometer patterns with 98% accuracy. Significance Improving detail reproduction and setting speed is a primary focus of dental impression material design and synthesis. Radical-mediated polymerizations, particularly thiol-ene reactions, are recognized for their speed, reduced shrinkage, and ‘click’ nature. PMID:24553250

  1. Modified thiol-ene networks: Tuning the glass transition temperature and energy damping capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ning; Rafailovich, Miriam; Gersappe, Dilip

    2013-03-01

    Utilizing thiol-ene `click' reactions, it is possible to produce thermoset networks that are highly homogeneous and thus exhibit enhanced energy damping capabilities. This talk will present recent results in the characterization and impact testing of modified thiol-ene networks with tunable physical properties. In particular, we synthesize ternary networks containing (1) bulky side-chain substituents, (2) isocyanate functionality, or (3) dual thiol components to improve control over the glass transition temperature and strain at break. In addition, we present results in the high-impact compression testing to demonstrate the energy damping capabilities of these materials.

  2. Advances and limitations of visual conditioning protocols in harnessed bees.

    PubMed

    Avarguès-Weber, Aurore; Mota, Theo

    2016-12-18

    Bees are excellent invertebrate models for studying visual learning and memory mechanisms, because of their sophisticated visual system and impressive cognitive capacities associated with a relatively simple brain. Visual learning in free-flying bees has been traditionally studied using an operant conditioning paradigm. This well-established protocol, however, can hardly be combined with invasive procedures for studying the neurobiological basis of visual learning. Different efforts have been made to develop protocols in which harnessed honey bees could associate visual cues with reinforcement, though learning performances remain poorer than those obtained with free-flying animals. Especially in the last decade, the intention of improving visual learning performances of harnessed bees led many authors to adopt distinct visual conditioning protocols, altering parameters like harnessing method, nature and duration of visual stimulation, number of trials, inter-trial intervals, among others. As a result, the literature provides data hardly comparable and sometimes contradictory. In the present review, we provide an extensive analysis of the literature available on visual conditioning of harnessed bees, with special emphasis on the comparison of diverse conditioning parameters adopted by different authors. Together with this comparative overview, we discuss how these diverse conditioning parameters could modulate visual learning performances of harnessed bees.

  3. Evaluation of Cable Harness Post-Installation Testing. Part B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, M. S.; Iannello, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Cable Harness Post-Installation Testing Report was written in response to an action issued by the Ares Project Control Board (PCB). The action for the Ares I Avionics & Software Chief Engineer and the Avionics Integration and Vehicle Systems Test Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Manager in the Vehicle Integration Office was to develop a set of guidelines for electrical cable harnesses. Research showed that post-installation tests have been done since the Apollo era. For Ares I-X, the requirement for post-installation testing was removed to make it consistent with the avionics processes used on the Atlas V expendable launch vehicle. Further research for the report involved surveying government and private sector launch vehicle developers, military and commercial aircraft, spacecraft developers, and harness vendors. Responses indicated crewed launch vehicles and military aircraft perform post-installation tests. Key findings in the report were as follows: Test requirements identify damage, human-rated vehicles should be tested despite the identification of statistically few failures, data does not support the claim that post-installation testing damages the harness insulation system, and proper planning can reduce overhead associated with testing. The primary recommendation of the report is for the Ares projects to retain the practice of post-fabrication and post-installation cable harness testing.

  4. Anterior axial ultrasound in monitoring infants with Pavlik harness.

    PubMed

    El Ferzli, Julie; Abuamara, Saad; Eurin, Danielle; Le Dosseur, Patrick; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas

    2004-01-01

    Real-time ultrasonography has been used for diagnosis and screening of developmental dysplasia of the hip for several years. If diagnostic criteria are well established, the use of sonography in follow-up of treated infants remains extremely variable. The aims of this study were (a). to describe the normal sonographic anatomy of the infant abducted hip on an anterior axial view, and (b). to define the role of this approach in the follow-up of developmental dysplasia treated by Pavlik harness. Thirty-eight patients with Pavlik harness had anterior axial sonograms in addition to their usual clinical and sonographic follow-up. Normal anatomy was inferred from the examination of 25 clinically proven normal hips in the same population. The best criterion of a normal positioning of the femoral head appears to be the alignment of the pubic bone and the femoral metaphysis. Pavlik harness was the only treatment in 32 patients. It was directly efficient in 22, after readjustment in 10 patients. Reduction was shown by anterior sonography in all of them. In 6 children, sonography showed no reduction and subsequent treatment by closed or open reduction was carried out. Anterior axial sonogram can show reduction of a dislocated hip in children with Pavlik harness, but it does not evaluate its stability. It helps optimize the settings of the harness, and may predict a poor outcome, but it does not identify the cause of non-reducibility.

  5. Using Discussion Methods to Inspire Diversity: Harnessing Social & Cultural Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raison, Brian; Gordon, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    How can you better harness the powerful social capital that exists within diverse individuals, families, businesses, and schools to make positive impacts in your community? What could you add to your next meeting--a Chamber strategic planning session, an employee wellness program, a non-profit board development--to better connect participants with…

  6. Understanding and Harnessing the Power of Ideas, Persuasion, and Trust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-17

    University, Korea Human rights & political culture Malaysia Prof. Dr. Abdul Rahman Embong nstitut Kajian Malaysia & Antarabangsa (IKMAS) Institute...Modeling of how to Harness Trust and Influence in Cyber- space Sing Syed Adnan Ali Shah BUKHARI Assoc Res Fellow & Team Leader South & Central Asia

  7. Harnessing Linguistic Variation to Improve Education. Rethinking Education. Volume 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yiakoumetti, Androula, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This volume brings together research carried out in a variety of geographic and linguistic contexts including Africa, Asia, Australia, Canada, the Caribbean, Europe and the United States and explores efforts to incorporate linguistic diversity into education and to "harness" this diversity for learners' benefit. It challenges the largely…

  8. Manufacture and quality control of interconnecting wire harnesses, Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The document covers interconnecting wire harnesses defined in the design standard, including type 6, enclosed in TFE heat shrink tubing; and type 7, flexible armored. Knowledge gained through experience on the Saturn 5 program coupled with recent advances in techniques, materials, and processes was incorporated into this document.

  9. Manufacture and quality control of interconnecting wire harnesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Four-volume series of documents has been prepared as standard reference. Each volume may be used separately and covers wire and cable preparation as well as harness fabrication and installation. Series should be useful addition to libraries of manufactures of electrical and electronic equipment.

  10. Harnessing the crowd to accelerate molecular medicine research.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert J; Merchant, Raina M

    2015-07-01

    Crowdsourcing presents a novel approach to solving complex problems within molecular medicine. By leveraging the expertise of fellow scientists across the globe, broadcasting to and engaging the public for idea generation, harnessing a scalable workforce for quick data management, and fundraising for research endeavors, crowdsourcing creates novel opportunities for accelerating scientific progress.

  11. Program for improved electrical harness documentation and fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Computer program provides automated print-out of harness interconnection table and automated cross-check of reciprocal pin/connector assignments, and improves accuracy and reliability of final documented data. Programs and corresponding library tapes are successfully and continuously employed on Nimbus spacecraft programs.

  12. A Study of Functional Polymer Colloids Prepared Using Thiol-Ene/Yne Click Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Olivia Z.

    This project demonstrates the first instance of thiol-ene chemistry as the polymerization method for the production of polymer colloids in two-phase heterogeneous suspensions, miniemulsions, and emulsions. This work was also expanded to thiol-yne chemistry for the production of polymer particles containing increased crosslinking density. The utility of thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistries for polymerization and polymer modification is well established in bulk systems. These reactions are considered 'click' reactions, which can be defined as processes that are both facile and simple, offering high yields with nearly 100% conversion, no side products, easy product separation, compatibility with a diverse variety of commercially available starting materials, and orthogonality with other chemistries. In addition, thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistry follow a step-growth mechanism for the development of highly uniform polymer networks, where polymer growth is dependent on the coupling of functional groups. These step-growth polymerization systems are in stark contrast to the chain-growth mechanisms of acrylic and styrenic monomers that have dominated the field of conventional heterogeneous polymerizations. Preliminary studies evaluated the mechanism of particle production in suspension and miniemulsion systems. Monomer droplets were compared to the final polymer particles to confirm that particle growth occurred through the polymerization of monomer droplets. Additional parameters examined include homogenization energy (mechanical mixing), diluent species and concentration, and monomer content. These reactions were conducted using photoinitiation to yield particles in a matter of minutes with diameters in the size range of several microns to hundreds of microns in suspensions or submicron particles in miniemulsions. Improved control over the particle size and size distribution was examined through variation of reaction parameters. In addition, a method of seeded suspension

  13. 42 CFR 84.173 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum... DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.173 Harnesses; installation and... harness designed and constructed to hold the components of the respirator in position against the...

  14. 42 CFR 84.196 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum... DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.196 Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. (a) Each respirator shall, where necessary, be equipped with a suitable harness designed...

  15. 42 CFR 84.133 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum... DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.133 Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. (a) Each supplied-air respirator shall, where necessary, be equipped with a suitable harness...

  16. 14 CFR 137.42 - Fastening of safety belts and shoulder harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fastening of safety belts and shoulder... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.42 Fastening of safety belts and shoulder harnesses. No... belt and shoulder harness properly secured about that person except that the shoulder harness need...

  17. Hybrid thiol-ene network nanocomposites based on multi(meth)acrylate POSS.

    PubMed

    Li, Liguo; Liang, Rendong; Li, Yajie; Liu, Hongzhi; Feng, Shengyu

    2013-09-15

    First, multi(meth)acrylate functionalized POSS monomers were synthesized in this paper. Secondly, FTIR was used to evaluate the homopolymerization behaviors of multi(meth)acrylate POSS and their copolymerization behaviors in the thiol-ene reactions with octa(3-mercaptopropyl) POSS in the presence of photoinitiator. Results showed that the photopolymerization rate of multimethacrylate POSS was faster than that of multiacrylate POSS. The FTIR results also showed that the copolymerizations were dominant in the thiol-ene reactions with octa(3-mercaptopropyl) POSS, different from traditional (meth)acrylate-thiol system, in which homopolymerizations were predominant. Finally, the resulted hybrid networks based on POSS were characterized by XRD, FE-SEM, DSC, and TGA. The characterization results showed that hybrid networks based on POSS were homogeneous and exhibited high thermal stability.

  18. Thiol-ene click reaction as a general route to functional trialkoxysilanes for surface coating applications.

    PubMed

    Tucker-Schwartz, Alexander K; Farrell, Richard A; Garrell, Robin L

    2011-07-27

    Functionalized trialkoxysilanes are widely used to modify the surface properties of materials and devices. It will be shown that the photoinitiated radical-based thiol-ene "click" reaction provides a simple and efficient route to diverse trialkoxysilanes. A total of 15 trialkoxysilanes were synthesized by reacting either alkenes with 3-mercaptopropyltrialkoxysilane or thiols with allyltrialkoxysilanes in the presence of a photoinitiator. The functionalized trialkoxysilanes were obtained in quantitative to near-quantitative yields with high purity. The photochemical reactions can be run neat in standard borosilicate glassware using a low power 15-W blacklight. A wide range of functional groups is tolerated in this approach, and even complex alkenes click with the silane precursors. To demonstrate that these silanes can be used as surface coating agents, several were reacted with iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles and the loadings quantified. The photoinitiated thiol-ene reaction thus offers a facile and efficient method for preparing surface-active functional trialkoxysilanes.

  19. BCl3-mediated ene reaction of sulfur dioxide and unfunctionalized alkenes.

    PubMed

    Marković, Dean; Volla, Chandra M R; Vogel, Pierre; Varela-Alvarez, Adrián; Sordo, José A

    2010-05-25

    The first ene reactions of SO(2) and unfunctionalized alkenes are reported. Calculations suggest that the endergonic ene reactions of SO(2) with alkenes can be used to generate beta,gamma-unsaturated sulfinyl and sulfonyl compounds. Indeed, in the presence of one equivalent of BCl(3), the unstable sulfinic acid form stable sulfinic acid.BCl(3) complexes that can be reacted in situ with NCS to generate corresponding sulfonyl chlorides, or with a base to generate corresponding sulfinates. The latter can be reacted with electrophiles to generate sulfones, or with silyl chloride to form beta,gamma-unsaturated silyl sulfinates. The sulfinic acid.BCl(3) complexes can be reacted with ethers that act as oxygen nucleophiles to produce corresponding sulfinic esters. Thus one-pot, three-component synthesis of beta,gamma-unsaturated sulfonamides, sulfinyl esters and sulfones have been developed starting from alkenes and sulfur dioxide (reagent and solvent).

  20. Redox Mediators in Visible Light Photocatalysis: Photocatalytic Radical Thiol–Ene Additions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synthetically useful radical thiol–ene reactions can be initiated by visible light irradiation in the presence of transition metal polypyridyl photocatalysts. The success of this method relies upon the use of p-toluidine as an essential additive. Using these conditions, high-yielding thiol–ene reactions of cysteine-containing biomolecules can be accomplished using biocompatibile wavelengths of visible light, under aqueous conditions, and with the thiol component as the limiting reagent. We present evidence that p-toluidine serves as a redox mediator that is capable of catalyzing the otherwise inefficient photooxidation of thiols to the key thiyl radical intermediate. Thus, we show that co-catalytic oxidants can be important in the design of synthetic reactions involving visible light photoredox catalysis. PMID:24428433

  1. Photocured thiol-ene based optical fluorescence sensor for determination of gold(III).

    PubMed

    Cubuk, Soner; Kahraman, Memet Vezir; Yetimoğlu, Ece Kök; Kenan, Sibel

    2014-02-17

    This study describes the preparation and the characterization of a new thiol-ene based polymeric fluorescence sensor by photo initiated polymerization of trimethylolpropane tris(3-mercaptopropionate), 2-hydroxyethylacrylate, and 2,4,6-triallyloxy-1,3,5-triazine which are used as monomers and also a photo initiator (2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenylacetophenone) for its usage as optical sensor for gold ions. The thiol-ene based polymeric membrane sensor was characterized by using attenuated total reflectance-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The response characteristics of the sensors including dynamic range, pH effect, response time, and the effect of foreign ions were investigated. Fluorescence spectra showed that the excitation/emission maxima of the membrane were at 379/425 nm, respectively.

  2. Preparation of reactive three-dimensional microstructures via direct laser writing and thiol-ene chemistry.

    PubMed

    Quick, Alexander S; Fischer, Joachim; Richter, Benjamin; Pauloehrl, Thomas; Trouillet, Vanessa; Wegener, Martin; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2013-02-25

    Three-dimensional microstructures are fabricated employing the direct laser writing process and radical thiol-ene polymerization. The resin system consists of a two-photon photoinitiator and multifunctional thiols and olefins. Woodpile photonic crystals with 22 layers and a rod distance of 2 μm are fabricated. The structures are characterized via scanning electron microscopy and focused ion beam milling. The thiol-ene polymerization during fabrication is verified via infrared spectroscopy. The structures are grafted in a subsequent thiol-Michael addition reaction with different functional maleimides. The success of the grafting reaction is evaluated via laser scanning microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The grafting density is calculated to be close to 200 molecules μm(-2) .

  3. On the biotransformation of ent-trachylobane to ent-kaur-11-ene diterpenes.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Braulio M; Gonzalez-Vallejo, Victoria; Guillermo, Ricardo

    2011-09-23

    The microbiological transformation of trachinodiol (1) by the fungus Mucor plumbeus afforded the corresponding 1α, 2α, 3α, and 17-hydroxy derivatives (2-4 and 6), respectively. 7β,16α,18-Trihydroxy-ent-kaur-11-ene (sicanatriol) (5) was also obtained in this feeding. The biotransformation of 1 to give 5 by this fungus may occur by enzymatic abstraction of a hydrogen atom, allylic to the cyclopropane ring, and subsequent cleavage of this ring. This route is similar to that postulated by us in plants of the genus Sideritis, where ent-trachylobane and ent-kaur-11-ene diterpenes coexist. This study confirms that hydroxylation of diterpenes by M. plumbeus occurs preferably at ring A carbons.

  4. HARNESS: Heterogeneous Adaptable Reconfigurable Networked Systems. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fagg, G. E.

    2004-01-20

    HARNESS was proposed as a system that combined the best of emerging technologies found in current distributed computing research and commercial products into a very flexible, dynamically adaptable framework that could be used by applications to allow them to evolve and better handle their execution environment. The HARNESS system was designed using the considerable experience from previous projects such as PVM, MPI, IceT and Cumulvs. As such, the system was designed to avoid any of the common problems found with using these current systems, such as no single point of failure, ability to survive machine, node and software failures. Additional features included improved intercomponent connectivity, with full support for dynamic down loading of addition components at run-time thus reducing the stress on application developers to build in all the libraries they need in advance.

  5. Uncovering Listeria monocytogenes hypervirulence by harnessing its biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Caroline; Touchon, Marie; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Leclercq, Alexandre; Criscuolo, Alexis; Gaultier, Charlotte; Roussel, Sophie; Brisabois, Anne; Disson, Olivier; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Brisse, Sylvain; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Microbial pathogenesis studies are typically performed with reference strains, thereby overlooking microbial intra-species virulence heterogeneity. Here we integrated human epidemiological and clinical data with bacterial population genomics to harness the biodiversity of the model foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and decipher the basis of its neural and placental tropisms. Taking advantage of the clonal structure of this bacterial species, we identify clones epidemiologically associated with either food or human central nervous system (CNS) and maternal-neonatal (MN) listeriosis. The latter are also most prevalent in patients without immunosuppressive comorbidities. Strikingly, CNS and MN clones are hypervirulent in a humanized mouse model of listeriosis. By integrating epidemiological data and comparative genomics, we uncovered multiple novel putative virulence factors and demonstrated experimentally the contribution of the first gene cluster mediating Listeria monocytogenes neural and placental tropisms. This study illustrates the exceptional power of harnessing microbial biodiversity to identify clinically relevant microbial virulence attributes. PMID:26829754

  6. Smart warping harnesses for active mirrors and stress polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemared, Sabri; Hugot, Emmanuel; Challita, Zalpha; Schnetler, Hermine; Kroes, Gabby; Marcos, Michel; Costille, Anne; Dohlen, Kjetil; Beuzit, Jean-Luc; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2016-07-01

    We present two ways to generate or compensate for first order optical aberrations using smart warping harnesses. In these cases, we used the same methodology leading to replace a previous actuation system currently on-sky and to get a freeform mirror intended to a demonstrator. Starting from specifications, a warping harness is designed, followed by a meshing model in the finite elements software. For the two projects, two different ways of astigmatism generation are presented. The first one, on the VLT-SPHERE instrument, with a single actuator, is able to generate a nearly pure astigmatism via a rotating motorization. Two actuators are sufficient to produce the same aberration for the active freeform mirror, main part of the OPTICON-FAME project, in order to use stress-polishing method.

  7. Hello World: Harnessing social media for the Rosetta mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, E.; Mignone, C.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Homfeld, A.-M.; Bauer, M.; McCaughrean, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    The European Space Agency's (ESA) comet-chasing Rosetta mission was launched in 2004, before social media became a popular tool for mainstream communication. By harnessing a range of platforms for communicating the key messages of this unprecedented space adventure as the spacecraft reached its destination ten years later, a wide range of new audiences were reached and could follow this once-in-a-lifetime mission.

  8. High-Density Terminal Box for Testing Wire Harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, W. B.; Collins, W. G.

    1982-01-01

    Compact terminal box provides access to complex wiring harnesses for testing. Box accommodates more than twice as many wires as previous boxes. Box takes in wires via cable connectors and distributes them to contacts on box face. Instead of separate insulated jacks in metal face panel, box uses pairs of small military-standard metal sockets in precision-drilled plastic panel. Shorting plug provides continuity for wires when not being tested.

  9. Heterofunctional Glycopolypeptides by Combination of Thiol-Ene Chemistry and NCA Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Krannig, Kai-Steffen; Schlaad, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Glycopolypeptides are prepared either by the polymerization of glycosylated amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides (NCAs) or by the post-polymerization functionalization of polypeptides with suitable functional groups. Here we present a method for the in-situ functionalization and (co-) polymerization of allylglycine N-carboxyanhydride in a facile one-pot procedure, combining radical thiol-ene photochemistry and nucleophilic ring-opening polymerization techniques, to yield well-defined heterofunctional glycopolypeptides.

  10. Gold-Catalyzed Cycloisomerization of 1,5-Allenynes via Dual Activation of an Ene Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Paul Ha-Yeon; Morganelli, Philip; Luzung, Michael R.; Houk, K. N.; Toste, F. Dean

    2010-01-01

    A tris-triphenylphosphinegold oxonium tetrafluoroborate, [(Ph3PAu)3O]BF4, catalyzes the rearrangement of 1,5-allenynes to produce cross-conjugated trienes. Experimental and computational evidence shows that the ene reaction proceeds through a unique nucleophilic addition of an allene double bond to a cationic phosphinegold(I) complexed phosphinegold(I) acetylide, followed by a 1,5-hydrogen shift. PMID:18327944

  11. A new solvent-dependent mechanism for a triazolinedione ene reaction.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Orlando; Squillacote, Michael E

    2008-02-01

    The ene reaction between 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) and tetramethylethylene has been investigated using QM/MM calculations in water, methanol, DMSO, and acetonitrile. The effects of solvation on the mechanism and rates of reaction are elucidated using two-dimensional potentials of mean force (PMF) simulations utilizing free-energy perturbation theory and Monte Carlo statistical mechanics. A new mechanism is proposed where direct formation of an open dipolar intermediate following the addition of PTAD to the alkene is rate-limiting and the pathway toward ene product is significantly dependent on the reaction medium. In protic solvents, the open dipolar intermediate may proceed directly to the ene product or reversibly form an aziridinium imide (AI) intermediate that does not participate in the reaction. However, in aprotic solvents the open intermediate is short-lived (<10-11 s) and the ene product forms via the AI intermediate. The calculated free energies of activation are in close agreement with those derived from experiment, e.g., DeltaG of 14.9 kcal/mol compared to 15.0 kcal/mol in acetonitrile. Density functional theory calculations at the (U)B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p) level using the CPCM continuum solvent model were also carried out and confirmed a zwitterionic, and not diradical, open intermediate present in the reaction. Only the QM/MM methodology was able to accurately reproduce the experimental rates and differentiate between the protic and aprotic solvents. Solute-solvent interaction energies, radial distribution functions, and charges are analyzed and show that the major factor dictating the changes in reaction path is hydrogen bond stabilization of the charge separations spanning 2 to 4 atoms in the intermediates and transition states.

  12. 100% thiol-functionalized ethylene PMOs prepared by "thiol acid-ene" chemistry.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Dolores; van den Berg, Otto; Romero-Salguero, Francisco J; Du Prez, Filip; Van der Voort, Pascal

    2013-03-21

    A novel thiol functionalized bis-silane PMO precursor was synthesized by highly efficient thiol acid-ene chemistry between the double bonds of 1,2-(E)-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethene and thioacetic acid. After aminolysis the self-assembly process of the formed SH-precursor with Pluronic P123 under acidic conditions yields the first 100% thiol-PMO material with good structural ordering.

  13. Enantioselective intramolecular aldehyde α-alkylation with simple olefins: direct access to homo-ene products.

    PubMed

    Comito, Robert J; Finelli, Fernanda G; MacMillan, David W C

    2013-06-26

    A highly selective method for the synthesis of asymmetrically substituted carbocycles and heterocycles from unactivated aldehyde-olefin precursors has been achieved via enantioselective SOMO-catalysis. Addition of a catalytically generated enamine radical cation across a pendent olefin serves to establish a general asymmetric strategy toward the production of a wide range of formyl-substituted rings with alkene transposition. Conceptually, this novel mechanism allows direct access to "homo-ene"-type products.

  14. Quick-disconnect harness system for helmet-mounted displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bapu, P. T.; Aulds, M. J.; Fuchs, Steven P.; McCormick, David M.

    1992-10-01

    We have designed a pilot's harness-mounted, high voltage quick-disconnect connectors with 62 pins, to transmit voltages up to 13.5 kV and video signals with 70 MHz bandwidth, for a binocular helmet-mounted display system. It connects and disconnects with power off, and disconnects 'hot' without pilot intervention and without producing external sparks or exposing hot embers to the explosive cockpit environment. We have implemented a procedure in which the high voltage pins disconnect inside a hermetically-sealed unit before the physical separation of the connector. The 'hot' separation triggers a crowbar circuit in the high voltage power supplies for additional protection. Conductor locations and shields are designed to reduce capacitance in the circuit and avoid crosstalk among adjacent circuits. The quick- disconnect connector and wiring harness are human-engineered to ensure pilot safety and mobility. The connector backshell is equipped with two hybrid video amplifiers to improve the clarity of the video signals. Shielded wires and coaxial cables are molded as a multi-layered ribbon for maximum flexibility between the pilot's harness and helmet. Stiff cabling is provided between the quick-disconnect connector and the aircraft console to control behavior during seat ejection. The components of the system have been successfully tested for safety, performance, ergonomic considerations, and reliability.

  15. Bioconversion of car-3-ene by a dioxygenase of Pleurotus sapidus.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Nicole; Krings, Ulrich; Sydes, Daniel; Wittig, Maximilian; Berger, Ralf G

    2012-06-30

    Mycelium of the basidiomycete Pleurotus sapidus known to contain a novel dioxygenase was used for the bioconversion of car-3-ene [I]. After 4h of incubation 25.3mgL(-1) car-3-en-5-one [V], 5.4mgL(-1) car-3-en-2-one [VII], and 7.3mgL(-1) car-2-en-4-one [XV] accumulated as major oxidation products. The identity of the respective carenones and their corresponding alcohols was confirmed by comparison with MS and NMR spectral data obtained for synthesized authentic compounds. The peak areas of oxidation products were at least five times higher as compared with autoxidation. A radical mechanism similar to lipoxygenase catalysis was proposed and substantiated with detailed product analyses. The reduction of assumed car-3-ene hydroperoxides to the corresponding alcohols evidenced the radical initiated formation of hydroperoxides and confirmed the regio- and stereo-selectivity of the dioxygenase. The introduction of molecular oxygen into the bicyclic car-3-ene [I] molecule occurred at allylic positions of a cyclic isopentenyl moiety with a pronounced preference for the position adjacent to the non-substituted carbon atom of the C-C-double bond. This co-factor independent selective oxygenation presents an alternative to P450 mono-oxygenase based approaches for the production of terpene derived flavor compounds, pharmaceuticals and other fine chemicals.

  16. Facile and Efficient Synthesis of Carbosiloxane Dendrimers via Orthogonal Click Chemistry Between Thiol and Ene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhida; Feng, Shengyu; Zhang, Jie

    2016-02-01

    A combination of a thiol-Michael addition reaction and a free radical mediated thiol-ene reaction is employed as a facile and efficient approach to carbosiloxane dendrimer synthesis. For the first time, carbosiloxane dendrimers are constructed rapidly by an orthogonal click strategy without protection/deprotection procedures. The chemoselectivity of these two thiol-ene click reactions leads to a design of a new monomer containing both electron-deficient carbon-carbon double bonds and unconjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. Siloxane bonds are introduced as the linker between these two kinds of carbon-carbon double bonds. Starting from a bifunctional thiol core, the dendrimers are constructed by iterative thiol-ene click reactions under different but both mild reaction conditions. After simple purification steps the fifth dendrimer with 54 peripheral functional groups is obtained with an excellent overall yield in a single day. Furthermore, a strong blue glow is observed when the dendrimer is excited by a UV lamp.

  17. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  18. Graphene Oxide-Polymer Composite Langmuir Films Constructed by Interfacial Thiol-Ene Photopolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaona; Ma, Kai; Jiao, Tifeng; Xing, Ruirui; Zhang, Lexin; Zhou, Jingxin; Li, Bingbing

    2017-02-01

    The effective synthesis and self-assembly of graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites are of key importance for a broad range of nanomaterial applications. In this work, a one-step chemical strategy is presented to synthesize stable GO-polymer Langmuir composite films by interfacial thiol-ene photopolymerization at room temperature, without use of any crosslinking agents and stabilizing agents. It is discovered that photopolymerization reaction between thiol groups modified GO sheets and ene in polymer molecules is critically responsible for the formation of the composite Langmuir films. The film formed by Langmuir assembly of such GO-polymer composite films shows potential to improve the mechanical and chemical properties and promotes the design of various GO-based nanocomposites. Thus, the GO-polymer composite Langmuir films synthesized by interfacial thiol-ene photopolymerization with such a straightforward and clean manner, provide new alternatives for developing chemically modified GO-based hybrid self-assembled films and nanomaterials towards a range of soft matter and graphene applications.

  19. Graphene Oxide-Polymer Composite Langmuir Films Constructed by Interfacial Thiol-Ene Photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaona; Ma, Kai; Jiao, Tifeng; Xing, Ruirui; Zhang, Lexin; Zhou, Jingxin; Li, Bingbing

    2017-12-01

    The effective synthesis and self-assembly of graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites are of key importance for a broad range of nanomaterial applications. In this work, a one-step chemical strategy is presented to synthesize stable GO-polymer Langmuir composite films by interfacial thiol-ene photopolymerization at room temperature, without use of any crosslinking agents and stabilizing agents. It is discovered that photopolymerization reaction between thiol groups modified GO sheets and ene in polymer molecules is critically responsible for the formation of the composite Langmuir films. The film formed by Langmuir assembly of such GO-polymer composite films shows potential to improve the mechanical and chemical properties and promotes the design of various GO-based nanocomposites. Thus, the GO-polymer composite Langmuir films synthesized by interfacial thiol-ene photopolymerization with such a straightforward and clean manner, provide new alternatives for developing chemically modified GO-based hybrid self-assembled films and nanomaterials towards a range of soft matter and graphene applications.

  20. Thiol-Ene Induced Diphosphonic Acid Functionalization of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, Ryan D.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Warner, Marvin G.

    2010-07-20

    Multi-functional organic molecules represent an interesting challenge for nanoparticle functionalization due to the potential for undesirable interactions between the substrate material and the variable functionalities, making it difficult to control the final orientation of the ligand. In the present study, UV-induced thiol-ene click chemistry has been utilized as a means of directed functionalization of bifunctional ligands on an iron oxide nanoparticle surface. Allyl diphosphonic acid ligand was covalently deposited on the surface of thiol-presenting iron oxide nanoparticles via the formation of a UV-induced thioether. This method of thiol-ene click chemistry offers a set of reaction conditions capable of controlling the ligand deposition and circumventing the natural affinity exhibited by the phosphonic acid moiety for the iron oxide surface. These claims are supported via a multimodal characterization platform which includes thermogravimetric analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and metal contact analysis and are consistent with a properly oriented, highly active ligand on the nanoparticle surface. These experiments suggest thiol-ene click chemistry as both a practical and generally applicable strategy for the directed deposition of multi-functional ligands on metal oxide nanoparticle surfaces.

  1. Surface modification of cyclomatrix polyphosphazene microsphere by thiol-ene chemistry and lectin recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Zhu, Xue-yan; Gao, Qiao-ling; Fang, Fei; Huang, Xiao-jun

    2016-11-01

    A new synthetic route leading to functional polyphosphazene cyclomatrix microsphere has been developed via thiol-ene click modification. Hexacholorocyclophosphazene (HCCP) was crosslinked with both bisphenol-S and 4,4‧-diallyl bisphenol-S to obtain vinyl polyphosphazene microspheres (VPZM) in order to ensure high crosslinking degree and introduce vinyl moieties. Compared to the microspheres obtained by HCCP and bisphenol-S, the size of VPZM was broadly dispersed from 400 nm to 1.40 μm. Thiol-ene click reactions were carried out to attach functional groups, such as glucosyl, carboxyl, ester and dodecyl groups onto polyphosphazene microspheres, which demonstrated no change in morphology and size after modification. Solid state NMR (SSNMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectoscopy (FT-IR) results showed that the vinyl moieties were introduced in the period of crosslinking and functionalization was also successful via click reactions. Moreover, the microspheres presented a little difference in thermal properties after modification. Concanavalin A (Con-A) fluorescent adsorption was also observed for glucosyl microspheres. Thus, the thiol-ene modified polyphosphazene microspheres displayed chemical flexibility in post-functionalization. These microspheres can be potentially applicated in enzyme immobilization, protein adsorption and chromatographic separation.

  2. Flight performance energetics and water turnovers of Tippler Pigeons with a harness and doorsal load

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gessaman, James A.; Workman, Gar W.; Fuller, Mark R.

    1991-01-01

    We measured carbon dioxide production and water efflux of 12 tippler pigeons (Columba spp.) during seven experimental flights using the doubly labeled water (DLW) method. Prior to the experiment birds were randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group flew as controls (no load or harness) on all seven flights. The other group wore a harness on two flights, a dorsal load/harness package (weighing about 5% of a birda??s mass) on two flights, and they were without a load in three flights. Plight duration of pigeons with only a harness and with a dorsal load/harness package was 21 and 26% less, respectively, than the controls. Pigeons wearing a harness, or wearing a dorsal load/harness package lost water 50-90%, and 57-100% faster, respectively, than control pigeons. The mean CO, production of pigeons wearing a harness or a load/harness package was not significantly different than pigeons without a harness or load. The small sample sizes and large variability in DLW measurements precluded a good test of the energetic cost of flying with a harness and dorsal load.

  3. Flight performance, energetics and water turnover of tippler pigeons with a harness and dorsal load

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gessaman, J.A.; Workman, G.W.; Fuller, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    We measured carbon dioxide production and water efflux of 12 tippler pigeons (Columba spp.) during seven experimental flights using the doubly labeled water (DLW) method. Prior to the experiment birds were randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group flew as controls (no load or harness) on all seven flights. The other group wore a harness on two flights, a dorsal load/harness package (weighing about 5% of a bird's mass) on two flights, and they were without a load in three flights. Flight duration of pigeons with only a harness and with a dorsal load/harness package was 21 and 26% less, respectively, than the controls. Pigeons wearing a harness, or wearing a dorsal load/harness package lost water 50-90%, and 57-100% faster, respectively, than control pigeons. The mean CO2 production of pigeons wearing a harness or a load/harness package was not significantly different than pigeons without a harness or load. The small sample sizes and large variability in DLW measuremets precluded a good test of the energetic cost of flying with a harness and dorsal load.

  4. Reactivity of vegetable oil macromonomers in thiol-ene, cationic, and emulsion polymerizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Micah Stephen

    Vegetable oils were, and continue, to be a mainstay in unsaturated polyester ("alkyd") technology. Our endeavor is to use vegetable oil-based polymers in environmentally-friendly coatings. The role of vegetable oil cis-unsaturation has not been fully explored in polymers. To that end, vegetable oil macromonomers (VOMMs) in three different systems were investigated to determine the involvement of cis-unsaturation in chain transfer, auto-oxidation, and copolymerization reactions. VOMMs were incorporated into UV curable thiol-ene coatings, UV cationic coatings, and acrylic solution copolymers and fundamental studies were conducted to determine how and to what extent cis-unsaturation contributes to film performance properties. In thiol-ene UV curable coatings, cis-unsaturation was involved in the initial curing reaction and to lesser degrees, in postcure crosslinking. Its behavior was determined to be dependent on the ene component. Thiol-ene photopolymerization yielded homogeneous networks but formulations containing VOMMs exhibited greater heterogeneity due to non-uniformity in the VOMM chemical structures, and the concurrent reactions occurring during thiol-ene photopolymerization and "dark cure". Partially epoxidized soybean oil was synthesized to contain varying levels of residual cis-unsaturation. Cationic photopolymerization of partially epoxidized soybean oil yielded lightly crosslinked films, but the influence of free radical decomposition byproducts has not been fully investigated. The low involvement of the cis-unsaturation in photopolymerization was attributed to its low reactivity and/or radical combination with antioxidants and molecular oxygen dissolved in the films. When used in emulsion polymerization, VOMMs lower the minimum filming temperature during coalescence and increase the Tg after application via auto-oxidation. Free radical polymerization of VOMMs is accompanied by chain transfer reactions between polymer radicals and VOMMs that reduces

  5. On-Orbit Evaluation of a New Treadmill Harness for Improved Crewmember Comfort and Load Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perusek, G. P.; Sheehan, C. C.; Savina, M. C.; Owings, T. M.; Davis, B. L.; Ryder, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    The current design of the International Space Station (ISS) Treadmill Harness has been reported to cause pain and discomfort to crewmembers during exercise. The Harness Station Development Test Objective (SDTO) provided participating crewmembers (n = 6) with a new harness design, the "Glenn Harness," to evaluate for comfort and loading as compared to the current Treadmill Harness. A novel suite of load-sensing instrumentation was developed to noninvasively measure load distribution and provided a first-ever quantification of actual dynamic loads during treadmill exercise. In addition, crew debriefs provided feedback on harness preference and overall impressions. Conclusions: Post-flight analysis in returned Glenn Harnesses (n = 3) showed minimal wear and tear. Four of the six subjects found the Glenn Harness to be more comfortable in this on-orbit, side-by-side comparison as measured by the crew comfort questionnaire and crew debriefs. Specific areas for improvement have been identified, and forward recommendations will be provided to the Human Research Program. The protocol developed for the SDTO provided valuable insight into crew comfort issues, design improvements, and loading preferences for exercise harnessing, which lays the groundwork for better harnessing systems and training protocols.

  6. How can developing countries harness biotechnology to improve health?

    PubMed Central

    Daar, Abdallah S; Berndtson, Kathryn; Persad, Deepa L; Singer, Peter A

    2007-01-01

    Background The benefits of genomics and biotechnology are concentrated primarily in the industrialized world, while their potential to combat neglected diseases in the developing world has been largely untapped. Without building developing world biotechnology capacity to address local health needs, this disparity will only intensify. To assess the potential of genomics to address health needs in the developing world, the McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health, along with local partners, organized five courses on Genomics and Public Health Policy in the developing world. The overall objective of the courses was to collectively explore how to best harness genomics to improve health in each region. This article presents and analyzes the recommendations from all five courses. Discussion In this paper we analyze recommendations from 232 developing world experts from 58 countries who sought to answer how best to harness biotechnology to improve health in their regions. We divide their recommendations into four categories: science; finance; ethics, society and culture; and politics. Summary The Courses' recommendations can be summarized across the four categories listed above: Science - Collaborate through national, regional, and international networks - Survey and build capacity based on proven models through education, training, and needs assessments Finance - Develop regulatory and intellectual property frameworks for commercialization of biotechnology - Enhance funding and affordability of biotechnology - Improve the academic-industry interface and the role of small and medium enterprise Ethics, Society, Culture - Develop public engagement strategies to inform and educate the public about developments in genomics and biotechnology - Develop capacity to address ethical, social and cultural issues - Improve accessibility and equity Politics - Strengthen understanding, leadership and support at the political level for biotechnology - Develop policies outlining

  7. Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process with Open Boundaries and Quadratic Harnesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryc, Włodek; Wesołowski, Jacek

    2017-02-01

    We show that the joint probability generating function of the stationary measure of a finite state asymmetric exclusion process with open boundaries can be expressed in terms of joint moments of Markov processes called quadratic harnesses. We use our representation to prove the large deviations principle for the total number of particles in the system. We use the generator of the Markov process to show how explicit formulas for the average occupancy of a site arise for special choices of parameters. We also give similar representations for limits of stationary measures as the number of sites tends to infinity.

  8. Materials that harness and modulate the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jamal S.; Roy, Krishnendu; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, biomaterial scientists have married materials engineering and immunobiology to conceptualize new immunomodulatory materials. This special class of biomaterials can modulate and harness the innate properties of immune functionality for enhanced therapeutic efficacy. Generally, two fundamental strategies are followed in the design of immunomodulatory biomaterials: (1) immuno-evasive (immuno-mimetic, immuno-suppressing, or immuno-inert) biomaterials and (2) immuno-activating or immuno-enhancing biomaterials. This article highlights the development and application of a number of immunomodulatory materials, categorized by these two general approaches. PMID:26997752

  9. "Hello, World!" Harnessing Social Media for the Rosetta Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, E.; Mignone, C.; Scuka, D.; Homfeld, A. M.; Ranero, K.; Rolfe, E.; Bennett, M.; Schepers, A.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Bauer, M.; McCaughrean, M.

    2016-03-01

    The European Space Agency's comet-chasing Rosetta mission was launched in 2004, before social media became a popular tool for mainstream communication. As it reached its destination ten years later, new audiences were reached and inspired by this once-in-a-lifetime event by harnessing a range of outlets for communicating the key messages. These included traditional online platforms, such as news websites, blogs, and Livestream, as well as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Flickr, YouTube, Google+ and SoundCloud. In this article, we outline the role social media channels played in making Rosetta one of the European Space Agency's biggest communication and public engagement successes.

  10. Peroxisystem: harnessing systems cell biology to study peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Schuldiner, Maya; Zalckvar, Einat

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, high-throughput experimentation with quantitative analysis and modelling of cells, recently dubbed systems cell biology, has been harnessed to study the organisation and dynamics of simple biological systems. Here, we suggest that the peroxisome, a fascinating dynamic organelle, can be used as a good candidate for studying a complete biological system. We discuss several aspects of peroxisomes that can be studied using high-throughput systematic approaches and be integrated into a predictive model. Such approaches can be used in the future to study and understand how a more complex biological system, like a cell and maybe even ultimately a whole organism, works.

  11. Harnessing natural product assembly lines: structure, promiscuity, and engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ladner, Christopher C; Williams, Gavin J

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutically relevant natural products are biosynthesized by the action of giant mega-enzyme assembly lines. By leveraging the specificity, promiscuity, and modularity of assembly lines, a variety of strategies have been developed that enable the biosynthesis of modified natural products. This review briefly summarizes recent structural advances related to natural product assembly lines, discusses chemical approaches to probing assembly line structures in the absence of traditional biophysical data, and surveys efforts that harness the inherent or engineered promiscuity of assembly lines for the synthesis of non-natural polyketides and nonribosomal peptide analogues. PMID:26527577

  12. Advantages and drawbacks of Thiol-ene based resins for 3D-printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonards, Holger; Engelhardt, Sascha; Hoffmann, Andreas; Pongratz, Ludwig; Schriever, Sascha; Bläsius, Jana; Wehner, Martin; Gillner, Arnold

    2015-03-01

    The technology of 3D printing is conquering the world and awakens the interest of many users in the most varying of applications. New formulation approaches for photo-sensitive thiol-ene resins in combination with various printing technologies, like stereolithography (SLA), projection based printing/digital light processing (DLP) or two-photon polymerization (TPP) are presented. Thiol-ene polymerizations are known for its fast and quantitative reaction and to form highly homogeneous polymer networks. As the resins are locally and temporally photo-curable the polymerization type is very promising for 3D-printing. By using suitable wavelengths, photoinitiator-free fabrication is feasible for single- and two photon induced polymerization. In this paper divinyl ethers of polyethylene glycols in combination with star-shaped tetrathiols were used to design a simple test-system for photo-curable thiol-ene resins. In order to control and improve curing depth and lateral resolution in 3D-polymerization processes, either additives in chemical formulation or process parameters can be changed. The achieved curing depth and resolution limits depend on the applied fabrication method. While two-/multiphoton induced lithography offers the possibility of micron- to sub-micron resolution it lacks in built-up speed. Hence single-photon polymerization is a fast alternative with optimization potential in sub-10-micron resolution. Absorber- and initiator free compositions were developed in order to avoid aging, yellowing and toxicity of resulting products. They can be cured with UV-laser radiation below 300 nm. The development at Fraunhofer ILT is focusing on new applications in the field of medical products and implants, technical products with respect to mechanical properties or optical properties of 3D-printed objects. Recent process results with model system (polyethylene glycol divinylether/ Pentaerithrytol tetrakis (3-mercaptopropionat), Raman measurements of polymer conversion

  13. Gold(I)-catalysed cycloisomerisation of 1,6-cyclopropene-enes.

    PubMed

    Miege, Frédéric; Meyer, Christophe; Cossy, Janine

    2012-06-18

    The gold(I)-catalysed cycloisomerisation of appropriately substituted 1,6-cyclopropene-enes proceeds through regioselective electrophilic ring opening of the three-membered ring to generate an alkenyl gold carbenoid that achieves the intramolecular cyclopropanation of the remote olefin. This strategy allows straightforward, highly efficient and diastereoselective access to a variety of substituted 3-oxa- and 3-azabicyclo[4.1.0]heptanes, as well as to bicyclo[4.1.0]heptan-3-ol derivatives. Since the isopropylidene group in the resulting cycloisomerisation products can be subjected to ozonolysis, 3,3-dimethylcyclopropenes behave as interesting surrogates for α-diazoketones.

  14. Synthesis of new pyrazolyl-1,3-diazabicyclo[3.1.0]hexe-3-ene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyani, Hamzeh; Albooyeh, Fereshteh; Fallahnezhad, Saied

    2015-07-01

    A series of new of photochromic 1,3-diazabicyclo[3.1.0]hex-3-ene derivatives based on the skeleton of five-membered pyrazole moiety have been synthesized and characterized by spectral techniques, as well as their photochromic properties were examined under UV light irradiation in various solutions. All these newly synthesized compounds showed good photochromic properties in the both solution and solid states. The UV-Visible spectral analysis of the corresponding pyrazolyl bicyclic aziridines established structure-photochromic behavior relationships.

  15. Preliminary Engineering Report contaminated groundwater seeps 317/319/ENE area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    When the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI) in the 317/319/ENE Area of Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) was being completed, groundwater was discovered moving to the surface through a series of seeps. The seeps are located approximately 600 ft south of the ANL fence line in Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve. Samples of this water were collected and analyzed for selected parameters. Two of five seeps sampled were found to contain detectable levels of organic contaminants. Three chemical species were identified: chloroform (14-25 {mu}g/L), carbon tetrachloride (56-340 {mu}g/L), and tetrachloroethylene (3-6 {mu}g/L). The other seeps did not contain detectable levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The water issuing from these two contaminated seeps flows into a narrow ravine, where it is visible as a trickle of water flowing through sand and gravel deposits on the floor of the ravine. Approximately 100-ft downstream of the seep area, the contaminated water is no longer visible, having drained back into the soil in the bed of the ravine. Figure 1 shows the location of the 317/319/ENE Area in relation to the ANL-E site and the Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve.

  16. A Theoretical Study of Ene Reactions in Solution: A Solution-Phase Translational Entropy Model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liu; Li, Shi-Jun; Fang, De-Cai

    2015-12-01

    Several density functional theory (DFT) methods, such as CAM-B3LYP, M06, ωB97x, and ωB97xD, are used to characterize a range of ene reactions. The Gibbs free energy, activation enthalpy, and entropy are calculated with both the gas- and solution-phase translational entropy; the results obtained from the solution-phase translational entropies are quite close to the experimental measurements, whereas the gas-phase translational entropies do not perform well. For ene reactions between the enophile propanedioic acid (2-oxo-1,3-dimethyl ester) and π donors, the two-solvent-involved explicit+implicit model can be employed to obtain accurate activation entropies and free-energy barriers, because the interaction between the carbonyl oxygen atom and the solvent in the transition state is strengthened with the formation of C-C and O-H bonds. In contrast, an implicit solvent model is adequate to calculate activation entropies and free-energy barriers for the corresponding reactions of the enophile 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione.

  17. Advanced functionalization of polyhydroxyalkanoate via the UV-initiated thiol-ene click reaction.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Kenji; Iwamoto, Kosuke; Satoh, Yasuharu; Sakai, Ryosuke; Satoh, Toshifumi; Dairi, Tohru

    2016-05-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) incorporating vinyl-bearing 3-hydroxyalkanoates were prepared in 8.5-12.9 g L(-1) yield. The molar ratios (0-16 mol%) of the vinyl-bearing 3-hydroxyalkanoate derivatives were controlled by the continuous feeding of undecylenate at various concentrations. Subsequently, the PHAs were functionalized by UV-initiated thiol-ene click reaction and chemical modification. (1)H NMR spectra suggested that 3-mercaptopropionic acid and 2-aminoethanethiol were successfully introduced into the vinyl-bearing PHA. Subsequently, chemical modification using fluorescein or a fibronectin active fragment (GRGDS) was attempted. The former yielded a PHA derivative capable of emitting fluorescence under UV irradiation, which was useful for determining the miscibility of PHA in a composite film comprising poly-ʟ-lactic acid (PLLA) and PHA. In the latter case, PHA bearing GRGDS peptides exhibited cell adhesiveness, suggesting that its biocompatibility was improved upon peptide introduction. Taken together, the UV-initiated thiol-ene click reaction was demonstrated to be useful in PHA modification.

