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Sample records for harmonic oscillator model

  1. An algebraic cluster model based on the harmonic oscillator basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levai, Geza; Cseh, J.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the semimicroscopic algebraic cluster model introduced recently, in which the internal structure of the nuclear clusters is described by the harmonic oscillator shell model, while their relative motion is accounted for by the Vibron model. The algebraic formulation of the model makes extensive use of techniques associated with harmonic oscillators and their symmetry group, SU(3). The model is applied to some cluster systems and is found to reproduce important characteristics of nuclei in the sd-shell region. An approximate SU(3) dynamical symmetry is also found to hold for the C-12 + C-12 system.

  2. A Simple Mechanical Model for the Isotropic Harmonic Oscillator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nita, Gelu M.

    2010-01-01

    A constrained elastic pendulum is proposed as a simple mechanical model for the isotropic harmonic oscillator. The conceptual and mathematical simplicity of this model recommends it as an effective pedagogical tool in teaching basic physics concepts at advanced high school and introductory undergraduate course levels. (Contains 2 figures.)

  3. Using Coupled Harmonic Oscillators to Model Some Greenhouse Gas Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Go, Clark Kendrick C.; Maquiling, Joel T.

    2010-07-28

    Common greenhouse gas molecules SF{sub 6}, NO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} are modeled as harmonic oscillators whose potential and kinetic energies are derived. Using the Euler-Lagrange equation, their equations of motion are derived and their phase portraits are plotted. The authors use these data to attempt to explain the lifespan of these gases in the atmosphere.

  4. Covariant harmonic oscillators and coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Daesoo; Kim, Young S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators shares the basic symmetry properties with the covariant harmonic oscillator formalism which provides a concise description of the basic features of relativistic hadronic features observed in high-energy laboratories. It is shown also that the coupled oscillator system has the SL(4,r) symmetry in classical mechanics, while the present formulation of quantum mechanics can accommodate only the Sp(4,r) portion of the SL(4,r) symmetry. The possible role of the SL(4,r) symmetry in quantum mechanics is discussed.

  5. Workshop on Harmonic Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D. (Editor); Kim, Y. S. (Editor); Zachary, W. W. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Proceedings of a workshop on Harmonic Oscillators held at the College Park Campus of the University of Maryland on March 25 - 28, 1992 are presented. The harmonic oscillator formalism is playing an important role in many branches of physics. This is the simplest mathematical device which can connect the basic principle of physics with what is observed in the real world. The harmonic oscillator is the bridge between pure and applied physics.

  6. The Two-Capacitor Problem Revisited: A Mechanical Harmonic Oscillator Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Keeyung

    2009-01-01

    The well-known two-capacitor problem, in which exactly half the stored energy disappears when a charged capacitor is connected to an identical capacitor, is discussed based on the mechanical harmonic oscillator model approach. In the mechanical harmonic oscillator model, it is shown first that "exactly half" the work done by a constant applied…

  7. Continuous vs. discrete models for the quantum harmonic oscillator and the hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, Miguel

    2001-07-01

    The Kravchuk and Meixner polynomials of discrete variable are introduced for the discrete models of the harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom. Starting from Rodrigues formula we construct raising and lowering operators, commutation and anticommutation relations. The physical properties of discrete models are figured out through the equivalence with the continuous models obtained by limit process.

  8. Modeling Stretching Modes of Common Organic Molecules with the Quantum Mechanical Harmonic Oscillator: An Undergraduate Vibrational Spectroscopy Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parnis, J. Mark; Thompson, Matthew G. K.

    2004-01-01

    An introductory undergraduate physical organic chemistry exercise that introduces the harmonic oscillator's use in vibrational spectroscopy is developed. The analysis and modeling exercise begins with the students calculating the stretching modes of common organic molecules with the help of the quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator (QMHO) model.

  9. The Quantum Arnold Transformation for the damped harmonic oscillator: from the Caldirola-Kanai model toward the Bateman model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Ruiz, F. F.; Guerrero, J.; Aldaya, V.; Cossío, F.

    2012-08-01

    Using a quantum version of the Arnold transformation of classical mechanics, all quantum dynamical systems whose classical equations of motion are non-homogeneous linear second-order ordinary differential equations (LSODE), including systems with friction linear in velocity such as the damped harmonic oscillator, can be related to the quantum free-particle dynamical system. This implies that symmetries and simple computations in the free particle can be exported to the LSODE-system. The quantum Arnold transformation is given explicitly for the damped harmonic oscillator, and an algebraic connection between the Caldirola-Kanai model for the damped harmonic oscillator and the Bateman system will be sketched out.

  10. Relativistic harmonic oscillator revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Bars, Itzhak

    2009-02-15

    The familiar Fock space commonly used to describe the relativistic harmonic oscillator, for example, as part of string theory, is insufficient to describe all the states of the relativistic oscillator. We find that there are three different vacua leading to three disconnected Fock sectors, all constructed with the same creation-annihilation operators. These have different spacetime geometric properties as well as different algebraic symmetry properties or different quantum numbers. Two of these Fock spaces include negative norm ghosts (as in string theory), while the third one is completely free of ghosts. We discuss a gauge symmetry in a worldline theory approach that supplies appropriate constraints to remove all the ghosts from all Fock sectors of the single oscillator. The resulting ghost-free quantum spectrum in d+1 dimensions is then classified in unitary representations of the Lorentz group SO(d,1). Moreover, all states of the single oscillator put together make up a single infinite dimensional unitary representation of a hidden global symmetry SU(d,1), whose Casimir eigenvalues are computed. Possible applications of these new results in string theory and other areas of physics and mathematics are briefly mentioned.

  11. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-17

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2{pi} in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step {delta}t. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/{delta}t is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is ''blue shifted'' relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval {delta}t. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  12. A time-discrete harmonic oscillator model of human car-following

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, P.

    2011-12-01

    A time-discrete stochastic harmonic oscillator is presented as a model of human car-following behaviour. This describes especially the non-continuous control of a human driver - acceleration changes from time to time at so called action-points and is kept constant in between. Analytical results can be derived which allow to classify the different types of motion possible within this approach. These results show that with weaker control by the human, unstable behaviour of the oscillator becomes more likely. This is in line with common understanding about the causes of accidents. Finally, since even the stochastic behaviour of this model is in parts analytically tractable, the width of the speed-difference and distance fluctuations can be expressed as function of the model's parameter. This allows a fresh view on empirical car-following data and the identification of parameters from real data in the context of the theory presented here.

  13. Symmetries of coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Kim, Y. S.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators possesses many interesting symmetries. It is noted that the symmetry of a single oscillator is that of the three-parameter group Sp(2). Thus two uncoupled oscillator exhibits a direct product of two Sp(2) groups, with six parameters. The coupling can be achieved through a rotation in the two-dimensional space of two oscillator coordinates. The closure of the commutation relations for the generators leads to the ten-parameter group Sp(4) which is locally isomorphic to the deSitter group O(3,2).

  14. Attractors and Spectral Characteristics of Neural Structures Based on the Model of the Quantum Harmonic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rigatos, Gerasimos G.

    2007-09-06

    Neural computation based on principles of quantum mechanics can provide improved models of memory processes and brain functioning and is of importance for the realization of quantum computing machines. To this end, this paper studies neural structures with weights that follow the model of the quantum harmonic oscillator. These weights correspond to diffusing particles, which interact to each other as the theory of Brownian motion predicts. The learning of the stochastic weights (convergence of the diffusing particles to an equilibrium) is analyzed. In the case of associative memories the proposed neural model results in an exponential increase of the number of attractors. Spectral analysis shows that the stochastic weights satisfy an equation which is analogous to the principle of uncertainty.

  15. Quantum wormholes and harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garay, Luis J.

    1993-01-01

    The quantum state of a wormhole can be represented by a path integral over all asymptotically Euclidean four-geometries and all matter fields which have prescribed values, the arguments of the wave function, on a three-surface which divides the space time manifold into two disconnected parts. Minisuperspace models which consist of a homogeneous massless scalar field coupled to a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker space time are considered. Once the path integral over the lapse function is performed, the requirement that the space time be asymptotically Euclidean can be accomplished by fixing the asymptotic gravitational momentum in the remaining path integral. It is argued that there does not exist any wave function which corresponds to asymptotic field configurations such that the effective gravitational constant is negative in the asymptotic region. Then, the wormhole wave functions can be written as linear combinations of harmonic oscillator wave functions.

  16. Covariant harmonic oscillators: 1973 revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noz, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Using the relativistic harmonic oscillator, a physical basis is given to the phenomenological wave function of Yukawa which is covariant and normalizable. It is shown that this wave function can be interpreted in terms of the unitary irreducible representations of the Poincare group. The transformation properties of these covariant wave functions are also demonstrated.

  17. Application of Elliott's SU(3) model to the triaxially deformed harmonic oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara-Tanabe, Kazuko

    2011-05-06

    We have introduced new bosons corresponding to the integral ratio of three frequencies for a harmonic oscillator potential, by means of a non-linear transformation which realizes the SU(3) group as a dynamical symmetry group, and which leaves the anisotropic harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian invariant. The classification of the single-particle levels based on this covering group predicts magic numbers depending on the deformation parameters {delta} and {gamma}. The special cases with tan {gamma} = 1/{radical}(3)({gamma} = 30 deg.) and {radical}(3)/5({gamma}{approx}19 deg.) are discussed.

  18. Application of Elliott's SU(3) model to the triaxially deformed harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara-Tanabe, Kazuko

    2011-05-01

    We have introduced new bosons corresponding to the integral ratio of three frequencies for a harmonic oscillator potential, by means of a non-linear transformation which realizes the SU(3) group as a dynamical symmetry group, and which leaves the anisotropic harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian invariant. The classification of the single-particle levels based on this covering group predicts magic numbers depending on the deformation parameters δ and γ. The special cases with tan γ = 1/√3 (γ = 30°) and √3 /5(γ˜19°) are discussed.

  19. The harmonic oscillator and nuclear physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    The three-dimensional harmonic oscillator plays a central role in nuclear physics. It provides the underlying structure of the independent-particle shell model and gives rise to the dynamical group structures on which models of nuclear collective motion are based. It is shown that the three-dimensional harmonic oscillator features a rich variety of coherent states, including vibrations of the monopole, dipole, and quadrupole types, and rotations of the rigid flow, vortex flow, and irrotational flow types. Nuclear collective states exhibit all of these flows. It is also shown that the coherent state representations, which have their origins in applications to the dynamical groups of the simple harmonic oscillator, can be extended to vector coherent state representations with a much wider range of applicability. As a result, coherent state theory and vector coherent state theory become powerful tools in the application of algebraic methods in physics.

  20. Second International Workshop on Harmonic Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Daesoo (Editor); Wolf, Kurt Bernardo (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The Second International Workshop on Harmonic Oscillators was held at the Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc from March 23 to 25, 1994. The Workshop gathered 67 participants; there were 10 invited lecturers, 30 plenary oral presentations, 15 posters, and plenty of discussion divided into the five sessions of this volume. The Organizing Committee was asked by the chairman of several Mexican funding agencies what exactly was meant by harmonic oscillators, and for what purpose the new research could be useful. Harmonic oscillators - as we explained - is a code name for a family of mathematical models based on the theory of Lie algebras and groups, with applications in a growing range of physical theories and technologies: molecular, atomic, nuclear and particle physics; quantum optics and communication theory.

  1. Retrieval of aerosol refractive index from extinction spectra with a damped harmonic-oscillator band model.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gareth E; Bass, Stephen F; Grainger, Roy G; Lambert, Alyn

    2005-03-01

    A new method for the retrieval of the spectral refractive indices of micrometer-sized particles from infrared aerosol extinction spectra has been developed. With this method we use a classical damped harmonic-oscillator model of molecular absorption in conjunction with Mie scattering to model extinction spectra, which we then fit to the measurements using a numerical optimal estimation algorithm. The main advantage of this method over the more traditional Kramers-Kronig approach is that it allows the full complex refractive-index spectra, along with the parameters of the particle size distribution, to be retrieved from a single extinction spectrum. The retrieval scheme has been extensively characterized and has been found to provide refractive indices with a maximum uncertainty of approximately 10% (with a minimum of approximately 0.1%). Comparison of refractive indices calculated from measurements of a ternary solution of HNO3, H2SO4, and H2O with those published in J. Phys. Chem. A 104, 783 (2000) show similar differences as found by other authors.

  2. The Harmonic Content of High-Frequency QPOs from the Relativistic Orbiting-Spot vs. Oscillating-Torus Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas, Vladimir; Bakala, Pavel; Torok, Gabriel; Wildner, Martin; Goluchova, Katerina

    2014-08-01

    Different theoretical schemes have been proposed to explain the origin of high-frequency (kilohertz) quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) from accreting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries and stellar-mass accreting black-holes. In the case of twin-peak sources, Fourier power-spectral density exhibits two dominant oscillation modes, often in the approximate ratio of small integers (3:2). Despite the rich phenomenology, base frequencies alone do not allow us to distinguish in a unique way among the most popular models. We discuss the harmonic content predicted by two competing scenarios, namely, the orbiting spot model and the oscillating torus model. By employing a ray-tracing code, we study the relativistic regime where the emerging radiation signal is influenced by effects of strong gravity (energy shifts and light bending). We consider spots moving on slightly non-circular trajectories in an accretion disk, and tori oscillating with fundamental modes. The harmonic content of the observed signal can allow us to reveal the ellipticity of the orbits and discriminate between the scheme of orbiting spots and the case of an oscillating torus. On a practical side, we estimate the required signal-to-noise ratio of the model light curve and we discuss what improvement would be needed in comparison with RXTE, depending on the source brightness.

  3. Modeling a Nanocantilever-Based Biosensor Using a Stochastically Perturbed Harmonic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Patrick; Joshi, Amitabh; Serna, Juan D.

    2014-05-01

    Nanoscale biosensors are devices designed to detect analytes by combining biological components and physicochemical detectors. A well-known design of these sensors involves the implementation of nanocantilevers. These microscopic diving boards are coated with binding probes that have an affinity for a particular amino acid, enzyme or protein in living organisms. When these probes attract target particles, such as biomolecules, the binding of these particles changes the vibrating frequency of the cantilever. This process is random in nature and produces fluctuations in the frequency and damping of the cantilever. In this paper, we studied the effect of these fluctuations using a stochastically perturbed, classical harmonic oscillator.

  4. Harmonic oscillator states in aberration optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    1993-01-01

    The states of the three-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator classify optical aberrations of axis-symmetric systems due to the isomorphism between the two mathematical structures. Cartesian quanta and angular momentum classifications have their corresponding aberration classifications. The operation of concatenation of optical elements introduces a new operation between harmonic oscillator states.

  5. A model of the two-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator in an AdS_3 background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we study a model of the two-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator in a three-dimensional anti-de Sitter background. We use a generalized Schrödinger picture in which the analogs of the Schrödinger operators of the particle are independent of both the time and the space coordinates in different representations. The spacetime independent operators of the particle induce the Lie algebra of Killing vector fields of the AdS_3 spacetime. In this picture, we have a metamorphosis of the Heisenberg uncertainty relations.

  6. Harmonic Oscillators as Bridges between Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    2005-03-31

    Other than scattering problems where perturbation theory is applicable, there are basically two ways to solve problems in physics. One is to reduce the problem to harmonic oscillators, and the other is to formulate the problem in terms of two-by-two matrices. If two oscillators are coupled, the problem combines both two-by-two matrices and harmonic oscillators. This method then becomes a powerful research tool to cover many different branches of physics. Indeed, the concept and methodology in one branch of physics can be translated into another through the common mathematical formalism. It is noted that the present form of quantum mechanics is largely a physics of harmonic oscillators. Special relativity is the physics of the Lorentz group which can be represented by the group of by two-by-two matrices commonly called SL(2, c). Thus the coupled harmonic oscillators can therefore play the role of combining quantum mechanics with special relativity. Both Paul A. M. Dirac and Richard P. Feynman were fond of harmonic oscillators, while they used different approaches to physical problems. Both were also keenly interested in making quantum mechanics compatible with special relativity. It is shown that the coupled harmonic oscillators can bridge these two different approaches to physics.

  7. Harmonic oscillator potential with a quartic anharmonicity in the prolate γ-rigid collective geometrical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaca, Radu

    2015-12-01

    An analytical expression for the energy spectrum of the ground and β bands was obtained in the axially symmetric γ-rigid regime of the Bohr-Mottelson Hamiltonian with a general quartic anharmonic oscillator potential in the β shape variable. As the Schrodinger equation for such a potential is not exactly solvable, the energy formula is derived on the basis of the JWKB approximation. Due to the scaling property of the quartic oscillator problem, the resulting energy depends on a single parameter up to an overall multiplicative constant. The upper limit of the domain of values for the free parameter is established by comparing the ground state eigenvalues with the corresponding numerically calculated results. Studying the behavior of the potential and of the whole energy spectrum as function of the free parameter, one establishes the present model's place between other γ-rigid models. The agreement with experiment is achieved through model fits for few near-vibrational nuclei.

  8. On the moment of inertia of a quantum harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Khamzin, A. A. Sitdikov, A. S.; Nikitin, A. S.; Roganov, D. A.

    2013-04-15

    An original method for calculating the moment of inertia of the collective rotation of a nucleus on the basis of the cranking model with the harmonic-oscillator Hamiltonian at arbitrary frequencies of rotation and finite temperature is proposed. In the adiabatic limit, an oscillating chemical-potential dependence of the moment of inertia is obtained by means of analytic calculations. The oscillations of the moment of inertia become more pronounced as deformations approach the spherical limit and decrease exponentially with increasing temperature.

  9. Quantum harmonic oscillator with superoscillating initial datum

    SciTech Connect

    Buniy, R. V.; Struppa, D. C.; Colombo, F.; Sabadini, I.

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we study the evolution of superoscillating initial data for the quantum driven harmonic oscillator. Our main result shows that superoscillations are amplified by the harmonic potential and that the analytic solution develops a singularity in finite time. We also show that for a large class of solutions of the Schrödinger equation, superoscillating behavior at any given time implies superoscillating behavior at any other time.

  10. Group Theory of Covariant Harmonic Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Y. S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1978-01-01

    A simple and concrete example for illustrating the properties of noncompact groups is presented. The example is based on the covariant harmonic-oscillator formalism in which the relativistic wave functions carry a covariant-probability interpretation. This can be used in a group theory course for graduate students who have some background in…

  11. Quantum harmonic oscillator in a thermal bath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yuhong

    1993-01-01

    The influence functional path-integral treatment of quantum Brownian motion is briefly reviewed. A newly derived exact master equation of a quantum harmonic oscillator coupled to a general environment at arbitrary temperature is discussed. It is applied to the problem of loss of quantum coherence.

  12. Quantum nondemolition measurements of harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, K. S.; Caves, C. M.; Zimmermann, M.; Sandberg, V. D.; Drever, R. W. P.

    1978-01-01

    Measuring systems to determine the real component of the complex amplitude of a harmonic oscillator are described. This amplitude is constant in the absence of driving forces, and the uncertainty principle accounts for the fact that only the real component can be measured precisely and continuously ('quantum nondemolition measurement'). Application of the measuring systems to the detection of gravitational waves is considered.

  13. Predicting charmonium and bottomonium spectra with a quark harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Badavi, F. F.; Townsend, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The nonrelativistic quark model is applied to heavy (nonrelativistic) meson (two-body) systems to obtain sufficiently accurate predictions of the spin-averaged mass levels of the charmonium and bottomonium spectra as an example of the three-dimensional harmonic oscillator. The present calculations do not include any spin dependence, but rather, mass values are averaged for different spins. Results for a charmed quark mass value of 1500 MeV/c-squared show that the simple harmonic oscillator model provides good agreement with experimental values for 3P states, and adequate agreement for the 3S1 states.

  14. Harmonic oscillator in presence of nonequilibrium environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Chattopadhyay, Sudip

    2009-06-21

    Based on a microscopic Hamiltonian picture where the system is coupled with the nonequilibrium environment, comprising of a set of harmonic oscillators, the Langevin equation with proper microscopic specification of Langevin force is formulated analytically. In our case, the reservoir is perturbed by an external force, either executing rapid or showing periodic fluctuations, hence the reservoir is not in thermal equilibrium. In the presence of external fluctuating force, using Shapiro-Loginov procedure, we arrive at the linear coupled first order differential equations for the two-time correlations and examine the time evolution of the same considering the system as a simple harmonic oscillator. We study the stochastic resonance phenomena of a Kubo-type oscillator (assumed to be the system) when the bath is modulated by a periodic force. The result(s) obtained here is of general significance and can be used to analyze the signature of stochastic resonance.

  15. Discussion on climate oscillations: CMIP5 general circulation models versus a semi-empirical harmonic model based on astronomical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2013-11-01

    Power spectra of global surface temperature (GST) records (available since 1850) reveal major periodicities at about 9.1, 10-11, 19-22 and 59-62 years. Equivalent oscillations are found in numerous multisecular paleoclimatic records. The Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) general circulation models (GCMs), to be used in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5, 2013), are analyzed and found not able to reconstruct this variability. In particular, from 2000 to 2013.5 a GST plateau is observed while the GCMs predicted a warming rate of about 2 °C/century. In contrast, the hypothesis that the climate is regulated by specific natural oscillations more accurately fits the GST records at multiple time scales. For example, a quasi 60-year natural oscillation simultaneously explains the 1850-1880, 1910-1940 and 1970-2000 warming periods, the 1880-1910 and 1940-1970 cooling periods and the post 2000 GST plateau. This hypothesis implies that about 50% of the ~ 0.5 °C global surface warming observed from 1970 to 2000 was due to natural oscillations of the climate system, not to anthropogenic forcing as modeled by the CMIP3 and CMIP5 GCMs. Consequently, the climate sensitivity to CO2 doubling should be reduced by half, for example from the 2.0-4.5 °C range (as claimed by the IPCC, 2007) to 1.0-2.3 °C with a likely median of ~ 1.5 °C instead of ~ 3.0 °C. Also modern paleoclimatic temperature reconstructions showing a larger preindustrial variability than the hockey-stick shaped temperature reconstructions developed in early 2000 imply a weaker anthropogenic effect and a stronger solar contribution to climatic changes. The observed natural oscillations could be driven by astronomical forcings. The ~ 9.1 year oscillation appears to be a combination of long soli-lunar tidal oscillations, while quasi 10-11, 20 and 60 year oscillations are typically found among major solar and heliospheric oscillations driven mostly by Jupiter and Saturn movements. Solar models based

  16. Time-Symmetric Discretization of The Harmonic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2010-11-24

    We explicitly and analytically demonstrate that simple time-symmetric discretization of the harmonic oscillator (used as a simple model of a discrete dynamical system), leads to discrete equations of motion whose solutions are perfectly stable at all time scales, and whose energy is exactly conserved. This result is important for both fundamental discrete physics, as well as for numerical analysis and simulation.

  17. Predicting charmonium and bottomonium spectra with a quark harmonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Norbury, J W; Badavi, F F; Townsend, L W

    1986-11-01

    We present a simple application of the three-dimensional harmonic oscillator which should provide a very nice particle physics example to be presented in introductory undergraduate quantum mechanics course. The idea is to use the nonrelativistic quark model to calculate the spin-averaged mass levels of the charmonium and bottomonium spectra. PMID:11538828

  18. Free Fall and Harmonic Oscillations: Analyzing Trampoline Jumps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Eager, David

    2015-01-01

    Trampolines can be found in many gardens and also in some playgrounds. They offer an easily accessible vertical motion that includes free fall. In this work, the motion on a trampoline is modelled by assuming a linear relation between force and deflection, giving harmonic oscillations for small amplitudes. An expression for the cycle-time is…

  19. Improving Density Functionals with Quantum Harmonic Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2013-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is the most widely used and successful approach for electronic structure calculations. However, one of the pressing challenges for DFT is developing efficient functionals that can accurately capture the omnipresent long-range electron correlations, which determine the structure and stability of many molecules and materials. Here we show that, under certain conditions, the problem of computing the long-range correlation energy of interacting electrons can be mapped to a system of coupled quantum harmonic oscillators (QHOs). The proposed model allows us to synergistically combine concepts from DFT, quantum chemistry, and the widely discussed random-phase approximation for the correlation energy. In the dipole limit, the interaction energy for a system of coupled QHOs can be calculated exactly, thereby leading to an efficient and accurate model for the many-body dispersion energy of complex molecules and materials. The studied examples include intermolecular binding energies, the conformational hierarchy of DNA structures, the geometry and stability of molecular crystals, and supramolecular host-guest complexes (A. Tkatchenko, R. A. DiStasio Jr., R. Car, M. Scheffler, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 236402 (2012); R. A. DiStasio Jr., A. von Lilienfeld, A. Tkatchenko, PNAS 109, 14791 (2012); A. Tkatchenko, D. Alfe, K. S. Kim, J. Chem. Theory and Comp. (2012), doi: 10.1021/ct300711r; A. Tkatchenko, A. Ambrosetti, R. A. DiStasio Jr., arXiv:1210.8343v1).

  20. Complex metabolic oscillations in plants forced by harmonic irradiance.

    PubMed Central

    Nedbal, Ladislav; Brezina, Vítezslav

    2002-01-01

    Plants exposed to harmonically modulated irradiance, approximately 1 + cos(omegat), exhibit a complex periodic pattern of chlorophyll fluorescence emission that can be deconvoluted into a steady-state component, a component that is modulated with the frequency of the irradiance (omega), and into at least two upper harmonic components (2omega and 3omega). A model is proposed that accounts for the upper harmonics in fluorescence emission by nonlinear negative feedback regulation of photosynthesis. In contrast to simpler linear models, the model predicts that the steady-state fluorescence component will depend on the frequency of light modulation, and that amplitudes of all fluorescence components will exhibit resonance peak(s) when the irradiance frequency is tuned to an internal frequency of a regulatory component. The experiments confirmed that the upper harmonic components appear and exhibit distinct resonant peaks. The frequency of autonomous oscillations observed earlier upon an abrupt increase in CO(2) concentration corresponds to the sharpest of the resonant peaks of the forced oscillations. We propose that the underlying principles are general for a wide spectrum of negative-feedback regulatory mechanisms. The analysis by forced harmonic oscillations will enable us to examine internal dynamics of regulatory processes that have not been accessible to noninvasive fluorescence monitoring to date. PMID:12324435

  1. Brownian motion with adhesion: harmonic oscillator with fluctuating mass.

    PubMed

    Gitterman, M; Klyatskin, V I

    2010-05-01

    In contrast to the cases usually studied of a harmonic oscillator subject to a random force (Brownian motion) or having random frequency or random damping, we consider a random mass which corresponds to an oscillator for which the particles of the surrounding medium adhere to it for some (random) time after the collision, thereby changing the oscillator mass. This model, which describes Brownian motion with adhesion, can be useful for the analysis of chemical and biological solutions as well as nanotechnological devices. We consider dichotomous noise and its limiting case, white noise.

  2. Harmonic oscillator interaction with squeezed radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodonov, V. V.; Nikonov, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    Although the problem of electromagnetic radiation by a quantum harmonic oscillator is considered in textbooks on quantum mechanics, some of its aspects have remained unclear until now. By this, we mean that usually the initial quantum states of both the oscillator and the field are assumed to be characterized by a definite energy level of the oscillator and definite occupation numbers of the field modes. In connection with growing interest in squeezed states, it would be interesting to analyze the general case when the initial states of both subsystems are arbitrary superpositions of energy eigenstates. This problem was considered in other work, where the power of the spontaneous emission was calculated in the case of an arbitrary oscillator's initial state, but the field was initially in a vacuum state. In the present article, we calculate the rate of the oscillator average energy, squeezing, and correlation parameter change under the influence of an arbitrary external radiation field. Some other problems relating to the interaction between quantum particles (atoms) or oscillators where the electromagnetic radiation is an arbitrary (in particular squeezed) state were investigated.

  3. Equity prices as a simple harmonic oscillator with noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataullah, Ali; Tippett, Mark

    2007-08-01

    The centred return on the London Stock Exchange's FTSE All Share Index is modelled as a simple harmonic oscillator with noise over the period from 1 January, 1994 until 30 June 2006. Our empirical results are compatible with the hypothesis that there is a period in the FTSE All Share Index of between two and two and one half years. This means the centred return will on average continue to increase for about a year after reaching the minimum in its oscillatory cycle; alternatively, it will continue on average to decline for about a year after reaching a maximum. Our analysis also shows that there is potential to exploit the harmonic nature of the returns process to earn abnormal profits. Extending our analysis to the low energy states of a quantum harmonic oscillator is also suggested.

  4. Random reverse-cyclic matrices and screened harmonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shashi C L; Jain, Sudhir R

    2012-04-01

    We have calculated the joint probability distribution function for random reverse-cyclic matrices and shown that it is related to an N-body exactly solvable model. We refer to this well-known model potential as a screened harmonic oscillator. The connection enables us to obtain all the correlations among the particle positions moving in a screened harmonic potential. The density of nontrivial eigenvalues of this ensemble is found to be of the Wigner form and admits a hole at the origin, in contrast to the semicircle law of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices. The spacing distributions assume different forms ranging from Gaussian-like to Wigner. PMID:22680453

  5. Using Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations to model the quantum harmonic oscillator modes observed in uranium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J. Y. Y.; Aczel, Adam A; Abernathy, Douglas L; Nagler, Stephen E; Buyers, W. J. L.; Granroth, Garrett E

    2014-01-01

    Recently an extended series of equally spaced vibrational modes was observed in uranium nitride (UN) by performing neutron spectroscopy measurements using the ARCS and SEQUOIA time-of- flight chopper spectrometers [A.A. Aczel et al, Nature Communications 3, 1124 (2012)]. These modes are well described by 3D isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator (QHO) behavior of the nitrogen atoms, but there are additional contributions to the scattering that complicate the measured response. In an effort to better characterize the observed neutron scattering spectrum of UN, we have performed Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations of the ARCS and SEQUOIA experiments with various sample kernels, accounting for the nitrogen QHO scattering, contributions that arise from the acoustic portion of the partial phonon density of states (PDOS), and multiple scattering. These simulations demonstrate that the U and N motions can be treated independently, and show that multiple scattering contributes an approximate Q-independent background to the spectrum at the oscillator mode positions. Temperature dependent studies of the lowest few oscillator modes have also been made with SEQUOIA, and our simulations indicate that the T-dependence of the scattering from these modes is strongly influenced by the uranium lattice.

  6. The Coupled Harmonic Oscillator: Not Just for Seniors Anymore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preyer, Norris W.

    1996-01-01

    Presents experiments that use Microcomputer Based Laboratory (MBL) techniques to enable freshmen physics students to investigate complex systems, such as nonlinear oscillators or coupled harmonic oscillators, at a level appropriate for an independent project. (JRH)

  7. BAYESIAN ANALYSIS OF MULTIPLE HARMONIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Arregui, I.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Diaz, A. J.

    2013-03-01

    The detection of multiple mode harmonic kink oscillations in coronal loops enables us to obtain information on coronal density stratification and magnetic field expansion using seismology inversion techniques. The inference is based on the measurement of the period ratio between the fundamental mode and the first overtone and theoretical results for the period ratio under the hypotheses of coronal density stratification and magnetic field expansion of the wave guide. We present a Bayesian analysis of multiple mode harmonic oscillations for the inversion of the density scale height and magnetic flux tube expansion under each of the hypotheses. The two models are then compared using a Bayesian model comparison scheme to assess how plausible each one is given our current state of knowledge.

  8. Harmonic oscillations and rotations in quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafilov, Simeon T.

    Similarly to the classical connection between simple harmonic motion and rotation about an axis there exists the possibility of a unified quantum treatment of angle and harmonic phase in the case of the electromagnetic field mode. This can be accomplished within the framework of a single mathematical construction based on the tensor product of the Hilbert spaces of two harmonic oscillators. The construction can be used to obtain PV extensions of the harmonic oscillator phase POV measure and define relative phase measurements. We have examined the limits placed by quantum mechanics on the variance of an ideal phase measurement, along with the improvement that can be achieved with the use of a collapsible relative phase measurement. While the optimizing input states were determined and some of their properties studied, no suggestions have been made about experimental generation of such states. The similarity of the quantum angle measurement to that of the relative phase measurement was exploited to find optimum input states that give the least variance in the angle variable of axial rotation. For sufficiently small values of J the optimizing states were shown to be close to the states of maximum angular momentum projection along the direction that is perpendicular to the rotation axis and lies in the plane of the most probable angle value. These two types of states become essentially different for higher values of J. The description of the simultaneous measurement of two spin 1/2 components of angular momentum was also accomplished. Different methods for the derivation of appropriate overcomplete sets of vectors were presented for the case of components at right angle and the more general case of components at an arbitrary angle. The results were applied to exploring how the violation of a Bell's inequality depends on the ideal nature of the quantum measurements involved, showing how the violation of the inequality

  9. Effective field theory in the harmonic oscillator basis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Binder, S.; Ekström, Jan A.; Hagen, Gaute; Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Wendt, Kyle A.

    2016-04-25

    In this paper, we develop interactions from chiral effective field theory (EFT) that are tailored to the harmonic oscillator basis. As a consequence, ultraviolet convergence with respect to the model space is implemented by construction and infrared convergence can be achieved by enlarging the model space for the kinetic energy. In oscillator EFT, matrix elements of EFTs formulated for continuous momenta are evaluated at the discrete momenta that stem from the diagonalization of the kinetic energy in the finite oscillator space. By fitting to realistic phase shifts and deuteron data we construct an effective interaction from chiral EFT at next-to-leadingmore » order. Finally, many-body coupled-cluster calculations of nuclei up to 132Sn converge fast for the ground-state energies and radii in feasible model spaces.« less

  10. Free fall and harmonic oscillations: analyzing trampoline jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Eager, David

    2015-01-01

    Trampolines can be found in many gardens and also in some playgrounds. They offer an easily accessible vertical motion that includes free fall. In this work, the motion on a trampoline is modelled by assuming a linear relation between force and deflection, giving harmonic oscillations for small amplitudes. An expression for the cycle-time is obtained in terms of maximum normalized force from the trampoline and the harmonic frequency. A simple expression is obtained for the ratio between air-time and harmonic period, and the maximum g-factor. The results are compared to experimental results, including accelerometer data showing 7g during bounces on a small trampoline in an amusement park play area. Similar results are obtained on a larger garden trampoline, and even larger accelerations have been measured for gymnastic trampolines.

  11. Coherent states for the relativistic harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldaya, Victor; Guerrero, J.

    1995-01-01

    Recently we have obtained, on the basis of a group approach to quantization, a Bargmann-Fock-like realization of the Relativistic Harmonic Oscillator as well as a generalized Bargmann transform relating fock wave functions and a set of relativistic Hermite polynomials. Nevertheless, the relativistic creation and annihilation operators satisfy typical relativistic commutation relations of the Lie product (vector-z, vector-z(sup dagger)) approximately equals Energy (an SL(2,R) algebra). Here we find higher-order polarization operators on the SL(2,R) group, providing canonical creation and annihilation operators satisfying the Lie product (vector-a, vector-a(sup dagger)) = identity vector 1, the eigenstates of which are 'true' coherent states.

  12. A Look at Damped Harmonic Oscillators through the Phase Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshbod, Yousef; Latulippe, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Damped harmonic oscillations appear naturally in many applications involving mechanical and electrical systems as well as in biological systems. Most students are introduced to harmonic motion in an elementary ordinary differential equation (ODE) course. Solutions to ODEs that describe simple harmonic motion are usually found by investigating the…

  13. Equivalence of curvature and noncommutativity in a physical space: Harmonic oscillator on sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorashi, S. A. A.; Mahdifar, A.; Roknizadeh, R.

    2014-06-01

    We study the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator on a noncommutative plane. We show that by introducing appropriate Bopp shifts, one can obtain the Hamiltonian of a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator on a sphere according to the Higgs model. By calculating the commutation relations, we show that this noncommutativity is strictly dependent on the curvature of the background space. In other words, we introduce a kind of duality between noncommutativity and curvature by introducing noncommutativity parameters as functions of curvature. Also, it is shown that the physical realization of such model is a charged harmonic oscillator in the presence of electromagnetic field.

  14. Harmonic and Anharmonic Behaviour of a Simple Oscillator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shea, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    We consider a simple oscillator that exhibits harmonic and anharmonic regimes and analyse its behaviour over the complete range of possible amplitudes. The oscillator consists of a mass "m" fixed at the midpoint of a horizontal rope. For zero initial rope tension and small amplitude the period of oscillation, tau, varies as tau is approximately…

  15. Optimal control of a harmonic oscillator: Economic interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janová, Jitka; Hampel, David

    2013-10-01

    Optimal control is a popular technique for modelling and solving the dynamic decision problems in economics. A standard interpretation of the criteria function and Lagrange multipliers in the profit maximization problem is well known. On a particular example, we aim to a deeper understanding of the possible economic interpretations of further mathematical and solution features of the optimal control problem: we focus on the solution of the optimal control problem for harmonic oscillator serving as a model for Phillips business cycle. We discuss the economic interpretations of arising mathematical objects with respect to well known reasoning for these in other problems.

  16. Non-Markovian quantum Brownian motion of a harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.

    1994-02-01

    We apply the density-matrix method to the study of quantum Brownian motion of a harmonic oscillator coupled to a heat bath, a system investigated previously by Caldeira and Leggett using a different method. Unlike the earlier work, in our derivation of the master equation the non-Markovian terms are maintained. Although the same model of interaction is used, discrepancy is found between their results and our equation in the Markovian limit. We also point out that the particular interaction model used by both works cannot lead to the phenomenological generalized Langevin theory of Kubo.

  17. Harmonic and anharmonic quantum-mechanical oscillators in noninteger dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandev, Trifce; Petreska, Irina; Lenzi, Ervin K.

    2014-01-01

    We present new results for time-independent solutions for a Schrödinger equation with noninteger dimension by considering different, harmonic and anharmonic, forms for the potential energy. The solutions obtained for these potentials are exact and expressed in terms of the special functions such as Laguerre and Gegenbauer polynomials, associated Legendre functions, and hypergeometric functions. Graphical comparison of the probability density function with the ones for two-dimensional and three-dimensional case is given. We derive the mean values rβsinδθbar for the harmonic oscillator in noninteger dimensions, which may be of interest in the perturbation theory for calculation of energy corrections. We consider anharmonic Kratzer potential energy function and we obtain bound and scattering states. Exact results in case of different forms of θ-dependent potentials are presented. In addition, they can be connected to rich variety of situations which enable us to model anisotropic interactions in real space.

  18. A harmonic oscillator having “volleyball damping”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, R. E.; Oyedeji, K.; Rucker, S. A.

    2006-05-01

    Volleyball damping corresponds to linear damping up to a certain critical velocity, with zero damping above this value. The dynamics of a linear harmonic oscillator is investigated with this damping mechanism.

  19. Probing deformed commutators with macroscopic harmonic oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Bawaj, Mateusz; Biancofiore, Ciro; Bonaldi, Michele; Bonfigli, Federica; Borrielli, Antonio; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Marconi, Lorenzo; Marino, Francesco; Natali, Riccardo; Pontin, Antonio; Prodi, Giovanni A.; Serra, Enrico; Vitali, David; Marin, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A minimal observable length is a common feature of theories that aim to merge quantum physics and gravity. Quantum mechanically, this concept is associated with a nonzero minimal uncertainty in position measurements, which is encoded in deformed commutation relations. In spite of increasing theoretical interest, the subject suffers from the complete lack of dedicated experiments and bounds to the deformation parameters have just been extrapolated from indirect measurements. As recently proposed, low-energy mechanical oscillators could allow to reveal the effect of a modified commutator. Here we analyze the free evolution of high-quality factor micro- and nano-oscillators, spanning a wide range of masses around the Planck mass mP (≈22 μg). The direct check against a model of deformed dynamics substantially lowers the previous limits on the parameters quantifying the commutator deformation. PMID:26088965

  20. The effect of singular potentials on the harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Filgueiras, C.; Silva, E.O.; Oliveira, W.; Moraes, F.