  18. Facile functionalization of PDMS elastomer surfaces using thiol-ene click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Chen, Yang; Brook, Michael A

    2013-10-08

    A variety of methods have been developed for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer surface functionalization, particularly for the improvement of hydrophilicity. However, in addition to difficulties in avoiding undesired physical changes to the modified surface, including surface cracking, "hydrophobic recovery" frequently leads hydrophilically modified surfaces to completely return over time to their hydrophobic nature, with accompanying loss of accessible functional groups. Thiol-ene chemistry provides a mild and robust technology for synthetic elaboration. We demonstrate the introduction of thiol groups onto the PDMS surface via base-catalyzed equilibration of MTS ((MeO)3Si(CH2)3SH). Thiols in the product elastomer were shown to be located primarily at the air interface using EDX, XPS, and fluorescence labeling initially, and after extended periods of time: total thiol concentrations at the surface and in the bulk were established by complementary chemical titrations with DTDP (4,4'-dithiodipyridine) and iodine titrations in different solvents. The surface density of thiols was readily controlled by reaction conditions: the rate of hydrophobic recovery, which led to incomplete loss of accessible functional groups, was determined. Thiol-ene click chemistry was then used to introduce a variety of hydrophilic moieties onto the surface including a silicone surfactant and maleic anhydride, respectively. In the latter case, molecular functionalization with both small (fluorescent labels) and polymeric nucleophiles (poly(ethylene glycol), chitosan) could be subsequently induced by simple ring-opening nucleophilic attack leading to permanently functional surfaces.

  19. Rapid approach to biobased telechelics through two one-pot thiol-ene click reactions.

    PubMed

    Lluch, Cristina; Ronda, Joan C; Galià, Marina; Lligadas, Gerard; Cádiz, Virginia

    2010-06-14

    The application of environmentally friendly thiol-ene chemistry to the preparation of biobased telechelics is presented in this work. This methodology is based on two one-pot photoinitiated thiol-ene click processes: step-growth polymerization using a 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanedithiol and end-group postpolymerization modification with three functional thiols: 2-mercaptoethanol, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane. We applied this approach to a potentially 100% biomass-derived monomer, allyl ester of 10-undecenoic acid (UDA). To show the generality and scope of this methodology, a series of well-defined telechelics with molecular weight ranging from 1000-3000 g/mol and hydroxyl, carboxyl, or trimethoxysilyl groups at the polymer terminus were prepared. An exhaustive (1)H NMR and MALDI-TOF MS analyses demonstrates the highly end-group fidelity of this methodology being an interesting procedure for the accelerated preparation of telechelics derived from divinyl monomers. UDA-based thelechelic diol prepared using this methodology was reacted with 4,4'-methylenebis(phenylisocyanate) and 1,4-butanediol as the chain extender to obtain multiblock poly(ester urethane).

  20. Facile Fabrication of Polymerizable Ionic Liquid Based-Gel Beads via Thiol-ene Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Taghavikish, Mona; Subianto, Surya; Dutta, Naba Kumar; Choudhury, Namita Roy

    2015-08-12

    Multipurpose gel beads prepared from natural or synthetic polymers have received significant attention in various applications such as drug delivery, coatings, and electrolytes because of their versatility and unique performance as micro- and nanocontainers.1 However, comparatively little work has been done on poly(ionic liquid)-based materials despite their unique ionic characteristics. Thus, in this contribution we report the facile preparation of polymerizable ionic liquid-based gel beads using thiol-ene click chemistry. This novel system incorporates pentaerythritol tetra (3-mercaptopropionate) (PETKMP) and 1,4-di(vinylimidazolium) butane bisbromide in a thiol-ene-based photopolymerization to fabricate the gel beads. Their chemical structure, thermal and mechanical properties have been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The gel beads possess low Tg and their ionic functionalities attribute self-healing properties and their ability to uptake small molecules or organic compounds offers their potential use as pH sensing material and macrocontainers.

  1. 3β-Acetoxy-6-nitrocholest-5-ene: Crystal structure, thermal, optical and dielectrical behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsuzzaman; Mashrai, Ashraf; Khanam, Hena; Mabkhot, Yahia Nasser; Frey, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    3β-Acetoxy-6-nitrocholest-5-ene (2) has been synthesized from 3β-acetoxycholest-5-ene (1). We provided an analysis of the compound by means of FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR and X-ray crystallography. In addition microstructural, thermal, optical and dielectrical properties were also investigated. The compound 2 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21 with cell dimensions, a = 15.7729 (13) Å, b = 9.8933 (8) Å, c = 17.8070(14) Å, α = 90.00, β = 96.176(4), γ = 90.00. The powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) of the compound was recorded to ascertain phase homogeneity. The SEM micrograph showed the presence of brick shaped, elongated nitrocholestane particles with 177.12 × 25.53 × 5.69 μm dimensions. Thermogravimetric analysis showed stability of the compound up to 200 °C. The dielectrical studies showed that with increase in frequency, the dielectric constant decreases and becomes almost constant at high frequencies.

  2. Harnessing plant-microbe interactions for enhancing farm productivity.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Catriona; Singh, Brajesh

    2014-01-01

    Declining soil fertility and farm productivity is a major global concern in order to achieve food security for a burgeoning world population. It is reported that improving soil health alone can increase productivity by 10-15% and in combination with efficient plant traits, farm productivity can be increased up to 50-60%. In this article we explore the emerging microbial and bioengineering technologies, which can be employed to achieve the transformational increase in farm productivity and can simultaneously enhance environmental outcomes i.e., low green house gas (GHG) emissions. We argue that metagenomics, meta-transcriptomics and metabolomics have potential to provide fundamental knowledge on plant-microbes interactions necessary for new innovations to increase farm productivity. Further, these approaches provide tools to identify and select novel microbial/gene resources which can be harnessed in transgenic and designer plant technologies for enhanced resource use efficiencies.

  3. Harnessing power from tides - State of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, P. R.

    1980-02-01

    Instead of a conventional dam, a membrane of reinforced plastic (the 'water sail'), hermetically anchored to the bottom and sides of a bay, could harness power from tides. Such a membrane, constructed in sections, and estimated to be 20 to 30 times cheaper to construct than a conventional tidal project, could operate in a tidal range of two meters, instead of the usual five meters. Moreover, it could be lowered or pulled aside to allow ship traffic to pass or to protect it during storms. The top of the barrier would be supported by a cable (fixed to floats) spanning the entrance to the bay, while the conversion of tidal energy would be accomplished using compressed air, with two tidal chambers connected to a large piston air motor, although the possible use of gas turbine engines will also be tested.

  4. Response of Cable Harnesses Subjected to High-velocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Kumi; Kawakita, Shirou; Takeba, Atsushi; Katayama, Masahide

    We compared numerical simulation results obtained using AUTODYN-3D, which is used for impact analysis of complex physical systems including fluid and solid materials, with experimental results obtained using a two-stage light gas gun. The response of electric power supply cable harnesses subjected to high-velocity impact at 4.01 km/s is shown and discussed. In addition, AUTODYN-3D was applied to the numerical simulation of the hypervelocity impact of micrometeoroids and space debris (M/OD) at 15 km/s and 20 km/s, respectively. Material models used in the numerical simulation are also discussed and investigated in order to cover a wide range of impact velocities, including shock-induced vaporization.

  5. Parachuting harnesses comparative evaluation on energy distribution grids.

    PubMed

    Hembecker, Paula Karina; Poletto, Angela Regina; Gontijo, Leila Amaral

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to make a comparative evaluation of three different parachuting harnesses to work at heights in the energy industry, from the electricians' point of view concerning these products under the optics of usability and ergonomic principles, and mainly justified by the high quantity of injuries at the energy industry due to high falls. According to its main target, this field research is classified as exploratory-descriptive transversal viewing study and, considering this perspective, the study was developed in four steps. Research results have enlightened the weakest spots and the potential improvement opportunities of these products, developed to assure safety of the work at heights to the energy industry, according to the opinion of the users. Still, results point that, regardless of the model, these devices have adapting issues to fulfill the electrical sector user's needs.

  6. Harnessing the Power of Information Technology: Open Business Models in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheets, Robert G.; Crawford, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Higher education is under enormous pressure to improve outcomes and reduce costs. Information technology can help achieve these goals, but only if it is properly harnessed. This article argues that one key to harnessing information technology is business model innovation that results in more "open" and "unbundled" operations in learning and…

  7. Generational Theory and the U.S. Army: Harnessing the True Power of Human Capital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Studies Research Paper September 2010- April 2011 4. TITLE AND ·sUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Generational Theory and the U.S. Army: Harnessing the...MASTER OF MILITARY STUDIES GENERATIONAL THEORY AND THE U.S. ARMY: HARNESSING THE TRUE POWER OF HUMAN CAPITAL SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT dF...

  8. STS-39 MS Harbaugh is suspended over JSC's WETF Bldg 29 pool via harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-39 Mission Specialist (MS) Gregory J. Harbaugh, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), is suspended above JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool via his parachute harness. Harbaugh will be dropped from the harness into the WETF's 25 ft deep pool to simulate an emergency egress bailout from the Space Shuttle into the ocean.

  9. STS-39 MS Bluford is suspended over JSC's WETF Bldg 29 pool via harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-39 Mission Specialist (MS) Guion S. Bluford, Jr, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), is suspended above JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool via his parachute harness. Bluford will be dropped from the harness into the WETF's 25 ft deep pool to simulate an emergency egress bailout from the Space Shuttle into the ocean.

  10. 14 CFR 121.311 - Seats, safety belts, and shoulder harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seats, safety belts, and shoulder harnesses... § 121.311 Seats, safety belts, and shoulder harnesses. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless... lounge or divan seat may share one approved safety belt during en route flight only. (b) Except...

  11. 14 CFR 121.311 - Seats, safety belts, and shoulder harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seats, safety belts, and shoulder harnesses... § 121.311 Seats, safety belts, and shoulder harnesses. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless... lounge or divan seat may share one approved safety belt during en route flight only. (b) Except...

  12. 14 CFR 135.171 - Shoulder harness installation at flight crewmember stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shoulder harness installation at flight... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Aircraft and Equipment § 135.171 Shoulder harness installation at flight... configuration, excluding any pilot seat, of 10 seats or more unless it is equipped with an approved...

  13. The effect of the use of full body harnesses on their protective properties.

    PubMed

    Baszczyński, Krzysztof; Jachowicz, Marcin

    2009-01-01

    A full body harness is a component of personal systems protecting against falls from a height. To ensure users' safety, the harness must retain its protective properties during its whole service period. All the elements of a harness (webbings, threads, metal buckles, etc.) are exposed to destructive factors. Harnesses stored and used for a few years were tested. The paper discusses the most frequent types of damage and their effect on the essential resistance parameters. The effect of atmospheric conditions, sunlight, mechanical damage and dust on the parameters of webbings was tested. Conclusions on the main causes of the loss of the protective properties of harnesses are drawn; periodic checks of the physical conditions and guidelines for estimating acceptable service time are recommended.

  14. Facile synthesis of cyanofurans via Michael-addition/cyclization of ene-yne-ketones with trimethylsilyl cyanide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Chen, Yang; Wu, Wanqing; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2017-01-03

    We have developed a Michael-addition/cyclization procedure between ene-yne-ketones and TMSCN under metal-free conditions. A wide range of cyanofurans was delivered in high yields, which could be further transformed to a series of furo-furanimines, furo-pyridazines or carboxamido-furans. In addition, deuterium-labeling experiments have been conducted to clarify the reaction pathway.

  15. Highly enantioselective and anti-diastereoselective catalytic intermolecular glyoxylate-ene reactions: effect of the geometrical isomers of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Min; Ding, Ran; Xu, Yun-He; Loh, Teck-Peng

    2015-06-05

    An efficient method for the synthesis of homoallylic alcohols with high enantioselectivities and anti-diastereoselectivities via an In(III)-catalyzed intermolecular glyoxylate-ene reaction has been developed. The geometrical isomers of alkenes were shown to have different reactivities. Only the isomers of the alkenes having a proton β-cis to the substituent reacted in this catalytic system.

  16. Iron-Catalyzed Tandem Conia-Ene/Friedel-Crafts Reactions of o-Alkynyldihydrochalcones: Access to Benzo[b]fluorenes.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Sikkandarkani; Srinivasan, Kannupal

    2016-02-05

    o-Alkynyldihydrochalcones when treated with a catalytic amount of anhydrous FeCl3 in refluxing 1,2-dichloroethane underwent tandem Conia-ene and Friedel-Crafts reactions to yield benzo[b]fluorene derivatives in good yields.

  17. Analysis of Production Lead Time for Missile Repair Parts: Contracts Dealing with Cable Assemblies and Wiring Harnesses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    contracts dealing with cable assemblies and wiring harnesses . Techniques of regression analysis and graphical analysis were employed on the data observations from thirty cable assembly and wiring harness contracts.

  18. A Thiol-Ene Coupling Approach to Native Peptide Stapling and Macrocyclization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanxiang; Chou, Danny Hung-Chieh

    2015-09-07

    We report the discovery of a peptide stapling and macrocyclization method using thiol-ene reactions between two cysteine residues and an α,ω-diene in high yields. This new approach enabled us to selectively modify cysteine residues in native, unprotected peptides with a variety of stapling modifications for helix stabilization or general macrocyclization. We synthesized stapled Axin mimetic analogues and demonstrated increased alpha helicity upon peptide stapling. We then synthesized stapled p53 mimetic analogues using pure hydrocarbon linkers and demonstrated their abilities to block the p53-MDM2 interaction and selectively kill p53 wild-type colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells but not p53 null cells. In summary, we demonstrated a robust and versatile peptide stapling method that could be potentially applied to both synthetic and expressed peptides.

  19. Polysiloxane-based luminescent elastomers prepared by thiol-ene "click" chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yujing; Lu, Haifeng; Xue, Lei; Wang, Xianming; Wu, Lianfeng; Feng, Shengyu

    2014-09-26

    Side-chain vinyl poly(dimethylsiloxane) has been modified with mercaptopropionic acid, methyl 3-mercaptopropionate, and mercaptosuccinic acid. Coordinative bonding of Eu(III) to the functionalized polysiloxanes was then carried out and crosslinked silicone elastomers were prepared by thiol-ene curing reactions of these composites. All these europium complexes could be cast to form transparent, uniform, thin elastomers with good flexibility and thermal stability. The networks were characterized by FTIR, NMR, UV/Vis, and luminescence spectroscopy as well as by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The europium elastomer luminophores exhibited intense red light at 617 nm under UV excitation at room temperature due to the (5)D0 →(7)F2 transition in Eu(III) ions. The newly synthesized luminescent materials offer many advantages, including the desired mechanical flexibility. They cannot be dissolved or fused, and so they have potential for use in optical and electronic applications.

  20. Making Silicone Rubber Highly Resistant to Bacterial Attachment Using Thiol-ene Grafting

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical devices are indispensable in modern medicine yet offer surfaces that promote bacterial attachment and biofilm formation, resulting in acute and chronic healthcare-associated infections. We have developed a simple method to graft acrylates to silicone rubber, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a commonly used device material that is often colonized by bacteria. We demonstrate a novel method whereby nontoxic bacteria attachment-resistant polymers can be readily grafted from and grafted to the surface using thiol-ene chemistry, substantially reducing bacterial colonization. With use of this approach, bacterial biofilm coverage can be reduced by 99% compared with standard PDMS in an in vitro assay. This grafting approach offers significant advantages over commonly used physisorbed coatings, especially in areas of high shear or mechanical stress. Furthermore, the approach is versatile such that the grafted material properties can be tailored for the desired final application. PMID:27775316

  1. Fates of imine intermediates in radical cyclizations of N-sulfonylindoles and ene-sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanmo; Hay, E Ben; Geib, Stephen J; Curran, Dennis P

    2015-01-01

    Two new fates of imine intermediates formed on radical cyclizations of ene-sulfonamides have been identified, reduction and hydration/fragmentation. Tin hydride-mediated cyclizations of 2-halo-N-(3-methyl-N-sulfonylindole)anilines provide spiro[indoline-3,3'-indolones] or spiro-3,3'-biindolines (derived from imine reduction), depending on the indole C2 substituent. Cyclizations of 2-haloanilide derivatives of 3-carboxy-N-sulfonyl-2,3-dihydropyrroles also presumably form spiro-imines as primary products. However, the lactam carbonyl group facilitates the ring-opening of these cyclic imines by a new pathway of hydration and retro-Claisen-type reaction, providing rearranged 2-(2'-formamidoethyl)oxindoles.

  2. Fates of imine intermediates in radical cyclizations of N-sulfonylindoles and ene-sulfonamides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanmo; Hay, E Ben; Geib, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Two new fates of imine intermediates formed on radical cyclizations of ene-sulfonamides have been identified, reduction and hydration/fragmentation. Tin hydride-mediated cyclizations of 2-halo-N-(3-methyl-N-sulfonylindole)anilines provide spiro[indoline-3,3'-indolones] or spiro-3,3'-biindolines (derived from imine reduction), depending on the indole C2 substituent. Cyclizations of 2-haloanilide derivatives of 3-carboxy-N-sulfonyl-2,3-dihydropyrroles also presumably form spiro-imines as primary products. However, the lactam carbonyl group facilitates the ring-opening of these cyclic imines by a new pathway of hydration and retro-Claisen-type reaction, providing rearranged 2-(2'-formamidoethyl)oxindoles. PMID:26664585

  3. Computational study of the carbonyl-ene reaction of encapsulated formaldehyde in Na-FAU zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangthong, Winyoo; Probst, Michael; Limtrakul, Jumras

    2005-06-01

    Density-functional theory (B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)) and the ONIOM (Our-own-N-layer Integrated molecular Orbital+molecular Mechanics) approach utilizing two-layer ONIOM schemes (B3LYP/6-31G(d,p):UFF) have been employed to investigate structures of Na-exchanged zeolite-encapsulated formaldehyde (HCHO@Na-zeolite) and their interactions with propylene. The carbonyl-ene reaction of propylene and formaldehyde was studied on three model systems: (1) formaldehyde in Na-exchanged zeolite: HCHO@Na-zeolite/CH 3CH dbnd6 CH 2; (2) naked Na(I) as catalyst: Na(I)/HCHO/CH 3CH dbnd6 CH 2; (3) a bare model where only the reactants are present: HCHO/CH 3CH dbnd6 CH 2. It is found that inclusion of the extended zeolite framework has an effect on the structure and energetics of the adsorption complexes and leads to a lower energy barrier (25.1 kcal/mol) of the reaction as compared to the bare model system (34.4 kcal/mol). If the naked Na(I) interacts with the HCHO/CH 3CH dbnd6 CH 2 complex the energy barrier of the system is even lower than HCHO@Na-zeolite/CH 3CH dbnd6 CH 2, due to the large electrostatic field generated by the naked Na(I) cation (17.5 kcal/mol). The carbonyl-ene reaction of propylene using HCHO@Na-faujasite takes place in a single concerted reaction step.

  4. Support to Climate Data Dissemination in a Worldwide Data Federation by IS-ENES2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathmann, Torsten; Toussaint, Frank; Kindermann, Stephan; Lautenschlager, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Thousands of users accessed climate data produced as part of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). The data were created by about 30 different institutes and disseminated to a large variety of end users via a worldwide distributed infrastructure (Earth System Grid Federation, ESGF) consisting of data nodes and data portals. Part of the data was also used for the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and preserved in a long term archive. A support activity was funded within the IS-ENES2 FP7 project to support the various aspects of data dissemination for large intercomparison projects like CMIP5 and CORDEX. The activity was structured into the following parts: Support for data providers: • Development of basic data quality assurance tools, to be applied by data provider prior to making data accessible in the data federation • Support in installing and using the quality assurance tools • Agreements on best practices of data dissemination (e.g. search facets to be supported across sites etc.) Support for data users: Establishment of basic user support infrastructure components and services: • Askbot based internet forum for user support questions and answers • Support pages on central portals • Continuous maintenance of user support mailing lists Support for data centres and for fostering their collaboration: • Development of automatic consistency checking routines for data federation portals operated at different sites • Organization of data node installation and operation support events • Collection of distributed data usage statistic metrics • Development of Data Management Plans (DMP) • Activities towards common data access policies The experiences gained within the IS-ENES2 support activities will provide the basis of activities for improving the user support process in the future, especially in the context of upcoming large intercomparison projects like CMIP6, which will use the same

  5. Application of a modified harness design for attachment of radio transmitters to shorebirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzenbacher, Peter; Haig, Susan M.; Oring, L.W.

    2000-01-01

    Radio transmitter attachment methodology is important to the design of radio telemetry studies. In 1998, we attached 5 transmitters to a captive population of Western Sandpipers(Calidris mauri) and 7 transmitters to wild Killdeer (Charadriusv ociferus) using a modified version of the Rappolea nd Tipton (1991) figure-8 leg-loop harness. Captive birds fitted with harnesses did not exhibit quantifiable differences in behavior relative to control birds. Based on initial success in using the leg-loop harnesses, we used harnesses to attach transmitters in the wild to 30 Killdeer and 49 Dunlin (Calidris alpina) during the winters of 1998-1999 and 1999-2000. This was part of a study on movements of wintering shorebirds in the Willamette Valley of Oregon,USA. Wild birds showed no adverse effects of the harnesses.Thus, the described harness is a practical method for attachment of transmitters to shorebirds. Advantages of this harness method include a reduction in handling time at capture, elimination of the need to clip feathers for attachment, and increased transmitter retention time.

  6. Lumbar spine disc heights and curvature: upright posture vs. supine compression harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Shi-Uk; Hargens, Alan R.; Fredericson, Michael; Lang, Philipp K.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spinal lengthening in microgravity is thought to cause back pain in astronauts. A spinal compression harness can compress the spine to eliminate lengthening but the loading condition with harness is different than physiologic conditions. Our purpose was to compare the effect of spine compression with a harness in supine position on disk height and spinal curvature in the lumbar spine to that of upright position as measured using a vertically open magnetic resonance imaging system. METHODS: Fifteen healthy subjects volunteered. On day 1, each subject lay supine for an hour and a baseline scan of the lumbar spine was performed. After applying a load of fifty percent of body weight with the harness for thirty minutes, the lumbar spine was scanned again. On day 2, after a baseline scan, a follow up scan was performed after kneeling for thirty minutes within the gap between two vertically oriented magnetic coils. Anterior and posterior disk heights, posterior disk bulging, and spinal curvature were measured from the baseline and follow up scans. RESULTS: Anterior disk heights increased and posterior disk heights decreased compared with baseline scans both after spinal compression with harness and upright posture. The spinal curvature increased by both loading conditions of the spine. DISCUSSION: The spinal compression with specially designed harness has the same effect as the physiologic loading of the spine in the kneeling upright position. The harness shows some promise as a tool to increase the diagnostic capabilities of a conventional MR system.

  7. The globalization of health research: harnessing the scientific diaspora.

    PubMed

    Anand, Nalini P; Hofman, Karen J; Glass, Roger I

    2009-04-01

    The scientific diaspora is a unique resource for U.S. universities. By drawing on the expertise, experience, and catalytic potential of diaspora scientists, universities can capitalize more fully on their diverse intellectual resources to make lasting contributions to global health. This article examines the unique contributions of the diaspora in international research collaborations, advantages of harnessing the diaspora and benefits to U.S. universities of fostering these collaborations, challenges faced by scientists who want to work with their home countries, examples of scientists engaging with their home countries, and specific strategies U.S. universities and donors can implement to catalyze these collaborations. The contributions of the diaspora to the United States are immense: International students enrolled in academic year 2007-2008 contributed an estimated $15 billion to the U.S. economy. As scientific research becomes increasingly global, the percentage of scientific publications with authors from foreign countries has grown from 8% in 1988 to 20% in 2005. Diaspora scientists can help build trusting relationships with scientists abroad, and international collaborations may improve the health of underserved populations at home. Although opportunities for diaspora networks are increasing, most home countries often lack enabling policies, infrastructure, and resources to effectively utilize their diaspora communities abroad. This article examines how some governments have successfully mobilized their scientific diaspora to become increasingly engaged in their national research agendas. Recommendations include specific strategies, including those that encourage U.S. universities to promote mini-sabbaticals and provide seed funding and flexible time frames.

  8. Harnessing the Therapeutic Potential of Th17 Cells.

    PubMed

    Bystrom, Jonas; Taher, Taher E; Muhyaddin, M Sherwan; Clanchy, Felix I; Mangat, Pamela; Jawad, Ali S; Williams, Richard O; Mageed, Rizgar A

    2015-01-01

    Th17 cells provide protective immunity to infections by fungi and extracellular bacteria as well as cancer but are also involved in chronic inflammation. The cells were first identified by their ability to produce interleukin 17A (IL-17A) and, subsequently, associated with chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Th17 cells have some gene profile similarity with stem cells and can remain dormant in mucosal tissues for long periods. Indeed, recent studies suggest that functionally distinct subsets of pro- and anti-inflammatory Th17 cells can interchange phenotype and functions. For development, Th17 cells require activation of the transcription factors STAT3 and RORγt while RUNX1, c-Maf, and Aiolos are involved in changes of phenotype/functions. Attempts to harness Th17 cells against pathogens and cancer using vaccination strategies are being explored. The cells gain protective abilities when induced to produce interferon γ (IFNγ). In addition, treatment with antibodies to IL-17 is effective in treating patients with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and refectory rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, since RORγt is a nuclear receptor, it is likely to be a potential future drug target for modulating Th17 functions. This review explores pathways through which Th17 subsets are induced, the molecular basis of their plasticity, and potential therapeutic strategies for their modulation in diseases.

  9. Harnessing click detectors for the genuine characterization of light states

    PubMed Central

    Heilmann, René; Sperling, Jan; Perez-Leija, Armando; Gräfe, Markus; Heinrich, Matthias; Nolte, Stefan; Vogel, Werner; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The key requirement for harnessing the quantum properties of light is the capability to detect and count individual photons. Of particular interest are photon-number-resolving detectors, which allow one to determine whether a state of light is classical or genuinely quantum. Existing schemes for addressing this challenge rely on a proportional conversion of photons to electrons. As such, they are capable of correctly characterizing small photon fluxes, yet are limited by uncertainties in the conversion rate. In this work, we employ a divide-and-conquer approach to infallibly discerning non-classicality of states of light. This is achieved by transforming the incident fields into uniform spatial distributions that readily lend themselves for characterization by standard on-off detectors. Since the exact statistics of the light stream in multiplexed on-off detectors are click statistics, our technique is freely scalable to accommodate–in principle–arbitrarily large photon fluxes. Our experiments pave the way towards genuine integrated photon-number-resolving detection for advanced on-chip photonic quantum networks. PMID:26771053

  10. Analytical Model of Shear of 4-harness Satin Weave Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lu; Chen, Julie; Sherwood, James

    2004-06-01

    Trellis shear is the main deformation mode in the thermo-stamping process of woven fabric composites. To model the shear properties of woven fabrics analytically, the equilibrium equation of the unit cell of a 4-harness satin weave glass/polypropylene woven fabric is studied. Frictional resistance moment and lateral compaction resistance moment are then predicted by studying the geometry of the unit cell. Then the model is used to predict the load versus shear angle curves in the picture frame test to reduce or eliminate the test itself. A parametric study is carried out to determine the sensitivity of the friction coefficient. To validate the model, picture-frame experimental results are presented. A very close correlation is observed between the model predictions and the experimental results. Results of plain weave fabrics are included to show the analytical model's ability to predict the effect of weave pattern. Results from an international benchmark testing are also presented to help establish the test standards for experimental characterization of the shear properties of woven fabrics in the thermo-stamping process.

  11. Abasic pivot substitution harnesses target specificity of RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Sook; Seok, Heeyoung; Lee, Dong Ha; Ham, Juyoung; Lee, Wooje; Youm, Emilia Moonkyung; Yoo, Jin Seon; Lee, Yong-Seung; Jang, Eun-Sook; Chi, Sung Wook

    2015-01-01

    Gene silencing via RNA interference inadvertently represses hundreds of off-target transcripts. Because small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can function as microRNAs, avoiding miRNA-like off-target repression is a major challenge. Functional miRNA–target interactions are known to pre-require transitional nucleation, base pairs from position 2 to the pivot (position 6). Here, by substituting nucleotide in pivot with abasic spacers, which prevent base pairing and alleviate steric hindrance, we eliminate miRNA-like off-target repression while preserving on-target activity at ∼80–100%. Specifically, miR-124 containing dSpacer pivot substitution (6pi) loses seed-mediated transcriptome-wide target interactions, repression activity and biological function, whereas other conventional modifications are ineffective. Application of 6pi allows PCSK9 siRNA to efficiently lower plasma cholesterol concentration in vivo, and abolish potentially deleterious off-target phenotypes. The smallest spacer, C3, also shows the same improvement in target specificity. Abasic pivot substitution serves as a general means to harness the specificity of siRNA experiments and therapeutic applications. PMID:26679372

  12. Mic Flocks in the Cloud: Harnessing Mobile Ubiquitous Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, M. A.; Christe, A.

    2015-12-01

    Smartphones provide a commercial, off-the-shelf solution to capture, store, analyze, and distribute infrasound using on-board or external microphones (mics) as well as on-board barometers. Free iOS infrasound apps can be readily downloaded from the Apple App Store, and Android versions are in progress. Infrasound propagates for great distances, has low sample rates, and provides a tractable pilot study scenario for open distributed sensor networks at regional and global scales using one of the most ubiquitous sensors on Earth - microphones. Data collection is no longer limited to selected vendors at exclusive prices: anybody on Earth can record and stream infrasound, and the diversity of recording systems and environments is rapidly expanding. Global deployment may be fast and easy (www.redvox.io), but comes with the cost of increasing data volume, velocity, variety, and complexity. Flocking - the collective motion of mobile agents - is a natural human response to threats or events of interest. Anticipating, modeling and harnessing flocking sensor topologies will be necessary for adaptive array and network processing. The increasing data quantity and complexity will exceed the processing capacity of human analysts and most research servers. We anticipate practical real-time applications will require the on-demand adaptive scalability and resources of the Cloud. Cloud architectures for such heterogeneous sensor networks will consider eventual integration into the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS).

  13. Abasic pivot substitution harnesses target specificity of RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Sook; Seok, Heeyoung; Lee, Dong Ha; Ham, Juyoung; Lee, Wooje; Youm, Emilia Moonkyung; Yoo, Jin Seon; Lee, Yong-Seung; Jang, Eun-Sook; Chi, Sung Wook

    2015-12-18

    Gene silencing via RNA interference inadvertently represses hundreds of off-target transcripts. Because small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can function as microRNAs, avoiding miRNA-like off-target repression is a major challenge. Functional miRNA-target interactions are known to pre-require transitional nucleation, base pairs from position 2 to the pivot (position 6). Here, by substituting nucleotide in pivot with abasic spacers, which prevent base pairing and alleviate steric hindrance, we eliminate miRNA-like off-target repression while preserving on-target activity at ∼ 80-100%. Specifically, miR-124 containing dSpacer pivot substitution (6pi) loses seed-mediated transcriptome-wide target interactions, repression activity and biological function, whereas other conventional modifications are ineffective. Application of 6pi allows PCSK9 siRNA to efficiently lower plasma cholesterol concentration in vivo, and abolish potentially deleterious off-target phenotypes. The smallest spacer, C3, also shows the same improvement in target specificity. Abasic pivot substitution serves as a general means to harness the specificity of siRNA experiments and therapeutic applications.

  14. Harnessing high-dimensional hyperentanglement through a biphoton frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhenda; Zhong, Tian; Shrestha, Sajan; Xu, Xinan; Liang, Junlin; Gong, Yan-Xiao; Bienfang, Joshua C.; Restelli, Alessandro; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Wong, Franco N. C.; Wei Wong, Chee

    2015-08-01

    Quantum entanglement is a fundamental resource for secure information processing and communications, and hyperentanglement or high-dimensional entanglement has been separately proposed for its high data capacity and error resilience. The continuous-variable nature of the energy-time entanglement makes it an ideal candidate for efficient high-dimensional coding with minimal limitations. Here, we demonstrate the first simultaneous high-dimensional hyperentanglement using a biphoton frequency comb to harness the full potential in both the energy and time domain. Long-postulated Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum revival is exhibited, with up to 19 time-bins and 96.5% visibilities. We further witness the high-dimensional energy-time entanglement through Franson revivals, observed periodically at integer time-bins, with 97.8% visibility. This qudit state is observed to simultaneously violate the generalized Bell inequality by up to 10.95 standard deviations while observing recurrent Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt S-parameters up to 2.76. Our biphoton frequency comb provides a platform for photon-efficient quantum communications towards the ultimate channel capacity through energy-time-polarization high-dimensional encoding.

  15. Competition between dihydrogen bond and beryllium bond in complexes between HBeH and HArF: a huge blue shift of distant H-Ar stretch.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingzhong; Liu, Xiaofeng; Li, Ran; Cheng, Jianbo; Li, Wenzuo

    2012-05-01

    A novel interaction mechanism between HArF and BeH(2) has been validated and characterized with quantum chemical calculations at the MP2/aug-cc-pVQZ level. They can interact through beryllium bonding formed between the positively charged Be atom in BeH(2) and the negatively charged F atom in HArF, besides through dihydrogen bonding. The former (61.3 kcal/mol) is much stronger than the latter (5.9 kcal/mol). The red shift is found for the associated H-Ar stretch in the dihydrogen bonding, whereas the big blue shift is observed for the distant H-Ar stretch in the beryllium bonding. The blue shift of the distant H-Ar stretch is affected greatly by computational methods. It is calculated to be 712 cm(-1) at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,2p) level, which appears to be the largest blue shift validated for any weakly bound complex yet. The substitution effect on the beryllium bond is similar to that on hydrogen bonds. The Kr atom makes the beryllium bond weaken and the distant blue shift decrease. The nature and properties of beryllium bond have been analyzed with natural bond orbital (NBO), atoms in molecules (AIM), and energy decomposition.

  16. Impact of Harness Attachment Point on Kinetics and Kinematics During Sled Towing.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Ian; Atkins, Steve J; Edmundson, Christopher J; Metcalfe, John; Sinclair, Jonathan K

    2016-03-01

    Resisted sprint training is performed in a horizontal direction and involves similar muscles, velocities, and ranges of motion (ROM) to those of normal sprinting. Generally, sleds are attached to the athletes through a lead (3 m) and harness; the most common attachment points are the shoulder or waist. At present, it is not known how the different harness point's impact on the kinematics and kinetics associated with sled towing (ST). The aim of the current investigation was to examine the kinetics and kinematics of shoulder and waist harness attachment points in relation to the acceleration phase of ST. Fourteen trained men completed normal and ST trials, loaded at 10% reduction of sprint velocity. Sagittal plane kinematics from the trunk, hip, knee, and ankle were measured, together with stance phase kinetics (third footstrike). Kinetic and kinematic parameters were compared between harness attachments using one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. The results indicated that various kinetic differences were present between the normal and ST conditions. Significantly greater net horizontal mean force, net horizontal impulses, propulsive mean force, and propulsive impulses were measured (p < 0.05). Interestingly, the waist harness also led to greater net horizontal impulse when compared with the shoulder attachment (p < 0.001). In kinematic terms, ST conditions significantly increased peak flexion in hip, knee, and ankle joints compared with the normal trials (p < 0.05). Results highlighted that the shoulder harness had a greater impact on trunk and knee joint kinematics when compared with the waist harness (p < 0.05). In summary, waist harnesses seem to be the most suitable attachment point for the acceleration phase of sprinting. Sled towing with these attachments resulted in fewer kinematic alterations and greater net horizontal impulse when compared with the shoulder harness. Future research is necessary in order to explore the long-term adaptations of

  17. Harnessing DNA-induced immune responses for improving cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Herrada, Andrés A.; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; González-Figueroa, Paula; Roco, Jonathan; Oyarce, César; Ligtenberg, Maarten A.; Lladser, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive strategy to promote protective cellular and humoral immunity against the encoded antigen. DNA vaccines are easy to generate, inexpensive to produce and purify at large-scale, highly stable and safe. In addition, plasmids used for DNA vaccines act as powerful “danger signals” by stimulating several DNA-sensing innate immune receptors that promote the induction of protective adaptive immunity. The induction of tumor-specific immune responses represents a major challenge for DNA vaccines because most of tumor-associated antigens are normal non-mutated self-antigens. As a consequence, induction of potentially self-reactive T cell responses against such poorly immunogenic antigens is controlled by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression. Although several DNA vaccines against cancer have reached clinical testing, disappointing results have been observed. Therefore, the development of new adjuvants that strongly stimulate the induction of antitumor T cell immunity and counteract immune-suppressive regulation is an attractive approach to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines and overcome tumor-associated tolerance. Understanding the DNA-sensing signaling pathways of innate immunity that mediate the induction of T cell responses elicited by DNA vaccines represents a unique opportunity to develop novel adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency. The advance of DNA adjuvants needs to be complemented with the development of potent delivery systems, in order to step toward successful clinical application. Here, we briefly discuss recent evidence showing how to harness DNA-induced immune response to improve the potency of cancer vaccines and counteract tumor-associated tolerance. PMID:23111166

  18. Harnessing wound healing and regeneration for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, A D; Ferguson, M W J

    2005-04-01

    Biomedical science has made major advances in understanding how cells grow into functioning tissue and the signalling mechanisms used to achieve this are slowly being dissected. Tissue engineering is the application of that knowledge to the building or repairing of organs, including skin, the largest organ in the body. Generally, engineered tissue is a combination of living cells and a supporting matrix. Besides serving as burn coverings, engineered skin substitutes can help patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Today, most of these ulcers are treated with an approach that includes antibiotics, glucose control, special shoes and frequent cleaning and bandaging. The results of such treatments are often disappointing and ineffectual, and scarring remains a major problem, mechanically, cosmetically and psychologically. Within our group we are attempting to address this by investigating novel approaches to skin tissue engineering. We are identifying novel therapeutic manipulations to improve the degree of integration between a tissue engineered dermal construct and the host by both molecular manipulation of growth factors but also by understanding and harnessing mechanisms of regenerative biology. For the purpose of this summary, we will concentrate primarily on the latter of these two approaches in that we have identified a novel mouse mutant that completely and perfectly regenerates skin and cartilaginous components following ear injury. This experimental animal will allow us to characterize not only novel genes involved in the regeneration process but also to utilize cells from such animals in artificial skin equivalents to assess their behaviour compared with normal cells. This approach should allow us to create a tissue-engineered substitute, which more closely resembles the normal regional microanatomy and physiology of the skin, allowing better integration to the host with minimal or no scarring.

  19. Cancer vaccines: harnessing the potential of anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    Although the presence of cancer suggests failure of the immune system to protect against development of tumors, the possibility that immunity can be redirected and focused to generate an anti-tumor response offers great translational possibility. The key to this is identifying antigens likely to be present in any given tumor and functionally critical to tumor survival and growth. Such tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are varied and optimally should be absent from normal tissue. Of particular interest are TAAs associated with the tumor stroma, as immunity directed against the stroma may restrict the ability of the tumor to grow and metastasize. Important to directing the immune system toward an effect anti-tumor response is the understanding of how TAAs are processed and how the tumor is able to evade immune elimination. The process of immunoediting happens in response to the selective pressure that the immune system places upon tumor cell populations and allows for emergence of tumor cells capable of escaping immune destruction. Efforts to harness the immune system for clinical application has been aided by vaccines based on purified recombinant protein or nucleic acid TAAs. For example, a vaccine for canine melanoma has been developed and approved based on immunization with DNA components of tyrosinase, a glycoprotein essential to melanin synthesis. The performance of cancer vaccines has been aided in some cases when supplemented with immunostimulatory molecules such as interleukin 2 or a novel extracellular matrix vaccine adjuvant. Vaccines with the broadest menu of antigenic targets may be those most likely to succeed against cancer. For this reason, tissue vaccines produced from harvested tumor material may offer significant benefit. With several cancer vaccines on the veterinary and human markets, efforts to understand basic tumor immunology are soon to yield great dividends.

  20. Innovation in the Harnessing and Transfer of Technology: The Gran Mariscal de Ayacucho Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner de Almea, Ruth

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the background, organization, success, problems, and functions of the Gran Mariscal de Ayacucho Foundation, Caracas, Venezuela, for producing human resources for the harnessing of scientific technology. The fellowship program supports study by students both at home and abroad. (SL)

  1. STS-39 MS Hieb is suspended over JSC's WETF Bldg 29 pool via harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-39 Mission Specialist (MS) Richard J. Hieb, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), is hoisted above JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool via his parachute harness. Hieb will be dropped from the harness into the WETF's 25 ft deep pool to simulate an emergency egress bailout from the Space Shuttle into the ocean. Divers in the pool will ensure Hieb's safety during the exercise.

  2. Biocatalyst mediated production of 6β,11α-dihydroxy derivatives of 4-ene-3-one steroids.

    PubMed

    Kolet, Swati P; Niloferjahan, Siddiqui; Haldar, Saikat; Gonnade, Rajesh; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V

    2013-11-01

    Biotransformation of steroids with 4-ene-3-one functionality such as progesterone (I), testosterone (II), 17α-methyltestosterone (III), 4-androstene-3,17-dione (IV) and 19-nortestosterone (V) were studied by using a fungal system belonging to the genera of Mucor (M881). The fungal system efficiently and quantitatively converted these steroids in regio- and stereo-selective manner into corresponding 6β,11α-dihydroxy compounds. Time course experiments suggested that the transformation was initiated by hydroxylation at 6β- or 11α-(10β-hydroxy in case of V) to form monohydroxy derivatives which upon prolonged incubation were converted into corresponding 6β,11α-dihydroxy derivatives. The fermentation studies carried out using 5L table-top fermentor with substrates (I and II) clearly indicates that 6β,11α-dihydroxy derivatives of steroids with 4-ene-3-one functionality can be produced in large scale by using M881.

  3. Monocatenary, branched, double-headed, and bolaform surface active carbohydrate esters via photochemical thiol-ene/-yne reactions.

    PubMed

    Boyère, Cédric; Broze, Guy; Blecker, Christophe; Jérôme, Christine; Debuigne, Antoine

    2013-10-18

    An original and versatile method for the synthesis of a range of novel mannose-based surfactants was developed via metal-free photo-induced thiol-ene/-yne 'click' reactions. This light-mediated hydrothiolation reaction involving a thiolated mannose was successfully applied to terminal and internal alkenes, dienes, and alkynes, leading to monocatenary, branched, double-headed, and bolaform amphiphilic carbohydrate esters, respectively. A surface activity study showed that these new compounds possess valuable properties and display specific behavior at the air-water interface. It also demonstrated the greater flexibility of the thioether moiety in the spacer of the surfactants produced via a thiol-ene reaction in comparison with the triazole heterocyclic rings in similar glucose-based surfactants synthesized elsewhere by the alkyne-azide 1,3-dipolar addition.

  4. Oxa-ene reaction of enols of amides with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione.

    PubMed

    Basheer, Ahmad; Rappoport, Zvi

    2008-01-04

    The reaction of 16 enols of amides with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-1,3-dione gave open chain adducts rather than the [2 + 2] cycloadducts with a hemiaminal moiety, both in solid state and in solution. This assignment is based on X-ray crystallography, (1)H and (13)C NMR data, and IR spectra. The suggested mechanism involves hydroxyl proton loss in a formal oxa-ene reaction. Mechanistic details and a possible alternative are discussed.

  5. Highly regio- and stereocontrolled formation of functionalized tricyclo[4.2.1.0(2,8)]non-3-enes.

    PubMed

    Toselli, Nicolas; Martin, David; Achard, Mathieu; Tenaglia, Alphonse; Buono, Gérard

    2009-05-15

    The electrophilic activations of bicyclo[4.2.1]nonatrienes by 4-isopropyl-1,2,4-triazolinedione, N-iodosuccinimide, or an epoxidation/acidic ring-opening sequence is reported. The subsequent in situ trappings by water, alcohols, or benzoic acids led to original tricyclo[4.2.1.0(2,8)]non-3-enes with high regio- and stereoselectivities. The synthetic potentiality of these synthons is illustrated by the straightforward access to a fused cyclopropane featuring six consecutive controlled stereocenters.

  6. Catalytic hetero-ene reactions of 5-methyleneoxazolines: highly enantioselective synthesis of 2,5-disubstituted oxazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Luo, Weiwei; Zhao, Jiannan; Yin, Chengkai; Liu, Xiaohua; Lin, Lili; Feng, Xiaoming

    2014-07-18

    An efficient catalytic asymmetric hetero-ene reaction of 5-methyleneoxazolines with 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds (including α-ketoesters and glyoxal derivatives) was realized using Ni(II)-N,N'-dioxide complexes as the catalysts. It provides a rapid, high yielding (up to 99%) route for the preparation of 2,5-disubstituted oxazole derivatives in a highly enantioenriched form (up to >99% ee) under mild conditions.

  7. 3,3'-Di-n-propyl-1,1'-[p-phenyl-enebis(methyl-ene)]diimidazolium dibromide.

    PubMed

    Haque, Rosenani A; Nasri, S Fatimah; Hemamalini, Madhukar; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2011-08-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C(20)H(28)N(4) (2+)·2Br(-), consists of half a 3,3'-di-n-propyl-1,1'-[p-phenyl-enenis(methyl-ene)]diimidazolium cation and a bromide anion. The cation is located on an inversion center and adopts an ⋯AAA⋯ trans conformation. In the crystal, the cation is linked to the anions via weak C-H⋯Br hydrogen bonds.

  8. Facile thiol-ene thermal crosslinking reaction facilitated hole-transporting layer for highly efficient and stable perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhong'an; Zhu, Zonglong; Chueh, Chu -Chen; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K. -Y.

    2016-08-08

    A crosslinked organic hole-transporting layer (HTL) is developed to realize highly efficient and stable perovskite solar cells via a facile thiol-ene thermal reaction. This crosslinked HTL not only facilitates hole extraction from perovskites, but also functions as an effective protective barrier. Lastly, a high-performance (power conversion efficiency: 18.3%) device is demonstrated to show respectable photo and thermal stability without encapsulation.

  9. Asymmetric Electrophilic α-Amination of Silyl Enol Ether Derivatives via the Nitrosocarbonyl Hetero-ene Reaction.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, David; Samoshin, Andrey V; Read de Alaniz, Javier

    2015-09-18

    The first example of a general asymmetric nitrosocarbonyl hetero-ene reaction is described. The procedure uses a copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidation of a commercially available chiral nitrosocarbonyl precursor (EleNOr) and is operationally simple. The transformation is both high yielding and highly diastereoselective for a range of silyl enol ether derivatives. A variety of synthetically useful postfunctionalization reactions are presented along with a mechanistic rationale that can be used as a predictive model for future asymmetric reactions with nitrosocarbonyl intermediates.

  10. Enhanced mechanical properties of photo-clickable thiol-ene PEG hydrogels through repeated photopolymerization of in-swollen macromer.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, C I; Aisenbrey, E A; Wahlquist, J A; Heveran, C M; Ferguson, V L; Bryant, S J; McLeod, R R

    2016-11-09

    Current hydrogels used for tissue engineering are limited to a single range of mechanical properties within the replicated tissue construct. We show that repeated in-swelling by a single hydrogel pre-cursor solution into an existing polymerized hydrogel followed by photo-exposure increases hydrogel mechanical properties. The process is demonstrated with a photo-clickable thiol-ene hydrogel using a biocompatible precursor solution of poly(ethylene glycol) dithiol and 8-arm poly(ethylene glycol) functionalized with norbornene. The polymer fraction in the precursor solution was varied by 5, 10, and 20 percent by weight and an off-stoichiometric ratio of thiol : ene was used, leaving free enes available for subsequent reaction. Multiple swelling and exposure cycles for the same precursor solution were performed. The compressive modulus increased by a factor between three and ten (formulation dependent), while volume swelling ratio decreased by a factor of two, consistent with increased crosslink density. The modified hydrogels also demonstrate increased toughness by fracturing at compressive forces five times greater than the initial hydrogel. We attribute the increased toughness to subsequent increases in crosslink density created by the repeated photopolymerization of in-swollen macromer. This technique demonstrates the ability to significantly modify hydrogel network properties by exploiting swelling and polymerization processes that can be applied to traditional three-dimensional printing systems to spatially control local mechanical properties.