    2010-11-15

    We address the problem of a quantum particle moving under interactions presenting singularities. The self-adjoint extension approach is used to guarantee that the Hamiltonian is self-adjoint and to fix the choice of boundary conditions. We specifically look at the harmonic oscillator added of either a {delta}-function potential or a Coulomb potential (which is singular at the origin). The results are applied to Landau levels in the presence of a topological defect, the Calogero model and to the quantum motion on the noncommutative plane.

  1. Phase of the quantum harmonic oscillator with applications to optical polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    The phase of the quantum harmonic oscillator, the temporal distribution of a particle in a square-well potential, and a quantum theory of angles are derived from a general theory of complementarity. Schwinger's harmonic oscillator model of angular momenta is modified for the case of photons. Angular distributions for systems of identical and distinguishable particles are discussed. Unitary and antiunitary time reversal operators are then presented and applied to optical polarization states in birefringent media.

  2. The Study of Damped Harmonic Oscillations Using an Electronic Counter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadhwa, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    We study damped harmonic oscillations in mechanical systems like the loaded spring and simple pendulum with the help of an oscillation measuring electronic counter. The experimental data are used in a software program that solves the differential equation for damped vibrations of any system and determines its position, velocity and acceleration as…

  3. Sub-structure of laser generated harmonics reveals plasma dynamics of a relativistically oscillating mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Braenzel, J.; Schnürer, M.; Steinke, S.; Priebe, G.; Sandner, W.; Andreev, A.; Platonov, K.

    2013-08-15

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of the dynamics of a relativistically oscillating plasma slab reveal spectral line splitting in laser driven harmonic spectra, leading to double harmonic series. Both series are well characterized with harmonics arising by two fundamental frequencies. While a relativistic oscillation of the critical density drives the harmonic emission, the splitting is a result of an additional acceleration during the laser pulse duration. In comparison with the oscillatory movement, this acceleration is rather weak and can be described by a plasma shock wave driven by the pressure of light. We introduce particle in cell simulations and an analytical model explaining the harmonic line splitting. The derived analytical formula gives direct access between the splitting in the harmonic spectrum and the acceleration of the plasma surface.

  4. First-harmonic approximation in nonlinear chirped-driven oscillators.

    PubMed

    Uzdin, Raam; Friedland, Lazar; Gat, Omri

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear classical oscillators can be excited to high energies by a weak driving field provided the drive frequency is properly chirped. This process is known as autoresonance (AR). We find that for a large class of oscillators, it is sufficient to consider only the first harmonic of the motion when studying AR, even when the dynamics is highly nonlinear. The first harmonic approximation is also used to relate AR in an asymmetric potential to AR in a "frequency equivalent" symmetric potential and to study the autoresonance breakdown phenomenon.

  5. Violation of smooth observable macroscopic realism in a harmonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Leshem, Amir; Gat, Omri

    2009-08-14

    We study the emergence of macrorealism in a harmonic oscillator subject to consecutive measurements of a squeezed action. We demonstrate a breakdown of dynamical realism in a wide parameter range that is maximized in a scaling limit of extreme squeezing, where it is based on measurements of smooth observables, implying that macroscopic realism is not valid in the harmonic oscillator. We propose an indirect experimental test of these predictions with entangled photons by demonstrating that local realism in a composite system implies dynamical realism in a subsystem.

  6. The Acoustic Simple Harmonic Oscillator: Experimental Verification and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, Sam

    2009-04-01

    In his famous volume, The Sensations of Tone, published in 1877, Hermann Helmholtz introduced a resonator that was central to his investigations of acoustics. This talk revisits the device that Helmholtz described and examines it as a manifestation of an acoustic simple harmonic oscillator (SHO). The presentation demonstrates that an enclosed volume which communicates with the outside world via a narrow tube exhibits a single strong frequency response in analogy to a mechanical SHO, along with weaker resonances of the air in the short pipe that comprises the ``neck.'' The investigations, furthermore, report results of a straightforward experiment that confirms the SHO model (with damping) and that is very accessible to undergraduate students using inexpensive equipment and internet-obtainable freeware. The current work also extends the analysis to include applications of the Helmholtz Resonator to several folk instruments, namely, the ocarina, whistling, and the ``bottle band.''

  7. A novel model of interaction between high frequency electromagnetic non-ionizing fields and microtubules viewed as coupled two-degrees of freedom harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, Luigi Maxmilian

    2015-01-01

    The question regarding the potential biological and adverse health effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields on living organisms is of primary importance in biophysics and medicine. Despite the several experimental evidences showing such occurrence in a wide frequency range from extremely low frequency to microwaves, a definitive theoretical model able to explain a possible mechanism of interaction between electromagnetic fields and living matter, especially in the case of weak and very weak intensities, is still missing. In this paper it has been suggested a possible mechanism of interaction involving the resonant absorption of electromagnetic radiation by microtubules. To this aim these have been modeled as non-dissipative forced harmonic oscillators characterized by two coupled "macroscopic" degrees of freedom, respectively describing longitudinal and transversal vibrations induced by the electromagnetic field. We have shown that the proposed model, although at a preliminary stage, is able to explain the ability of even weak electromagnetic radiating electromagnetic fields to transfer high quantities of energy to living systems by means of a resonant mechanism, so capable to easily damage microtubules structure. PMID:25714384

  8. A novel model of interaction between high frequency electromagnetic non-ionizing fields and microtubules viewed as coupled two-degrees of freedom harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, Luigi Maxmilian

    2015-01-01

    The question regarding the potential biological and adverse health effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields on living organisms is of primary importance in biophysics and medicine. Despite the several experimental evidences showing such occurrence in a wide frequency range from extremely low frequency to microwaves, a definitive theoretical model able to explain a possible mechanism of interaction between electromagnetic fields and living matter, especially in the case of weak and very weak intensities, is still missing. In this paper it has been suggested a possible mechanism of interaction involving the resonant absorption of electromagnetic radiation by microtubules. To this aim these have been modeled as non-dissipative forced harmonic oscillators characterized by two coupled "macroscopic" degrees of freedom, respectively describing longitudinal and transversal vibrations induced by the electromagnetic field. We have shown that the proposed model, although at a preliminary stage, is able to explain the ability of even weak electromagnetic radiating electromagnetic fields to transfer high quantities of energy to living systems by means of a resonant mechanism, so capable to easily damage microtubules structure.

  9. q-Deformed and c-Deformed Harmonic Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogami, I. S.; Koizumi, K.; Mir-Kasimov, R. M.

    2003-10-01

    Hamilton functions of classical deformed oscillators (c-deformed oscillators) are derived from Hamiltonians of q-deformed oscillators of the Macfarlane and Dubna types. A new scale parameter, lq, with the dimension of length, is introduced to relate a dimensionless parameter characterizing the deformation with the natural length of the harmonic oscillator. Contraction from q-deformed oscillators to c-deformed oscillators is accomplished by keeping lq finite while taking the limit hbar → 0. The c-deformed Hamilton functions for both types of oscillators are found to be invariant under discrete translations: the step of the translation for the Dubna oscillator is half of that for the Macfarlane oscillator. The c-deformed oscillator of the Macfarlane type has propagating solutions in addition to localized ones. Reinvestigation of the q-deformed oscillator carried out in the light of these findings for the c-deformed systems proves that the q-deformed systems are invariant under the same translation symmetries as the c-deformed systems and have propagating waves of the Bloch type.

  10. Negative ion mediated electron stimulated disordering of c(8 × 2) benzoate-Cu(110): extension of the displaced harmonic oscillator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Frederick, B. G.; Perry, C. C.; Munz, A. W.; Bertrams, Th.; Richardson, N. V.

    1997-11-01

    We have extended the displaced harmonic oscillator model for negative ion resonance (NIR) scattering in high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), to interpret the energy transfer processes leading to disordering in STM and LEED, by allowing the curvature of the negative ion PES to be different to that of the ground PES. For the benzoate-Cu(110) system, the results of the extended model are significantly better if the ground and negative ion PESs have frequencies hω = 0.40 and 0.48 eV, respectively, rather than the same frequency. The large resonance width and asymmetry, but not the small overtone to fundamental excitation probability ratio, observed in HREELS can be accounted for with values of the coupling constant, β = 22.2 and inverse lifetime of Г = 0.6 eV (1.1 fs). These parameters, with nD = 7 are simultaneously able to account for the ratio of the STM:LEED disordering cross-sections and, most significantly, predict the large slope observed in the STM disordering cross-section as a function of bias. The properties of the probability distribution, Pn( ɛi, for the NIR process, involving two Franck-Condon transitions, is contrasted with the DIET process and some non-classical behaviour for the case ω 0 ≉ ω 1 is noted.

  11. Symmetry algebra of a generalized anisotropic harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castanos, O.; Lopez-Pena, R.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that the symmetry Lie algebra of a quantum system with accidental degeneracy can be obtained by means of the Noether's theorem. The procedure is illustrated by considering a generalized anisotropic two dimensional harmonic oscillator, which can have an infinite set of states with the same energy characterized by an u(1,1) Lie algebra.

  12. The One-Dimensional Damped Forced Harmonic Oscillator Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores-Hidalgo, G.; Barone, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we give a general solution to the problem of the damped harmonic oscillator under the influence of an arbitrary time-dependent external force. We employ simple methods accessible for beginners and useful for undergraduate students and professors in an introductory course of mechanics.

  13. Simulating Harmonic Oscillator and Electrical Circuits: A Didactical Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albano, Giovannina; D'Apice, Ciro; Tomasiello, Stefania

    2002-01-01

    A Mathematica[TM] package is described that uses simulations and animations to illustrate key concepts in harmonic oscillation and electric circuits for students not majoring in physics or mathematics. Students are not required to know the Mathematica[TM] environment: a user-friendly interface with buttons functionalities and on-line help allows…

  14. Entanglement Degree of Parasupersymmetric Coherent States of Harmonic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtarshenas, S. J.

    2006-12-01

    We study the boson parafermion entanglement of the parasupersymmetric coherent states of the harmonic oscillator and derive the degree of entanglement in terms of the concurrence. The conditions for obtaining the maximal entanglement is also examined, and it is shown that in the usual supersymmetry situation we can obtain maximally entangled Bell states.

  15. 34 GHz second-harmonic peniotron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressman, Lawrence Jude

    Harmonic operation of gyro-devices has been proposed as a way to lower the magnetic field required to a level feasible with normal (i.e., non-superconducting) magnets. The problem is, however, that gyrotron efficiency drops dramatically at harmonics greater than two, making development of such a device of limited utility. A promising solution to this quandary is the development of a related device, the peniotron, which is believed capable of achieving both high efficiency and harmonic operation resulting in a reduction of the required axial magnetic field. Although the physics of the peniotron interaction, including its high electronic conversion efficiency, has been understood and experimentally verified, demonstration of characteristics consistent with a practical device has been more elusive. This is the goal of this effort---specifically, to demonstrate high device efficiency (defined as the actual power output as a fraction of the electron beam power) with an electron beam generated by a compact cusp electron gun consistent in size and performance with other microwave vacuum electron devices. The cavity design process revealed that the pi/2 mode couples easily to the output circular waveguide. In fact, the transition to circular waveguide produced such a low reflection coefficient that an iris was needed at the cavity output to achieve the desired Q. Integral couplers were also designed to couple directly into the slotted cavity for diagnostic purposes for simplicity in this proof-of-principle physics experiment. This eliminated the need for a high-power circular vacuum window and allowed the diagnostic coupling to be made in standard WR-28 rectangular waveguide. Although mode competition did prevent the second-harmonic peniotron mode from being tuned over its entire range of magnetic field, the peniotron mode was stable over a range sufficient to allow useful experimental data to be obtained. However, another unexpected problem which occurred during execution

  16. Networks of dissipative quantum harmonic oscillators: A general treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ponte, M. A. de; Mizrahi, S. S.; Moussa, M. H. Y.

    2007-09-15

    We present a general treatment of a bosonic dissipative network: a chain of coupled dissipative harmonic oscillators whatever its topology--i.e., whichever the way the oscillators are coupled together, the strength of their couplings, and their natural frequencies. Starting with a general more realistic scenario where each oscillator is coupled to its own reservoir, we also discuss the case where all the network oscillators are coupled to a common reservoir. We obtain the master equation governing the dynamic of the network states and the associated evolution equation of the Glauber-Sudarshan P function. With these instruments we briefly show how to analyze the decoherence and the evolution of the linear entropy of general states of the network. We also show how to obtain the master equation for the case of distinct reservoirs from that of a common one.

  17. High gain amplifiers: Power oscillations and harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Dattoli, G.; Ottaviani, P. L.; Pagnutti, S.

    2007-08-01

    We discuss the power oscillations in saturated high gain free electron laser amplifiers and show that the relevant period can be written in terms of the gain length. We use simple arguments following from the solution of the pendulum equation in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. Nontrivial effects due to nonlinear harmonic generation and inhomogeneous broadening are discussed too, as well as the saturated dynamics of short pulses.

  18. An analogue of the Berry phase for simple harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, S. K.

    2013-03-01

    We evaluate a variant of Berry's phase for a ‘missing’ family of the square integrable wavefunctions for the linear harmonic oscillator, which cannot be derived by the separation of variables (in a natural way). Instead, it is obtained by the action of the maximal kinematical invariance group on the standard solutions. A simple closed formula for the phase (in terms of elementary functions) is found here by integration with the help of a computer algebra system.

  19. Observing the geometric phase of a superconducting harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechal, M.; Berger, S.; Abdumalikov, A. A.; Fink, J. M.; Mlynek, J. A.; Steffen, L.; Wallraff, A.; Filipp, S.

    2012-02-01

    Steering a quantum harmonic oscillator state along cyclic trajectories leads to a path-dependent geometric phase [1]. However, the linearity of the system precludes its observation without a non-linear quantum probe. We therefore make use of a superconducting qubit serving as an interferometer to measure the adiabatic geometric phase of a harmonic oscillator realized as an on-chip resonant circuit [2]. We study the geometric phase for a variety of trajectories and show that, in agreement with theory, it is proportional to the area enclosed by the trajectory in the space of coherent states. At the transition to the non-adiabatic regime, oscillatory dephasing effects caused by residual qubit-resonator entanglement are observed and analyzed. We also discuss the possibility of using the harmonic oscillator geometric phase to implement two-qubit phase gates. [4pt] [1] S. Chaturvedi, M. S. Sriram, V. Srinivasan, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 20, L1071 (1987).[2] M. Pechal et al., arXiv:1109.1157v1 [quant-ph].

  20. Teaching from a Microgravity Environment: Harmonic Oscillator and Pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benge, Raymond; Young, Charlotte; Davis, Shirley; Worley, Alan; Smith, Linda; Gell, Amber

    2009-04-01

    This presentation reports on an educational experiment flown in January 2009 as part of NASA's Microgravity University program. The experiment flown was an investigation into the properties of harmonic oscillators in reduced gravity. Harmonic oscillators are studied in every introductory physics class. The equation for the period of a harmonic oscillator does not include the acceleration due to gravity, so the period should be independent of gravity. However, the equation for the period of a pendulum does include the acceleration due to gravity, so the period of a pendulum should appear longer under reduced gravity (such as lunar or Martian gravity) and shorter under hyper-gravity. These environments can be simulated aboard an aircraft. Video of the experiments being performed aboard the aircraft is to be used in introductory physics classes. Students will be able to record information from watching the experiment performed aboard the aircraft in a similar manner to how they collect data in the laboratory. They can then determine if the experiment matches theory. Video and an experimental procedure are being prepared based upon this flight, and these materials will be available for download by faculty anywhere with access to the internet who wish to use the experiment in their own classrooms.

  1. Spatial analysis of harmonic oscillation of gypsy moth outbreak intensity.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Kyle J; Liebhold, Andrew M; Johnson, Derek M

    2009-03-01

    Outbreaks of many forest-defoliating insects are synchronous over broad geographic areas and occur with a period of approximately 10 years. Within the range of the gypsy moth in North America, however, there is considerable geographic heterogeneity in strength of periodicity and the frequency of outbreaks. Furthermore, gypsy moth outbreaks exhibit two significant periodicities: a dominant period of 8-10 years and a subdominant period of 4-5 years. In this study, we used a simulation model and spatially referenced time series of outbreak intensity data from the Northeastern United States to show that the bimodal periodicity in the intensity of gypsy moth outbreaks is largely a result of harmonic oscillations in gypsy moth abundance at and above a 4 km(2) scale of resolution. We also used geographically weighted regression models to explore the effects of gypsy moth host-tree abundance on the periodicity of gypsy moths. We found that the strength of 5-year cycles increased relative to the strength of 10-year cycles with increasing host tree abundance. We suggest that this pattern emerges because high host-tree availability enhances the growth rates of gypsy moth populations.

  2. Decoherence and dissipation of a quantum harmonic oscillator coupled to two-level systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schlosshauer, Maximilian; Hines, A. P.; Milburn, G. J.

    2008-02-15

    We derive and analyze the Born-Markov master equation for a quantum harmonic oscillator interacting with a bath of independent two-level systems. This hitherto virtually unexplored model plays a fundamental role as one of the four 'canonical' system-environment models for decoherence and dissipation. To investigate the influence of further couplings of the environmental spins to a dissipative bath, we also derive the master equation for a harmonic oscillator interacting with a single spin coupled to a bosonic bath. Our models are experimentally motivated by quantum-electromechanical systems and micron-scale ion traps. Decoherence and dissipation rates are found to exhibit temperature dependencies significantly different from those in quantum Brownian motion. In particular, the systematic dissipation rate for the central oscillator decreases with increasing temperature and goes to zero at zero temperature, but there also exists a temperature-independent momentum-diffusion (heating) rate.

  3. MODEL HARMONIZATION POTENTIAL AND BENEFITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The IPCS Harmonization Project, which is currently ongoing under the auspices of the WHO, in the context of chemical risk assessment or exposure modeling, does not imply global standardization. Instead, harmonization is thought of as an effort to strive for consistency among appr...

  4. Pisot q-coherent states quantization of the harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Gazeau, J.P.; Olmo, M.A. del

    2013-03-15

    We revisit the quantized version of the harmonic oscillator obtained through a q-dependent family of coherent states. For each q, 0oscillator: localization in the configuration and in the phase spaces, angle operator, probability distributions and related statistical features, time evolution and semi-classical phase space trajectories. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantized version of the harmonic oscillator (HO) through a q-family of coherent states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For q,0oscillator.

  5. Unified Description of q-Deformed Harmonic Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogami, I. S.; Koizumi, K.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that a wide class of q-deformed harmonic oscillators, including those of the Macfarlane type and Dubna type, can be described in a unified way. The Hamiltonian of the oscillator is assumed to be given by a q-deformed anti-commutator of the q-deformed ladder operators. By solving q-difference equations, explicit coordinate representations of ladder operators and wave functions are derived, and unified parametric representations are found for q-Hermite functions and related formulas for oscillators of the Macfarlane and Dubna types. In addition to the well-known solutions with globally periodic structure, it is found that there exist an infinite number of solutions with globally aperiodic structure.

  6. Analytic energy-level densities of separable harmonic oscillators including approximate hindered rotor corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döntgen, M.

    2016-09-01

    Energy-level densities are key for obtaining various chemical properties. In chemical kinetics, energy-level densities are used to predict thermochemistry and microscopic reaction rates. Here, an analytic energy-level density formulation is derived using inverse Laplace transformation of harmonic oscillator partition functions. Anharmonic contributions to the energy-level density are considered approximately using a literature model for the transition from harmonic to free motions. The present analytic energy-level density formulation for rigid rotor-harmonic oscillator systems is validated against the well-studied CO+O˙ H system. The approximate hindered rotor energy-level density corrections are validated against the well-studied H2O2 system. The presented analytic energy-level density formulation gives a basis for developing novel numerical simulation schemes for chemical processes.

  7. The harmonic oscillator and the position dependent mass Schroedinger equation: isospectral partners and factorization operators

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, J.; Ovando, G.; Pena, J. J.

    2010-12-23

    One of the most important scientific contributions of Professor Marcos Moshinsky has been his study on the harmonic oscillator in quantum theory vis a vis the standard Schroedinger equation with constant mass [1]. However, a simple description of the motion of a particle interacting with an external environment such as happen in compositionally graded alloys consist of replacing the mass by the so-called effective mass that is in general variable and dependent on position. Therefore, honoring in memoriam Marcos Moshinsky, in this work we consider the position-dependent mass Schrodinger equations (PDMSE) for the harmonic oscillator potential model as former potential as well as with equi-spaced spectrum solutions, i.e. harmonic oscillator isospectral partners. To that purpose, the point canonical transformation method to convert a general second order differential equation (DE), of Sturm-Liouville type, into a Schroedinger-like standard equation is applied to the PDMSE. In that case, the former potential associated to the PDMSE and the potential involved in the Schroedinger-like standard equation are related through a Riccati-type relationship that includes the equivalent of the Witten superpotential to determine the exactly solvable positions-dependent mass distribution (PDMD)m(x). Even though the proposed approach is exemplified with the harmonic oscillator potential, the procedure is general and can be straightforwardly applied to other DEs.

  8. Parametric oscillators from factorizations employing a constant-shifted Riccati solution of the classical harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosu, H. C.; Khmelnytskaya, K. V.

    2011-09-01

    We determine the kind of parametric oscillators that are generated in the usual factorization procedure of second-order linear differential equations when one introduces a constant shift of the Riccati solution of the classical harmonic oscillator. The mathematical results show that some of these oscillators could be of physical nature. We give the solutions of the obtained second-order differential equations and the values of the shift parameter providing strictly periodic and antiperiodic solutions. We also notice that this simple problem presents parity-time (PT) symmetry. Possible applications are mentioned.

  9. Evolution of a quantum harmonic oscillator coupled to a minimal thermal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidiella-Barranco, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper it is studied the influence of a minimal thermal environment on the dynamics of a quantum harmonic oscillator (labelled A), prepared in a coherent state. The environment itself consists of a second oscillator (labelled B), initially in a thermal state. Two types of interaction Hamiltonians are considered, and the time-evolution of the reduced density operator of oscillator A is compared to the one obtained from the usual master equation approach, i.e., assuming that oscillator A is coupled to a large reservoir. An analysis of the linear entropy evolution of oscillator A shows that simplified models may be able to describe important features related to the phenomenon of decoherence, such as the rapid growth of the linear entropy, as well as its dependence on the effective temperature of the environment.

  10. Dissipation-induced transition of a simple harmonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zong-Qian; Li, Yu-Qi; Pan, Xiao-Yin

    2014-12-14

    We investigate the dissipation-induced transition probabilities between any two eigenstates of a simple harmonic oscillator. Using the method developed by Yu and Sun [Phys. Rev. A 49, 592 (1994)], the general analytical expressions for the transition probabilities are obtained. The special cases: transition probabilities from the ground state to the first few excited states are then discussed in detail. Different from the previous studies in the literature where only the effect of damping was considered, it is found that the Brownian motion makes the transitions between states of different parity possible. The limitations of the applicability of our results are also discussed.

  11. Elementary derivation of the quantum propagator for the harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Jiushu

    2016-10-01

    Operator algebra techniques are employed to derive the quantum evolution operator for the harmonic oscillator. The derivation begins with the construction of the annihilation and creation operators and the determination of the wave function for the coherent state as well as its time-dependent evolution, and ends with the transformation of the propagator in a mixed position-coherent-state representation to the desired one in configuration space. Throughout the entire procedure, besides elementary operator manipulations, it is only necessary to solve linear differential equations and to calculate Gaussian integrals.

  12. A method of solving simple harmonic oscillator Schroedinger equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maury, Juan Carlos F.

    1995-01-01

    A usual step in solving totally Schrodinger equation is to try first the case when dimensionless position independent variable w is large. In this case the Harmonic Oscillator equation takes the form (d(exp 2)/dw(exp 2) - w(exp 2))F = 0, and following W.K.B. method, it gives the intermediate corresponding solution F = exp(-w(exp 2)/2), which actually satisfies exactly another equation, (d(exp 2)/dw(exp 2) + 1 - w(exp 2))F = 0. We apply a different method, useful in anharmonic oscillator equations, similar to that of Rampal and Datta, and although it is slightly more complicated however it is also more general and systematic.

  13. Quantum entanglement in coupled harmonic oscillator systems: from micro to macro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Jhih-Yuan; Chou, Chung-Hsien

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the entanglement dynamics of several models of coupled harmonic oscillators, whereby a number of properties concerning entanglement have been scrutinized, such as how the environment affects entanglement of a system, and death and revival of entanglement. Among them, there are two models for which we are able to vary their particle numbers easily by assuming identicalness, thereby examining how the particle number affects entanglement. We have found that the upper bound of entanglement between identical oscillators is approximately inversely proportional to the particle number.

  14. Dissipative quantum trajectories in complex space: Damped harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chia-Chun

    2016-10-01

    Dissipative quantum trajectories in complex space are investigated in the framework of the logarithmic nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The logarithmic nonlinear Schrödinger equation provides a phenomenological description for dissipative quantum systems. Substituting the wave function expressed in terms of the complex action into the complex-extended logarithmic nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we derive the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation including the dissipative potential. It is shown that dissipative quantum trajectories satisfy a quantum Newtonian equation of motion in complex space with a friction force. Exact dissipative complex quantum trajectories are analyzed for the wave and solitonlike solutions to the logarithmic nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the damped harmonic oscillator. These trajectories converge to the equilibrium position as time evolves. It is indicated that dissipative complex quantum trajectories for the wave and solitonlike solutions are identical to dissipative complex classical trajectories for the damped harmonic oscillator. This study develops a theoretical framework for dissipative quantum trajectories in complex space.

  15. Entanglement dynamics for a conditionally kicked harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrais, Eric G.; Sales, J. S.; de Almeida, N. G.

    2016-08-01

    The time evolution of the quantum kicked harmonic oscillator (KHO) is described by the Floquet operator which maps the state of the system immediately before one kick onto the state at a time immediately after the next. Quantum KHO is characterized by three parameters: the coupling strength V 0, the so-called Lamb–Dicke parameter η whose square is proportional to the effective Planck constant {{\\hslash }}{{eff}}, and the ratio T of the natural frequency of the oscillator and the kick frequency. To a given coupling strength and depending on T being a natural or irrational number, the phase space of the classical kicked oscillator can display different behaviors, as for example, stochastic webs or quasicrystal structures, thus showing a chaotic or localized behavior that is mirrored in the quantum phase space. On the other hand, the classical limit is studied letting {{\\hslash }}{{eff}} become negligible. In this paper we investigate how the ratio T, considered as integer, rational or irrational, influences the entanglement dynamics of the quantum KHO and study how the entanglement dynamics behaves when varying either V 0 or {{\\hslash }}{{eff}} parameters.

  16. Entanglement dynamics for a conditionally kicked harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrais, Eric G.; Sales, J. S.; de Almeida, N. G.

    2016-08-01

    The time evolution of the quantum kicked harmonic oscillator (KHO) is described by the Floquet operator which maps the state of the system immediately before one kick onto the state at a time immediately after the next. Quantum KHO is characterized by three parameters: the coupling strength V 0, the so-called Lamb-Dicke parameter η whose square is proportional to the effective Planck constant {{\\hslash }}{{eff}}, and the ratio T of the natural frequency of the oscillator and the kick frequency. To a given coupling strength and depending on T being a natural or irrational number, the phase space of the classical kicked oscillator can display different behaviors, as for example, stochastic webs or quasicrystal structures, thus showing a chaotic or localized behavior that is mirrored in the quantum phase space. On the other hand, the classical limit is studied letting {{\\hslash }}{{eff}} become negligible. In this paper we investigate how the ratio T, considered as integer, rational or irrational, influences the entanglement dynamics of the quantum KHO and study how the entanglement dynamics behaves when varying either V 0 or {{\\hslash }}{{eff}} parameters.

  17. Oscillator Seeding of a High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL in a Radiator-First Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, P.; Wurtele, J.; Penn, G.; Reinsch, M.

    2012-05-20

    A longitudinally coherent X-ray pulse from a high repetition rate free electron laser (FEL) is desired for a wide variety of experimental applications. However, generating such a pulse with a repetition rate greater than 1 MHz is a significant challenge. The desired high repetition rate sources, primarily high harmonic generation with intense lasers in gases or plasmas, do not exist now, and, for the multi-MHz bunch trains that superconducting accelerators can potentially produce, are likely not feasible with current technology. In this paper, we propose to place an oscillator downstream of a radiator. The oscillator generates radiation that is used as a seed for a high gain harmonic generation (HGHG) FEL which is upstream of the oscillator. For the first few pulses the oscillator builds up power and, until power is built up, the radiator has no HGHG seed. As power in the oscillator saturates, the HGHG is seeded and power is produced. The dynamics and stability of this radiator-first scheme is explored analytically and numerically. A single-pass map is derived using a semi-analytic model for FEL gain and saturation. Iteration of the map is shown to be in good agreement with simulations. A numerical example is presented for a soft X-ray FEL.

  18. Exact solution of a quantum forced time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeon, Kyu Hwang; George, Thomas F.; Um, Chung IN

    1992-01-01

    The Schrodinger equation is used to exactly evaluate the propagator, wave function, energy expectation values, uncertainty values, and coherent state for a harmonic oscillator with a time dependent frequency and an external driving time dependent force. These quantities represent the solution of the classical equation of motion for the time dependent harmonic oscillator.

  19. The Harmonic Oscillator with a Gaussian Perturbation: Evaluation of the Integrals and Example Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earl, Boyd L.

    2008-01-01

    A general result for the integrals of the Gaussian function over the harmonic oscillator wavefunctions is derived using generating functions. Using this result, an example problem of a harmonic oscillator with various Gaussian perturbations is explored in order to compare the results of precise numerical solution, the variational method, and…

  20. Relativistic Harmonic Oscillators and Hadronic Structures in the Quantum-Mechanics Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Y. S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1978-01-01

    A relativistic harmonic-oscillator formalism which is mathematically simple as the nonrelativistic harmonic oscillator is given. In view of its effectiveness in describing Lorentz-deformed hadrons, the inclusion of this formalism in a first-year graduate course will make the results of high-energy experiments more understandable. (BB)

  1. Quantum Encoding and Entanglement in Terms of Phase Operators Associated with Harmonic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manu Pratap; Rajput, B. S.

    2016-10-01

    Realization of qudit quantum computation has been presented in terms of number operator and phase operators associated with one-dimensional harmonic oscillator and it has been demonstrated that the representations of generalized Pauli group, viewed in harmonic oscillator operators, allow the qudits to be explicitly encoded in such systems. The non-Hermitian quantum phase operators contained in decomposition of the annihilation and creation operators associated with harmonic oscillator have been analysed in terms of semi unitary transformations (SUT) and it has been shown that the non-vanishing analytic index for harmonic oscillator leads to an alternative class of quantum anomalies. Choosing unitary transformation and the Hermitian phase operator free from quantum anomalies, the truncated annihilation and creation operators have been obtained for harmonic oscillator and it has been demonstrated that any attempt of removal of quantum anomalies leads to absence of minimum uncertainty.

  2. Quantum Encoding and Entanglement in Terms of Phase Operators Associated with Harmonic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manu Pratap; Rajput, B. S.

    2016-06-01

    Realization of qudit quantum computation has been presented in terms of number operator and phase operators associated with one-dimensional harmonic oscillator and it has been demonstrated that the representations of generalized Pauli group, viewed in harmonic oscillator operators, allow the qudits to be explicitly encoded in such systems. The non-Hermitian quantum phase operators contained in decomposition of the annihilation and creation operators associated with harmonic oscillator have been analysed in terms of semi unitary transformations (SUT) and it has been shown that the non-vanishing analytic index for harmonic oscillator leads to an alternative class of quantum anomalies. Choosing unitary transformation and the Hermitian phase operator free from quantum anomalies, the truncated annihilation and creation operators have been obtained for harmonic oscillator and it has been demonstrated that any attempt of removal of quantum anomalies leads to absence of minimum uncertainty.

  3. Cooper pair of superconductivity in the coordinate representation and q-deformed harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Ngu, Man; Gia Vinh, Ngo; Lan, Nguyen Tri; Thanh, Luu Thi Kim; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2016-06-01

    In this work we study the similarity between the wave functions of q -deformed harmonic oscillator and wave functions of Cooper pair. The wave functions of Cooper pairs in coordinate-space have an “onion-like” layered structure with exponent decay (Boltzmann) envelope modulation. The ground state wave function of q -deform harmonic oscillator has the form of oscillate functions with Gaussian decay envelope modulation. The corresponding between Boltzmann and Gaussian forms of envelope functions and their quantum similarity are discussed.

  4. Novel Approach for Solving the Equation of Motion of a Simple Harmonic Oscillator. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauthier, N.

    2004-01-01

    An elementary method, based on the use of complex variables, is proposed for solving the equation of motion of a simple harmonic oscillator. The method is first applied to the equation of motion for an undamped oscillator and it is then extended to the more important case of a damped oscillator. It is finally shown that the method can readily be…

  5. A least squares finite element scheme for transonic flow around harmonically oscillating airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, C. L.; Fix, G. J.; Gunzburger, M. D.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation shows that a finite element scheme with a weighted least squares variational principle is applicable to the problem of transonic flow around a harmonically oscillating airfoil. For the flat plate case, numerical results compare favorably with the exact solution. The obtained numerical results for the transonic problem, for which an exact solution is not known, have the characteristics of known experimental results. It is demonstrated that the performance of the employed numerical method is independent of equation type (elliptic or hyperbolic) and frequency. The weighted least squares principle allows the appropriate modeling of singularities, which such a modeling of singularities is not possible with normal least squares.

  6. Optical-parametric-oscillator solitons driven by the third harmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsky, Vitaly; Malomed, Boris A.

    2004-12-01

    We introduce a model of a lossy second-harmonic-generating (χ(2)) cavity externally pumped at the third harmonic, which gives rise to driving terms of a new type, corresponding to a cross-parametric gain. The equation for the fundamental-frequency (FF) wave may also contain a quadratic self-driving term, which is generated by the cubic nonlinearity of the medium. Unlike previously studied phase-matched models of χ(2) cavities driven at the second harmonic or at FF, the present one admits an exact analytical solution for the soliton, at a special value of the gain parameter. Two families of solitons are found in a numerical form, and their stability area is identified through numerical computation of the perturbation eigenvalues (stability of the zero solution, which is a necessary condition for the soliton’s stability, is investigated in an analytical form). One family is a continuation of the special analytical solution. At given values of the parameters, one soliton is stable and the other one is not; they swap their stability at a critical value of the mismatch parameter. The stability of the solitons is also verified in direct simulations, which demonstrate that an unstable pulse rearranges itself into a stable one, or into a delocalized state, or decays to zero. A soliton which was given an initial boost C starts to move but quickly comes to a halt, if the boost is smaller than a critical value Ccr . If C>Ccr , the boost destroys the soliton (sometimes, through splitting into two secondary pulses). Interactions between initially separated solitons are investigated, too. It is concluded that stable solitons always merge into a single one. In the system with weak loss, it appears in a vibrating form, slowly relaxing to the static shape. With stronger loss, the final soliton emerges in the stationary form.

  7. Cycle-Averaged Phase-Space States for the Harmonic and the Morse Oscillators, and the Corresponding Uncertainty Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.; Constantoudis, Vasilios

    2009-01-01

    In Planck's model of the harmonic oscillator (HO) a century ago, both the energy and the phase space were quantized according to epsilon[subscript n] = nhv, n = 0, 1, 2..., and [double integral]dp[subscript x] dx = h. By referring to just these two relations, we show how the adoption of "cycle-averaged phase-space states" (CAPSSs) leads to the…

  8. Dynamics in the Kuramoto model with a bi-harmonic coupling function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Di; Cui, Haitao; Tian, Junlong; Xiao, Yi; Zhang, Yingxin

    2016-09-01

    We study a variant of the Kuramoto model with a bi-harmonic coupling function, in which oscillators with positive first harmonic coupling strength are conformists and oscillators with negative first harmonic coupling strength are contrarians. We show that the model displays different synchronous dynamics and different dynamics may be characterized by the phase distributions of oscillators. There exist stationary synchronous states, travelling wave states, π state and, most interestingly, another type of nonstationary state: an oscillating π state. The phase distribution oscillates in a confined region and the phase difference between conformists and contrarians oscillates around π with a constant amplitude and a constant period in oscillating π state. Finally, the bifurcation diagram of the model in the parameter space is presented.

  9. Molecular Solid EOS based on Quasi-Harmonic Oscillator approximation for phonons

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-09-02

    A complete equation of state (EOS) for a molecular solid is derived utilizing a Helmholtz free energy. Assuming that the solid is nonconducting, phonon excitations dominate the specific heat. Phonons are approximated as independent quasi-harmonic oscillators with vibrational frequencies depending on the specific volume. The model is suitable for calibrating an EOS based on isothermal compression data and infrared/Raman spectroscopy data from high pressure measurements utilizing a diamond anvil cell. In contrast to a Mie-Gruneisen EOS developed for an atomic solid, the specific heat and Gruneisen coefficient depend on both density and temperature.

  10. Brownian motion of a harmonic oscillator in a noninertial reference frame.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Aquino, J I; Romero-Bastida, M

    2013-08-01

    The Brownian motion of a charged harmonic oscillator in the presence of additional force fields, such as a constant magnetic field and arbitrary time-dependent electric and mechanical forces, is studied in a rotational reference frame under uniform motion. By assuming an isotropic surrounding medium (a scalar friction constant), we solve explicitly the Smoluchowski equation associated with the Langevin equation for the charged harmonic oscillator and calculate the mean square displacements along and orthogonal to the rotation axis.

  11. Amplitude and phase representation of quantum invariants for the time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez Guasti, M.; Moya-Cessa, H.

    2003-06-01

    The correspondence between classical and quantum invariants is established. The Ermakov-Lewis quantum invariant of the time-dependent harmonic oscillator is translated from the coordinate and momentum operators into amplitude and phase operators. In doing so, Turski's phase operator as well as Susskind-Glogower operators are generalized to the time-dependent harmonic-oscillator case. A quantum derivation of the Manley-Rowe relations is shown as an example.

  12. Continuous variable quantum optical simulation for time evolution of quantum harmonic oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiaowei; Hao, Shuhong; Guo, Hong; Xie, Changde; Su, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Quantum simulation enables one to mimic the evolution of other quantum systems using a controllable quantum system. Quantum harmonic oscillator (QHO) is one of the most important model systems in quantum physics. To observe the transient dynamics of a QHO with high oscillation frequency directly is difficult. We experimentally simulate the transient behaviors of QHO in an open system during time evolution with an optical mode and a logical operation system of continuous variable quantum computation. The time evolution of an atomic ensemble in the collective spontaneous emission is analytically simulated by mapping the atomic ensemble onto a QHO. The measured fidelity, which is used for quantifying the quality of the simulation, is higher than its classical limit. The presented simulation scheme provides a new tool for studying the dynamic behaviors of QHO. PMID:26961962

  13. Continuous variable quantum optical simulation for time evolution of quantum harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaowei; Hao, Shuhong; Guo, Hong; Xie, Changde; Su, Xiaolong

    2016-03-10

    Quantum simulation enables one to mimic the evolution of other quantum systems using a controllable quantum system. Quantum harmonic oscillator (QHO) is one of the most important model systems in quantum physics. To observe the transient dynamics of a QHO with high oscillation frequency directly is difficult. We experimentally simulate the transient behaviors of QHO in an open system during time evolution with an optical mode and a logical operation system of continuous variable quantum computation. The time evolution of an atomic ensemble in the collective spontaneous emission is analytically simulated by mapping the atomic ensemble onto a QHO. The measured fidelity, which is used for quantifying the quality of the simulation, is higher than its classical limit. The presented simulation scheme provides a new tool for studying the dynamic behaviors of QHO.