  11. Aptamer-based organic-silica hybrid affinity monolith prepared via "thiol-ene" click reaction for extraction of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Jin-cheng; Lian, Hong-zhen; Chen, Hong-yuan

    2015-06-01

    A novel strategy for preparing aptamer-based organic-silica hybrid monolithic column was developed via "thiol-ene" click chemistry. Due to the large specific surface area of the hybrid matrix and the simplicity, rapidness and high efficiency of "thiol-ene" click reaction, the average coverage density of aptamer on the organic-silica hybrid monolith reached 420 pmol μL(-1). Human α-thrombin can be captured on the prepared affinity monolithic column with high specificity and eluted by NaClO4 solution. N-p-tosyl-Gly-Pro-Arg p-nitroanilide acetate was used as the sensitive chromogenic substrate of thrombin. The thrombin enriched by this affinity column was detected with a detection of limit of 0.01 μM by spectrophotometry. Furthermore, the extraction recovery of thrombin at 0.15 μM in human serum was 91.8% with a relative standard deviation of 4.0%. These results indicated that "thiol-ene" click chemistry provided a promising technique to immobilize aptamer on organic-inorganic hybrid monolith and the easily-assembled affinity monolithic material could be used to realize highly selective recognition of trace proteins.

  12. Hello, world: Harnessing social media for the Rosetta mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Emily; Mignone, Claudia; O'Flaherty, Karen; Homfeld, Anne-Mareike; Bauer, Markus; McCaughrean, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The European Space Agency's (ESA) comet-chasing Rosetta mission was launched in 2004, before social media became a popular tool for mainstream communication. By harnessing a range of platforms for communicating the key messages of this unprecedented mission as it reached its destination ten years later, new audiences were reached and a global impact was achieved. Rosetta-specific social media accounts - @ESA_Rosetta on Twitter, the Rosetta Mission Facebook page and the rosettamission Instagram account - were developed during 2013/14 and used alongside the traditional reporting line of the main ESA website and the Rosetta blog to build awareness about the mission. Coordinated with ESA's existing social media channels (Flickr, YouTube, G+, Twitter, Facebook and Livestream) and with the support of ESA's country desks and Rosetta partner agency accounts (including @philae2014), information could be shared in a number of European languages, ensuring a wide reach across Europe - and the world. We discuss the roles of the various social media accounts in supporting and promoting the competitions and social media campaigns that were built around the key mission milestones of 2014: waking up from deep space hibernation (January), arriving at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (August) and naming the landing site for Philae ahead of the landing event in November. We discuss the different approach to each channel, such as the first person twitter accounts, the dialogue with and between blog users, and the discussions held live via G+ Hangouts with leading scientists and spacecraft operators. We compare and contrast the audiences, the interaction we had with them and how challenges were overcome. We also use the science-fiction-meets-science-fact Ambition short movie, and its "undercover" dissemination on social media, as an example of how the profile of the Rosetta mission was raised in a unique way. By using a variety of social media platforms to target different audiences with

  13. Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Plasticity Harnesses Endocytic Circuitries.

    PubMed

    Corallino, Salvatore; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Zobel, Martina; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Scita, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    execution of different biological processes, with a primary role in the control of polarized functions. Thus, they may be relevant for controlling EMT or certain aspects of it. Here, by discussing a few paradigmatic cases, we will outline how endocytosis may be harnessed by the EMT process to promote dynamic changes in cellular identity, and to increase cellular flexibility and adaptation to micro-environmental cues, ultimately impacting on physiological and pathological processes, first and foremost cancer progression.

  14. Photogenerated Lectin Sensors Produced by Thiol-Ene/Yne Photo-Click Chemistry in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, Oscar; Lee, Irene H.; Aastrup, Teodor; Yan, Mingdi; Ramström, Olof

    2012-01-01

    The photoinitiated radical reactions between thiols and alkenes/alkynes (thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistry) have been applied to a functionalization methodology to produce carbohydrate-presenting surfaces for analyses of biomolecular interactions. Polymer-coated quartz surfaces were functionalized with alkenes or alkynes in a straightforward photochemical procedure utilizing perfluorophenylazide (PFPA) chemistry. The alkene/alkyne surfaces were subsequently allowed to react with carbohydrate thiols in water under UV-irradiation. The reaction can be carried out in a drop of water directly on the surface without photoinitiator and any disulfide side products were easily washed away after the functionalization process. The resulting carbohydrate-presenting surfaces were evaluated in real-time studies of protein-carbohydrate interactions using a quartz crystal microbalance flow-through system with recurring injections of selected lectins with intermediate regeneration steps using low pH buffer. The resulting methodology proved fast, efficient and scalable to high-throughput analysis formats, and the produced surfaces showed significant protein binding with expected selectivities of the lectins used in the study. PMID:22341757

  15. Roll-to-plate fabrication of microfluidic devices with rheology-modified thiol-ene resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkbeil, Silja; Aho, Johanna; Yde, Leif; Lindvold, Lars R.; Stensborg, Jan F.; Rantanen, Jukka; Lafleur, Josiane P.; Kutter, Jörg P.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the replication possibilities of microfluidic channels by UV-roll-to-plate fabrication were investigated and a study of rheology-modified thiol-ene for the application in such a UV-roll-to-plate setup was conducted. The system allows the manufacture of channels with aspect ratios of 2:1 and a maximal channel depth of 90 μm as well as the sealing of the finished devices with patterning and sealing speeds of up to 19 m min-1. By adding fumed silica nanoparticles to the uncured resins, it was possible to alter the rheological behavior of the resin system to fabricate shallow microfluidic channels with 40  ×  95 μm cross-sectional dimensions. Moreover, deeper (90 μm) channels can be fabricated with highly viscous resins based on thiol-terminated oligomers. As a demonstration, capillary electrophoresis chips were prepared and tested for a simple separation of two fluorescent dyes.

  16. Biostability enhancement of oil core - polysaccharide multilayer shell via photoinitiator free thiol-ene 'click' reaction.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Vincenzo; Vecchione, Raffaele; Sagliano, Angela; Carella, Antonio; Guarnieri, Daniela; Belli, Valentina; Raiola, Luca; Roviello, Antonio; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-06-01

    Layer-by-layer of polyelectrolytes has emerged as one of the easiest and most controlled techniques to deposit ultrathin polymer layers mainly driven by electrostatic interactions. However, this kind of interaction results to be weak and easily breakable in physiological environment. Here we report on the preparation of nanocapsules completely made of natural biomaterials: a lipophilic core (soybean oil and egg lecithin as surfactant) as nanometric template and a polysaccharide-based multilayer shell (glycol chitosan and heparin) covalently cross-linked. We first modified glycol chitosan with a thiol moiety and heparin with an alkene moiety, respectively, and then we built a polymer multilayer film with a covalent cross-linkage among layers, exploiting the light initiated thiol-ene reaction, known as click chemistry. We showed the possibility to perform the covalent cross-linkage without any photoinitiator or metal catalyst, thus avoiding cytotoxic effects and further purification steps. The so realized nanocapsules resulted to be stable and completely biocompatible and, therefore, of interest for the biotechnology fields, mainly for drug delivery.

  17. Functionalization of hybrid monolithic columns via thiol-ene click reaction for proteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongshan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Zheyi; Wang, Hongwei; Ou, Junjie; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa

    2017-01-16

    The vinyl-functionalized hybrid monolithic columns (75 and 150μm i.d.) were prepared via sol-gel chemistry of tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) and vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS). The content of accessible vinyl groups was further improved after the monolithic column was post-treated with vinyldimethylethoxysilane (VDMES). The surface properties of monolithic columns were tailored via thiol-ene click reaction by using 1-octadecanethiol, sodium 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonate and 2,2'-(ethylenedioxy)diethanethiol/vinylphosphonic acid, respectively. The preparing octadecyl-functionalized monolithic columns were adopted for proteomics analysis in cLC-MS/MS. A 37-cm-long×75-μm-i.d. monolithic column could identify 3918 unique peptides and 1067 unique proteins in the tryptic digest of proteins from HeLa cells. When a 90-cm-long×75-μm-i.d. monolithic column was used, the numbers of unique peptides and proteins were increased by 82% and 32%, respectively. Furthermore, strong cation exchange (SCX) monolithic columns (4cm in length×150μm i.d.) were also prepared and coupled with the 37-cm-long×75-μm-i.d. octadecyl-functionalized monolithic column for two-dimensional SCX-RPLC-MS/MS analysis, which could identify 17114 unique peptides and 3211 unique proteins.

  18. An ene reductase from Clavispora lusitaniae for asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan; Yu, Hui-Lei; Lin, Guo-Qiang; Xu, Jian-He

    2014-03-05

    A putative ene reductase gene from Clavispora lusitaniae was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the encoded protein (ClER) was purified and characterized for its biocatalytic properties. This NADPH-dependent flavoprotein was identified with reduction activities toward a diverse range of activated alkenes including conjugated enones, enals, maleimide derivative and α,β-unsaturated carboxylic esters. The purified ClER exhibited a relatively high activity of 7.3 U mg(prot)⁻¹ for ketoisophorone while a remarkable catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)=810 s⁻¹ mM⁻¹) was obtained for 2-methyl-cinnamaldehyde due to the high affinity. A series of prochiral activated alkenes were stereoselectively reduced by ClER furnishing the corresponding saturated products in up to 99% ee. The practical applicability of ClER was further evaluated for the production of (R)-levodione, a valuable chiral compound, from ketoisophorone. Using the crude enzyme of ClER and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH), 500 mM of ketoisophorone was efficiently converted to (R)-levodione with excellent stereoselectivity (98% ee) within 1h. All these positive features demonstrate a high synthetic potential of ClER in the asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes.

  19. Iron complexes of tetramine ligands catalyse allylic hydroxyamination via a nitroso–ene mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Porter, David; Poon, Belinda M-L

    2015-01-01

    Summary Iron(II) complexes of the tetradentate amines tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPA) and N,N′-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N,N′-dimethylethane-1,2-diamine (BPMEN) are established catalysts of C–O bond formation, oxidising hydrocarbon substrates via hydroxylation, epoxidation and dihydroxylation pathways. Herein we report the capacity of these catalysts to promote C–N bond formation, via allylic amination of alkenes. The combination of N-Boc-hydroxylamine with either FeTPA (1 mol %) or FeBPMEN (10 mol %) converts cyclohexene to the allylic hydroxylamine (tert-butyl cyclohex-2-en-1-yl(hydroxy)carbamate) in moderate yields. Spectroscopic studies and trapping experiments suggest the reaction proceeds via a nitroso–ene mechanism, with involvement of a free N-Boc-nitroso intermediate. Asymmetric induction is not observed using the chiral tetramine ligand (+)-(2R,2′R)-1,1′-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-2,2′-bipyrrolidine ((R,R′)-PDP). PMID:26734101

  20. Simple thiol-ene click chemistry modification of SBA-15 silica pores with carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Bordoni, Andrea V; Lombardo, M Verónica; Regazzoni, Alberto E; Soler-Illia, Galo J A A; Wolosiuk, Alejandro

    2015-07-15

    A straightforward approach for anchoring tailored carboxylic groups in mesoporous SiO2 colloidal materials is presented. The thiol-ene photochemical reaction between vinyltrimethoxysilane precursors and various thiocarboxylic acids which has, click chemistry features (i.e. high conversion yields, insensitivity to oxygen, mild reaction conditions), results in carboxylated silane precursors that can be readily used as surface modifiers. The carboxylic groups of acetic, undecanoic and succinic acid were immobilized on the silica mesopore walls of SBA-15 powders employing the synthesized silane precursors. Post-grafting has been confirmed through infrared spectrometry (FTIR), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), elemental analysis (EA) and zeta potential measurements. Detailed field-emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data revealed parallel mesopores and ordered mesostructures. It is shown that the immobilized COOH groups are chemically accessible for acid-base reactions as well as copper adsorption. Immobilization of easily synthesized tailored carboxylic modified alkoxide precursors within mesoporous systems provides a unique chemical nanoenvironment within these ordered frameworks.

  1. Superhydrophobic and Slippery Lubricant-Infused Flexible Transparent Nanocellulose Films by Photoinduced Thiol-Ene Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiaqi; Fang, Wenwen; Welle, Alexander; Feng, Wenqian; Filpponen, Ilari; Rojas, Orlando J; Levkin, Pavel A

    2016-12-14

    Films comprising nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) are suitable substrates for flexible devices in analytical, sensor, diagnostic, and display technologies. However, some major challenges in such developments include their high moisture sensitivity and the complexity of current methods available for functionalization and patterning. In this work, we present a facile process for tailoring the surface wettability and functionality of NFC films by a fast and versatile approach. First, the NFC films were coated with a layer of reactive nanoporous silicone nanofilament by polycondensation of trichlorovinylsilane (TCVS). The TCVS afforded reactive vinyl groups, thereby enabling simple UV-induced functionalization of NFC films with various thiol-containing molecules via the photo "click" thiol-ene reaction. Modification with perfluoroalkyl thiols resulted in robust superhydrophobic surfaces, which could then be further transformed into transparent slippery lubricant-infused NFC films that displayed repellency against both aqueous and organic liquids with surface tensions as low as 18 mN·m(-1). Finally, transparent and flexible NFC films incorporated hydrophilic micropatterns by modification with OH, NH2, or COOH surface groups, enabling space-resolved superhydrophobic-hydrophilic domains. Flexibility, transparency, patternability, and perfect superhydrophobicity of the produced nanocellulose substrates warrants their application in biosensing, display protection, and biomedical and diagnostics devices.

  2. Preparation and properties of cyclic acetal based biodegradable gel by thiol-ene photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kemin; Lu, Jian; Yin, Ruixue; Chen, Lu; Du, Shuang; Jiang, Yan; Yu, Qiang

    2013-04-01

    Synthetic, hydrolytically degradable biomaterials have been widely developed for biomedical use; however, most of them will form acidic products upon degradation of polymer backbone. In order to address this concern, we proposed to fabricate a biodegradable gel based on the crosslinking of a cyclic acetal monomer with reactable diallyl group and multifunctional thiols by thiol-ene photopolymerization. This gel produces diols and carbonyl end groups upon hydrolytic degradation and could be entirely devoid of acidic by-products. Real time infrared spectroscopy was employed to investigate the effect of different light intensities and concentrations of photoinitiator on the polymerization kinetics. With the increase of the concentration of photoinitiator and light intensity, both the rate of polymerization and final double bond conversion increased. Degradation of cyclic acetal based networks was investigated in PBS medium so as to simulate physiological conditions. The remaining mass of the materials after 25 days incubation was 84%. TGA analysis showed that the gels exhibited a typical weight loss (97.2%) at around 378 °C. In vitro cytotoxicity showed that the cyclic acetal based gels had non-toxicity to cell L-929 and had good biocompatibility.

  3. Photo-initiated thiol-ene click reactions as a potential strategy for incorporation of [M(I)(CO)3]+ (M = Re, (99m)Tc) complexes.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Thomas R; Lyon, Patrice A; Silva-Lopez, Elsa; Twamley, Brendan; Benny, Paul D

    2013-03-18

    Click reactions offer a rapid technique to covalently assemble two molecules. In radiopharmaceutical construction, these reactions can be utilized to combine a radioactive metal complex with a biological targeting molecule to yield a potent tool for imaging or therapy applications. The photo-initiated radical thiol-ene click reaction between a thiol and an alkene was examined for the incorporation of [M(I)(CO)3](+) (M = Re, (99m)Tc) systems for conjugating biologically active targeting molecules containing a thiol. In this strategy, a potent chelate system, 2,2'-dipicolylamine (DPA), for [M(I)(CO)3](+) was functionalized at the central amine with a terminal alkene linker that was explored with two synthetic approaches, click then chelate and chelate then click, to determine the flexibility and applicability of the thiol-ene click reaction to specifically incorporate ligand systems and metal complexes with a thiol containing molecule. In the click then chelate approach, the thiol-ene click reaction was carried out with the DPA chelate followed by complexation with [M(I)(CO)3](+). In the chelate then click approach, the alkene functionalized DPA chelate was first complexed with [M(I)(CO)3](+) followed by the conduction of the thiol-ene click reaction. Initial studies utilized benzyl mercaptan as a model thiol for both strategies to generate the identical product from either route to provide information on reactivity and product formation. DPA ligands functionalized with two unique linker systems (allyl and propyl allyl ether) were prepared to examine the effect of the proximity of the chelate or complex on the thiol-ene click reaction. Both the thiol-ene click and coordination reactions with Re, (99m)Tc were performed in moderate to high yields demonstrating the potential of the thiol-ene click reaction for [M(I)(CO)3](+) incorporation into thiol containing biomolecules.

  4. An examination of shoulder kinematics and kinetics when using a commercial trunk harness while sheep shearing.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Diane E; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Pal, Poonam; Callaghan, Jack P

    2008-01-01

    Sheep shearing is a very physically demanding occupation, especially on the low back, such that many commercial harnesses have been developed to help reduce the load on the back. Such harnesses have been shown to significantly reduce peak and cumulative low back loads; however, the effect that these harnesses have on the shoulders, which are also highly involved during sheep shearing, has not been previously examined. The purpose of this study was to examine the shoulder postures and cumulative shoulder moments of 12 New Zealand sheep shearers. The use of the trunk harness reduced the percentage of time spent in shoulder flexion greater than 90 degrees and the time spent in shoulder abduction greater than 45 degrees as well as reduced the cumulative net joint flexor, abductor, and adductor shoulder moments by a minimum of 21%, 14%, and 42%, respectively. Therefore, the use of a commercial trunk harness to reduce low back injury may also help to reduce the risk of shoulder injury while sheep shearing.

  5. Stress relaxation via addition-fragmentation chain transfer in a thiol-ene photopolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Kloxin, Christopher J.; Scott, Timothy F.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2009-01-01

    Allyl sulfide addition-fragmentation chain transfer was employed concurrently with the radical-mediated formation of a thiol-ene network to enable network adaptation and mitigation of polymerization-induced shrinkage stress. This result represents the first demonstration of simultaneous polymerization and network adaptation in covalently crosslinked networks with significant implications for the fabrication of low stress polymer networks. For comparison, analogous networks incorporating propyl sulfide moieties, incapable of addition-fragmentation, were synthesized and evaluated in parallel. At the highest irradiation intensity, the allyl sulfide-containing material demonstrated a more than 75% reduction in the final stress when compared with the propyl sulfide-containing material. Analysis of the conversion evolution revealed that allyl sulfide addition-fragmentation decreased the polymerization rate owing to thiyl radical sequestration. Slow consumption of the allyl sulfide functional group suggests that intramolecular homolytic substitution occurs by a step-wise, rather than concerted, mechanism. Simultaneous stress and conversion measurements demonstrated that the initial stress evolution was identical for both the allyl and propyl sulfide-containing materials but diverged after gelation. While addition-fragmentation chain transfer was found to occur throughout the polymerization, its effect on the stress evolution was concentrated towards the end of polymerization when network rearrangement becomes the dominant mechanism for stress relaxation. Even after the polymerization reaction was completed, the polymerization-induced shrinkage stress in the allyl sulfide-containing material continued to decrease, exhibiting a maximum in the stress evolution and demonstrating the potential for continuing, longer term stress relaxation. PMID:20160931

  6. Thiol–ene-based biological/synthetic hybrid biomatrix for 3-D living cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kedi; Fu, Yao; Chung, WeiJu; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Cui, Yujia; Hsu, Ian C.; Kao, Weiyuan John

    2013-01-01

    Although various cell encapsulation materials are available commercially for a wide range of potential therapeutic cells, their combined clinical impact remains inconsistent. Synthetic materials such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels are mechanically robust and have been extensively explored but lack natural biofunctionality. Naturally derived materials including collagen, fibrin and alginate-chitosan are often labile and mechanically weak. In this paper we report the development of a hybrid biomatrix based on the thiol-ene reaction of PEG diacrylate (PEGdA) and cysteine/PEG-modified gelatin (gel-PEG-Cys). We hypothesized that covalent crosslinking decreases gelatin dissolution thus increasing gelatin resident time within the matrix and the duration of its biofunctionality; at the same time the relative ratio of PEGdA to gel-PEG-Cys in the matrix formulation directly affects hydrogel bulk and local microenvironment properties. Bulk viscoelastic properties were highly dependent on PEGdA concentration and total water content, while gel-PEG-Cys concentration was more critical to swelling profiles. Microviscoelastic properties were related to polymer concentration. The covalently crosslinked gel-PEG-Cys with PEGdA decreased gelatin dissolution out of the matrix and collagenase-mediated degradation. Fibroblasts and keratinocyte increased adhesion density and formed intercellular connections on stiffer hydrogel surfaces, while cells exhibited more cytoplasmic spreading and proliferation when entrapped within softer hydrogels. Hence, this material system contains multiparametric factors that can easily be controlled to modulate the chemical, physical and biological properties of the biomatrix for soft tissue scaffolding and cell presentation to reconstruct lost tissue architecture and physical functionality. PMID:22484717

  7. Spectroscopic characterization of structural isomers of naphthalene: 1-Phenyl-1-butyn-3-ene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebree, Joshua A.; Plusquellic, David F.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2011-12-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF), single vibronic level dispersed fluorescence (DFL) spectra, and high resolution rotationally resolved scans of the S 0-S 1 transition of the C 10H 8 isomer 1-phenyl-1-butyn-3-ene have been recorded under jet-cooled conditions. The S 0-S 1 origin of PAV at 34 922 cm -1 is very weak. A vibronic band located 464.0 above the origin, assigned as 30 10, dominates the LIF excitation spectrum, with intensity arising from vibronic coupling with the S 2 state. High resolution scans of the S 0-S 1 origin and 30 10 vibronic bands determine that the former is a 65:35 a: b hybrid band, while 30 10 is a pure a-type band, confirming the role for vibronic coupling and identifying the coupled state as the S 2 state. DFL spectra of all vibronic bands in the first 800 cm -1 of the spectrum were recorded. A near-complete assignment of the vibronic structure in both S 0 and S 1 states is obtained. Herzberg-Teller vibronic coupling is carried by two vibrations, ν28 and ν30, involving in-plane deformations of the vinylacetylene side chain, leading to Duschinsky mixing evident in the intensities of transitions in excitation and DFL spectra. Extensive Duschinsky mixing is also present among the lowest five out-of-plane vibrational modes, involving motion of the side chain. Comparison with the results of DFT B3LYP and TDDFT calculations with a 6-311+G(d,p) basis set confirm and strengthen the assignments.

  8. Polymers of sodium-N-undec-10-ene-1-oyl taurate and sodium-N-undec-10-ene-1-oyl aminoethyl-2-phosphonate as pseudostationary phases for electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tellman, K T; Palmer, C P

    1999-01-01

    The use of micelle polymers, a class of polysoaps with a polymerized hydrophobic interior and a charged hydrophillic exterior, as pseudostationary phases in electrokinetic chromatography has generated significant interest. Their stable structure has been shown to provide significant advantages over conventional micelles when used as pseudostationary phases. In previous studies, micelle polymers have had carboxylate and sulfate head groups. These chemistries have limitations: carboxylate micelle polymers precipitate out of solution at pH less than seven or eight and sulfate head groups are not stable to hydrolysis and are hydrolyzed during polymerization. Additionally, while the chemical selectivity of conventional micelles varies with head group chemistry, no significant differences in chemical selectivity were observed between analogous polymers with sulfate and carboxylate groups. To overcome the limitations of carboxylate and sulfate head groups, and to further investigate the chemical selectivity of micelle polymers, poly(sodium-N-undec-10-ene-1-oyl-taurate) and poly(sodium-N-undec-10-ene-1-oyl-ethyl-2-phosphonate) micellar polymers have been synthesized and characterized as pseudostationary phases. These polymers have amide functionality and stable, strongly acidic sulfonate and phosphonate head groups. These polymers did provide improved solubility at low pH, and are stable under the conditions studied. The chromatographic performance and chemical selectivity of the polymers has been studied by several methods, including linear solvation energy relationships. Poly(sodiumN-undec-10-ene-1-oyl-taurate) has greater electrophoretic mobility than other polymers of this type, and can be used for the separation of hydrophobic compounds. The polymers do exhibit unique selectivity, but the differences in selectivity are not significant for the majority of compounds studied.

  9. C27-C30 neohop-13(18)-enes and their saturated and aromatic derivatives in sediments: Indicators for diagenesis and water column stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; Volkman, John K.

    2014-05-01

    A limited suite of C27, C29 and C30 rearranged hopenes identified as neohop-13(18)-enes have been reported in immature Recent and ancient marine/lacustrine sediments and their presence has been explained by dehydration and isomerisation of ubiquitous hopanols or hopenes. Here we investigated the source and fate of neohop-13(18)-enes in a range of Recent and ancient sediments. The analysis of δ13C values of hop-17(21)-ene and neohop-13(18)-ene in Arabian Sea surface sediments, in the Monterey Formation and in immature Cenomanian black shales show that they differ by 2-3‰, suggesting that the C30 neohop-13(18)-ene has a source different from those of the non-rearranged C30 hopenes. A new member of the family of neohop-13(18)-enes, the C28 hopene 28,30-dinorhop-13(18)-ene, was identified based on comparison of its mass spectral data with that of other members of the family of neohopenes. Its occurrence explains the formation of a series of orphan aromatic hopanoids bearing an ethyl group at C-21, known to occur in high concentrations in some organic-rich ancient sediments. Circumstantial evidence for this formation pathway is provided by identical δ13C values for the C28 28,30-dinorhop-13(18)-ene and two aromatic hopanoids in two Cretaceous black shales. Relatively abundant C28 28,30-dinorhopene and related aromatic derivatives were present in ancient sediments where the distribution of other biomarkers (i.e. isorenieratene derivatives) indicated a stratified palaeo water column. Therefore, it is suggested that these compounds are derived from bacteria dwelling at or below the chemocline and may be used as indicators of stratified water bodies in the past. 28,30-Dinorhop-13(18)-ene may also be a precursor of the unusual C28 desmethylhopane 28,30-dinorhopane found in high concentrations in anoxic sediments and a limited suite of crude oils, which is consistent with the proposal that it too ultimately derives from bacteria living at the oxic-anoxic interface.

  10. Subject Load-Harness Interaction During Zero-Gravity Treadmill Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCrory, Jean L.; Baron, Heidi A.; Derr, Janice A.; Davis, Brian L.; Cavanagh, Peter R.

    1996-01-01

    When astronauts exercise on orbit, a subject load device (SLD) must be used to return the subject back to the supporting surface. The load in the SLD needs to be transferred the body by a harness which typically distributes this load between the pelvis and We shoulders. Through the use of a zero-gravity simulator, this research compared subject comfort and ground reaction forces during treadmill running at three levels of subject load (60%,80%, and 100% of body weight) in two harness designs ("shoulder only" and "waist "and shoulder ").

  11. The Phenol-Ene Reaction: Biaryl Synthesis via Trapping Reactions between HDDA-Generated Benzynes and Phenolics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juntian; Niu, Dawen; Brinker, Vincent A; Hoye, Thomas R

    2016-11-04

    Benzynes produced thermally by the cycloisomerization of triyne-containing precursors [i.e., by the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) reaction] react with phenols at the carbon ortho to the hydroxyl in an enelike fashion. Following tautomerization of the intermediate cyclohexadienones, this produces biaryl derivatives. DFT calculations of model reactions support this mechanistic interpretation. Substituted, unsymmetrical phenols and bis-phenols react in a fashion that can be explained by engagement of the most readily available (non-hydrogen-bonded) hydroxyl in the phenol-ene process.

  12. Radical cyclizations of cyclic ene sulfonamides occur with β-elimination of sulfonyl radicals to form polycyclic imines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanmo; Hay, E Ben; Geib, Steven J; Curran, Dennis P

    2013-11-06

    Radical cyclizations of cyclic ene sulfonamides provide stable bicyclic and tricyclic aldimines and ketimines in good yields. Depending on the structure of the precursor, the cyclizations occur to provide fused and spirocyclic imines with five-, six-, and seven-membered rings. The initial radical cyclization produces an α-sulfonamidoyl radical that undergoes elimination to form the imine and a phenylsulfonyl radical. In a related method, 3,4-dihydroquinolines can also be produced by radical translocation reactions of N-(2-iodophenylsulfonyl)tetrahydroiso-quinolines. In either case, very stable sulfonamides are cleaved to form imines (rather than amines) under mild reductive conditions.

  13. Rh(I)-catalyzed Pauson-Khand-type cycloaddition reaction of ene-vinylidenecyclopropanes with carbon monoxide (CO).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Dong, Xiang; Shi, Min; McDowell, Patrick; Li, Guigen

    2012-11-02

    An intramolecular Pauson-Khand type cycloaddition reaction of ene-vinylidenecyclopropanes with carbon monoxide has been established by using [Rh(COD)Cl](2) as the catalyst. The reaction was found to be highly efficient in solvents of 1,2-dichloroethane and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane to give excellent yields of 90-99%. The reaction provides easy access to a series of fused 6,5-ring structures containing spiro-cyclopropane units that are useful for drug design and development. A mechanism of this cycloaddition process has been proposed accounting for structures of resulting products that were unambiguously assigned by X-ray diffractional analysis.

  14. Radical cyclizations of cyclic ene sulfonamides occur with β-elimination of sulfonyl radicals to form polycyclic imines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanmo; Hay, E. Ben; Geib, Steven J.; Curran, Dennis P.

    2013-01-01

    Radical cyclizations of cyclic ene sulfonamides provide stable bicyclic and tricyclic aldimines and ketimines in good yields. Depending on the structure of the precursor, the cyclizations occur to provide fused and spirocyclic imines with five-, six-, and seven-membered rings. The initial radical cyclization produces an α-sulfonamidoyl radical that undergoes elimination to form the imine and a phenylsulfonyl radical. In a related method, 3,4-dihydroquinolines can also be produced by radical translocation reactions of N-(2-iodophenylsulfonyl)tetrahydroisoquinolines. In either case, very stable sulfonamides are cleaved to form imines (rather than amines) under mild reductive conditions. PMID:24111991

  15. Thiol-ene and photo-cleavage chemistry for controlled presentation of biomolecules in hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Grim, Joseph C; Marozas, Ian A; Anseth, Kristi S

    2015-12-10

    photochemical methods have led to important advances in the tissue regeneration community, namely the thiol-ene photo-click reaction for bioconjugation and photocleavage reactions that allow for the removal of protecting groups. Specific examples will be highlighted where these methodologies have been used to engineer hydrogels that control and direct cell function with the aim of inspiring their use in regenerative medicine.

  16. Reliability and Validity of the Zephyr[TM] BioHarness[TM] to Measure Respiratory Responses to Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailstone, Jono; Kilding, Andrew E.

    2011-01-01

    The Zephyr[TM] BioHarness[TM] (Zephyr Technology, Auckland, New Zealand) is a wireless physiological monitoring system that has the ability to measure respiratory rate unobtrusively. However, the ability of the BioHarness[TM] to accurately and reproducibly determine respiratory rate across a range of intensities is currently unknown. The aim of…

  17. Harnessing the Potential of Information Technologies in Education: Finding Innovation and Adaptability in Mali and Ghana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslar, Zoey L.

    This study is based on the premises that information technologies (IT) are essential to African development and that education systems are responsible for developing a countries' human capacity to maximize those technologies. The study examines the ability of education systems in Mali and Ghana to develop the capacity to harness the potential of…

  18. Language Teaching in a Globalised World: Harnessing Linguistic Super-Diversity in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruen, Jennifer; Kelly, Niamh

    2016-01-01

    The student body is becoming increasingly diverse in terms of language, nationality and cultural background. This study explores ways in which such linguistic diversity can be harnessed in the language classroom to enhance the language learning process. This paper describes a series of activities which were designed and implemented in four higher…

  19. The Facebook-in-Action: Challenging, Harnessing and Enhancing Students Class Assignments and Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saifudin, Adam Mohd; Yacob, Aizan; Saad, Rohaizah

    2016-01-01

    Issues of universities students harnessing and capitalizing the usage of Facebook for their own learning capabilities and effective thinking is always the focus of education scholars, in assessing the quality class assignments and projects produced by them. Therefore, Facebook is now becoming unbearable influence since the internet activation in…

  20. 42 CFR 84.73 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. 84.73 Section 84.73 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES...

  1. 42 CFR 84.116 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. 84.116 Section 84.116 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY...

  2. 42 CFR 84.1133 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. 84.1133 Section 84.1133 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY...

  3. 14 CFR 105.43 - Use of single-harness, dual-parachute systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of single-harness, dual-parachute... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Parachute Equipment and... been packed within 180 days before the date of its use by a certificated parachute rigger, the...

  4. Harnessing the power of big data: infusing the scientific method with machine learning to transform ecology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most efforts to harness the power of big data for ecology and environmental sciences focus on data and metadata sharing, standardization, and accuracy. However, many scientists have not accepted the data deluge as an integral part of their research because the current scientific method is not scalab...

  5. After the electronic field: structure, bonding, and the first hyperpolarizability of HArF.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng-Qing; Zhong, Rong-Lin; Kan, Yu-He; Sun, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Min; Xu, Hong-Liang; Su, Zhong-Min

    2013-04-30

    In this work, we add different strength of external electric field (E(ext)) along molecule axis (Z-axis) to investigate the electric field induced effect on HArF structure. The H-Ar bond is the shortest at E(ext) = -189 × 10(-4) and the Ar-F bond show shortest value at E(ext) = 185 × 10(-4) au. Furthermore, the wiberg bond index analyses show that with the variation of HArF structure, the covalent bond H-Ar shows downtrend (ranging from 0.79 to 0.69) and ionic bond Ar-F shows uptrend (ranging from 0.04 to 0.17). Interestingly, the natural bond orbital analyses show that the charges of F atom range from -0.961 to -0.771 and the charges of H atoms range from 0.402 to 0.246. Due to weakened charge transfer, the first hyperpolarizability (β(tot)) can be modulated from 4078 to 1087 au. On the other hand, make our results more useful to experimentalists, the frequency-dependent first hyperpolarizabilities were investigated by the coupled perturbed Hartree-Fork method. We hope that this work may offer a new idea for application of noble-gas hydrides.

  6. 42 CFR 84.73 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. 84.73 Section 84.73 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES...

  7. 42 CFR 84.116 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. 84.116 Section 84.116 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY...

  8. 42 CFR 84.73 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. 84.73 Section 84.73 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES...

  9. 42 CFR 84.73 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. 84.73 Section 84.73 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES...

  10. 42 CFR 84.73 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. 84.73 Section 84.73 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES...

  11. 42 CFR 84.116 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. 84.116 Section 84.116 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY...

  12. 42 CFR 84.116 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. 84.116 Section 84.116 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY...

  13. 42 CFR 84.116 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. 84.116 Section 84.116 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY...

  14. Pressure distribution under three different types of harnesses used for guide dogs.

    PubMed

    Peham, C; Limbeck, S; Galla, K; Bockstahler, B

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the pressure distribution under three different types of harnesses used for guide dogs (designated H1, H2 and H3). The dogs (n = 8) led a trainer through a course including a range of exercises (straight line, curve left, curve right, upstairs and downstairs). All dogs were clinically sound and showed no sign of lameness. The pressures beneath the harnesses were determined by sensor strips and related to the gait. In all harnesses, the highest pressures were found in the right sternal region (H1 2.02 ± 0.6N/cm(2); H2 1.76 ± 0.4N/cm(2); H3 1.14 ± 0.5 N/cm(2)). In all other regions, the pressures were in the range of 0-1.32 N/cm(2). The right and left sternal regions were almost constantly loaded. Contrary to previous assumptions, the back regions had minimal loading. This investigation demonstrated that there were significant differences among the harnesses.

  15. Kinematic assessment of treadmill running using different body-weight support harnesses.

    PubMed

    Millslagle, Duane; Levy, Morris; Matack, Nicholas

    2006-10-01

    10 male collegiate runners (M age = 21.4, SD = 1.5 yr.) ran on a treadmill with no body-weight support (BWS), 20% BWS, and 40% BWS conditions. In addition, they wore three different commercially available harnesses at the 20% and 40% BWS conditions. The aim was to run on the treadmill at a fast speed while maintaining an adequate step length. The purpose was to investigate how each harness changed running gait, and the differences in running gait between the harnesses with various body-weight support. Analysis of variance indicated significant restriction of upper body torso rotation between the harnesses at the 40% BWS conditions. Body-weight support resulted in a longer stride, decreased cadence, less vertical displacement of the center of mass, and diminished hip and ankle joint excursions. These changes indicated that increased body-weight support results in longer steps with the foot contacting the belt for a shorter period of time with less leg angular changes throughout the running cycling.

  16. STS-42 Payload Specialist Bondar suspended from parachute harness in JSC WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Payload Specialist Roberta L. Bondar, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), is suspended from her parachute harness over JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool during launch emergency egress exercises. Bondar is representing Canada during the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) mission aboard OV-103.

  17. Early failure of Pavlik harness treatment for developmental hip dysplasia: clinical and ultrasound predictors.

    PubMed

    Lerman, J A; Emans, J B; Millis, M B; Share, J; Zurakowski, D; Kasser, J R

    2001-01-01

    A cohort of 93 patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) treated with a Pavlik harness were evaluated to determine predictors of treatment failure. Failure was defined as failure to achieve or maintain hip reduction in the Pavlik harness. Of 93 patients (137 hips), 17 (26 hips) failed Pavlik harness treatment. Univariate risk factors for failure included bilaterality, initial clinical exam, and initial ultrasound (US) percent coverage. Clinical exam and initial percent coverage were multivariate risk factors for failure. Among initially clinically dislocatable hips, a low initial US alpha angle correlated with an increased likelihood of failure. All (6/6) patients with an initially irreducible hip and an initial coverage of <20% by US eventually failed treatment. Gender, side of pathology, and age at diagnosis and initiation of treatment did not correlate with failure. Irreducibility by physical exam combined with US coverage of <20% identified a patient group that uniformly failed Pavlik harness treatment. These patients may be candidates for alternative bracing, traction, or closed or open reduction.

  18. Harnessing Sparse and Low-Dimensional Structures for Robust Clustering of Imagery Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Shankar Ramamohan

    2009-01-01

    We propose a robust framework for clustering data. In practice, data obtained from real measurement devices can be incomplete, corrupted by gross errors, or not correspond to any assumed model. We show that, by properly harnessing the intrinsic low-dimensional structure of the data, these kinds of practical problems can be dealt with in a uniform…

  19. 14 CFR 27.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... about in the rotorcraft in normal flight must be padded. (f) Each seat and its supporting structure must..., the headrest and its supporting structure must be designed to resist the inertia forces specified in... structure; and (ii) Each safety belt or harness to the seat or structure. (g) When the safety belt...

  20. 14 CFR 23.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and shoulder harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...: (a) Each seat/restraint system and the supporting structure must be designed to support occupants... and the attachment of— (1) Each seat to the structure; and (2) Each safety belt and shoulder harness to the seat or structure. (b) Each forward-facing or aft-facing seat/restraint system in...

  1. 14 CFR 29.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... in the rotorcraft in normal flight must be padded. (f) Each seat and its supporting structure must be..., the headrest and its supporting structure must be designed to resist the inertia forces specified in... structure; and (ii) Each safety belt or harness to the seat or structure. (g) When the safety belt...

  2. 14 CFR 29.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... in the rotorcraft in normal flight must be padded. (f) Each seat and its supporting structure must be..., the headrest and its supporting structure must be designed to resist the inertia forces specified in... structure; and (ii) Each safety belt or harness to the seat or structure. (g) When the safety belt...

  3. 14 CFR 23.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and shoulder harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...: (a) Each seat/restraint system and the supporting structure must be designed to support occupants... and the attachment of— (1) Each seat to the structure; and (2) Each safety belt and shoulder harness to the seat or structure. (b) Each forward-facing or aft-facing seat/restraint system in...

  4. 14 CFR 29.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... in the rotorcraft in normal flight must be padded. (f) Each seat and its supporting structure must be..., the headrest and its supporting structure must be designed to resist the inertia forces specified in... structure; and (ii) Each safety belt or harness to the seat or structure. (g) When the safety belt...

  5. 14 CFR 23.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and shoulder harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...: (a) Each seat/restraint system and the supporting structure must be designed to support occupants... and the attachment of— (1) Each seat to the structure; and (2) Each safety belt and shoulder harness to the seat or structure. (b) Each forward-facing or aft-facing seat/restraint system in...

  6. 14 CFR 27.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... about in the rotorcraft in normal flight must be padded. (f) Each seat and its supporting structure must..., the headrest and its supporting structure must be designed to resist the inertia forces specified in... structure; and (ii) Each safety belt or harness to the seat or structure. (g) When the safety belt...

  7. 14 CFR 29.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... in the rotorcraft in normal flight must be padded. (f) Each seat and its supporting structure must be..., the headrest and its supporting structure must be designed to resist the inertia forces specified in... structure; and (ii) Each safety belt or harness to the seat or structure. (g) When the safety belt...

  8. 14 CFR 23.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and shoulder harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...: (a) Each seat/restraint system and the supporting structure must be designed to support occupants... and the attachment of— (1) Each seat to the structure; and (2) Each safety belt and shoulder harness to the seat or structure. (b) Each forward-facing or aft-facing seat/restraint system in...

  9. 14 CFR 27.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... about in the rotorcraft in normal flight must be padded. (f) Each seat and its supporting structure must..., the headrest and its supporting structure must be designed to resist the inertia forces specified in... structure; and (ii) Each safety belt or harness to the seat or structure. (g) When the safety belt...

  10. 14 CFR 29.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... in the rotorcraft in normal flight must be padded. (f) Each seat and its supporting structure must be..., the headrest and its supporting structure must be designed to resist the inertia forces specified in... structure; and (ii) Each safety belt or harness to the seat or structure. (g) When the safety belt...

  11. 14 CFR 27.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... about in the rotorcraft in normal flight must be padded. (f) Each seat and its supporting structure must..., the headrest and its supporting structure must be designed to resist the inertia forces specified in... structure; and (ii) Each safety belt or harness to the seat or structure. (g) When the safety belt...

  12. 14 CFR 23.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and shoulder harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...: (a) Each seat/restraint system and the supporting structure must be designed to support occupants... and the attachment of— (1) Each seat to the structure; and (2) Each safety belt and shoulder harness to the seat or structure. (b) Each forward-facing or aft-facing seat/restraint system in...

  13. 14 CFR 27.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... about in the rotorcraft in normal flight must be padded. (f) Each seat and its supporting structure must..., the headrest and its supporting structure must be designed to resist the inertia forces specified in... structure; and (ii) Each safety belt or harness to the seat or structure. (g) When the safety belt...

  14. Improving Students' Educational Experience by Harnessing Digital Technology: elgg in the ODL Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tung, Lai Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Given the rising popularity of both open and distance learning (ODL) and social networking tools, it seems logical to merge and harness these two popular technologies with the goal of improving student educational experience. The integration seems to hold tremendous promise for the open and distance learning mode. To reduce the gap in the…

  15. [Preparation of organic-inorganic hybrid boronate affinity monolith via thiol-ene click reaction for specific capture of glycoproteins].

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Mao, Jie; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2013-06-01

    A novel strategy for the preparation of the organic-inorganic hybrid boronate affinity monolith was developed via the "thiol-ene" click reaction. A thiol group-modified silica monolith was first synthesized via the sol-gel process by the in situ co-condensation with tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) as precursors. Then 3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid (AAPBA) was covalently immobilized on the hybrid monolith via the "thiol-ene" click reaction to form AAPBA-silica hybrid affinity monolith. The reaction conditions for the preparation of AAPBA-silica hybrid affinity monolith were optimized, including the ratio of TMOS to MPTMS, the contents of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and methanol. The morphology and mechanical stability of the boronate affinity monolith were characterized and evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The obtained boronate affinity hybrid monolith exhibited excellent specificity toward the nucleosides containing cis-diols under neutral conditions. It was further applied to the specific capture of the glycoproteins ovalbumin and horseradish peroxidase. The method is novel and reliable, which has a great potential for the preparation of different kinds of the boronate affinity monoliths.

  16. A colorimetric detection of acrylamide in potato chips based on nucleophile-initiated thiol-ene Michael addition.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinqin; Fu, Yingchun; Xu, Xiahong; Qiao, Zhaohui; Wang, Ronghui; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yanbin

    2016-02-07

    Acrylamide (AA), a neurotoxin and a potential carcinogen, has been found in various thermally processed foods such as potato chips, biscuits, and coffee. Simple, cost-effective, and sensitive methods for the rapid detection of AA are needed to ensure food safety. Herein, a novel colorimetric method was proposed for the visual detection of AA based on a nucleophile-initiated thiol-ene Michael addition reaction. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were aggregated by glutathione (GSH) because of a ligand-replacement, accompanied by a color change from red to purple. In the presence of AA, after the thiol-ene Michael addition reaction between GSH and AA with the catalysis of a nucleophile, the sulfhydryl group of GSH was consumed by AA, which hindered the subsequent ligand-replacement and the aggregation of AuNPs. Therefore, the concentration of AA could be determined by the visible color change caused by dispersion/aggregation of AuNPs. This new method showed high sensitivity with a linear range from 0.1 μmol L(-1) to 80 μmol L(-1) and a detection limit of 28.6 nmol L(-1), and especially revealed better selectivity than the fluorescence sensing method reported previously. Moreover, this new method was used to detect AA in potato chips with a satisfactory result in comparison with the standard methods based on chromatography, which indicated that the colorimetric method can be expanded for the rapid detection of AA in thermally processed foods.

  17. A robust platform for functional microgels via thiol-ene achemistry with reactive polyether-based nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Carolin; Gopez, Jeffrey; Lundberg, Pontus; Ritter, Helmut; Killops, Kato L.

    2015-01-01

    We herein report the development of crosslinked polyether particles as a reactive platform for the preparation of functional microgels. Thiol-ene crosslinking of poly(allyl glycidyl ether) in miniemulsion droplets - stabilized by a surface active, bio-compatible polyethylene glycol block copolymer - resulted in colloidal gels with a PEG corona and an inner polymeric network containing reactive allyl units. The stability of the allyl groups allows the microgels to be purified and stored before a second, subsequent thiol-ene functionalization step allows a wide variety of pH- and chemically-responsive groups to be introduced into the nanoparticles. The facile nature of this synthetic platform enables the preparation of microgel libraries that are responsive to different triggers but are characterized by the same size distribution, surface functionality, and crosslinking density. In addition, the utilization of a crosslinker containing cleavable ester groups renders the resulting hydrogel particles degradable at elevated pH or in the presence of esterase under physiological conditions. PMID:26005499

  18. Facile preparation of organic-silica hybrid monolith for capillary hydrophilic liquid chromatography based on "thiol-ene" click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Luan; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Zheng; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Yu, Qiong-Wei; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2013-04-05

    In this work, a one-step approach to facile preparation of organic-inorganic hybrid monoliths was successfully developed. After vinyl-end organic monomers and azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) were mixed with hydrolyzed tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS), the homogeneous mixture was introduced into a fused-silica capillary for simultaneous polycondensation and "thiol-ene" click reaction to form the organic-silica hybrid monoliths. By employing this strategy, two types of organic-silica hybrid monoliths with positively charged quaternary ammonium and amide groups were prepared, respectively. The functional groups were successfully introduced onto the monoliths during the sol-gel process with "thiol-ene" click reaction, which was demonstrated by ζ-potential assessment, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The porous structure of the prepared monolithic columns was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. These results indicate the prepared organic-silica hybrid monoliths possess homogeneous column bed, large specific surface area, good mechanical stability, and excellent permeability. The prepared monolithic columns were then applied for anion-exchange/hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. Different types of analytes, including benzoic acids, inorganic ions, nucleosides, and nucleotides, were well separated with high column efficiency around 80,000-130,000 plates/m. Taken together, we present a facile and universal strategy to prepare organic-silica hybrid monoliths with a variety of organic monomers using one-step approach.