  14. Continuous variable quantum optical simulation for time evolution of quantum harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaowei; Hao, Shuhong; Guo, Hong; Xie, Changde; Su, Xiaolong

    2016-03-01

    Quantum simulation enables one to mimic the evolution of other quantum systems using a controllable quantum system. Quantum harmonic oscillator (QHO) is one of the most important model systems in quantum physics. To observe the transient dynamics of a QHO with high oscillation frequency directly is difficult. We experimentally simulate the transient behaviors of QHO in an open system during time evolution with an optical mode and a logical operation system of continuous variable quantum computation. The time evolution of an atomic ensemble in the collective spontaneous emission is analytically simulated by mapping the atomic ensemble onto a QHO. The measured fidelity, which is used for quantifying the quality of the simulation, is higher than its classical limit. The presented simulation scheme provides a new tool for studying the dynamic behaviors of QHO.

  15. Floquet topological system based on frequency-modulated classical coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Grazia; Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically propose how to observe topological effects in a generic classical system of coupled harmonic oscillators, such as classical pendula or lumped-element electric circuits, whose oscillation frequency is modulated fast in time. Making use of Floquet theory in the high-frequency limit, we identify a regime in which the system is accurately described by a Harper-Hofstadter model where the synthetic magnetic field can be externally tuned via the phase of the frequency modulation of the different oscillators. We illustrate how the topologically protected chiral edge states, as well as the Hofstadter butterfly of bulk bands, can be observed in the driven-dissipative steady state under a monochromatic drive. In analogy with the integer quantum Hall effect, we show how the topological Chern numbers of the bands can be extracted from the mean transverse shift of the steady-state oscillation amplitude distribution. Finally, we discuss the regime where the analogy with the Harper-Hofstadter model breaks down.

  16. The Adiabatic Invariant of the n-Degree-of-Freedom Harmonic Oscillator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devaud, M.; Leroy, V.; Bacri, J.-C.; Hocquet, T.

    2008-01-01

    In this graduate-level theoretical paper, we propose a general derivation of the adiabatic invariant of the n-degree-of-freedom harmonic oscillator, available whichever the physical nature of the oscillator and of the parametrical excitation it undergoes. This derivation is founded on the use of the classical Glauber variables and ends up with…

  17. On the measurement of a weak classical force coupled to a harmonic oscillator: experimental progress

    SciTech Connect

    Bocko, M.F.; Onofrio, R.

    1996-07-01

    Several high-precision physics experiments are approaching a level of sensitivity at which the intrinsic quantum nature of the experimental apparatus is the dominant source of fluctuations limiting the sensitivity of the measurements. This quantum limit is embodied by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which prohibits arbitrarily precise simultaneous measurements of two conjugate observables of a system but allows one-time measurements of a single observable with any precision. The dynamical evolution of a system immediately following a measurement limits the class of observables that may be measured repeatedly with arbitrary precision, with the influence of the measurement apparatus on the system being confined strictly to the conjugate observables. Observables having this feature, and the corresponding measurements performed on them, have been named quantum nondemolition or back-action evasion observables. In a previous review (Caves {ital et} {ital al}., 1980, Rev. Mod. Phys. {bold 52}, 341) a quantum-mechanical analysis of quantum nondemolition measurements of a harmonic oscillator was presented. The present review summarizes the experimental progress on quantum nondemolition measurements and the classical models developed to describe and guide the development of practical implementations of quantum nondemolition measurements. The relationship between the classical and quantum theoretical models is also reviewed. The concept of quantum nondemolition and back-action evasion measurements originated in the context of measurements on a macroscopic mechanical harmonic oscillator, though these techniques may be useful in other experimental contexts as well, as is discussed in the last part of this review. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Evading surface and detector frequency noise in harmonic oscillator measurements of force gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Eric W.; Lee, SangGap; Hickman, Steven A.; Harrell, Lee E.; Marohn, John A.

    2010-07-01

    We introduce and demonstrate a method of measuring small force gradients acting on a harmonic oscillator in which the force-gradient signal of interest is used to parametrically up-convert a forced oscillation below resonance into an amplitude signal at the oscillator's resonance frequency. The approach, which we demonstrate in a mechanically detected electron spin resonance experiment, allows the force-gradient signal to evade detector frequency noise by converting a slowly modulated frequency signal into an amplitude signal.

  19. Theoretical-experimental method of determining the drag coefficient of a harmonically oscillating thin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, A. G.; Kamalutdinov, A. M.; Paimushin, V. N.; Firsov, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    A method for determining the drag coefficient of a thin plate harmonically oscillating in a viscous incompressible fluid is proposed. The method is based on measuring the amplitude of deflections of cantilever-fixed thin plates exhibiting damping flexural oscillations with a frequency corresponding to the first mode and on solving an inverse problem of calculating the drag coefficient on the basis of the experimentally found logarithmic decrement of beam oscillations.

  20. Harmonic oscillations of laminae in non-Newtonian fluids: A lattice Boltzmann-Immersed Boundary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosis, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the fluid dynamics induced by a rigid lamina undergoing harmonic oscillations in a non-Newtonian calm fluid is investigated. The fluid is modelled through the lattice Boltzmann method and the flow is assumed to be nearly incompressible. An iterative viscosity-correction based procedure is proposed to properly account for the non-Newtonian fluid feature and its accuracy is evaluated. In order to handle the mutual interaction between the lamina and the encompassing fluid, the Immersed Boundary method is adopted. A numerical campaign is performed. In particular, the effect of the non-Newtonian feature is highlighted by investigating the fluid forces acting on a harmonically oscillating lamina for different values of the Reynolds number. The findings prove that the non-Newtonian feature can drastically influence the behaviour of the fluid and, as a consequence, the forces acting upon the lamina. Several considerations are carried out on the time history of the drag coefficient and the results are used to compute the added mass through the hydrodynamic function. Moreover, the computational cost involved in the numerical simulations is discussed. Finally, two applications concerning water resources are investigated: the flow through an obstructed channel and the particle sedimentation. Present findings highlight a strong coupling between the body shape, the Reynolds number, and the flow behaviour index.

  1. A neural network model of harmonic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Clifford F.

    2003-04-01

    Harmonic detection theories postulate that a virtual pitch is perceived when a sufficient number of harmonics is present. The harmonics need not be consecutive, but higher harmonics contribute less than lower harmonics [J. Raatgever and F. A. Bilsen, in Auditory Physiology and Perception, edited by Y. Cazals, K. Horner, and L. Demany (Pergamon, Oxford, 1992), pp. 215-222 M. K. McBeath and J. F. Wayand, Abstracts of the Psychonom. Soc. 3, 55 (1998)]. A neural network model is presented that has the potential to simulate this operation. Harmonics are first passed through a bank of rounded exponential filters with lateral inhibition. The results are used as inputs for an autoassociator neural network. The model is trained using harmonic data for symphonic musical instruments, in order to test whether it can self-organize by learning associations between co-occurring harmonics. It is shown that the trained model can complete the pattern for missing-fundamental sounds. The Performance of the model in harmonic detection will be compared with experimental results for humans.

  2. Creation and localization of entanglement in a simple configuration of coupled harmonic oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Leandro, J. F.; Semiao, F. L.

    2009-05-15

    We investigate a simple arrangement of coupled harmonic oscillators which brings out some interesting effects concerning creation of entanglement. It is well known that if each member in a linear chain of coupled harmonic oscillators is prepared in a 'classical state', such as a pure coherent state or a mixed thermal state, no entanglement is created in the rotating wave approximation. On the other hand, if one of the oscillators is prepared in a nonclassical state (pure squeezed state, for instance), entanglement may be created between members of the chain. In the setup considered here, we found that a great family of nonclassical (squeezed) states can localize entanglement in such a way that distant oscillators never become entangled. We present a detailed study of this particular localization phenomenon. Our results may find application in future solid state implementations of quantum computers, and we suggest an electromechanical system consisting of an array of coupled micromechanical oscillators as a possible implementation.

  3. Thermodynamics of trajectories of a quantum harmonic oscillator coupled to N baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigeon, Simon; Fusco, Lorenzo; Xuereb, André; De Chiara, Gabriele; Paternostro, Mauro

    2015-07-01

    We undertake a thorough analysis of the thermodynamics of the trajectories followed by a quantum harmonic oscillator coupled to N dissipative baths by using an approach to large-deviation theory inspired by phase-space quantum optics. As an illustrative example, we study the archetypal case of a harmonic oscillator coupled to two thermal baths, allowing for a comparison with the analogous classical result. In the low-temperature limit, we find a significant quantum suppression in the rate of work exchanged between the system and each bath. We further show how the presented method is capable of giving analytical results even for the case of a driven harmonic oscillator. Based on that result, we analyze the laser cooling of the motion of a trapped ion or optomechanical system, illustrating how the emission statistics can be controllably altered by the driving force.

  4. Entanglement in a continuously measured two-level system coupled to a harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Concepcion, E.; Alonso, D.; Brouard, S.

    2009-05-15

    The dynamics of a two-level system (TLS) coupled to a harmonic oscillator (HO) is studied under the combined effect of a thermal bath acting on the HO and of a detector continuously measuring one of the components of the spinlike TLS. The analysis focuses on the dynamics of the 'relative entropy of entanglement' (REE) in the one-energy-excitation manifold of the reduced TLS+HO system. For this model system, a stationary state is shown to be reached for which the relative entropy of entanglement is in general nonzero, even though, under certain approximations, the separate effects of bath and detector would be to remove any trace of this resource from the system. Analytical as well as numerical results are obtained for the REE as a function of the different parameters involved in the model definition.

  5. A high-fidelity harmonic drive model.

    SciTech Connect

    Preissner, C.; Royston, T. J.; Shu, D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a new model of the harmonic drive transmission is presented. The purpose of this work is to better understand the transmission hysteresis behavior while constructing a new type of comprehensive harmonic drive model. The four dominant aspects of harmonic drive behavior - nonlinear viscous friction, nonlinear stiffness, hysteresis, and kinematic error - are all included in the model. The harmonic drive is taken to be a black box, and a dynamometer is used to observe the input/output relations of the transmission. This phenomenological approach does not require any specific knowledge of the internal kinematics. In a novel application, the Maxwell resistive-capacitor hysteresis model is applied to the harmonic drive. In this model, sets of linear stiffness elements in series with Coulomb friction elements are arranged in parallel to capture the hysteresis behavior of the transmission. The causal hysteresis model is combined with nonlinear viscous friction and spectral kinematic error models to accurately represent the harmonic drive behavior. Empirical measurements are presented to quantify all four aspects of the transmission behavior. These measurements motivate the formulation of the complete model. Simulation results are then compared to additional measurements of the harmonic drive performance.

  6. On the effects of a screw dislocation and a linear potential on the harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, M. J.; Furtado, C.; Bakke, K.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum effects on the harmonic oscillator due to the presence of a linear scalar potential and a screw dislocation are investigated. By searching for bound states solutions, it is shown that an Aharonov-Bohm-type effect for bound states and a restriction of the values of the angular frequency of the harmonic oscillator can be obtained, where the allowed values are determined by the topology of the screw dislocation and the quantum numbers associated with the radial modes and the angular momentum. As particular cases, the angular frequency and the energy levels associated with the ground state and the first excited state of the system are obtained.

  7. An oscillator circuit for dual-harmonic tracking of frequency and resistance in quartz resonator sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Marco; Ferrari, Vittorio

    2009-12-01

    An oscillator circuit is proposed that simultaneously excites and tracks two harmonic resonances in a quartz crystal resonator sensor. The oscillator outputs two pairs of signals, related to the sensor series resonant frequency and motional resistance for the fundamental and the third harmonic, respectively. The circuit also provides compensation of the sensor parallel capacitance for increased accuracy. By probing the resonator with the superposition of two harmonic modes simultaneously, enhanced sensing capabilities can be advantageously achieved because a larger set of parameters can be measured with a single sensor and its response is tracked in real time. Experimental tests were first run with the developed oscillator connected to 5 MHz AT-cut crystals exposed to different liquid solutions, obtaining results in good agreement with the theory. Evidence of different dynamic responses at the fundamental and the third harmonic was obtained, possibly related to differences in acoustic penetration depth into the liquid. The oscillator was then tested with the sensor loaded by microdroplets of liquid solutions deposited by a piezoelectric microdispenser. The oscillator could detect and track the resulting time response of the sensor, outperforming measurement methods based on impedance analysis in terms of speed and resolution, and evidencing a complex combination of effects in the sensor transient response.

  8. Coupled harmonic oscillators for the measurement of a weak classical force at the standard quantum limit

    SciTech Connect

    Leaci, Paola; Ortolan, Antonello

    2007-12-15

    We discuss limitations in precision measurements of a weak classical force coupled to quantum mechanical systems, the so-called standard quantum limit (SQL). Among the several contexts exploiting the measurement of classical signals, gravitational wave (GW) detection is of paramount importance. In this framework, we analyze the quantum limited sensitivity of a free test mass, a quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator, two harmonic oscillators with equal masses and different resonance frequencies, and finally two mechanical oscillators with different masses and resonating at the same frequency. The sensitivity analysis of the latter two cases illustrates the potentialities of back-action reduction and classical impedance matching schemes, respectively. By examining coupled quantum oscillators as detectors of classical signals, we found a viable path to approach the SQL for planned or operating GW detectors, such as DUAL and AURIGA.

  9. Generalized power-spectrum Larmor formula for an extended charged particle embedded in a harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marengo, Edwin A.; Khodja, Mohamed R.

    2006-09-01

    The nonrelativistic Larmor radiation formula, giving the power radiated by an accelerated charged point particle, is generalized for a spatially extended particle in the context of the classical charged harmonic oscillator. The particle is modeled as a spherically symmetric rigid charge distribution that possesses both translational and spinning degrees of freedom. The power spectrum obtained exhibits a structure that depends on the form factor of the particle, but reduces, in the limit of an infinitesimally small particle and for the charge distributions considered, to Larmor’s familiar result. It is found that for finite-duration small-enough accelerations as well as perpetual uniform accelerations the power spectrum of the spatially extended particle reduces to that of a point particle. It is also found that when the acceleration is violent or the size parameter of the particle is very large compared to the wavelength of the emitted radiation the power spectrum is highly suppressed. Possible applications are discussed.

  10. Harmonic oscillator representation in the theory of scattering and nuclear reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smirnov, Yuri F.; Shirokov, A. M.; Lurie, Yuri, A.; Zaitsev, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    The following questions, concerning the application of the harmonic oscillator representation (HOR) in the theory of scattering and reactions, are discussed: the formulation of the scattering theory in HOR; exact solutions of the free motion Schroedinger equation in HOR; separable expansion of the short range potentials and the calculation of the phase shifts; 'isolated states' as generalization of the Wigner-von Neumann bound states embedded in continuum; a nuclear coupled channel problem in HOR; and the description of true three body scattering in HOR. As an illustration the soft dipole mode in the (11)Li nucleus is considered in a frame of the (9)Li+n+n cluster model taking into account of three body continuum effects.

  11. Collapse and revival of quantum coherence for a harmonic oscillator interacting with a classical fluctuating environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapani, Jacopo; Bina, Matteo; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2015-02-01

    We address the dynamics of nonclassicality for a quantum system interacting with a noisy fluctuating environment described by a classical stochastic field. As a paradigmatic example, we consider a harmonic oscillator initially prepared in a maximally nonclassical state, e.g., a Fock number state or a Schrödinger-cat-like state, and then coupled to either a resonant or a nonresonant external field. Stochastic modeling allows us to describe the decoherence dynamics without resorting to approximated quantum master equations and to introduce non-Markovian effects in a controlled way. A detailed comparison among different nonclassicality criteria and a thorough analysis of the decoherence time reveal a rich phenomenology whose main features may be summarized as follows: (i) Classical memory effects increase the survival time of quantum coherence and (ii) a detuning between the natural frequency of the system and the central frequency of the classical field induces revivals of quantum coherence.

  12. Revised calculation of four-particle harmonic-oscillator transformation brackets matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickevičius, S.; Germanas, D.; Kalinauskas, R. K.

    2013-02-01

    In this article we present a new, considerably enhanced and more rapid method for calculation of the matrix of four-particle harmonic-oscillator transformation brackets (4HOB). The new method is an improved version of 4HOB matrix calculations which facilitates the matrix calculation by finding the eigenvectors of the 4HOB matrix explicitly. Using this idea the new Fortran code for fast and 4HOB matrix calculation is presented. The calculation time decreases more than a few hundred times for large matrices. As many problems of nuclear and hadron physics structure are modeled on the harmonic oscillator (HO) basis our presented method can be useful for large-scale nuclear structure and many-particle identical fermion systems calculations. Program summaryTitle of program: HOTB_M Catalogue identifier: AEFQ_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFQ_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2149 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17576 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90. Computer: Any computer with Fortran 90 compiler. Operating system: Windows, Linux, FreeBSD, True64 Unix. RAM: Up to a few Gigabytes (see Tables 1 and 2 included in the distribution package) Classification: 17.16, 17.17. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEFQ_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 182(2011)1377 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Calculation of the matrix of the 4HOB in a more effective way, which allows us to calculate the matrix of the brackets up to a few hundred times more rapidly than in a previous version. Solution method: The method is based on compact expressions of 4HOB, presented in [1] and its simplifications presented in this paper. Reasons for new version

  13. Multivariable harmonic balance analysis of the neuronal oscillator for leech swimming.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyong; Zheng, Min; Friesen, W Otto; Iwasaki, Tetsuya

    2008-12-01

    Biological systems, and particularly neuronal circuits, embody a very high level of complexity. Mathematical modeling is therefore essential for understanding how large sets of neurons with complex multiple interconnections work as a functional system. With the increase in computing power, it is now possible to numerically integrate a model with many variables to simulate behavior. However, such analysis can be time-consuming and may not reveal the mechanisms underlying the observed phenomena. An alternative, complementary approach is mathematical analysis, which can demonstrate direct and explicit relationships between a property of interest and system parameters. This paper introduces a mathematical tool for analyzing neuronal oscillator circuits based on multivariable harmonic balance (MHB). The tool is applied to a model of the central pattern generator (CPG) for leech swimming, which comprises a chain of weakly coupled segmental oscillators. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the MHB method and provide analytical explanations for some CPG properties. In particular, the intersegmental phase lag is estimated to be the sum of a nominal value and a perturbation, where the former depends on the structure and span of the neuronal connections and the latter is roughly proportional to the period gradient, communication delay, and the reciprocal of the intersegmental coupling strength. PMID:18663565

  14. The impact damped harmonic oscillator in free decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.; North, C. M.

    1987-01-01

    The impact-damped oscillator in free decay is studied by using time history solutions. A large range of oscillator amplitude is covered. The amount of damping is correlated with the behavior of the impacting mass. There are three behavior regimes: (1) a low amplitude range with less than one impact per cycle and very low damping, (2) a useful middle amplitude range with a finite number of impacts per cycle, and (3) a high amplitude range with an infinite number of impacts per cycle and progressively decreasing damping. For light damping the impact damping in the middle range is: (1) proportional to impactor mass, (2) additive to proportional damping, (3) a unique function of vibration amplitude, (4) proportional to 1-epsilon, where epsilon is the coefficient of restitution, and (5) very roughly inversely proportional to amplitude. The system exhibits jump phenomena and period doublings. An impactor with 2 percent of the oscillator's mass can produce a loss factor near 0.1.

  15. Quantum optics. Quantum harmonic oscillator state synthesis by reservoir engineering.

    PubMed

    Kienzler, D; Lo, H-Y; Keitch, B; de Clercq, L; Leupold, F; Lindenfelser, F; Marinelli, M; Negnevitsky, V; Home, J P

    2015-01-01

    The robust generation of quantum states in the presence of decoherence is a primary challenge for explorations of quantum mechanics at larger scales. Using the mechanical motion of a single trapped ion, we utilize reservoir engineering to generate squeezed, coherent, and displaced-squeezed states as steady states in the presence of noise. We verify the created state by generating two-state correlated spin-motion Rabi oscillations, resulting in high-contrast measurements. For both cooling and measurement, we use spin-oscillator couplings that provide transitions between oscillator states in an engineered Fock state basis. Our approach should facilitate studies of entanglement, quantum computation, and open-system quantum simulations in a wide range of physical systems.

  16. Vibrational spectroscopy and relaxation of an anharmonic oscillator coupled to harmonic bath.

    PubMed

    Joutsuka, Tatsuya; Ando, Koji

    2011-05-28

    The vibrational spectroscopy and relaxation of an anharmonic oscillator coupled to a harmonic bath are examined to assess the applicability of the time correlation function (TCF), the response function, and the semiclassical frequency modulation (SFM) model to the calculation of infrared (IR) spectra. These three approaches are often used in connection with the molecular dynamics simulations but have not been compared in detail. We also analyze the vibrational energy relaxation (VER), which determines the line shape and is itself a pivotal process in energy transport. The IR spectra and VER are calculated using the generalized Langevin equation (GLE), the Gaussian wavepacket (GWP) method, and the quantum master equation (QME). By calculating the vibrational frequency TCF, a detailed analysis of the frequency fluctuation and correlation time of the model is provided. The peak amplitude and width in the IR spectra calculated by the GLE with the harmonic quantum correction are shown to agree well with those by the QME though the vibrational frequency is generally overestimated. The GWP method improves the peak position by considering the zero-point energy and the anharmonicity although the red-shift slightly overshoots the QME reference. The GWP also yields an extra peak in the higher-frequency region than the fundamental transition arising from the difference frequency of the center and width oscillations of a wavepacket. The SFM approach underestimates the peak amplitude of the IR spectra but well reproduces the peak width. Further, the dependence of the VER rate on the strength of an excitation pulse is discussed. PMID:21639460

  17. M-shaped asymmetric nonlinear oscillator for broadband vibration energy harvesting: Harmonic balance analysis and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leadenham, S.; Erturk, A.

    2014-11-01

    Over the past few years, nonlinear oscillators have been given growing attention due to their ability to enhance the performance of energy harvesting devices by increasing the frequency bandwidth. Duffing oscillators are a type of nonlinear oscillator characterized by a symmetric hardening or softening cubic restoring force. In order to realize the cubic nonlinearity in a cantilever at reasonable excitation levels, often an external magnetic field or mechanical load is imposed, since the inherent geometric nonlinearity would otherwise require impractically high excitation levels to be pronounced. As an alternative to magnetoelastic structures and other complex forms of symmetric Duffing oscillators, an M-shaped nonlinear bent beam with clamped end conditions is presented and investigated for bandwidth enhancement under base excitation. The proposed M-shaped oscillator made of spring steel is very easy to fabricate as it does not require extra discrete components to assemble, and furthermore, its asymmetric nonlinear behavior can be pronounced yielding broadband behavior under low excitation levels. For a prototype configuration, linear and nonlinear system parameters extracted from experiments are used to develop a lumped-parameter mathematical model. Quadratic damping is included in the model to account for nonlinear dissipative effects. A multi-term harmonic balance solution is obtained to study the effects of higher harmonics and a constant term. A single-term closed-form frequency response equation is also extracted and compared with the multi-term harmonic balance solution. It is observed that the single-term solution overestimates the frequency of upper saddle-node bifurcation point and underestimates the response magnitude in the large response branch. Multi-term solutions can be as accurate as time-domain solutions, with the advantage of significantly reduced computation time. Overall, substantial bandwidth enhancement with increasing base excitation is

  18. su(2) Lie algebra approach for the Feynman propagator of the one-dimensional harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, D.; Avendaño, C. G.

    2014-04-01

    We evaluate the Feynman propagator for the harmonic oscillator in one dimension. Considering the ladder operators for the Hamiltonian of this system, we construct a set of operators which satisfy the su(2) Lie algebra to obtain Mehler’s formula.

  19. Two-parameter double-oscillator model of Mathews-Lakshmanan type: Series solutions and supersymmetric partners

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze-Halberg, Axel E-mail: xbataxel@gmail.com; Wang, Jie

    2015-07-15

    We obtain series solutions, the discrete spectrum, and supersymmetric partners for a quantum double-oscillator system. Its potential features a superposition of the one-parameter Mathews-Lakshmanan interaction and a one-parameter harmonic or inverse harmonic oscillator contribution. Furthermore, our results are transferred to a generalized Pöschl-Teller model that is isospectral to the double-oscillator system.

  20. Harmonic mode competition in a terahertz gyrotron backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, S. H.; Chiu, C. C.; Chang, P. C.; Wu, K. L.; Chu, K. R.

    2012-10-15

    Electron cyclotron maser interactions at terahertz (THz) frequencies require a high-order-mode structure to reduce the wall loss to a tolerable level. To generate THz radiation, it is also essential to employ cyclotron harmonic resonances to reduce the required magnetic field strength to a value within the capability of the superconducting magnets. However, much weaker harmonic interactions in a high-order-mode structure lead to serious mode competition problems. The current paper addresses harmonic mode competition in the gyrotron backward wave oscillator (gyro-BWO). We begin with a comparative study of the mode formation and oscillation thresholds in the gyro-BWO and gyromonotron. Differences in linear features result in far fewer 'windows' for harmonic operation of the gyro-BWO. Nonlinear consequences of these differences are examined in particle simulations of the multimode competition processes in the gyro-BWO, which shed light on the competition criteria between modes of different as well as the same cyclotron harmonic numbers. The viability of a harmonic gyro-BWO is assessed on the basis of the results obtained.

  1. HOTB: High precision parallel code for calculation of four-particle harmonic oscillator transformation brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepšys, A.; Mickevicius, S.; Germanas, D.; Kalinauskas, R. K.

    2014-11-01

    This new version of the HOTB program for calculation of the three and four particle harmonic oscillator transformation brackets provides some enhancements and corrections to the earlier version (Germanas et al., 2010) [1]. In particular, new version allows calculations of harmonic oscillator transformation brackets be performed in parallel using MPI parallel communication standard. Moreover, higher precision of intermediate calculations using GNU Quadruple Precision and arbitrary precision library FMLib [2] is done. A package of Fortran code is presented. Calculation time of large matrices can be significantly reduced using effective parallel code. Use of Higher Precision methods in intermediate calculations increases the stability of algorithms and extends the validity of used algorithms for larger input values. Catalogue identifier: AEFQ_v4_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFQ_v4_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 Number of lines in programs, including test data, etc.: 1711 Number of bytes in distributed programs, including test data, etc.: 11667 Distribution format: tar.gz Program language used: FORTRAN 90 with MPI extensions for parallelism Computer: Any computer with FORTRAN 90 compiler Operating system: Windows, Linux, FreeBSD, True64 Unix Has the code been vectorized of parallelized?: Yes, parallelism using MPI extensions. Number of CPUs used: up to 999 RAM(per CPU core): Depending on allocated binomial and trinomial matrices and use of precision; at least 500 MB Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEFQ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181, Issue 2, (2010) 420-425 Does the new version supersede the previous version? Yes Nature of problem: Calculation of matrices of three-particle harmonic oscillator brackets (3HOB) and four-particle harmonic oscillator brackets (4HOB) in a more

  2. Coherent dynamics of a flux qubit coupled to a harmonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Chiorescu, I; Bertet, P; Semba, K; Nakamura, Y; Harmans, C J P M; Mooij, J E

    2004-09-01

    In the emerging field of quantum computation and quantum information, superconducting devices are promising candidates for the implementation of solid-state quantum bits (qubits). Single-qubit operations, direct coupling between two qubits and the realization of a quantum gate have been reported. However, complex manipulation of entangled states-such as the coupling of a two-level system to a quantum harmonic oscillator, as demonstrated in ion/atom-trap experiments and cavity quantum electrodynamics-has yet to be achieved for superconducting devices. Here we demonstrate entanglement between a superconducting flux qubit (a two-level system) and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The latter provides the measurement system for detecting the quantum states; it is also an effective inductance that, in parallel with an external shunt capacitance, acts as a harmonic oscillator. We achieve generation and control of the entangled state by performing microwave spectroscopy and detecting the resultant Rabi oscillations of the coupled system. PMID:15356624

  3. Self-sustained oscillation and harmonic generation in optomechanical systems with quadratic couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Kong, Hong-Yan

    2014-02-01

    Many works are based on the steady-state analysis of mean-value dynamics in electro- or optomechanical systems to explore vibration cooling, squeezing, and quantum-state controlling of massive objects. These studies are always conducted in a red-detuned pumping field under a lower power to maintain a stable situation. In this paper we consider self-sustained oscillations of a cavity-field-driven oscillator combined with quadratic coupling in a blue-detuned regime above a pumping threshold. Our study finds that the oscillator will be far away from its steady-state behavior by conducting a self-sustained oscillation with a discrete amplitude locking effect producing a rich energy-balanced structure. The dynamical backaction of this self-oscillation on the field mode induces a multipeak field spectrum, which implies an efficient harmonic generation with its intensity modified not only by the displacement x0 but also by the amplitude A of the mechanical oscillation. The corresponding nonlinear field spectrum and its magnitude are analytically analyzed with quadratic coupling when the mechanical oscillator is dynamically locked to a self-sustained oscillation.

  4. Quenching of vortex breakdown oscillations via harmonic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, J. M.; Cui, Y. D.; Marques, F.; Lim, T. T.

    Vortex breakdown is a phenomenon inherent to many practical problems, such as leading-edge vortices on aircraft, atmospheric tornadoes, and flame-holders in combustion devices. The breakdown of these vortices is associated with the stagnation of the axial velocity on the vortex axis and the development of a near-axis recirculation zone. For large enough Reynolds number, the breakdown can be time-dependent. The unsteadiness can have serious consequences in some applications, such as tail-buffeting in aircraft flying at high angles of attack. There has been much interest in controlling the vortex breakdown phenomenon, but most efforts have focused on either shifting the threshold for the onset of steady breakdown or altering the spatial location of the recirculation zone. There has been much less attention paid to the problem of controlling unsteady vortex breakdown. Here we present results from a combined experimental and numerical investigation of vortex breakdown in an enclosed cylinder in which low-amplitude modulations of the rotating endwall that sets up the vortex are used as an open-loop control. As expected, for very low amplitudes of the modulation, variation of the modulation frequency reveals typical resonance tongues and frequency locking, so that the open-loop control allows us to drive the unsteady vortex breakdown to a prescribed periodicity within the resonance regions. For modulation amplitudes above a critical level that depends on the modulation frequency (but still very low), the result is a periodic state synchronous with the forcing frequency over an extensive range of forcing frequencies. Of particular interest is the spatial form of this forced periodic state: for modulation frequencies less than about twice the natural frequency of the unsteady breakdown, the oscillations of the near-axis recirculation zone are amplified, whereas for modulation frequencies larger than about twice the natural frequency the oscillations of the recirculation

  5. Nonstandard conserved Hamiltonian structures in dissipative/damped systems: Nonlinear generalizations of damped harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Pradeep, R. Gladwin; Chandrasekar, V. K.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2009-05-15

    In this paper we point out the existence of a remarkable nonlocal transformation between the damped harmonic oscillator and a modified Emden-type nonlinear oscillator equation with linear forcing, xe+{alpha}xx+{beta}x{sup 3}+{gamma}x=0, which preserves the form of the time independent integral, conservative Hamiltonian, and the equation of motion. Generalizing this transformation we prove the existence of nonstandard conservative Hamiltonian structure for a general class of damped nonlinear oscillators including Lienard-type systems. Further, using the above Hamiltonian structure for a specific example, namely, the generalized modified Emden equation xe+{alpha}x{sup q}x+{beta}x{sup 2q+1}=0, where {alpha}, {beta}, and q are arbitrary parameters, the general solution is obtained through appropriate canonical transformations. We also present the conservative Hamiltonian structure of the damped Mathews-Lakshmanan oscillator equation. The associated Lagrangian description for all the above systems is also briefly discussed.

  6. Coherent states for nonlinear harmonic oscillator and some of its properties

    SciTech Connect

    Amir, Naila E-mail: naila.amir@sns.nust.edu.pk; Iqbal, Shahid E-mail: siqbal@sns.nust.edu.pk

    2015-06-15

    A one-dimensional nonlinear harmonic oscillator is studied in the context of generalized coherent states. We develop a perturbative framework to compute the eigenvalues and eigenstates for the quantum nonlinear oscillator and construct the generalized coherent states based on Gazeau-Klauder formalism. We analyze their statistical properties by means of Mandel parameter and second order correlation function. Our analysis reveals that the constructed coherent states exhibit super-Poissonian statistics. Moreover, it is shown that the coherent states mimic the phenomena of quantum revivals and fractional revivals during their time evolution. The validity of our results has been discussed in terms of various parametric bounds imposed by our computational scheme.

  7. The Harmonic Oscillator Influenced by Gravitational Wave in Noncommutative Quantum Phase Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakup, Rehimhaji; Dulat, Sayipjamal; Li, Kang; Hekim, Mamatabdulla

    2014-04-01

    Dynamical property of harmonic oscillator affected by linearized gravitational wave (LGW) is studied in a particular case of both position and momentum operators which are noncommutative to each other. By using the generalized Bopp's shift, we, at first, derived the Hamiltonian in the noncommutative phase space (NPS) and, then, calculated the time evolution of coordinate and momentum operators in the Heisenberg representation. Tiny vibration of flat Minkowski space and effect of NPS let the Hamiltonian of harmonic oscillator, moving in the plain, get new extra terms from it's original and noncommutative space partner. At the end, for simplicity, we take the general form of the LGW into gravitational plain wave, obtain the explicit expression of coordinate and momentum operators.

  8. Superdiffusion of Energy in a Chain of Harmonic Oscillators with Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara, Milton; Komorowski, Tomasz; Olla, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    We consider a one dimensional infinite chain of harmonic oscillators whose dynamics is perturbed by a stochastic term conserving energy and momentum. We prove that in the unpinned case the macroscopic evolution of the energy converges to the solution of the fractional diffusion equation . For a pinned system we prove that its energy evolves diffusively, generalizing some results of Basile and Olla (J. Stat. Phys. 155(6):1126-1142, 2014).

  9. Corrections to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for a harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Chris W.

    1993-02-01

    We derive simple expressions for the energy corrections to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation valid for a harmonic oscillator. We apply these corrections to the electronic and rotational ground state of H+2 and show that the diabatic energy corrections are linearly dependent on the vibrational quantum numbers as seen in recent variational calculations [D. A. Kohl and E. J. Shipsey, J. Chem. Phys. 84, 2707 (1986)].

  10. Joint entropy and decoherence without dissipation in a driven harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotue, A. J.; Wirngo, A. V.; Keumo Tsiaze, R. M.; Hounkonnou, M. N.

    2016-09-01

    The joint entropy of a non-dissipative driven harmonic oscillator for both the single and the double Gaussian states is determined. It is shown that, a non-random driving force does not influence the evolution of the system's joint entropy. For a random driving force however, the joint entropy increases almost monotonically with time, while exhibiting oscillatory behavior. The increase is a further proof of the decoherence mechanism in the system, for which we determine the duration and other characteristics.

  11. Transient energy excitation in shortcuts to adiabaticity for the time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xi; Muga, J. G.

    2010-11-15

    We study for the time-dependent harmonic oscillator the transient energy excitation in speed-up processes ('shortcuts to adiabaticity') designed to reproduce the initial populations at some predetermined final frequency and time. We provide lower bounds and examples. Implications for the limits imposed to the process times and for the principle of unattainability of the absolute zero, in a single expansion or in quantum refrigerator cycles, are drawn.

  12. Evidence for Harmonic Content and Frequency Evolution of Oscillations During the Rising Phase of X-ray Bursts From 4U 1636-536

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bgattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, E.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a study of the evolution of burst oscillation properties during the rising phase of X-ray bursts from 4U 1636-536 observed with the proportional counter array (PCA) on board the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) . We present evidence for significant harmonic structure of burst oscillation pulses during the early rising phases of bursts. This is the first such detection in burst rise oscillations, and is very important for constraining neutron star structure parameters and the equation of state models of matter at the core of a neutron star. The detection of harmonic content only during the initial portions of the burst rise is consistent with the theoretical expectation that with time the thermonuclear burning region becomes larger, and hence the fundamental and harmonic amplitudes both diminish. We also find, for the first time from this source, strong evidence of oscillation frequency increase during the burst rise. The timing behavior of harmonic content, amplitude, and frequency of burst rise oscillations may be important in understanding the spreading of thermonuclear flames under the extreme physical conditions on neutron star surfaces.

  13. Quantum spatial-periodic harmonic model for daily price-limited stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangyi; Zhang, Jian-Wei; Xu, Jingjing; Guo, Hong

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the behaviors of stocks in daily price-limited stock markets by purposing a quantum spatial-periodic harmonic model. The stock price is considered to be oscillating and damping in a quantum spatial-periodic harmonic oscillator potential well. A complicated non-linear relation including inter-band positive correlation and intra-band negative correlation between the volatility and trading volume of a stock is numerically derived with the energy band structure of the model concerned. The effectiveness of price limit is re-examined, with some observed characteristics of price-limited stock markets in China studied by applying our quantum model.

  14. Brownian motion of a classical harmonic oscillator in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Aquino, J I; Velasco, R M; Uribe, F J

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, the stochastic diffusion process of a charged classical harmonic oscillator in a constant magnetic field is exactly described through the analytical solution of the associated Langevin equation. Due to the presence of the magnetic field, stochastic diffusion takes place across and along the magnetic field. Along the magnetic field, the Brownian motion is exactly the same as that of the ordinary one-dimensional classical harmonic oscillator, which was very well described in Chandrasekhar's celebrated paper [Rev. Mod. Phys. 15, 1 (1943)]. Across the magnetic field, the stochastic process takes place on a plane, perpendicular to the magnetic field. For internally Gaussian white noise, this planar-diffusion process is exactly described through the first two moments of the positions and velocities and their corresponding cross correlations. In the absence of the magnetic field, our analytical results are the same as those calculated by Chandrasekhar for the ordinary harmonic oscillator. The stochastic planar diffusion is also well characterized in the overdamped approximation, through the solutions of the Langevin equation.

  15. Using harmonic oscillators to determine the spot size of Hermite-Gaussian laser beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steely, Sidney L.

    1993-01-01

    The similarity of the functional forms of quantum mechanical harmonic oscillators and the modes of Hermite-Gaussian laser beams is illustrated. This functional similarity provides a direct correlation to investigate the spot size of large-order mode Hermite-Gaussian laser beams. The classical limits of a corresponding two-dimensional harmonic oscillator provide a definition of the spot size of Hermite-Gaussian laser beams. The classical limits of the harmonic oscillator provide integration limits for the photon probability densities of the laser beam modes to determine the fraction of photons detected therein. Mathematica is used to integrate the probability densities for large-order beam modes and to illustrate the functional similarities. The probabilities of detecting photons within the classical limits of Hermite-Gaussian laser beams asymptotically approach unity in the limit of large-order modes, in agreement with the Correspondence Principle. The classical limits for large-order modes include all of the nodes for Hermite Gaussian laser beams; Sturm's theorem provides a direct proof.

  16. The harmonic oscillator on Riemannian and Lorentzian configuration spaces of constant curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñena, José F.; Rañada, Manuel F.; Santander, Mariano

    2008-03-01

    The harmonic oscillator as a distinguished dynamical system can be defined not only on the Euclidean plane but also on the sphere and on the hyperbolic plane, and more generally on any configuration space with constant curvature and metric of any signature, either Riemannian (definite positive) or Lorentzian (indefinite). In this paper we study the main properties of these "curved" harmonic oscillators simultaneously on any such configuration space, using a Cayley-Klein (CK)-type approach, with two free parameters κ1,κ2 which altogether correspond to the possible values for curvature and signature type: the generic Riemannian and Lorentzian spaces of constant curvature (sphere S2, hyperbolic plane H2, AntiDeSitter sphere AdS1+1, and DeSitter sphere dS1+1) appear in this family, with Euclidean and Minkowski spaces as flat particular cases. We solve the equations of motion for the curved harmonic oscillator and obtain explicit expressions for the orbits by using three different methods: by direct integration, by obtaining the general CK version of Binet's equation, and finally as a consequence of its superintegrable character. The orbits are conics with center at the potential origin on any CK space, thereby extending this well known Euclidean property to any constant curvature configuration space. The final part of the article, that has a more geometric character, presents pertinent results of the theory of conics on spaces of constant curvature.