  19. Double bond in the side chain of 1alpha,25-dihydroxy-22-ene-vitamin D(3) is reduced during its metabolism: studies in chronic myeloid leukemia (RWLeu-4) cells and rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Sunita Rao, D; Balkundi, D; Uskokovic, M R; Tserng, K; Clark, J W; Horst, R L; Satyanarayana Reddy, G

    2001-08-01

    1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)] is mainly metabolized via the C-24 oxidation pathway and undergoes several side chain modifications which include C-24 hydroxylation, C-24 ketonization, C-23 hydroxylation and side chain cleavage between C-23 and C-24 to form the final product, calcitroic acid. In a recent study we reported that 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(2) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(2)] like 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), is also converted into the same final product, calcitroic acid. This finding indicated that 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(2) also undergoes side chain cleavage between C-23 and C-24. As the side chain of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(2) when compared to the side chain of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), has a double bond between C-22 and C-23 and an extra methyl group at C-24 position, it opens the possibility for both (a) double bond reduction and (b) demethylation to occur during the metabolism of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(2). We undertook the present study to establish firmly the possibility of double bond reduction in the metabolism of vitamin D(2) related compounds. We compared the metabolism of 1alpha,25-dihydroxy-22-ene-vitamin D(3) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)-22-ene-D(3)], a synthetic vitamin D analog whose side chain differs from that of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) only through a single modification namely the presence of a double bond between C-22 and C-23. Metabolism studies were performed in the chronic myeloid leukemic cell line (RWLeu-4) and in the isolated perfused rat kidney. Our results indicate that both 1alpha,25(OH)(2)-22-ene-D(3) and 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) are converted into common metabolites namely, 1alpha,24(R),25-trihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1alpha,24(R),25(OH)(3)D(3)], 1alpha,25-dihydroxy-24-oxovitamin D(3) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)-24-oxo-D(3)], 1alpha,23(S),25-trihydroxy-24-oxovitamin D(3) and 1alpha,23-dihydroxy-24,25,26,27-tetranorvitamin D(3). This finding indicates that the double bond in the side chain of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)-22-ene-D(3) is reduced during its metabolism. Along with

  20. Inhibitory effect of some imidazole antifungal compounds on the synthesis of 16-ene-C19-steroid catalyzed by pig testicular microsomes.

    PubMed

    Nakajin, S; Takahashi, K; Shinoda, M

    1991-01-01

    The activity of the enzyme (16-ene-C19-steroid synthesizing enzyme) responsible for the conversion of C21-steroids to 16-ene-C19-steroids, which was localized on pig testicular microsomes, was inhibited by some typical imidazole antifungal compounds such as clotrimazole, econazole, miconazole and ketoconazole which are known to be universal inhibitors of cytochrome P-450-dependent enzymes. The 50% inhibitory concentrations of clotrimazole, econazole and miconazole were 0.29, 0.36 and 1.25 microM, respectively for 16-ene-C19-steroid synthesizing enzyme activity. Clotrimazole was the most powerful inhibitor of all the compounds examined, which shows the competitive inhibition for 16-ene-C19-steroid synthesizing enzyme activity. The Ki-value was 0.26 microM for its activity. The degree of the inhibition by these imidazole compounds was very similar to the inhibition of 17 alpha-hydroxylase and C17,20-lyase activities on pig testicular microsomes.

  1. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of novel 3-amino-4-hydrazine-cyclobut-3-ene-1,2-diones as potent and selective CXCR2 chemokine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shilan; Liu, Yinhui; Wang, Hongmei; Ding, Yili; Wu, Hao; Dong, Jingchao; Wong, Angela; Chen, Shu-Hui; Li, Ge; Chan, Manuel; Sawyer, Nicole; Gervais, Francois G; Henault, Martin; Kargman, Stacia; Bedard, Leanne L; Han, Yongxin; Friesen, Rick; Lobell, Robert B; Stout, David M

    2009-10-01

    We describe herein a novel series of 3-amino-4-hydrazine-cyclobut-3-ene-1,2-diones as potent and selective inhibitors against the CXCR2 chemokine receptor and IL-8-mediated chemotaxis of a CXCR2-expressing cell line. Furthermore, these alkyl-hydrazine series inhibitors such as 5b demonstrated acceptable metabolic stability when incubated in human and rat microsomes.

  2. Formal Alder-ene reaction of a bicyclo[1.1.0]butane in the synthesis of the tricyclic quaternary ammonium core of daphniglaucins

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Masafumi; Walczak, Maciej A. A.; Wipf, Peter

    2008-01-01

    A tricyclic substructure of the tetracyclic nitrogen core of the daphniglaucins was formed by an oxidative activation of the allyl side chain of a bicyclo[1.1.0]butylmethylamine, a spontaneous intramolecular formal Alder-ene reaction, and a selective cyclization of a triol intermediate. PMID:19129907

  3. 'Soft' harness for external attachment of large radio transmitters to northern pike (Esox lucius)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herke, S.W.; Moring, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    We developed a 'soft' harness for dorsally attaching large, external radio transmitters to northern pike (Esox lucius). The key harness component was a soft, flexible, thick-walled tubing that prevented tissue abrasion by the attachment lines which passed through the tubing. Six field-tagged fish (1.5-7.5 kg) were monitored for 45-115 days before tracking was terminated. Tracking patterns of fish indicated no apparent effect of these large, external transmitters on movement behavior; further, the transmitters did not appear to entangle the fish in vegetation. One fish with its transmitter still secure was recaptured after 54 days, and there was minimal tissue erosion under the transmitter. With minor improvements for the attachment lines and the transmitter saddle, the method is suitable for externally attaching large telemetry transmitters to fish.

  4. Therapeutic strategies for harnessing human eosinophils in allergic inflammation, hypereosinophilic disorders, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Amini-Vaughan, Zhaleh J; Martinez-Moczygemba, Margarita; Huston, David P

    2012-10-01

    The eosinophil is a multifunctional granulocyte best known for providing host defense against parasites. Paradoxically, eosinophils are also implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, asthma, and hypereosinophilic syndromes. Emerging evidence also supports the potential for harnessing the cytotoxic power of eosinophils and redirecting it to kill solid tumors. Central to eosinophil physiology is interleukin-5 (IL-5) and its receptor (IL-5R) which is composed of a ligand-specific alpha chain (IL-5Rα) and the common beta chain (βc). Eosinophil activation can lead to their degranulation, resulting in rapid release of an arsenal of tissue-destructive proinflammatory mediators and cytotoxic proteins that can be both beneficial and detrimental to the host. This review discusses eosinophil immunobiology and therapeutic strategies for targeting of IL-5 and IL-5R, as well as the potential for harnessing eosinophil cytotoxicity as a tumoricide.

  5. Theoretical Study of Decomposition Pathways for HArF and HKrF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Lundell, Jan; Gerber, R. Benny; Kwak, Donchan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    To provide theoretical insights into the stability and dynamics of the new rare gas compounds HArF and HKrF, reaction paths for decomposition processes HRgF to Rg + HF and HRgF to H + Rg + F (Rg = Ar, Kr) are calculated using ab initio electronic structure methods. The bending channels, HRgF to Rg + HF, are described by single-configurational MP2 and CCSD(T) electronic structure methods, while the linear decomposition paths, HRgF to H + Rg + F, require the use of multi-configurational wave functions that include dynamic correlation and are size extensive. HArF and HKrF molecules are found to be energetically stable with respect to atomic dissociation products (H + Rg + F) and separated by substantial energy barriers from Rg + HF products, which ensure their kinetic stability. The results are compatible with experimental data on these systems.

  6. Fabrication of Large-Area Two-Dimensional Microgel Colloidal Crystals via Interfacial Thiol-Ene Click Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyun; Weng, Junying; Guan, Ying; Zhang, Yongjun

    2016-04-26

    A method for the fabrication of high quality, large area 2D colloidal crystals (CCs) using poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel sphere, an extremely soft colloid, as building block was proposed. First the microgel spheres were assembled into 3D colloidal crystals. The first 111 plane of the 3D crystal close to the substrate was then fixed in situ onto the substrate. Highly efficient photoinitiated thiol-ene coupling was chosen for the fixing purpose. Thanks to the high quality of 3D microgel CCs, the resulting 2D CCs exhibit a high degree of ordering. Large area 2D CCs were fabricated because large area 3D microgel CCs can be facilely fabricated. Besides planar substrates, the method allows the fabrication of 2D CCs on curved surface, too. In addition, the interpartical distance in the 2D CCs can be tuned by the concentration of the microgel dispersion.

  7. Synthesis of antibacterial amphiphilic elastomer based on polystyrene-block-polyisoprene-block-polystyrene via thiol-ene addition.

    PubMed

    Keleş, Elif; Hazer, Baki; Cömert, Füsun B

    2013-04-01

    A new type of amphiphilic antibacterial elastomer has been described. Thermoplastic elastomer, polystyrene-block-polyisoprene-block-polystyrene (PS-b-PI-b-PS) triblock copolymer was functionalized in toluene solution by free radical mercaptan addition in order to obtain an amphiphilic antibacterial elastomer. Thiol terminated PEG was grafted through the double bonds of PS-b-PI-b-PS via free radical thiol-ene coupling reaction. The antibacterial properties of the amphiphilic graft copolymers were observed. The original and the modified polymers were used to create microfibers in an electro-spinning process. Topology of the electrospun micro/nanofibers were studied by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The chemical structures of the amphiphilic comb type graft copolymers were elucidated by the combination of elemental analysis, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, GPC and FTIR.

  8. Color-Transformable Silicone Elastomers Prepared by Thiol-Ene Reaction with Potential Application in UV-LEDs.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yujing; Gou, Zhiming; Zhang, Jie; Feng, Shengyu

    2016-04-01

    A series of high-efficiency, full-color fluorescent elastomers based on polysiloxane matrix prepared by an easy thiol-ene "click" reaction is reported here. It is found for the first time that the same elastomer can emit transformable colors by conveniently altering the excitation wavelength because of the effect of energy transfer and the "fluorescence switch" of lanthanide ions. A fluent change in emission colors can also be feasible and conveniently reproducible by varying the stoichiometric ratio of lanthanide ions and rhodamine-B in solution and in polymer elastomers. The obtained elastomers are further coated onto commercially available UV-LED cells from the solution medium followed by an in situ cross-linking step.

  9. Orthogonal dual thiol–chloroacetyl and thiol–ene couplings for the sequential one-pot assembly of heteroglycoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Michele; Daskhan, Gour Chand; Thomas, Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe the first one-pot orthogonal strategy to prepare well-defined cyclopeptide-based heteroglycoclusters (hGCs) from glycosyl thiols. Both thiol–chloroactetyl coupling (TCC) and thiol–ene coupling (TEC) have been used to decorate cyclopeptides regioselectively with diverse combination of sugars. We demonstrate that the reaction sequence starting with TCC can be performed one-pot whereas the reverse sequence requires a purification step after the TEC reaction. The versatility of this orthogonal strategy has been demonstrated through the synthesis of diverse hGCs displaying alternating binary combinations of α-D-Man or β-D-GlcNAc, thus providing rapid access to attractive heteroglycosylated platforms for diverse biological applications. PMID:25161711

  10. Preparation of a novel carboxyl stationary phase by "thiol-ene" click chemistry for hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xi-Tian; Liu, Tao; Ji, Shu-Xian; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2013-08-01

    A novel carboxyl-bonded silica stationary phase was prepared by "thiol-ene" click chemistry. The resultant Thiol-Click-COOH phase was evaluated under hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mobile phase conditions. A comparison of the chromatographic performance of Thiol-Click-COOH and pure silica columns was performed according to the retention behaviors of analytes and the charged state of the stationary phases. The results indicated that the newly developed Thiol-Click-COOH column has a higher surface charge and stronger hydrophilicity than the pure silica column. Furthermore, the chromatographic behaviors of five nucleosides on the Thiol-Click-COOH phase were investigated in detail. Finally, a good separation of 13 nucleosides and bases, and four water-soluble vitamins was achieved.

  11. Chiral bis(oxazoline) copper(II) complexes: versatile catalysts for enantioselective cycloaddition, Aldol, Michael, and carbonyl ene reactions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J S; Evans, D A

    2000-06-01

    A bis(oxazoline) (box) copper(II) complex and its hydrated counterpart (1 and 2) function as enantioselective Lewis acid catalysts for carbocyclic and hetero Diels-Alder, aldol, Michael, ene, and amination reactions with substrates capable of chelation through six- and five-membered rings. X-ray crystallography of the chiral complexes reveals a propensity for the formation of distorted square planar or square pyramidal geometries. The sense of asymmetric induction is identical for all the processes catalyzed by [Cu((S,S)-t-Bu-box)](X)(2) complexes 1 and 2 (X = OTf and SbF) resulting from the intervention of a distorted square planar catalyst-substrate binary complex. These catalyzed processes exhibit excellent temperature-selectivity profiles. Reactions catalyzed by [Cu(S,S-Ph-pybox)](SbF(6))(2) and their derived chelation complexes are also discussed.

  12. Crystal structure of bis-(η(2)-ethyl-ene)(η(5)-penta-methyl-cyclo-penta-dien-yl)cobalt.

    PubMed

    Ramful, Chandika D; Robertson, Katherine N; Ylijoki, Kai E O

    2016-09-01

    The title compound, [Co(C10H15)(C2H4)2], was prepared by Na/Hg reduction of [Co2(C10H15)2(μ-Cl)2] in THF under an ethyl-ene atmosphere and crystallized from pentane at 193 K. The Co-C(olefin) bonds have an average length of 2.022 (2) Å, while the Co-C(penta-dien-yl) bonds average 2.103 (19) Å. The olefin C=C bonds are 1.410 (1) Å. The dihedral angle between the planes defined by the cyclo-penta-dienyl ligand and the two olefin ligands is 0.25 (12)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked into chains by C-H⋯π inter-actions.

  13. Holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) transmission gratings formed by visible light initiated thiol-ene photopolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofford, Jeremy M.; Natarajan, Lalgudi V.; Tondiglia, Vincent P.; Sutherland, Richard L.; Lloyd, Pamela F.; Siwecki, Stephen A.; Bunning, Timothy J.

    2006-08-01

    We report on the initial development of a visible initiator for thiol-ene photopolymerization using the 647 nm radiation from a Krypton ion laser. The photoinitiator system consists of the dye oxazine 170 perchlorate and the co-initiator benzoyl peroxide. Electron transfer occurs between the singlet excited state of the oxazine dye and benzoyl peroxide with subsequent decomposition of the peroxide yielding benzoyl oxy radicals capable of free radical initiation. We demonstrate that this photoinitiation system enables holographic patterning of HPDLC gratings as initial Bragg transmission gratings with a periodicity less than one micron using 647 nm radiation. These gratings were electrically switchable between a diffractive and transmissive state. Morphology studies using bright field transmission electron microscopy (BFTEM) indicate the phase separation of nearly spherical shaped nematic liquid crystal droplets of several hundred nanometers in diameter. This demonstration suggests that reflection gratings can be written using this photoinitiator system and 647 nm radiation which have switchable notch wavelengths approaching 2 microns.

  14. Facile Synthesis of Prussian Blue Derivate-Modified Mesoporous Material via Photoinitiated Thiol-Ene Click Reaction for Cesium Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jun; Ma, Jiaqi; He, Weiwei; Hua, Daoben

    2015-08-01

    A novel strategy to synthesize a functional mesoporous material for efficient removal of cesium is reported. Specifically, Prussian blue derivate-modified SBA-15 (SBA-15@FC) was prepared by photoinitiated thiol-ene reaction between thiol-modified SBA-15 and pentacyano(4-vinyl pyridine)ferrate complex. The effects of weight percentage of the Prussian blue derivate, pH, adsorbent dose, co-existing ions, and initial concentration were evaluated on the adsorption of cesium ions. The adsorption kinetically follows a pseudo-second-order model and reaches equilibrium within 2 h with a high adsorption capacity of about 13.90 mg Cs g(-1) , which indicates that SBA-15@FC is a promising adsorbent to effectively remove cesium from aqueous solutions.

  15. World Bank: harnessing civil society expertise in undertaking and disseminating research findings.

    PubMed

    Simms, Ben

    2013-01-01

    The UK Consortium on AIDS and International Development was an essential partner to the evaluation leaders in harnessing the contribution and expertise of civil society. This article describes what the partnership entailed, the additional value it brought and how civil society might use the evaluation findings both as a tool for advocacy and a means for improving its own engagement with the individuals directly affected by HIV and with those who care for them.

  16. The relevance of netnography to the harness of Romanian health care electronic word-of-mouth.

    PubMed

    Bratucu, R; Gheorghe, I R; Radu, A; Purcarea, V L

    2014-09-15

    Nowadays, consumers use the computer mediated communication to make purchase decisions on a large variety of products and services. Since health care services are archetypal by nature, consumers in this field are one of the most encountered users of electronic word-of-mouth. The objective of this paper is to explain and support the necessity of adopting a different qualitative method when electronic word of mouth is harnessed on health care dedicated forums, that is, netnography.

  17. Damping Models for Shear-Deformable Beam with Applications to Spacecraft Wiring Harness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-28

    Air Force Research Laboratory AFRL /RVSV Space Vehicles Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Ave., SE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT Kirtland AFB, NM 87117...Kingman Rd, Suite 0944 Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 2 cys Official Record Copy AFRL /RVSV/Derek... AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2014-0189 AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2014-0189 DAMPING MODELS FOR SHEAR-DEFORMABLE BEAM WITH APPLICATIONS TO SPACECRAFT WIRING HARNESS

  18. Harnessing Localized Ridges for High-Aspect-Ratio Hierarchical Patterns with Dynamic Tunability and Multifunctionality

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Changyong; Chan, Hon Fai; Zang, Jianfeng; Leong, Kam W.; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2014-01-01

    We invent a simple method for fabricating high-aspect-ratio, hierarchical and dynamically tunable surface patterns by harnessing localized-ridge instabilities in gold nanofilms coated on elastomer substrates (a); develop a theoretical model to calculate the critical parameters (e.g. wavelength and amplitude) for designing the new patterns (b); and demonstrate novel applications of the patterns as super-hydrophobic coatings (c) and biomimetic cell-culture substrates (d) capable of on-demand tunability. PMID:24339233

  19. STS-32 Pilot Wetherbee wearing LES is suspended by harness over WETF pool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-32 Pilot James D. Wetherbee, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and lauch and entry helmet (LEH), is suspended by his parachute harness over JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 25 ft deep pool. During the exercises the crew practiced the procedures to follow in the event of an emergency aboard the Space Shuttle and familiarized themselves with post-Challenger pole system of emergency egress.

  20. Inadequate harnesses as a cause of death in two light aircraft accidents.

    PubMed

    Hill, I R

    1980-09-01

    In the two accidents described, both fatalities occurred because the victims were wearing only lap belts. One of the victims was piloting an aircraft. These were survivable aircraft accidents and illustrate the inadequacy of this type of harness. Recently promulgated legislation in the United Kingdom should mean that front seat incidents of this nature will become a rarity. The dangers will still exist for those in rear passenger seats, however, because they are not covered by the new laws.

  1. The relevance of netnography to the harness of Romanian health care electronic word-of-mouth

    PubMed Central

    Bratucu, R; Gheorghe, IR; Radu, A; Purcarea, VL

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nowadays, consumers use the computer mediated communication to make purchase decisions on a large variety of products and services. Since health care services are archetypal by nature, consumers in this field are one of the most encountered users of electronic word-of-mouth. The objective of this paper is to explain and support the necessity of adopting a different qualitative method when electronic word of mouth is harnessed on health care dedicated forums, that is, netnography. PMID:25408755

  2. Effects of harness-attached transmitters on premigration and reproduction of Brant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, David H.; Flint, Paul L.

    1995-01-01

    Radio transmitters are an important tool in waterfowl ecology studies, but little is known about their effects on free-ranging geese. We attached transmitters to female brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) to investigate migration schedules at a fall staging area, return rates to nesting grounds, and nesting rates of returning females in subsequent breeding seasons. Radio-tagged females (n = 62) carried either 35-g back-mounted transmitters attached with ribbon harnesses, or 26- or 32-g back-mounted transmitters affixed with plastic-coated wire harnesses (Dwyer 1972). Arrival and departure schedules at Izembek Lagoon, Alaska, did not differ (P > 0.05) between radio-tagged females and the entire population in 1987-89. Color-banded females with transmitters returned to the breeding colony in subsequent nesting seasons (1988-92) at a lower (P ≤ 0.003) rate (≤4%) than color-banded females without transmitters (57-83%). The 1 returning color-banded female with a transmitter did not breed, while an average 90% of the returning color-banded females without transmitters nested in subsequent breeding seasons (P = 0.005). Back-mounted, harness-attached transmitters may bias data in studies of waterfowl behavior, productivity, and survival.

  3. Molecular mapping of a sunflower rust resistance gene from HAR6

    PubMed Central

    Bulos, Mariano; Ramos, María L.; Altieri, Emiliano; Sala, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    Sunflower rust, caused by Puccinia helianthi Schw., can result in significant yield losses in cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. var. macrocarpus Ckll.). HAR6 is a germplasm population resistant to most predominant rust races. The objectives of this study were to map the resistance factor present in HAR6 (RHAR6), and to provide and validate molecular tools for the identification of this gene for marker assisted selection purposes. Virulence reaction of seedlings for the F2 population and F2:3 families suggested that a single dominant gene confers rust resistance in HAR6-1, a selected rust resistance line from the original population. Genetic mapping with eight markers covered 97.4 cM of genetic distance on linkage group 13 of the sunflower consensus map. A co-dominant marker ZVG61 is the closest marker distal to RHAR6 at a genetic distance of 0.7 cM, while ORS581, a dominant marker linked in the coupling phase, is proximal to RHAR6 at a genetic distance of 1.5 cM. Validation of these markers was assessed by converting a susceptible line into a rust resistant isoline by means of marker assisted backcrossing. The application of these results to assist the breeding process and to design new strategies for rust control in sunflower is discussed. PMID:23641190

  4. Accelerations and Passenger Harness Loads Measured in Full-Scale Light-Airplane Crashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiband, A. Martin; Simpkinson, Scott H.; Black, Dugald O.

    1953-01-01

    Full-scale light-airplane crashes simulating stall-spin accidents were conducted to determine the decelerations to which occupants are exposed and the resulting harness forces encountered in this type of accident. Crashes at impact speeds from 42 to 60 miles per hour were studied. The airplanes used were of the familiar steel-tube, fabric-covered, tandem, two-seat type. In crashes up to an impact speed of 60 miles per hour, crumpling of the forward fuselage structure prevented the maximum deceleration at the rear-seat location from exceeding 26 to 33g. This maximum g value appeared independent of the impact speed. Restraining forces in the seatbelt - shoulder-harness combination reached 5800 pounds. The rear-seat occupant can survive crashes of the type studied at impact speeds up to 60 miles per hour, if body movement is restrained by an adequate seatbelt-shoulder-harness combination so as to prevent injurious contact with obstacles normally present in the cabin. Inwardly collapsing cabin structure, however, is a potential hazard in the higher-speed crashes.

  5. Mapping the Sea Floor of the Historic Area Remediation Site (HARS) Offshore of New York City

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford

    2002-01-01

    The area offshore of New York City has been used for the disposal of dredged material for over a century. The area has also been used for the disposal of other materials such as acid waste, industrial waste, municipal sewage sludge, cellar dirt, and wood. Between 1976 and 1995, the New York Bight Dredged Material Disposal Site, also known as the Mud Dump Site (MDS), received on average about 6 million cubic yards of dredged material annually. In September 1997 the MDS was closed as a disposal site, and it and the surrounding area were designated as the Historic Area Remediation Site (HARS). The sea floor of the HARS, approximately 9 square nautical miles in area, currently is being remediated by placing a minimum 1-m-thick cap of clean dredged material on top of the surficial sediments that are contaminated from previous disposal of dredged and other materials. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is working cooperatively with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to map the sea floor geology of the HARS and changes in the characteristics of the surficial sediments over time.

  6. The Belem Framework for Action: Harnessing the Power and Potential of Adult Learning and Education for a Viable Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Learning, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the Belem Framework for Action. This framework focuses on harnessing the power and potential of adult learning and education for a viable future. This framework begins with a preamble on adult education and towards lifelong learning.

  7. Corticosteroidogenesis in the toad Bufo arenarum H: evidence for a precursor role for an aldosterone 3 beta-hydroxy-5-ene analogue (3 beta, 11 beta, 21-trihydroxy-20-oxo-5-pregnen-18-al).

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, N R; Shackleton, C H; Harnik, M; Cozza, E N; Gros, E G; Lantos, C P

    1993-01-01

    A material isolated following pregnenolone incubations with toad (Bufo arenarum) inter-renal tissue at 28 degrees C has been identified as a 3 beta-hydroxy-5-ene analogue of aldosterone (3 beta, 11 beta, 21-trihydroxy-20-oxo-5-pregnen-18-al). The initial identification was made by enzymic and m.s. methods, and structural confirmation was achieved through comparison with chemically synthesized authentic material. The relative efficacy of corticosterone, 18-hydroxycorticosterone and the 3 beta-hydroxy-5-ene aldosterone analogue as aldosterone precursors was evaluated. In the in vitro situation studied, the 3 beta-hydroxy-5-ene steroid was by far the best precursor. PMID:8503841

  8. Harnessing methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The total methane resource in hydrates—ice-like substances found in deep ocean sediments and Arctic permafrost—exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuel resources,such as coal, oil, and conventional gas, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).The Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act, signed into law by U.S. President Bill Clinton on May 3, establishes a new federal commitment to developing methane hydrates, which has been touted as a potentially clean energy source that could make the U.S. less dependent on foreign sources of energy. The bill authorizes $47.5 million over five years for the Department of Energy to establish a federal methane hydrate research and development program.

  9. Protective level of safety harnesses combined with some racing car seats in frontal impacts--a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Ottoson, A L; Lövsund, P

    1986-12-01

    As a basis for a prospective modification of the present seat-belt regulation in Sweden, the protective level of safety harnesses compared with three-point belts has been studied. Biomechanical tests were carried out with different combinations of belts and seats. The results showed that a three-point belt on a conventional seat offered the best protection in frontal impacts. The geometry of the safety harness (inverted Y-harness and four-point belt) induces the lap belt to slide over the iliac crest and the restraining force will be on the abdomen (submarining). This may be prevented by the use of a six-point belt, where two crotch straps keep the lap belt in position. The safety harness induces strong rebounds on the head, owing to the fact that the shoulder straps stop the forward motion of the torso too fast. High accelerations and HIC-values were registered for the head. The shoulder straps of the safety harnesses also expose the wearer's shoulders and spine to high stresses in frontal impacts, which may induce injuries to the shoulders and compression injuries to the spine. Various solutions which may result in an increase of the protective level of the system safety harness and racing-car seat in frontal impacts are discussed.

  10. The IS-ENES climate4impact portal: bridging the CMIP5 and CORDEX data to impact users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som de Cerff, Wim; Plieger, Maarten; Page, Christian; Tatarinova, Natalia; Hutjes, Ronald; de Jong, Fokke; Bärring, Lars; Sjökvist, Elin; Vega Saldarriaga, Manuel; Santiago Cofiño Gonzalez, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    The aim of climate4impact (climate4impact.eu) is to enhance the use of Climate Research Data and to enhance the interaction with climate effect/impact communities. The portal is based on 17 impact use cases from 5 different European countries, and is evaluated by a user panel consisting of use case owners. It has been developed within the IS-ENES European project and is currently operated and further developed in the IS ENES2 project. As the climate impact community is very broad, the focus is mainly on the scientific impact community. Climate4impact is connected to the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) nodes containing global climate model data (GCM data) from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) and regional climate model data (RCM) data from the Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX). This global network of climate model data centers offers services for data description, discovery and download. The climate4impact portal connects to these services using OpenID, and offers a user interface for searching, visualizing and downloading global climate model data and more. A challenging task is to describe the available model data and how it can be used. The portal informs users about possible caveats when using climate model data. All impact use cases are described in the documentation section, using highlighted keywords pointing to detailed information in the glossary. Climate4impact currently has two main objectives. The first one is to work on a web interface which automatically generates a graphical user interface on WPS endpoints. The WPS calculates climate indices and subset data using OpenClimateGIS/icclim on data stored in ESGF data nodes. Data is then transmitted from ESGF nodes over secured OpenDAP and becomes available in a new, per user, secured OpenDAP server. The results can then be visualized again using ADAGUC WMS. Dedicated wizards for processing of climate indices will be developed in close

  11. Different DMRT3 Genotypes Are Best Adapted for Harness Racing and Riding in Finnhorses.

    PubMed

    Jäderkvist Fegraeus, Kim; Johansson, Lisa; Mäenpää, Minna; Mykkänen, Anna; Andersson, Lisa S; Velie, Brandon D; Andersson, Leif; Árnason, Thorvaldur; Lindgren, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies showed a positive effect of the DMRT3 "gait keeper" mutation on harness racing performance in Standardbreds, French-, and Nordic trotters. The mutation has also been shown to influence riding traits in multiple breeds. This study investigated the effect of the DMRT3 mutation on harness racing performance and riding traits in Finnhorses. Finnhorses used for harness racing (n = 180) and for riding (n = 59) were genotyped for the DMRT3 mutation. For the trotters the genotypes were evaluated for association with racing performance (number of starts, victories, placings, earnings, and race times). At 3-6 years of age the AA genotype was superior compared with the CA and CC genotypes. The AA horses had a significantly higher proportion of victories (P = 1.4×10(-6)) and placings (P = 4.1×10(-7)), better race times (P = 0.01), and earned more money (P = 0.009) compared with C-horses. For the Finnhorses used for riding the owners answered a questionnaire to score how well the horse performed the gaits walk, trot, and canter on a scale from 1 to 6. These scores were tested for association with the DMRT3 genotypes. Although AA horses were more successful as racehorses, the CC and CA horses appear more adapted for classical riding disciplines. The AA horses received significantly lower gait scores compared with C-horses for the majority of gaits. Except for rhythm in extended canter (P = 0.05), there were no significant differences between CA and CC horses. This study shows that there are different optimal genotypes for different disciplines and the DMRT3 mutation clearly influences gaits and performance in Finnhorses.

  12. Characterization of the metabolic pathway of 1,25-dihydroxy-16-ene vitamin D3 in rat kidney by on-line high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yeung, B; Vouros, P; Siu-Caldera, M L; Reddy, G S

    1995-04-18

    1,25-Dihydroxy-16-ene vitamin D3 is a synthetic analog of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, the most physiologically active metabolite of vitamin D3. The renal metabolism of 1,25-dihydroxy-16-ene vitamin D3 had been studied previously using a perfused rat kidney system [Reddy et al., Bioorg Med Chem Lett 3: 1879-1884, 1993], and its C-24 oxidative metabolic pathway had been found to be different from that of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 by HPLC. To further delineate the differences between the C-24 oxidative metabolic pathways of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and 1,25-dihydroxy-16-ene vitamin D3 in this present study we investigated the C-24 oxidation pathway of 1,25-dihydroxy-16-ene vitamin D3 using a novel detection approach based on on-line capillary liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Two types of tandem mass spectrometric detection were employed to characterize the metabolites in the kidney perfusate: (a) the preliminary screening of metabolites by parent scan, which led to the tentative discovery of the production of 1,23,25-trihydroxy-24-oxo-16-ene vitamin D3, a new metabolite of 1,25-dihydroxy-16-ene vitamin D3, and (b) the pharmacokinetic studies of the substrate, 1,25-dihydroxy-16-ene vitamin D3 and its metabolites by multiple reaction monitoring. In the latter, the mass spectrometric sensitivity for quantification was found to be about 20-fold better than UV detection. The current work concluded that the C-24 oxidative metabolic pathway of 1,25-dihydroxy-16-ene vitamin D3 closely mimicked that of its natural counterpart. Furthermore, the use of mass spectrometry permitted the clearance rate of the starting substrate to be studied at a more physiological level (ng/mL or submicromolar level), which had not been possible previously by HPLC-UV detection.

  13. Monooxime reactivators of acetylcholinesterase with (E)-but-2-ene linker: preparation and reactivation of tabun- and paraoxon-inhibited acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Musilek, Kamil; Holas, Ondrej; Jun, Daniel; Dohnal, Vlastimil; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Opletalova, Veronika; Dolezal, Martin; Kuca, Kamil

    2007-11-01

    Acetylcholinesterase reactivators are crucial antidotes for the treatment of organophosphate intoxication. Fifteen new monooxime reactivators of acetylcholinesterase with a (E)-but-2-ene linker were developed in an effort to extend the properties of K-oxime (E)-1-(4-carbamoylpyridinium)-4-(4-hydroxyiminomethylpyridinium)-but-2-ene dibromide (K203). The known reactivators (pralidoxime, HI-6, obidoxime, K075, K203) and the new compounds were tested in vitro on a model of tabun- and paraoxon-inhibited AChE. Monooxime reactivators were not able to exceed the best known compounds for tabun poisoning, but some of them did show reactivation comparable with known compounds for paraoxon poisoning. However, extensive differences were found by a SAR study for various substitutions on the non-oxime part of the reactivator molecule.

  14. Classical conditioning of proboscis extension in harnessed Africanized honey bee queens (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Aquino, Italo S; Abramson, Charles I; Soares, Ademilson E E; Fernandes, Andrea Cardoso; Benbassat, Danny

    2004-06-01

    Experiments are reported on learning in virgin Africanized honey bee queens (Apis mellifera L.). Queens restrained in a "Pavlovian harness" received a pairing of hexanal odor with a 1.8-M feeding of sucrose solution. Compared to explicitly unpaired controls, acquisition was rapid in reaching about 90%. Acquisition was also rapid in queens receiving an unconditioned stimulus of "bee candy" or an unconditioned stimulus administered by worker bees. During extinction the conditioned response declines. The steepest decline was observed in queens receiving an unconditioned stimulus of bee candy. These findings extend previous work on learning of Afrianized honey bee workers to a population of queen bees.

  15. Harnessing collaborative technology to accelerate achievement of chronic disease management objectives for Canada.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Leslee J; Healey, Lindsay; Falk, Will

    2007-01-01

    Morgan and colleagues put forth a call to action for the transformation of the Canadian healthcare system through the adoption of a national chronic disease prevention and management (CDPM) strategy. They offer examples of best practices and national solutions including investment in clinical information technologies to help support improved care and outcomes. Although we acknowledge that the authors propose CDPM solutions that are headed in the right direction, more rapid deployment of solutions that harness the potential of advanced collaborative technologies is required. We provide examples of how technologies that exist today can help to accelerate the achievement of some key CDPM objectives.

  16. New Dimensions in Microarchitecture Harnessing 3D Integration Technologies (BRIEFING CHARTS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-06

    New Dimensions in Microarchitecture Harnessing 3D Integration Technologies Kerry Bernstein IBM T.J. Watson Research Center Yorktown Heights, NY...e m o r y H i e r a r c h y L1 Size limited by Cycle time Components of Processor Performance From ISCA ’06 Keynote address by Phil Emma , IBM Delay...From ISCA ’06 Keynote address by Phil Emma , IBM 6 March, 2007 New Dimensions in Microarchitecture 8 What Is Bandwidth Used For? Miss Penalty

  17. Biology and Applications of CRISPR Systems: Harnessing Nature's Toolbox for Genome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Wright, Addison V; Nuñez, James K; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-14

    Bacteria and archaea possess a range of defense mechanisms to combat plasmids and viral infections. Unique among these are the CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated) systems, which provide adaptive immunity against foreign nucleic acids. CRISPR systems function by acquiring genetic records of invaders to facilitate robust interference upon reinfection. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the diverse mechanisms by which Cas proteins respond to foreign nucleic acids and how these systems have been harnessed for precision genome manipulation in a wide array of organisms.

  18. Wearing a safety harness during treadmill walking influences lower extremity kinematics mainly through changes in ankle regularity and local stability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Wearing a harness during treadmill walking ensures the subject's safety and is common practice in biomedical engineering research. However, the extent to which such practice influences gait is unknown. This study investigated harness-related changes in gait patterns, as evaluated from lower extremity kinematics during treadmill walking. Findings Healthy subjects (n = 10) walked on a treadmill at their preferred speed for 3 minutes with and without wearing a harness (LiteGait®, Mobility Research, Inc.). In the former condition, no weight support was provided to the subjects. Lower extremity kinematics was assessed in the sagittal plane from the mean (meanRoM), standard deviation (SDRoM) and coefficient of variation (CoVRoM) of the hip, knee, and ankle ranges of motion (RoM), as well as from the sample entropy (SampEn) and the largest Lyapunov exponent (LyE) of the joints' angles. Wearing the harness increased the meanRoM of the hip, the SDRoM and the CoVRoM of the knee, and the SampEn and the LyE of the ankle. In particular, the harness effect sizes for both the SampEn and the LyE of the ankle were large, likely reflecting a meaningful decline in the neuromuscular stabilizing control of this joint. Conclusions Wearing a harness during treadmill walking marginally influences lower extremity kinematics, resulting in more or less subtle changes in certain kinematic variables. However, in cases where differences in gait patterns would be expressed through modifications in these variables, having subjects walk with a harness may mask or reinforce such differences. PMID:22305105

  19. Preparation and Characterization of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane-Containing, Titania-Thiol-Ene Composite Photocatalytic Coatings, Emphasizing the Hydrophobic-Hydrophilic Transition.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, LaCrissia U; Netchaev, Anton D; Jefcoat, Jennifer A; Windham, Amber D; McFarland, Frederick M; Guo, Song; Buchanan, Randy K; Buchanan, J Paige

    2015-06-17

    Coatings prepared from titania-thiol-ene compositions were found to be both self-cleaning, as measured by changes in water contact angle, and photocatalytic toward the degradation of an organic dye. Stable titania-thiol-ene dispersions at approximately 2 wt % solids were prepared using a combination of high-shear mixing and sonication in acetone solvent from photocatalytic titania, trisilanol isobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) dispersant, and select thiol-ene monomers, i.e., trimethylolpropane tris(3-mercaptopropionate) (TMPMP), pentaerythritol allyl ether (APE), and 1,3,5-triallyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (TTT). The dispersed particle compositions were characterized by DLS and TEM. The synthetic methods employed yield a strongly bound particle/POSS complex, supported by IR, 29Si NMR, and TGA. The factors of spray techniques, carrier solvent volatility, and particle size and size distributions, in combination, likely all contribute to the highly textured but uniform surfaces observed via SEM and AFM. Polymer composites possessed thermal transitions (e.g., Tg) consistent with composition. In general, the presence of polymer matrix provided mechanical integrity, without significantly compromising or prohibiting other critical performance characteristics, such as film processing, photocatalytic degradation of adsorbed contaminants, and the hydrophobic-hydrophilic transition. In all cases, coatings containing photocatalytic titania were converted from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic, as defined by changes in the water contact angle. The superhydrophilic state of samples was considered persistent, since long time durations in complete darkness were required to observe any significant hydrophobic return. In a preliminary demonstration, the photocatalytic activity of prepared coatings was confirmed through the degradation of crystal violet dye. This work demonstrates that a scalable process can be found to prepare titania-thiol-ene

  20. Biotransformation of ent-kaur-16-ene and ent-trachylobane 7β-acetoxy derivatives by the fungus Gibberella fujikuroi (Fusarium fujikuroi).

    PubMed

    Fraga, Braulio M; Bressa, Carlo; González-Vallejo, Victoria; González, Pedro; Guillermo, Ricardo

    2012-09-01

    Candol A (7β-hydroxy-ent-kaur-16-ene) (6) is efficiently transformed by Gibberella fujikuroi into the gibberellin plant hormones. In this work, the biotransformation of its acetate by this fungus has led to the formation of 7β-acetoxy-ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (3), whose corresponding alcohol is a short-lived intermediate in the biosynthesis of gibberellins and seco-ring ent-kaurenoids in this fungus. Further biotransformation of this compound led to the hydroxylation of the 3β-positions to give 7β-acetoxy-3β-hydroxy-ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (14), followed by a 2β- or 18-hydroxylation of this metabolite. The incubation of epicandicandiol 7β-monoacetate (7β-acetoxy-18-hydroxy-ent-kaur-16-ene) (10) produces also the 19-hydroxylation to form the 18,19 diol (20), which is oxidized to give the corresponding C-18 or C-19 acids. These results indicated that the presence of a 7β-acetoxy group does not inhibit the fungal oxidation of C-19 in 7β-acetoxy-ent-kaur-16-ene, but avoids the ring B contraction that leads to the gibberellins and the 6β-hydroxylation necessary for the formation of seco-ring B ent-kaurenoids. The biotransformation of 7β-acetoxy-ent-trachylobane (trachinol acetate) (27) only led to the formation of 7β-acetoxy-18-hydroxy-ent-trachylobane (33).

  1. Synthesis and Applications of Silyl 2-Methylprop-2-ene-1-sulfinates in Preparative Silylation and GC-Derivatization Reactions of Polyols and Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Marković, Dean; Tchawou, Wandji Augustin; Novosjolova, Irina; Laclef, Sylvain; Stepanovs, Dmitrijs; Turks, Māris; Vogel, Pierre

    2016-03-14

    Trimethylsilyl, triethylsilyl, tert-butyldimethylsilyl, and triisopropylsilyl 2-methylprop-2-ene-1-sulfinates were prepared through (CuOTf)2⋅C6H6-catalyzed sila-ene reactions of the corresponding methallylsilanes with SO2 at 50 °C. Sterically hindered, epimerizable, and base-sensitive alcohols gave the corresponding silyl ethers in high yields and purities at room temperature and under neutral conditions. As the byproducts of the silylation reaction (SO2 +isobutylene) are volatile, the workup was simplified to solvent evaporation. The developed method can be employed for the chemo- and regioselective semiprotection of polyols and glycosides and for the silylation of unstable aldols. The high reactivity of the developed reagents is shown by the synthesis of sterically hindered per-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-α-D-glucopyranose, the X-ray crystallographic analysis of which is the first for a per-O-silylated hexopyranose. The per-O-silylation of polyols, hydroxy carboxylic acids, and carbohydrates with trimethylsilyl 2-methylprop-2-ene-1-sulfinate was coupled with the GC analysis of nonvolatile polyhydroxy compounds both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  2. The vibrational spectra of 1,3-dithiane-1-oxide and 1,3-dithia-1-oxocyclohept-5-ene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noskov, A. I.; Fishman, A. I.; Galjautdinova, A. N.; Klimovitskii, E. N.

    2010-09-01

    The IR spectra of 1,3-dithiane-1-oxide (I) and 1,3-dithia-1-oxocyclohept-5-ene (II) were recorded in solution, solid and liquid phase over 4000-400 cm -1 spectral range. It was found that both (I) and (II) in liquid phase and solutions exist in two conformations: (I) chair-e ( Ce) and chair-a ( Ca) with equatorial and axial positions of the S dbnd O bond, respectively, and (II) chair-e ( Ce) and boat-e ( Be). The intensity variations with temperature (300-180 K) of the bands 632 ( Ca) and 644 cm -1 ( Ce) of (I) in acetone-d 6 and the bands 482 ( Be) и 448 cm -1 ( Ce) of (II) in melt were employed in Van't Hoff plot and gave the values Δ H°( Ca - Ce) = 380 ± 40 cal mol -1 (I) and Δ H° ( Be - Ce) = 400 ± 100 cal mol -1 (II). Ab initio calculations were carried out with the Gaussian 98 program using the basis set 6-31G(d) for (I) and 6-311++G(d,p) for (II). The energy difference between Ca and Ce conformations for (I) and Be and Ce for (II) are in a good agreement with experimental results. Vibrational frequencies for both conformations (I) and (II) were calculated. After appropriate scaling a reasonably good agreement between the experimental and calculated wave numbers was obtained.

  3. Functional characterization and stability improvement of a ‘thermophilic-like’ ene-reductase from Rhodococcus opacus 1CP

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Anika; Mehnert, Marika; Paul, Caroline E.; Westphal, Adrie H.; van Berkel, Willem J. H.; Tischler, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Ene-reductases (ERs) are widely applied for the asymmetric synthesis of relevant industrial chemicals. A novel ER OYERo2 was found within a set of 14 putative old yellow enzymes (OYEs) obtained by genome mining of the actinobacterium Rhodococcus opacus 1CP. Multiple sequence alignment suggested that the enzyme belongs to the group of ‘thermophilic-like’ OYEs. OYERo2 was produced in Escherichia coli and biochemically characterized. The enzyme is strongly NADPH dependent and uses non-covalently bound FMNH2 for the reduction of activated α,β-unsaturated alkenes. In the active form OYERo2 is a dimer. Optimal catalysis occurs at pH 7.3 and 37°C. OYERo2 showed highest specific activities (45-50 U mg-1) on maleimides, which are efficiently converted to the corresponding succinimides. The OYERo2-mediated reduction of prochiral alkenes afforded the (R)-products with excellent optical purity (ee > 99%). OYERo2 is not as thermo-resistant as related OYEs. Introduction of a characteristic intermolecular salt bridge by site-specific mutagenesis raised the half-life of enzyme inactivation at 32°C from 28 to 87 min and improved the tolerance toward organic co-solvents. The suitability of OYERo2 for application in industrial biocatalysis is discussed. PMID:26483784

  4. Enantioselective Reduction of Citral Isomers in NCR Ene Reductase: Analysis of an Active-Site Mutant Library.

    PubMed

    Kress, Nico; Rapp, Johanna; Hauer, Bernhard

    2017-02-08

    A deeper understanding of the >99 % S-selective reduction of both isomers of citral catalyzed by NCR ene reductase was achieved by active-site mutational studies and docking simulation. Though structurally similar, the E/Z isomers of citral showed a significantly varying selectivity response to introduced mutations. Although it was possible to invert (E)-citral reduction enantioselectivity to ee 46 % (R) by introducing mutation W66A, for (Z)-citral it remained ≥88 % (S) for all single-residue variants. Residue 66 seems to act as a lever for opposite binding modes. This was underlined by a W66A-based double-mutant library that enhanced the (E)-citral derived enantioselectivity to 63 % (R) and significantly lowered the S selectivity for (Z)-citral to 44 % (S). Formation of (R)-citronellal from an (E/Z)-citral mixture is a desire in industrial (-)-menthol synthesis. Our findings pave the way for a rational enzyme engineering solution.

  5. Facile preparation of biocompatible sulfhydryl cotton fiber-based sorbents by "thiol-ene" click chemistry for biological analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Mei; Zhu, Gang-Tian; Zhu, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Shao-Ting; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2014-10-22

    Sulfhydryl cotton fiber (SCF) has been widely used as adsorbent for a variety of metal ions since 1971. Thanks to the abundant thiols on SCF, in this study, we reported a universal method for the facile preparation of SCF-based materials using "thiol-ene" click chemistry for the first time. With the proposed method, two types of SCF-based materials, phenylboronic acid grafted sulfhydryl cotton fiber (SCF-PBA) and zirconium phosphonate-modified sulfhydryl cotton fiber (SCF-pVPA-Zr(4+)), were successfully prepared. The grafted functional groups onto the thiol group of SCF were demonstrated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The prepared fibrous materials exhibited excellent fiber strength, good stability in aqueous or nonaqueous solutions, and great biocompatibility. Moreover, we developed filter-free in-pipet-tip SPE using these SCF-based materials as adsorbent for the enrichment of ribonucleosides, glycopeptides and phosphopeptides. Our results showed that SCF-PBA adsorbent can selectively capture ribonucleosides and glycopeptides from complex biological samples. And SCF-pVPA-Zr(4+) adsorbent exhibited high selectivity and capacity in the enrichment of phosphopeptides from the digestion mixture of β-casein and bovine serum albumin (BSA), as well as human serum and nonfat milk digest. Generally, the preparation strategy can be a universal method for the synthesis of other functionalized cotton-based adsorbents with special requirement in microscale biological analysis.