  17. Rotational shear effects on edge harmonic oscillations in DIII-D quiescent H-mode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Burrell, K. H.; Ferraro, N. M.; Osborne, T. H.; Austin, M. E.; Garofalo, A. M.; Groebner, R. J.; Kramer, G. J.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; McKee, G. R.; Muscatello, C. M.; Nazikian, R.; Ren, X.; Snyder, P. B.; Solomon, W. M.; Tobias, B. J.; Yan, Z.

    2016-07-01

    In the quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) regime, edge harmonic oscillations (EHOs) play an important role in avoiding transient edge localized mode (ELM) power fluxes by providing benign and continuous edge particle transport. A detailed theoretical, experimental and modeling comparison has been made of low-n (n  ⩽  5) EHO in DIII-D QH-mode plasmas. The calculated linear eigenmode structure from the extended magentoohydrodynamics (MHD) code M3D-C1 matches closely the coherent EHO properties from external magnetics data and internal measurements using the ECE, BES, ECE-Imaging and microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) diagnostics, as well as the kink/peeling mode properties found by the ideal MHD code ELITE. Numerical investigations indicate that the low-n EHO-like solutions from M3D-C1 are destabilized by rotation and/or rotational shear while high-n modes are stabilized. This effect is independent of the rotation direction, suggesting that EHOs can be destabilized in principle with rotation in either direction. The modeling results are consistent with observations of EHO, support the proposed theory of the EHO as a low-n kink/peeling mode destabilized by edge E  ×  B rotational shear, and improve our understanding and confidence in creating and sustaining QH-mode in present and future devices.

  18. The quantum harmonic oscillator on the sphere and the hyperbolic plane: {kappa}-dependent formalism, polar coordinates, and hypergeometric functions

    SciTech Connect

    Carinena, Jose F.; Ranada, Manuel F.; Santander, Mariano

    2007-10-15

    A nonlinear model representing the quantum harmonic oscillator on the sphere and the hyperbolic plane is solved in polar coordinates (r,{phi}) by making use of a curvature-dependent formalism. The curvature {kappa} is considered as a parameter and then the radial Schroedinger equation becomes a {kappa}-dependent Gauss hypergeometric equation. The energy spectrum and the wave functions are exactly obtained in both the sphere S{sup 2} ({kappa}>0) and the hyperbolic plane H{sup 2} ({kappa}<0). A comparative study between the spherical and the hyperbolic quantum results is presented.

  19. A Back-to-Front Derivation: The Equal Spacing of Quantum Levels Is a Proof of Simple Harmonic Oscillator Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, David L.; Romero, Luciana C. Davila

    2009-01-01

    The dynamical behaviour of simple harmonic motion can be found in numerous natural phenomena. Within the quantum realm of atomic, molecular and optical systems, two main features are associated with harmonic oscillations: a finite ground-state energy and equally spaced quantum energy levels. Here it is shown that there is in fact a one-to-one…

  20. Thermodynamical analysis of a quantum heat engine based on harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Insinga, Andrea; Andresen, Bjarne; Salamon, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Many models of heat engines have been studied with the tools of finite-time thermodynamics and an ensemble of independent quantum systems as the working fluid. Because of their convenient analytical properties, harmonic oscillators are the most frequently used example of a quantum system. We analyze different thermodynamical aspects with the final aim of the optimization of the performance of the engine in terms of the mechanical power provided during a finite-time Otto cycle. The heat exchange mechanism between the working fluid and the thermal reservoirs is provided by the Lindblad formalism. We describe an analytical method to find the limit cycle and give conditions for a stable limit cycle to exist. We explore the power production landscape as the duration of the four branches of the cycle are varied for short times, intermediate times, and special frictionless times. For short times we find a periodic structure with atolls of purely dissipative operation surrounding islands of divergent behavior where, rather than tending to a limit cycle, the working fluid accumulates more and more energy. For frictionless times the periodic structure is gone and we come very close to the global optimal operation. The global optimum is found and interestingly comes with a particular value of the cycle time. PMID:27575089

  1. Thermodynamical analysis of a quantum heat engine based on harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insinga, Andrea; Andresen, Bjarne; Salamon, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Many models of heat engines have been studied with the tools of finite-time thermodynamics and an ensemble of independent quantum systems as the working fluid. Because of their convenient analytical properties, harmonic oscillators are the most frequently used example of a quantum system. We analyze different thermodynamical aspects with the final aim of the optimization of the performance of the engine in terms of the mechanical power provided during a finite-time Otto cycle. The heat exchange mechanism between the working fluid and the thermal reservoirs is provided by the Lindblad formalism. We describe an analytical method to find the limit cycle and give conditions for a stable limit cycle to exist. We explore the power production landscape as the duration of the four branches of the cycle are varied for short times, intermediate times, and special frictionless times. For short times we find a periodic structure with atolls of purely dissipative operation surrounding islands of divergent behavior where, rather than tending to a limit cycle, the working fluid accumulates more and more energy. For frictionless times the periodic structure is gone and we come very close to the global optimal operation. The global optimum is found and interestingly comes with a particular value of the cycle time.

  2. 𝒩 = 2 supersymmetric harmonic oscillator: Basic brackets without canonical conjugate momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, N.; Shukla, A.; Malik, R. P.

    2015-09-01

    We exploit the ideas of spin-statistics theorem, normal-ordering and the key concepts behind the symmetry principles to derive the canonical (anti)commutators for the case of a one (0 + 1)-dimensional (1D) 𝒩 = 2 supersymmetric (SUSY) harmonic oscillator (HO) without taking the help of the mathematical definition of canonical conjugate momenta with respect to the bosonic and fermionic variables of this toy model for the Hodge theory (where the continuous and discrete symmetries of the theory provide the physical realizations of the de Rham cohomological operators of differential geometry). In our present endeavor, it is the full set of continuous symmetries and their corresponding generators that lead to the derivation of basic (anti)commutators amongst the creation and annihilation operators that appear in the normal mode expansions of the dynamical fermionic and bosonic variables of our present 𝒩 = 2 SUSY theory of a HO. These basic brackets are in complete agreement with such kind of brackets that are derived from the standard canonical method of quantization scheme.

  3. Thermodynamical analysis of a quantum heat engine based on harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Insinga, Andrea; Andresen, Bjarne; Salamon, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Many models of heat engines have been studied with the tools of finite-time thermodynamics and an ensemble of independent quantum systems as the working fluid. Because of their convenient analytical properties, harmonic oscillators are the most frequently used example of a quantum system. We analyze different thermodynamical aspects with the final aim of the optimization of the performance of the engine in terms of the mechanical power provided during a finite-time Otto cycle. The heat exchange mechanism between the working fluid and the thermal reservoirs is provided by the Lindblad formalism. We describe an analytical method to find the limit cycle and give conditions for a stable limit cycle to exist. We explore the power production landscape as the duration of the four branches of the cycle are varied for short times, intermediate times, and special frictionless times. For short times we find a periodic structure with atolls of purely dissipative operation surrounding islands of divergent behavior where, rather than tending to a limit cycle, the working fluid accumulates more and more energy. For frictionless times the periodic structure is gone and we come very close to the global optimal operation. The global optimum is found and interestingly comes with a particular value of the cycle time.

  4. The Harmonic Oscillator in the Classical Limit of a Minimal-Length Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintela, T. S.; Fabris, J. C.; Nogueira, J. A.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we explicitly solve the problem of the harmonic oscillator in the classical limit of a minimal-length scenario. We show that (i) the motion equation of the oscillator is not linear anymore because the presence of a minimal length introduces an anarmonic term and (ii) its motion is described by a Jacobi sine elliptic function. Therefore, the motion is periodic with the same amplitude and with the new period depending on the minimal length. This result (the change in the period of oscillation) is very important since it enables us to find in a quite simple way the most relevant effect of the presence of a minimal length and consequently traces of the Planck-scale physics. We show applications of our results in spectroscopy and gravity.

  5. HOTB: High precision parallel code for calculation of four-particle harmonic oscillator transformation brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepšys, A.; Mickevicius, S.; Germanas, D.; Kalinauskas, R. K.

    2014-11-01

    This new version of the HOTB program for calculation of the three and four particle harmonic oscillator transformation brackets provides some enhancements and corrections to the earlier version (Germanas et al., 2010) [1]. In particular, new version allows calculations of harmonic oscillator transformation brackets be performed in parallel using MPI parallel communication standard. Moreover, higher precision of intermediate calculations using GNU Quadruple Precision and arbitrary precision library FMLib [2] is done. A package of Fortran code is presented. Calculation time of large matrices can be significantly reduced using effective parallel code. Use of Higher Precision methods in intermediate calculations increases the stability of algorithms and extends the validity of used algorithms for larger input values. Catalogue identifier: AEFQ_v4_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFQ_v4_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 Number of lines in programs, including test data, etc.: 1711 Number of bytes in distributed programs, including test data, etc.: 11667 Distribution format: tar.gz Program language used: FORTRAN 90 with MPI extensions for parallelism Computer: Any computer with FORTRAN 90 compiler Operating system: Windows, Linux, FreeBSD, True64 Unix Has the code been vectorized of parallelized?: Yes, parallelism using MPI extensions. Number of CPUs used: up to 999 RAM(per CPU core): Depending on allocated binomial and trinomial matrices and use of precision; at least 500 MB Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEFQ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181, Issue 2, (2010) 420-425 Does the new version supersede the previous version? Yes Nature of problem: Calculation of matrices of three-particle harmonic oscillator brackets (3HOB) and four-particle harmonic oscillator brackets (4HOB) in a more

  6. Properties of infrared extrapolations in a harmonic oscillator basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, Sidney A.; Kruse, Michael K. G.

    2016-02-01

    The success and utility of effective field theory (EFT) in explaining the structure and reactions of few-nucleon systems has prompted the initiation of EFT-inspired extrapolations to larger model spaces in ab initio methods such as the no-core shell model (NCSM). In this contribution, we review and continue our studies of infrared (ir) and ultraviolet (uv) regulators of NCSM calculations in which the input is phenomenological NN and NNN interactions fitted to data. We extend our previous findings that an extrapolation in the ir cutoff with the uv cutoff above the intrinsic uv scale of the interaction is quite successful, not only for the eigenstates of the Hamiltonian but also for expectation values of operators, such as r2, considered long range. The latter results are obtained with Hamiltonians transformed by the similarity renormalization group (SRG) evolution. On the other hand, a possible extrapolation of ground state energies in the uv cutoff when the ir cutoff is below the intrinsic ir scale is not robust and does not agree with the ir extrapolation of the same data or with independent calculations using other methods.

  7. Stability Analysis of a Second Harmonic Coaxial-Waveguide Gyrotron Backward-Wave Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, C. L.; Hong, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    This study analyzes the stability of a Ka-band second harmonic gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO) with a coaxial interaction waveguide. All of the possible competing modes in the frequency tuning range are considered. To suppress various competing modes, the downstream part of the coaxial interaction waveguide is loaded with distributed losses. Although the competing modes have different kinds of transverse field distributions, simulation results show that the losses of the outer cylinder and those of the inner cylinder serve as complementary means of suppressing the competing modes. The losses can stabilize the competing modes while having minor effects on the start-oscillation current of the operating mode. Detailed investigations were performed involving the dependence of the start-oscillation currents on the parameters of the lossy inner cylinder and the lossy outer cylinder, including the resistivity and the length of the lossy section. Moreover, under stable operating conditions, the performances of the second harmonic coaxial gyro-BWO with different sets of circuit parameters are predicted and compared.

  8. The residue harmonic balance for fractional order van der Pol like oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, A. Y. T.; Yang, H. X.; Guo, Z. J.

    2012-02-01

    When seeking a solution in series form, the number of terms needed to satisfy some preset requirements is unknown in the beginning. An iterative formulation is proposed so that when an approximation is available, the number of effective terms can be doubled in one iteration by solving a set of linear equations. This is a new extension of the Newton iteration in solving nonlinear algebraic equations to solving nonlinear differential equations by series. When Fourier series is employed, the method is called the residue harmonic balance. In this paper, the fractional order van der Pol oscillator with fractional restoring and damping forces is considered. The residue harmonic balance method is used for generating the higher-order approximations to the angular frequency and the period solutions of above mentioned fractional oscillator. The highly accurate solutions to angular frequency and limit cycle of the fractional order van der Pol equations are obtained analytically. The results that are obtained reveal that the proposed method is very effective for obtaining asymptotic solutions of autonomous nonlinear oscillation systems containing fractional derivatives. The influence of the fractional order on the geometry of the limit cycle is investigated for the first time.

  9. Use of videos for students to see the effect of changing gravity on harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benge, Raymond; Young, Charlotte; Worley, Alan; Davis, Shirley; Smith, Linda; Gell, Amber

    2010-03-01

    In introductory physics classes, students are introduced to harmonic oscillators such as masses on springs and the simple pendulum. In derivation of the equations describing these systems, the term ``g'' for the acceleration due to gravity cancels in the equation for the period of a mass oscillating on a spring, but it remains in the equation for the period of a pendulum. Frequently there is a homework problem asking how the system described would behave on the Moon, Mars, etc. Students have to have faith in the equations. In January, 2009, a team of community college faculty flew an experiment aboard an aircraft in conjunction with NASA's Microgravity University program. The experiment flown was a study in harmonic oscillator and pendulum behavior under various gravity situations. The aircraft simulated zero gravity, Martian, Lunar, and hypergravity conditions. The experiments were video recorded for students to study the behavior of the systems in varying gravity conditions. These videos are now available on the internet for anyone to use in introductory physics classes.

  10. Optical detection of harmonic oscillations in fluorescent dye-loaded microbubbles ensonified by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Schutt, Carolyn E; Ibsen, Stuart; Benchimol, Michael; Hsu, Mark; Esener, Sadik

    2015-06-15

    A new optical contrast agent has been developed by exposing dye-loaded microbubbles to a rapidly-cooled thermal treatment to homogenize the dye distribution across the surface. Ultrasound causes these microbubbles to oscillate in size which changes the self-quenching efficiency of the dye molecules creating a "blinking" signal. We demonstrate for the first time that these microbubbles can reproducibly generate second, third, and even fourth harmonic fluorescence intensity modulations, in addition to the fundamental frequency of the driving ultrasound. Detecting these harmonic signals could produce a higher signal-to-noise ratio for fluorescence imaging in medical applications by allowing fundamental frequency interference and artifacts to be filtered out. PMID:26076274

  11. Harmonic Pinnacles in the Discrete Gaussian Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubetzky, Eyal; Martinelli, Fabio; Sly, Allan

    2016-06-01

    The 2 D Discrete Gaussian model gives each height function {η : {mathbb{Z}^2tomathbb{Z}}} a probability proportional to {exp(-β mathcal{H}(η))}, where {β} is the inverse-temperature and {mathcal{H}(η) = sum_{x˜ y}(η_x-η_y)^2} sums over nearest-neighbor bonds. We consider the model at large fixed {β}, where it is flat unlike its continuous analog (the Discrete Gaussian Free Field). We first establish that the maximum height in an {L× L} box with 0 boundary conditions concentrates on two integers M, M + 1 with {M˜ √{(1/2πβ)log Lloglog L}}. The key is a large deviation estimate for the height at the origin in {mathbb{Z}2}, dominated by "harmonic pinnacles", integer approximations of a harmonic variational problem. Second, in this model conditioned on {η≥ 0} (a floor), the average height rises, and in fact the height of almost all sites concentrates on levels H, H + 1 where {H˜ M/√{2}}. This in particular pins down the asymptotics, and corrects the order, in results of Bricmont et al. (J. Stat. Phys. 42(5-6):743-798, 1986), where it was argued that the maximum and the height of the surface above a floor are both of order {√{log L}}. Finally, our methods extend to other classical surface models (e.g., restricted SOS), featuring connections to p-harmonic analysis and alternating sign matrices.

  12. Stochastic resonance in a fractional harmonic oscillator subject to random mass and signal-modulated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Zhu, Cheng-Yin; Cheng, Xiao-Feng; Li, Heng

    2016-10-01

    Stochastic resonance in a fractional harmonic oscillator with random mass and signal-modulated noise is investigated. Applying linear system theory and the characteristics of the noises, the analysis expression of the mean output-amplitude-gain (OAG) is obtained. It is shown that the OAG varies non-monotonically with the increase of the intensity of the multiplicative dichotomous noise, with the increase of the frequency of the driving force, as well as with the increase of the system frequency. In addition, the OAG is a non-monotonic function of the system friction coefficient, as a function of the viscous damping coefficient, as a function of the fractional exponent.

  13. Propagators of isochronous an-harmonic oscillators and Mehler formula for the exceptional Hermite polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupasov-Maksimov, Andrey M.

    2015-12-01

    It is shown that fundamental solutions Kσ(x , y ; t) = < x |e  - i Hσ t | y > of the non-stationary Schrödinger equation (Green functions, or propagators) for the rational extensions of the Harmonic oscillator Hσ =Hosc + ΔVσ are expressed in terms of elementary functions only. An algorithm to calculate explicitly Kσ for an arbitrary increasing sequence of positive integers σ is given, and compact expressions for K { 1 , 2 } and K { 2 , 3 } are presented. A generalization of Mehler's formula to the case of exceptional Hermite polynomials is given.

  14. Harmonic oscillators and resonance series generated by a periodic unstable classical orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazansky, A. K.; Ostrovsky, Valentin N.

    1995-01-01

    The presence of an unstable periodic classical orbit allows one to introduce the decay time as a purely classical magnitude: inverse of the Lyapunov index which characterizes the orbit instability. The Uncertainty Relation gives the corresponding resonance width which is proportional to the Planck constant. The more elaborate analysis is based on the parabolic equation method where the problem is effectively reduced to the multidimensional harmonic oscillator with the time-dependent frequency. The resonances form series in the complex energy plane which is equidistant in the direction perpendicular to the real axis. The applications of the general approach to various problems in atomic physics are briefly exposed.

  15. Heat transport through lattices of quantum harmonic oscillators in arbitrary dimensions.

    PubMed

    Asadian, A; Manzano, D; Tiersch, M; Briegel, H J

    2013-01-01

    In d-dimensional lattices of coupled quantum harmonic oscillators, we analyze the heat current caused by two thermal baths of different temperatures, which are coupled to opposite ends of the lattice, with a focus on the validity of Fourier's law of heat conduction. We provide analytical solutions of the heat current through the quantum system in the nonequilibrium steady state using the rotating-wave approximation and bath interactions described by a master equation of Lindblad form. The influence of local dephasing in the transition of ballistic to diffusive transport is investigated.

  16. Generalized Hopf Fibration and Geometric SO(3) Reduction of the 4DOF Harmonic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, J. C.; Crespo, F.; Ferrer, S.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that the generalized Hopf map ℍ × ℍ → ℍ × ℝ × ℝ quaternion formulation can be interpreted as an SO(3) orbit map for a symplectic SO(3) action. As a consequence the generalized Hopf fibration S7 → S4 appears in the SO(3) geometric symplectic reduction of the 4DOF isotropic harmonic oscillator. Furthermore it is shown how the Hopf fibration and associated twistor fibration play a role in the geometry of the Kepler problem and the rigid body problem.

  17. Semiclassical analysis of long-wavelength multiphoton processes: The periodically driven harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Ronald F.; Vela-Arevalo, Luz V.

    2002-11-01

    The problem of multiphoton processes for intense, long-wavelength irradiation of atomic and molecular electrons is presented. The recently developed method of quasiadiabatic time evolution is used to obtain a nonperturbative analysis. When applied to the standard vector potential coupling, an exact auxiliary equation is obtained that is in the electric dipole coupling form. This is achieved through application of the Goeppert-Mayer gauge. While the analysis to this point is general and aimed at microwave irradiation of Rydberg atoms, a Floquet analysis of the auxiliary equation is presented for the special case of the periodically driven harmonic oscillator. Closed form expressions for a complete set of Floquet states are obtained. These are used to demonstrate that for the oscillator case there are no multiphoton resonances.

  18. Relation between the extended time-delayed feedback control algorithm and the method of harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Pyragas, Viktoras; Pyragas, Kestutis

    2015-08-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. E 91, 012920 (2015)] Olyaei and Wu have proposed a new chaos control method in which a target periodic orbit is approximated by a system of harmonic oscillators. We consider an application of such a controller to single-input single-output systems in the limit of an infinite number of oscillators. By evaluating the transfer function in this limit, we show that this controller transforms into the known extended time-delayed feedback controller. This finding gives rise to an approximate finite-dimensional theory of the extended time-delayed feedback control algorithm, which provides a simple method for estimating the leading Floquet exponents of controlled orbits. Numerical demonstrations are presented for the chaotic Rössler, Duffing, and Lorenz systems as well as the normal form of the Hopf bifurcation. PMID:26382493

  19. The sojourn time of the inverted harmonic oscillator on the noncommutative plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guang-Jie; Ren, Zhong-Zhou; Ju, Guo-Xing; Long, Chao-Yun

    2011-10-01

    The sojourn time of the Gaussian wavepacket that is stationed at the center of the inverted harmonic oscillator is investigated on the noncommutative plane in detail. In ordinary commutative space quantum mechanics, the sojourn time of the Gaussian wavepacket is always a monotonically decreasing function of the curvature parameter ω of the potential. However, in this paper, we find that the spatial noncommutativity makes the sojourn time a concave function of ω with a minimum at an inflection point ω0. Furthermore, if ω is larger than a certain critical value the sojourn time will become infinity. Thus, the ordinary intuitive physical picture about the relation between the sojourn time and the shape of the inverted oscillator potential is changed when the spatial noncommutativity is considered.

  20. Relation between the extended time-delayed feedback control algorithm and the method of harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyragas, Viktoras; Pyragas, Kestutis

    2015-08-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. E 91, 012920 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.012920] Olyaei and Wu have proposed a new chaos control method in which a target periodic orbit is approximated by a system of harmonic oscillators. We consider an application of such a controller to single-input single-output systems in the limit of an infinite number of oscillators. By evaluating the transfer function in this limit, we show that this controller transforms into the known extended time-delayed feedback controller. This finding gives rise to an approximate finite-dimensional theory of the extended time-delayed feedback control algorithm, which provides a simple method for estimating the leading Floquet exponents of controlled orbits. Numerical demonstrations are presented for the chaotic Rössler, Duffing, and Lorenz systems as well as the normal form of the Hopf bifurcation.

  1. On suq(1,1)-models of quantum oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakishiyev, M. N.; Atakishiyev, N. M.; Klimyk, A. U.

    2006-09-01

    Models of the quantum oscillator, based on the discrete series representations of the quantum algebra suq(1,1), are constructed. The position and momentum operators in these models are twisted generators J2 and J1 for such suq(1,1)-representations, respectively. As in the case of the standard harmonic oscillator in quantum mechanics, the position and momentum operators here have continuous simple spectra. These spectra cover a finite interval on the real line, which depends on a value of q. Eigenfunctions of these operators are explicitly found. It is shown that the Macfarlane-Biedenharn q-oscillator is a limit case of the oscillators under discussion. The q =1 limit case, in which spectra of the position and momentum operators cover the whole real line, is also considered in detail.

  2. Confined One Dimensional Harmonic Oscillator as a Two-Mode System

    SciTech Connect

    Gueorguiev, V G; Rau, A P; Draayer, J P

    2005-07-11

    The one-dimensional harmonic oscillator in a box problem is possibly the simplest example of a two-mode system. This system has two exactly solvable limits, the harmonic oscillator and a particle in a (one-dimensional) box. Each of the two limits has a characteristic spectral structure describing the two different excitation modes of the system. Near each of these limits, one can use perturbation theory to achieve an accurate description of the eigenstates. Away from the exact limits, however, one has to carry out a matrix diagonalization because the basis-state mixing that occurs is typically too large to be reproduced in any other way. An alternative to casting the problem in terms of one or the other basis set consists of using an ''oblique'' basis that uses both sets. Through a study of this alternative in this one-dimensional problem, we are able to illustrate practical solutions and infer the applicability of the concept for more complex systems, such as in the study of complex nuclei where oblique-basis calculations have been successful.

  3. Franck-Condon transitions in a system with large-amplitude anharmonic vibrations coupled to a harmonic-oscillator bath: Application to the C 1s photoelectron spectrum of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-samha, M.; Boerve, K. J.

    2006-10-15

    A vibrational adiabatic approach to Franck-Condon analysis is presented for systems with a few highly displaced oscillators coupled to a bath of harmonic oscillators. The model reduces the many-coupled-oscillator problem to few-body problems, albeit with corrections due to coupling to harmonic modes. The theory is applied with very good results to the carbon 1s photoelectron spectrum of ethanol, which is strongly influenced by change in conformation from gauche to anti when ethanol is ionized at the methyl site.

  4. Double simple-harmonic-oscillator formulation of the thermal equilibrium of a fluid interacting with a coherent source of phonons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defacio, B.; Vannevel, Alan; Brander, O.

    1993-01-01

    A formulation is given for a collection of phonons (sound) in a fluid at a non-zero temperature which uses the simple harmonic oscillator twice; one to give a stochastic thermal 'noise' process and the other which generates a coherent Glauber state of phonons. Simple thermodynamic observables are calculated and the acoustic two point function, 'contrast' is presented. The role of 'coherence' in an equilibrium system is clarified by these results and the simple harmonic oscillator is a key structure in both the formulation and the calculations.

  5. Arbitrary-quantum-state preparation of a harmonic oscillator via optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojan, Katharina; Reich, Daniel M.; Dotsenko, Igor; Raimond, Jean-Michel; Koch, Christiane P.; Morigi, Giovanna

    2014-08-01

    The efficient initialization of a quantum system is a prerequisite for quantum technological applications. Here we show that several classes of quantum states of a harmonic oscillator can be efficiently prepared by means of a Jaynes-Cummings interaction with a single two-level system. This is achieved by suitably tailoring external fields which drive the dipole and/or the oscillator. The time-dependent dynamics that leads to the target state is identified by means of optimal control theory (OCT) based on Krotov's method. Infidelities below 10-4 can be reached for the parameters of the experiment of Raimond, Haroche, Brune and co-workers, where the oscillator is a mode of a high-Q microwave cavity and the dipole is a Rydberg transition of an atom. For this specific situation we analyze the limitations on the fidelity due to parameter fluctuations and identify robust dynamics based on pulses found using ensemble OCT. Our analysis can be extended to quantum-state preparation of continuous-variable systems in other platforms, such as trapped ions and circuit QED.

  6. Sampled-data synchronisation of coupled harmonic oscillators with communication and input delays subject to controller failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liyun; Zhou, Jin; Wu, Quanjun

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the sampled-data synchronisation problems of coupled harmonic oscillators with communication and input delays subject to controller failure. A synchronisation protocol is proposed for such oscillator systems over directed network topology, and then some general algebraic criteria on exponential convergence for the proposed protocol are established. The main features of the present investigation include: (1) both the communication and input delays are simultaneously addressed, and the directed network topology is firstly considered and (2) the effects of time delays on synchronisation performance are theoretically and numerically investigated. It is shown that in the absence of communication delays, coupled harmonic oscillators can achieve synchronisation oscillatory motion. Whereas if communication delays are nonzero at infinite multiple sampled-data instants, its synchronisation (or consensus) state is zero. This conclusion can be used as an effective control strategy to stabilise coupled harmonic oscillators in practical applications. Furthermore, it is interesting to find that increasing either communication or input delays will enhance the synchronisation performance of coupled harmonic oscillators. Subsequently, numerical examples illustrate and visualise theoretical results.

  7. Modelling harmonic generation measurements in solids.

    PubMed

    Best, S R; Croxford, A J; Neild, S A

    2014-02-01

    Harmonic generation measurements typically make use of the plane wave result when extracting values for the nonlinearity parameter, β, from experimental measurements. This approach, however, ignores the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and receiver integration which are common features in a typical experiment. Our aim is to determine the importance of these effects when making measurements of β over different sample dimensions, or using different input frequencies. We describe a three-dimensional numerical model designed to accurately predict the results of a typical experiment, based on a quasi-linear assumption. An experiment is designed to measure the axial variation of the fundamental and second harmonic amplitude components in an ultrasonic beam, and the results are compared with those predicted by the model. The absolute β values are then extracted from the experimental data using both the simulation and the standard plane wave result. A difference is observed between the values returned by the two methods, which varies with axial range and input frequency. PMID:23786784

  8. Solution of the Quantum Harmonic Oscillator Plus a Delta-Function Potential at the Origin: The "Oddness" of Its Even-Parity Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viana-Gomes, J.; Peres, N. M. R.

    2011-01-01

    We derive the energy levels associated with the even-parity wavefunctions of the harmonic oscillator with an additional delta-function potential at the origin. Our results bring to the attention of students a non-trivial and analytical example of a modification of the usual harmonic oscillator potential, with emphasis on the modification of the…

  9. Fourth-order master equation for a charged harmonic oscillator coupled to an electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Arzu; Eryigit, Resul

    Using Krylov averaging method, we have derived a fourth-order master equation for a charged harmonic oscillator weakly coupled to an electromagnetic field. Interaction is assumed to be of velocity coupling type which also takes into account the diagmagnetic term. Exact analytical expressions have been obtained for the second, the third and the fourth-order corrections to the diffusion and the drift terms of the master equation. We examined the validity range of the second order master equation in terms of the coupling constant and the bath cutoff frequency and found that for the most values of those parameters, the contribution from the third and the fourth order terms have opposite signs and cancel each other. Inclusion of the third and the fourth-order terms is found to not change the structure of the master equation. Bolu, Turkey.

  10. Bose-Einstein condensation in a two-component Bose gas with harmonic oscillator interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulseoud, A. A.; Abbas, A. H.; Galal, A. A.; El-Sherbini, Th M.

    2016-07-01

    In this article a system containing two species of identical bosons interacting via a harmonic oscillator potential is considered. It is assumed that the number of bosons of each species is the same and that bosons belonging to the same species repel each other while those belonging to different species attract. The Hamiltonian is diagonalized and the energy spectrum of the system is written down. The behaviour of the system in the thermodynamic limit is studied within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble, and thermodynamic parameters, such as the internal energy, entropy and specific heat capacity are calculated. It is shown that the system exhibits a single species Bose-Einstein condensation when the coupling strengths are equal and a dual species condensation when they are different.

  11. Analytical transformed harmonic oscillator basis for continuum discretized coupled channels calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, A. M.; Arias, J. M.; Gomez-Camacho, J.; Perez-Bernal, F.

    2009-11-15

    A new method for continuum discretization in continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculations is proposed. The method is based on an analytic local-scale transformation of the harmonic-oscillator wave functions proposed for other purposes in a recent work [Karatagladis et al., Phys. Rev. C 71, 064601 (2005)]. The new approach is compared with the standard method of continuum discretization in terms of energy bins for the reactions d+{sup 58}Ni at 80 MeV, {sup 6}Li+{sup 40}Ca at 156 MeV, and {sup 6}He+{sup 208}Pb at 22 MeV and 240 MeV/nucleon. In all cases very good agreement between both approaches is found.

  12. Alternative descriptions of wave and particle aspects of the harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuch, Dieter

    1993-01-01

    The dynamical properties of the wave and particle aspects of the harmonic oscillator can be studied with the help of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (SE). Especially the time-dependence of maximum and width of Gaussian wave packet solutions allow to show the evolution and connections of those two complementary aspects. The investigation of the relations between the equations describing wave and particle aspects leads to an alternative description of the considered systems. This can be achieved by means of a Newtonian equation for a complex variable in connection with a conservation law for a nonclassical angular momentum-type quantity. With the help of this complex variable, it is also possible to develop a Hamiltonian formalism for the wave aspect contained in the SE, which allows to describe the dynamics of the position and momentum uncertainties. In this case the Hamiltonian function is equivalent to the difference between the mean value of the Hamiltonian operator and the classical Hamiltonian function.

  13. Bose–Einstein condensation in a two-component Bose gas with harmonic oscillator interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulseoud, A. A.; Abbas, A. H.; Galal, A. A.; El-Sherbini, Th M.

    2016-07-01

    In this article a system containing two species of identical bosons interacting via a harmonic oscillator potential is considered. It is assumed that the number of bosons of each species is the same and that bosons belonging to the same species repel each other while those belonging to different species attract. The Hamiltonian is diagonalized and the energy spectrum of the system is written down. The behaviour of the system in the thermodynamic limit is studied within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble, and thermodynamic parameters, such as the internal energy, entropy and specific heat capacity are calculated. It is shown that the system exhibits a single species Bose–Einstein condensation when the coupling strengths are equal and a dual species condensation when they are different.

  14. On transversal oscillations of a vertically translating string with small time-harmonic length variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiko, Nick V.; van Horssen, Wim T.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the free transverse vibrations of a vertically moving string with a harmonically time-varying length are studied. The string length variations are assumed to be small. By using the multiple-timescales perturbation method in conjunction with a Fourier series approach, we determine the resonance frequencies and derive the non-secularity conditions in the form of an infinite dimensional system of coupled ordinary differential equations. This system describes the long time behavior of the amplitudes of the oscillations. Then, the eigenvalues of the obtained system are studied by the Galerkin truncation method, and applicability of this method is discussed. Apart from this, the dynamic stability of the solution is investigated by an energy analysis. Additionally, resonance detuning is considered.

  15. Development and applications of algorithms for calculating the transonic flow about harmonically oscillating wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, F. E.; Weatherill, W. H.; Yip, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    A finite difference method to solve the unsteady transonic flow about harmonically oscillating wings was investigated. The procedure is based on separating the velocity potential into steady and unsteady parts and linearizing the resulting unsteady differential equation for small disturbances. The differential equation for the unsteady velocity potential is linear with spatially varying coefficients and with the time variable eliminated by assuming harmonic motion. An alternating direction implicit procedure was investigated, and a pilot program was developed for both two and three dimensional wings. This program provides a relatively efficient relaxation solution without previously encountered solution instability problems. Pressure distributions for two rectangular wings are calculated. Conjugate gradient techniques were developed for the asymmetric, indefinite problem. The conjugate gradient procedure is evaluated for applications to the unsteady transonic problem. Different equations for the alternating direction procedure are derived using a coordinate transformation for swept and tapered wing planforms. Pressure distributions for swept, untaped wings of vanishing thickness are correlated with linear results for sweep angles up to 45 degrees.

  16. Spherical harmonic stacking for the singlets of Earth's normal modes of free oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Ding, Hao

    2014-08-01

    We extend the spherical harmonic stacking (SHS) method of Buland et al. (1979) for the radial (vertical) component in the seismogram to the transverse (horizontal) components of the displacement field. Taking advantage of the orthogonality of the spherical harmonic functions (scalar and vectorial), SHS isolates and accentuates the signals of individual singlets of the Earth's normal modes of free oscillation. We apply the SHS on the broadband Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) seismograms from up to 97 IRIS seismic stations for the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, in experiments targeted to spheroidal as well as toroidal modes—2S1, 0S3, 2S2, 3S1, 1S3, 0T2, and 0T3. We report the complete resolution of the singlet frequencies of these multiplets, some for the first time, and estimate the singlets' complex frequencies using the frequency domain autoregressive method of Chao and Gilbert (1980). The latter contain useful information to be used in inversions for the 3-D structure of the Earth's interior.

  17. High efficiency fourth-harmonic generation from nanosecond fiber master oscillator power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Xiaodong; Steinvurzel, Paul; Rose, Todd S.; Lotshaw, William T.; Beck, Steven M.; Clemmons, James H.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate high power, deep ultraviolet (DUV) conversion to 266 nm through frequency quadrupling of a nanosecond pulse width 1064 nm fiber master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA). The MOPA system uses an Yb-doped double-clad polarization-maintaining large mode area tapered fiber as the final gain stage to generate 0.5-mJ, 10 W, 1.7- ns single mode pulses at a repetition rate of 20 kHz with measured spectral bandwidth of 10.6 GHz (40 pm), and beam qualities of Mx 2=1.07 and My 2=1.03, respectively. Using LBO and BBO crystals for the second-harmonic generation (SHG) and fourth-harmonic generation (FHG), we have achieved 375 μJ (7.5 W) and 92.5 μJ (1.85 W) at wavelengths of 532 nm and 266 nm, respectively. To the best of our knowledge these are the highest narrowband infrared, green and UV pulse energies obtained to date from a fully spliced fiber amplifier. We also demonstrate high efficiency SHG and FHG with walk-off compensated (WOC) crystal pairs and tightly focused pump beam. An SHG efficiency of 75%, FHG efficiency of 47%, and an overall efficiency of 35% from 1064 nm to 266 nm are obtained.

  18. Measures for the non-Markovianity of a harmonic oscillator coupled to a discrete bath derived from numerically exact references

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ulf; Saalfrank, Peter

    2015-02-01

    System-bath problems in physics and chemistry are often described by Markovian master equations. However, the Markov approximation, i.e., neglect of bath memory effects is not always justified, and different measures of non-Markovianity have been suggested in the literature to judge the validity of this approximation. Here we calculate several computable measures of non-Markovianity for the non-trivial problem of a harmonic oscillator coupled to a large number of bath oscillators. The Multi Configurational Time Dependent Hartree method is used to provide a numerically converged solution of the system-bath Schrödinger equation, from which the appropriate quantities can be calculated. In particular, we consider measures based on trace-distances and quantum discord for a variety of initial states. These quantities have proven useful in the case of two-level and other small model systems typically encountered in quantum optics, but are less straightforward to interpret for the more complex model systems that are relevant for chemical physics. Supplementary material in the form of one zip file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2014-50727-8

  19. Bound state solution of Dirac equation for 3D harmonics oscillator plus trigonometric scarf noncentral potential using SUSY QM approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cari, C. Suparmi, A.

    2014-09-30

    Dirac equation of 3D harmonics oscillator plus trigonometric Scarf non-central potential for spin symmetric case is solved using supersymmetric quantum mechanics approach. The Dirac equation for exact spin symmetry reduces to Schrodinger like equation. The relativistic energy and wave function for spin symmetric case are simply obtained using SUSY quantum mechanics method and idea of shape invariance.

  20. Comment on "On the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian description of the damped linear harmonic oscillator" [J. Math. Phys. 48, 032701 (2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Carl M.; Gianfreda, Mariagiovanna; Hassanpour, Nima; Jones, Hugh F.

    2016-08-01

    In a remarkable paper Chandrasekar et al. showed that the (second-order constant-coefficient) classical equation of motion for a damped harmonic oscillator can be derived from a Hamiltonian having one degree of freedom. This paper gives a simple derivation of their result and generalizes it to the case of an nth-order constant-coefficient differential equation.

  1. Solutions of the Klein-Gordon equation with equal scalar and vector harmonic oscillator plus inverse quadratic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ita, B. I.; Obong, H. P.; Ehi-Eromosele, C. O.; Edobor-Osoh, A.; Ikeuba, A. I.

    2014-11-01

    The solutions of the Klein-Gordon equation with equal scalar and vector harmonic oscillator plus inverse quadratic potential for S-waves have been presented using the Nikiforov-Uvarov method. The bound state energy eigenvalues and the corresponding un-normalized eigenfunctions are obtained in terms of the Laguerre polynomials.

  2. Oscillating water column structural model

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Guild; Bull, Diana L; Jepsen, Richard Alan; Gordon, Margaret Ellen

    2014-09-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter is a structure with an opening to the ocean below the free surface, i.e. a structure with a moonpool. Two structural models for a non-axisymmetric terminator design OWC, the Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) are discussed in this report. The results of this structural model design study are intended to inform experiments and modeling underway in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated Reference Model Project (RMP). A detailed design developed by Re Vision Consulting used stiffeners and girders to stabilize the structure against the hydrostatic loads experienced by a BBDB device. Additional support plates were added to this structure to account for loads arising from the mooring line attachment points. A simplified structure was designed in a modular fashion. This simplified design allows easy alterations to the buoyancy chambers and uncomplicated analysis of resulting changes in buoyancy.

  3. Quantum dephasing of a two-state system by a nonequilibrium harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Craig C.

    2013-07-14

    In this paper, we investigate coherent quantum dynamics in a nonequilibrium environment. We focus on a two-state quantum system strongly coupled to a single classical environmental oscillator, and explore the effect of nonstationary statistical properties of the oscillator on the quantum evolution. A simple nonequilibrium model, consisting of an oscillator with a well-defined initial phase which undergoes subsequent diffusion, is introduced and studied. Approximate but accurate analytic expressions for the evolution of the off-diagonal density matrix element of the quantum system are derived in the second-order cumulant approximation. The effect of the initial phase choice on the subsequent quantum evolution is quantified. It is observed that the initial phase can have a significant effect on the preservation of coherence on short time scales, suggesting this variable as a control parameter for optimizing coherence in many-body quantum systems.

  4. Quantization and instability of the damped harmonic oscillator subject to a time-dependent force

    SciTech Connect

    Majima, H. Suzuki, A.

    2011-12-15

    We consider the one-dimensional motion of a particle immersed in a potential field U(x) under the influence of a frictional (dissipative) force linear in velocity (-{gamma}x) and a time-dependent external force (K(t)). The dissipative system subject to these forces is discussed by introducing the extended Bateman's system, which is described by the Lagrangian: L=mxy-U(x+1/2 y)+U(x-1/2 y)+({gamma})/2 (xy-yx)-xK(t)+yK(t), which leads to the familiar classical equations of motion for the dissipative (open) system. The equation for a variable y is the time-reversed of the x motion. We discuss the extended Bateman dual Lagrangian and Hamiltonian by setting U(x{+-}y/2)=1/2 k(x{+-}y/2){sup 2} specifically for a dual extended damped-amplified harmonic oscillator subject to the time-dependent external force. We show the method of quantizing such dissipative systems, namely the canonical quantization of the extended Bateman's Hamiltonian H. The Heisenberg equations of motion utilizing the quantized Hamiltonian H surely lead to the equations of motion for the dissipative dynamical quantum systems, which are the quantum analog of the corresponding classical systems. To discuss the stability of the quantum dissipative system due to the influence of an external force K(t) and the dissipative force, we derived a formula for transition amplitudes of the dissipative system with the help of the perturbation analysis. The formula is specifically applied for a damped-amplified harmonic oscillator subject to the impulsive force. This formula is used to study the influence of dissipation such as the instability due to the dissipative force and/or the applied impulsive force. - Highlights: > A method of quantizing dissipative systems is presented. > In order to obtain the method, we apply Bateman's dual system approach. > A formula for a transition amplitude is derived. > We use the formula to study the instability of the dissipative systems.

  5. Building Mathematical Models of Simple Harmonic and Damped Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    By developing a sequence of mathematical models of harmonic motion, shows that mathematical models are not right or wrong, but instead are better or poorer representations of the problem situation. (MKR)

  6. On The Exact and JWKB Solution of 1D Quantum Harmonic Oscillator by Mathematica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz, Coşkun

    2016-04-01

    Although being the fundamental semiclassical approximation method mainly used in quantum mechanics and optical waveguides, JWKB method along with the application of the associated JWKB asymptotic matching rules is known to give exact solutions for the Quantum Harmonic Oscillator (QHO). Asymptotically matched JWKB solutions are typically accurate or exact in the entire domain except for a narrow domain around the classical turning points where potential energy equals the total energy of the related quantum mechanical system. So, one has to cope with this diverging behavior at the classical turning points since it prohibits us from using continuity relations at the related boundaries to determine the required JWKB coefficients. Here, a computational diagram and related mathematica codes to surmount the problem by applying parity matching for even and odd JWKB solutions rather than boundary continuities are being presented. In effect, JWKB coefficients as well as the conversion factor for the dimensionless form of the Schrodingers equation, which is common to both exact and JWKB solutions, is being successfully obtained.

  7. Reduced dynamics of coupled harmonic and anharmonic oscillators using higher-order perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Markus; Schreiber, Michael; Kleinekathoefer, Ulrich

    2007-03-21

    Several techniques to solve a hierarchical set of equations of motion for propagating a reduced density matrix coupled to a thermal bath have been developed in recent years. This is either done using the path integral technique as in the original proposal by Tanimura and Kubo [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 58, 101 (1998)] or by the use of stochastic fields as done by Yan et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 395, 216 (2004)]. Based on the latter ansatz a compact derivation of the hierarchy using a decomposition of the spectral density function is given in the present contribution. The method is applied to calculate the time evolution of the reduced density matrix describing the motion in a harmonic, an anharmonic, and two coupled oscillators where each system is coupled to a thermal bath. Calculations to several orders in the system-bath coupling with two different truncations of the hierarchy are performed. The respective density matrices are used to calculate the time evolution of various system properties and the results are compared and discussed with a special focus on the convergence with respect to the truncation scheme applied.

  8. Application of functional analysis to perturbation theory of differential equations. [nonlinear perturbation of the harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, V. M.; Bond, V. B.

    1980-01-01

    The deviation of the solution of the differential equation y' = f(t, y), y(O) = y sub O from the solution of the perturbed system z' = f(t, z) + g(t, z), z(O) = z sub O was investigated for the case where f and g are continuous functions on I x R sup n into R sup n, where I = (o, a) or I = (o, infinity). These functions are assumed to satisfy the Lipschitz condition in the variable z. The space Lip(I) of all such functions with suitable norms forms a Banach space. By introducing a suitable norm in the space of continuous functions C(I), introducing the problem can be reduced to an equivalent problem in terminology of operators in such spaces. A theorem on existence and uniqueness of the solution is presented by means of Banach space technique. Norm estimates on the rate of growth of such solutions are found. As a consequence, estimates of deviation of a solution due to perturbation are obtained. Continuity of the solution on the initial data and on the perturbation is established. A nonlinear perturbation of the harmonic oscillator is considered a perturbation of equations of the restricted three body problem linearized at libration point.

  9. Observation of laser transverse modes analogous to a SU(2) wave packet of a quantum harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.F.; Lan, Y.P.

    2002-11-01

    We report the generation of a new type of laser transverse mode that is analogous to a SU(2) elliptical wave packet of a quantum harmonic oscillator. Experimental results show that using a doughnut pump profile to excite an isotropic microchip laser in a spherical cavity can generate the elliptical transverse modes. The formation of elliptical transverse modes is found to be a spontaneous locking process of Hermite-Gaussian modes within the same family. The chaotic relaxation oscillation caused by the interaction of two nearly degenerate elliptical modes is also observed.

  10. Variational study of a two-level system coupled to a harmonic oscillator in an ultrastrong-coupling regime

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Myung-Joong; Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2010-08-15

    The nonclassical behavior of a two-level system coupled to a harmonic oscillator is investigated in the ultrastrong coupling regime. We revisit the variational solution of the ground state and find that the existing solutions do not account accurately for nonclassical effects such as squeezing. We suggest a trial wave function and demonstrate that it has an excellent accuracy for the quantum correlation effects as well as for the energy.

  11. Entropy of orthogonal polynomials with Freud weights and information entropies of the harmonic oscillator potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Assche, W.; Yáñez, R. J.; Dehesa, J. S.

    1995-08-01

    The information entropy of the harmonic oscillator potential V(x)=1/2λx2 in both position and momentum spaces can be expressed in terms of the so-called ``entropy of Hermite polynomials,'' i.e., the quantity Sn(H):= -∫-∞+∞H2n(x)log H2n(x) e-x2dx. These polynomials are instances of the polynomials orthogonal with respect to the Freud weights w(x)=exp(-||x||m), m≳0. Here, a very precise and general result of the entropy of Freud polynomials recently established by Aptekarev et al. [J. Math. Phys. 35, 4423-4428 (1994)], specialized to the Hermite kernel (case m=2), leads to an important refined asymptotic expression for the information entropies of very excited states (i.e., for large n) in both position and momentum spaces, to be denoted by Sρ and Sγ, respectively. Briefly, it is shown that, for large values of n, Sρ+1/2logλ≂log(π√2n/e)+o(1) and Sγ-1/2log λ≂log(π√2n/e)+o(1), so that Sρ+Sγ≂log(2π2n/e2)+o(1) in agreement with the generalized indetermination relation of Byalinicki-Birula and Mycielski [Commun. Math. Phys. 44, 129-132 (1975)]. Finally, the rate of convergence of these two information entropies is numerically analyzed. In addition, using a Rakhmanov result, we describe a totally new proof of the leading term of the entropy of Freud polynomials which, naturally, is just a weak version of the aforementioned general result.

  12. On the limits of quasi-static analysis for a simple Coulomb frictional oscillator in response to harmonic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papangelo, A.; Ciavarella, M.

    2015-03-01

    Due to the nonlinearity of the Coulomb friction law, even the simplest models of interfaces in contact show a very rich dynamic solution. It is often desirable, especially if the frequency of loading is only a fraction of the first natural frequency of the system, to replace a full dynamic analysis with a quasi-static one, which obviously is much simpler to obtain. In this work, we study a simple Coulomb frictional oscillator with harmonic tangential load, but with constant normal load. It is found that the quasi-static solution (which has only 2 stops) captures approximately the displacement peak as long as the forcing frequency is low enough for the dynamic solution to have 2 or, even better, more than 2 stops. Instead, the velocity peak is not correctly estimated, since the velocity becomes highly irregular due to the stick-slip stops, whose number increases without limit for zero frequency. In this sense, the classical quasi-static solution, obtaining by cancelling inertia terms in the equilibrium equations, does not coincide with the limit of the full dynamic solution at low frequencies. The difference is not eliminated by adding a small amount of viscous damping, as only with critical damping, the dynamic solution is very close to the quasi-static one. Additional discrepancies arise above a limit frequency whose value depends on the ratio of the tangential load to the limit one for sliding, and correspond to when the dynamic solution turns from 2 to 0 stop per cycle.

  13. Teaching Oscillations by a Model of Nanoresonator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindell, A.; Viiri, J.

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscience offers fascinating opportunities for science education as it links the achievements of modern technology to traditional models of science. In this article we present a nanotechnology orientated lesson on oscillations, suitable for physics courses at high schools and universities. The focus of the lesson is in forced oscillations on a…

  14. On Noether's Theorem for the Invariant of the Time-Dependent Harmonic Oscillator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abe, Sumiyoshi; Itto, Yuichi; Matsunaga, Mamoru

    2009-01-01

    The time-dependent oscillator describing parametric oscillation, the concept of invariant and Noether's theorem are important issues in physics education. Here, it is shown how they can be interconnected in a simple and unified manner.

  15. Selective mode suppression in a W-band second harmonic coaxial-waveguide gyrotron backward-wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, C. L.; Syu, M. F.; Yang, M. T.; Chen, K. L.

    2012-07-01

    A gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO) encounters increasingly severe mode competition problems during development toward the goal of higher power at high frequencies. A coaxial interaction waveguide with distributed losses is proposed to enhance the stability and frequency tunability of a W-band second harmonic gyro-BWO. The losses of the inner and outer cylinders complement each other and effectively stabilize all of the competing modes while having minor effects on the operating mode. Under stable operating conditions, the W-band second harmonic coaxial gyro-BWO has a predicted peak output power of 71 kW with a magnetic tuning bandwidth of 1.0 GHz.

  16. Wigner distribution function and entropy of the damped harmonic oscillator within the theory of the open quantum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isar, Aurelian

    1995-01-01

    The harmonic oscillator with dissipation is studied within the framework of the Lindblad theory for open quantum systems. By using the Wang-Uhlenbeck method, the Fokker-Planck equation, obtained from the master equation for the density operator, is solved for the Wigner distribution function, subject to either the Gaussian type or the delta-function type of initial conditions. The obtained Wigner functions are two-dimensional Gaussians with different widths. Then a closed expression for the density operator is extracted. The entropy of the system is subsequently calculated and its temporal behavior shows that this quantity relaxes to its equilibrium value.

  17. Harmonic and interharmonic distortion modeling in multiconverter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, R.; Morrison, R.E.; Testa, A.; Menniti, D.

    1995-07-01

    The problem of modeling multiconverter systems in presence of harmonic and interharmonic distortion is considered. Specifically, current source rectifiers are considered as distortion sources some supply d.c. motors and the remaining supplying inverters feeding a.c. machines. The classical analogue, frequency domain and time domain models proposed in the literature to study harmonic distortion in a multiconverter system are considered and for each model suitable extension to include the interharmonic distortion are presented and critically analyzed. The results of several experiments are reported to show the usefulness and to compare the accuracy of the different extensions considered.

  18. Signal evolution in the local magnetic field of a capillary -- analogy to the damped driven harmonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Ziener, Christian H; Kampf, Thomas; Melkus, Gerd; Jakob, Peter M; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Bauer, Wolfgang R

    2012-05-01

    The temporal behavior of the magnetization decay caused by the local inhomogeneous magnetic field of a capillary is analyzed. Respecting the diffusion of the spins surrounding the capillary and the strength of the susceptibility difference between the capillary and the surrounding medium, it is possible to distinguish different dephasing regimes. Each dephasing regime can be related to a certain characteristic form of the magnetization decay. If the influence of the diffusion dominates, the magnetization exhibits a monotonic decay. In the opposite case of dominating influence of the susceptibility effects, the magnetization shows an oscillating behavior. It can be shown that the dephasing process is closely related to the behavior of a damped driven harmonic oscillator.

  19. Harmonic oscillator wave functions of a self-assembled InAs quantum dot measured by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, Karen; Wenderoth, Martin; Prüser, Henning; Pierz, Klaus; Schumacher, Hans W; Ulbrich, Rainer G

    2013-08-14

    InAs quantum dots embedded in an AlAs matrix inside a double barrier resonant tunneling diode are investigated by cross-sectional scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The wave functions of the bound quantum dot states are spatially and energetically resolved. These bound states are known to be responsible for resonant tunneling phenomena in such quantum dot diodes. The wave functions reveal a textbook-like one-dimensional harmonic oscillator behavior showing up to five equidistant energy levels of 80 meV spacing. The derived effective oscillator mass of m* = 0.24m0 is 1 order of magnitude higher than the effective electron mass of bulk InAs that we attribute to the influence of the surrounding AlAs matrix. This underlines the importance of the matrix material for tailored QD devices with well-defined properties. PMID:23777509

  20. Harmonic oscillators: the quantization of simple systems in the old quantum theory and their functional roles in biology.

    PubMed

    Steele, Richard H

    2008-03-01

    This article introduces quantum physics into biology in an intuitive and non-intimidating manner. It extends the quantum aspects of harmonic oscillators, and electromagnetic fields, to their functional roles in biology. Central to this process are the De Broglie wave-particle duality equation, and the adiabatic invariant parameters, magnetic moment, angular momentum and magnetic flux, determined by Ehrenfest as imposing quantum constraints on the dynamics of charges in motion. In mechanisms designed to explain the generation of low-level light emissions in biology we have adopted a biological analog of the electrical circuitry modeled on the parallel plated capacitor, traversed by helical protein structures, capable of generating electromagnetic radiation in the optical spectral region. The charge carrier required for the emissions is an accelerating electron driven, in a cyclotron-type mechanism, by ATP-induced reverse electron transfer with the radial, emission, components, mediated by coulombic forces within the helical configurations. Adenine, an essential nucleotide constituent of DNA, was examined with its long wavelength absorption maximum determining the energetic parameters for the calculations. The calculations were made for a virtual 5-turn helix where each turn of the helix emits a different frequency, generating a biological quantum series. The components of six adiabatic invariant equations were found to be embedded in Planck's constant rendering them discrete, finite, non-random, non-statistical-Planck's constant precludes probability. A mechanism for drug-induced hallucination is described that might provide insights as to the possible role of electromagnetic fields in consciousness. Sodium acceleration through a proposed nerve membrane helical channel generated electromagnetic emissions in the microwave region in confirmation of reported microwave emission for active nerves and may explain saltatory nerve conduction. Theoretical calculations for a

  1. Teaching Oscillations by a Model of Nanoresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindell, A.; Viiri, J.

    2009-12-01

    Nanoscience offers fascinating opportunities for science education as it links the achievements of modern technology to traditional models of science. In this article we present a nanotechnology orientated lesson on oscillations, suitable for physics courses at high schools and universities. The focus of the lesson is in forced oscillations on a cantilever beam used as a sensor in scanning probe microscopy or as an independent micro mechanical force sensor.

  2. Structure and Behavior of the Edge Harmonic Oscillation in Quiescent H-Mode Plasmas on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Burrell, K. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Solomon, W. M.

    2013-10-01

    The edge harmonic oscillation (EHO) is a steady-state, pedestal-localized instability that is observed in high-performance, ELM-free Quiescent H-mode plasmas. The spatiotemporal characteristics of the EHO have been measured in QH-mode plasmas with a 2D BES array that measures low-k density fluctuations. The skewness of the fluctuation distribution increases radially from -0.5 to +1 near the separatrix, consistent with the radially varying and highly non-sinusoidal harmonic structure. These fluctuation characteristics are qualitatively consistent with an outward particle transport driven by the EHO. The density fluctuation (ñ / n) profile peaks inside the pedestal, near ρ = 0.90-0.95, and is observed from ρ = 0 . 85 to the separatrix; the fundamental frequency is typically in the range of 5-15 kHz. The radial structure of the oscillation has a monotonically varying phase shift of approximately 180 degrees across the outer plasma region that changes direction with plasma current, suggesting that the mode structure is impacted by the high edge toroidal rotation velocity. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FG02-08ER54999, DE-FC02-04ER54698, and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. Physical models for the source of Lascar's harmonic tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, M.

    2000-08-01

    Over an 18 h interval in April 1994, the tremor at Lascar volcano, Chile, was characterized by a spectrum with narrow peaks at a fundamental freqency of about 0.63 Hz and more than 25 overtones at exact integer multiples. This harmonic tremor was recorded at four three-component, high-dynamic range stations during the deployment of the Proyecto de Investigación Sismológica de la Cordillera Occidental 94 (PISCO'94). Usually this tremor's source is modeled as the resonance of a fluid-filled crack or organ pipe-like structure in the volcano. The resonance of a real, physical structure, however, can produce neither as many overtones nor such exact multiples as those observed in the harmonic tremor at Lascar. Harmonics also occur in a spectrum if the source signal is repetitive but nonsinusoidal. Fluid dynamics offers at least three realistic source models for harmonic tremor which produce repetitive, nonsinusoidal waveforms: the release of gas through a very small outlet (the soda bottle model), slug flow in a narrow conduit, and von Kármán vortices produced at obstacles. These models represent different flow regimes, each with its own characteristic range of Reynolds numbers. For each model the fundamental frequency of the tremor is related to the Reynolds number for the flow. Combining the Reynolds numbers for each model with typical kinematic viscosities for the possible fluids present in a volcano—magma, water, steam, air or some combination, at appropriate temperatures and pressures—provides limits on such physical parameters of the volcano as the dimensions of the flow conduit and the flow velocity of the fluid generating the tremor. If any single one of these three models is actually the process in the volcano which generates harmonic tremor, then the tremor is caused by movements of water or gases in the hydrothermal system near the volcano's surface.

  4. The Harmonic Structure of High-Frequency Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    2004-05-01

    Observations from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer have shown the existence of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) in the X-ray flux from accreting black hole binary systems. In at least two systems, these HFQPOs come in pairs with a 2:3 frequency commensurability. We employ a simple ``hot spot'' model to explain the position and amplitude of the HFQPO peaks. Using the exact geodesic equations for the Kerr metric, we calculate the trajectories of massive test particles, which are treated as isotropic, monochromatic emitters in their rest frames. Photons are traced from the accretion disk to a distant observer to produce time- and frequency-dependent images of the orbiting hot spot and background disk. The power spectrum of the X-ray light curve consists of multiple peaks at integral combinations of the black hole coordinate frequencies. In particular, if the radial frequency is one-third of the azimuthal frequency (as is the case near the innermost stable circular orbit), beat frequencies appear in the power spectrum at two-thirds and four-thirds of the fundamental azimuthal orbital frequency, in agreement with observations. In addition, we model the effects of shearing the hot spot in the disk, producing an arc of emission that also follows a geodesic orbit, as well as the effects of nonplanar orbits that experience Lens-Thirring precession around the black hole axis. By varying the arc length, we are able to explain the relative amplitudes of the QPOs at either 2ν or 3ν in observations from XTE J1550-564 and GRO J1655-40. In the context of this model, the observed power spectra allow us to infer values for the black hole mass and angular momentum and also constrain the parameters of the model, such as the hot spot size and luminosity.

  5. Decoherence of a quantum harmonic oscillator monitored by a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Brouard, S.; Alonso, D.; Sokolovski, D.

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the dynamics of a quantum oscillator, whose evolution is monitored by a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) trapped in a symmetric double-well potential. It is demonstrated that the oscillator may experience various degrees of decoherence depending on the variable being measured and the state in which the BEC is prepared. These range from a ''coherent'' regime in which only the variances of the oscillator position and momentum are affected by measurement, to a slow (power-law) or rapid (Gaussian) decoherence of the mean values themselves.

  6. A Comprehensive and Harmonized Digital Forensic Investigation Process Model.

    PubMed

    Valjarevic, Aleksandar; Venter, Hein S

    2015-11-01

    Performing a digital forensic investigation (DFI) requires a standardized and formalized process. There is currently neither an international standard nor does a global, harmonized DFI process (DFIP) exist. The authors studied existing state-of-the-art DFIP models and concluded that there are significant disparities pertaining to the number of processes, the scope, the hierarchical levels, and concepts applied. This paper proposes a comprehensive model that harmonizes existing models. An effort was made to incorporate all types of processes proposed by the existing models, including those aimed at achieving digital forensic readiness. The authors introduce a novel class of processes called concurrent processes. This is a novel contribution that should, together with the rest of the model, enable more efficient and effective DFI, while ensuring admissibility of digital evidence. Ultimately, the proposed model is intended to be used for different types of DFI and should lead to standardization.

  7. A Comprehensive and Harmonized Digital Forensic Investigation Process Model.

    PubMed

    Valjarevic, Aleksandar; Venter, Hein S

    2015-11-01

    Performing a digital forensic investigation (DFI) requires a standardized and formalized process. There is currently neither an international standard nor does a global, harmonized DFI process (DFIP) exist. The authors studied existing state-of-the-art DFIP models and concluded that there are significant disparities pertaining to the number of processes, the scope, the hierarchical levels, and concepts applied. This paper proposes a comprehensive model that harmonizes existing models. An effort was made to incorporate all types of processes proposed by the existing models, including those aimed at achieving digital forensic readiness. The authors introduce a novel class of processes called concurrent processes. This is a novel contribution that should, together with the rest of the model, enable more efficient and effective DFI, while ensuring admissibility of digital evidence. Ultimately, the proposed model is intended to be used for different types of DFI and should lead to standardization. PMID:26258644

  8. Non-Hamiltonian Modeling of Squeezing and Thermal Disorder in Driven Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewran, Sashwin; Zloshchastiev, Konstantin G.; Sergi, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Recently, model systems with quadratic Hamiltonians and time-dependent interactions were studied by Briegel and Popescu (Proc R Soc A 469:20110290, 2013) and by Galve et al. (Phys Rev Lett 105:180501, 2010; Phys Rev Lett 81:062117, 2010) in order to consider the possibility of both quantum refrigeration in enzymes and entanglement in the high temperature limit. Following this line of research, we studied a model comprising two quantum harmonic oscillators driven by a time-dependent harmonic coupling. Such a system was embedded in a thermal bath represented in two different ways. In one case, the bath was composed of a finite but great number of independent harmonic oscillators with an Ohmic spectral density. In the other case, the bath was more efficiently defined in terms of a single oscillator coupled to a non-Hamiltonian thermostat. In both cases, we simulated the effect of the thermal disorder on the generation of the squeezed states in the two-oscillators relevant system. We found that, in our model, the thermal disorder of the bath determines the presence of a threshold temperature, for the generation of squeezed states, equal to K. Such a threshold is estimated to be within temperatures where chemical reactions and biological activity comfortably take place.

  9. A Computer Model for Soda Bottle Oscillations: "The Bottelator".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltzberg, Leonard J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents a model to explain the behavior of oscillatory phenomena found in the soda bottle oscillator. Describes recording the oscillations, and the design of the model based on the qualitative explanation of the oscillations. Illustrates a variety of physiochemical concepts including far-from-equilibrium oscillations, feedback, solubility and…

  10. Speech synthesis with pitch modification using harmonic plus noise model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehana, Parveen K.; Pandey, Prem C.

    2003-10-01

    In harmonic plus noise model (HNM) based speech synthesis, the input signal is modeled as two parts: the harmonic part using amplitudes and phases of the harmonics of the fundamental and the noise part using an all-pole filter excited by random white Gaussian noise. This method requires relatively less number of parameters and computations, provides good quality output, and permits pitch and time scaling without explicit estimation of vocal tract parameters. Pitch scaling to synthesize the speech with interpolated original amplitudes and phases at the multiples of the scaled pitch frequency results in an unnatural quality. Our investigation for obtaining natural quality output showed that the frequency scale of the amplitudes and phases of the harmonics of the original signal needed to be modified by a speaker dependent warping function. The function was obtained by studying the relationship between pitch frequency and formant frequencies for the three cardinal vowels naturally occurring with different pitches in a passage with intonation. Listening tests showed that good quality speech was obtained by linear frequency scaling of the amplitude and phase spectra, by the same factor as the pitch-scaling.

  11. Bright multi-keV harmonic generation from relativistically oscillating plasma surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dromey, B; Kar, S; Bellei, C; Carroll, D C; Clarke, R J; Green, J S; Kneip, S; Markey, K; Nagel, S R; Simpson, P T; Willingale, L; McKenna, P; Neely, D; Najmudin, Z; Krushelnick, K; Norreys, P A; Zepf, M

    2007-08-24

    The first evidence of x-ray harmonic radiation extending to 3.3 A, 3.8 keV (order n>3200) from petawatt class laser-solid interactions is presented, exhibiting relativistic limit efficiency scaling (eta approximately n{-2.5}-n{-3}) at multi-keV energies. This scaling holds up to a maximum order, n{RO} approximately 8{1/2}gamma;{3}, where gamma is the relativistic Lorentz factor, above which the first evidence of an intensity dependent efficiency rollover is observed. The coherent nature of the generated harmonics is demonstrated by the highly directional beamed emission, which for photon energy hnu>1 keV is found to be into a cone angle approximately 4 degrees , significantly less than that of the incident laser cone (20 degrees ).

  12. On su{sub q}(1,1)-models of quantum oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Atakishiyev, M. N.; Atakishiyev, N. M.; Klimyk, A. U.

    2006-09-15

    Models of the quantum oscillator, based on the discrete series representations of the quantum algebra su{sub q}(1,1), are constructed. The position and momentum operators in these models are twisted generators J{sub 2} and J{sub 1} for such su{sub q}(1,1)-representations, respectively. As in the case of the standard harmonic oscillator in quantum mechanics, the position and momentum operators here have continuous simple spectra. These spectra cover a finite interval on the real line, which depends on a value of q. Eigenfunctions of these operators are explicitly found. It is shown that the Macfarlane-Biedenharn q-oscillator is a limit case of the oscillators under discussion. The q=1 limit case, in which spectra of the position and momentum operators cover the whole real line, is also considered in detail.

  13. Nonstationary harmonic modeling for ECG removal in surface EMG signals.

    PubMed

    Zivanovic, Miroslav; González-Izal, Miriam

    2012-06-01

    We present a compact approach for mitigating the presence of electrocardiograms (ECG) in surface electromyographic (EMG) signals by means of time-variant harmonic modeling of the cardiac artifact. Heart rate and QRS complex variability, which often account for amplitude and frequency time variations of the ECG, are simultaneously captured by a set of third-order constant-coefficient polynomials modulating a stationary harmonic basis in the analysis window. Such a characterization allows us to significantly suppress ECG from the mixture by preserving most of the EMG signal content at low frequencies (less than 20 Hz). Moreover, the resulting model is linear in parameters and the least-squares solution to the corresponding linear system of equations efficiently provides model parameter estimates. The comparative results suggest that the proposed method outperforms two reference methods in terms of the EMG preservation at low frequencies. PMID:22453600

  14. Four mass coupled oscillator guitar model.

    PubMed

    Popp, John E

    2012-01-01

    Coupled oscillator models have been used for the low frequency response (50 to 250 Hz) of a guitar. These 2 and 3 mass models correctly predict measured resonance frequency relationships under various laboratory boundary conditions, but did not always represent the true state of a guitar in the players' hands. The model presented has improved these models in three ways, (1) a fourth oscillator includes the guitar body, (2) plate stiffnesses and other fundamental parameters were measured directly and effective areas and masses used to calculate the responses, including resonances and phases, directly, and (3) one of the three resultant resonances varies with neck and side mass and can also be modeled as a bar mode of the neck and body. The calculated and measured resonances and phases agree reasonably well.

  15. Four mass coupled oscillator guitar model.

    PubMed

    Popp, John E

    2012-01-01

    Coupled oscillator models have been used for the low frequency response (50 to 250 Hz) of a guitar. These 2 and 3 mass models correctly predict measured resonance frequency relationships under various laboratory boundary conditions, but did not always represent the true state of a guitar in the players' hands. The model presented has improved these models in three ways, (1) a fourth oscillator includes the guitar body, (2) plate stiffnesses and other fundamental parameters were measured directly and effective areas and masses used to calculate the responses, including resonances and phases, directly, and (3) one of the three resultant resonances varies with neck and side mass and can also be modeled as a bar mode of the neck and body. The calculated and measured resonances and phases agree reasonably well. PMID:22280705

  16. Using a mobile phone acceleration sensor in physics experiments on free and damped harmonic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos Castro-Palacio, Juan; Velázquez-Abad, Luisberis; Giménez, Marcos H.; Monsoriu, Juan A.

    2013-06-01

    We have used a mobile phone acceleration sensor, and the Accelerometer Monitor application for Android, to collect data in physics experiments on free and damped oscillations. Results for the period, frequency, spring constant, and damping constant agree very well with measurements obtained by other methods. These widely available sensors are likely to find increased use in instructional laboratories.

  17. Modelling the Madden Julian Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Slingo, J M; Inness, P M; Sperber, K R

    2004-05-21

    The MJO has long been an aspect of the global climate that has provided a tough test for the climate modelling community. Since the 1980s there have been numerous studies of the simulation of the MJO in atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs), ranging from Hayashi and Golder (1986, 1988) and Lau and Lau (1986), through to more recent studies such as Wang and Schlesinger (1999) and Wu et al. (2002). Of course, attempts to reproduce the MJO in climate models have proceeded in parallel with developments in our understanding of what the MJO is and what drives it. In fact, many advances in understanding the MJO have come through modeling studies. In particular, failure of climate models to simulate various aspects of the MJO has prompted investigations into the mechanisms that are important to its initiation and maintenance, leading to improvements both in our understanding of, and ability to simulate, the MJO. The initial focus of this chapter will be on modeling the MJO during northern winter, when it is characterized as a predominantly eastward propagating mode and is most readily seen in observations. Aspects of the simulation of the MJO will be discussed in the context of its sensitivity to the formulation of the atmospheric model, and the increasing evidence that it may be a coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon. Later, we will discuss the challenges regarding the simulation of boreal summer intraseasonal variability, which is more complex since it is a combination of the eastward propagating MJO and the northward propagation of the tropical convergence zone. Finally some concluding remarks on future directions in modeling the MJO and its relationship with other timescales of variability in the tropics will be made.

  18. A Two Cavity Model for Umbral Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Yun, Hong Sik

    1987-06-01

    In the present study a two-mode, separately concurring resonant cavity model is proposed for theorectical interpretation of the 3 minute umbral oscillation. The proposed model has been investigated by calculating the transmission coefficients of the waves propagating through the umbral photosphere (photospheric weak-field cavity) and chromosphere (chromospheric strong-field cavity) into the corona, for 3 different umbral model atmospheres by Staude (1982), Beebe et al. (1982) and Avrett (1981). In computing the transmission coefficients we made use of multi-layer approximation by representing the umbral atmosphere by a number of separate layers with (1) temperature varying linearly with depth and (2) temperature constant within each layer. The medium is assumed to be compressible, non-viscous, perfectly conducting under gravity. The computed resonant period, transmission spectra, phase spectra, and kinetic energy density of the waves associated with the oscillations are presented in comparison with the observations and their model dependent characteristics are discussed.

  19. A new set of coherent states for the isotropic harmonic oscillator: Coherent angular momentum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, A. J.; Leemon, H. I.

    1981-04-01

    The Hamiltonian for the oscillator has earlier been written in the form where ν† and ν are raising and lowering operators for ν†ν, which has eigenvalues k (the ''radial'' quantum number), and λ† and λ are raising and lowering 3-vector operators for λ†ṡλ, which has eigenvalues l (the total angular momentum quantum number). A new set of coherent states for the oscillator is now defined by diagonalizing ν and λ. These states bear a similar relation to the commuting operators H, L2, and L3 (where L is the angular momentum of the system) as the usual coherent states do to the commuting number operators N1, N2, and N3. It is proposed to call them coherent angular momentum states. They are shown to be minimum-uncertainty states for the variables ν, ν†, λ, and λ†, and to provide a new quasiclassical description of the oscillator. This description coincides with that provided by the usual coherent states only in the special case that the corresponding classical motion is circular, rather than elliptical; and, in general, the uncertainty in the angular momentum of the system is smaller in the new description. The probabilities of obtaining particular values for k and l in one of the new states follow independent Poisson distributions. The new states are overcomplete, and lead to a new representation of the Hilbert space for the oscillator, in terms of analytic functions on C×K3, where K3 is the three-dimensional complex cone. This space is related to one introduced recently by Bargmann and Todorov, and carries a very simple realization of all the representations of the rotation group.

  20. Modeling of solar oscillation power spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Edwin R.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Jefferies, Stuart M.

    1990-01-01

    To produce accurate estimates of the line-profile parameters of a model used to represent the spectral features in a solar oscillation power spectrum, it is necessary to (1) select the appropriate probability density function when deriving the maximum-likelihood function to be employed for the parameter estimation and (2) allow for the redistribution of spectral power caused by gaps in the data string. This paper describes a maximum-likelihood method for estimating the model parameters (based on the observed power spectrum statistics) that accounts for redistribution of spectral power caused by gaps in the data string, by convolving the model with the power spectrum of the observed window function. The accuracy and reliability of the method were tested using both artificial and authentic solar oscillation power spectrum data. A comparison of this method with various least-squares techniques is also presented.

  1. Testing an astronomically based decadal-scale empirical harmonic climate model versus the IPCC (2007) general circulation climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2012-05-01

    We compare the performance of a recently proposed empirical climate model based on astronomical harmonics against all CMIP3 available general circulation climate models (GCM) used by the IPCC (2007) to interpret the 20th century global surface temperature. The proposed astronomical empirical climate model assumes that the climate is resonating with, or synchronized to a set of natural harmonics that, in previous works (Scafetta, 2010b, 2011b), have been associated to the solar system planetary motion, which is mostly determined by Jupiter and Saturn. We show that the GCMs fail to reproduce the major decadal and multidecadal oscillations found in the global surface temperature record from 1850 to 2011. On the contrary, the proposed harmonic model (which herein uses cycles with 9.1, 10-10.5, 20-21, 60-62 year periods) is found to well reconstruct the observed climate oscillations from 1850 to 2011, and it is shown to be able to forecast the climate oscillations from 1950 to 2011 using the data covering the period 1850-1950, and vice versa. The 9.1-year cycle is shown to be likely related to a decadal Soli/Lunar tidal oscillation, while the 10-10.5, 20-21 and 60-62 year cycles are synchronous to solar and heliospheric planetary oscillations. We show that the IPCC GCM's claim that all warming observed from 1970 to 2000 has been anthropogenically induced is erroneous because of the GCM failure in reconstructing the quasi 20-year and 60-year climatic cycles. Finally, we show how the presence of these large natural cycles can be used to correct the IPCC projected anthropogenic warming trend for the 21st century. By combining this corrected trend with the natural cycles, we show that the temperature may not significantly increase during the next 30 years mostly because of the negative phase of the 60-year cycle. If multisecular natural cycles (which according to some authors have significantly contributed to the observed 1700-2010 warming and may contribute to an

  2. A Model for Semantic Equivalence Discovery for Harmonizing Master Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piprani, Baba

    IT projects often face the challenge of harmonizing metadata and data so as to have a "single" version of the truth. Determining equivalency of multiple data instances against the given type, or set of types, is mandatory in establishing master data legitimacy in a data set that contains multiple incarnations of instances belonging to the same semantic data record . The results of a real-life application define how measuring criteria and equivalence path determination were established via a set of "probes" in conjunction with a score-card approach. There is a need for a suite of supporting models to help determine master data equivalency towards entity resolution—including mapping models, transform models, selection models, match models, an audit and control model, a scorecard model, a rating model. An ORM schema defines the set of supporting models along with their incarnation into an attribute based model as implemented in an RDBMS.

  3. Conventional spherical harmonic analysis for regional modelling of the geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Santis, Angelo

    1992-05-01

    The 3D global geomagnetic field is modeled by adjusted spherical harmonic analysis (ASHA), which is based on the expansion of conventional spherical harmonics after the colatitude interval is adjusted to that of a hemisphere. This kind of analysis can also be applied to modeling general 2D functions. ASHA is compared to spherical cap harmonic analysis, which involves the computation of more complex Legendre functions with real harmonic degree.

  4. Driven Dynamics and Rotary Echo of a Qubit Tunably Coupled to a Harmonic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, S.; Bylander, J.; Yan, F.; Forn-Díaz, P.; Bolkhovsky, V.; Braje, D.; Fitch, G.; Harrabi, K.; Lennon, D.; Miloshi, J.; Murphy, P.; Slattery, R.; Spector, S.; Turek, B.; Weir, T.; Welander, P. B.; Yoshihara, F.; Cory, D. G.; Nakamura, Y.; Orlando, T. P.; Oliver, W. D.

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated the driven dynamics of a superconducting flux qubit that is tunably coupled to a microwave resonator. We find that the qubit experiences an oscillating field mediated by off-resonant driving of the resonator, leading to strong modifications of the qubit Rabi frequency. This opens an additional noise channel, and we find that low-frequency noise in the coupling parameter causes a reduction of the coherence time during driven evolution. The noise can be mitigated with the rotary-echo pulse sequence, which, for driven systems, is analogous to the Hahn-echo sequence.

  5. Driven Dynamics and Rotary Echo of a Qubit Tunably Coupled to a Harmonic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, William; Gustavsson, Simon; Bylander, Jonas; Yan, Fei; Forn-Diaz, Pol; Bolkhovsky, Vlad; Braje, Danielle; Fitch, George; Harrabi, Khalil; Lennon, Donna; Miloshi, Jovi; Murphy, Peter; Slattery, Rick; Spector, Steven; Turek, Ben; Weir, Terry; Welander, Paul; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Cory, David; Nakamura, Yasunobu; Orlando, Terry

    2013-03-01

    We have investigated the driven dynamics of a superconducting flux qubit that is tunably coupled to a microwave resonator. We find that the qubit experiences an oscillating field mediated by off-resonant driving of the resonator, leading to strong modifications of the qubit Rabi frequency. This opens an additional noise channel, and we find that low-frequency noise in the coupling parameter causes a reduction of the coherence time during driven evolution. The noise can be mitigated with the rotary-echo pulse sequence, which, for driven systems, is analogous to the Hahn-echo sequence.

  6. The exact transformation from spherical harmonic to ellipsoidal harmonic coefficients for gravitational field modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xuanyu

    2016-06-01

    The spherical and ellipsoidal harmonic series of the external gravitational potential for a given mass distribution are equivalent in their mutual region of uniform convergence. In an instructive case, the equality of the two series on the common coordinate surface of an infinitely large sphere reveals the exact correspondence between the spherical and ellipsoidal harmonic coefficients. The transformation between the two sets of coefficients can be accomplished via the numerical methods by Walter (Celest Mech 2:389-397, 1970) and Dechambre and Scheeres (Astron Astrophys 387:1114-1122, 2002), respectively. On the other hand, the harmonic coefficients are defined by the integrals of mass density moments in terms of the respective solid harmonics. This paper presents general algebraic formulas for expressing the solid ellipsoidal harmonics as a linear combination of the corresponding solid spherical harmonics. An exact transformation from spherical to ellipsoidal harmonic coefficients is found by incorporating these connecting expressions into the density integral. A computational procedure is proposed for the transformation. Numerical results based on the nearly ellipsoidal Martian moon, Phobos, are presented for validation of the method.