  6. Structure, thermal and spectral study of 16α,17-epoxypregn-4-ene-3,11,20-trione monohydate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Qiang; Wang, JingKang

    2005-10-01

    16α,17-epoxypregn-4-ene-3,11,20-trione is an important steroid intermediate in synthesis of many hormone pharmaceuticals, such as cortisone acetate and betamethason. It does not dissolve in water, but the single crystals grown from acetone with some water shows evident hydration behavior. The thermal analyses by DSC and TG-DTA and the IR spectra characterization of the anhydrous and hydrous crystals were performed and compared. The hydrate was also proved by IR spectral and thermal analyses. Single crystal structure of the hydrate indicates one water molecule per host molecule is included into the host lattice. The incorporation of water molecules does not change the crystal cell dimensions significantly, except for some increment of the cell along the axis b. In the crystal cell, two steroid molecules are linked through the water molecules as a bridge by forming two different hydrogen bonds. The incorporation of one water molecule makes some conformation changes of the molecules in the crystal unit cell.

  7. Thiol-ene hydrogels as desmoplasia-mimetic matrices for modeling pancreatic cancer cell growth, invasion, and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Ki, Chang Seok; Lin, Tsai-Yu; Korc, Murray; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2014-12-01

    The development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is heavily influenced by local stromal tissues, or desmoplasia. Biomimetic hydrogels capable of mimicking tumor niches are particularly useful for discovering the role of independent matrix cues on cancer cell development. Here, we report a photo-curable and bio-orthogonal thiol-ene (i.e., cross-linked by mutually reactive norbornene and thiol groups via photoinitiation) hydrogel platform for studying the growth, morphogenesis, drug resistance, and cancer stem cell marker expression in PDAC cells cultured in 3D. The hydrogels were prepared from multi-arm poly(ethylene glycol)-norbornene cross-linked with protease-sensitive peptide to permit cell-mediated matrix remodeling. Collagen 1 fibrils were incorporated into the covalent network while cytokines (e.g., EGF and TGF-β1) were supplemented in the culture media for controlling cell fate. We found that the presence of collagen 1 enhanced cell proliferation and Yes-associated protein (YAP) translocation to cell nuclei. Cytokines and collagen 1 synergistically up-regulated MT1-MMP expression and induced cell spreading, suggestive of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the encapsulated cells. Furthermore, PDAC cells cultured in 3D developed chemo-resistance even in the absence of collagen 1 and cytokines. This phenotype is likely a consequence of the enrichment of pancreatic cancer stem cells that expressed high levels of CD24, sonic hedgehog (SHH), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).

  8. Crystal structure of di-aqua-(μ2-tri-ethyl-ene-tetra-minehexa-acetato)-dizinc tetra-hydrate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Lu, Li-Ping

    2015-03-01

    The reaction of ZnO and tri-ethyl-ene-tetra-minehexaacetic acid (H6TTHA) in aqueous solution after refluxing yields the binuclear title compound, [Zn2(C18H26N4O12)(H2O)2]·4H2O. There is a centre of symmetry in the [Zn2(H2TTHA)(H2O)2] mol-ecule in the crystalline state. Both Zn(II) ions are octahedrally surrounded and bound by an N2O3 donor set from the H2TTHA(4-) anion and a water mol-ecule; the N atoms are cis and the water mol-ecule is trans to an N atom. The Zn⋯Zn separation is 7.562 (1) Å. An intra-molecular C-H⋯O inter-action is observed and both carboxyl-ate H atoms are disordered over two adjacent sites. In the crystal, the components are linked by O-H⋯O and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds generating a three-dimensonal network.

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of High Performance Polyimides Containing the Bicyclo(2.2.2)oct-7-ene Ring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarado, M.; Harruna, I. I.; Bota, K. B.

    1997-01-01

    Due to the difficulty in processing polyimides with high temperature stability and good solvent resistance, we have synthesized high performance polyimides with bicyclo(2.2.2)-oct-7-ene ring system which can easily be fabricated into films and fibers and subsequently converted to the more stable aromatic polyimides. In order to improve processability, we prepared two polyimides by reacting 1,4-phenylenediamine and 1,3phenylediamine with bicyclo(2.2.2)-7-octene-2,3,5,6-tetracarboxylic dianhydride. The polyimides were characterized by FTIR, FTNMR, solubility and thermal analysis. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the 1,4-phenylenediamine and 1,3-phenylenediamine containing polyimides were stable up to 460 and 379 C, respectively under nitrogen atmosphere. No melting transitions were observed for both polyimides. The 1,4-phenylenediamine containing polyimide is partially soluble in dimethyl sulfoxide, methane sulfonic acid and soluble in sulfuric acid at room temperature. The 1,3-phenylenediamine containing polyimide is partially soluble in dimethyl sulfoxide, tetramethyl urea, N,N-dimethyl acetamide and soluble in methane sulfonic acid and sulfuric acid.

  10. Effects of harness transmitters on behavior and reproduction of wild mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pietz, Pamela J.; Krapu, Gary L.; Greenwood, Raymond J.; Lokemoen, John T.

    1993-01-01

    Radio telemetry has been an important research tool in waterfowl studies for >20 years, yet little effort has been made to evaluate potential effects of transmitters on the birds that carry them. As part of a 4-year mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) study in the prairie pothole region of North Dakota and Minnesota, we compared radio-marked and unmarked female mallards in terms of percent time observed feeding, resting, and preening; nest initiation date; and clutch size and egg volume. Radio-marked females carried a 23-g back-mounted transmitter attached with a 2-loop harness (Dwyer 1972). On average, radio-marked females tended to feed less, rest and preen more, initiate nests later, and lay smaller clutches and eggs than unmarked females. Thus, behavioral and reproductive data from ducks marked with back-mounted harness-attached transmitters may be biased. We recommend that new designs of radio packages be field tested and caution that effects may be masked under extreme environmental conditions.

  11. New Padded Harness for Self-Acquisition of Resting 12-Lead ECGs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Rood, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a dry-electrode harness that permits easy, rapid, and unsupervised self-acquisition of resting 12-lead ECGs without the use of any disposables. Various other advantageous features of the harness include: 1) padded or inflatable cushions at the lateral sides of the torso that function to press the left arm (LA) and right arm (RA) dry electrodes mounted on cushions against sideward (as shown in the Figure below) or downward-rested arms of the subject; 2) sufficient distal placement of the arm electrodes with good abutment and without the need for adhesives, straps, bands, bracelets, or gloves on the arms; 3) padding over the sternum to avoid "tenting" in the V1 through V3 (and V3R, when present) electrode positions; 4) easy-to-don, one-piece design with an adjustable single point of connection and an adjustable shoulder strap; and 5) Lund or "modified Lund" placement of the dry electrodes, the results of which more effectively reproduce results from "standard" 12-lead ECG placements than do results from Mason-Likar lead placements.

  12. Potential of mixed microalgae to harness biodiesel from ecological water-bodies with simultaneous treatment.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S Venkata; Devi, M Prathima; Mohanakrishna, G; Amarnath, N; Babu, M Lenin; Sarma, P N

    2011-01-01

    Biodiesel as an eco-friendly fuel is gaining much acceptance in recent years. This communication provides an overview on the possibility of using mixed microalgae existing in ecological water-bodies for harnessing biodiesel. Microalgal cultures from five water-bodies are cultivated in domestic wastewater in open-ponds and the harvested algal-biomass was processed through acid-catalyzed transesterification. Experiments evidenced the potential of using mixed microalgae for harnessing biodiesel. Presence of palmitic acid (C16:0) in higher fraction and physical properties of algal oil correlated well with the biodiesel properties. Functional characteristics of water-bodies showed to influence both species diversity and lipid accumulation. Microalgae from stagnant water-bodies receiving domestic discharges documented higher lipid accumulation. Algal-oil showed to consist 33 types of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids having wide food and fuel characteristics. Simultaneous wastewater treatment was also noticed due to the syntrophic association in the water-body microenvironment. Diversity studies visualized the composition of algae species known to accumulate higher lipids.

  13. Plug-and-play design approach to smart harness for modular small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mughal, M. Rizwan; Ali, Anwar; Reyneri, Leonardo M.

    2014-02-01

    A typical satellite involves many different components that vary in bandwidth demand. Sensors that require a very low data rate may reside on a simple two- or three-wire interface such as I2C, SPI, etc. Complex sensors that require high data rate and bandwidth may reside on an optical interface. The AraMiS architecture is an enhanced capability architecture with different satellite configurations. Although keeping the low-cost and COTS approach of CubeSats, it extends the modularity concept as it also targets different satellite shapes and sizes. But modularity moves beyond the mechanical structure: the tiles also have thermo-mechanical, harness and signal-processing functionalities. Further modularizing the system, every tile can also host a variable number of small sensors, actuators or payloads, connected using a plug-and-play approach. Every subsystem is housed in a small daughter board and is supplied, by the main tile, with power and data distribution functions, power and data harness, mechanical support and is attached and interconnected with space-grade spring-loaded connectors. The tile software is also modular and allows a quick adaptation to specific subsystems. The basic software for the CPU is properly hardened to guarantee high level of radiation tolerance at very low cost.

  14. Water gate array for current flow or tidal movement pneumatic harnessing system

    DOEpatents

    Gorlov, Alexander M.

    1991-01-01

    The invention, which provides a system for harnessing power from current flow or tidal movement in a body of water, comprises first and second hydro-pneumatic chambers each having ingress and egress below the water surface near the river or ocean floor and water gates operative to open or seal the ports to the passage of water. In an exemplary embodiment, the gates are sychronized by shafts so that the ingress ports of each chamber are connected to the egress ports of each other chamber. Thus, one set of gates is closed, while the other is open, thereby allowing water to flow into one chamber and build air pressure therein and allowing water to flow out of the other chamber and create a partial vacuum therein. A pipe connects the chambers, and an air turbine harnesses the air movement within the pipe. When water levels are equilibrated, the open set of gates is closed by a counterweight, and the other set is allowed to open by natural force of the water differential. The water gates may be comprised of a plurality of louvers which are ganged for simultaneous opening and closing. The system is designed to operate with air turbines or other pneumatic devices. Its design minimizes construction cost and environmental impact, yet provides a clean renewable energy source.

  15. Acute cervical spinal cord injury secondary to air bag deployment without proper use of lap or shoulder harnesses.

    PubMed

    Hart, R A; Mayberry, J C; Herzberg, A M

    2000-02-01

    The authors present a case report of a patient with cervical central spinal cord syndrome caused by a hyperextension injury after a motor vehicle collision in which the air bag deployed in the absence of shoulder or lap belt harnesses. The potential for cervical spine and spinal cord hyperextension injuries in passengers positioned in front of air bags without proper use of shoulder or lap belt harnesses is discussed. Cervical central spinal cord quadriplegia occurred with cervical spondylosis and kyphosis that was managed by early three-level cervical corpectomy in a 58-year-old patient. Early improvement in the patient's neurological status occurred but was incomplete at the time of this report. Cervical hyperextension injuries are possible in passengers positioned in the front seat of cars with air bags when shoulder or lap belt harnesses are not used properly. Previous biomechanical studies have documented the potential for these types of injuries.

  16. Doppler sensors and harnesses for cardiac and peripheral arterial flow monitoring.

    PubMed

    Arbeille, P

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to design Doppler sensors and harnesses for monitoring in real time the cardiac stroke volume and output, the cerebral flow volume and resistance and the lower limb arterial flow and resistance changes. For the middle cerebral artery investigation we used a 2-MHz transcranial pulsed wave (PW) Doppler probe (commercial probe) mounted on a rotula, fixed on the horizontal branch of a headset designed like an audio headset. The arch of the headset passed over the top of the skull. For the common carotid investigation, a 4-MHz continuous-wave (CW) or PW flat Doppler probe was inserted in a circular silicone support of 5-cm diameter and 0.6-cm thickness. This soft support could adapt to the irregular surface of the neck, and the silicone material, which is fairly adhesive to the skin, made the system stable. The transducers were preoriented at 45 degrees from the support, which provided an acceptable orientation of the Doppler beam. The aortic Doppler harness consisted of a 2-MHz PW Doppler probe, mounted on a rotula fixed on a plastic rigid support 7 x 1.5 cm2 in area (parallel to the sternum) whose length could be changed (4-7 cm) to localize the rotula and its sensor on the suprasternal area. This flat segment was fixed on a rotating platform, part of a solid square plastic support (10 x 10 cm2) placed on the upper part of the sternum. This system was maintained by elastic bands passing around the shoulder and the chest. The femoral Doppler harness consisted of a 4-MHz CW or PW flat Doppler probe, inserted in a flat and rectangular rigid plastic support 10 x 3 cm2 in area. This rigid support was well adapted to the flat surface of the internal part of the thigh, which made the system stable. Two elastic bands passed around the thigh and the abdomen, which avoided any translation of the support and kept the sensor in contact with the skin. The transducers were preoriented at 45 degrees from the support, which provided an acceptable

  17. Regulation of a putative corticosteroid, 17,21-dihydroxypregn-4-ene,3,20-one, in sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Brent W; Didier, Wes; Rai, Satbir; Johnson, Nicholas S; Libants, Scot; Yun, Sang-Seon; Close, David A

    2014-01-15

    In higher vertebrates, in response to stress, the hypothalamus produces corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which stimulates cells in the anterior pituitary to produce adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which in turn stimulates production of either cortisol (F) or corticosterone (B) by the adrenal tissues. In lampreys, however, neither of these steroids is present. Instead, it has been proposed that the stress steroid is actually 17,21-dihydroxypregn-4-ene-3,20-dione (11-deoxycortisol; S). However, there have been no studies yet to determine its mechanism of regulation or site of production. Here we demonstrate that (1) intraperitoneal injections of lamprey-CRH increase plasma S in a dose dependent manner, (2) intraperitoneal injections of four lamprey-specific ACTH peptides at 100μg/kg, did not induce changes in plasma S concentrations in either males or females; (3) two lamprey-specific gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH I and III) and arginine-vasotocin (AVT), all at single doses, stimulated S production as well as, or to an even greater extent than CRH; (4) sea lamprey mesonephric kidneys, in vitro, converted tritiated 17α-hydroxyprogesterone (17α-P) into a steroid that had the same chromatographic properties (on HPLC and TLC) as S; (5) kidney tissues released significantly more immunoassayable S into the incubation medium than gill, liver or gonad tissues. One interpretation of these results is that the corticosteroid production of the sea lamprey, one of the oldest extant vertebrates, is regulated through multiple pathways rather than the classical HPI-axis. However, the responsiveness of this steroid to the GnRH peptides means that a reproductive rather than a stress role for this steroid cannot yet be ruled out.

  18. Regulation of a putative corticosteroid, 17, 21-dihydroxypregn-4-ene, 3, 20-one, in sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Brent W.; Didier, Wes; Satbir, Rai; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Libants, Scot V.; Sang-Seon, Yun; Close, David

    2013-01-01

    In higher vertebrates, in response to stress, the hypothalamus produces corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which stimulates cells in the anterior pituitary to produce adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which in turn stimulates production of either cortisol (F) or corticosterone (B) by the adrenal tissues. In lampreys, however, neither of these steroids is present. Instead, it has been proposed that the stress steroid is actually 17,21-dihydroxypregn-4-ene-3,20-dione (11-deoxycortisol; S). However, there have been no studies yet to determine its mechanism of regulation or site of production. Here we demonstrate that (1) intraperitoneal injections of lamprey-CRH increase plasma S in a dose dependent manner, (2) intraperitoneal injections of four lamprey-specific ACTH peptides at 100 lg/kg, did not induce changes in plasma S concentrations in either males or females; (3) two lamprey-specific gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH I and III) and arginine-vasotocin (AVT), all at single doses, stimulated S production as well as, or to an even greater extent than CRH; (4) sea lamprey mesonephric kidneys, in vitro, converted tritiated 17a-hydroxyprogesterone (17a-P) into a steroid that had the same chromatographic properties (on HPLC and TLC) as S; (5) kidney tissues released significantly more immunoassayable S into the incubation medium than gill, liver or gonad tissues. One interpretation of these results is that the corticosteroid production of the sea lamprey, one of the oldest extant vertebrates, is regulated through multiple pathways rather than the classical HPI-axis. However, the responsiveness of this steroid to the GnRH peptides means that a reproductive rather than a stress role for this steroid cannot yet be ruled out.

  19. Fabrication of Thiol-Ene "Clickable" Copolymer-Brush Nanostructures on Polymeric Substrates via Extreme Ultraviolet Interference Lithography.

    PubMed

    Dübner, Matthias; Gevrek, Tugce N; Sanyal, Amitav; Spencer, Nicholas D; Padeste, Celestino

    2015-06-03

    We demonstrate a new approach to grafting thiol-reactive nanopatterned copolymer-brush structures on polymeric substrates by means of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) interference lithography. The copolymer brushes were designed to contain maleimide functional groups as thiol-reactive centers. Fluoropolymer films were exposed to EUV radiation at the X-ray interference lithography beamline (XIL-II) at the Swiss Light Source, in order to create radical patterns on their surfaces. The radicals served as initiators for the copolymerization of thiol-ene "clickable" brushes, composed of a furan-protected maleimide monomer (FuMaMA) and different methacrylates, namely, methyl methacrylate (MMA), ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (EGMA), or poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA). Copolymerization with ethylene-glycol-containing monomers provides antibiofouling properties to these surfaces. The number of reactive centers on the grafted brush structures can be tailored by varying the monomer ratios in the feed. Grafted copolymers were characterized by using attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy. The reactive maleimide methacrylate (MaMA) units were utilized to conjugate thiol-containing moieties using the nucleophilic Michael-addition reaction, which proceeds at room temperature without the need for any metal-based catalyst. Using this approach, a variety of functionalities was introduced to yield polyelectrolytes, as well as fluorescent and light-responsive polymer-brush structures. Functionalization of the brush structures was demonstrated via ATR-IR and UV-vis spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy, and was also indicated by a color switch. Furthermore, grafted surfaces were generated via plasma activation, showing a strongly increased wettability for polyelectrolytes and a reversible switch in static water contact angle (CA) of up to 18° for P(EGMA-co-MaMA-SP) brushes, upon exposure to alternating visible and UV-light irradiation.

  20. Design and fabrication of uniquely shaped thiol-ene microfibers using a two-stage hydrodynamic focusing design.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Darryl A; Shields, Adam R; Howell, Peter B; Ligler, Frances S

    2013-08-07

    Microfluidic systems have advantages that are just starting to be realized for materials fabrication. In addition to the more common use for fabrication of particles, hydrodynamic focusing has been used to fabricate continuous polymer fibers. We have previously described such a microfluidics system which has the ability to generate fibers with controlled cross-sectional shapes locked in place by in situ photopolymerization. The previous fiber fabrication studies produced relatively simple round or ribbon shapes, demonstrated the use of a variety of polymers, and described the interaction between sheath-core flow-rate ratios used to control the fiber diameter and the impact on possible shapes. These papers documented the fact that no matter what the intended shape, higher flow-rate ratios produced rounder fibers, even in the absence of interfacial tension between the core and sheath fluids. This work describes how to fabricate the next generation of fibers predesigned to have a much more complex geometry, as exemplified by the "double anchor" shape. Critical to production of the pre-specified fibers with complex features was independent control over both the shape and the size of the fabricated microfibers using a two-stage hydrodynamic focusing system. Design and optimization of the channels was performed using finite element simulations and confocal imaging to characterize each of the two stages theoretically and experimentally. The resulting device design was then used to generate thiol-ene fibers with a unique double anchor shape. Finally, proof-of-principle functional experiments demonstrated the ability of the fibers to transport fluids and to interlock laterally.

  1. Harnessing complexity: taking advantage of context and relationships in dissemination of school-based interventions.

    PubMed

    Butler, Helen; Bowes, Glenn; Drew, Sarah; Glover, Sara; Godfrey, Celia; Patton, George; Trafford, Lea; Bond, Lyndal

    2010-03-01

    Schools and school systems are increasingly asked to use evidence-based strategies to promote the health and well-being of students. The dissemination of school-based health promotion research, however, offers particular challenges to conventional approaches to dissemination. Schools and education systems are multifaceted organizations that sit within constantly shifting broader contexts. This article argues that health promotion dissemination needs to be rethought for school communities as complex systems and that this requires understanding and harnessing the dynamic ecology of the sociopolitical context. In developing this argument, the authors draw on their experience of the dissemination process of a multilevel school-based intervention in a complex educational context. Building on this experience, they argue for the need to move beyond conventional dissemination strategies to a focus on active partnerships between developers and users of school-based intervention research and offer a conceptual tool for planning dissemination.

  2. The sweetest pill to swallow: how patient neurobiology can be harnessed to maximise placebo effects.

    PubMed

    Jubb, Jayne; Bensing, Jozien M

    2013-12-01

    The burgeoning interest in placebo effects over the last 10-15 years has fallen into two main research areas: elucidation of the neurobiological mechanisms recruited following placebo administration, and investigations into the situations and contexts in which placebo effects are evoked. There has been little attention focused on bridging these two i.e. how to actively translate and apply these neurobiological mechanisms into daily clinical practice in a responsible way. This article addresses this gap, first through a narrative review of the last 15 years of neuroscience findings with special attention focussed on the elucidation of the neurotransmitters, pathways and mechanisms involved in placebo effects, and secondly, at how these psycho(neuro)biological effects could be harnessed in medical care.

  3. Harnessing the world's biodiversity data: promise and peril in ecological niche modeling of species distributions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert P

    2012-07-01

    Recent advances allow harnessing enormous stores of biological and environmental data to model species niches and geographic distributions. Natural history museums hold specimens that represent the only information available for most species. Ecological niche models (sometimes termed species distribution models) combine such information with digital environmental data (especially climatic) to offer key insights for conservation biology, management of invasive species, zoonotic human diseases, and other pressing environmental problems. Five major pitfalls seriously hinder such research, especially for cross-space or cross-time uses: (1) incorrect taxonomic identifications; (2) lacking or inadequate databasing and georeferences; (3) effects of sampling bias across geography; (4) violation of assumptions related to selection of the study region; and (5) problems regarding model evaluation to identify optimal model complexity. Large-scale initiatives regarding data availability and quality, technological development, and capacity building should allow high-quality modeling on a scale commensurate with the enormous potential of and need for these techniques.

  4. Harnessing spectral property of dual wavelength white LED to improve vertical scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Chong, Wee Keat; Li, Xiang; Soh, Yeng Chai

    2013-07-01

    Unlike a conventional white light source that emits a continuous and broad spectrum of light, the dual wavelength white light emitting diode (LED) generates white light by mixing blue and yellow lights, so there are two distinct peaks in its intensity spectrum. Prior works had shown that the spectral property of the dual wavelength white LED can affect the vertical scanning interferometry negatively if the spectral effects are not compensated. In this paper, we shall examine this issue by modeling the spectral property and variation of the dual wavelength white LED, followed by investigating its effects on the interference signal of vertical scanning interferometry. Instead of compensating the spectral effects of the dual wavelength white LED, we harness its spectral property to improve the performance of a phase-based height reconstruction algorithm in vertical scanning interferometry.

  5. Thinking globally, acting locally: harnessing the immune system to deal with recalcitrant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Russell, Michael W

    2015-04-28

    Traditional approaches to harnessing the immune system to confront infectious diseases depend on vaccines, which have generally proven highly effective, but for many infections these either are not available or are of limited effectiveness. Although antibiotic therapy has been extremely successful in reducing the burden of bacterial disease, the emergence of resistance among several important pathogens threatens to undermine this accomplishment, and despite some successes chemotherapeutic treatments for viral, fungal, and parasitic infections are more limited. Understanding the mechanisms whereby pathogens manipulate the immune system to favor their survival, or exploit weaknesses in host immunity, can lead to novel approaches for the treatment of infections by redirecting host immune responses against the pathogen. Such treatments may be most effectively applied at the mucosal locations which are frequently the sites of initial infection and may also suggest new approaches for vaccine development.

  6. Harnessing Geometric Frustration to Form Band Gaps in Acoustic Channel Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pai; Zheng, Yue; Fernandes, Matheus C.; Sun, Yushen; Xu, Kai; Sun, Sijie; Kang, Sung Hoon; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate both numerically and experimentally that geometric frustration in two-dimensional periodic acoustic networks consisting of arrays of narrow air channels can be harnessed to form band gaps (ranges of frequency in which the waves cannot propagate in any direction through the system). While resonant standing wave modes and interferences are ubiquitous in all the analyzed network geometries, we show that they give rise to band gaps only in the geometrically frustrated ones (i.e., those comprising of triangles and pentagons). Our results not only reveal a new mechanism based on geometric frustration to suppress the propagation of pressure waves in specific frequency ranges but also open avenues for the design of a new generation of smart systems that control and manipulate sound and vibrations.

  7. Let Our Powers Combine! Harnessing NASA's Earth Observatory Natural Event Tracker (EONET) in Worldview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Min Minnie; Ward, Kevin; Boller, Ryan; Gunnoe, Taylor; Baynes, Kathleen; King, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Constellations of NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites orbit the earth to collect images and data about the planet in near real-time. Within hours of satellite overpass, you can discover where the latest wildfires, severe storms, volcanic eruptions, and dust and haze events are occurring using NASA's Worldview web application. By harnessing a repository of curated natural event metadata from NASA Earth Observatory's Natural Event Tracker (EONET), Worldview has moved natural event discovery to the forefront and allows users to select events-of-interest from a curated list, zooms to the area, and adds the most relevant imagery layers for that type of natural event. This poster will highlight NASA Worldviews new natural event feed functionality.

  8. Harnessing Vehicle Automation for Public Mobility -- An Overview of Ongoing Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Stanley E.

    2015-11-05

    This presentation takes a look at the efforts to harness automated vehicle technology for public transport. The European CityMobil2 is the leading demonstration project in which automated shuttles were, or are planned to be, demonstrated in several cities and regions. The presentation provides a brief overview of the demonstrations at Oristano, Italy (July 2014), LaRochelle, France (Dec 2014), Lausanne, Switzerland (Apr 2015), Vantaa, Finland (July 2015), and Trikala, Greece (Sept 2015). In addition to technology exposition, the objectives included generating a legal framework for operation in each location and gaging the reaction of the public to unmanned shuttles, both of which were successfully achieved. Several such demonstrations are planned throughout the world, including efforts in North America in conjunction with the GoMentum Station in California. These early demonstration with low-speed automated shuttles provide a glimpse of the possible with a fully automated fleet of driverless vehicle providing a public transit service.

  9. Harnessing Geometric Frustration to Form Band Gaps in Acoustic Channel Lattices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pai; Zheng, Yue; Fernandes, Matheus C; Sun, Yushen; Xu, Kai; Sun, Sijie; Kang, Sung Hoon; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-02-24

    We demonstrate both numerically and experimentally that geometric frustration in two-dimensional periodic acoustic networks consisting of arrays of narrow air channels can be harnessed to form band gaps (ranges of frequency in which the waves cannot propagate in any direction through the system). While resonant standing wave modes and interferences are ubiquitous in all the analyzed network geometries, we show that they give rise to band gaps only in the geometrically frustrated ones (i.e., those comprising of triangles and pentagons). Our results not only reveal a new mechanism based on geometric frustration to suppress the propagation of pressure waves in specific frequency ranges but also open avenues for the design of a new generation of smart systems that control and manipulate sound and vibrations.

  10. Amplifying the response of soft actuators by harnessing snap-through instabilities

    PubMed Central

    Overvelde, Johannes T. B.; Kloek, Tamara; D’haen, Jonas J. A.; Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Soft, inflatable segments are the active elements responsible for the actuation of soft machines and robots. Although current designs of fluidic actuators achieve motion with large amplitudes, they require large amounts of supplied volume, limiting their speed and compactness. To circumvent these limitations, here we embrace instabilities and show that they can be exploited to amplify the response of the system. By combining experimental and numerical tools we design and construct fluidic actuators in which snap-through instabilities are harnessed to generate large motion, high forces, and fast actuation at constant volume. Our study opens avenues for the design of the next generation of soft actuators and robots in which small amounts of volume are sufficient to achieve significant ranges of motion. PMID:26283372

  11. Cold water cleaning of brain proteins, biofilm and bone - harnessing an ultrasonically activated stream.

    PubMed

    Birkin, P R; Offin, D G; Vian, C J B; Howlin, R P; Dawson, J I; Secker, T J; Hervé, R C; Stoodley, P; Oreffo, R O C; Keevil, C W; Leighton, T G

    2015-08-28

    In the absence of sufficient cleaning of medical instruments, contamination and infection can result in serious consequences for the health sector and remains a significant unmet challenge. In this paper we describe a novel cleaning system reliant on cavitation action created in a free flowing fluid stream where ultrasonic transmission to a surface, through the stream, is achieved using careful design and control of the device architecture, sound field and the materials employed. Cleaning was achieved with purified water at room temperature, moderate fluid flow rates and without the need for chemical additives or the high power consumption associated with conventional strategies. This study illustrates the potential in harnessing an ultrasonically activated stream to remove biological contamination including brain tissue from surgical stainless steel substrates, S. epidermidis biofilms from glass, and fat/soft tissue matter from bone structures with considerable basic and clinical applications.

  12. Harnessing Colloidal Crack Formation by Flow-Enabled Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Jiang, Beibei; Han, Wei; He, Ming; Li, Xiao; Wang, Wei; Hong, Suck Won; Byun, Myunghwan; Lin, Shaoliang; Lin, Zhiqun

    2017-03-02

    Self-assembly of nanomaterials to yield a wide diversity of high-order structures, materials, and devices promises new opportunities for various technological applications. Herein, we report that crack formation can be effectively harnessed by elaborately restricting the drying of colloidal suspension using a flow-enabled self-assembly (FESA) strategy to yield large-area periodic cracks (i.e., microchannels) with tunable spacing. These uniform microchannels can be utilized as a template to guide the assembly of Au nanoparticles, forming intriguing nanoparticle threads. This strategy is simple and convenient. As such, it opens the possibility for large-scale manufacturing of crack-based or crack-derived assemblies and materials for use in optics, electronics, optoelectronics, photonics, magnetic device, nanotechnology, and biotechnology.

  13. Harnessing the Endocannabinoid 2-Arachidonoylglycerol to Lower Intraocular Pressure in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sally; Leishman, Emma; Hu, Sherry Shujung; Elghouche, Alhasan; Daily, Laura; Murataeva, Natalia; Bradshaw, Heather; Straiker, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cannabinoids, such as Δ9-THC, act through an endogenous signaling system in the vertebrate eye that reduces IOP via CB1 receptors. Endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) ligand, 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), likewise activates CB1 and is metabolized by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). We investigated ocular 2-AG and its regulation by MAGL and the therapeutic potential of harnessing eCBs to lower IOP. Methods We tested the effect of topical application of 2-AG and MAGL blockers in normotensive mice and examined changes in eCB-related lipid species in the eyes and spinal cord of MAGL knockout (MAGL−/−) mice using high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS). We also examined the protein distribution of MAGL in the mouse anterior chamber. Results 2-Arachidonoyl glycerol reliably lowered IOP in a CB1- and concentration-dependent manner. Monoacylglycerol lipase is expressed prominently in nonpigmented ciliary epithelium. The MAGL blocker KML29, but not JZL184, lowered IOP. The ability of CB1 to lower IOP is not desensitized in MAGL−/− mice. Ocular monoacylglycerols, including 2-AG, are elevated in MAGL−/− mice but, in contrast to the spinal cord, arachidonic acid and prostaglandins are not changed. Conclusions Our data confirm a central role for MAGL in metabolism of ocular 2-AG and related lipid species, and that endogenous 2-AG can be harnessed to reduce IOP. The MAGL blocker KML29 has promise as a therapeutic agent, while JZL184 may have difficulty crossing the cornea. These data, combined with the relative specificity of MAGL for ocular monoacylglycerols and the lack of desensitization in MAGL−/− mice, suggest that the development of an optimized MAGL blocker offers therapeutic potential for treatment of elevated IOP. PMID:27333182

  14. Optimizing the respiratory pump: harnessing inspiratory resistance to treat systemic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Convertino, Victor A; Ryan, Kathy L; Rickards, Caroline A; Glorsky, Steven L; Idris, Ahamed H; Yannopoulos, Demetris; Metzger, Anja; Lurie, Keith G

    2011-06-01

    We review the physiology and affects of inspiration through a low level of added resistance for the treatment of hypotension. Recent animal and clinical studies demonstrated that one of the body's natural response mechanisms to hypotension is to harness the respiratory pump to increase circulation. That finding is consistent with observations, in the 1960s, about the effect of lowering intrathoracic pressure on key physiological and hemodynamic variables. We describe studies that focused on the fundamental relationship between the generation of negative intrathoracic pressure during inspiration through a low level of resistance created by an impedance threshold device and the physiologic sequelae of a respiratory pump. A decrease in intrathoracic pressure during inspiration through a fixed resistance resulting in a pressure difference of 7 cm H(2)O has multiple physiological benefits, including: enhanced venous return and cardiac stroke volume, lower intracranial pressure, resetting of the cardiac baroreflex, elevated cerebral blood flow oscillations, increased tissue blood flow/pressure gradient, and maintenance of the integrity of the baroreflex-mediated coherence between arterial pressure and sympathetic nerve activity. While breathing has traditionally been thought primarily to provide gas exchange, studies of the mechanisms involved in animals and humans provide the physiological underpinnings for "the other side of breathing": to increase circulation to the heart and brain, especially in the setting of physiological stress. The existing results support the use of the intrathoracic pump to treat clinical conditions associated with hypotension, including orthostatic hypotension, hypotension during and after hemodialysis, hemorrhagic shock, heat stroke, septic shock, and cardiac arrest. Harnessing these fundamental mechanisms that control cardiopulmonary physiology provides new opportunities for respiratory therapists and others who have traditionally focused on

  15. The validity and reliability of a customized rigid supportive harness during Smith machine back squat exercise.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brendan R; Dascombe, Ben J; Delaney, Jace A; Elsworthy, Nathan; Lockie, Robert G; Sculley, Dean V; Slattery, Katie M

    2014-03-01

    Although the back squat exercise is commonly prescribed to both athletic and clinical populations, individuals with restricted glenohumeral mobility may be unable to safely support the bar on the upper trapezius using their hands. The aims of this study were to investigate the validity and reliability of a back squat variation using a rigid supportive harness that does not require unrestricted glenohumeral mobility for quantifying 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Thirteen young men (age = 25.3 ± 4.5 years, height = 179.2 ± 6.9 cm, and body mass = 86.6 ± 12.0 kg) with at least 2 years resistance training experience volunteered to participate in the study. Subjects reported to the lab on 3 occasions, each separated by 1 week. During testing sessions, subjects were assessed for 1RM using the traditional back squat (session 1) and harness back squat (HBS; sessions 2 and 3) exercises. Mean 1RM for the traditional back squat, and 2 testing sessions of the HBS (HBS1 and HBS2) were 148.4 ± 25.0 kg, 152.5 ± 25.7 kg, and 150.4 ± 22.6 kg, respectively. Back squat and mean HBS 1RM scores were very strongly correlated (r = 0.96; p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in 1RM scores between the 3 trials. The test-retest 1RM scores with the HBS demonstrated high reliability, with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.98 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.93-0.99), and a coefficient of variation of 2.6% (95% CI = 1.9-4.3). Taken together, these data suggest that the HBS exercise is a valid and reliable method for assessing 1RM in young men with previous resistance training experience and may be useful for individuals with restricted glenohumeral mobility.

  16. Trunk Muscle Activation and Estimating Spinal Compressive Force in Rope and Harness Vertical Dance.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Margaret; Dai, Boyi; Zhu, Qin; Humphrey, Neil

    2015-12-01

    Rope and harness vertical dance takes place off the floor with the dancer suspended from his or her center of mass in a harness attached to a rope from a point overhead. Vertical dance represents a novel environment for training and performing in which expected stresses on the dancer's body are different from those that take place during dance on the floor. Two male and eleven female dancers with training in vertical dance performed six typical vertical dance movements with electromyography (EMG) electrodes placed bilaterally on rectus abdominus, external oblique, erector spinae, and latissimus dorsi. EMG data were expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). A simplified musculoskeletal model based on muscle activation for these four muscle groups was used to estimate the compressive force on the spine. The greatest muscle activation for erector spinae and latissimus dorsi and the greatest trunk compressive forces were seen in vertical axis positions where the dancer was moving the trunk into a hyper-extended position. The greatest muscle activation for rectus abdominus and external oblique and the second highest compressive force were seen in a supine position with the arms and legs extended away from the center of mass (COM). The least muscle activation occurred in positions where the limbs were hanging below the torso. These movements also showed relatively low muscle activation compression forces. Post-test survey results revealed that dancers felt comfortable in these positions; however, observation of some positions indicated insufficient muscular control. Computing the relative contribution of muscles, expressed as muscle activation and estimated spinal compression, provided a measure of how much the muscle groups were working to support the spine and the rest of the dancer's body in the different movements tested. Additionally, identifying typical muscle recruitment patterns in each movement will help identify key exercises

  17. Registration of a male fertility restorer oilseed sunflower germplasm HA-R9 resistant to sunflower rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) germplasm HA-R9 (Reg. No.xxx, PI 667595) was developed by the USDA-ARS, Sunflower and Plant Biology Research Unit in collaboration with the Agricultural Experiment Station of North Dakota State University and released in January, 2013. Sunflower rust (caused by P...

  18. Opportunities for high aspect ratio micro-electro-magnetic-mechanical systems (HAR-MEMMS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, S.

    1993-10-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: Opportunities for HAR-MEMMS at LBL; Industrial Needs and Opportunities; Deep Etch X-ray Lithography; MEMS Activities at BSAC; DNA Amplification with Microfabricated Reaction Chamber; Electrochemistry Research at LBL; MEMS Activities at LLNL; Space Microsensors and Microinstruments; The Advanced Light Source; Institute for Micromaching; IBM MEMS Interests; and Technology Transfer Opportunities at LBL.

  19. African goat improvement project: A feed the future initiative harnessing geneticdiversity for conservation, disease resistance, and improved productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AFRICAN GOAT IMPROVEMENT PROJECT: A FEED THE FUTURE INITIATIVE HARNESSING GENETIC DIVERSITY FOR CONSERVATION, DISEASE RESISTANCE, AND IMPROVED PRODUCTIVITY Food production systems in Africa depend heavily on the use of locally adapted animals. These animals are of agricultural, cultural, and econom...

  20. Opportunities for High Aspect Ratio Micro-Electro-Magnetic-Mechanical Systems (HAR-MEMMS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Steven

    1993-10-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: Opportunities for HAR-MEMMS at LBL; Industrial Needs and Opportunities; Deep Etch X-ray Lithography; MEMS Activities at BSAC; DNA Amplification with Microfabricated Reaction Chamber; Electrochemistry Research at LBL; MEMS Activities at LLNL; Space Microsensors and Microinstruments; The Advanced Light Source; Institute for Micromaching; IBM MEMS Interests; and Technology Transfer Opportunities at LBL.

  1. Genetic mapping of HA-R4 identified the downy mildew resistance gene to races 300, 770, and 734

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major genes for sunflower downy mildew resistance have been designated as Pl genes. Many Pl genes have been reported, with 10 of them having been mapped. In this study, we report the molecular mapping of the Pl gene in a downy mildew differential line HA-R4, which has been temporarily named PlHA...

  2. Genetic mapping of rust resistance genes in confection sunflower line HA-R6 and oilseed line RHA 397

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few widely effective resistance sources to sunflower rust, incited by Puccinia helianthi Schwein., have been identified in confection sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). The USDA inbred line HA-R6 is one of the few confection sunflower lines resistant to rust. A previous allelism test indicated that r...

  3. GENERATION OF TWO NOVEL CELL LINES THAT STABLY EXPRESS HAR AND FIREFLY LUCIFERASE GENES FOR ENDOCRINE SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generation of Two Novel Cell Lines that Stably Express hAR and Firefly Luciferase Genes for Endocrine Screening
    K.L. Bobseine*1, W.R. Kelce2, P.C. Hartig*1, and L.E. Gray, Jr.1
    1USEPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC, 2Searle, Reproductive Toxicology Divi...

  4. Harnessing the instabilities of soft matter: Dynamically tuning of wetting, assembly and pattern transformation in polymer microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying

    2008-10-01

    In this dissertation, we have investigated the fabrication, mechanical instability and applications of two kinds of polymer micro/nano-structures: high-aspect-ratio (HAR) polymer pillar arrays, and periodic porous elastomer membranes. For HAR polymer pillar arrays, we demonstrated the fabrication of high-aspect-ratio (up to 18) polymer micropillars with different shapes and dimensions by replica molding. Capillary force lithography (CFL) is also demonstrated as a simple and flexible method to fabricate microstructures with controlled aspect ratios. Meanwhile, by introducing conventional photoresist SU-8, CFL is successfully coupled with photolithography and used to create hierarchical 2D or 3D structures, which greatly expand the capability of current capillary force lithography. The mechanical stability of HAR structures with varied materials and different aspect ratio, density and shape were also studied and the results show that the adhesive forces from environment are the major cause of structure collapsing. When HAR polymer pillars are subjected to different solvents treatment, both capillary force and solvent swelling need to be considered to completely understand the structure instability. On HAR micropillar array, thermoresponsive polymer brushes, poly ( N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), were selectively grafted at different locations for dynamically tuning surface wetting or pattern assembly. When the temperature changed from 40°C to 20°, depending on the location of polymer brushes, different wetting transitions, either from a composite solid/air state (Cassie state) to a composite solid/liquid state (Hemi-wicking state) or a transition between two Cassie states were observed. Meanwhile, the dynamically tuning of water contact angle enables us to control capillary drying force and thus harness pattern collapse to create superlattice micropatterns. For periodic porous elastomer membrane, a novel pattern transformation effect is discovered due to the

  5. Synthesis of monooxime-monocarbamoyl bispyridinium compounds bearing (E)-but-2-ene linker and evaluation of their reactivation activity against tabun- and paraoxon-inhibited acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Musilek, Kamil; Holas, Ondrej; Kuca, Kamil; Jun, Daniel; Dohnal, Vlastimil; Opletalova, Veronika; Dolezal, Martin

    2008-02-01

    Six AChE monooxime-monocarbamoyl reactivators with an (E)-but-2-ene linker were synthesized using modification of currently known synthetic pathways. Their potency to reactivate AChE inhibited by the nerve agent tabun and insecticide paraoxon was tested in vitro. The reactivation efficacies of pralidoxime, HI-6, obidoxime, K048, K075 and the newly prepared reactivators were compared. According to the results obtained, one reactivator seems to be promising against tabun-inhibited AChE and two reactivators against paraoxon-inhibited AChE. The best results were obtained for bisquaternary substances with at least one oxime group in position four.

  6. A novel triterpene from the roots of Paullinia pinnata: 6α-(3'-methoxy-4'-hydroxybenzoyl)-lup-20(29)-ene-3-one.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Nora; Annan, Kofi; Mensah, Abraham Y; Ekuadzi, Edmund; Mensah, Merlin L K; Habtemariam, Solomon

    2015-04-01

    Paullinia pinnata L. (Sapindaceae) is an endemic West African plant that is extensively used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases. Previous phytochemical analysis by various groups led to the isolation of several novel lupene-based triterpenene derivatives along with other classes of compounds. As part of our continued phytochemical studies on the roots of this plant, we have now identified yet another novel triterpene, 6a-(3'-methoxy-4'-hydroxybenzoyl)-lup-20(29)-ene-3-one. The identification of the compound through comprehensive spectroscopic studies is discussed.

  7. Crystal structure of 1,2,3,4-di-O-methyl­ene-α-d-galacto­pyran­ose

    PubMed Central

    Tiritiris, Ioannis; Tussetschläger, Stefan; Kantlehner, Willi

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C8H12O6, was synthesized by de­acetyl­ation of 6-acetyl-1,2,3,4-di-O-methyl­ene-α-d-galactose with sodium methoxide. The central part of the mol­ecule consists of a six-membered C5O pyran­ose ring with a twist-boat conformation. Both fused dioxolane rings adopt an envelope conformation with C and O atoms as the flap. In the crystal, O—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds are present between adjacent mol­ecules, generating a three-dimensional network. PMID:26870551

  8. A stepwise retro-imino-ene as a key step in the mechanism of allene formation via the Crabbé acetylene homologation.

    PubMed

    González, Marta; Rodríguez, Roi Álvarez; Cid, Maria Magdalena; López, Carlos Silva

    2012-05-15

    The mechanism of the acetylene homologation procedure accidentally discovered and further developed by Crabbé and coworkers is unknown. Kinetic isotope effect (KIE) experiments, however, suggest that an intramolecular hydrogen shift is the key step of the transformation. In this work, we present a computational study of this mechanism. We found that the reaction proceeds via an unexpected stepwise retro-imino-ene rearrangement. This mechanism justifies the role of Cu(I) as a reaction catalyst and is also compatible with the KIE experiments reported.

  9. Studies toward the synthesis of cinachyramine. An efficient route to 1,5-diazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-enes

    PubMed Central

    Barykina-Tassa, Olga V.; Snider, Barry B.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogenation (3 atm) of readily available pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidines 10, 14, and 17 over 5% Rh/Al2O3 forms 1,5-diazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-enes 9, 15, and 18 in > 95% yield, providing a general route to this little-studied class of compounds. All attempts to form the tetrahydro-1,2,4-triazine moiety of cinachyramine (1) by rearrangement of amidinium dimethylhydrazone 8 using the procedures developed by Kamatori to convert hydrazone 3a to tetrahydro-1,2,4-triazine 4a were unsuccessful. PMID:26097260

  10. Transition through co-optation: Harnessing carbon democracy for clean energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Kathryn-Louise

    This dissertation explores barriers to a clean energy transition in the United States. Clean energy is demonstrably viable, yet the pace of clean energy adoption in the U.S. is slow, particularly given the immediate threat of global climate change. The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the factors inhibiting a domestic energy transition and to propose pragmatic approaches to catalyzing a transition. The first article examines the current political-economic and socio-technical energy landscape in the U.S. Fossil fuels are central to the functioning of the American economy. Given this centrality, constellations of power have been constructed around the reliable and affordable access of fossil fuels. The fossil fuel energy regime is comprised of: political-economic networks with vested interests in continued fossil fuel reliance, and fixed infrastructure that is minimally compatible with distributed generation. A transition to clean energy threatens the profitability of fossil fuel regime actors. Harnessing structural critiques from political ecology and process and function-oriented socio-technical systems frameworks, I present a multi-level approach to identifying pragmatic means to catalyzing an energy transition. High-level solutions confront the existing structure, mid-level solutions harness synergy with the existing structure, and low-level solutions lie outside of the energy system or foster the TIS. This is exemplified using a case study of solar development in Massachusetts. Article two presents a case study of the clean energy technological innovation system (TIS) in Massachusetts. I examine the actors and institutions that support cleantech development. Further, I scrutinize the actors and institutions that help sustain the TIS support system. The concept of a catalyst is presented; a catalyst is an actor that serves to propel TIS functions. Catalysts are critical to facilitating anchoring. Strategic corporate partners are identified as powerful

  11. Harnessing the immunomodulatory effect of thermal and non-thermal ablative therapies for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Bastianpillai, Christopher; Petrides, Neophytos; Shah, Taimur; Guillaumier, Stephanie; Ahmed, Hashim U; Arya, Manit

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive interventional therapies are evolving rapidly and their use for the treatment of solid tumours is becoming more extensive. The in situ destruction of solid tumours by such therapies is thought to release antigens that can prime an antitumour immune response. In this review, we offer an overview of the current evidence for immune response activation associated with the utilisation of the main thermal and non-thermal ablation therapies currently in use today. This is followed by an assessment of the hypothesised mechanisms behind this immune response priming and by a discussion of potential methods of harnessing this specific response, which may subsequently be applicable in the treatment of cancer patients. References were identified through searches of PubMed/MEDLINE and Cochrane databases to identify peer-reviewed original articles, meta-analyses and reviews. Papers were searched from 1850 until October 2014. Articles were also identified through searches of the authors' files. Only papers published in English were reviewed. Thermal and non-thermal therapies have the potential to stimulate antitumour immunity although the current body of evidence is based mostly on murine trials or small-scale phase 1 human trials. The evidence for this immune-modulatory response is currently the strongest in relation to cryotherapy and radiotherapy, although data is accumulating for related ablative treatments such as high-intensity focused ultrasound, radiofrequency ablation and irreversible electroporation. This effect may be greatly enhanced by combining these therapies with other immunostimulatory interventions. Evidence is emerging into the immunomodulatory effect associated with thermal and non-thermal ablative therapies used in cancer treatment in addition to the mechanism behind this effect and how it may be harnessed for therapeutic use. A potential exists for treatment approaches that combine ablation of the primary tumour with control and possible

  12. Assessment of the role of in situ generated (E)-2,4-diene-valproic acid in the toxicity of valproic acid and (E)-2-ene-valproic acid in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Surendradoss, Jayakumar; Chang, Thomas K.H.; Abbott, Frank S.