  7. Three-dimensional simulations of harmonic radiation and harmonic lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Mark J.; McVey, Brian D.

    Characteristics of the harmonic emission from free electron lasers (FELs) are examined in the spontaneous, coherent-spontaneous and stimulated emission regimes. The radiation at both odd and even harmonic frequencies is treated for electron beams with finite emittance and energy spread. In the spontaneous emission regime, the transverse radiation patterns including the transverse frequency dependences, are given. How this expression is modified to include energy spread and emittance is described. In the coherent-spontaneous emission and stimulated emission regimes, the interaction of the radiation fields with the electrons must be treated self consistently. Here, a single frequency distributed transverse source function for each electron is used in the harmonic version of the 3-D code FELEX to model the harmonic radiation. The code has recently been modified to simultaneously model the fundamental and harmonic interactions for multiple-pass oscillator simulations. These modifications facilitate the examination of FELs under various operating conditions. When the FEL is lasing at the fundamental, the evolution of the harmonic fields can be examined. This evolution is unique in the sense that the electron beam radiates at the harmonic frequencies in the presence of the harmonic radiation circulating in the cavity. As a result, enhancements of the harmonic emission can be observed. Finally, harmonic lasing can occur in cases where there is sufficient gain to overcome cavity losses and lasing at the fundamental can be suppressed. The characteristics and efficiency of these interactions are explored.

  8. Three-dimensional simulations of harmonic radiation and harmonic lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Mark J.; McVey, Brian D.

    1991-07-01

    Characteristics of the harmonic emission from free electron lasers (FELs) are examined in the spontaneous, coherent-spontaneous and stimulated emission regimes. The radiation at both odd and even harmonic frequencies is treated for electron beams with finite emittance and energy spread. In the spontaneous emission regime, the transverse radiation patterns including the transverse frequency dependences, are given. How this expression is modified to include energy spread and emittance is described. In the coherent-spontaneous emission and stimulated emission (lasing) regimes, the interaction of the radiation fields with the electrons must be treated self-consistently. Here, a single-frequency distributed transverse source function for each electron is used in the harmonic version (HELEX) of the 3D code FELEX to model the harmonic radiation. This code has recently been modified to simultaneously model the fundamental and harmonic interactions for multiple-pass oscillator simulations. These modifications facilitate the examination of FELs under various operating conditions. When the FEL is lasing at the fundamental, the evolution of the harmonic fields can be examined. This evolution is unique in the sense that the electron beam (which is bunched by the fundamental optical field) radiates at the harmonic frequencies in the presence of the harmonic radiation circulating in the cavity. As a result, enhancements of the harmonic emission can be observed. Finally, harmonic lasing can occur in cases where there is sufficient gain to overcome cavity losses and lasing at the fundamental can be suppressed. The characteristics and efficiency of these interactions are explored.

  9. Beyond harmonic sounds in a simple model for birdsong production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador, Ana; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2008-12-01

    In this work we present an analysis of the dynamics displayed by a simple bidimensional model of labial oscillations during birdsong production. We show that the same model capable of generating tonal sounds can present, for a wide range of parameters, solutions which are spectrally rich. The role of physiologically sensible parameters is discussed in each oscillatory regime, allowing us to interpret previously reported data.

  10. SevenOperators, a Mathematica script for harmonic oscillator nuclear matrix elements arising in semileptonic electroweak interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, Wick; Lunardini, Cecilia

    2008-09-01

    Semi-leptonic electroweak interactions in nuclei—such as β decay, μ capture, charged- and neutral-current neutrino reactions, and electron scattering—are described by a set of multipole operators carrying definite parity and angular momentum, obtained by projection from the underlying nuclear charge and three-current operators. If these nuclear operators are approximated by their one-body forms and expanded in the nucleon velocity through order |p→|/M, where p→ and M are the nucleon momentum and mass, a set of seven multipole operators is obtained. Nuclear structure calculations are often performed in a basis of Slater determinants formed from harmonic oscillator orbitals, a choice that allows translational invariance to be preserved. Harmonic-oscillator single-particle matrix elements of the multipole operators can be evaluated analytically and expressed in terms of finite polynomials in q, where q is the magnitude of the three-momentum transfer. While results for such matrix elements are available in tabular form, with certain restriction on quantum numbers, the task of determining the analytic form of a response function can still be quite tedious, requiring the folding of the tabulated matrix elements with the nuclear density matrix, and subsequent algebra to evaluate products of operators. Here we provide a Mathematica script for generating these matrix elements, which will allow users to carry out all such calculations by symbolic manipulation. This will eliminate the errors that may accompany hand calculations and speed the calculation of electroweak nuclear cross sections and rates. We illustrate the use of the new script by calculating the cross sections for charged- and neutral-current neutrino scattering in 12C. Program summaryProgram title: SevenOperators Catalogue identifier: AEAY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland

  11. Numerical linearized MHD model of flapping oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Ivanov, I. B.; Semenov, V. S.; Erkaev, N. V.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Kink-like magnetotail flapping oscillations in a Harris-like current sheet with earthward growing normal magnetic field component Bz are studied by means of time-dependent 2D linearized MHD numerical simulations. The dispersion relation and two-dimensional eigenfunctions are obtained. The results are compared with analytical estimates of the double-gradient model, which are found to be reliable for configurations with small Bz up to values ˜ 0.05 of the lobe magnetic field. Coupled with previous results, present simulations confirm that the earthward/tailward growth direction of the Bz component acts as a switch between stable/unstable regimes of the flapping mode, while the mode dispersion curve is the same in both cases. It is confirmed that flapping oscillations may be triggered by a simple Gaussian initial perturbation of the Vz velocity.

  12. Design of a 0.25 THz second harmonic gyrotron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Li, Hongfu

    2008-12-01

    A design process for a second harmonic operation of a low ohm lossy TE03 mode 0.25 THz gyrotron has been presented. Mode competition and mode selection are carefully studied through the linear theory of CRM. The cavity are designed and optimized by using a time domain open cavity calculation code, and validated by using the famous FEM code HFSS. Interaction numerical investigations are carried out by using a self-consistent nonlinear theory cod. The influences of the magnetic field, current, voltage and the velocity ratio of the electron beam under the interaction between the electron beam and RF field are analyzed. The 14-kW 0.25 THz gyrotron with a predicted device efficiency of 39% is driven by a 25-kV 1.5-A (v⊥/v// = 1.5, ▵vz / vz = 6%) electron beam from a magnetron injection gun. A tapered magnetic field is adopted in the large signal simulation to prompt the electron efficiency.

  13. Testing the Model of Oscillating Magnetic Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szaforz, Ż.; Tomczak, M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to test the model of oscillating magnetic traps (the OMT model), proposed by Jakimiec and Tomczak ( Solar Phys. 261, 233, 2010). This model describes the process of excitation of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during solar flares. In the OMT model energetic electrons are accelerated within a triangular, cusp-like structure situated between the reconnection point and the top of a flare loop as seen in soft X-rays. We analyzed QPPs in hard X-ray light curves for 23 flares as observed by Yohkoh. Three independent methods were used. We also used hard X-ray images to localize magnetic traps and soft X-ray images to diagnose thermal plasmas inside the traps. We found that the majority of the observed pulsation periods correlates with the diameters of oscillating magnetic traps, as was predicted by the OMT model. We also found that the electron number density of plasma inside the magnetic traps in the time of pulsation disappearance is strongly connected with the pulsation period. We conclude that the observations are consistent with the predictions of the OMT model for the analyzed set of flares.

  14. Interaction of mechanical and electrical oscillations and sensitivity in a model of sensory hair cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amro, Rami M.; Neiman, Alexander B.

    2013-03-01

    Sensory hair cells are the first stage in conveying the mechanical stimuli into the electrical signals in auditory and vestibular organs of vertebrates. Experiments showed that hair cells rely on active processes in hair bundles to achieve high selective sensitivity, e.g. due to myosin molecular motors inside stereocilia. In lower vertebrates these active processes result in spontaneous oscillations of hair bundles which can be accompanied by oscillations of the cells' membrane potentials. We use modeling to study how the dynamics of both the membrane potential and the hair bundle interact to produce coherent self-sustained oscillations and how this interaction contributes to the cell's sensitivity to external mechanical perturbations. The model incorporates a mechanical stochastic hair bundle system coupled to a Hodgkin-Huxley type system for the membrane potential. We show that oscillatory regimes result in enhanced sensitivity and selectivity to harmonic stimuli.

  15. Coherent States for the Finite su(2)-OSCILLATOR Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicent, Luis Edgar

    A finite oscillator is a system that has a discrete and finite number of spatial positions and energy levels accessible. The su(2)-oscillator model takes the generators of the angular momentum su(2) algebra and, giving to each one a definite physical interpretation, provides a consistent mathematical description of a finite oscillator. This work searches an example of identification of generalized coherent states, within the collection of states and wavefunctions of the finite su(2) oscillator model.

  16. Statistical model of clutter suppression in tissue harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiang; Hamilton, Mark F

    2011-03-01

    A statistical model is developed for the suppression of clutter in tissue harmonic imaging (THI). Tissue heterogeneity is modeled as a random phase screen that is characterized by its correlation length and variance. With the autocorrelation function taken to be Gaussian and for small variance, statistical solutions are derived for the mean intensities at the fundamental and second-harmonic frequencies in the field of a focused sound beam that propagates through the phase screen. The statistical solutions are verified by comparison with ensemble averaging of direct numerical simulations. The model demonstrates that THI reduces the aberration clutter appearing in the focal region regardless of the depth of the aberrating layer, with suppression of the clutter most effective when the layer is close to the source. The model is also applied to the reverberation clutter that is transmitted forward along the axis of the beam. As with aberration clutter, suppression of such reverberation clutter by THI is most pronounced when the tissue heterogeneity is located close to the source.

  17. A model of nonautonomous dynamics driven by repeated harmonic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrebnov, V. A.; Tamura, H.

    2016-06-01

    We consider an exactly solvable model of nonautonomous W*-dynamics driven by repeated harmonic interaction. The dynamics is Hamiltonian and quasifree. Because of inelastic interaction in the large-time limit, it leads to relaxation of initial states to steady states. We derive the explicit entropy production rate accompanying this relaxation. We also study the evolution of different subsystems to elucidate their eventual correlations and convergence to equilibriums. In conclusion, we prove that the W*-dynamics manifests a universal stationary behavior in a short-time interaction limit.

  18. Low-noise sub-harmonic injection locked multiloop ring oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilin, Xu; Di, Wu; Xueming, Wei; Baolin, Wei; Jihai, Duan; Fadi, Gui

    2016-09-01

    A three-stage differential voltage-controlled ring oscillator is presented for wide-tuning and low-phase noise requirement of clock and data recovery circuit in ultra wideband (UWB) wireless body area network. To improve the performance of phase noise of delay cell with coarse and fine frequency tuning, injection locked technology together with pseudo differential architecture are adopted. In addition, a multiloop is employed for frequency boosting. Two RVCOs, the standard RVCO without the IL block and the proposed IL RVCO, were fabricated in SMIC 0.18 μm 1P6M Salicide CMOS process. The proposed IL RVCO exhibits a measured phase noise of ‑112.37 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset from the center frequency of 1 GHz, while dissipating a current of 8 mA excluding the buffer from a 1.8-V supply voltage. It shows a 16.07 dB phase noise improvement at 1 MHz offset compared to the standard topology. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61264001), the Guangxi Natural Science Foundation (Nos. 2013GXNSFAA019333, 2015GXNSFAA139301, 2014GXNSFAA118386), the Graduate Education Innovation Program of GUET (No. GDYCSZ201457), the Project of Guangxi Education Department (No. LD14066B) and the High-Level-Innovation Team and Outstanding Scholar Project of Guangxi Higher Education Institutes.

  19. Modeling Airborne Gravimetry with High-Degree Harmonic Expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Simon; Wang, Yan Ming; Roman, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Since its official unveiling at the 2008 General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union, EGM2008 has demonstrated that high-degree harmonic expansions constitute a useful and effective final representation for high-resolution global gravitational models. However, such expansions also provide a versatile means of capturing (modeling), inter-comparing, and optimally combining local and regional high-resolution terrestrial data sets of different types. Here we present a general recipe for using high-degree expansions to capture, downward-continue and assimilate airborne survey data. This approach relies on the production of two ‘competing' high-degree expansions. A first, ‘terrestrial-only' expansion incorporates EGM2008 globally, and high-resolution terrestrial gravimetry regionally. This expansion can be used to upward-continue the regional terrestrial data to the flight level of the airborne survey, such that the terrestrial gravimetry outside the survey area can be merged with the airborne data inside the survey area, all at flight level. Harmonic analysis of this merged data set, also at flight level, yields a second ‘airborne-augmented' expansion, which closely matches the ‘terrestrial-only' expansion outside the survey area, but which also closely reproduces the airborne survey data inside the survey area. Capturing the airborne and terrestrial data in this way means that downward-continuation of the airborne data, as well as spectral/spatial comparison (and ultimate combination) of the airborne data with the terrestrial (and satellite) data, can all be achieved through spherical- and ellipsoidal-harmonic synthesis of these two competing expansions, and their spectral combination. This general approach is illustrated with a worked example.

  20. Further investigation of a finite difference procedure for analyzing the transonic flow about harmonically oscillating airfoils and wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weatherill, W. H.; Ehlers, F. E.; Yip, E.; Sebastian, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical and empirical studies of a finite difference method for the solution of the transonic flow about harmonically oscillating wings and airfoils are presented. The procedure is based on separating the velocity potential into steady and unsteady parts and linearizing the resulting unsteady equations for small disturbances. The steady velocity potential is obtained first from the well-known nonlinear equation for steady transonic flow. The unsteady velocity potential is then obtained from a linear differential equation in complex form with spatially varying coefficients. Since sinusoidal motion is assumed, the unsteady equation is independent of time. An out-of-core direct solution procedure was developed and applied to two-dimensional sections. Results are presented for a section of vanishing thickness in subsonic flow and an NACA 64A006 airfoil in supersonic flow. Good correlation is obtained in the first case at values of Mach number and reduced frequency of direct interest in flutter analyses. Reasonable results are obtained in the second case. Comparisons of two-dimensional finite difference solutions with exact analytic solutions indicate that the accuracy of the difference solution is dependent on the boundary conditions used on the outer boundaries. Homogeneous boundary conditions on the mesh edges that yield complex eigenvalues give the most accurate finite difference solutions. The plane outgoing wave boundary conditions meet these requirements.

  1. Core-oscillator model of Caulobacter crescentus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecan, Yves; Biondi, Emanuele; Blossey, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a powerful model organism for studies of bacterial cell cycle regulation. Although the major regulators and their connections in Caulobacter have been identified, it still is a challenge to properly understand the dynamics of its circuitry which accounts for both cell cycle progression and arrest. We show that the key decision module in Caulobacter is built from a limit cycle oscillator which controls the DNA replication program. The effect of an induced cell cycle arrest is demonstrated to be a key feature to classify the underlying dynamics.

  2. Core-oscillator model of Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Vandecan, Yves; Biondi, Emanuele; Blossey, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a powerful model organism for studies of bacterial cell cycle regulation. Although the major regulators and their connections in Caulobacter have been identified, it still is a challenge to properly understand the dynamics of its circuitry which accounts for both cell cycle progression and arrest. We show that the key decision module in Caulobacter is built from a limit cycle oscillator which controls the DNA replication program. The effect of an induced cell cycle arrest is demonstrated to be a key feature to classify the underlying dynamics.

  3. On square-integrability of solutions of the stationary Schrödinger equation for the quantum harmonic oscillator in two dimensional constant curvature spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Noguera, Norman; Rózga, Krzysztof

    2015-07-15

    In this work, one provides a justification of the condition that is usually imposed on the parameters of the hypergeometric equation, related to the solutions of the stationary Schrödinger equation for the harmonic oscillator in two-dimensional constant curvature spaces, in order to determine the solutions which are square-integrable. One proves that in case of negative curvature, it is a necessary condition of square integrability and in case of positive curvature, a necessary condition of regularity. The proof is based on the analytic continuation formulas for the hypergeometric function. It is observed also that the same is true in case of a slightly more general potential than the one for harmonic oscillator.

  4. Adaptive Runge-Kutta integration for stiff systems: Comparing Nosé and Nosé-Hoover dynamics for the harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham Hoover, William; Clinton Sprott, Julien; Griswold Hoover, Carol

    2016-10-01

    We describe the application of adaptive (variable time step) integrators to stiff differential equations encountered in many applications. Linear harmonic oscillators subject to nonlinear thermal constraints can exhibit either stiff or smooth dynamics. Two closely related examples, Nosé's dynamics and Nosé-Hoover dynamics, are both based on Hamiltonian mechanics and generate microstates consistent with Gibbs' canonical ensemble. Nosé's dynamics is stiff and can present severe numerical difficulties. Nosé-Hoover dynamics, although it follows exactly the same trajectory, is smooth and relatively trouble-free. We emphasize the power of adaptive integrators to resolve stiff problems such as the Nosé dynamics for the harmonic oscillator. The solutions also illustrate the power of computer graphics to enrich numerical solutions.

  5. Revisiting an old concept: the coupled oscillator model for VCD. Part 1: the generalised coupled oscillator mechanism and its intrinsic connection to the strength of VCD signals.

    PubMed

    Nicu, Valentin Paul

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the renewed interest in the coupled oscillator (CO) model for VCD, in this work a generalised coupled oscillator (GCO) expression is derived by introducing the concept of a coupled oscillator origin. Unlike the standard CO expression, the GCO expression is exact within the harmonic approximation. Using two illustrative example molecules, the theoretical concepts introduced here are demonstrated by performing a GCO decomposition of the rotational strengths computed using DFT. This analysis shows that: (1) the contributions to the rotational strengths that are normally neglected in the standard CO model can be comparable to or larger than the CO contribution, and (2) the GCO mechanism introduced here can affect the VCD intensities of all types of modes in symmetric and asymmetric molecules.

  6. MODELING THREE-DIMENSIONAL MORPHOLOGICAL STRUCTURES USING SPHERICAL HARMONICS

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li; Farid, Hany; McPeek, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying morphological shape is a fundamental issue in evolutionary biology. Recent technological advances (e.g., confocal microscopy, laser scanning, computer tomography) have made the capture of detailed three-dimensional (3D) morphological structure easy and cost-effective. In this article, we develop a 3D analytic framework (SPHARM—spherical harmonics) for modeling the shapes of complex morphological structures from continuous surface maps that can be produced by these technologies. Because the traditional SPHARM methodology has limitations in several of its processing steps, we present new algorithms for two SPHARM processing steps: spherical parameterization and SPHARM registration. These new algorithms allow for the numerical characterization of a much larger class of 3D models. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by applying it to modeling the cerci of Enallagma damselflies. PMID:19154365

  7. Simplified phase noise model for negative-resistance oscillators and a comparison with feedback oscillator models.

    PubMed

    Everard, Jeremy; Xu, Min; Bale, Simon

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a greatly simplified model for the prediction of phase noise in oscillators which use a negative resistance as the active element. It is based on a simple circuit consisting of the parallel addition of a noise current, a negative admittance/resistance, and a parallel (Qlimited) resonant circuit. The transfer function is calculated as a forward trans-resistance (VOUT/IIN) and then converted to power. The effect of limiting is incorporated by assuming that the phase noise element of the noise floor is kT/2, i.e., -177 dBm/Hz at room temperature. The result is the same as more complex analyses, but enables a simple, clear insight into the operation of oscillators. The phase noise for a given power in the resonator appears to be lower than in feedback oscillators. The reasons for this are explained. Simulation and experimental results are included.

  8. Experimental investigation and model development for a harmonic drive transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preissner, Curt; Shu, Deming; Royston, Thomas J.

    2007-09-01

    Harmonic drive transmissions (HDTs) are compact, low-backlash, high-ratio, high-resolution rotary motion transmissions. One application to benefit from these attributes is the revolute joint robot. Engineers at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are investigating the use of this type of robot for the positioning of an x-ray detector; understanding the properties of the robot components is crucial to modeling positioner behavior. The robot bearing elements had been investigated previously, leaving the transmission as the missing component. While the benefits of HDTs are well known, the disadvantages, including fluctuating dissipation characteristics and nonlinear stiffness, are not understood as well. These characteristics can contribute uncontrolled dynamics to the overall robot performance. A dynamometer has been constructed at the APS to experimentally measure the HDT's response. Empirical torque and position data were recorded for multiple transmission load cases and input conditions. In turn, a computer model of the dynamometer HDT system was constructed to approximate the observed response.

  9. Experimental investigation and model development for a harmonic drive transmission.

    SciTech Connect

    Preissner, C.; Shu, D.; Royston, T. J.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2007-01-01

    Harmonic drive transmissions (HDTs) are compact, low-backlash, high-ratio, high-resolution rotary motion transmissions. One application to benefit from these attributes is the revolute joint robot. Engineers at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are investigating the use of this type of robot for the positioning of an x-ray detector; understanding the properties of the robot components is crucial to modeling positioner behavior. The robot bearing elements had been investigated previously, leaving the transmission as the missing component. While the benefits of HDTs are well known, the disadvantages, including fluctuating dissipation characteristics and nonlinear stiffness, are not understood as well. These characteristics can contribute uncontrolled dynamics to the overall robot performance. A dynamometer has been constructed at the APS to experimentally measure the HDT's response. Empirical torque and position data were recorded for multiple transmission load cases and input conditions. In turn, a computer model of the dynamometer HDT system was constructed to approximate the observed response.

  10. Biological oscillations for learning walking coordination: dynamic recurrent neural network functionally models physiological central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Hoellinger, Thomas; Petieau, Mathieu; Duvinage, Matthieu; Castermans, Thierry; Seetharaman, Karthik; Cebolla, Ana-Maria; Bengoetxea, Ana; Ivanenko, Yuri; Dan, Bernard; Cheron, Guy

    2013-01-01

    The existence of dedicated neuronal modules such as those organized in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum, or spinal cord raises the question of how these functional modules are coordinated for appropriate motor behavior. Study of human locomotion offers an interesting field for addressing this central question. The coordination of the elevation of the 3 leg segments under a planar covariation rule (Borghese et al., 1996) was recently modeled (Barliya et al., 2009) by phase-adjusted simple oscillators shedding new light on the understanding of the central pattern generator (CPG) processing relevant oscillation signals. We describe the use of a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) mimicking the natural oscillatory behavior of human locomotion for reproducing the planar covariation rule in both legs at different walking speeds. Neural network learning was based on sinusoid signals integrating frequency and amplitude features of the first three harmonics of the sagittal elevation angles of the thigh, shank, and foot of each lower limb. We verified the biological plausibility of the neural networks. Best results were obtained with oscillations extracted from the first three harmonics in comparison to oscillations outside the harmonic frequency peaks. Physiological replication steadily increased with the number of neuronal units from 1 to 80, where similarity index reached 0.99. Analysis of synaptic weighting showed that the proportion of inhibitory connections consistently increased with the number of neuronal units in the DRNN. This emerging property in the artificial neural networks resonates with recent advances in neurophysiology of inhibitory neurons that are involved in central nervous system oscillatory activities. The main message of this study is that this type of DRNN may offer a useful model of physiological central pattern generator for gaining insights in basic research and developing clinical applications.

  11. Playing the quantum harp: multipartite squeezing and entanglement of harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Olivier; Menicucci, Nicolas C.; Flammia, Steven T.; Zaidi, Hussain; Bloomer, Russell; Pysher, Matthew

    2008-02-01

    The frequency comb of an optical resonator is a naturally large set of exquisitely well defined quantum systems, such as in the broadband mode-locked lasers which have redefined time/frequency metrology and ultraprecise measurements in recent years. High coherence can therefore be expected in the quantum version of the frequency comb, in which nonlinear interactions couple different cavity modes, as can be modeled by different forms of graph states. We show that is possible to thereby generate states of interest to quantum metrology and computing, such as multipartite entangled cluster and Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states.

  12. A model for premixed combustion oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-03-01

    Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to increasing application of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described; it was developed to explain experimental results and to provide guidance for developing active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, etc. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a PC. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with bimolecular reaction between fuel and air. Although focus is on the model, it and experimental results are compared to understand effects of inlet air temperature and open loop control schemes. The model shows that both are related to changes in transport time.

  13. Demonstration of double EIT using coupled harmonic oscillators and RLC circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harden, Joshua; Joshi, Amitabh; Serna, Juan D.

    2011-03-01

    Single and double electromagnetically induced transparencies (EIT) in a medium, consisting of four-level atoms in the inverted-Y configuration, are discussed using mechanical and electrical analogies. A three-coupled spring-mass system subject to damping and driven by an external force is used to represent the four-level atom mechanically. The equations of motion of this system are solved analytically, which revealed single and double EIT. On the other hand, three coupled RLC circuits are used, as the electrical analogue, to explore and experimentally demonstrate single and double EIT. The simplicity of these two models makes this experiment appropriate for undergraduate students and easy to incorporate into a college physics laboratory.

  14. Modeling and analysis of aircraft non-linear components for harmonics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Karimi, K.J.; Voss, J.

    1995-12-31

    Modern commercial aircraft Electric Power Systems (EPS) include many nonlinear components which produce harmonics. The addition of all the current harmonics could result in a power system with unacceptable levels of voltage distortion. It is important to be able to predict the levels of voltage distortion at early program stages to correct any potential problems and avoid costly redesigns. In this paper the nature and sources of harmonic producing equipment are described. These sources of harmonics and their effect on aircraft power system operation are described. Models for various aircraft non-linear components are developed in this paper. These component models are used in a model of the Boeing 777 EPS which is used to calculate voltage harmonics for various airplane configurations and flight conditions. A description of this model and the models used for various components are given. Tests performed to validate these models are described. Comparison of experimental results with analytical model predictions are given.

  15. Contribution to harmonic balance calculations of self-sustained periodic oscillations with focus on single-reed instruments.

    PubMed

    Farner, Snorre; Vergez, Christophe; Kergomard, Jean; Lizée, Aude

    2006-03-01

    The harmonic balance method (HBM) was originally developed for finding periodic solutions of electronical and mechanical systems under a periodic force, but has been adapted to self-sustained musical instruments. Unlike time-domain methods, this frequency-domain method does not capture transients and so is not adapted for sound synthesis. However, its independence of time makes it very useful for studying any periodic solution, whether stable or unstable, without care of particular initial conditions in time. A computer program for solving general problems involving nonlinearly coupled exciter and resonator, HARMBAL, has been developed based on the HBM. The method as well as convergence improvements and continuation facilities are thoroughly presented and discussed in the present paper. Applications of the method are demonstrated, especially on problems with severe difficulties of convergence: the Helmholtz motion (square signals) of single-reed instruments when no losses are taken into account, the reed being modeled as a simple spring. PMID:16583920

  16. Difference oscillator in terms of the Meixner polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakishiyev, Natig M.; Jafarov, Elchin I.; Nagiyev, Shakir M.; Wolf, Kurt B.

    1998-07-01

    We discuss a difference model of the linear harmonic oscillator based on the Meixner polynomials. As limit and special cases, it contains difference oscillator models in terms of the Kravchuk and Charlier polynomials, as well as the wavefunctions of the linear harmonic oscillator in quantum mechanics. We show that the dynamical group is SU(1,1) and construct explicitly the corresponding coherent state. The reproducing kernel for the wavefunctions of the Meixner model is also found.

  17. Polymerization and oscillation stuttering in a filamentous model of the subcellular Min oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Sengupta, Supratim; Sain, Anirban; Derr, Julien

    2011-03-01

    We present a computational model of the E. coli Min oscillation that involves polymerization of MinD filaments followed by depolymerization stimulated by filament-end zones of MinE. Our stochastic model is fully three-dimensional, and tracks the diffusion and interactions of every MinD and MinE molecule. We recover self-organized Min oscillations. We investigate the experimental phenomenon of oscillation stuttering, which we relate to the disruption of MinE tip-binding at the filament scale.

  18. Alternating Lags of QPO Harmonics: A Generic Model and its Application to the 67 mHz QPO of GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Ranjeev; Mandal, Soma

    2013-12-01

    A generic model for alternating lags in quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) harmonics is presented where variations in the photon spectrum are caused by oscillations in two parameters that characterize the spectrum. It is further assumed that variations in one of the parameters are linearly driven by variations in the other after a time delay td . It is shown that alternating lags will be observed for a range of td values. A phenomenological model based on this generic one is developed that can explain the amplitude and phase lag variation with energy of the fundamental and the next three harmonics of the 67 mHz QPO observed in GRS 1915+105. The phenomenological model also predicts the variation of the Bicoherence phase with energy, which can be checked by further analysis of the observational data.

  19. Multiple Bifurcations in a Polynomial Model of Bursting Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, G.

    1998-06-01

    Bursting oscillations are commonly seen to be the primary mode of electrical behaviour in a variety of nerve and endocrine cells, and have also been observed in some biochemical and chemical systems. There are many models of bursting. This paper addresses the issue of being able to predict the type of bursting oscillation that can be produced by a model. A simplified model capable of exhibiting a wide variety of bursting oscillations is examined. By considering the codimension-2 bifurcations associated with Hopf, homoclinic, and saddle-node of periodics bifurcations, a bifurcation map in two-dimensional parameter space is created. Each region on the map is characterized by a qualitatively distinct bifurcation diagram and, hence, represents one type of bursting oscillation. The map elucidates the relationship between the various types of bursting oscillations. In addition, the map provides a different and broader view of the current classification scheme of bursting oscillations.

  20. Investigation of Self-Oscillation using Particle Balance Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Inshik; Na, Byungkeun; Chang, Hongyoung

    2015-09-01

    Self-oscillation, which is obtained by using a DC-only power supply with specific anode voltage conditions, is investigated in a cylindrical system with thermal electrons using tungsten filaments. From analysis of the obtained oscillation profiles, the experimental data is consistent with the model derived from the particle balance model. The self-oscillation period characteristics with respect to the pressure and gas species are also analyzed. As the physics and particle motion of self-oscillation near the electron avalanche is analyzed in different perspective, this study may advance the understanding of this phenomenon. This research was supported by the Ministry of Knowledge Economy (MKE) of Korea (Grant No. 10041681).

  1. Investigation of self-oscillation using particle balance model

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Inshik; Na, Byungkeun Chang, Hongyoung

    2015-08-15

    Self-oscillation obtained using a DC-only power supply under specific anode voltage conditions is investigated in a cylindrical system with thermal electrons using tungsten filaments. Analysis of the obtained oscillation profiles reveals that the experimental data are consistent with a model derived from the particle balance model. The self-oscillation period characteristics with respect to the pressure and gas species are also analyzed. As the physics and particle motion of self-oscillation near the plasma transition region are analyzed from different perspectives, this paper may advance the study of this phenomenon.

  2. Analytical modelling and x-ray imaging of oscillations of a single magnetic domain wall

    SciTech Connect

    Bocklage, Lars; Kruger, Benjamin; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2009-07-10

    Domain-wall oscillation in a pinnig potential is described analytically in a one dimensional model for the feld-driven case. For a proper description the pinning potential has to be extended by nonharmonic contributions. Oscillations of a domain wall are observed on its genuine time scale by magnetic X-ray microscopy. It is shown that the nonharmonic terms are present in real samples with a strong restoring potential. In the framework of our model we gain deep insight into the domain-wall motion by looking at different phase spaces. The corrections of the harmonic potential can change the motion of the domain wall significantly. The damping parameter of permalloy is determined via the direct imaging technique.

  3. Modelling spatial oscillations in soil borehole bacteria.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, M J; Cribbin, L B; Winstanley, H F; Fowler, A C

    2014-12-21

    Spatial oscillations in groundwater contaminant concentrations can be successfully explained by consideration of a competitive microbial community in conditions of poor nutrient supply, in which the effects of spatial diffusion of the nutrient sources are included. In previous work we showed that the microbial competition itself allowed oscillations to occur, and, in common with other reaction-diffusion systems, the addition of spatial diffusion transforms these temporal oscillations into travelling waves, sometimes chaotic. We therefore suggest that irregular chemical profiles sometimes found in contaminant plume borehole profiles may be a consequence of this competition.

  4. Investigation of Bohr Hamiltonian in the presence of time-dependent Manning-Rosen, harmonic oscillator and double ring shaped potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhani, Hadi; Hassanabadi, Hassan

    2016-08-01

    This paper contains study of Bohr Hamiltonian considering time-dependent form of two important and famous nuclear potentials and harmonic oscillator. Dependence on time in interactions is considered in general form. In order to investigate this system, a powerful mathematical method has been employed, so-called Lewis-Riesenfeld dynamical invariant method. Appropriate dynamical invariant for considered system has been constructed. Then its eigen functions and the wave function are derived. At the end, we discussed about physical meaning of the results.

  5. Phase computations and phase models for discrete molecular oscillators

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biochemical oscillators perform crucial functions in cells, e.g., they set up circadian clocks. The dynamical behavior of oscillators is best described and analyzed in terms of the scalar quantity, phase. A rigorous and useful definition for phase is based on the so-called isochrons of oscillators. Phase computation techniques for continuous oscillators that are based on isochrons have been used for characterizing the behavior of various types of oscillators under the influence of perturbations such as noise. Results In this article, we extend the applicability of these phase computation methods to biochemical oscillators as discrete molecular systems, upon the information obtained from a continuous-state approximation of such oscillators. In particular, we describe techniques for computing the instantaneous phase of discrete, molecular oscillators for stochastic simulation algorithm generated sample paths. We comment on the accuracies and derive certain measures for assessing the feasibilities of the proposed phase computation methods. Phase computation experiments on the sample paths of well-known biological oscillators validate our analyses. Conclusions The impact of noise that arises from the discrete and random nature of the mechanisms that make up molecular oscillators can be characterized based on the phase computation techniques proposed in this article. The concept of isochrons is the natural choice upon which the phase notion of oscillators can be founded. The isochron-theoretic phase computation methods that we propose can be applied to discrete molecular oscillators of any dimension, provided that the oscillatory behavior observed in discrete-state does not vanish in a continuous-state approximation. Analysis of the full versatility of phase noise phenomena in molecular oscillators will be possible if a proper phase model theory is developed, without resorting to such approximations. PMID:22687330

  6. Long-term operation of surface high-harmonic generation from relativistic oscillating mirrors using a spooling tape

    SciTech Connect

    Bierbach, Jana; Yeung, Mark; Eckner, Erich; Roedel, Christian; Kuschel, Stephan; Zepf, Matt; Paulus, Gerhard G.

    2015-05-01

    Surface high-harmonic generation in the relativistic regime is demonstrated as a source of extreme ultra-violet (XUV) pulses with extended operation time. Relativistic high-harmonic generation is driven by a frequency-doubled high-power Ti:Sapphire laser focused to a peak intensity of 3·1019 W/cm2 onto spooling tapes. We demonstrate continuous operation over up to one hour runtime at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Harmonic spectra ranging from 20 eV to 70 eV (62 nm to 18 nm) were consecutively recorded by an XUV spectrometer. An average XUV pulse energy in the µJ range is measured. With the presented setup, relativistic surface high-harmonic generation becomes a powerful source of coherent XUV pulses that might enable applications in, e.g. attosecond laser physics and the seeding of free-electron lasers, when the laser issues causing 80-% pulse energy fluctuations are overcome.

  7. The analysis of solar models: Neutrinos and oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, R. K.; Rhodes, E. J., Jr.; Tomczyk, S.; Dumont, P. J.; Brunish, W. M.

    1983-01-01

    Tests of solar neutrino flux and solar oscillation frequencies were used to assess standard stellar structure theory. Standard and non-standard solar models are enumerated and discussed. The field of solar seismology, wherein the solar interior is studied from the measurement of solar oscillations, is introduced.

  8. Noise induced oscillations and coherence resonance in a generic model of the nonisothermal chemical oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Simakov, David S. A.; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are common in biological systems and they also occur in artificial non-biological systems. Generally, these reactions are subject to random fluctuations in environmental conditions which translate into fluctuations in the values of physical variables, for example, temperature. We formulate a mathematical model for a nonisothermal minimal chemical oscillator containing a single negative feedback loop and study numerically the effects of stochastic fluctuations in temperature in the absence of any deterministic limit cycle or periodic forcing. We show that noise in temperature can induce sustained limit cycle oscillations with a relatively narrow frequency distribution and some characteristic frequency. These properties differ significantly depending on the noise correlation. Here, we have explored white and colored (correlated) noise. A plot of the characteristic frequency of the noise induced oscillations as a function of the correlation exponent shows a maximum, therefore indicating the existence of autonomous stochastic resonance, i.e. coherence resonance. PMID:23929212

  9. Determination of local optical response functions of nanostructures with increasing complexity by using single and coupled Lorentzian oscillator models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschlimann, Martin; Brixner, Tobias; Fischer, Alexander; Hensen, Matthias; Huber, Bernhard; Kilbane, Deirdre; Kramer, Christian; Pfeiffer, Walter; Piecuch, Martin; Thielen, Philip

    2016-07-01

    We reconstruct the optical response of nanostructures of increasing complexity by fitting interferometric time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) data from an ultrashort (21 fs) laser excitation source with different harmonic oscillator-based models. Due to its high spatial resolution of ~40 nm, PEEM is a true near-field imaging system and enables in normal incidence mode a mapping of plasmon polaritons and an intuitive interpretation of the plasmonic behaviour. Using an actively stabilized Mach-Zehnder interferometer, we record two-pulse correlation signals with 50 as time resolution that contain information about the temporal plasmon polariton evolution. Spectral amplitude and phase of excited plasmon polaritons are extracted from the recorded phase-resolved interferometric two-pulse correlation traces. We show that the optical response of a plasmon polariton generated at a gold nanoparticle can be reconstructed from the interferometric two-pulse correlation signal using a single harmonic oscillator model. In contrast, for a corrugated silver surface, a system with increased plasmonic complexity, in general an unambiguous reconstruction of the local optical response based on coupled and uncoupled harmonic oscillators, fails. Whereas for certain local responses different models can be discriminated, this is impossible for other positions. Multidimensional spectroscopy offers a possibility to overcome this limitation.

  10. Analytical and numerical analysis of a rotational invariant D = 2 harmonic oscillator in the light of different noncommutative phase-space configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Everton M. C.; Marcial, Mateus V.; Mendes, Albert C. R.; Oliveira, Wilson

    2013-11-01

    In this work we have investigated some properties of classical phase-space with symplectic structures consistent, at the classical level, with two noncommutative (NC) algebras: the Doplicher-Fredenhagen-Roberts algebraic relations and the NC approach which uses an extended Hilbert space with rotational symmetry. This extended Hilbert space includes the operators θ ij and their conjugate momentum π ij operators. In this scenario, the equations of motion for all extended phase-space coordinates with their corresponding solutions were determined and a rotational invariant NC Newton's second law was written. As an application, we treated a NC harmonic oscillator constructed in this extended Hilbert space. We have showed precisely that its solution is still periodic if and only if the ratio between the frequencies of oscillation is a rational number. We investigated, analytically and numerically, the solutions of this NC oscillator in a two-dimensional phase-space. The result led us to conclude that noncommutativity induces a stable perturbation into the commutative standard oscillator and that the rotational symmetry is not broken. Besides, we have demonstrated through the equations of motion that a zero momentum π ij originated a constant NC parameter, namely, θ ij = const., which changes the original variable characteristic of θ ij and reduces the phase-space of the system. This result shows that the momentum π ij is relevant and cannot be neglected when we have that θ ij is a coordinate of the system.

  11. Global oscillation mechanism in the stochastic Lotka model.

    PubMed

    Kashcheyevs, V; Kuzovkov, V N

    2001-06-01

    The microscopic one-parameter kinetic model of the oscillatory A+B-->2 B reaction (Lotka model) is studied using direct Monte Carlo simulations and analytical methods. Percolation is proposed as the mechanism of global oscillations that are not limited to any finite size of a system. An analytical estimate of the oscillation frequency is derived and compared to computer simulations. We also observe the transition from synchronized oscillations to specific f(-2) noise in two dimensions which was previously reported for self-organized critical models.