    2012-11-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) undergoes cytochrome P450-mediated desaturation to form 4-ene-VPA, which subsequently yields (E)-2,4-diene-VPA by β-oxidation. Another biotransformation pathway involves β-oxidation of VPA to form (E)-2-ene-VPA, which also generates (E)-2,4-diene-VPA by cytochrome P450-mediated desaturation. Although the synthetic form of (E)-2,4-diene-VPA is more hepatotoxic than VPA as shown in various experimental models, there is no conclusive evidence to implicate the in situ generated (E)-2,4-diene-VPA in VPA hepatotoxicity. The present study investigated the effects of modulating the in situ formation of (E)-2,4-diene-VPA on markers of oxidative stress (formation of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein; DCF), steatosis (accumulation of BODIPY 558/568 C{sub 12}), necrosis (release of lactate dehydrogenase; LDH), and on cellular total glutathione (GSH) levels in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes treated with VPA or (E)-2-ene-VPA. Treatment with either of these chemicals alone increased each of the toxicity endpoints. In VPA-treated hepatocytes, (E)-2,4-diene-VPA was detected only at trace levels, even after phenobarbital (PB) pretreatment and there was no effect on the toxicity of VPA. Furthermore, pretreatment with a cytochrome P450 enzyme inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT), did not influence the extent of VPA toxicity in both PB-pretreated and vehicle-pretreated hepatocytes. However, in (E)-2-ene-VPA-treated hepatocytes, PB pretreatment greatly enhanced the levels of (E)-2,4-diene-VPA and this was accompanied by a further enhancement of the effects of (E)-2-ene-VPA on DCF formation, BODIPY accumulation, LDH release, and GSH depletion. Pretreatment with 1-ABT reduced the concentrations of (E)-2,4-diene-VPA and the extent of (E)-2-ene-VPA toxicity; however, this occurred in PB-pretreated hepatocytes, but not in control hepatocytes. In conclusion, in situ generated (E)-2,4-diene-VPA is not responsible for the hepatocyte toxicity of VPA, whereas it

  13. Synthesis of Upconverting Hydrogel Nanocomposites Using Thiol-Ene Click Chemistry: Template for the Formation of Dendrimer-Like Gold Nanoparticle Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Meesaragandla, Brahmaiah; Mahalingam, Venkataramanan

    2015-11-16

    The synthesis of upconverting hydrogel nanocomposites by base-catalyzed thiol-ene click reaction between 10-undecenoic acid capped Yb(3+)/Er(3+)-doped NaYF4 nanoparticles and pentaerythritol tetrakis(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP) as tetrathiol monomer is reported. This synthetic strategy for nanocomposite gels is quite different from works where usually the preformed gels are mixed with the nanoparticles. Developing nanocomposites by surface modification of capping ligands would allow tuning and controlling of the separation of the nanoparticles inside the gel network. The hydrogel nanocomposites prepared by thiol-ene click reaction show strong enhancement in luminescence intensity compared to 10-undecenoic acid-capped Yb(3+)/Er(3+)-doped NaYF4 nanoparticles through the upconversion process (under 980 nm laser excitation). The hydrogel nanocomposites display strong swelling characteristics in water resulting in porous structures. Interestingly, the resulting nanocomposite gels act as templates for the synthesis of dendrimer-like Au nanostructures when HAuCl4 is reduced in the presence of the nanocomposite gels.

  14. Thiol-ene "click" reaction triggered by neutral ionic liquid: the "ambiphilic" character of [hmim]Br in the regioselective nucleophilic hydrothiolation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Saima; Shard, Amit; Andhare, Nitin H; Richa; Sinha, Arun K

    2015-01-12

    Thiol-ene "click" chemistry has emerged as a powerful strategy to construct carbon-heteroatom (C-S) bonds, which generally results in the formation of two regioisomers. To this end, the neutral ionic liquid [hmim]Br has been explored as a solvent cum catalyst for the synthesis of linear thioethers from activated and inactivated styrene derivatives or secondary benzyl alcohols and thiols without the requirement of using a metal complex, base, or free radical initiator. Furthermore, detailed mechanistic investigations using (1)H NMR spectroscopy and quadrupole time-of-flight electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (Q-TOF ESI-MS) revealed that the "ambiphilic" character of the ionic liquid promotes the nucleophilic addition of thiol to styrene through an anti-Markovnikov pathway. The catalyst recyclability and the extension of the methodology for thiol-yne click chemistry are additional benefits. A competitive study among thiophenol, styrene, and phenyl acetylene revealed that the rate of reaction is in the order of thiol-yne>thiol-ene>dimerization of thiol in [hmim]Br.

  15. Facile one-pot preparation of a novel imidazolium-based monolith by thiol-ene click chemistry for capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Yang, Haiguan; Chen, Tao; Qin, Yuemei; Ye, Fanggui

    2016-11-09

    In this work, a novel imidazolium-based monolith was fabricated through a simple route. With 1-vinyl-3-octadecylimidazolium bromide and ethylene dimethacrylate as monomers, pentaerythritol tetra-(3-mercaptopropionate) as crosslinker, AIBN as thermal initiator, the monolith was facilely fabricated by one-pot thiol-ene click chemistry. The influences of both the content of monomer/crosslinker and porogenic systems on the morphology, and permeability of the monolith were studied. The optimal reaction conditions were used to prepare a homogeneous and permeable monolith. The optimal preparation of monolithic column was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. High efficiency and quick separation of alkylbenzenes, styrene and ethylbenzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, phenols, anilines, and aromatic acids were achieved. The minimum plate height of this monolith were determined as 11.42 μm for thiourea and 13.26 μm for benzene. All results indicated that thiol-ene click chemistry provides a quick way for the fabrication of imidazolium-based monolith.

  16. Novel Anti-Biofouling Soft Contact Lens: l-Cysteine Conjugated Amphiphilic Conetworks via RAFT and Thiol-Ene Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengfeng; Liu, Ziyuan; Wang, Haiye; Feng, Xiaofeng; He, Chunju

    2017-03-02

    A unique l-cysteine conjugated antifouling amphiphilic conetwork (APCN) is synthesized through end-crosslinking of well-defined triblock copolymers poly(allyl methacrylate)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(allyl methacrylate) via a combination of reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and thiol-ene "click" chemistry. The synthesized poly(ethylene glycol) macro-RAFT agent initiates the polymerization of allyl methacrylate in a controlled manner. The vinyl pendant groups of the precursor partially conjugate with l-cysteine and the rest fully crosslink with mercaptopropyl-containing siloxane via thiol-ene click chemistry under UV irradiation into APCNs, which show distinguished properties, that is, excellent biocompatibility, more than 39.6% water content, 101 barrers oxygen permeability, optimized mechanical properties, and more than 93% visible light transmittance. What's more, the resultant APCNs exhibit eminent resistance to protein adsorption, where the bovine serum albumin and lysozyme adsorption are decreased to 12 and 21 µg cm(-2) , respectively. The outstanding properties of APCNs depend on the RAFT controlled method, which precisely designs the hydrophilic/hydrophobic segments and eventually greatly improves the crosslinking efficiency and homogeneity. Meantime, the l-cysteine monolayer can effectively reduce the surface hydrophobicity and prevent protein adsorption, which exhibits the viability for antifouling surface over and under ophthalmic devices, suggesting a promising soft contact lens.

  17. Humeral remodeling and soft tissue injury of the wings caused by backpack harnesses for radio transmitters in New Zealand Takahē (Porphyrio hochstetteri).

    PubMed

    Michael, Sarah; Gartrell, Brett; Hunter, Stuart

    2013-07-01

    Backpack harnesses are commonly used to attach radio and satellite transmitters to a wide range of bird species for research and conservation management. They are an integral part of the conservation management of the New Zealand Takahē (Porphyrio hochstetteri), an endangered flightless rail. Radio transmitters mounted on backpack harnesses enable the birds to be tracked in their remaining native range of remote, mountainous Fiordland, New Zealand. We evaluated 26 Takahē retrospectively at necropsy by gross examination, radiography, and computed tomography to assess damage from the backpack harness. Ten birds that had never worn a harness had no evidence of wing injury. Of the 16 birds that had worn a harness, 10 (63%) had superficial soft tissue injury to skin or patagium or more severe injury, such as remodeling of the distal humerus at the harness cord-wing interface, or pathologic fractures. Such injuries are hypothesized to be associated with discomfort, increased risk of infection or fracture, and therefore reduced fitness. These findings have implications for all avian species deployed with backpack harnesses.

  18. A new technology for harnessing the dye polluted water and dye collection in a chemical factory.

    PubMed

    Pu, J P; Pu, P M; Hu, C H; Qian, J L; Pu, J X; Hua, J K

    2001-04-01

    A new technology for harnessing the dye polluted water and dye collection was developed. It is based on the enhanced evaporation by using solar, wind and air temperature energy and additional heat-electric energy. It consists of four parts: (1) evaporation carrier system (evaporation carrier and frame for evaporation carrier) for polluted water; (2) polluted water circulating system (pumping-spraying-collecting); (3) heating system; (4) workshop with polluted water reservoir-tanks and rainfall prevention roof. The polluted water was (heated in case necessary) sprayed to the evaporation carrier system and the water was evaporated when it moved in the space and downward along the carrier mainly by using natural (solar, wind and air temperature energy). In case, when there is no roof for the carrier system, the polluted water can be stored in the reservoirs (storage volume for about 20 days). The first 10-25 mm rainfall also need to be stored in the reservoirs to meet the state standard for discharging wastewater. The dye may be collected at the surface in the reservoir-tanks and the crystallized salt may be collected at the bottom plate. The black-color wastewater released by the factory is no more discharged to the surface water system of Taihu Lake Basin. About 2 kg dye and 200 kg industrial salt may be collected from each tone of the polluted water. The non-pollution production of dye may be realized by using this technology with environmental, economical and social benefits.

  19. Harnessing membrane trafficking to promote cancer spreading and invasion: The case of RAB2A.

    PubMed

    Kajiho, Hiroaki; Kajiho, Yuko; Scita, Giorgio

    2017-01-06

    How cancer disseminates and metastasizes remains an outstanding open question. Emerging evidence indicates that membrane trafficking is frequently harnessed by tumors of epithelial origin to acquire a mesenchymal program of invasiveness. However, the critical molecular hubs used by cancer cells this context have only began to be elucidated. Here, we discussed the results of a recent phenotypic screening that led to the identification of the small GTPase RAB2A, not previously involved in cancer dissemination, as pivotal for the acquisition of pericellular proteolysis, cell dissemination and distant metastatic spreading of human breast cancer. At the cellular levels, RAB2A controls both canonical polarized Golgi-to-Plasma membrane trafficking of the junctional protein E-cadherin, and post-endocytic trafficking of the membrane-bound metalloprotease, MT1-MMP. This finding reveals an unexpected plasticity in the control of diverse trafficking routes exerted by RAB2A through canonical (Golgi stacking) and non-canonical (late endosome recycling) functional interactions, contributing to break established membrane trafficking dogma on the rigorous molecular distinction between polarized Golgi and post endocytic routes. Finally, they suggest that epithelial cancers may specifically select for those molecules that enable them to control multiple trafficking routes, in turn essential for the regulation of activities necessary for acquisition of mesenchymal traits.

  20. Harnessing the power of reputation: strengths and limits for promoting cooperative behaviors.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Pat

    2012-12-20

    Evolutionary approaches have done much to identify the pressures that select for cooperative sentiment. This helps us understand when and why cooperation will arise, and applied research shows how these pressures can be harnessed to promote various types of cooperation. In particular, recent evidence shows how opportunities to acquire a good reputation can promote cooperation in laboratory and applied settings. Cooperation can be promoted by tapping into forces like indirect reciprocity, costly signaling, and competitive altruism. When individuals help others, they receive reputational benefits (or avoid reputational costs), and this gives people an incentive to help. Such findings can be applied to promote many kinds of helping and cooperation, including charitable donations, tax compliance, sustainable and pro-environmental behaviors, risky heroism, and more. Despite the potential advantages of using reputation to promote positive behaviors, there are several risks and limits. Under some circumstances, opportunities for reputation will be ineffective or promote harmful behaviors. By better understanding the dynamics of reputation and the circumstances under which cooperation can evolve, we can better design social systems to increase the rate of cooperation and reduce conflict.

  1. Salinity stress induced lipid synthesis to harness biodiesel during dual mode cultivation of mixotrophic microalgae.

    PubMed

    Venkata Mohan, S; Devi, M Prathima

    2014-08-01

    Influence of salinity as a stress factor to harness biodiesel was assessed during dual mode cultivation of microalgae by integrating biomass growth phase (BGP) and salinity induced lipid induction phase (LIP). BGP was evaluated in mixotrophic mode employing nutrients (NPK) and carbon (glucose) source while LIP was operated under stress environment with varying salt concentrations (0, 0.5, 1 and 2gNaCl/l). Salinity stress triggered both biomass growth and lipid synthesis in microalgae significantly. BGP showed higher increments in biomass growth (2.55g/l) while LIP showed higher lipid productivity (1gNaCl/l; total/neutral lipid, 23.4/9.2%) than BGP (total/neutral lipid, 15.2/6%). Lower concentrations of salinity showed positive influence on the process while higher concentrations showed marked inhibition. Salinity stress also facilitated in maintaining saturated fatty acid methyl esters in higher amounts which associates with the improved fuel properties. Efficient wastewater treatment was observed during BGP operation indicating the assimilation of carbon/nutrients by microalgae.

  2. Harnessing snap-through instability for shape-recoverable energy-absorbing structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sung; Shan, Sicong; Raney, Jordan; Wang, Pai; Candido, Francisco; Lewis, Jennifer; Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-03-01

    Energy absorbing materials and structures are used in numerous areas for maintaining structural integrity, protection and comfort. To absorb/dissipate energy from shock/vibration, one generally relies on processes such as plastic deformation and damping as the case of metal foams and suspensions. Because plastic deformation and damping induce irreversible change in the energy-absorbing systems such as shape changes and degradation of damping elements by heat dissipation, it would be desirable to develop a new energy-absorption mechanism with reversibility. Furthermore, it would be desirable to implement energy-absorption mechanisms whose behavior is not affected by the rate of loading. Here, we report a shape-recoverable system that absorbs energy without degradation by harnessing multistability in elastic structures. Using numerical simulations, we investigate geometrical parameters that determine the onset of the snap-through and multi-stability. We subsequently manufacture structures with different geometrical parameters and sizes using a scalable direct-write 3D printing approach. We experimentally demonstrate reversible energy-absorption in these structures at strain rates over three orders of magnitudes, with reduced peak acceleration under impact by up to one order of magnitude compared with control samples. Our findings can open new opportunities for scalable design and manufacturing of energy-absorbing materials and structures.

  3. Harnessing Innovative Technologies to Advance Children’s Mental Health: Behavioral Parent Training As an Example

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Deborah J.; Forehand, Rex; Cuellar, Jessica; Kincaid, Carlye; Parent, Justin; Fenton, Nicole; Goodrum, Nada

    2012-01-01

    Disruptive behaviors of childhood are among the most common reasons for referral of children to mental health professionals. Behavioral parent training (BPT) is the most efficacious intervention for these problem behaviors, yet BPT is substantially underutilized beyond university research and clinic settings. With the aim of addressing this research-to-practice gap, this article highlights the considerable, but largely unrealized, potential for technology to overcome the two most pressing challenges hindering the diffusion of BPT: (1). The dearth of BPT training and supervision opportunities for therapists who work with families of children with disruptive behaviors and; (2). The failure to engage and retain families in BPT services when services are available. To this end, this review presents a theoretical framework to guide technological innovations in BPT and highlights examples of how technology is currently being harnessed to overcome these challenges. This review also discusses recommendations for using technology as a delivery vehicle to further advance the field of BPT and the potential implications of technological innovations in BPT for other areas of children’s mental health are discussed. PMID:23313761

  4. Harnessing Potential Evaporation as a Renewable Energy Resource With Water-Saving Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavusoglu, A. H.; Chen, X.; Gentine, P.; Sahin, O.

    2015-12-01

    Water's large latent heat of vaporization makes evaporation a critical component of the energy balance at the Earth's surface. An immense amount of energy drives the hydrological cycle and is an important component of various weather and climate patterns. However, the potential of harnessing evaporation has received little attention as a renewable energy resource compared to wind and solar energy. Here, we investigate the potential of harvesting energy from naturally evaporating water. Using weather data across the contiguous United States and a modified model of potential evaporation, we estimate the power availability, intermittency, and the changes in evaporation rates imposed by energy conversion. Our results indicate that natural evaporation can deliver power densities similar to existing renewable energy platforms and require little to no energy storage to match the varying power demands of urban areas. This model also predicts additional, and substantial, water savings by reducing evaporative losses. These findings suggest that evaporative energy harvesting can address significant challenges with water/energy interactions that could be of interest to the hydrology community.

  5. Dams, environment and regional development--harnessing the "elixir of life: water" for overall development.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Jay Narayan

    2002-01-01

    Water--the Elixir of Life--has the potential to sustain human life and also to develop it further, and that is why various international instruments have aptly recognized its role in sustainable development. This paper reviews the global and Indian water scenario before presenting the case of Gujarat State, where perennial water scarcity has raised serious threats to the existence of millions of people and cattle and has led to environmental degradation and constrained economic development. More than 13,000 villages out of 18,028 villages of the State are facing scarcity in terms of crop failure this year. Drinking water supply is maintained by transporting water by road tankers, "water special" trains and even by ships via a sea route. Lack of access to safe and clean water for domestic use has a detrimental effect on the social fabric, and even incidences of migration and water riots are recorded. The paper discusses the efficacy of available options including rain water harvesting. The efforts of the State to harness the untapped waters of Narmada for the survival of millions and sustainable development of western India, are discussed adjudging socioeconomic and environmental impacts. The paper concludes that assured water supply is essentially critical for overall development.

  6. Harnessing heterologous and endogenous CRISPR-Cas machineries for efficient markerless genome editing in Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Michael E; Bruder, Mark R; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A; Chou, C Perry

    2016-05-09

    Application of CRISPR-Cas9 systems has revolutionized genome editing across all domains of life. Here we report implementation of the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system in Clostridium pasteurianum for markerless genome editing. Since 74% of species harbor CRISPR-Cas loci in Clostridium, we also explored the prospect of co-opting host-encoded CRISPR-Cas machinery for genome editing. Motivation for this work was bolstered from the observation that plasmids expressing heterologous cas9 result in poor transformation of Clostridium. To address this barrier and establish proof-of-concept, we focus on characterization and exploitation of the C. pasteurianum Type I-B CRISPR-Cas system. In silico spacer analysis and in vivo interference assays revealed three protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences required for site-specific nucleolytic attack. Introduction of a synthetic CRISPR array and cpaAIR gene deletion template yielded an editing efficiency of 100%. In contrast, the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system generated only 25% of the total yield of edited cells, suggesting that native machinery provides a superior foundation for genome editing by precluding expression of cas9 in trans. To broaden our approach, we also identified putative PAM sequences in three key species of Clostridium. This is the first report of genome editing through harnessing native CRISPR-Cas machinery in Clostridium.

  7. Energy-Looping Nanoparticles: Harnessing Excited-State Absorption for Deep-Tissue Imaging.

    PubMed

    Levy, Elizabeth S; Tajon, Cheryl A; Bischof, Thomas S; Iafrati, Jillian; Fernandez-Bravo, Angel; Garfield, David J; Chamanzar, Maysamreza; Maharbiz, Michel M; Sohal, Vikaas S; Schuck, P James; Cohen, Bruce E; Chan, Emory M

    2016-09-27

    Near infrared (NIR) microscopy enables noninvasive imaging in tissue, particularly in the NIR-II spectral range (1000-1400 nm) where attenuation due to tissue scattering and absorption is minimized. Lanthanide-doped upconverting nanocrystals are promising deep-tissue imaging probes due to their photostable emission in the visible and NIR, but these materials are not efficiently excited at NIR-II wavelengths due to the dearth of lanthanide ground-state absorption transitions in this window. Here, we develop a class of lanthanide-doped imaging probes that harness an energy-looping mechanism that facilitates excitation at NIR-II wavelengths, such as 1064 nm, that are resonant with excited-state absorption transitions but not ground-state absorption. Using computational methods and combinatorial screening, we have identified Tm(3+)-doped NaYF4 nanoparticles as efficient looping systems that emit at 800 nm under continuous-wave excitation at 1064 nm. Using this benign excitation with standard confocal microscopy, energy-looping nanoparticles (ELNPs) are imaged in cultured mammalian cells and through brain tissue without autofluorescence. The 1 mm imaging depths and 2 μm feature sizes are comparable to those demonstrated by state-of-the-art multiphoton techniques, illustrating that ELNPs are a promising class of NIR probes for high-fidelity visualization in cells and tissue.

  8. Harnessing Intracellular Biochemical Pathways for In Vitro Synthesis of Designer Tellurium Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ling-Hong; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Tu, Jia-Wei; Shi, Yun-Bo; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2015-10-28

    Synthesizing nanomaterials of desired properties is a big challenge, which requires extremely harsh conditions and/or use of toxic materials. More recently developed in vivo methods have brought a different set of problems such as separation and purification of nanomaterials made in vivo. Here, a novel approach that harnesses cellular pathways for in vitro synthesis of high-quality tellurium nanorods with tunable lengths and optical properties is reported. It is first demonstrated that in vivo biochemical pathways could be used to synthesize Te nanorods via the intracellular reduction of TeO3(2-) in living Staphylococcus aureus cells. The pathways to set up a quasi-biological system for Te precursor formation are then utilized, which could further synthesize Te nanorods in vitro. This allows to successfully synthesize in vitro, under routine laboratory conditions, Te nanorods with uniform and tunable lengths, ranging from about 10 to 200 nm, and controllable optical properties with high molar extinction coefficients. The approach here should open new avenues for controllable, facile, and efficient synthesis of designer nanomaterials for diverse industrial and biomedical applications.

  9. Harnessing disorder: onychophorans use highly unstructured proteins, not silks, for prey capture

    PubMed Central

    Haritos, Victoria S.; Niranjane, Ajay; Weisman, Sarah; Trueman, Holly E.; Sriskantha, Alagacone; Sutherland, Tara D.

    2010-01-01

    Onychophora are ancient, carnivorous soft-bodied invertebrates which capture their prey in slime that originates from dedicated glands located on either side of the head. While the biochemical composition of the slime is known, its unusual nature and the mechanism of ensnaring thread formation have remained elusive. We have examined gene expression in the slime gland from an Australian onychophoran, Euperipatoides rowelli, and matched expressed sequence tags to separated proteins from the slime. The analysis revealed three categories of protein present: unique high-molecular-weight proline-rich proteins, and smaller concentrations of lectins and small peptides, the latter two likely to act as protease inhibitors and antimicrobial agents. The predominant proline-rich proteins (200 kDa+) are composed of tandem repeated motifs and distinguished by an unusually high proline and charged residue content. Unlike the highly structured proteins such as silks used for prey capture by spiders and insects, these proteins lack ordered secondary structure over their entire length. We propose that on expulsion of slime from the gland onto prey, evaporative water loss triggers a glass transition change in the protein solution, resulting in adhesive and enmeshing thread formation, assisted by cross-linking of complementary charged and hydrophobic regions of the protein. Euperipatoides rowelli has developed an entirely new method of capturing prey by harnessing disordered proteins rather than structured, silk-like proteins. PMID:20519222

  10. Harnessing oil sands microbial communities for use in ex situ naphthenic acid bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Demeter, Marc A; Lemire, Joe; George, Iain; Yue, Gordon; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2014-02-01

    The caustic hot water extraction process used to release bitumen from the Alberta oil sands generates large volumes of tailings waste, or oil sands process water (OSPW). OSPW contains several components of environmental concern including diluents, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and naphthenic acids (NAs); the latter are of particular concern as they are acutely toxic to aquatic organisms and mammals. Studies have demonstrated that the naturally occurring OSPW bacteria are capable of metabolizing the NAs. However, this in situ process takes place over hundreds of years, and is incomplete, leaving a recalcitrant fraction of NAs intact. In this study we explore options for recovering and harnessing the naturally occurring OSPW bacteria for potential future use in an aerobic ex situ OSPW treatment system. Here we evaluate our recovered microbes on their ability to degrade two model NAs, cyclohexane carboxylic acid and cyclohexane acetic acid. Using OSPW as a source for a bacterial inoculum, we were able to compare single and multispecies OSPW cultures, grown as either a biofilm, or as a planktonic suspension. Furthermore, we examined the effect of available nutrients on the ability of these cultures to degrade NAs. All biofilms were grown using the Calgary Biofilm Device. GC-MS, and GC-FID reveal that multispecies biofilm and planktonic cultures are each capable of degrading both NAs; a trait not observed for single species cultures. Moreover, complementary carbon sources have a tangible effect on the ability of the cultures to initiate the degradation of the NAs.

  11. Strategies and Advancements in Harnessing the Immune System for Gastric Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Subhash, Vinod Vijay; Yeo, Mei Shi; Tan, Woei Loon; Yong, Wei Peng

    2015-01-01

    In cancer biology, cells and molecules that form the fundamental components of the tumor microenvironment play a major role in tumor initiation, and progression as well as responses to therapy. Therapeutic approaches that would enable and harness the immune system to target tumor cells mark the future of anticancer therapy as it could induce an immunological memory specific to the tumor type and further enhance tumor regression and relapse-free survival in cancer patients. Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortalities that has a modest survival benefit from existing treatment options. The advent of immunotherapy presents us with new approaches in gastric cancer treatment where adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, and antibody therapies have all been used with promising outcomes. In this paper, we review the current advances and prospects in the gastric cancer immunotherapy. Special focus is laid on new strategies and clinical trials that attempt to enhance the efficacy of various immunotherapeutic modalities in gastric cancer. PMID:26579545

  12. Harnessing the secretome of cardiac stem cells as therapy for ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Khanabdali, Ramin; Rosdah, Ayeshah A; Dusting, Gregory J; Lim, Shiang Y

    2016-08-01

    Adult stem cells continue to promise opportunities to repair damaged cardiac tissue. However, precisely how adult stem cells accomplish cardiac repair, especially after ischemic damage, remains controversial. It has been postulated that the clinical benefit of adult stem cells for cardiovascular disease results from the release of cytokines and growth factors by the transplanted cells. Studies in animal models of myocardial infarction have reported that such paracrine factors released from transplanted adult stem cells contribute to improved cardiac function by several processes. These include promoting neovascularization of damaged tissue, reducing inflammation, reducing fibrosis and scar formation, as well as protecting cardiomyocytes from apoptosis. In addition, these factors might also stimulate endogenous repair by activating cardiac stem cells. Interestingly, stem cells discovered to be resident in the heart appear to be functionally superior to extra-cardiac adult stem cells when transplanted for cardiac repair and regeneration. In this review, we discuss the therapeutic potential of cardiac stem cells and how the proteins secreted from these cells might be harnessed to promote repair and regeneration of damaged cardiac tissue. We also highlight how recent controversies about the efficacy of adult stem cells in clinical trials of ischemic heart disease have not dampened enthusiasm for the application of cardiac stem cells and their paracrine factors for cardiac repair: the latter have proved superior to the mesenchymal stem cells used in most clinical trials in the past, some of which appear to have been conducted with sub-optimal rigor.

  13. Harnessing surface-bound enzymatic reactions to organize microcapsules in solution

    PubMed Central

    Shklyaev, Oleg E.; Shum, Henry; Sen, Ayusman; Balazs, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    By developing new computational models, we examine how enzymatic reactions on an underlying surface can be harnessed to direct the motion and organization of reagent-laden microcapsules in a fluid-filled microchannel. In the presence of appropriate reagents, surface-bound enzymes can act as pumps, which drive large-scale fluid flows. When the reagents diffuse through the capsules’ porous shells, they can react with enzymatic sites on the bottom surface. The ensuing reaction generates fluid density variations, which result in fluid flows. These flows carry the suspended microcapsules and drive them to aggregate into “colonies” on and near the enzyme-covered sites. This aggregation continues until the reagent has been depleted and the convection stops. We show that the shape of the assembled colonies can be tailored by patterning the distribution of enzymes on the surface. This fundamental physicochemical mechanism could have played a role in the self-organization of early biological cells (protocells) and can be used to regulate the autonomous motion and targeted delivery of microcarriers in microfluidic devices. PMID:27034990

  14. Periodic trends governing the interactions between impurity atoms [H-Ar] and (alpha)-U

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Christopher David

    2008-01-01

    The binding energies, geometries, charges and electronic structures of a series of impurity atoms [H-Ar] interacting with the {alpha}-U lattice in various configurations were assessed by means of density functional theory calculations. Periodic trends governing the binding energy were highlighted and related to the electronic properties of the impurity atoms, with some consideration given to the band-structure of {alpha}-U. The strongest bound impurity atoms include [C, N, O] and [Si, P, S]. The general trends in the binding energy can be reproduced by a simple parameterisation in terms of the electronegativity (charge-transfer) and covalent radius (elasticity theory) of the impurity atom. The strongest bound atoms deviate from this model, due to their ability to bind with an optimum mixture of covalency and ionicity. This last point is evidenced by the partial overlap of the impurity atom p-band with the hybrid d-/f-band of {alpha}-U. It is expected that the trends and general behaviour reported in this work can be extended to the interactions of impurity atoms with other metallic systems.

  15. Harnessing Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Potential and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dana; Kim, Young Sam; Shin, Dong Wun; Park, Chang Shin; Kang, Ju Hee

    2016-10-01

    No disease-modifying therapies (DMT) for neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) have been established, particularly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unclear why candidate drugs that successfully demonstrate therapeutic effects in animal models fail to show disease-modifying effects in clinical trials. To overcome this hurdle, patients with homogeneous pathologies should be detected as early as possible. The early detection of AD patients using sufficiently tested biomarkers could demonstrate the potential usefulness of combining biomarkers with clinical measures as a diagnostic tool. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for NDs are being incorporated in clinical trials designed with the aim of detecting patients earlier, evaluating target engagement, collecting homogeneous patients, facilitating prevention trials, and testing the potential of surrogate markers relative to clinical measures. In this review we summarize the latest information on CSF biomarkers in NDs, particularly AD and PD, and their use in clinical trials. The large number of issues related to CSF biomarker measurements and applications has resulted in relatively few clinical trials on CSF biomarkers being conducted. However, the available CSF biomarker data obtained in clinical trials support the advantages of incorporating CSF biomarkers in clinical trials, even though the data have mostly been obtained in AD trials. We describe the current issues with and ongoing efforts for the use of CSF biomarkers in clinical trials and the plans to harness CSF biomarkers for the development of DMT and clinical routines. This effort requires nationwide, global, and multidisciplinary efforts in academia, industry, and regulatory agencies to facilitate a new era.

  16. MRI Evaluation of Spinal Length and Vertebral Body Angle During Loading with a Spinal Compression Harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James A.; Hargens, Alan R.; Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, Alan, R.; Sanchez, E.; Yang, C.; Mitsui, I.; Schwandt, D.; Fechner, K. P.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Weight bearing by the spinal column during upright posture often plays a role in the common problem of low back pain. Therefore, we developed a non-ferromagnetic spinal compression harness to enable MRI investigations of the spinal column during axial loading. Human subjects were fitted with a Nest and a footplate which were connected by adjustable straps to an analog load cell. MRI scans of human subjects (5 males and 1 female with age range of 27-53 yrs) during loaded and unloaded conditions were accomplished with a 1.5 Tesla GE Signa scanner. Studies of two subjects undergoing sequentially increasing spinal loads revealed significant decreases (r(sup 2) = 0.852) in spinal length between T4 and L5 culminating in a 1.5 to 2% length decrease during loading with 75% body weight. Sagittal vertebral body angles of four subjects placed under a constant 50% body weight load for one hour demonstrated increased lordotic and kyphotic curvatures. In the lumbar spine, the L2 vertebral body experienced the greatest angular change (-3 deg. to -5 deg.) in most subjects while in the thoracic spine, T4 angles increased from the unloaded state by +2 deg. to +9 deg. Overall, our studies demonstrate: 1) a progressive, although surprisingly small, decrease in spinal length with increasing load and 2) relatively large changes in spinal column angulation with 50% body weight.

  17. Harnessing Geothermal Energy from CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, M. O.; Randolph, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Recent geotechnical research shows that geothermal heat can be efficiently mined by circulating CO2 through naturally permeable, porous rock formations. This method, called CO2 Plume Geothermal (CPG), targets the same geologic reservoirs that are suitable for deep saline aquifer CO2 sequestration or enhanced oil recovery (EOR). While previous investigations have focused on CO2-based heat mining from saline aquifers, here we present new research that is primarily concerned with EOR reservoirs, specifically those using a CO2 flood. EOR operations provide excellent opportunities for economically-favorable geothermal energy recovery, assuming subsurface temperatures are sufficient, because the majority of costly infrastructure (i.e., wells) is in place. Moreover, the subsurface characteristics that make a site suitable for hydrocarbon recovery -- at least moderate reservoir permeability and porosity, and a low-permeability capping feature -- help ensure that fluid can be circulated for heat extraction and that CO2 will be contained. However, heat extraction from the CO2 + water/brine + hydrocarbon EOR production stream is challenging, requiring fluid separation and multiple binary and/or direct power systems (depending on site-specific fluid composition and conditions). We discuss several scenarios, encompassing multiple power system configurations, for harnessing geothermal energy from CO2 EOR operations. In addition, we present preliminary numerical modeling results for net power production from such EOR operations -- accounting for wide variation in produced fluid temperature, pressure, and composition -- and consider the economic implications of power sales for EOR sites.

  18. Auxiliary Basis Sets for Density Fitting in Explicitly Correlated Calculations: The Atoms H-Ar.

    PubMed

    Kritikou, Stella; Hill, J Grant

    2015-11-10

    Auxiliary basis sets specifically matched to the correlation consistent cc-pVnZ-F12 and cc-pCVnZ-F12 orbital basis sets for the elements H-Ar have been optimized at the density-fitted second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory level of theory for use in explicitly correlated (F12) methods, which utilize density fitting for the evaluation of two-electron integrals. Calculations of the correlation energy for a test set of small to medium sized molecules indicate that the density fitting error when using these auxiliary sets is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude smaller than the F12 orbital basis set incompleteness error. The error introduced by the use of these fitting sets within the resolution-of-the-identity approximation of the many-electron integrals arising in F12 theory has also been assessed and is demonstrated to be negligible and well-controlled. General guidelines are proposed for the optimization of density fitting auxiliary basis sets for use with F12 methods for other elements.

  19. Harnessing structural darkness in the visible and infrared wavelengths for a new source of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianfeng; Liu, Changxu; Zhu, Yihan; Masala, Silvia; Alarousu, Erkki; Han, Yu; Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Engineering broadband light absorbers is crucial to many applications, including energy-harvesting devices and optical interconnects. The performances of an ideal absorber are that of a black body, a dark material that absorbs radiation at all angles and polarizations. Despite advances in micrometre-thick films, the absorbers available to date are still far from an ideal black body. Here, we describe a disordered nanostructured material that shows an almost ideal black-body absorption of 98-99% between 400 and 1,400 nm that is insensitive to the angle and polarization of the incident light. The material comprises nanoparticles composed of a nanorod with a nanosphere of 30 nm diameter attached. When diluted into liquids, a small concentration of nanoparticles absorbs on average 26% more than carbon nanotubes, the darkest material available to date. By pumping a dye optical amplifier with nanosecond pulses of ˜100 mW power, we harness the structural darkness of the material and create a new type of light source, which generates monochromatic emission (˜5 nm wide) without the need for any resonance. This is achieved through the dynamics of light condensation in which all absorbed electromagnetic energy spontaneously generates single-colour energy pulses.

  20. Project WEALTH (Water, Energy, Agriculture, Lighting, Training and Health): Harnessing the wealth of nations

    SciTech Connect

    Kashkari, C.

    1996-12-31

    Project WEALTH, hereafter referred to as WEALTH, is a global plan for the economic development of an estimated one million villages in the world, where one billion people live. The plan will focus on the provision of: Water, Energy, Agriculture, Lighting, Training and Health (WEALTH), by harnessing the natural resources of the villages and utilizing the technologies available in the industrialized countries. In the first phase of the project, one model village (WEALTH Center) will be established in every developing country of the world. The Center will serve as the training and demonstration center and promote the project in the country. WEALTH will provide economic opportunities for the industrialized and the developing countries. The Small Business Sector will play a major role in the implementation of the project. The project will be developed and implemented, not by governments, but by private sector, in cooperation with national governments. When fully operational, the project has the potential of generating business to the tune of billions of dollars every year. The Inner-cities of the US can participate in the project resulting in their own rapid development. WEALTH will spur global economic growth and lay the foundation for prosperity and peace in the twenty-first century.

  1. Pushing to a cure by harnessing innate immunity against hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Ireton, Reneé C; Gale, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes 350,000 deaths and infects at least 3million people worldwide every year. Currently no vaccine has been developed. Direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs with high efficacy for suppressing HCV infection have recently been introduced into the clinic. While DAAs initially required combination therapy with type-1 interferon (IFN) administration for full efficacy and to avoid viral resistance to treatment, new DAA combinations show promise as an IFN-free regimen. However, IFN-free DAA therapy is in its infancy, still to be proven and today is cost-prohibitive for the patient. A major goal in HCV therapy to remove or replace IFN with DAAs or an alternative therapeutic to render virologic response with continued virus sensitivity to DAAs, thus facilitating a cure for infection. Recent advances in our understanding of innate immune responses to HCV have identified new therapeutic targets to combat HCV infection. We discuss how the targeting of innate immune response factors can be harnessed with DAAs to produce new generations of DAA-based HCV therapeutics. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "Hepatitis C: next steps toward global eradication."

  2. A Bottom-Up Engineered Broadband Optical Nanoabsorber for Radiometry and Energy Harnessing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Coles, James B.; Megerian, Krikor G.; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2013-01-01

    Optical absorbers based on vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), synthesized using electric-field assisted growth, are described here that show an ultra-low reflectance, 100X lower compared to Au-black from wavelength lamba approximately 350 nm - 2.5 micron. A bi-metallic Co/Ti layer was shown to catalyze a high site density of MWCNTs on metallic substrates and the optical properties of the absorbers were engineered by controlling the bottom-up synthesis conditions using dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Reflectance measurements on the MWCNT absorbers after heating them in air to 400deg showed negligible changes in reflectance which was still low, approximately 0.022 % at lamba approximately 2 micron. In contrast, the percolated structure of the reference Au-black samples collapsed completely after heating, causing the optical response to degrade at temperatures as low as 200deg. The high optical absorption efficiency of the MWCNT absorbers, synthesized on metallic substrates, over a broad spectral range, coupled with their thermal ruggedness, suggests they have promise in solar energy harnessing applications, as well as thermal detectors for radiometry.

  3. A bacteriophage tubulin harnesses dynamic instability to center DNA in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Erb, Marcella L; Kraemer, James A; Coker, Joanna K C; Chaikeeratisak, Vorrapon; Nonejuie, Poochit; Agard, David A; Pogliano, Joe

    2014-11-27

    Dynamic instability, polarity, and spatiotemporal organization are hallmarks of the microtubule cytoskeleton that allow formation of complex structures such as the eukaryotic spindle. No similar structure has been identified in prokaryotes. The bacteriophage-encoded tubulin PhuZ is required to position DNA at mid-cell, without which infectivity is compromised. Here, we show that PhuZ filaments, like microtubules, stochastically switch from growing in a distinctly polar manner to catastrophic depolymerization (dynamic instability) both in vitro and in vivo. One end of each PhuZ filament is stably anchored near the cell pole to form a spindle-like array that orients the growing ends toward the phage nucleoid so as to position it near mid-cell. Our results demonstrate how a bacteriophage can harness the properties of a tubulin-like cytoskeleton for efficient propagation. This represents the first identification of a prokaryotic tubulin with the dynamic instability of microtubules and the ability to form a simplified bipolar spindle.

  4. The Dam1 kinetochore complex harnesses microtubule dynamics to produce force and movement.

    PubMed

    Asbury, Charles L; Gestaut, Daniel R; Powers, Andrew F; Franck, Andrew D; Davis, Trisha N

    2006-06-27

    Kinetochores remain attached to microtubule (MT) tips during mitosis even as the tips assemble and disassemble under their grip, allowing filament dynamics to produce force and move chromosomes. The specific proteins that mediate tip attachment are uncertain, and the mechanism of MT-dependent force production is unknown. Recent work suggests that the Dam1 complex, an essential component of kinetochores in yeast, may contribute directly to kinetochore-MT attachment and force production, perhaps by forming a sliding ring encircling the MT. To test these hypotheses, we developed an in vitro motility assay where beads coated with pure recombinant Dam1 complex were bound to the tips of individual dynamic MTs. The Dam1-coated beads remained tip-bound and underwent assembly- and disassembly-driven movement over approximately 3 microm, comparable to chromosome displacements in vivo. Dam1-based attachments to assembling tips were robust, supporting 0.5-3 pN of tension applied with a feedback-controlled optical trap as the MTs lengthened approximately 1 microm. The attachments also harnessed energy from MT disassembly to generate movement against tension. Reversing the direction of force (i.e., switching to compressive force) caused the attachments to disengage the tip and slide over the filament, but sliding was blocked by areas where the MT was anchored to a coverslip, consistent with a coupling structure encircling the filament. Our findings demonstrate how the Dam1 complex may contribute directly to MT-driven chromosome movement.

  5. Harnessing heterologous and endogenous CRISPR-Cas machineries for efficient markerless genome editing in Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, Michael E.; Bruder, Mark R.; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A.; Chou, C. Perry

    2016-01-01

    Application of CRISPR-Cas9 systems has revolutionized genome editing across all domains of life. Here we report implementation of the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system in Clostridium pasteurianum for markerless genome editing. Since 74% of species harbor CRISPR-Cas loci in Clostridium, we also explored the prospect of co-opting host-encoded CRISPR-Cas machinery for genome editing. Motivation for this work was bolstered from the observation that plasmids expressing heterologous cas9 result in poor transformation of Clostridium. To address this barrier and establish proof-of-concept, we focus on characterization and exploitation of the C. pasteurianum Type I-B CRISPR-Cas system. In silico spacer analysis and in vivo interference assays revealed three protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences required for site-specific nucleolytic attack. Introduction of a synthetic CRISPR array and cpaAIR gene deletion template yielded an editing efficiency of 100%. In contrast, the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system generated only 25% of the total yield of edited cells, suggesting that native machinery provides a superior foundation for genome editing by precluding expression of cas9 in trans. To broaden our approach, we also identified putative PAM sequences in three key species of Clostridium. This is the first report of genome editing through harnessing native CRISPR-Cas machinery in Clostridium. PMID:27157668

  6. Harnessing surface-bound enzymatic reactions to organize microcapsules in solution.

    PubMed

    Shklyaev, Oleg E; Shum, Henry; Sen, Ayusman; Balazs, Anna C

    2016-03-01

    By developing new computational models, we examine how enzymatic reactions on an underlying surface can be harnessed to direct the motion and organization of reagent-laden microcapsules in a fluid-filled microchannel. In the presence of appropriate reagents, surface-bound enzymes can act as pumps, which drive large-scale fluid flows. When the reagents diffuse through the capsules' porous shells, they can react with enzymatic sites on the bottom surface. The ensuing reaction generates fluid density variations, which result in fluid flows. These flows carry the suspended microcapsules and drive them to aggregate into "colonies" on and near the enzyme-covered sites. This aggregation continues until the reagent has been depleted and the convection stops. We show that the shape of the assembled colonies can be tailored by patterning the distribution of enzymes on the surface. This fundamental physicochemical mechanism could have played a role in the self-organization of early biological cells (protocells) and can be used to regulate the autonomous motion and targeted delivery of microcarriers in microfluidic devices.

  7. Harnessing the power of light to treat staphylococcal infections focusing on MRSA.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Tanupriya; Avci, Pinar; Gupta, Gaurav K; Rineh, Ardeshir; Lakshmanan, Shanmugamurthy; Batwala, Vincent; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become the most important drug-resistant microbial pathogen in countries throughout the world. Morbidity and mortality due to MRSA infections continue to increase despite efforts to improve infection control measures and to develop new antibiotics. Therefore alternative antimicrobial strategies that do not give rise to development of resistance are urgently required. A group of therapeutic interventions has been developed in the field of photomedicine with the common theme that they rely on electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths between 200 and 1000 nm broadly called "light". These techniques all use simple absorption of photons by specific chromophores to deliver the killing blow to microbial cells while leaving the surrounding host mammalian cells relatively unharmed. Photodynamic inactivation uses dyes called photosensitizers (PS) that bind specifically to MRSA cells and not host cells, and generate reactive oxygen species including singlet oxygen and singlet oxygen upon illumination. Sophisticated molecular strategies to target the PS to MRSA cells have been designed. Ultraviolet C radiation can damage microbial DNA without unduly harming host DNA. Blue light can excite endogenous porphyrins and flavins in MRSA cells that are not present in host cells. Near-infrared lasers can interfere with microbial membrane potentials without raising the temperature of the tissue. Taken together these innovative approaches towards harnessing the power of light suggest that the ongoing threat of MRSA may eventually be defeated.

  8. Harnessing innovative technologies to advance children's mental health: behavioral parent training as an example.

    PubMed

    Jones, Deborah J; Forehand, Rex; Cuellar, Jessica; Kincaid, Carlye; Parent, Justin; Fenton, Nicole; Goodrum, Nada

    2013-03-01

    Disruptive behaviors of childhood are among the most common reasons for referral of children to mental health professionals. Behavioral parent training (BPT) is the most efficacious intervention for these problem behaviors, yet BPT is substantially underutilized beyond university research and clinic settings. With the aim of addressing this research-to-practice gap, this article highlights the considerable, but largely unrealized, potential for technology to overcome the two most pressing challenges hindering the diffusion of BPT: (1). The dearth of BPT training and supervision opportunities for therapists who work with families of children with disruptive behaviors; and (2). The failure to engage and retain families in BPT services when services are available. To this end, this review presents a theoretical framework to guide technological innovations in BPT and highlights examples of how technology is currently being harnessed to overcome these challenges. This review also discusses recommendations for using technology as a delivery vehicle to further advance the field of BPT and the potential implications of technological innovations in BPT for other areas of children's mental health are discussed.

  9. Harnessing intrinsic localized modes to identify impurities in nonlinear periodic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thota, M.; Harne, R. L.; Wang, K. W.

    2015-02-01

    Intrinsic localized modes (ILMs) are concentrations of vibrational energy in periodic systems/lattices due to the combined influences of nonlinearity and discreteness. Moreover, ILMs can move within the system and may strongly interact with an impurity, such as a stiffness change, mass variation, etc. Numerous scientific fields have uncovered examples and evidence of ILMs, motivating a multidisciplinary pursuit to rigorously understand the underlying principles. In spite of the diverse technical studies, a characterization of ILM interaction behaviors with multiple impurities in dissipative lattices remains outstanding. The insights on such behaviors may be broadly useful when dynamic measurements are the only accessible features of the periodic system. For instance, one may guide an ILM within the lattice using a deliberately applied and steered impurity and harness the observed interaction behaviors with a second, static (immovable) impurity/defect to identify how the underlying lattice is different at the second, defected site, whether or not one knew the position of the defect a priori. In this spirit, this research studies, analyzes, and characterizes the interaction types amongst an ILM and multiple impurities, and devises a method to identify a static defect impurity using quantitatively and qualitatively distinct interaction phenomena. The method is found to be robust to moderate levels of lattice stiffness heterogeneity and is applicable to monitor various property changes that represent impurities. Finally, experimental studies verify that ILMs interact with multiple impurities in unique ways such that defect features may be effectively identified.