  12. Nonlinear propagation in ultrasonic fields: measurements, modelling and harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, V F

    2000-03-01

    In high amplitude ultrasonic fields, such as those used in medical ultrasound, nonlinear propagation can result in waveform distortion and the generation of harmonics of the initial frequency. In the nearfield of a transducer this process is complicated by diffraction effects associated with the source. The results of a programme to study the nonlinear propagation in the fields of circular, focused and rectangular transducers are described, and comparisons made with numerical predictions obtained using a finite difference solution to the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (or KZK) equation. These results are extended to consider nonlinear propagation in tissue-like media and the implications for ultrasonic measurements and ultrasonic heating are discussed. The narrower beamwidths and reduced side-lobe levels of the harmonic beams are illustrated and the use of harmonics to form diagnostic images with improved resolution is described. PMID:10829672

  13. Harmonic engine

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Charles L.; Sewall, Noel; Boroa, Carl

    2014-08-19

    An engine based on a reciprocating piston engine that extracts work from pressurized working fluid. The engine includes a harmonic oscillator inlet valve capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into of the engine. In particular, the inlet valve includes an inlet valve head and a spring arranged together as a harmonic oscillator so that the inlet valve head is moveable from an unbiased equilibrium position to a biased closed position occluding an inlet. Upon releasing the inlet valve the inlet valve head undergoes a single oscillation past the equilibrium positio to a maximum open position and returns to a biased return position close to the closed position to choke the flow and produce a pressure drop across the inlet valve causing the inlet valve to close. Protrusions carried either by the inlet valve head or piston head are used to bump open the inlet valve from the closed position and initiate the single oscillation of the inlet valve head, and protrusions carried either by the outlet valve head or piston head are used to close the outlet valve ahead of the bump opening of the inlet valve.

  14. Harmonic engine

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-10-20

    A high efficiency harmonic engine based on a resonantly reciprocating piston expander that extracts work from heat and pressurizes working fluid in a reciprocating piston compressor. The engine preferably includes harmonic oscillator valves capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into and out of the expander, and also preferably includes a shunt line connecting an expansion chamber of the expander to a buffer chamber of the expander for minimizing pressure variations in the fluidic circuit of the engine. The engine is especially designed to operate with very high temperature input to the expander and very low temperature input to the compressor, to produce very high thermal conversion efficiency.

  15. Modeling Wave Driven Non-linear Flow Oscillations: The Terrestrial QBO and a Solar Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO) of the zonal circulation observed in the terrestrial atmosphere at low latitudes is driven by wave mean flow interaction as was demonstrated first by Lindzen and Holton (1968), shown in a laboratory experiment by Plumb and McEwan (1978), and modeled by others (e.g., Plumb, Dunkerton). Although influenced by the seasonal cycle of solar forcing, the QBO, in principle, represents a nonlinear flow oscillation that can be maintained by a steady source of upward propagating waves. The wave driven non-linearity is of third or odd order in the flow velocity, which regenerates the fundamental harmonic itself to keep the oscillation going - the fluid dynamical analog of the displacement mechanism in the mechanical clock. Applying Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization (DSP) for gravity waves (GW), we discuss with a global-scale spectral model numerical experiments that elucidate some properties of the QBO and its possible effects on the climatology of the atmosphere. Depending on the period of the QBO, wave filtering can cause interaction with the seasonal variations to produce pronounced oscillations with beat periods around 10 years. Since the seasonal cycle and its variability influence the period of the QBO, it may also be a potent conduit of solar activity variations to lower altitudes. Analogous to the terrestrial QBO, we propose that a flow oscillation may account for the 22-year periodicity of the solar magnetic cycle, potentially answering Dicke (1978) who asked, "Is there a chronometer hidden deep inside the Sun?" The oscillation would occur below the convection region, where gravity waves can propagate. Employing a simplified, analytic model, Hines' DSP is applied to estimate the flow oscillation. Depending on the adopted horizontal wavelengths of GW's, wave amplitudes less than 10 m/s can be made to produce oscillating zonal flows of about 20 m/s that should be large enough to generate a significant oscillation in the magnetic

  16. Modeling temperature compensation in chemical and biological oscillators.

    PubMed

    Ruoff, P; Rensing, L; Kommedal, R; Mohsenzadeh, S

    1997-09-01

    All physicochemical and biological oscillators maintain a balance between destabilizing reactions (as, for example, intrinsic autocatalytic or amplifying reactions) and stabilizing processes. These two groups of processes tend to influence the period in opposite directions and may lead to temperature compensation whenever their overall influence balances. This principle of "antagonistic balance" has been tested for several chemical and biological oscillators. The Goodwin negative feedback oscillator appears of particular interest for modeling the circadian clocks in Neurospora and Drosophila and their temperature compensation. Remarkably, the Goodwin oscillator not only gives qualitative, correct phase response curves for temperature steps and temperature pulses, but also simulates the temperature behavior of Neurospora frq and Drosophila per mutants almost quantitatively. The Goodwin oscillator predicts that circadian periods are strongly dependent on the turnover of the clock mRNA or clock protein. A more rapid turnover of clock mRNA or clock protein results, in short, a slower turnover in longer period lengths.

  17. MOST photometry and modeling of the rapidly oscillating (roAp) star γ Equulei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruberbauer, M.; Saio, H.; Huber, D.; Kallinger, T.; Weiss, W. W.; Guenther, D. B.; Kuschnig, R.; Matthews, J. M.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rucinski, S.; Sasselov, D.; Walker, G. A. H.

    2008-03-01

    Aims:Despite photometry and spectroscopy of its oscillations obtained over the past 25 years, the pulsation frequency spectrum of the rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) star γ Equ has remained poorly understood. Better time-series photometry, combined with recent advances to incorporate interior magnetic field geometry into pulsational models, enable us to perform improved asteroseismology of this roAp star. Methods: We obtained 19 days of continuous high-precision photometry of γ Equ with the Most (Microvariability & Oscillations of STars) satellite. The data were reduced with two different reduction techniques and significant frequencies were identified. Those frequencies were fitted by interpolating a grid of pulsation models that include dipole magnetic fields of various polar strengths. Results: We identify 7 frequencies in γ Equ that we associate with 5 high-overtone p-modes and 1st and 2nd harmonics of the dominant p-mode. One of the modes and both harmonics are new discoveries for this star. Our best model solution (1.8 M⊙, log T_eff ~3.882; polar field strength ~8.1 kG) leads to unique mode identifications for these frequencies (ℓ = 0, 1, 2 and 4). This is the first purely asteroseismic fit to a grid of magnetic models. We measure amplitude and phase modulation of the primary frequency due to beating with a closely spaced frequency that had never been resolved. This casts doubts on theories that such modulation - unrelated to the rotation of the star - is due to a stochastic excitation mechanism. Based on data from the Most satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute of Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  18. Absorption of Fast Waves at Moderate to High Ion Cyclotron Harmonics: Experimental Results and Theoretical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Choi, M.; Prater, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luo, Y.; Baity, F. W.; Murakami, M.; Porkolab, M.

    2006-10-01

    Strong absorption of fast Alfvén waves (FW) by ion cyclotron damping has been observed in DIII-D at the 4th and 5th harmonic of an injected beam while only weak absorption is observed at the 8th harmonic. The experimental results are compared with three different theoretical models; differences between the predictions of the models suggest the possible importance of finite-width orbit effects at high harmonics. In a linear model, it is found that damping on fast ions from neutral beam injection can be significant even at the 8th harmonic under experimentally relevant conditions. This is tested in experiments in DIII-D with FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz. A novel Dα charge exchange recombination diagnostic is used to observe interaction of the FW power with beam ions. The results are compared with modeling with quasilinear and with orbit-following codes.

  19. The NASA/MSFC global reference atmospheric model: MOD 3 (with spherical harmonic wind model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Fletcher, G. R.; Gramling, F. E.; Pace, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    Improvements to the global reference atmospheric model are described. The basic model includes monthly mean values of pressure, density, temperature, and geostrophic winds, as well as quasi-biennial and small and large scale random perturbations. A spherical harmonic wind model for the 25 to 90 km height range is included. Below 25 km and above 90 km, the GRAM program uses the geostrophic wind equations and pressure data to compute the mean wind. In the altitudes where the geostrophic wind relations are used, an interpolation scheme is employed for estimating winds at low latitudes where the geostrophic wind relations being to mesh down. Several sample wind profiles are given, as computed by the spherical harmonic model. User and programmer manuals are presented.

  20. Atomic Oscillator Strengths for Stellar Atmosphere Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffoni, Matthew; Pickering, Juliet C.

    2015-08-01

    In order to correctly model stellar atmospheres, fundamental atomic data must be available to describe atomic lines observed in their spectra. Accurate, laboratory-measured oscillator strengths (f-values) for Fe peak elements in neutral or low-ionisation states are particularly important for determining chemical abundances.However, advances in astronomical spectroscopy in recent decades have outpaced those in laboratory astrophysics, with the latter frequently being overlooked at the planning stages of new projects. As a result, numerous big-budget astronomy projects have been, and continue to be hindered by a lack of suitable, accurately-measured reference data to permit the analysis of expensive astronomical spectra; a problem only likely to worsen in the coming decades as spectrographs at new facilities increasingly move to infrared wavelengths.At Imperial College London - and in collaboration with NIST, Wisconsin University and Lund University - we have been working with the astronomy community in an effort to provide new accurately-measured f-values for a range of projects. In particular, we have been working closely with the Gaia-ESO (GES) and SDSS-III/APOGEE surveys, both of which have discovered that many lines that would make ideal candidates for inclusion in their analyses have poorly defined f-values, or are simply absent from the database. Using high-resolution Fourier transform spectroscopy (R ~ 2,000,000) to provide atomic branching fractions, and combining these with level lifetimes measured with laser induced fluorescence, we have provided new laboratory-measured f-values for a range of Fe-peak elements, most recently including Fe I, Fe II, and V I. For strong, unblended lines, uncertainties are as low as ±0.02 dex.In this presentation, I will describe how experimental f-values are obtained in the laboratory and present our recent work for GES and APOGEE. In particular, I will also discuss the strengths and limitations of current laboratory

  1. Fractional Relativistic Yamaleev Oscillator Model and Its Dynamical Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shao-Kai; He, Jin-Man; Xu, Yan-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Tian

    2016-07-01

    In the paper we construct a new kind of fractional dynamical model, i.e. the fractional relativistic Yamaleev oscillator model, and explore its dynamical behaviors. We will find that the fractional relativistic Yamaleev oscillator model possesses Lie algebraic structure and satisfies generalized Poisson conservation law. We will also give the Poisson conserved quantities of the model. Further, the relation between conserved quantities and integral invariants of the model is studied and it is proved that, by using the Poisson conserved quantities, we can construct integral invariants of the model. Finally, the stability of the manifold of equilibrium states of the fractional relativistic Yamaleev oscillator model is studied. The paper provides a general method, i.e. fractional generalized Hamiltonian method, for constructing a family of fractional dynamical models of an actual dynamical system.

  2. Long-term operation of surface high-harmonic generation from relativistic oscillating mirrors using a spooling tape

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bierbach, Jana; Yeung, Mark; Eckner, Erich; Roedel, Christian; Kuschel, Stephan; Zepf, Matt; Paulus, Gerhard G.

    2015-05-01

    Surface high-harmonic generation in the relativistic regime is demonstrated as a source of extreme ultra-violet (XUV) pulses with extended operation time. Relativistic high-harmonic generation is driven by a frequency-doubled high-power Ti:Sapphire laser focused to a peak intensity of 3·1019 W/cm2 onto spooling tapes. We demonstrate continuous operation over up to one hour runtime at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Harmonic spectra ranging from 20 eV to 70 eV (62 nm to 18 nm) were consecutively recorded by an XUV spectrometer. An average XUV pulse energy in the µJ range is measured. With the presented setup, relativistic surface high-harmonic generationmore » becomes a powerful source of coherent XUV pulses that might enable applications in, e.g. attosecond laser physics and the seeding of free-electron lasers, when the laser issues causing 80-% pulse energy fluctuations are overcome.« less

  3. Computational-Model-Based Analysis of Context Effects on Harmonic Expectancy

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Satoshi; Remijn, Gerard B.; Nakajima, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Expectancy for an upcoming musical chord, harmonic expectancy, is supposedly based on automatic activation of tonal knowledge. Since previous studies implicitly relied on interpretations based on Western music theory, the underlying computational processes involved in harmonic expectancy and how it relates to tonality need further clarification. In particular, short chord sequences which cannot lead to unique keys are difficult to interpret in music theory. In this study, we examined effects of preceding chords on harmonic expectancy from a computational perspective, using stochastic modeling. We conducted a behavioral experiment, in which participants listened to short chord sequences and evaluated the subjective relatedness of the last chord to the preceding ones. Based on these judgments, we built stochastic models of the computational process underlying harmonic expectancy. Following this, we compared the explanatory power of the models. Our results imply that, even when listening to short chord sequences, internally constructed and updated tonal assumptions determine the expectancy of the upcoming chord. PMID:27003807

  4. Relaxation oscillations in an idealized ocean circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Andrew; Saha, Raj

    2016-06-01

    This work is motivated by a desire to understand transitions between stable equilibria observed in Stommel's 1961 thermohaline circulation model. We adapt the model, including a forcing parameter as a dynamic slow variable. The resulting model is a piecewise-smooth, three time-scale system. The model is analyzed using geometric singular perturbation theory to demonstrate the existence of attracting periodic orbits. The system is capable of producing classical relaxation oscillations as expected, but there is also a parameter regime in which the model exhibits small amplitude oscillations known as canard cycles. Forcing the model with obliquity variations from the last 100,000 years produces oscillations that are modulated in amplitude and frequency. The output shows similarities with important features of the climate proxy data of the same period.

  5. Solvable Model for Chimera States of Coupled Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Daniel M.; Mirollo, Rennie; Strogatz, Steven H.; Wiley, Daniel A.

    2008-08-01

    Networks of identical, symmetrically coupled oscillators can spontaneously split into synchronized and desynchronized subpopulations. Such chimera states were discovered in 2002, but are not well understood theoretically. Here we obtain the first exact results about the stability, dynamics, and bifurcations of chimera states by analyzing a minimal model consisting of two interacting populations of oscillators. Along with a completely synchronous state, the system displays stable chimeras, breathing chimeras, and saddle-node, Hopf, and homoclinic bifurcations of chimeras.

  6. Solvable model for chimera states of coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Daniel M; Mirollo, Rennie; Strogatz, Steven H; Wiley, Daniel A

    2008-08-22

    Networks of identical, symmetrically coupled oscillators can spontaneously split into synchronized and desynchronized subpopulations. Such chimera states were discovered in 2002, but are not well understood theoretically. Here we obtain the first exact results about the stability, dynamics, and bifurcations of chimera states by analyzing a minimal model consisting of two interacting populations of oscillators. Along with a completely synchronous state, the system displays stable chimeras, breathing chimeras, and saddle-node, Hopf, and homoclinic bifurcations of chimeras.

  7. Quantum Optimal Control of Single Harmonic Oscillator under Quadratic Controls together with Linear Dipole Polarizability: A Fluctuation Free Expectation Value Dynamical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Ayvaz, Muzaffer; Demiralp, Metin

    2011-09-14

    In this study, the optimal control equations for one dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator under the quadratic control operators together with linear dipole polarizability effects are constructed in the sense of Heisenberg equation of motion. A numerical technique based on the approximation to the non-commuting quantum mechanical operators from the fluctuation free expectation value dynamics perspective in the classical limit is also proposed for the solution of optimal control equations which are ODEs with accompanying boundary conditions. The dipole interaction of the system is considered to be linear, and the observable whose expectation value will be suppressed during the control process is considered to be quadratic in terms of position operator x. The objective term operator is also assumed to be quadratic.

  8. Spherical harmonic analysis of a synoptic climatology generated with a global general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christidis, Z. D.; Spar, J.

    1980-01-01

    Spherical harmonic analysis was used to analyze the observed climatological (C) fields of temperature at 850 mb, geopotential height at 500 mb, and sea level pressure. The spherical harmonic method was also applied to the corresponding "model climatological" fields (M) generated by a general circulation model, the "GISS climate model." The climate model was initialized with observed data for the first of December 1976 at 00. GMT and allowed to generate five years of meteorological history. Monthly means of the above fields for the five years were computed and subjected to spherical harmonic analysis. It was found from the comparison of the spectral components of both sets, M and C, that the climate model generated reasonable 500 mb geopotential heights. The model temperature field at 850 mb exhibited a generally correct structure. However, the meridional temperature gradient was overestimated and overheating of the continents was observed in summer.

  9. Comment on “Mössbauer studies of harmonically bound oscillators in Brownian motion: a quantum approach”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewari, S. P.; Silotia, Poonam

    1994-05-01

    It is argued that the recent claim of Kumar [Phys. Lett. A 154 (1991) 461], that assuming the protein specific modes in a deoxymyoglobin crystal to be described by a quantum mechanical overdamped oscillator can explain the sudden sharp decrease, above a characteristic temperature, of the Lamb-Mössbauer recoilles fraction of the 57Fe atom in the protein crystal, is not teenable.

  10. A simple two cavity model for umbral oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, H. S.; Lee, J. W.

    For 3-min umbral oscillations a two-mode resonant model is proposed, with the resonance of each mode occurring separately in cavities of the photosphere and chromosphere. The model has been investigated by calculating the transmissions of the waves propagating through the cavities of the umbral photosphere and chromosphere of 3 different model atmosphere (Staude, 1982; Beebe et al., 1982; and Avrett, 1981). The computed resonant periods, transmission spectra, and kinetic-energy density of the waves associated with the oscillations are presented for comparison with observations.

  11. Oscillations and multiple steady states in active membrane transport models.

    PubMed

    Vieira, F M; Bisch, P M

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of some non-linear extensions of the six-state alternating access model for active membrane transport is investigated. We use stoichio-metric network analysis to study the stability of steady states. The bifurcation analysis has been done through standard numerical methods. For the usual six-state model we have proved that there is only one steady state, which is globally asymptotically stable. When we added an autocatalytic step we found self-oscillations. For the competition between a monomer cycle and a dimer cycle, with steps of dimer formation, we have also found self-oscillations. We have also studied models involving the formation of a complex with other molecules. The addition of two steps for formation of a complex of the monomer with another molecule does not alter either the number or the stability of steady states of the basic six-state model. The model which combines the formation of a complex with an autocatalytic step shows both self-oscillations and multiple steady states. The results lead us to conclude that oscillations could be produced by active membrane transport systems if the transport cycle contains a sufficiently large number of steps (six in the present case) and is coupled to at least one autocatalytic reaction,. Oscillations are also predicted when the monomer cycle is coupled to a dimer cycle. In fact, the autocatalytic reaction can be seen as a simplification of the model involving competition between monomer and dimer cycles, which seems to be a more realistic description of biological systems. A self-regulation mechanism of the pumps, related to the multiple stationary states, is expected only for a combined effect of autocatalysis and formation of complexes with other molecules. Within the six-state model this model also leads to oscillation.

  12. Harmonic uniflow engine

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2016-03-22

    A reciprocating-piston uniflow engine includes a harmonic oscillator inlet valve capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into the engine. In particular, the inlet valve includes an inlet valve head and a spring arranged together as a harmonic oscillator so that the inlet valve head is moveable from an unbiased equilibrium position to a biased closed position occluding an inlet. When released, the inlet valve head undergoes a single oscillation past the equilibrium position to a maximum open position and returns to a biased return position close to the closed position to choke the flow and produce a pressure drop across the inlet valve causing the inlet valve to close. In other embodiments, the harmonic oscillator arrangement of the inlet valve enables the uniflow engine to be reversibly operated as a uniflow compressor.

  13. Reply to Steele & Ferrer: Modeling Oscillation, Approximately or Exactly?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oud, Johan H. L.; Folmer, Henk

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses modeling oscillation in continuous time. It criticizes Steele and Ferrer's article "Latent Differential Equation Modeling of Self-Regulatory and Coregulatory Affective Processes" (2011), particularly the approximate estimation procedure applied. This procedure is the latent version of the local linear approximation procedure…

  14. Improvement of the low frequency oscillation model for Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunsheng; Wang, Huashan

    2016-08-01

    The low frequency oscillation of the discharge current in Hall thrusters is a major aspect of these devices that requires further study. While the existing model captures the ionization mechanism of the low frequency oscillation, it unfortunately fails to express the dynamic characteristics of the ion acceleration. The analysis in this paper shows this is because of the simplification of the electron equation, which affects both the electric field distribution and the ion acceleration process. Additionally, the electron density equation is revised and a new model that is based on the physical properties of ion movement is proposed.

  15. Nonequilibrium simulations of model ionomers in an oscillating electric field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ting, Christina L.; Sorensen-Unruh, Karen E.; Stevens, Mark J.; Frischknecht, Amalie L.

    2016-07-25

    Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of ionomer melts in an applied oscillating electric field. The frequency-dependent conductivity and susceptibility are calculated directly from the current density and polarization density, respectively. At high frequencies, we find a peak in the real part of the conductivity due to plasma oscillations of the ions. At lower frequencies, the dynamic response of the ionomers depends on the ionic aggregate morphology in the system, which consists of either percolated or isolated aggregates. We show that the dynamic response of the model ionomers to the applied oscillating field can be understoodmore » by comparison with relevant time scales in the systems, obtained from independent calculations.« less

  16. Nonequilibrium simulations of model ionomers in an oscillating electric field.

    PubMed

    Ting, Christina L; Sorensen-Unruh, Karen E; Stevens, Mark J; Frischknecht, Amalie L

    2016-07-28

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of ionomer melts in an applied oscillating electric field. The frequency-dependent conductivity and susceptibility are calculated directly from the current density and polarization density, respectively. At high frequencies, we find a peak in the real part of the conductivity due to plasma oscillations of the ions. At lower frequencies, the dynamic response of the ionomers depends on the ionic aggregate morphology in the system, which consists of either percolated or isolated aggregates. We show that the dynamic response of the model ionomers to the applied oscillating field can be understood by comparison with relevant time scales in the systems, obtained from independent calculations. PMID:27475392

  17. A Comparison between a GFDL General Circulation Model and Observations using Harmonic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavi, F.

    2010-09-01

    One of the most important features in analyzing the climatology of any region is to study the precipitation and its periodicity of different harmonics in order to investigate the behavior of the observed data. In this study using precipitation values obtained from the 20C3M (run1) experiment of the GFDL general circulation model (CM2.1) and CPC Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) from NCEP, harmonic analysis has been employed to study the seasonal variation of precipitation over the Middle East (20°-40°N, 30°-65°E).The monthly precipitation values were averaged over a 25-year integration, producing a dataset 12 monthly for each grid locations. The annual mean and seasonal variance for each grid obtained from two dataset. Maps of the first, second and third harmonic amplitudes and phases provide a useful source of comparison between model output and observational data. Results show that the method of harmonic analysis allows a more analytical comparison between model predictions and data than the conventional approach of representing the annual march in the form of a curve of mean monthly rainfall amounts. The method delineates regional boundaries of the various precipitation regimes in the Middle East.A comparison of the simulated and observed values indicate that the GCM fails to capture a significant amount of the regional detail in precipitation climatology in the South of Middle East when its results are decomposed by harmonic analysis.

  18. On the Ratio of Periods of the Fundamental Harmonic and First Overtone of Magnetic Tube Kink Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, M. S.; Petrukhin, N. S.; Pelinovsky, E.

    2016-04-01

    We study kink oscillations of thin magnetic tubes. We assume that the density inside and outside the tube (and possibly also the cross-section radius) can vary along the tube. This variation is assumed to be of such a form that the kink speed is symmetric with respect to the tube centre and varies monotonically from the tube ends to the tube centre. Then we prove a theorem stating that the ratio of periods of the fundamental mode and first overtone is a monotonically increasing function of the ratio of the kink speed at the tube centre and the tube ends. In particular, it follows from this theorem that the period ratio is lower than two when the kink speed increases from the tube ends to its centre, while it is higher than two when the kink speed decreases from the tube ends to its centre. The first case is typical for non-expanding coronal magnetic loops, and the second for prominence threads. We apply the general results to particular problems. First we consider kink oscillations of coronal magnetic loops. We prove that, under reasonable assumptions, the ratio of the fundamental period to the first overtone is lower than two and decreases when the loop size increases. The second problem concerns kink oscillations of prominence threads. We consider three internal density profiles: generalised parabolic, Gaussian, and Lorentzian. Each of these profiles contain the parameter α that is responsible for its sharpness. We calculate the dependence of the period ratio on the ratio of the mean to the maximum density. For all considered values of α we find that a formula relating the period ratio and the ratio of the mean and maximum density suggested by Soler, Goossens, and Ballester ( Astron. Astrophys. 575, A123, 2015) gives a sufficiently good approximation to the exact dependence.

  19. Stochastic coupled oscillator model of EEG for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ghorbanian, P; Ramakrishnan, S; Ashrafiuon, H

    2014-01-01

    Coupled nonlinear oscillator models of EEG signals during resting eyes-closed and eyes-open conditions are presented based on Duffing-van der Pol oscillator dynamics. The frequency and information entropy contents of the output of the nonlinear model and the actual EEG signal is matched through an optimization algorithm. The framework is used to model and compare EEG signals recorded from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched healthy controls (CTL) subjects. The results show that 1) the generated model signal can capture the frequency and information entropy contents of the EEG signal with very similar power spectral distribution and non-periodic time history; 2) the EEG and the generated signal from the eyes-closed model are α band dominant for CTL subjects and θ band dominant for AD patients; and 3) statistically distinct models represent the EEG signals from AD patients and CTL subject during resting eyes-closed condition. PMID:25570056

  20. Memcapacitor model and its application in a chaotic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guang-Yi, Wang; Bo-Zhen, Cai; Pei-Pei, Jin; Ti-Ling, Hu

    2016-01-01

    A memcapacitor is a new type of memory capacitor. Before the advent of practical memcapacitor, the prospective studies on its models and potential applications are of importance. For this purpose, we establish a mathematical memcapacitor model and a corresponding circuit model. As a potential application, based on the model, a memcapacitor oscillator is designed, with its basic dynamic characteristics analyzed theoretically and experimentally. Some circuit variables such as charge, flux, and integral of charge, which are difficult to measure, are observed and measured via simulations and experiments. Analysis results show that besides the typical period-doubling bifurcations and period-3 windows, sustained chaos with constant Lyapunov exponents occurs. Moreover, this oscillator also exhibits abrupt chaos and some novel bifurcations. In addition, based on the digital signal processing (DSP) technology, a scheme of digitally realizing this memcapacitor oscillator is provided. Then the statistical properties of the chaotic sequences generated from the oscillator are tested by using the test suit of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The tested randomness definitely reaches the standards of NIST, and is better than that of the well-known Lorenz system. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61271064, 61401134, and 60971046), the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant Nos. LZ12F01001 and LQ14F010008), and the Program for Zhejiang Leading Team of S&T Innovation, China (Grant No. 2010R50010).

  1. Algebraic approach to the projected deformed oscillator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asherova, R. M.; Smirnov, Yu. F.; Tolstoy, V. N.; Shustov, A. P.

    1981-03-01

    A new method of calculation in terms of the projected deformed oscillator model is proposed. The method involves expansion of its wave functions in terms of the wave functions of an isotropic oscillator potential. Only overlap integrals between projected wave functions and reduced probabilities B(E2) of E2 transitions are examined. B(E2) values are expressed as a series containing the corresponding values of the Elliott SU(3) scheme. The convergence of these expansions is shown to be fairly good. The expectation values of operators ( QQ) and ( QQQ), which characterize the effective internal non-sphericity and non-axiality of the nucleus, are also calculated and discussed.

  2. Generation of a tunable environment for electrical oscillator systems.

    PubMed

    León-Montiel, R de J; Svozilík, J; Torres, Juan P

    2014-07-01

    Many physical, chemical, and biological systems can be modeled by means of random-frequency harmonic oscillator systems. Even though the noise-free evolution of harmonic oscillator systems can be easily implemented, the way to experimentally introduce, and control, noise effects due to a surrounding environment remains a subject of lively interest. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a setup that provides a unique tool to generate a fully tunable environment for classical electrical oscillator systems. We illustrate the operation of the setup by implementing the case of a damped random-frequency harmonic oscillator. The high degree of tunability and control of our scheme is demonstrated by gradually modifying the statistics of the oscillator's frequency fluctuations. This tunable system can readily be used to experimentally study interesting noise effects, such as noise-induced transitions in systems driven by multiplicative noise, and noise-induced transport, a phenomenon that takes place in quantum and classical coupled oscillator networks.

  3. Mixed quartic-harmonic oscillators: a study of the ring puckering vibration of a cyclic amino acid dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withnall, Robert; Andrews, David L.; Mendham, Andrew P.; Chowdhry, Babur Z.

    2001-10-01

    A band at ca. 150 cm-1 in the far infrared spectrum of diketopiperazine (DKP) is assigned to a ring puckering vibration. The multiplet structure reported for this band in the low temperature (77 K) far IR spectrum can be interpreted if the vibration is assumed to have quartic character. By means of Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation theory, a new vibrational selection rule, (Delta) n equals +/- 1, +/- 3, has been derived for mixed quartic-quadratic vibrations in the near harmonic region for the case of zero electrical anharmonicity. Assignments of the multiplet components have been made in the light of this vibrational selection rule. A two-parameter potential energy function of the ring puckering coordinate has been derived for the DKP molecule. This has enabled a value of ca. 355 cm-1 to be estimated for the energy barrier to interconversion of enantiomeric boat forms of DKP. The 0 - 1 transition has been estimated to have a wavenumber value of 0.033 cm-1 (1 GHz) in excellent agreement with the value of approximately 1 GHz obtained from a gas phase microwave spectroscopic study.

  4. Exact analytical expressions and numerical analysis of two-center Franck Condon factors and matrix elements over displaced harmonic oscillator wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseinov, I. I.; Mamedov, B. A.; Ekenoğlu, A. S.

    2006-08-01

    A detailed study is undertaken, using various techniques, in deriving analytical formula of Franck-Condon overlap integrals and matrix elements of various functions of power (x), exponential (exp(-2cx)) and Gaussian (exp(-cx)) over displaced harmonic oscillator wave functions with arbitrary frequencies. The results suggested by previous experience with various algorithms are presented in mathematically compact form and consist of generalization. The relationships obtained are valid for the arbitrary values of parameters and the computation results are in good agreement with the literature. The numerical results illustrate clearly a further reduction in calculation times. Program summaryProgram name:FRANCK Catalogue identifier:ADXX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXX_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Programming language:Mathematica 5.0 Computer:Pentium M 1.4 GHz Operating system:Mathematica 5.0 RAM:512 MB No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:825 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:16 344 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of problem:The programs calculate the Franck-Condon factors and matrix elements over displaced harmonic oscillator wave functions with arbitrary quantum numbers (n,n), frequencies (a,a) and displacement (d) for the various functions of power (x), exponential (exp(-2cx)) and Gaussian (exp(-cx)). Solution method:The Franck-Condon factors and matrix elements are evaluated using binomial coefficients and basic integrals. Restrictions:The results obtained by the present programs show great numerical stability for arbitrary quantum numbers (n,n), frequencies (a,a) and displacement (d). Unusual features:None Running time:As an example, for the value of Franck-Condon Overlap Integral I(d;α,α)=0.004405001887372332 with n=3, n=2, a=4, a=3, d=2, the compilation time in a Pentium M 1.4 GHz computer is 0.18 s. Execution

  5. Sudden lateral asymmetry and torsional oscillations of section models of suspension bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, R. H.; Davis, F. M.

    2007-11-01

    Cable-supported bridges typically exhibit minimal torsional motion under traffic and wind loads. If symmetry of the bridge about the deck's centerline is suddenly lost, such as by the failure of one or more cables or hangers (suspenders), torsional motion of the deck may grow and angles of twist may become large. The initiation of the disastrous torsional oscillations of the original Tacoma Narrows Bridge involved a sudden lateral asymmetry due to loosening of a cable band at midspan. The effects of these types of events on two-degree-of-freedom and four-degree-of-freedom section models of suspension bridges are analyzed. Vertical and rotational motions of the deck, along with vertical motions of the cables, are considered. A harmonic vertical force and an aerodynamic moment proportional to angular velocity are applied to the deck. Resistance is provided by translational and rotational springs and dashpots. Flutter instability and large oscillations occur under the aerodynamic moment, which provides "negative damping." In order to model the occurrence of limit cycles, nonlinear damping of the van der Pol type is included in one case, and nonlinear stiffness of the hangers in others. The frequencies of the limit cycles are compared to the natural frequencies of the system.

  6. Relaxation oscillation model of hemodynamic parameters in the cerebral vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevko, A. A.; Mikhaylova, A. V.; Chupakhin, A. P.; Ufimtseva, I. V.; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Orlov, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    Simulation of a blood flow under normality as well as under pathology is extremely complex problem of great current interest both from the point of view of fundamental hydrodynamics, and for medical applications. This paper proposes a model of Van der Pol - Duffing nonlinear oscillator equation describing relaxation oscillations of a blood flow in the cerebral vessels. The model is based on the patient-specific clinical experimental data flow obtained during the neurosurgical operations in Meshalkin Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology. The stability of the model is demonstrated through the variations of initial data and coefficients. It is universal and describes pressure and velocity fluctuations in different cerebral vessels (arteries, veins, sinuses), as well as in a laboratory model of carotid bifurcation. Derived equation describes the rheology of the ”blood stream - elastic vessel wall gelatinous brain environment” composite system and represents the state equation of this complex environment.

  7. A new look at equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoden, Shigeo; Holton, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Simplified quasi-biennial oscillation models are studied, taking bifurcation theory into account. It is found that the model has a trivial steady solution of no mean zonal flow when the two components of the wave forcing are symmetric. The steady solution becomes unstable with respect to an oscillatory eigenmode when the amplitude of the wave forcing exceeds a critical value. Periodic solutions branch off from the steady solution at this point because of Hopf bifurcation. If the two components are not symmetric, the model has a nontrivial steady solution with nonzero mean zonal flow. Hopf bifurcation takes place and periodic solutions which are not symmetric with respect to time appear. A two-level model is developed to analyze the quasi-biennial oscillation mechanism. It is shown that both vertical diffusion and the shielding effect are needed to obtain periodic solutions.

  8. Model of high-order harmonic generation from laser interaction with a plasma grating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S J; Zhuo, H B; Zou, D B; Gan, L F; Zhou, H Y; Li, X Z; Yu, M Y; Yu, W

    2016-05-01

    Harmonic generation from linearly polarized high-intensity short-pulse laser normally impacting a solid plasma grating is investigated using analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that when the radiation excited by the relativistic electron quiver motion in the laser fields suitably matches a harmonic of the grating periodicity, it will be significantly enhanced and peak with narrow angular spread in specific directions. The corresponding theory shows that the phenomenon can be attributed to an interference effect of the periodic grating on the excitation.

  9. Model of high-order harmonic generation from laser interaction with a plasma grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. J.; Zhuo, H. B.; Zou, D. B.; Gan, L. F.; Zhou, H. Y.; Li, X. Z.; Yu, M. Y.; Yu, W.

    2016-05-01

    Harmonic generation from linearly polarized high-intensity short-pulse laser normally impacting a solid plasma grating is investigated using analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that when the radiation excited by the relativistic electron quiver motion in the laser fields suitably matches a harmonic of the grating periodicity, it will be significantly enhanced and peak with narrow angular spread in specific directions. The corresponding theory shows that the phenomenon can be attributed to an interference effect of the periodic grating on the excitation.

  10. Model of high-order harmonic generation from laser interaction with a plasma grating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S J; Zhuo, H B; Zou, D B; Gan, L F; Zhou, H Y; Li, X Z; Yu, M Y; Yu, W

    2016-05-01

    Harmonic generation from linearly polarized high-intensity short-pulse laser normally impacting a solid plasma grating is investigated using analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that when the radiation excited by the relativistic electron quiver motion in the laser fields suitably matches a harmonic of the grating periodicity, it will be significantly enhanced and peak with narrow angular spread in specific directions. The corresponding theory shows that the phenomenon can be attributed to an interference effect of the periodic grating on the excitation. PMID:27300994

  11. A model for premixed combustion oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes a simulation based on a time dependent, nonlinear control volume analysis. The combustion is modeled as a well-stirred reactor having finite kinetics. Flow properties and species in the nozzle, combustion, and tailpipe regions are determined using a control volume formulation of the conservation equation.

  12. Modeling of large aperture third harmonic frequency conversion of high power Nd:glass laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, M.A.; Wegner, P.J.; Speck, D.R.; Bibeau, C.; Ehrlich, R.B.; Laumann, C.W.; Lawson, J.K.; Weiland, T.L.

    1991-03-13

    To provide high-energy, high-power beams at short wavelengths for inertial-confinement-fusion experiments, we routinely convert the 1.053-{mu}m output of the Nova, Nd:phosphate-glass, laser system to its third-harmonic wavelength. We describe performance and conversion efficiency modeling of the 3 {times} 3 arrays potassium-dihydrogen-phosphate crystal plates used for type II/type II phase-matched harmonic conversion of Nova 0.74-m diameter beams, and an alternate type I/type II phase-matching configuration that improves the third-harmonic conversion efficiency. These arrays provide energy conversion of up to 65% and intensity conversion to 70%. 19 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Developing Antimatter Containment Technology: Modeling Charged Particle Oscillations in a Penning-Malmberg Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Martin, J. J.; Pearson, J. B.; Lewis, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA MSFC Propulsion Research Center (PRC) is conducting a research activity examining the storage of low energy antiprotons. The High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) is an electromagnetic system (Penning-Malmberg design) consisting of a 4 Tesla superconductor, a high voltage confinement electrode system, and an ultra high vacuum test section; designed with an ultimate goal of maintaining charged particles with a half-life of 18 days. Currently, this system is being experimentally evaluated using normal matter ions which are cheap to produce and relatively easy to handle and provide a good indication of overall trap behavior, with the exception of assessing annihilation losses. Computational particle-in-cell plasma modeling using the XOOPIC code is supplementing the experiments. Differing electrode voltage configurations are employed to contain charged particles, typically using flat, modified flat and harmonic potential wells. Ion cloud oscillation frequencies are obtained experimentally by amplification of signals induced on the electrodes by the particle motions. XOOPIC simulations show that for given electrode voltage configurations, the calculated charged particle oscillation frequencies are close to experimental measurements. As a two-dimensional axisymmetric code, XOOPIC cannot model azimuthal plasma variations, such as those induced by radio-frequency (RF) modulation of the central quadrupole electrode in experiments designed to enhance ion cloud containment. However, XOOPIC can model analytically varying electric potential boundary conditions and particle velocity initial conditions. Application of these conditions produces ion cloud axial and radial oscillation frequency modes of interest in achieving the goal of optimizing HiPAT for reliable containment of antiprotons.

  14. Region Spherical Harmonic Magnetic Modeling from Near-Surface and Satellite-Altitude Anomlaies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyung Rae; von Frese, Ralph R. B.; Taylor, Patrick T.