  10. Use of an abduction brace for developmental dysplasia of the hip after failure of Pavlik harness use.

    PubMed

    Hedequist, Daniel; Kasser, James; Emans, John

    2003-01-01

    The authors reviewed the records of 15 infants who were treated with an abduction brace after Pavlik harness use for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) failed. Failure was defined as persistent dislocation or instability of the hip. Thirteen of these 15 patients had resolution of DDH with the use of an abduction brace. The median time spent in the brace before stabilization of examination findings was 24 days; the median time in the brace before normalization of ultrasound parameters was 46 days. There were no complications with regard to use of the abduction orthosis. At final follow-up of an average of 3 years and 7 months, no patient had undergone surgery and no patient had residual dysplasia or avascular necrosis of the hip. The two patients in whom both the Pavlik harness and abduction brace failed went on to successful closed reduction and spica cast application.

  11. Overcrowded 1,8-diazafluorenylidene-chalcoxanthenes. Introducing nitrogens at the fjord regions of bistricyclic aromatic enes.

    PubMed

    Levy, Amalia; Cohen, Shmuel; Agranat, Israel

    2003-08-07

    The effects of introducing nitrogen atoms in the fjord regions and chalcogen bridges on the conformations of overcrowded bistricyclic aromatic enes (1, X not equal to Y) (BAEs) were studied. 9-(9'H-1',8'-Diazafluoren-9'-ylidene)-9H-thioxanthene (12), 9-(9H-1',8'-diazafluoren-9'-ylidene)-9H-selenoxanthene (13), 9-(9'H-1',8'-diazafluoren-9'-ylidene)-9H-telluroxanthene (14), 9-(9' H-1',8'-fluoren-9-ylidene)-9H-xanthene (15) and 9-(9' H-1',8'-fluoren-9'-ylidene)-9H-fluorene (16) were synthesized by two-fold extrusion coupling reactions of 1,8-diaza-9H-fluoren-9-one (19)/chalcoxanthenthiones (24-27) (or /9H-fluorene-9-thione (30)). The 1',8'-diazafluoren-9-ylidene-chalcoxanthenes (11) were compared with the respective fluoren-9-ylidene-chalcoxanthenes (10). The structures of 12-16 were established by 1H, 13C, 77Se, and 125Te NMR spectroscopies. The crystal and molecular structures of 12-14 were determined by X-ray analysis. The yellow molecules of 12-14 adopted mono-folded conformations with folding dihedrals in the chalocoxanthylidene moieties of 62.7 degrees (12), 62.4 degrees (13) and 59.9 degrees (14). The folding dihedrals in the respective 1',8'-diazafluorenylidene moieties were very small, ca. 2 degrees, compared with 10.2/8.0 degrees in (9'H-fluoren-9'-ylidene)-9H-selenoxanthene (7). A 5 degree pure twist of C9=C9' in 14 is noted. The degrees of overcrowding in the fjord regions of 12-14 (intramolecular non-bonding distances) were relatively small. The degrees of pyramidalization of C9 and C9' were 17.0/3.0 degrees (12), 17.4/2.4 degrees (13) and 2.2/2.2 degrees (14). These high values in 12 and 13 stem from the resistance of the 1.8-diazafluorenylidene moiety to fold and from the limits in the degrees of folding of the thioxanthylidene and selenoxanthylidene moieties (due to shorter S10-C4a/S10-C10a and Se10-C4a/Se10-C10a bonds, as compared with the respective Te-C bonds in 14). The molecules of 15 and 16 adopt twisted conformations, a conclusion drawn from the

  12. Impact of ionic and nanoparticle speciation states of silver on light harnessing photosynthetic events in Spirodela polyrhiza.

    PubMed

    Shabnam, Nisha; Sharmila, P; Pardha-Saradhi, P

    2017-01-02

    Owing to wide range of applications, nanotechnology is growing expeditiously. Likely negative impact of nanoparticles (NPs), which are inevitably released into our surroundings, on living organisms is of growing concern. Findings presented here are outcome of investigations carried out to evaluate the impact of ionic and NP speciation states of silver on light harnessing photosynthetic events in Spirodela polyrhiza fronds. Fronds exposed to ionic speciation state showed significant decline in PS (photosystem) II efficiency (Fv/Fm; variable fluorescence/maximal fluorescence), while those exposed to silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) showed marginal decline. Accordingly, decline in amplitude of Chl a fluorescence transients was sharper in fronds treated with Ag(+) than those treated with Ag-NPs. Of the various phases Chl a fluorescence transient, J-I phase [which reflects reduction of plastoquinone (PQ) pool] was most sensitive to both Ag(+) and Ag-NPs. Phenomenological yield models, built using Biolyzer software, revealed that fronds exposed to Ag(+) possessed significantly lower potential to trap and harness absorbed light energy for photochemical reactions than those exposed to Ag-NPs. Accordingly, dissipation of absorbed light energy as heat was significantly higher in fronds exposed to Ag(+) than those exposed to Ag-NPs. These findings revealed that NP speciation state of silver is significantly less toxic to light harnessing photosynthetic machinery of S. polyrhiza, compared to ionic speciation state.

  13. Neighboring group participation in the additions of iodonium and bromonium ions to N-alkoxycarbonyl-2-azabicyclo[2.2.n]alk-5-enes (n = 1,2).

    PubMed

    Krow, Grant R; Gandla, Deepa; Guo, Weiwei; Centafont, Ryan A; Lin, Guoliang; DeBrosse, Charles; Sonnet, Philip E; Ross, Charles W; Ramjit, Harri G; Carroll, Patrick J; Cannon, Kevin C

    2008-03-21

    Additions of iodonium-X reagents to N-alkoxycarbonyl-2-azabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-enes and the homologous 2-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-5-enes have been found to mirror the outcomes of additions of bromonium-X reagents. Only rearranged products were observed for reactions of either of these halonium ion reagents with the azabicylo[2.2.1]hept-5-enes. For the azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-5-enes, nitrogen participation in addition of IOH or BrOH was dependent on the N-alkoxycarbonyl group. With larger N-Boc, N-Cbz, or N-Troc protecting groups, unrearranged 5-anti-hydroxy-6-syn-I(or Br)-2-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octanes were formed by nucleophilic attack at C(5) on syn-halonium ions. The structure of N-methyl-8-anti-bromo-4-anti-hydroxy-2-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane has been reassigned by X-ray analysis.

  14. Harnessing Sun's Energy with Quantum Dots Based Next Generation Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Halim, Mohammad A

    2012-12-27

    Our energy consumption relies heavily on the three components of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal) and nearly 83% of our current energy is consumed from those sources. The use of fossil fuels, however, has been viewed as a major environmental threat because of their substantial contribution to greenhouse gases which are responsible for increasing the global average temperature. Last four decades, scientists have been searching for alternative sources of energy which need to be environmentally clean, efficient, cost-effective, renewable, and sustainable. One of the promising sustainable sources of energy can be achieved by harnessing sun energy through silicon wafer, organic polymer, inorganic dye, and quantum dots based solar cells. Among them, quantum dots have an exceptional property in that they can excite multiple electrons using only one photon. These dots can easily be synthesized, processed in solution, and incorporated into solar cell application. Interestingly, the quantum dots solar cells can exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit; however, it is a great challenge for other solar cell materials to exceed the limit. Theoretically, the quantum dots solar cell can boost the power conversion efficiency up to 66% and even higher to 80%. Moreover, in changing the size of the quantum dots one can utilize the Sun's broad spectrum of visible and infrared ranges. This review briefly overviews the present performance of different materials-based solar cells including silicon wafer, dye-sensitized, and organic solar cells. In addition, recent advances of the quantum dots based solar cells which utilize cadmium sulfide/selenide, lead sulfide/selenide, and new carbon dots as light harvesting materials has been reviewed. A future outlook is sketched as to how one could improve the efficiency up to 10% from the current highest efficiency of 6.6%.

  15. Harnessing Sun’s Energy with Quantum Dots Based Next Generation Solar Cell

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Mohammad A.

    2012-01-01

    Our energy consumption relies heavily on the three components of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal) and nearly 83% of our current energy is consumed from those sources. The use of fossil fuels, however, has been viewed as a major environmental threat because of their substantial contribution to greenhouse gases which are responsible for increasing the global average temperature. Last four decades, scientists have been searching for alternative sources of energy which need to be environmentally clean, efficient, cost-effective, renewable, and sustainable. One of the promising sustainable sources of energy can be achieved by harnessing sun energy through silicon wafer, organic polymer, inorganic dye, and quantum dots based solar cells. Among them, quantum dots have an exceptional property in that they can excite multiple electrons using only one photon. These dots can easily be synthesized, processed in solution, and incorporated into solar cell application. Interestingly, the quantum dots solar cells can exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit; however, it is a great challenge for other solar cell materials to exceed the limit. Theoretically, the quantum dots solar cell can boost the power conversion efficiency up to 66% and even higher to 80%. Moreover, in changing the size of the quantum dots one can utilize the Sun’s broad spectrum of visible and infrared ranges. This review briefly overviews the present performance of different materials-based solar cells including silicon wafer, dye-sensitized, and organic solar cells. In addition, recent advances of the quantum dots based solar cells which utilize cadmium sulfide/selenide, lead sulfide/selenide, and new carbon dots as light harvesting materials has been reviewed. A future outlook is sketched as to how one could improve the efficiency up to 10% from the current highest efficiency of 6.6%. PMID:28348320

  16. Harnessing the Power of SIRT1 and Non-coding RNAs in Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) contribute to a significant amount of disability and death in the world. Of these disorders, vascular disease is ranked high, falls within the five leading causes of death, and impacts multiple other disease entities such as those of the cardiac system, nervous system, and metabolic disease. Targeting the silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (SIRT1) pathway and the modulation of micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) may hold great promise for the development of novel strategies for the treatment of vascular disease since each of these pathways are highly relevant to cardiac and nervous system disorders as well as to metabolic dysfunction. SIRT1 is vital in determining the course of stem cell development and the survival, metabolism, and life span of differentiated cells that are overseen by both autophagy and apoptosis. SIRT1 interfaces with a number of pathways that involve forkhead transcription factors, mechanistic of rapamycin (mTOR), AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1) such that the level of activity of SIRT1 can become a critical determinant for biological and clinical outcomes. The essential fine control of SIRT1 is directly tied to the world of non-coding RNAs that ultimately oversee SIRT1 activity to either extend or end cellular survival. Future studies that can further elucidate the crosstalk between SIRT1 and non-coding RNAs should serve well our ability to harness the power of SIRT1 and non-coding RNAs for the treatment of vascular disorders. PMID:27897112

  17. Humans robustly adhere to dynamic walking principles by harnessing motor abundance to control forces.

    PubMed

    Toney, Megan E; Chang, Young-Hui

    2013-12-01

    Human walking dynamics are typically framed in the context of mechanics and energetics rather than in the context of neuromuscular control. Dynamic walking principles describe one helpful theoretical approach to characterize efficient human walking mechanics over many steps. These principles do not, however, address how such walking is controlled step-by-step despite small perturbations from natural variability. Our purpose was to identify neuromechanical control strategies used to achieve consistent and robust locomotion despite natural step-to-step force variability. We used the uncontrolled manifold concept to test whether human walkers select combinations of leading and trailing leg-forces that generate equivalent net-force trajectories during step-to-step transitions. Subjects selected leading and trailing leg-force combinations that generated consistent vertical net-force during step-to-step transitions. We conclude that vertical net-force is an implicit neuromechanical goal of human walking whose trajectory is stabilized for consistent step-to-step transitions, which agrees with the principles of dynamic walking. In contrast, inter-leg-force combinations modulated anterior-posterior net-force trajectories with each step to maintain constant walking speed, indicating that a consistent anterior-posterior net-force trajectory is not an implicit goal of walking. For a more complete picture of hierarchical locomotor control, we also tested whether each individual leg-force trajectory was stabilized through the selection of leg-force equivalent joint-torque combinations. The observed consistent vertical net-force trajectory was achieved primarily through the selection of joint-torque combinations that modulated trailing leg-force during step-to-step transitions. We conclude that humans achieve robust walking by harnessing inherent motor abundance of the joints and legs to maintain consistent step-by-step walking performance.

  18. Molecular breeding of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with high RNA content by harnessing essential ribosomal RNA transcription regulator.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Kariya, Takahiro; Usugi, Shogo; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    As yeast is commonly used for RNA production, it is industrially important to breed strains with high RNA contents. The upstream activating factor (UAF) plays an important role in transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), a major constituent of intracellular RNA species. Here, we targeted the essential rRNA transcription regulator Rrn5 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a component of the UAF complex, and disrupted the genomic RRN5 gene using a helper plasmid carrying an RRN5 gene. Then we isolated nine suppressor mutants (Sup mutants) of RRN5 gene disruption, causing deficiency in rRNA transcription. The Sup mutants had RNA contents of approximately 40% of the wild type level and expansion of rDNA repeats to ca. 400-700 copies. Reintroduction of a functional RRN5 gene into Sup mutants caused a reduction in the number of rDNA repeats to close to the wild type level but did not change RNA content. However, we found that reintroduction of RRN5 into the Sup16 mutant (in which the FOB1 gene encoding the rDNA replication fork barrier site binding protein was disrupted) resulted in a significant increase (17%) in RNA content compared with wild type, although the rDNA repeat copy number was almost identical to the wild type strain. In this case, upregulated transcription of non-transcribed spacers (NTS) occurred, especially in the NTS2 region; this was likely mediated by RNA polymerase II and accounted for the increased RNA content. Thus, we propose a novel breeding strategy for developing high RNA content yeast by harnessing the essential rRNA transcription regulator.

  19. Rational design of peptide vaccines for autoimmune disease: harnessing molecular recognition to fix a broken network.

    PubMed

    Weathington, Nathaniel M; Blalock, J Edwin

    2003-02-01

    Autoreactive T-cells and antibodies are found at low levels in normal individuals and are thought to be kept at bay by regulatory T-cells and a network of idiotypic and anti-idiotype-bearing antigen receptors on lymphocytes as well as idiotypic anti-idiotypic antibodies. Disruption of this network by genetic, environmental and unknown factors is thought to result in autoimmune diseases. An obvious, ideal and specific therapy for such disorders would be to harness this regulatory network to re-establish immunologic homeostasis. In practice, however, this is not an easy task as most autoimmune diseases involve polyclonal responses to self antigen. Thus, we are faced with the conundrum of not knowing which autoreactive idiotype-bearing antibody or antigen receptor(s) to target in order to restore or induce network regulatory function. The thesis of this review is that understanding a fundamental property governing peptide/protein shape can be used in part to circumvent the problems of self reactivity and polyclonality in autoimmune disorders. More specifically, an algorithm has been developed to design peptide vaccines with shapes that are thought to be complementary in contour to self epitopes which seem to be the focus of autoimmunity. In theory, such complementary shapes should be engendered in certain autoreactive antigen receptors--these complementary constructs consequently represent receptor mimetics. By targeting an immune response against such mimetics, one generates a polyclonal anti-idiotype response that matches the complexity of the autoimmune response itself. This article will describe the algorithm for vaccine design, summarize the in vitro and in vivo evidence for its efficacy and discuss possible therapeutic utility in human autoimmune diseases.

  20. Harnessing Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Potential and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dana; Kim, Young-Sam; Shin, Dong Wun; Park, Chang-Shin

    2016-01-01

    No disease-modifying therapies (DMT) for neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) have been established, particularly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unclear why candidate drugs that successfully demonstrate therapeutic effects in animal models fail to show disease-modifying effects in clinical trials. To overcome this hurdle, patients with homogeneous pathologies should be detected as early as possible. The early detection of AD patients using sufficiently tested biomarkers could demonstrate the potential usefulness of combining biomarkers with clinical measures as a diagnostic tool. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for NDs are being incorporated in clinical trials designed with the aim of detecting patients earlier, evaluating target engagement, collecting homogeneous patients, facilitating prevention trials, and testing the potential of surrogate markers relative to clinical measures. In this review we summarize the latest information on CSF biomarkers in NDs, particularly AD and PD, and their use in clinical trials. The large number of issues related to CSF biomarker measurements and applications has resulted in relatively few clinical trials on CSF biomarkers being conducted. However, the available CSF biomarker data obtained in clinical trials support the advantages of incorporating CSF biomarkers in clinical trials, even though the data have mostly been obtained in AD trials. We describe the current issues with and ongoing efforts for the use of CSF biomarkers in clinical trials and the plans to harness CSF biomarkers for the development of DMT and clinical routines. This effort requires nationwide, global, and multidisciplinary efforts in academia, industry, and regulatory agencies to facilitate a new era. PMID:27819412

  1. Chemomechanical Coupling in Hexameric Protein-Protein Interfaces Harnesses Energy within V-Type ATPases.

    PubMed

    Singharoy, Abhishek; Chipot, Christophe; Moradi, Mahmoud; Schulten, Klaus

    2017-01-11

    ATP synthase is the most prominent bioenergetic macromolecular motor in all life forms, utilizing the proton gradient across the cell membrane to fuel the synthesis of ATP. Notwithstanding the wealth of available biochemical and structural information inferred from years of experiments, the precise molecular mechanism whereby vacuolar (V-type) ATP synthase fulfills its biological function remains largely fragmentary. Recently, crystallographers provided the first high-resolution view of ATP activity in Enterococcus hirae V1-ATPase. Employing a combination of transition-path sampling and high-performance free-energy methods, the sequence of conformational transitions involved in a functional cycle accompanying ATP hydrolysis has been investigated in unprecedented detail over an aggregate simulation time of 65 μs. Our simulated pathways reveal that the chemical energy produced by ATP hydrolysis is harnessed via the concerted motion of the protein-protein interfaces in the V1-ring, and is nearly entirely consumed in the rotation of the central stalk. Surprisingly, in an ATPase devoid of a central stalk, the interfaces of this ring are perfectly designed for inducing ATP hydrolysis. However, in a complete V1-ATPase, the mechanical property of the central stalk is a key determinant of the rate of ATP turnover. The simulations further unveil a sequence of events, whereby unbinding of the hydrolysis product (ADP + Pi) is followed by ATP uptake, which, in turn, leads to the torque generation step and rotation of the center stalk. Molecular trajectories also bring to light multiple intermediates, two of which have been isolated in independent crystallography experiments.

  2. Cymbidium ringspot virus harnesses RNA silencing to control the accumulation of virus parasite satellite RNA.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, Vitantonio; Burgyán, József

    2008-12-01

    Cymbidium ringspot virus (CymRSV) satellite RNA (satRNA) is a parasitic subviral RNA replicon that replicates and accumulates at the cost of its helper virus. This 621-nucleotide (nt) satRNA species has no sequence similarity to the helper virus, except for a 51-nt-long region termed the helper-satellite homology (HSH) region, which is essential for satRNA replication. We show that the accumulation of satRNA strongly depends on temperature and on the presence of the helper virus p19 silencing suppressor protein, suggesting that RNA silencing plays a crucial role in satRNA accumulation. We also demonstrate that another member of the Tombusvirus genus, Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV), supports satRNA accumulation at a higher level than CymRSV. Our results suggest that short interfering RNA (siRNA) derived from CymRSV targets satRNA more efficiently than siRNA from CIRV, possibly because of the higher sequence similarity between the HSH regions of the helper and CIRV satRNAs. RNA silencing sensor RNA carrying the putative satRNA target site in the HSH region was efficiently cleaved when transiently expressed in CymRSV-infected plants but not in CIRV-infected plants. Strikingly, replacing the CymRSV HSH box2 sequence with that of CIRV restores satRNA accumulation both at 24 degrees C and in the absence of the p19 suppressor protein. These findings demonstrate the extraordinary adaptation of this virus to its host in terms of harnessing the antiviral silencing response of the plant to control the virus parasite satRNA.

  3. Harnessing diversity towards the reconstructing of large scale gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Hase, Takeshi; Ghosh, Samik; Yamanaka, Ryota; Kitano, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating gene regulatory network (GRN) from large scale experimental data remains a central challenge in systems biology. Recently, numerous techniques, particularly consensus driven approaches combining different algorithms, have become a potentially promising strategy to infer accurate GRNs. Here, we develop a novel consensus inference algorithm, TopkNet that can integrate multiple algorithms to infer GRNs. Comprehensive performance benchmarking on a cloud computing framework demonstrated that (i) a simple strategy to combine many algorithms does not always lead to performance improvement compared to the cost of consensus and (ii) TopkNet integrating only high-performance algorithms provide significant performance improvement compared to the best individual algorithms and community prediction. These results suggest that a priori determination of high-performance algorithms is a key to reconstruct an unknown regulatory network. Similarity among gene-expression datasets can be useful to determine potential optimal algorithms for reconstruction of unknown regulatory networks, i.e., if expression-data associated with known regulatory network is similar to that with unknown regulatory network, optimal algorithms determined for the known regulatory network can be repurposed to infer the unknown regulatory network. Based on this observation, we developed a quantitative measure of similarity among gene-expression datasets and demonstrated that, if similarity between the two expression datasets is high, TopkNet integrating algorithms that are optimal for known dataset perform well on the unknown dataset. The consensus framework, TopkNet, together with the similarity measure proposed in this study provides a powerful strategy towards harnessing the wisdom of the crowds in reconstruction of unknown regulatory networks.

  4. An Integrated Approach to Functional Engineering: An Engineering Database for Harness, Avionics and Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piras, Annamaria; Malucchi, Giovanni

    2012-08-01

    In the design and development phase of a new program one of the critical aspects is the integration of all the functional requirements of the system and the control of the overall consistency between the identified needs on one side and the available resources on the other side, especially when both the required needs and available resources are not yet consolidated, but they are evolving as the program maturity increases.The Integrated Engineering Harness Avionics and Software database (IDEHAS) is a tool that has been developed to support this process in the frame of the Avionics and Software disciplines through the different phases of the program. The tool is in fact designed to allow an incremental build up of the avionics and software systems, from the description of the high level architectural data (available in the early stages of the program) to the definition of the pin to pin connectivity information (typically consolidated in the design finalization stages) and finally to the construction and validation of the detailed telemetry parameters and commands to be used in the test phases and in the Mission Control Centre. The key feature of this approach and of the associated tool is that it allows the definition and the maintenance / update of all these data in a single, consistent environment.On one side a system level and concurrent approach requires the feasibility to easily integrate and update the best data available since the early stages of a program in order to improve confidence in the consistency and to control the design information.On the other side, the amount of information of different typologies and the cross-relationships among the data imply highly consolidated structures requiring lot of checks to guarantee the data content consistency with negative effects on simplicity and flexibility and often limiting the attention to special needs and to the interfaces with other disciplines.

  5. Monodisperse colloidal metal particle from nonaqueous solutions: catalytic behavior in hydrogenation of but-1-ene of platinum, palladium, and rhodium particles supported on pumice

    SciTech Connect

    Boutonnet, M.; Kizling, J.; Mintsa-Eya, V.; Choplin, A.; Touroude, R.; Maire, G.; Stenius, P.

    1987-01-01

    Metal catalysts have been prepared by depositing monodisperse particles of platinum (2-3 nm), rhodium (2-3 nm), or palladium (5 nm) prepared in reversed micellar solutions on pumice. The particles are well dispersed on the support whereas particles deposited from aqueous or alcoholic solution give large aggregates. The catalytic properties of these different catalysts in the deuteration, isomerization, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange of but-1-ene have been compared. The activities calculated per metal surface atom are similar. However, platinum prepared from microemulsions show unusually high selectivity in the isomerization reaction, and for such particles dehydrogenated species are active in the exchange reaction. The specificity of rhodium and palladium catalysts is independent of the mode of preparation. The reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  6. catena-Poly[[tetra-μ-formato-κ(8) O:O'-dicopper(II)]-μ-hexa-methyl-ene-tetra-mine-κ(2) N (1):N (5)].

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianfang; Huang, Ziping; Cao, Changnian; Cheng, Chunchun; Sun, Chunyan

    2013-11-30

    In the title polymeric compound, [Cu2(HCO2)4(C6H12N4)] n , the Cu(II) atom is five-coordinated in a square-pyramidal geometry that is defined by four O atoms from four formate ligands and one N atom from a hexa-methyl-ene-tetra-mine ligand. The two Cu(II) atoms are separated by 2.6850 (7) Å, and together with the four formate ligands they form a paddle-wheel unit. The hexa-mine ligand uses only two of its four N atoms to link Cu2 cluster units, affording a zigzag chain running along the b-axis direction. The hexa-mine ligand lies on a mirror plane.

  7. catena-Poly[[[aqua-chlorido-manganese(II)]-bis-[μ-1,1'-(oxydi-p-phenyl-ene)di-1H-imidazole-κN:N

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiao-Long

    2011-01-15

    The title coordination polymer, {[MnCl(C(18)H(14)N(4)O)(2)(H(2)O)]Cl·C(3)H(7)NO·H(2)O}(n), obtained by the solvothermal reaction of BIDPE and manganese(II) salt in H(2)O/DMF (DMF is dimethyl-formamide), is composed of a chain of [Mn(2)(BIDPE)(2)] [BIDPE is 1,1'-(oxydi-p-phenyl-ene)di-1H-imidazole] metallocyclic rings that exhibit inversion symmetry. The coordination about the Mn(II) ions is distorted octahedral with a MnClN(4)O coordination set. In the crystal, the polymeric chains are linked by O-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, forming a two-dimensional network parallel to (100). A number of C-H⋯Cl and C-H⋯O inter-actions are also present.

  8. Crystal structure of bis­(η2-ethyl­ene)(η5-penta­methyl­cyclo­penta­dien­yl)cobalt

    PubMed Central

    Ramful, Chandika D.; Robertson, Katherine N.; Ylijoki, Kai E. O.

    2016-01-01

    The title compound, [Co(C10H15)(C2H4)2], was prepared by Na/Hg reduction of [Co2(C10H15)2(μ-Cl)2] in THF under an ethyl­ene atmosphere and crystallized from pentane at 193 K. The Co—C(olefin) bonds have an average length of 2.022 (2) Å, while the Co—C(penta­dien­yl) bonds average 2.103 (19) Å. The olefin C=C bonds are 1.410 (1) Å. The dihedral angle between the planes defined by the cyclo­penta­dienyl ligand and the two olefin ligands is 0.25 (12)°. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked into chains by C—H⋯π inter­actions. PMID:27920922

  9. catena-Poly[[[aqua­(1,10-phenanthro­line)zinc(II)]-μ-3,3′-(p-phenyl­ene)di­acrylato] hemihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ya-Ping; Sun, Da-Jun; Zang, Hu; Su, Guan-Fang; Li, Yu-Lin

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, {[Zn(C12H8O4)(C12H8N2)(H2O)]·0.5H2O}n, each ZnII atom is six-coordinated by two N atoms from one 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), three carboxyl­ate O atoms from two different L ligands [H2 L = 3,3′-(p-phenyl­ene)diacrylic acid] and one water mol­ecule in a distorted octa­hedral environment. The two L dianions are situated across inversion centres and bridge neighbouring ZnII centres, yielding a chain propagating parallel to [100]. O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the coordinated water molecule, the solvent water molecule (half-occupied) and the carboxylate O atoms further stabilize the structure. PMID:21583394

  10. Photogeneration of 3beta-hydroxy-5alpha-cholest-6-ene-5-hydroperoxide in rat skin: evidence for occurrence of singlet oxygen in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, S; Ozawa, N; Hiratsuka, A; Watabe, T

    1999-08-01

    We identified singlet oxygen adduct of cholesterol, 3beta-hydroxy-5alpha-cholest-6-ene-5-hydroperoxide (5alpha-OOH), in skin of rats pretreated with oral doses of pheophorbide a and subsequent visible irradiation, that have been known to induce photosensitive diseases in animals and humans. In a living animal body, this is the first demonstration of presence of 5alpha-OOH, that is known to be formed exclusively by reaction in vitro between singlet oxygen and cholesterol. By the quantitative determination with high performance liquid chromatography equipped with a chemiluminescence detector, we observed time-dependent increase in concentrations of 5alpha-OOH in skin of rats pretreated with oral doses of pheophorbide a and subsequent visible irradiation, suggesting the occurrence of a labile activated oxygen species, singlet oxygen, in this system.

  11. Preparation of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-based hybrid monolith by ring-opening polymerization and post-functionalization via thiol-ene click reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongshan; Ou, Junjie; Lin, Hui; Wang, Hongwei; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa

    2014-05-16

    A polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) hybrid monolith was simply prepared by using octaglycidyldimethylsilyl POSS (POSS-epoxy) and cystamine dihydrochloride as monomers via ring-opening polymerization. The effects of composition of prepolymerization solution and polycondensation temperature on the morphology and permeability of monolithic column were investigated in detail. The obtained POSS hybrid monolithic column showed 3D skeleton morphology and exhibited high column efficiency of ∼71,000 plates per meter in reversed-phase mechanism. Owing to this POSS hybrid monolith essentially possessing a great number of disulfide bonds, the monolith surface would expose thiol groups after reduction with dithiothreitol (DTT), which supplied active sites to functionalize with various alkene monomers via thiol-ene click reaction. The results indicated that the reduction with DTT could not destroy the 3D skeleton of hybrid monolith. Both stearyl methylacrylate (SMA) and benzyl methacrylate (BMA) were selected to functionalize the hybrid monolithic columns for reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), while [2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-dimethyl-(3-sulfopropyl)-ammonium hydroxide (MSA) was used to modify the hybrid monolithic column in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). These modified hybrid monolithic columns could be successfully applied for separation of small molecules with high efficiency. It is demonstrated that thiol-ene click reaction supplies a facile way to introduce various functional groups to the hybrid monolith possessing thiol groups. Furthermore, due to good permeability of the resulting hybrid monoliths, we also prepared long hybrid monolithic columns in narrow-bore capillaries. The highest column efficiency reached to ∼70,000 plates using a 1-m-long column of 75μm i.d. with a peak capacity of 147 for isocratic chromatography, indicating potential application in separation and analysis of complex biosamples.

  12. One-pot preparation of glutathione-silica hybrid monolith for mixed-mode capillary liquid chromatography based on "thiol-ene" click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zian; Tan, Xiaoqing; Yu, Ruifang; Lin, Jiashi; Yin, Xiaofei; Zhang, Lan; Yang, Huanghao

    2014-08-15

    A novel glutathione (GSH)-silica hybrid monolithic column synthesized via a combination of thiol-ene click reaction and one-pot process was described, where thiol-end GSH organic monomer and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) were mixed with hydrolyzed tetramethyloxysilane (TMOS) and γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (γ-MAPS) and then introduced into a fused-silica capillary for simultaneous polycondensation and "thiol-ene" click reaction to form the GSH-silica hybrid monolith. The effects of the molar ratio of TMOS/γ-MAPS, the amount of GSH, and the volume of porogen on the morphology, permeability and pore properties of the prepared GSH-silica hybrid monoliths were studied in detail. A uniform monolithic network with high porosity was obtained. A series of test compounds including alkylbenzenes, amides, and anilines were used to evaluate the retention behaviors of the GSH-silica hybrid monolithic column. The results demonstrated that the prepared GSH-silica hybrid monolith exhibited multiple interactions including hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity, as well as cation exchange interaction. The run-to-run, column-to-column and batch-to-batch reproducibilities of the GSH-silica hybrid monolith for phenols' retention were satisfactory with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 1.3% (n=5), 2.6% (n=3) and 3.2% (n=3), respectively, indicating the effectiveness and practicability of the proposed method. In addition, the GSH-silica hybrid monolith was applied to the separation of nucleotides, peptides and protein tryptic digests, respectively. The successful applications suggested the potential of the GSH-silica hybrid monolith in complex sample analysis.

  13. Semi-interpenetrating solid polymer electrolyte based on thiol-ene cross-linker for all-solid-state lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suk, Jungdon; Lee, Yu Hwa; Kim, Do Youb; Kim, Dong Wook; Cho, Song Yun; Kim, Ji Man; Kang, Yongku

    2016-12-01

    We developed highly promising solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) based on a novel cross-linker containing star-shaped phosphazene with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) branches with very high ionic conductivity (7.6 × 10-4 S cm-1), improved mechanical stability, and good electrochemical stability for all-solid-state lithium batteries. In particular, allyl groups were introduced at the ends of the cross-linker in order to overcome the easy self-polymerization of existing cross-linking acrylate end groups. A novel semi-interpenetrating network (semi-IPN) SPE was prepared by in-situ radical polymerization of a precursor solution containing lithium salt, poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether as a plasticizer, and a mixture of pentaerythritol tetrakis(3-mercaptopropionate) and a synthesized hexakis(allyloxy)cyclotriphosphazene (thiol-ene PAL) as the cross-linker. Batteries employing LiFePO4 as the cathode, lithium foil as the anode, and the SPE thin film as the electrolyte were assembled and tested. At ambient temperature, the initial discharge capacity was 147 mAh/g at 0.1 °C and 132 mAh/g at 0.5 °C, and 97% of the capacity was retained at the 100th cycle. All-solid-state pouch-package lithium cells assembled with the SPEs exhibited stable electrochemical performance, even under a severely wrinkled state. These outstanding properties of SPEs based on thiol-ene PAL demonstrate feasibility for practical battery applications with improved reliability and safety.

  14. Helmet Use Amongst Equestrians: Harnessing Social and Attitudinal Factors Revealed in Online Forums

    PubMed Central

    Haigh, Laura; Thompson, Kirrilly

    2015-01-01

    relationship between risk perception, protective knowledge, attitudes, decision-making and behavior. Whilst this complexity is largely due to the involvement of interspecies relationships through which safety, risk and trust are distributed; our findings about harnessing the potential of barriers could be extended to other high risk activities. PMID:26479375

  15. A method to harness global crowd-sourced data to understand travel behavior in avalanche terrain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrikx, J.; Johnson, J.

    2015-12-01

    To date, most studies of the human dimensions of decision making in avalanche terrain has focused on two areas - post-accident analysis using accident reports/interviews and, the development of tools as decision forcing aids. We present an alternate method using crowd-sourced citizen science, for understanding decision-making in avalanche terrain. Our project combines real-time GPS tracking via a smartphone application, with internet based surveys of winter backcountry users as a method to describe and quantify travel practices in concert with group decision-making dynamics, and demographic data of participants during excursions. Effectively, we use the recorded GPS track taken within the landscape as an expression of the decision making processes and terrain usage by the group. Preliminary data analysis shows that individual experience levels, gender, avalanche hazard, and group composition all influence the ways in which people travel in avalanche terrain. Our results provide the first analysis of coupled real-time GPS tracking of the crowd while moving in avalanche terrain combined with psychographic and demographic correlates. This research will lead to an improved understanding of real-time decision making in avalanche terrain. In this paper we will specifically focus on the presentation of the methods used to solicit, and then harness the crowd to obtain data in a unique and innovative application of citizen science where the movements within the terrain are the desired output data (Figure 1). Figure 1: Example GPS tracks sourced from backcountry winter users in the Teton Pass area (Wyoming), from the 2014-15 winter season, where tracks in red represent those recorded as self-assessed experts (as per our survey), and where tracks in blue represent those recorded as self-assessed intermediates. All tracks shown were obtained under similar avalanche conditions. Statistical analysis of terrain metrics showed that the experts used steeper terrain than the

  16. Epidemiology of musculoskeletal injuries in a population of harness Standardbred racehorses in training

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a substantial paucity of studies concerning musculoskeletal injuries in harness Standardbred racehorses. Specifically, little is known about the epidemiology of exercise-related musculoskeletal injuries. Most studies on this subject involve Thoroughbred racehorses, whose biomechanics and racing speed differ from Standardbred, making comparisons difficult. Here, a population of Standardbred racehorses trained at the same racecourse was studied over four years and a classification system for exercise-related musculoskeletal injuries was designed. The incidence rates of musculoskeletal injuries causing horses’ withdrawal from training for 15 days or longer were investigated. A mixed-effects Poisson regression model was used to estimate musculoskeletal injury rates and to describe significance of selected risk factors for exercise-related injuries in this population. Results A total of 356 trotter racehorses from 10 different stables contributed 8961 months at risk of musculoskeletal injuries. Four-hundred-and-twenty-nine injuries were reported and classified into 16 categories, based on their aetiology and anatomical localisation. The overall exercise-related injury rate was 4.79 per 100 horse months. When considering risk factors one by one in separate univariable analyses, we obtained the following results: rates did not differ significantly between genders and classes of age, whereas one driver seemed to cause fewer injuries than the others. Racing speed and racing intensity, as well as recent medical history, seemed to be significant risk factors (p < 0.001), while being shod or unshod during racing was not. On the other hand, when pooling several risk factors in a multivariable approach, only racing intensity turned out to be significant (p < 0.001), since racing speed and the racing intensity were partially confounded, being strongly correlated to one another. Conclusion Characterizing epidemiology of exercise-related musculoskeletal

  17. Harnessing the power of mobile technologies for collaborating, crowdsourcing, and creating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crompton, H.

    2015-12-01

    Today's digital technologies can have a powerful influence on teaching and learning. M-learning and u-learning in particular are changing pedagogical practice. Sub categories are rapidly emerging, such as context-aware ubiquitous learning, that involve students learning subject content while immersed in authentic and relevant surroundings. Learning cultures are a nebulous blend of traditions, values, beliefs, and rituals built up over time. For a long time, education has long been conceived as classroom-based and predominantly sedentary (Merchant, 2012). Recent mobile technologies are disrupting this culture in favor of learning that is contextualized, personalized, on demand, and ubiquitous (Crompton, 2013). 21st century students are a different breed than past generations (Prensky, 2001). These students have grown up in a time that has not only altered their perceptions and practices but modified the wiring of the brain through neuroplasticity (Crompton, 2012). Students now cognitively receive information quickly through non-linear methods (Gross, 2003, Oblinger & Oblinger, 2005). They think differently. They also seem to be attached to mobile devices 24/7, although the content of the lesson does not match what they seem to be doing on the mobile devices. This presentation will showcase how to get your students to harness the power of mobile devices for educational purposes. For example, students in your classes will be using devices to collaborate on activities with Google Forms, crowdsourcing the best class questions in Slido, and screencasting thoughts and ideas to share with others with Educreations. These are examples of free apps or Web 2.0 tools that can be used on all the major mobile platforms. Crompton, H. (2013). Mobile learning: New approach, new theory. In Z. L. Berge & L. Y. Muilenburg (Eds.), Handbook of mobile learning (pp. 47-57). Prensky, M. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants. Mcb University Press, 9(5). Oblinger, D., & Oblinger, J

  18. Determining Damping Trends from a Range of Cable Harness Assemblies on a Launch Vehicle Panel from Test Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; Davis, R. Ben; LaVerde, Bruce; Jones, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The team of authors at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been investigating estimating techniques for the vibration response of launch vehicle panels excited by acoustics and/or aero-fluctuating pressures. Validation of the approaches used to estimate these environments based on ground tests of flight like hardware is of major importance to new vehicle programs. The team at MSFC has recently expanded upon the first series of ground test cases completed in December 2010. The follow on tests recently completed are intended to illustrate differences in damping that might be expected when cable harnesses are added to the configurations under test. This validation study examines the effect on vibroacoustic response resulting from the installation of cable bundles on a curved orthogrid panel. Of interest is the level of damping provided by the installation of the cable bundles and whether this damping could be potentially leveraged in launch vehicle design. The results of this test are compared with baseline acoustic response tests without cables. Damping estimates from the measured response data are made using a new software tool that employs a finite element model (FEM) of the panel in conjunction with advanced optimization techniques. This paper will report on the \\damping trend differences. observed from response measurements for several different configurations of cable harnesses. The data should assist vibroacoustics engineers to make more informed damping assumptions when calculating vibration response estimates when using model based analysis approach. Achieving conservative estimates that have more flight like accuracy is desired. The paper may also assist analysts in determining how ground test data may relate to expected flight response levels. Empirical response estimates may also need to be adjusted if the measured response used as an input to the study came from a test article without flight like cable harnesses.

  19. Harnessing the Risk-Related Data Supply Chain: An Information Architecture Approach to Enriching Human System Research and Operations Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buquo, Lynn E.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

    2011-01-01

    An Information Architecture facilitates the understanding and, hence, harnessing of the human system risk-related data supply chain which enhances the ability to securely collect, integrate, and share data assets that improve human system research and operations. By mapping the risk-related data flow from raw data to useable information and knowledge (think of it as a data supply chain), the Human Research Program (HRP) and Space Life Science Directorate (SLSD) are building an information architecture plan to leverage their existing, and often shared, IT infrastructure.

  20. High-Affinity Binding of the Staphylococcal HarA Protein to Haptoglobin and Hemoglobin Involves a Domain with an Antiparallel Eight-Stranded β-Barrel Fold▿

    PubMed Central

    Dryla, Agnieszka; Hoffmann, Bernd; Gelbmann, Dieter; Giefing, Carmen; Hanner, Markus; Meinke, Andreas; Anderson, Annaliesa S.; Koppensteiner, Walter; Konrat, Robert; von Gabain, Alexander; Nagy, Eszter

    2007-01-01

    Iron scavenging from the host is essential for the growth of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we further characterized two staphylococcal cell wall proteins previously shown to bind hemoproteins. HarA and IsdB harbor homologous ligand binding domains, the so called NEAT domain (for “near transporter”) present in several surface proteins of gram-positive pathogens. Surface plasmon resonance measurements using glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged HarAD1, one of the ligand binding domains of HarA, and GST-tagged full-length IsdB proteins confirmed high-affinity binding to hemoglobin and haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) of 5 to 50 nM. Haptoglobin binding could be detected only with HarA and was in the low micromolar range. In order to determine the fold of this evolutionarily conserved ligand binding domain, the untagged HarAD1 protein was subjected to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which revealed an eight-stranded, purely antiparallel β-barrel with the strand order (-β1↓-β2↑-β3↓-β6↑-β5↓-β4↑-β7↓-β8↑), forming two Greek key motifs. Based on structural-homology searches, the topology of the HarAD1 domain resembles that of the immunoglobulin (Ig) fold family, whose members are involved in protein-protein interactions, but with distinct structural features. Therefore, we consider that the HarAD1/NEAT domain fold is a novel variant of the Ig fold that has not yet been observed in other proteins. PMID:17041047

  1. Harness That S.O.B.: Distributing Remote Sensing Analysis in a Small Office/Business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, J.; Combe, J.; McCord, T. B.

    2009-12-01

    Researchers in a small office/business (SOB) operate with limited funding, equipment, and software availability. To mitigate these issues, we developed a distributed computing framework that: 1) leverages open source software to implement functionality otherwise reliant on proprietary software and 2) harnesses the unused power of (semi-)idle office computers with mixed operating systems (OSes). This abstract outlines some reasons for the effort, its conceptual basis and implementation, and provides brief speedup results. The Multiple-Endmember Linear Spectral Unmixing Model (MELSUM)1 processes remote-sensing (hyper-)spectral images. The algorithm is computationally expensive, sometimes taking a full week or more for a 1 million pixel/100 wavelength image. Analysis of pixels is independent, so a large benefit can be gained from parallel processing techniques. Job concurrency is limited by the number of active processing units. MELSUM was originally written in the Interactive Data Language (IDL). Despite its multi-threading capabilities, an IDL instance executes on a single machine, and so concurrency is limited by the machine's number of central processing units (CPUs). Network distribution can access more CPUs to provide a greater speedup, while also taking advantage of (often) underutilized extant equipment. appropriately integrating open source software magnifies the impact by avoiding the purchase of additional licenses. Our method of distribution breaks into four conceptual parts: 1) the top- or task-level user interface; 2) a mid-level program that manages hosts and jobs, called the distribution server; 3) a low-level executable for individual pixel calculations; and 4) a control program to synchronize sequential sub-tasks. Each part is a separate OS process, passing information via shell commands and/or temporary files. While the control and low-level executables are short-lived, the top-level program and distribution server run (at least) for the entirety of

  2. Three decades of harnessing the GPS data explosion for geophysics (Vening Meinesz Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewitt, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    In this presentation, I attempt to convey the immensity of the task that faced the geodesy community three decades ago, and continues to challenge us, to harness all potentially valuable GPS data available in the world for geophysical science. It would be fair to see that three decades ago, we were struggling with controlled tests just to get GPS geodesy working, and had little time to imagine the flood of data today. Yet the geodesy community has succeeded in meeting this challenge. Today, for example, the Nevada Geodetic Laboratory produces and makes publicly available coordinate time series for over 12,000 geodetic GPS station around the globe with various data intervals, latencies, and reference frames. About 8,000 stations have their daily time series updated every week, with 4,000 being updated the next day with coordinates at daily and 5 minute intervals. About 2,000 stations have their time series updated every hour with coordinates at 5 minute intervals. I will show examples of how these time series are being used by NGL and many other scientists to study a wide variety of geophysical topics, including plate tectonics, earthquake modeling, seismic and tsunami hazard, volcanic deformation, water resources, mountain growth, terrestrial reference frame realization, glacial isostatic adjustment, ice sheet melting, sea level rise and coastal subsidence, and even fundamental physics, using GPS atomic clocks to probe the nature of dark matter in the universe. The explosion in GPS data has challenged us to invent new data processing algorithms and develop robust automation in order to keep up with the flood. This explosion has been exponential, and therefore it can be said that it is not a recent phenomena, but rather that it began in the earliest years of GPS geodesy, and has always posed a challenge to us. Over the course of my post-doctoral career starting in late 1985, I have had the good fortune to witness the key developments that have taken place since the

  3. "Harnessing genomics to improve health in Africa" – an executive course to support genomics policy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alyna C; Mugabe, John; Singer, Peter A; Daar, Abdallah S

    2005-01-01

    Background Africa in the twenty-first century is faced with a heavy burden of disease, combined with ill-equipped medical systems and underdeveloped technological capacity. A major challenge for the international community is to bring scientific and technological advances like genomics to bear on the health priorities of poorer countries. The New Partnership for Africa's Development has identified science and technology as a key platform for Africa's renewal. Recognizing the timeliness of this issue, the African Centre for Technology Studies and the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics co-organized a course on Genomics and Public Health Policy in Nairobi, Kenya, the first of a series of similar courses to take place in the developing world. This article presents the findings and recommendations that emerged from this process, recommendations which suggest that a regional approach to developing sound science and technology policies is the key to harnessing genome-related biotechnology to improve health and contribute to human development in Africa. Methods The objectives of the course were to familiarize participants with the current status and implications of genomics for health in Africa; to provide frameworks for analyzing and debating the policy and ethical questions; and to begin developing a network across different sectors by sharing perspectives and building relationships. To achieve these goals the course brought together a diverse group of stakeholders from academic research centres, the media, non-governmental, voluntary and legal organizations to stimulate multi-sectoral debate around issues of policy. Topics included scientific advances in genomics innovation systems and business models, international regulatory frameworks, as well as ethical and legal issues. Results Seven main recommendations emerged: establish a network for sustained dialogue among participants; identify champions among politicians; use the New Plan for African

  4. Preliminary traction and the use of under-thigh pillows to prevent avascular necrosis of the femoral head in Pavlik harness treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Seto, Y; Futami, T; Kashiwagi, N

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-one hips of 145 patients were treated with the Pavlik harness for developmental dysplasia of the hip. The patients were divided into two groups. Group A consisted of 65 patients (70 hips) who were treated between 1980 and 1987. The harness was applied immediately after the diagnosis. Group B consisted of 80 patients (91 hips) who were treated between 1988 and 1992. These patients received preliminary traction, and small pillows supported the lower extremities from just above the knee to the foot to prevent extreme abduction when the harness was applied. When the distance from the middle point of the proximal metaphyseal border of the femur to the Y-line (distance "a") was 8 mm or more on the initial X-ray picture, the rate of avascular necrosis in group A was 11% and that in group B was 0%; the difference was significant. However, when distance "a" was less than 8 mm, the rate of avascular necrosis in group A was 13% and that in group B was 12%, and there was no significant difference. Thus, we suggest that the Pavlik harness is indicated for developmental dysplasia of the hip in which distance "a" is 8 mm or more. Traction should precede application of the harness, and pillows placed under the thigh must be used during application.

  5. Microbes at Surface-Air Interfaces: The Metabolic Harnessing of Relative Humidity, Surface Hygroscopicity, and Oligotrophy for Resilience.

    PubMed

    Stone, Wendy; Kroukamp, Otini; Korber, Darren R; McKelvie, Jennifer; Wolfaardt, Gideon M

    2016-01-01

    The human environment is predominantly not aqueous, and microbes are ubiquitous at the surface-air interfaces with which we interact. Yet microbial studies at surface-air interfaces are largely survival-oriented, whilst microbial metabolism has overwhelmingly been investigated from the perspective of liquid saturation. This study explored microbial survival and metabolism under desiccation, particularly the influence of relative humidity (RH), surface hygroscopicity, and nutrient availability on the interchange between these two phenomena. The combination of a hygroscopic matrix (i.e., clay or 4,000 MW polyethylene glycol) and high RH resulted in persistent measurable microbial metabolism during desiccation. In contrast, no microbial metabolism was detected at (a) hygroscopic interfaces at low RH, and (b) less hygroscopic interfaces (i.e., sand and plastic/glass) at high or low RH. Cell survival was conversely inhibited at high RH and promoted at low RH, irrespective of surface hygroscopicity. Based on this demonstration of metabolic persistence and survival inhibition at high RH, it was proposed that biofilm metabolic rates might inversely influence whole-biofilm resilience, with 'resilience' defined in this study as a biofilm's capacity to recover from desiccation. The concept of whole-biofilm resilience being promoted by oligotrophy was supported in desiccation-tolerant Arthrobacter spp. biofilms, but not in desiccation-sensitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The ability of microbes to interact with surfaces to harness water vapor during desiccation was demonstrated, and potentially to harness oligotrophy (the most ubiquitous natural condition facing microbes) for adaptation to desiccation.

  6. Parallel kinetic resolution of tert-butyl (RS)-3-oxy-substituted cyclopent-1-ene-carboxylates for the asymmetric synthesis of 3-oxy-substituted cispentacin and transpentacin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Aye, Yimon; Davies, Stephen G; Garner, A Christopher; Roberts, Paul M; Smith, Andrew D; Thomson, James E

    2008-06-21

    tert-Butyl (RS)-3-methoxy- and (RS)-3-tert-butyldiphenylsilyloxy-cyclopent-1-ene-carboxylates display excellent levels of enantiorecognition in mutual kinetic resolutions with both lithium (RS)-N-benzyl-N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)amide and lithium (RS)-N-3,4-dimethoxybenzyl-N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)amide. A 50 : 50 pseudoenantiomeric mixture of lithium (S)-N-benzyl-N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)amide and lithium (R)-N-3,4-dimethoxybenzyl-N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)amide allows for the efficient parallel kinetic resolution of the tert-butyl (RS)-3-oxy-substituted cyclopent-1-ene-carboxylates, affording differentially protected 3-oxy-substituted cispentacin derivatives in high yield and >98% de. Subsequent N-deprotection and hydrolysis provides access to 3-oxy-substituted cispentacin derivatives in good yield, and in >98% de and >98% ee, while stereoselective epimerisation and subsequent deprotection affords the corresponding transpentacin analogues in good yield, and in >98% de and >98% ee.

  7. Synthesis and structure of the mercury chloride complex of 2,2′-(2-bromo-5-tert-butyl-1,3-phenyl­ene)bis­(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazole)

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Varsha; Singh, Harkesh B.

    2017-01-01

    In the title mercury complex, catena-poly[[di­chlorido­mercury(II)]-μ-2,2′-(2-bromo-5-tert-butyl-1,3-phenyl­ene)bis­(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazole)-κ2 N 3:N 3′], [HgCl2(C26H25BrN4)]n, the HgII atom is coordinated by two Cl atoms and by two N atoms from two 2,2′-(2-bromo-5-tert-butyl-1,3-phenyl­ene)bis­(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazole) ligands. The metal cation adopts a distorted tetrahedral coordination geometry with with bond angles around mercury of 100.59 (15)° [N—Hg—N] and 126.35 (7)° [Cl—Hg—Cl]. This arrangement gives rise to a zigzag helical 1-D polymer propagating along the b-axis direction. PMID:28316804

  8. Origin and palaeoenvironmental significance of C25 and C27n-alk-1-enes in a 25,000-year lake-sedimentary record from equatorial East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bree, L. G. J.; Rijpstra, W. I. C.; Cocquyt, C.; Al-Dhabi, N. A.; Verschuren, D.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; de Leeuw, J. W.

    2014-11-01

    We studied the distribution of long-chain alkenes (n-C23 to n-C31) in well-dated sediments from Lake Challa, a deep crater lake near Mt. Kilimanjaro in equatorial East Africa, to reveal signatures of palaeo-environmental and palaeo-climatic changes affecting the production of these compounds during the last 25 kyr. The apolar fractions of organic sediment extracts dated to the last 16 kyr showed an unusual dominance of δ13C-depleted n-C25:1 and n-C27:1 alk-1-enes. These alkenes were not detected in soil and litter from near the shoreline and from the inner rim of the crater, pointing to an autochthonous, aquatic source. Analysis of suspended particulate matter indicated that the n-alk-1-enes are produced in the well-oxygenated upper 30 m of the water column, indicating a phytoplanktonic origin. Sedimenting particles collected monthly from December 2006 to November 2007 showed increased fluxes of n-alk-1-enes following the locally prominent short rain season in November-December. Green algae and/or cyanobacteria were identified as candidate sources of these alkenes. Production of the n-C25:1 and n-C27:1 alkenes in Lake Challa was much reduced during the Last Glacial Maximum and early late-glacial period, suggesting a temperature or CO2 effect on habitat suitability. We explored the potential of n-alk-1-ene accumulation rates, and of a derived Alkene Index [n-C27:1]/([n-C25:1] + [n-C27:1]), to record longer-term climatic changes. The Alkene Index record of Lake Challa over the past 25 kyr shows clear periodicity with a dominant frequency of ∼2.3 kyr, potentially indicative of monsoon variability directly or indirectly forced by variation in solar radiation.

  9. Formation of HArF in solid Ar revisited: are mobile vacancies involved in the matrix-site conversion at 30 K?

    PubMed

    Khriachtchev, Leonid; Lignell, Antti; Rasanen, Markku

    2004-02-15

    The HArF molecule can occupy in solid Ar thermally unstable and stable configurations, and their microscopic structure is not understood at the moment. We present additional experimental results on the formation of two HArF configurations and analyze them with emphasis on possible reactions of the unstable configuration with matrix vacancies to form the stable configuration. We conclude that the existing computational scenarios do not describe fully the present experimental data. In order to explain qualitatively the experimental results, two tentative models are discussed. The first model is based on local mobility of matrix vacancies produced during photolysis and the second model considers isomerization of the HArF at Arn supermolecule. More importantly, the present results constitute the experimental basis for future theoretical studies.

  10. “Grafting to” of RAFTed Responsive Polymers to Glass Substrates by Thiol–Ene and Critical Comparison to Thiol–Gold Coupling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Surface-grafted polymers have been widely applied to modulate biological interfaces and introduce additional functionality. Polymers derived from reversible addition–fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization have a masked thiol at the ω-chain end providing an anchor point for conjugation and in particular displays high affinity for gold surfaces (both flat and particulate). In this work, we report the direct grafting of RAFTed polymers by a “thiol–ene click” (Michael addition) onto glass substrates rather than gold, which provides a more versatile surface for subsequent array-based applications but retains the simplicity. The immobilization of two thermoresponsive polymers are studied here, poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] (pOEGMA) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM). Using a range of surface analysis techniques the grafting efficiency was compared to thiol–gold and was quantitatively compared to the gold alternative using quartz crystal microbalance. It is shown that this method gives easy access to grafted polymer surfaces with pNIPAM resulting in significantly increased surface coverage compared to pOEGMA. The nonfouling (protein resistance) character of these surfaces is also demonstrated. PMID:27409356

  11. In vivo estrogenic potential of 4-methyl-2,4-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)pent-1-ene, an active metabolite of bisphenol A, in uterus of ovariectomized rat.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Katsuhiro; Takiguchi, Masufumi; Yoshihara, Shin'ichi

    2010-08-01

    4-Methyl-2,4-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)pent-1-ene (MBP), an active metabolite of bisphenol A (BPA), has more potent estrogenic activity than BPA in vitro, but its activity in vivo is not established. Here, we examined in vivo estrogenic activity of MBP by means of uterotrophic assay in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats. MBP exhibited dose-dependent estrogenic activity, as evaluated in terms of effects on uterus weight, uterine luminal epithelial cell height and myometrium thickness. The highest concentration of MBP (10 mg/kg/day) completely reversed the changes caused by OVX, and its activity was equivalent to that of 5 microg/kg/day 17beta-estradiol (E2). We also investigated the effects of MBP on transcription of several estrogen-related genes. The changes of mRNA levels of estrogen receptors alpha and beta, c-fos and insulin-like growth factor 1 in MBP-treated OVX rats were qualitatively similar to those in E2-treated rats. BPA did not show any significant effect on OVX rat in these conditions. This study is the first to demonstrate that MBP, an active metabolite of BPA, has potent in vivo estrogenic activity, being about 500-fold more potent than BPA in OVX rats.

  12. Multifunctional phenylboronic acid-tagged fluorescent silica nanoparticles via thiol-ene click reaction for imaging sialic acid expressed on living cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liwei; Zhang, Xianxia; Zhang, Zhengyong; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Song; Kong, Jilie

    2013-10-15

    Multifunctional fluorescent silica nanoparticles with phenylboronic acid tags were developed for labeling sialic acid on the surface of living cancer cells. In this paper, fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) with strong and stable emission at 515 nm were firstly prepared through a reverse microemulsion process, and then modified with highly selective phenylboronic acid (PBA) tags on their surface via an aqueous 'thiol-ene' click reaction. These nanoparticles had a hydrodynamic diameter of 92.6 ± 9.1 nm, and a bright fluorescence signal, which is 366 times higher than that of a single dye molecule. Meanwhile, these PBA-tagged FSNPs were found very stable in aqueous solution as well as in cell culture medium, verified by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and zeta potential analysis. The over-expressed sialic acid (SA) on the membrane of living HeLa cells was visualized in situ by a confocal laser scanning microscopy, ascribed to the specific interaction between PBA and SA. Thus, the PBA-FSBPs showed a great potential in probing SA expressed on living cells with high selectivity and sensitivity.

  13. Facile "one-pot" synthesis of poly(methacrylic acid)-based hybrid monolith via thiol-ene click reaction for hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xumei; Tan, Wangming; Chen, Ye; Chen, Yingzhuang; Ma, Ming; Chen, Bo; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-07-08

    A novel sol-gel "one-pot" approach in tandem with a radical-mediated thiol-ene reaction for the synthesis of a methacrylic acid-based hybrid monolith was developed. The polymerization monomers, tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) and 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTS), were hydrolyzed in high-concentration methacrylic acid solution that also served as a hydrophilic functional monomer. The resulting solution was then mixed with initiator (2, 2'-azobis (2-methylpropionamide) dihydrochloride) and porogen (urea, polyethylene glycol 20,000) in a capillary column and polymerized in water bath. The column had a uniform porous structure and a good permeability. The evaluation of the monolith was performed by separation of small molecules including nucleosides, phenols, amides, bases and Triton X-100. The calibration curves for uridine, inosine, adenosine and cytidine were determined. All the calibration curves exhibited good linear regressions (R(2)≥0.995) within the test ranges of 0.5-40μg/mL for four nucleosides. Additionaliy, atypical hydrophilic mechanism was proved by elution order from low to high according to polarity retention time increased with increases in the content of the organic solvent in the mobile phase. Further studies indicated that hydrogen bond and electrostatic interactions existed between the polar analytes and the stationary phase. This was the mechanism of retention. The excellent separation of the BSA digest showed good hydrophility of the column and indicated the potential in separation of complex biological samples.

  14. Developing Activity Localization Fluorescence Peptide Probe Using Thiol-Ene Click Reaction for Spatially Resolved Imaging of Caspase-8 in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Si-Jia; Kuang, Yong-Qing; Luo, Feng-Yan; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2016-08-02

    Small molecule probes suitable for high-resolution fluorescence imaging of enzyme activity pose a challenge in chemical biology. We developed a novel design of activity localization fluorescence (ALF) peptide probe, which enables spatially resolved, highly sensitive imaging of peptidase in live cells. The ALF probe was synthesized by a facile thiol-ene click reaction of a cysteine-appended peptide with an acryloylated fluorophore. Upon cleavage by peptidase, the probe undergoes a seven-membered intramolecular cyclization and releases the fluorophore with the excited-state intramolecular photon transfer (ESIPT) effect. A highly fluorescent, insoluble aggregate was formed around the enzyme, which facilitates high-sensitivity and high-resolution imaging. This design is demonstrated for detection of caspase-8 activation. The results show that our design allows easy, high-yield synthesis of the probe, and the probe affords high sensitivity for caspase-8 detection. Live cell imaging reveals that the probe is able to render highly localized and high-contrast fluorescence signal for caspase-8. Our design holds the potential as a generally applicable strategy for developing high-sensitivity and high-resolution imaging peptide probes in cell biology and diagnostics.

  15. Density functional theory study of the carbonyl-ene reaction of encapsulated formaldehyde in Cu(I), Ag(I), and Au(I) exchanged FAU zeolites.

    PubMed

    Wannakao, Sippakorn; Khongpracha, Pipat; Limtrakul, Jumras

    2011-11-17

    Carbonyl-ene reactions, which involve C-C bond formation, are essential in many chemical syntheses. The formaldehyde-propene reaction catalyzed by several of the group 11 metal cations, Cu(+), Ag(+), and Au(+) exchanged on the faujasite zeolite (metal-FAU) has been investigated by density functional theory at the M06-L/6-31G(d,p) level. The Au-FAU exhibits a higher activity than the others due to the high charge transfer between the Au and the reactant molecules, even though it is located at a negatively charged site of the zeolite. This site enables it to compensate for the charge of the Au(+) ion. The NBO analysis reveals that the 6s orbital of the Au atom plays an important role, inducing a charge on the probe molecules. Moreover, the effect of the zeolite framework makes the Au-FAU more active than the others by stabilizing the high charge induced transition structure. The activation energy of the reaction catalyzed by Au-FAU is 13.0 kcal/mol whereas that of Cu and Ag-FAU is found to be around 17 kcal/mol. The product desorption needs to be improved for Au-FAU; however, we suggest that catalysts with high charge transfer might provide a promising activity.

  16. The synthesis of weak acidic type hybrid monolith via thiol-ene click chemistry and its application in hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jiao; Liu, Shengquan; Wang, Menglin; Yao, Shouzhuo; Chen, Yingzhuang

    2017-02-17

    In this work, a porous structure and good permeability monolithic column was polymerized in UV transparent fused-silica capillaries via photo-initiated thiol-ene click polymerization of 2, 4, 6, 8-tetravinyl-2, 4, 6, 8- tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (TMTVS), pentaerythritol tetra(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP), itaconic acid, respectively, in the presence of porogenic solvents (tetrahydrofuran and methanol) and a initiator (2, 2-dimethoxy-2-phenylacetophenone) (DMPA) within 30 min. The physical properties of this monolith were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements. For an overall evaluation of the monolith in chromatographic application, separations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenols, amides and bases were carried out. The column efficiency of this monolith could be as high as 112560 N/m. It also possesses a potential application in fabrication of monoliths with high efficiency for c-LC. In addition, the resulting monolithic column demonstrated the potential use in analysis of environment waters. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Fast preparation of a highly efficient organic monolith via photo-initiated thiol-ene click polymerization for capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lianfang; Ou, Junjie; Liu, Zhongshan; Lin, Hui; Wang, Hongwei; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa

    2015-05-15

    A novel organic monolith was firstly prepared in a UV-transparent fused-silica capillary by a single-step approach via photo-initiated thiol-ene click polymerization reaction of 1,2,4-trivinylcyclohexane (TVCH) and pentaerythriol tetra(3-mercaptopropionate) (4SH) within 10min. The effects of both composition of prepolymerization solution and polymerization time on the morphology and permeability of monolithic column were investigated in detail. Then, the optimal condition was acquired to fabricate a homogeneous and permeable organic monolith. The chemical groups of the monolithic column were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The SEM graphs showed the organic monolith possessed a uniform porous structure, which promotes the highest column efficiency of ∼133,000 plates per meter for alkylbenzenes at the linear velocity of 0.65mm/s in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Finally, the organic monolithic column was further applied for separation of basic compounds, pesticides and EPA610, indicating satisfactory separation ability.

  18. Rapid assembly of a library of lipophilic iminosugars via the thiol-ene reaction yields promising pharmacological chaperones for the treatment of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Goddard-Borger, Ethan D; Tropak, Michael B; Yonekawa, Sayuri; Tysoe, Christina; Mahuran, Don J; Withers, Stephen G

    2012-03-22

    A highly divergent route to lipophilic iminosugars that utilizes the thiol-ene reaction was developed to enable the rapid synthesis of a collection of 16 dideoxyiminoxylitols bearing various different lipophilic substituents. Enzyme kinetic analyses revealed that a number of these products are potent, low-nanomolar inhibitors of human glucocerebrosidase that stabilize the enzyme to thermal denaturation by up to 20 K. Cell based assays conducted on Gaucher disease patient derived fibroblasts demonstrated that administration of the compounds can increase lysosomal glucocerebrosidase activity levels by therapeutically relevant amounts, as much as 3.2-fold in cells homozygous for the p.N370S mutation and 1.4-fold in cells homozygous for the p.L444P mutation. Several compounds elicited this increase in enzyme activity over a relatively wide dosage range. The data assembled here illustrate how the lipophilic moiety common to many glucocerebrosidase inhibitors might be used to optimize a lead compound's ability to chaperone the protein in cellulo. The flexibility of this synthetic strategy makes it an attractive approach to the rapid optimization of glycosidase inhibitor potency and pharmacokinetic behavior.

  19. Thiol-ene Michael-type formation of gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrices for three-dimensional mesenchymal stromal/stem cell administration to cutaneous wounds.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kedi; Cantu, David Antonio; Fu, Yao; Kim, Jaehyup; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Hematti, Peiman; Kao, W John

    2013-11-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are considered promising cellular therapeutics in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. MSCs secrete high concentrations of immunomodulatory cytokines and growth factors, which exert paracrine effects on infiltrating immune and resident cells in the wound microenvironment that could favorably promote healing after acute injury. However, better spatial delivery and improved retention at the site of injury are two factors that could improve the clinical application of MSCs. In this study, we utilized thiol-ene Michael-type addition for rapid encapsulation of MSCs within a gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrix. This biomatrix was also applied as a provisional dressing to full thickness wounds in Sprague-Dawley rats. The three-way interaction of MSCs, gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrices, and host immune cells and adjacent resident cells in the wound microenvironment favorably modulated wound progression and host response. In this model we observed attenuated immune cell infiltration, lack of foreign giant cell (FBGC) formation, accelerated wound closure and re-epithelialization, as well as enhanced neovascularization and granulation tissue formation by 7 days. The MSC entrapped in the gelatin/poly(ethylene glycol) biomatrix localized cell presentation adjacent to the wound microenvironment and thus mediated the early resolution of inflammatory events and facilitated the proliferative phases in wound healing.

  20. Acute effect of 3β-hidroxihop-22(29)ene on insulin secretion is mediated by GLP-1, potassium and calcium channels for the glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Castro, Allisson Jhonatan Gomes; Cazarolli, Luisa Helena; de Carvalho, Francieli Kanumfre; da Luz, Gabrielle; Altenhofen, Delsi; dos Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Silva, Fátima Regina Mena Barreto

    2015-06-01

    The effect of 3β-hidroxihop-22(29)ene (3-BHO) on insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion as well as the mechanism of action of the compound in pancreatic islet on glucose homeostasis was investigated. The data from in vivo treatment show that 3-BHO significantly reduces the hyperglycemia by increasing the insulin and GLP-1 secretion, as well as by accumulating hepatic glycogen in hyperglycemic rats. In rat pancreatic β-cell, 3-BHO stimulates the glucose uptake, insulin vesicles translocation to the plasma membrane and thus the insulin secretion through the involvement of potassium channels (ATP- and Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels) and calcium channels (L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (L-VDCC)). Furthermore, this study also provides evidence for a crosstalk between intracellular high calcium concentration, PKA and PKC in the signal transduction of 3-BHO to stimulate insulin secretion. In conclusion, 3-BHO diminishes glycaemia, stimulates GLP-1 secretion and potentiates insulin secretion and increase hepatic glycogen content. Moreover, this triterpene modulates calcium influx characterizing ATP-K(+), Ca(2+)-K(+) and L-VDCC channels-dependent pathways as well as PKA and PKC activity in pancreatic islets underlying the signaling of 3-BHO for the secretory activity and contribution on glucose homeostasis.

  1. "One-step" preparation of thiol-ene clickable PEG-based thermoresponsive hyperbranched copolymer for in situ crosslinking hybrid hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yixiao; Saeed, Aram Omer; Hassan, Waqar; Keigher, Catherine; Zheng, Yu; Tai, Hongyun; Pandit, Abhay; Wang, Wenxin

    2012-01-01

    A well-defined poly(ethylene glycol) based hyperbranched thermoresponsive copolymer with high content of acrylate vinyl groups was synthesized via a "one-pot and one-step" deactivation enhanced atom transfer radical polymerization approach, which provided an injectable and in situ crosslinkable system via Michael-type thiol-ene reaction with a thiol-modified hyaluronan biopolymer. The hyperbranched structure, molecular weight, and percentage of vinyl content of the copolymer were characterized by gel permeation chromatography and (1)H NMR. The lower critical solution temperature of this copolymer is close to body temperature, which can result in a rapid thermal gelation at 37 °C. The scanning electron microscopy analysis of crosslinked hydrogel showed the network formation with porous structure, and 3D cell culture study demonstrated the good cell viability after the cells were embedded inside the hydrogel. This injectable and in situ crosslinking hybrid hydrogel system offers great promise as a new class of hybrid biomaterials for tissue engineering.

  2. Photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer and photophysical characteristics of (2Z)-3-[4-(dimethylamino) phenyl]-2-(2-methylphenyl) prop-2-ene-nitrile (DPM) in different media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiri, Abdullah M.; El-Daly, Samy A.; Alamry, Khalid A.; Arshad, Muhammad Nadeem; Pannipara, Mehboobali

    2015-10-01

    A new fluorophore, (2Z)-3-[4-(dimethylamino) phenyl]-2-(2-methylphenyl) prop-2-ene-nitrile (DPM), was synthesized by knoevenagel condensation of 4-(dimethylamino) benzaldehyde and 2-methylbenzyl cyanide in ethanol using NaOH as base. The electronic absorption and emission characteristic of DPM was studied in different solvents. The X-ray crystallographic structure of DPM was also investigated. A crystalline solid of DPM gives a strong green emission at about 533 nm; these phenomena are important for the application of DPM dye in organic photo emitting diode. DPM exhibits a red shift in its emission spectrum as solvent polarity increases, indicating a large change in the dipole moment of dye molecule upon excitation due to intramolecular charge transfer in excited DPM*. The fluorescence quantum yield depends strongly on the properties of the solvents, which was attributed to positive and negative solvatokinetic effects. The DPM dye displays solubilization in cationic (CTAB) micelle and could be used as a probe to determine the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of CTAB.

  3. Westphalen's diol diacetate: 19(10→5)-abeo-5β-cholest-9-ene-3β,6β-diyl diacetate.

    PubMed

    Ramírez Hernández, Johana; Sandoval-Ramírez, Jesús; Meza-Reyes, Socorro; Vega Báez, José Luis; Bernès, Sylvain

    2012-12-01

    THE STRUCTURE OF THE TITLE STEROID [ALTERNATIVE NAME: 3β,6β-diacet-oxy-5β-methyl-19-norcholest-9(10)-ene], C31H50O4, confirms the generally accepted mechanism for the rearrangement of a cholestan-5α-ol derivative reported a century ago by Westphalen. The methyl group at position 10 of the starting material migrates to position 5 in the steroidal nucleus, while a Δ(9) bond is formed, as indicated by the C=C bond length of 1.347 (4) Å. The methyl transposition leaves the 5R configuration unchanged, with the methyl oriented towards the β face. During the rearrangement, the steroidal B ring experiences a conformational distortion from chair to envelope with the C atom at position 6 as the flap. In the title structure, the isopropyl group of the side chain is disordered over two positions, with occupancies of 0.733 (10) and 0.267 (10). The carbonyl O atom in the acetyl group at C3 is also disordered with an occupancy ratio of 0.62 (4):0.38 (4).

  4. Thiol-ene immobilisation of carbohydrates onto glass slides as a simple alternative to gold-thiol monolayers, amines or lipid binding.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Caroline I; Edmondson, Steve; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate arrays are a vital tool in studying infection, probing the mechanisms of bacterial, viral and toxin adhesion and the development of new treatments, by mimicking the structure of the glycocalyx. Current methods rely on the formation of monolayers of carbohydrates that have been chemically modified with a linker to enable interaction with a functionalised surface. This includes amines, biotin, lipids or thiols. Thiol-addition to gold to form self-assembled monolayers is perhaps the simplest method for immobilisation as thiolated glycans are readily accessible from reducing carbohydrates in a single step, but are limited to gold surfaces. Here we have developed a quick and versatile methodology which enables the use of thiolated carbohydrates to be immobilised as monolayers directly onto acrylate-functional glass slides via a 'thiol-ene'/Michael-type reaction. By combining the ease of thiol chemistry with glass slides, which are compatible with microarray scanners this offers a cost effective, but also useful method to assemble arrays.

  5. Occurrence of (Z)-3,4-Dideoxyglucoson-3-ene in Different Types of Beer and Malt Beer as a Result of 3-Deoxyhexosone Interconversion.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Michael; Nobis, Arndt; Witte, Sophia; Henle, Thomas

    2016-04-06

    In beer, 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG) and 3-deoxygalactosone (3-DGal) are important sugar degradation products, but little is known about the relevance of the interconversion reaction between these compounds in different types of beer. In the present study, 3-DG was quantitated at concentrations of 12.9-52.7 mg/L and 3-DGal at concentrations of 6.0-26.4 mg/L in different types of beer (pilsner, wheat, bock, dark, and alcohol-free beers). The concentrations in malt beer tended to be higher. Largely overlapping concentration ranges precluded a classification of beers by their 3-deoxyglycosone contents. 3,4-Dideoxyglucoson-3-ene (3,4-DGE) was identified as an important intermediate and quantitated in beer and malt beer for the first time. The E and Z isomers of the corresponding quinoxaline were synthesized by a new synthetic approach and isolated by semipreparative HPLC. An assay was developed for quantitation of (E)- and (Z)-3,4-DGE by HPLC-MS/MS, and the Z isomer was determined at concentrations of 0.3-1.7 mg/L in beer and 0.5-4.8 mg/L in malt beer samples. The E isomer was shown to be of little importance. Concentrations of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) were twice as high as those of (Z)-3,4-DGE in beer samples (0.4-3.7 mg/L) but much higher in malt beer samples (1.6-336 mg/L).

  6. Effects of Bisphenol A Metabolite 4-Methyl-2,4-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)pent-1-ene on Lung Function and Type 2 Pulmonary Alveolar Epithelial Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Su, Chin-Chuan; Lee, Kuan-I; Chen, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is recognized as a major pollutant worldwide. 4-Methyl-2,4-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)pent-1-ene (MBP) is a major active metabolite of BPA. The epidemiological and animal studies have reported that BPA is harmful to lung function. The role of MBP in lung dysfunction after BPA exposure still remains unclear. This study investigated whether MBP would induce lung alveolar cell damage and evaluated the role of MBP in the BPA exposure-induced lung dysfunction. An in vitro type 2 alveolar epithelial cell (L2) model and an ex vivo isolated reperfused rat lung model were used to determine the effects of BPA or MBP on cell growth and lung function. MBP, but not BPA, dose-dependently increased the mean artery pressure (Pa), pulmonary capillary pressure (Pc), pulmonary capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), and wet/dry weight ratio in isolated reperfused rat lungs. MBP significantly reduced cell viability and induced caspases-3/7 cleavage and apoptosis and increased AMP-activated protein kinas (AMPK) phosphorylation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related molecules expression in L2 cells, which could be reversed by AMPK-siRNA transfection. These findings demonstrated for the first time that MBP exposure induced type 2 alveolar cell apoptosis and lung dysfunction through an AMPK-regulated ER stress signaling pathway. PMID:27982077

  7. Biocomposites from Natural Rubber: Synergistic Effects of Functionalized Cellulose Nanocrystals as Both Reinforcing and Cross-Linking Agents via Free-Radical Thiol-ene Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Parambath Kanoth, Bipinbal; Claudino, Mauro; Johansson, Mats; Berglund, Lars A; Zhou, Qi

    2015-08-05

    Natural rubber/cellulose nanocrystals (NR/CNCs) form true biocomposites from renewable resources and are demonstrated to show significantly improved thermo-mechanical properties and reduced stress-softening. The nanocomposites were prepared from chemically functionalized CNCs bearing thiols. CNCs served as both reinforcing and cross-linking agents in the NR matrix, and the study was designed to prove the cross-linking function of modified CNCs. CNCs were prepared from cotton, and the cross-linkable mercapto-groups were introduced onto the surface of CNCs by esterification. Nanocomposite films were prepared by dispersing the modified CNCs (m-CNCs) in NR matrix by solution casting. The cross-links at the filler-matrix (m-CNCs-NR) interface were generated by photochemically initiated thiol-ene reactions as monitored by real-time FTIR analysis. The synergistic effects of reinforcement and chemical cross-linking at the m-CNCs-NR interface on structure, thermo-mechanical, and stress-softening behavior were investigated. Methods included field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), swelling tests, dynamic mechanical analysis, and tensile tests. Compared to biocomposites from NR with unmodified CNCs, the NR/m-CNCs nanocomposites showed 2.4-fold increase in tensile strength, 1.6-fold increase in strain-to-failure, and 2.9-fold increase in work-of-fracture at 10 wt % of m-CNCs in NR.

  8. A novel route to prepare a multilayer system via the combination of interface-mediated catalytic chain transfer polymerization and thiol-ene click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Adem; Caykara, Tuncer

    2017-05-01

    Herein, we have designed a novel multilayer system composed of poly(methyl methacrylate) [poly(MMA)] brush, biotin, streptavidin and protein-A on a silicon substrate to attach onanti-immunoglobulin G (anti-IgG). poly(MMA) brush with vinyl end-group was first synthesized by the interface-mediated catalytic chain transfer polymerization. The brush was then modified with cysteamine molecules to generate the polymer chains with amine end-group via a thiol-ene click chemistry. The amine end-groups of poly(MMA) chains were also modified with biotin units to ensure selective connection points for streptavidin molecules. Finally, a multilayer system on the silicon substrate was formed by using streptavidin and protein-A molecules, respectively. This multilayer system was employed to attach anti-IgG molecules in a highly oriented manner and provide anti-IgG molecular functional configuration on the multilayer. High reproducibility of the amount of anti-IgG adsorption and homogeneous anti-IgG adsorption layer on the silicon surface could be provided by this multilayer system. The multilayer system with protein A may be opened the door for designing an efficient immunoassay protein chip.

  9. A p-menth-1-ene-4,7-diol (EC-1) from Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dhnh. triggers apoptosis and cell cycle changes in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Islam, Farhadul; Khanam, Jahan Ara; Khatun, Mahbuba; Zuberi, Natasha; Khatun, Laboni; Kabir, Syed Rashel; Reza, Md Abu; Ali, M M; Rabbi, M A; Gopalan, Vinod; Lam, Alfred King-Yin

    2015-04-01

    Anticancer activities of p-menth-1-ene-4,7-diol (EC-1) isolated from Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dhnh. were studied on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay. Anticancer activities also analyzed in EAC-bearing mice by assessment of cancer growth inhibition, changes in cancer volume, changes in life span, and hematological parameters. Apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence microscope, DNA fragmentation assay, and flow cytometry. The expression of apoptosis-related genes, Bcl-2, Bcl-X, PARP-1, p53, and Bax, were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). EC-1 significantly inhibited proliferation of EAC cells in vivo and restored the altered hematological parameters of EAC-bearing mice. Cytological observation by fluorescence microscope showed apoptosis of EAC cells upon treatment with EC-1. Also, DNA fragmentation assay revealed EAC cells' apoptosis following EC-1 treatment. Increased mRNA expressions of p53 and Bax genes and negative expressions of Bcl-2 and Bcl-X were observed in cells treated with EC-1. These findings confirmed the induction of apoptosis by EC-1. In addition, MTT assay showed dose-dependent anticancer activity of EC-1 against EAC cell. Cell cycle analysis revealed that EC-1 treatment caused suppression of EAC cells at S phase. To conclude, EC-1 is a novel anticancer compound and showed antiproliferative and apoptotic activities in cellular and mice models.

  10. Harnessing cognitive neuroscience to develop new treatments for improving cognition in schizophrenia: CNTRICS selected cognitive paradigms for animal models.

    PubMed

    Moore, Holly; Geyer, Mark A; Carter, Cameron S; Barch, Deanna M

    2013-11-01

    Over the past two decades, the awareness of the disabling and treatment-refractory effects of impaired cognition in schizophrenia has increased dramatically. In response to this still unmet need in the treatment of schizophrenia, the Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (CNTRICS) initiative was developed. The goal of CNTRICS is to harness cognitive neuroscience to develop a brain-based set of tools for measuring cognition in schizophrenia and to test new treatments. CNTRICS meetings focused on development of tasks with cognitive construct validity for use in both human and animal model studies. This special issue presents papers discussing the cognitive testing paradigms selected by CNTRICS for animal model systems. These paradigms are designed to measure cognitive constructs within the domains of perception, attention, executive function, working memory, object/relational long-term memory, and social/affective processes.

  11. Harnessing the synthetic capabilities of glycopeptide antibiotic tailoring enzymes: characterization of the UK-68,597 biosynthetic cluster.

    PubMed

    Yim, Grace; Kalan, Lindsay; Koteva, Kalinka; Thaker, Maulik N; Waglechner, Nicholas; Tang, Irene; Wright, Gerard D

    2014-11-24

    In this study, a draft genome sequence of Actinoplanes sp. ATCC 53533 was assembled, and an 81-kb biosynthetic cluster for the unusual sulfated glycopeptide UK-68,597 was identified. Glycopeptide antibiotics are important in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Glycopeptides contain heptapeptide backbones that are modified by many tailoring enzymes, including glycosyltransferases, sulfotransferases, methyltransferases, and halogenases, generating extensive chemical and functional diversity. Several tailoring enzymes in the cluster were examined in vitro for their ability to modify glycopeptides, resulting in the synthesis of novel molecules. Tailoring enzymes were also expressed in the producer of the glycopeptide aglycone A47934, generating additional chemical diversity. This work characterizes the biosynthetic program of UK-68,597 and demonstrates the capacity to expand glycopeptide chemical diversity by harnessing the unique chemistry of tailoring enzymes.

  12. Screening selectively harnessed environmental microbial communities for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in moving bed biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Demeter, Marc A; Lemire, Joseph A; Mercer, Sean M; Turner, Raymond J

    2017-03-01

    Bacteria are often found tolerating polluted environments. Such bacteria may be exploited to bioremediate contaminants in controlled ex situ reactor systems. One potential strategic goal of such systems is to harness microbes directly from the environment such that they exhibit the capacity to markedly degrade organic pollutants of interest. Here, the use of biofilm cultivation techniques to inoculate and activate moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems for the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was explored. Biofilms were cultivated from 4 different hydrocarbon contaminated sites using a minimal medium spiked with the 16 EPA identified PAHs. Overall, all 4 inoculant sources resulted in biofilm communities capable of tolerating the presence of PAHs, but only 2 of these exhibited enhanced PAH catabolic gene prevalence coupled with significant degradation of select PAH compounds. Comparisons between inoculant sources highlighted the dependence of this method on appropriate inoculant screening and biostimulation efforts.

  13. [Social marketers' lack of success in using CSM discipline to harness commercial resources and increase contraceptive prevalence].

    PubMed

    Davies, J

    1984-01-01

    Social marketers have certainly shown that the CSM discipline can quickly and cost-effectively harness commercial resources to increase contraceptive prevalence. But why hasn't the social marketing idea caught on in more countries? According to Social Marketing Forum, only a tiny number of countries have active programs after more than a decade of effort. The most likely reason for this lack of success is doubt and fear on the part of both developing countries' officials and donor agencies about allowing marketing enthusiasts--with our very noticeable advertising methods--to join the family planning fight. And what has our answer been? Usually, a head-on retort such as, "But look at all the condoms we've sold]" And that gets us nowhere, because the successful peddling of 1 not-so-impressive method doesn't begin to balance the fears of a possible backlash that brash condom promotions could bring down on official heads. The lesson we should be learning is that social marketers possess to narrow an outlook and promote a small range of products that don't enthuse decisionmakers. Hence, we are often perceived as condom salesmen--and not much more. What should we be doing? We should be selling the idea of using private sector experience to assist national development. That means social development, particularly improved health, family planning and women's education. These 3 activities have proven effective in reducing fertility and would add up to a marketing opportunity--a longterm challenge that should enthuse dicisionmakers, private sector entrepreneurs and donor agencies alike. Further, our model--the commercial sector--is renowned for branching out and secceeding in a broad range of endeavors. As an example, Procter and Gamble uses separate divisions to market different products. Initiatives already exist in many countries to harness the private sector as a development tool. Social marketers should be leading the initiative--and benefitting from it, too.

  14. Microbes at Surface-Air Interfaces: The Metabolic Harnessing of Relative Humidity, Surface Hygroscopicity, and Oligotrophy for Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Wendy; Kroukamp, Otini; Korber, Darren R.; McKelvie, Jennifer; Wolfaardt, Gideon M.

    2016-01-01

    The human environment is predominantly not aqueous, and microbes are ubiquitous at the surface-air interfaces with which we interact. Yet microbial studies at surface-air interfaces are largely survival-oriented, whilst microbial metabolism has overwhelmingly been investigated from the perspective of liquid saturation. This study explored microbial survival and metabolism under desiccation, particularly the influence of relative humidity (RH), surface hygroscopicity, and nutrient availability on the interchange between these two phenomena. The combination of a hygroscopic matrix (i.e., clay or 4,000 MW polyethylene glycol) and high RH resulted in persistent measurable microbial metabolism during desiccation. In contrast, no microbial metabolism was detected at (a) hygroscopic interfaces at low RH, and (b) less hygroscopic interfaces (i.e., sand and plastic/glass) at high or low RH. Cell survival was conversely inhibited at high RH and promoted at low RH, irrespective of surface hygroscopicity. Based on this demonstration of metabolic persistence and survival inhibition at high RH, it was proposed that biofilm metabolic rates might inversely influence whole-biofilm resilience, with ‘resilience’ defined in this study as a biofilm’s capacity to recover from desiccation. The concept of whole-biofilm resilience being promoted by oligotrophy was supported in desiccation-tolerant Arthrobacter spp. biofilms, but not in desiccation-sensitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The ability of microbes to interact with surfaces to harness water vapor during desiccation was demonstrated, and potentially to harness oligotrophy (the most ubiquitous natural condition facing microbes) for adaptation to desiccation. PMID:27746774

  15. Application of the SAMGrid test-harness for performance evaluation and tuning of a distributed cluster implementation of data handling services

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, A.; Baranovski, A.; Garzoglio, G.; Loebel-Carpenter, L.; Herber, R.; Illingworth, R.; Kennedy, R.; Kreymer, A.; Kumar, A.; Lueking, L.; Merritt, W.; Terekhov, I.; Trumbo, J.; White, S.; Veseli, S.; Burgon-Lyon, M.; St. Denis, R.; Belforte, S.; Kerzel, U.; Leslie, M.; Bartsch, V.; /Oxford U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Texas Tech.

    2004-12-01

    The SAMGrid team has recently refactored its test harness suite for greater flexibility and easier configuration. This makes possible more interesting applications of the test harness, for component tests, integration tests, and stress tests. This new implementation of the test harness is a Python framework which uses XML for configuration and small plug-in python modules for specific test purposes We report on the architecture of the test harness and its recent application to stress tests of a new analysis cluster at Fermilab, to explore the extremes of analysis use cases and the relevant parameters for tuning in the SAMGrid station services. One current testing application is running on a 128-CPU analysis cluster with access to 6 TB distributed cache and also to a 2 TB centralized cache, permitting studies of different cache strategies. We have also studied the service parameters which affect the performance of retrieving data from tape storage. The use cases studied vary from those which will require rapid file delivery with short processing time per file, to the opposite extreme of long processing time per file. These results are interesting for their implications with regard to Grid operations, and illustrate the type of monitoring and test facilities required to accomplish such performance tuning.

  16. A comparison of the amounts of energy and nitrogen voided as excreta by cockerels housed over trays or fitted with harnesses and plastic collection bags.

    PubMed

    Sibbald, I R; Wolynetz, M S

    1987-12-01

    Three experiments using adult Single Comb White Leghorn cockerels were made to compare the amounts of energy and nitrogen voided as excreta when collected either in plastic bags held in place by harnesses (H) or on trays placed below the wire-floored cages (T). In the first experiment, previously fasted birds were given, by intubation into the crop, 30 g of ground yellow corn or meat meal; other birds continued to be fasted. Excreta were collected for 48 h. The second experiment was similar but included five feedingstuffs and a second excreta collection was made on trays during the 48 to 72-h period postfeeding. The third experiment also involved 0 to 48 and 48 to 72-h collections but the input was a laying hen diet in amounts ranging from 0 to 50 g by 10 g increments. Birds fitted with harnesses voided less excreta energy than T-birds but the output of excreta nitrogen was independent of the collection method. The differences between H and T-birds were independent of the nature and amount of feed input. Removal of harnesses resulted in compensatory excreta energy output in the subsequent 24 h. The H minus T differences were not attributable to outliers within a group because variances were generally similar among collection methods. The reduced excreta energy outputs of H-birds tended to cause higher estimates of true metabolizable energy for the feedingstuffs but the effect was modified because both fasted and fed birds were affected by the harnesses.

  17. Evidence for partial melting at northern Tavan Har and relationship to Late Triassic sinistral shear in the East Gobi Fault Zone, southeastern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stypula, M.; Webb, L. E.; Hagen-Peter, G. A.

    2009-12-01

    We present preliminary data and interpretations from an ongoing study focused on the timing, extent, and significance of partial melting at northern Tavan Har in southeastern Mongolia. Tavan Har is a basement block within the East Gobi Fault Zone. Regional studies of the East Gobi Fault Zone reveal at least three phases of reactivation during the Mesozoic, including the formation of a Late Triassic sinistral ductile shear zone that can be traced for ~250 km along strike. The metamorphic tectonites of the shear zone exposed in the northern Tavan Har block are dominated by steeply-dipping, NE-striking foliations and subhorizontal lineations. The lithologies of northern Tavan Har consist of mylonite, ultramylonite, amphibolite-facies gneiss, granitic gneiss, and migmatite. The suite of lithologies is observed to extend to the northern margin of the study region where they are overprinted at greenschist-facies conditions and ultimately truncated by the Northern Zuunbayan Fault. The granitic gneiss is a synkinematic pluton that truncates the western margin of Tavan Har and includes vestiges of amphibolite and mylonite lithologies. The amphibolite grade tectonites represent the highest metamorphic grade in relation to the shear zone. Mylonites located throughout the shear zone exhibit WNW plunging lineations. Many generations of dikes and veining are apparent throughout the field area, revealing variable degrees of folding and cross cutting relationships. The southern margin of the migmatite zone is in fault contact with Lower Cretaceous rift basin strata. Previous argon dating determined that the timing of ductile sinistral shear at amphibolite-facies conditions occurred c. 225 Ma. The same study obtained an age of 240 Ma for hornblende from a melanosome within the migmatite unit, giving significance to the question of the timing of partial melting and its relationship to the shear zone. New mapping and structural analysis of the southern margin of the northern Tavan

  18. Measurement accuracy of heart rate and respiratory rate during graded exercise and sustained exercise in the heat using the Zephyr BioHarness.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-H; Roberge, R; Powell, J B; Shafer, A B; Jon Williams, W

    2013-06-01

    The Zephyr BioHarness was tested to determine the accuracy of heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) measurements during 2 exercise protocols in conjunction with either a laboratory metabolic cart (Vmax) or a previously validated portable metabolic system (K4b2). In one protocol, HR and RR were measured using the BioHarness and Vmax during a graded exercise up to V˙O2max (n=12). In another protocol, HR and RR were measured using the BH and K4b2 during sustained exercise (30% and 50% V˙O2max for 20 min each) in a hot environment (30 °C, 50% relative humidity) (n=6). During the graded exercise, HR but not RR, obtained from the BioHarness was higher compared to the Vmax at baseline and 30% V˙O2max (p<0.05), but showed no significant difference at other stages with high correlation coefficients for both HR (r=0.87-0.96) and RR (r=0.90-0.99 above 30% V˙O2max). During the exercise in the heat, there were no significant differences between the BioHarness and K4b2 system. Correlation coefficients between the methods were low for HR but moderately to highly correlated (0.49-0.99) for RR. In conclusion, the BioHarness is comparable to Vmax and K4b2 over a wide range of V˙O2 during graded exercise and sustained exercise in the heat.

  19. Interactions of butane, but-2-ene or xylene-like linked bispyridinium para-aldoximes with native and tabun-inhibited human cholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Calić, Maja; Bosak, Anita; Kuca, Kamil; Kovarik, Zrinka

    2008-09-25

    Kinetic parameters were evaluated for inhibition of native and reactivation of tabun-inhibited human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7) and human plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, EC 3.1.1.8) by three bispyridinium para-aldoximes with butane (K074), but-2-ene (K075) or xylene-like linker (K114). Tested aldoximes reversibly inhibited both cholinesterases with the preference for binding to the native AChE. Both cholinesterases showed the highest affinity for K114 (K(i) was 0.01 mM for AChE and 0.06 mM for BChE). The reactivation of tabun-inhibited AChE was efficient by K074 and K075. Their overall reactivation rate constants were around 2000 min(-1)M(-1), which is seven times higher than for the classical bispyridinium para-aldoxime TMB-4. The reactivation of tabun-inhibited AChE assisted by K114 was slow and reached 90% after 20 h. Since the aldoxime binding affinity of tabun-inhibited AChE was similar for all tested aldoximes (and corresponded to their K(i)), the rate of the nucleophilic displacement of the phosphoryl-moiety from the active site serine was the limiting factor for AChE reactivation. On the other hand, none of the aldoximes displayed a significant reactivation of tabun-inhibited BChE. Even after 20 h, the reactivation maximum was 60% for 1 mM K074 and K075, and only 20% for 1 mM K114. However, lower BChE affinities for K074 and K075 compared to AChE suggest that the fast tabun-inhibited AChE reactivation by these compounds would not be obstructed by their interactions with BChE in vivo.

  20. Design of peptide substrates for nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence assays of proteases: 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene as a noninvasive fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Andreas; Florea, Mara; Roth, Doris; Enderle, Thilo; Nau, Werner M

    2007-01-15

    Fluorescence protease assays were investigated with peptide substrates containing a 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene-labeled asparagine (Dbo) as a fluorescent amino acid. The special characteristic of the fluorophore Dbo is its exceedingly long fluorescence lifetime (ca. 300 ns in water under air), which allows the use of nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence (Nano-TRF) detection to efficiently suppress shorter-lived background emission. In addition, the natural amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine can be employed as intramolecular fluorescence quenchers, which facilitates substrate design. Fourteen synthetic peptide substrates (composed of 2-19 amino acids) and five enzymes (trypsin, pepsin, carboxypeptidase A, leucine aminopeptidase, and chymotrypsin) were investigated and, in all 28 examined combinations, enzymatic activity was detected by monitoring the increase in steady state fluorescence with time and determining the reaction rates as kcat/Km values, which ranged from 0.2 to 80x10(6) M-1 min-1. The results suggest an excellent compatibility of the very small and hydrophilic fluorescent probe Dbo with solid-phase peptide synthesis and the investigated proteases. For all 14 peptides the fluorescence lifetimes before and after enzymatic cleavage were measured and Nano-TRF measurements were performed in 384-well microplates. The fluorescence lifetimes of the different peptides provide the basis for the rational design of Dbo-based fluorescent substrates for protease assays. Measurements in Nano-TRF mode revealed, in addition to efficient suppression of background fluorescence, an increased differentiation between cleaved and uncleaved substrate. The Dbo-based assays can be adapted for high-throughput screening.