    2013-01-01

    The compiled near-surface data and satellite crustal magnetic measured data are modeled with a regionally concentrated spherical harmonic presentation technique over Australia and Antarctica. Global crustal magnetic anomaly studies have used a spherical harmonic analysis to represent the Earth's magnetic crustal field. This global approach, however is best applied where the data are uniformly distributed over the entire Earth. Satellite observations generally meet this requirement, but unequally distributed data cannot be easily adapted in global modeling. Even for the satellite observations, due to the errors spread over the globe, data smoothing is inevitable in the global spherical harmonic presentations. In addition, global high-resolution modeling requires a great number of global spherical harmonic coefficients for the regional presentation of crustal magnetic anomalies, whereas a lesser number of localized spherical coefficients will satisfy. We compared methods in both global and regional approaches and for a case where the errors were propagated outside the region of interest. For observations from the upcoming Swarm constellation, the regional modeling will allow the production a lesser number of spherical coefficients that are relevant to the region of interest

  15. Model of Wave Driven Flow Oscillation for Solar Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Wolff, Charles L.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    At low latitudes in the Earth's atmosphere, the observed zonal flow velocities are dominated by the semi-annual and quasi-biennial oscillations with periods of 6 months and 20 to 32 months respectively. These terrestrial oscillations, the SAO and QBO respectively, are driven by wave-mean flow interactions due to upward propagating planetary-scale waves (periods of days) and small-scale gravity waves (periods of hours). We are proposing (see also Mayr et al., GRL, 2001) that such a mechanism may drive long period oscillations (reversing flows) in stellar and planetary interiors, and we apply it to the Sun. The reversing flows would occur below the convective envelope where waves can propagate. We apply a simplified, one dimensional, analytical flow model that incorporates a gravity wave parameterization due to Hines (1997). Based on this analysis, our estimates show that relatively small wave amplitudes less than 10 m/s can produce zonal flow amplitudes of 20 m/s, which should be sufficient to generate the observed variations in the magnetic field. To produce the 22-year period of oscillation, a low buoyancy frequency must be chosen, and this places the proposed flow in a region that is close to (and below) the base of the convective envelope. Enhanced turbulence associated with this low stability should help to generate the dynamo currents. With larger stability at deeper levels in the solar interior, the model can readily produce also oscillations with much longer periods. To provide an understanding of the fluid dynamics involved, we present numerical results from a 2D model for the terrestrial atmosphere that exemplify the non-linear nature of the wave interaction for which a mechanical analog is the escapement mechanism of the clock.

  16. Issues in consumer exposure modeling: towards harmonization on a global scale.

    PubMed

    Kephalopoulos, Stylianos; Bruinen de Bruin, Yuri; Arvanitis, Athanasios; Hakkinen, Pertti; Jantunen, Matti

    2007-12-01

    Understanding where and how chemicals are used throughout their life cycle is becoming increasingly important. In 2003, within the context of REACH and GPSD legislation, the European Commission started developing a European and global infrastructure of exposure methods and tools. The infrastructure aims (1) to link modeling tools and exposure-related data and scenarios in a single framework so that harmonized exposure assessment procedures can be developed for consumer products in the EU and (2) to make this framework flexible enough to allow global application. A number of issues are raised by a global infrastructure of consumer exposure modeling that answers to multi-legislative mandates. These include transparency, consistency, usability, and defensibility of the models, including the relevant degree of complexity for priority setting versus assessment. As part of the initiative to set up a harmonized global infrastructure on consumer exposure assessment, these issues were presented, discussed, and further developed in a series of European Commission-sponsored workshops organized in October 2004 and June 2005 as part of the "Harmonization of Consumer Exposure Models on a Global Scale" project. The project focused on development, harmonization, and validation of consumer exposure modeling approaches. The workshops included experts from the EU, USA, Japan, and Canada. The conclusions and recommendations made on the basis of this work are described. To help achieve harmonization of approaches, the European Commission's Joint Research Centre is proposing a framework (1) to compare information on elements of chemical risk assessment to understand exposure regulations in different countries, (2) to save time and expense by sharing information and models, and (3) to promote credible science through better communication among organizations and by peer review of assessments and assessment procedures.

  17. Dynamic models for magnetospheric oscillations on the minute scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Pecseli, H.; Børve, S.; Trulsen, J.

    2012-12-01

    Sudden pulses in the model solar wind sets the Earth's magnetosphere into damped oscillatory motions. Oscillation periods on the order of 5-10 min have been observed by instrumented spacecrafts. A simple model is capable of explaining the basic properties of these oscillations and give scaling laws for their characteristics in terms of the parameters of the problem, such as the Solar wind momentum density. The period of the oscillations, their damping and anharmonic nature are accounted for.The model has no free adjustable numerical parameters and can be seen as an effort to predict some dynamic properties of the magnetosphere on the basis of measurable steady state characteristics. A simple test of the model is found by comparing its prediction of the Earth-Magnetopause distance with observed values. The results agree well with observations. The analysis is supported by numerical simulations solving the Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) equations in two spatial dimensions, where we let a solar wind interact with a magnetic dipole representing a magnetized Earth. Two tilt-angles of the magnetic dipole axis were considered. We observe the formation of a magnetosheath, with the magnetopause at a distance corresponding well to the analytical results. The analytical model seem to be robust, and gives good qualitative agreement with the numerical simulations for a range of parameters, also concerning oscillation periods and damping times for cases where the dynamic response to perturbations are considered. The analysis allows also for predicting the magnetic field perturbations detected on Earth due to changes in the magnetosheath current. In order to improve the model we study a conformal mapping that brings the shape of the magnetosheath model closer to observations.

  18. Responses to applied forces and the Jarzynski equality in classical oscillator systems coupled to finite baths: an exactly solvable nondissipative nonergodic model.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo

    2011-07-01

    Responses of small open oscillator systems to applied external forces have been studied with the use of an exactly solvable classical Caldeira-Leggett model in which a harmonic oscillator (system) is coupled to finite N-body oscillators (bath) with an identical frequency (ω(n) = ω(o) for n = 1 to N). We have derived exact expressions for positions, momenta, and energy of the system in nonequilibrium states and for work performed by applied forces. A detailed study has been made on an analytical method for canonical averages of physical quantities over the initial equilibrium state, which is much superior to numerical averages commonly adopted in simulations of small systems. The calculated energy of the system which is strongly coupled to a finite bath is fluctuating but nondissipative. It has been shown that the Jarzynski equality is valid in nondissipative nonergodic open oscillator systems regardless of the rate of applied ramp force. PMID:21867150

  19. Harmonization and translation of crop modeling data to ensure interoperability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP, www.agmip.org) seeks to improve the capability of ecophysiological and economic models to describe the potential impacts of climate change on agricultural systems. AgMIP protocols emphasize the use of multiple models; consequentl...

  20. Modelling of global boundary effects on harmonic motion imaging of soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Pelegri, Assimina A

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical imaging techniques have been developed for soft tissue characterisation and detection of breast tumours. Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) uses a focused ultrasound technology to generate a harmonic radiation force in a localised region inside a soft tissue. The resulting dynamic response is used to map the local distribution of the mechanical properties of the tissue. In this study, a finite element (FE) model is developed to investigate the effect of global boundary conditions on the dynamic response of a soft tissue during HMI. The direct-solution steady-state dynamic analysis procedure is used to compute the harmonic displacement amplitude in FE simulations. The model is parameterised in terms of boundary conditions and viscoelastic properties, and the corresponding raster-scan displacement amplitudes are captured to examine its response. The effect of the model's global dimensions on the harmonic response is also investigated. It is observed that the dynamic response of soft tissue with high viscosity is independent of the global boundary conditions for regions remote to the boundary; thus, it can be subjected to local analysis to estimate the underlying mechanical properties. However, the dynamic response is sensitive to global boundary conditions for tissue with low viscosity or regions located near to the boundary.

  1. Plastic bottle oscillator as an on-off-type oscillator: Experiments, modeling, and stability analyses of single and coupled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohira, Masahiro I.; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Magome, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-02-01

    An oscillatory system called a plastic bottle oscillator is studied, in which the downflow of water and upflow of air alternate periodically in an upside-down plastic bottle containing water. It is demonstrated that a coupled two-bottle system exhibits in- and antiphase synchronization according to the nature of coupling. A simple ordinary differential equation is deduced to interpret the characteristics of a single oscillator. This model is also extended to coupled oscillators, and the model reproduces the essential features of the experimental observations.

  2. Plastic bottle oscillator as an on-off-type oscillator: experiments, modeling, and stability analyses of single and coupled systems.

    PubMed

    Kohira, Masahiro I; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Magome, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-02-01

    An oscillatory system called a plastic bottle oscillator is studied, in which the downflow of water and upflow of air alternate periodically in an upside-down plastic bottle containing water. It is demonstrated that a coupled two-bottle system exhibits in- and antiphase synchronization according to the nature of coupling. A simple ordinary differential equation is deduced to interpret the characteristics of a single oscillator. This model is also extended to coupled oscillators, and the model reproduces the essential features of the experimental observations.

  3. Model for relaxation oscillations in a helicon discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degeling, A. W.; Sheridan, T. E.; Boswell, R. W.

    1999-05-01

    Relaxation oscillations observed in the large-volume, helicon plasma experiment WOMBAT (Waves on Magnetized Beams and Turbulence) [R. W. Boswell and R. K. Porteous, Appl. Phys. Lett. 50, 1130 (1987)] are modeled. These oscillations have a period of several milliseconds and have been identified as transitions between a low-density, inductive discharge and a high-density, helicon-wave discharge. In the model, it is assumed that the mode transitions are triggered by variations in the neutral density in the source region. The neutral density decreases due to ionization augmented by ion pumping and increases due to refilling of the source chamber from the much larger diffusion chamber. The system is modeled using two, coupled, nonlinear, ordinary differential equations that describe the neutral and plasma densities in the source chamber. Ionization by inductively-coupled fields and ionization due to electrons accelerated by helicon waves with phase velocities near the threshold electron velocity for ionization are considered. The model is found to reproduce experimentally measured variations of the plasma density and helicon wave phase velocity with rf power, neutral pressure and magnetic field. The negative impedance needed for the existence of a relaxation oscillation is provided by the helicon-wave coupling mechanism.

  4. A Lattice Boltzmann Model for Oscillating Reaction-Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Romo, Suemi; Ibañez-Orozco, Oscar; Sosa-Herrera, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    A computational algorithm based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is proposed to model reaction-diffusion systems. In this paper, we focus on how nonlinear chemical oscillators like Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) and the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid (CIMA) reactions can be modeled by LBM and provide with new insight into the nature and applications of oscillating reactions. We use Gaussian pulse initial concentrations of sulfuric acid in different places of a bidimensional reactor and nondiffusive boundary walls. We clearly show how these systems evolve to a chaotic attractor and produce specific pattern images that are portrayed in the reactions trajectory to the corresponding chaotic attractor and can be used in robotic control.

  5. Damping of Bloch oscillations in the Hubbard model.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Martin; Werner, Philipp

    2011-10-28

    Using nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory, we study the isolated Hubbard model in a static electric field in the limit of weak interactions. Linear response behavior is established at long times, but only if the interaction exceeds a critical value, below which the system exhibits an ac-type response with Bloch oscillations. The transition from ac to dc response is defined in terms of the universal long-time behavior of the system, which does not depend on the initial condition.

  6. Predictive discrete dark matter model and neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucenna, M. S.; Morisi, S.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J. W. F.; Shimizu, Yusuke

    2012-10-01

    Dark matter stability can be achieved through a partial breaking of a flavor symmetry. In this framework we propose a type-II seesaw model where left-handed matter transforms nontrivially under the flavor group Δ(54), providing correlations between neutrino oscillation parameters, consistent with the recent Daya-Bay and RENO reactor angle measurements, as well as lower bounds for neutrinoless double beta decay. The dark matter phenomenology is provided by a Higgs-portal.

  7. Modelling soil erosion at European scale: towards harmonization and reproducibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosco, C.; de Rigo, D.; Dewitte, O.; Poesen, J.; Panagos, P.

    2015-02-01

    Soil erosion by water is one of the most widespread forms of soil degradation. The loss of soil as a result of erosion can lead to decline in organic matter and nutrient contents, breakdown of soil structure and reduction of the water-holding capacity. Measuring soil loss across the whole landscape is impractical and thus research is needed to improve methods of estimating soil erosion with computational modelling, upon which integrated assessment and mitigation strategies may be based. Despite the efforts, the prediction value of existing models is still limited, especially at regional and continental scale, because a systematic knowledge of local climatological and soil parameters is often unavailable. A new approach for modelling soil erosion at regional scale is here proposed. It is based on the joint use of low-data-demanding models and innovative techniques for better estimating model inputs. The proposed modelling architecture has at its basis the semantic array programming paradigm and a strong effort towards computational reproducibility. An extended version of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) has been implemented merging different empirical rainfall-erosivity equations within a climatic ensemble model and adding a new factor for a better consideration of soil stoniness within the model. Pan-European soil erosion rates by water have been estimated through the use of publicly available data sets and locally reliable empirical relationships. The accuracy of the results is corroborated by a visual plausibility check (63% of a random sample of grid cells are accurate, 83% at least moderately accurate, bootstrap p ≤ 0.05). A comparison with country-level statistics of pre-existing European soil erosion maps is also provided.

  8. Modelling soil erosion at European scale: towards harmonization and reproducibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosco, C.; de Rigo, D.; Dewitte, O.; Poesen, J.; Panagos, P.

    2014-04-01

    Soil erosion by water is one of the most widespread forms of soil degradation. The loss of soil as a result of erosion can lead to decline in organic matter and nutrient contents, breakdown of soil structure and reduction of the water holding capacity. Measuring soil loss across the whole landscape is impractical and thus research is needed to improve methods of estimating soil erosion with computational modelling, upon which integrated assessment and mitigation strategies may be based. Despite the efforts, the prediction value of existing models is still limited, especially at regional and continental scale. A new approach for modelling soil erosion at large spatial scale is here proposed. It is based on the joint use of low data demanding models and innovative techniques for better estimating model inputs. The proposed modelling architecture has at its basis the semantic array programming paradigm and a strong effort towards computational reproducibility. An extended version of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) has been implemented merging different empirical rainfall-erosivity equations within a climatic ensemble model and adding a new factor for a better consideration of soil stoniness within the model. Pan-European soil erosion rates by water have been estimated through the use of publicly available datasets and locally reliable empirical relationships. The accuracy of the results is corroborated by a visual plausibility check (63% of a random sample of grid cells are accurate, 83% at least moderately accurate, bootstrap p ≤ 0.05). A comparison with country level statistics of pre-existing European maps of soil erosion by water is also provided.

  9. Development of QTc prolongation model incorporating circadian rhythm using harmonic model.

    PubMed

    Back, Hyun-moon; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Yun, Hwi-yeol; Kwon, Kwang-il

    2015-05-01

    1. QT prolongation is one of the major safety tests used in the development of a new drug. The ICH guidelines for the evaluation of QT prolongation recommend the use of the in vitro hERG assay and the in vivo telemetry test. However, QT intervals change under normal conditions due to circadian rhythm and can affect the results of the tests. In this study, we developed a PK/PD model to describe the QT interval after the administration of astemizole allowing for the normal changes by circadian rhythm. 2. The typical PK parameters of absorption rate constant (ka), volume of distribution (Vc and Vm), metabolism (km), and elimination rate constant (kel and kel-m) were 0.49 h(-1), 4950 L, 20 L, 0.0127 h(-1), 0.0095 h(-1), and 0.95 h(-1), respectively. The final PK/PD model was the biophase model with the modified harmonic model. The typical PK/PD parameters, base QTc interval (QT0), amplitude (T1, T3), period of QTc interval changing (T2, T4), and EC50 were 233 ms, 3.31, 1.5, -9.24 h, 1.85 h, and 0.81 ng/ml, respectively. 3. The PK/PD model to explain the changes of the QT interval that allows normal changes in the circadian rhythm after the administration of astemizole was developed successfully. This final model can be applied to the development of a human model.

  10. Secondary flow structures under simple harmonic inflow in a bent pipe model for curved arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, Autumn; Seagrave, Penelope; Shu, Fangjun; Bulusu, Kartik; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2010-11-01

    Inward centrifuging of fluid in the inviscid core of a 180 degree curved pipe leads to Lyne-type vortices under zero-mean harmonic oscillations, along with the formation of vortices in the Stokes' layer, that rotate in the same directional sense as their steady flow counterpart (Dean vortices). Under physiological conditions, the development of the Lyne-type vortices is believed to be influenced by the systolic pulse, and its associated rapid acceleration and deceleration. Experimental data acquired using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) for three harmonic waveforms of different frequencies clarify the conditions under which Lyne vortices form. Multiple vortex pairs were observed for all waveforms and frequencies investigated, including Dean and Lyne-type vortex structures at a Womersley number of 4.22, much lower than previously reported. Hence, frequency alone is not an adequate governing parameter to characterize secondary flow structures in pulsatile flows. A regime map of the secondary flow was sought by using an acceleration-based parameter and the Dean number.

  11. Spherical harmonic modelling to ultra-high degree of Bouguer and isostatic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmino, G.; Vales, N.; Bonvalot, S.; Briais, A.

    2012-07-01

    The availability of high-resolution global digital elevation data sets has raised a growing interest in the feasibility of obtaining their spherical harmonic representation at matching resolution, and from there in the modelling of induced gravity perturbations. We have therefore estimated spherical Bouguer and Airy isostatic anomalies whose spherical harmonic models are derived from the Earth's topography harmonic expansion. These spherical anomalies differ from the classical planar ones and may be used in the context of new applications. We succeeded in meeting a number of challenges to build spherical harmonic models with no theoretical limitation on the resolution. A specific algorithm was developed to enable the computation of associated Legendre functions to any degree and order. It was successfully tested up to degree 32,400. All analyses and syntheses were performed, in 64 bits arithmetic and with semi-empirical control of the significant terms to prevent from calculus underflows and overflows, according to IEEE limitations, also in preserving the speed of a specific regular grid processing scheme. Finally, the continuation from the reference ellipsoid's surface to the Earth's surface was performed by high-order Taylor expansion with all grids of required partial derivatives being computed in parallel. The main application was the production of a 1' × 1' equiangular global Bouguer anomaly grid which was computed by spherical harmonic analysis of the Earth's topography-bathymetry ETOPO1 data set up to degree and order 10,800, taking into account the precise boundaries and densities of major lakes and inner seas, with their own altitude, polar caps with bedrock information, and land areas below sea level. The harmonic coefficients for each entity were derived by analyzing the corresponding ETOPO1 part, and free surface data when required, at one arc minute resolution. The following approximations were made: the land, ocean and ice cap gravity spherical

  12. RSRM Chamber Pressure Oscillations: Transit Time Models and Unsteady CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tom; Stewart, Eric

    1996-01-01

    Space Shuttle solid rocket motor low frequency internal pressure oscillations have been observed since early testing. The same type of oscillations also are present in the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM). The oscillations, which occur during RSRM burn, are predominantly at the first three motor cavity longitudinal acoustic mode frequencies. Broadband flow and combustion noise provide the energy to excite these modes at low levels throughout motor burn, however, at certain times during burn the fluctuating pressure amplitude increases significantly. The increased fluctuations at these times suggests an additional excitation mechanism. The RSRM has inhibitors on the propellant forward facing surface of each motor segment. The inhibitors are in a slot at the segment field joints to prevent burning at that surface. The aft facing segment surface at a field joint slot burns and forms a cavity of time varying size. Initially the inhibitor is recessed in the field joint cavity. As propellant burns away the inhibitor begins to protrude into the bore flow. Two mechanisms (transit time models) that are considered potential pressure oscillation excitations are cavity-edge tones, and inhibitor hole-tones. Estimates of frequency variation with time of longitudinal acoustic modes, cavity edge-tones, and hole-tones compare favorably with frequencies measured during motor hot firing. It is believed that the highest oscillation amplitudes occur when vortex shedding frequencies coincide with motor longitudinal acoustic modes. A time accurate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis was made to replicate the observations from motor firings and to observe the transit time mechanisms in detail. FDNS is the flow solver used to detail the time varying aspects of the flow. The fluid is approximated as a single-phase ideal gas. The CFD model was an axisymmetric representation of the RSRM at 80 seconds into burn.Deformation of the inhibitors by the internal flow was determined

  13. Finite q-oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakishiyev, Natig M.; Klimyk, Anatoliy U.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2004-05-01

    The finite q-oscillator is a model that obeys the dynamics of the harmonic oscillator, with the operators of position, momentum and Hamiltonian being functions of elements of the q-algebra suq(2). The spectrum of position in this discrete system, in a fixed representation j, consists of 2j + 1 'sensor'-points x_s={\\case12}[2s]_q, s\\in\\{-j,-j+1,\\ldots,j\\} , and similarly for the momentum observable. The spectrum of energies is finite and equally spaced, so the system supports coherent states. The wavefunctions involve dual q-Kravchuk polynomials, which are solutions to a finite-difference Schrödinger equation. Time evolution (times a phase) defines the fractional Fourier-q-Kravchuk transform. In the classical limit as q rarr 1 we recover the finite oscillator Lie algebra, the N = 2j rarr infin limit returns the Macfarlane-Biedenharn q-oscillator and both limits contract the generators to the standard quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator.

  14. Reference Model 6 (RM6): Oscillating Wave Energy Converter.

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Diana L; Smith, Chris; Jenne, Dale Scott; Jacob, Paul; Copping, Andrea; Willits, Steve; Fontaine, Arnold; Brefort, Dorian; Gordon, Margaret Ellen; Copeland, Robert; Jepsen, Richard Alan

    2014-10-01

    This report is an addendum to SAND2013-9040: Methodology for Design and Economic Analysis of Marine Energy Conversion (MEC) Technologies. This report describes an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter reference model design in a complementary manner to Reference Models 1-4 contained in the above report. In this report, a conceptual design for an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter (WEC) device appropriate for the modeled reference resource site was identified, and a detailed backward bent duct buoy (BBDB) device design was developed using a combination of numerical modeling tools and scaled physical models. Our team used the methodology in SAND2013-9040 for the economic analysis that included costs for designing, manufacturing, deploying, and operating commercial-scale MEC arrays, up to 100 devices. The methodology was applied to identify key cost drivers and to estimate levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for this RM6 Oscillating Water Column device in dollars per kilowatt-hour ($/kWh). Although many costs were difficult to estimate at this time due to the lack of operational experience, the main contribution of this work was to disseminate a detailed set of methodologies and models that allow for an initial cost analysis of this emerging technology. This project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program Office (WWPTO), within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE). Sandia National Laboratories, the lead in this effort, collaborated with partners from National Laboratories, industry, and universities to design and test this reference model.

  15. Collective signaling behavior in a networked-oscillator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.-H.; Hui, P. M.

    2007-09-01

    We propose and study the collective behavior of a model of networked signaling objects that incorporates several ingredients of real-life systems. These ingredients include spatial inhomogeneity with grouping of signaling objects, signal attenuation with distance, and delayed and impulsive coupling between non-identical signaling objects. Depending on the coupling strength and/or time-delay effect, the model exhibits completely, partially, and locally collective signaling behavior. In particular, a correlated signaling (CS) behavior is observed in which there exist time durations when nearly a constant fraction of oscillators in the system are in the signaling state. These time durations are much longer than the duration of a spike when a single oscillator signals, and they are separated by regular intervals in which nearly all oscillators are silent. Such CS behavior is similar to that observed in biological systems such as fireflies, cicadas, crickets, and frogs. The robustness of the CS behavior against noise is also studied. It is found that properly adjusting the coupling strength and noise level could enhance the correlated behavior.

  16. Results of a model for premixed combustion oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to increasing use of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described in this paper. The model was developed to help explain specific experimental observations and to provide guidance for development of active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, etc. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor which are analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the fuel nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing a set of ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a personal computer. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with a bimolecular reaction rate between fuel and air. A variety of numerical results and comparisons to experimental data are presented to demonstrate the utility of the model. Model results are used to understand the fundamental mechanisms which drive combustion oscillations, effects of inlet air temperature and nozzle geometry on instability, and effectiveness of open loop control schemes.

  17. Realistic model of compact VLSI FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosp, Jordi; Binczak, Stéphane; Madrenas, Jordi; Fernández, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    In this article, we present a compact analogue VLSI implementation of the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model, intended to model large-scale, biologically plausible, oscillator networks. As the model requires a series resistor and a parallel capacitor with the inductor, which is the most complex part of the design, it is possible to greatly simplify the active inductor implementation compared to other implementations of this device as typically found in filters by allowing appreciable, but well modelled, nonidealities. We model and obtain the parameters of the inductor nonideal model as an inductance in series with a parasitic resistor and a second order low-pass filter with a large cut-off frequency. Post-layout simulations for a CMOS 0.35 μm double-poly technology using the MOSFET Spice BSIM3v3 model confirm the proper behaviour of the design.

  18. Oscillator models of the solar cycle and the Waldmeier effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, M.; Petrovay, K.

    2013-11-01

    We study the behaviour of the van der Pol oscillator when either its damping parameter μ or its nonlinearity parameter ξ is subject to additive or multiplicative random noise. Assuming various power law exponents for the relation between the oscillating variable and the sunspot number, for each case we map the parameter plane defined by the amplitude and the correlation time of the perturbation and mark the parameter regime where the sunspot number displays solar-like behaviour. Solar-like behaviour is defined here as a good correlation between the rise rate and cycle amplitude and the lack of a good correlation between the decay rate and amplitude, together with significant ({⪆ 10} %) r.m.s. variation in cycle lengths and cycle amplitudes. It is found that perturbing μ alone the perturbed van der Pol oscillator does not show solar-like behaviour. When the perturbed variable is ξ, solar-like behaviour is displayed for perturbations with a correlation time of about 3-4 years and significant amplitude. Such studies may provide useful constraints on solar dynamo models and their parameters.

  19. Transfer function-based modelling for voltage oscillation phenomena in PWM motor drives with long feeding cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Choel; Park, Ju H.

    2010-04-01

    In this article, a transfer function-based modelling is proposed to investigate voltage oscillation phenomena, i.e. over-voltage at the motor terminal, associated with pulse-width modulation (PWM) inverter-fed motor drives with long feeding cables. As such, the long feeding cable is assumed to be a distortionless transmission line; then, a bounce diagram and time-harmonic method are utilised to derive a simple model with a minimum computational burden that is easy to realise using the Matlab/Simulink software package. Furthermore, the model takes account of the inverter output and the motor terminal filters, which are commonly used to suppress the motor terminal over-voltage. The model accuracy is verified by a comparison with the circuit-oriented software, OrCAD/PSpice, simulation results.

  20. Dynamic stall of an oscillating wing. Part 1: Evaluation of turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, G. R.; Ekaterinaris, J. A.; Mccroskey, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Unsteady flowfields of a two-dimensional oscillating wing are calculated using an implicit, finite-difference, Navier-Stokes numerical scheme using five widely used turbulence models. The objective of this study is to identify an appropriate turbulence model for accurate simulation of three-dimensional dynamic stall. Three unsteady flow conditions corresponding to attached flow, light-stall, and deep-stall of an oscillating wing experiment were chosen as test cases for computations. Results of unsteady airload hysteresis curves, harmonics of unsteady pressures, and instantaneous flow pictures are presented. Comparison of unsteady airloads with experiment show that all models are deficient in some sense and not a single model predicts all airloads consistently and in agreement with experiment for all flow conditions. For the attached flow condition, the Renormalization Group Theory (RNG), the Johnoson-King (J-K), and the Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) models have better performance. The Baldwin-Lomax (B-L) and the Baldwin-Barth (B-B) models fair poorly. At the light-stall condition, the results for the RNG, the J-K, and S-A models are in agreement with experiment for the upstroke but they all over predict the separation shown by the experiment and therefore have bigger hysteresis loops than experimental results. The B-B model results are also in good agreement for upstroke but have poor lift hysteresis for downstroke. It has superior drag and pitching-moment predictions. For deep-stall conditions, the airloads for the RNG, the B -B, and the S-A models have fair agreement with experiment, but the B-B model performed better at the extreme deep-stall condition. Overall, the RNG model provides significant improvement over the B-L model in all flow regimes with no additional computational cost. The Baldwin-Barth model is the most expensive of the models considered here, costing about 2.5 times that of the Baldwin-Lomax model. Finally, a brief discussion of the effects of grid

  1. Development of QTc prolongation model incorporating circadian rhythm using harmonic model.

    PubMed

    Back, Hyun-moon; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Yun, Hwi-yeol; Kwon, Kwang-il

    2015-05-01

    1. QT prolongation is one of the major safety tests used in the development of a new drug. The ICH guidelines for the evaluation of QT prolongation recommend the use of the in vitro hERG assay and the in vivo telemetry test. However, QT intervals change under normal conditions due to circadian rhythm and can affect the results of the tests. In this study, we developed a PK/PD model to describe the QT interval after the administration of astemizole allowing for the normal changes by circadian rhythm. 2. The typical PK parameters of absorption rate constant (ka), volume of distribution (Vc and Vm), metabolism (km), and elimination rate constant (kel and kel-m) were 0.49 h(-1), 4950 L, 20 L, 0.0127 h(-1), 0.0095 h(-1), and 0.95 h(-1), respectively. The final PK/PD model was the biophase model with the modified harmonic model. The typical PK/PD parameters, base QTc interval (QT0), amplitude (T1, T3), period of QTc interval changing (T2, T4), and EC50 were 233 ms, 3.31, 1.5, -9.24 h, 1.85 h, and 0.81 ng/ml, respectively. 3. The PK/PD model to explain the changes of the QT interval that allows normal changes in the circadian rhythm after the administration of astemizole was developed successfully. This final model can be applied to the development of a human model. PMID:25475996

  2. MAVRIC Flutter Model Transonic Limit Cycle Oscillation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Schuster, David M.; Spain, Charles V.; Keller, Donald F.; Moses, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    The Models for Aeroelastic Validation Research Involving Computation semi-span wind-tunnel model (MAVRIC-I), a business jet wing-fuselage flutter model, was tested in NASA Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel with the goal of obtaining experimental data suitable for Computational Aeroelasticity code validation at transonic separation onset conditions. This research model is notable for its inexpensive construction and instrumentation installation procedures. Unsteady pressures and wing responses were obtained for three wingtip configurations clean, tipstore, and winglet. Traditional flutter boundaries were measured over the range of M = 0.6 to 0.9 and maps of Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO) behavior were made in the range of M = 0.85 to 0.95. Effects of dynamic pressure and angle-of-attack were measured. Testing in both R134a heavy gas and air provided unique data on Reynolds number, transition effects, and the effect of speed of sound on LCO behavior. The data set provides excellent code validation test cases for the important class of flow conditions involving shock-induced transonic flow separation onset at low wing angles, including Limit Cycle Oscillation behavior.

  3. An itinerant oscillator model with cage inertia for mesorheological granular experiments.

    PubMed

    Lasanta, Antonio; Puglisi, Andrea

    2015-08-14

    Recent experiments with a rotating probe immersed in weakly fluidized granular materials show a complex behavior on a wide range of time scales. Viscous-like relaxation at high frequency is accompanied by an almost harmonic dynamical trapping at intermediate times, with possibly anomalous long time behavior in the form of super-diffusion. Inspired by the itinerant oscillator model for diffusion in molecular liquids, and other models with coupled thermostats acting at different time scales, here we discuss a new model able to account for fast viscous relaxation, dynamical trapping, and super-diffusion at long times. The main difference with respect to liquids is a non-negligible cage inertia for the surrounding (granular) fluid, which allows it to sustain a slow but persistent motion for long times. The computed velocity power density spectra and mean-squared displacement qualitatively reproduce the experimental findings. We also discuss the linear response to external perturbations and the tail of the distribution of persistency time, which is associated with superdiffusion, and whose cut-off time is determined by cage inertia.

  4. Collective dynamics of duffing oscillators: Model for dipole ripple

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, T.; Ellison, J.A.; Kauffmann, S.K.

    1995-09-01

    The emittance growth due to power supply ripple in dipoles is modeled by the collective behavior of forced Duffing oscillators. The method of averaging reduces the problem to an autonomous system. A coarse grained long time limit of the phase space density and the rate of approach to this limit are discussed in terms of the autonomous system. The equilibrium density, the rate of approach to equilibrium and the equilibrium values depend crucially on the detuning parameter. We find the frequencies which lead to the largest emittance growth in three different forcing regimes and also characterize the dependence of emittance growth on forcing amplitude in these regimes.

  5. Generalized double-gradient model of flapping oscillations: Oblique waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    The double-gradient model of flapping oscillations is generalized for oblique plane waves, propagating in the equatorial plane. It is found that longitudinal propagation (ky = 0) is prohibited, while transversal (kx = 0) or nearly transversal waves should possess a maximum frequency, diminishing with the reduction of | k y / k x | ratio. It turns out that the sausage mode may propagate in a narrow range of directions only, | k y / k x | ≫ 1 . A simple analytical expression for the dispersion relation of the kink mode, valid in most part of wave numbers range, | k y / k x | < 9 , is derived.

  6. Frictional-faulting model for harmonic tremor before Redoubt Volcano eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dmitrieva, Ksenia; Hotovec-Ellis, Alicia J.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Dunham, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Seismic unrest, indicative of subsurface magma transport and pressure changes within fluid-filled cracks and conduits, often precedes volcanic eruptions. An intriguing form of volcano seismicity is harmonic tremor, that is, sustained vibrations in the range of 0.5–5 Hz. Many source processes can generate harmonic tremor. Harmonic tremor in the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, has been linked to repeating earthquakes of magnitudes around 0.5–1.5 that occur a few kilometres beneath the vent. Before many explosions in that eruption, these small earthquakes occurred in such rapid succession—up to 30 events per second—that distinct seismic wave arrivals blurred into continuous, high-frequency tremor. Tremor abruptly ceased about 30 s before the explosions. Here we introduce a frictional-faulting model to evaluate the credibility and implications of this tremor mechanism. We find that the fault stressing rates rise to values ten orders of magnitude higher than in typical tectonic settings. At that point, inertial effects stabilize fault sliding and the earthquakes cease. Our model of the Redoubt Volcano observations implies that the onset of volcanic explosions is preceded by active deformation and extreme stressing within a localized region of the volcano conduit, at a depth of several kilometres.

  7. Quantum interference of high-order harmonics from mixed gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Fernández, A.; Velarde, P.

    2016-08-01

    We present a theoretical study about the interference of the harmonics generated by a mixture of two gases, He-Ne. Our model is based on the electron quantum paths, a discrete number of electron trajectories, and continuum-bound transitions. A laser with intensity around 1014W/cm2 that interacts with a mixture of gases, He-Ne, produces an interference that is destructive at the low-order harmonics and oscillates between constructive and destructive near to cutoff. This destructive interference at high-order harmonics may be used to explore other transitions, which are currently hidden. At low-order harmonic frequencies, our numerical results are in very good agreement with experimental data. At higher-order harmonics, where there are no experimental data, comparison is with a Schrödinger solver.

  8. High harmonic phase in molecular nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, Brian K.

    2009-10-17

    Electronic structure in atoms and molecules modulates the amplitude and phase of high harmonic generation (HHG). We report measurements of the high harmonic spectral amplitude and phase in N{sub 2}. The phase is measured interferometrically by beating the N{sub 2} harmonics with those of an Ar reference oscillator in a gas mixture. A rapid phase shift of 0.2{pi} is observed in the vicinity of the HHG spectral minimum, where a shift of {pi} had been presumed [J. Itatani et al., Nature 432, 867 (2004)]. We compare the phase measurements to a simulation of the HHG recombination step in N{sub 2} that is based on a simple interference model. The results of the simulation suggest that modifications beyond the simple interference model are needed to explain HHG spectra in molecules.

  9. Linear and nonlinear aspects of the tropical 30-60 day oscillation: A modeling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Duane E.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    1991-01-01

    The scientific problem focused on study of the tropical 30-60 day oscillation and explanation for this phenomenon is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: the scientific problem (the importance of low frequency oscillations; suggested mechanisms for developing the tropical 30-60 day oscillation); proposed research and its objective; basic approach to research; and results (satellite data analysis and retrieval development; thermodynamic model of the oscillation; the 5-level GCM).

  10. The Ohio State 1991 geopotential and sea surface topography harmonic coefficient models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Richard H.; Wang, Yan Ming; Pavlis, Nikolaos K.

    1991-01-01

    The computation is described of a geopotential model to deg 360, a sea surface topography model to deg 10/15, and adjusted Geosat orbits for the first year of the exact repeat mission (ERM). This study started from the GEM-T2 potential coefficient model and it's error covariance matrix and Geosat orbits (for 22 ERMs) computed by Haines et al. using the GEM-T2 model. The first step followed the general procedures which use a radial orbit error theory originally developed by English. The Geosat data was processed to find corrections to the a priori geopotential model, corrections to a radial orbit error model for 76 Geosat arcs, and coefficients of a harmonic representation of the sea surface topography. The second stage of the analysis took place by doing a combination of the GEM-T2 coefficients with 30 deg gravity data derived from surface gravity data and anomalies obtained from altimeter data. The analysis has shown how a high degree spherical harmonic model can be determined combining the best aspects of two different analysis techniques. The error analysis was described that has led to the accuracy estimates for all the coefficients to deg 360. Significant work is needed to improve the modeling effort.

  11. Simple membrane-based model of the Min oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Min proteins in E. coli bacteria organize into a dynamic pattern oscillating between the two cell poles. This process identifies the middle of the cell and enables symmetric cell division. In an experimental model system consisting of a flat membrane with effectively infinite supply of proteins and energy source, the Min proteins assemble into travelling waves. Here we propose a simple one-dimensional model of the Min dynamics that, unlike the existing models, reproduces the sharp decrease of Min concentration when the majority of protein detaches from the membrane, and even the narrow MinE maximum immediately preceding the detachment. The proposed model thus provides a possible mechanism for the formation of the MinE ring known from cells. The model is restricted to one dimension, with protein interactions described by chemical kinetics allowing at most bimolecular reactions, and explicitly considering only three, membrane-bound, species. The bulk solution above the membrane is approximated as being well-mixed, with constant concentrations of all species. Unlike other models, our proposal does not require autocatalytic binding of MinD to the membrane. Instead, it is assumed that two MinE molecules are necessary to induce the dissociation of the MinD dimer and its subsequent detachment from the membrane. We investigate which reaction schemes lead to unstable homogeneous steady states and limit cycle oscillations, and how diffusion affects their stability. The suggested model qualitatively describes the shape of the Min waves observed on flat membranes, and agrees with the experimental dependence of the wave period on the MinE concentration. These results highlight the importance of MinE presence on the membrane without being bound to MinD, and of the reactions of Min proteins on the membrane.

  12. Coherent harmonic production using a two-section undulator FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Jaroszynski, D.A.; Prazeres, R.; Glotin, F.

    1995-12-31

    We present measurements and a theoretical analysis of a new method of generating harmonic radiation in a free-electron laser oscillator with a two section undulator in a single optical cavity. To produce coherent harmonic radiation the undulator is arranged so that the downstream undulator section resonance frequency matches a harmonic of the upstream undulator. Both the fundamental and the harmonic optical fields evolve in the same optical cavity and are coupled out with different extraction fractions using a hole in one of the cavity mirrors. We present measurements that show that the optical power at the second and third harmonic can be enhanced by more than an order of magnitude in this fundamental/harmonic configuration. We compare the production of harmonic radiation of a two sectioned fundamental/harmonic undulator with that produced from a FEL operating at its highest efficiency with a step-tapered undulator, where the bunching at the end of the first section is very large. We examine, the dependence of the harmonic power on the intracavity power by adjusting the optical cavity desynchronism, {delta}L. We also examine the evolution of the fundamental and harmonic powers as a function of cavity roundtrip number to evaluate the importance of the small signal gain at the harmonic. We compare our measurements with predictions of a multi-electron numerical model that follows the evolution of fundamental and harmonic power to saturation. This fundamental/harmonic mode, of operation of the FEL may have useful applications in the production of coherent X-ray and VUV radiation, a spectral range where high reflectivity optical cavity mirrors are difficult or impossible to manufacture.

  13. Quantum-optical model for the dynamics of high-order-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombkötő, Ákos; Czirják, Attila; Varró, Sándor; Földi, Péter

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a two-level atom in the field of a strong laser pulse. The resulting time-dependent polarization is the source of a radiation the frequency components of which are essentially harmonics of the driving field's carrier frequency. The time evolution of this secondary radiation is analyzed in terms of the expectation values of the photon-number operators for a large number of electromagnetic modes that are initially in the vacuum state. Our method is based on a multimode version of the Jaynes-Cummings-Paul model and can be generalized to different radiating systems as well. We show that, after the exciting pulse, the final distribution of the photon numbers is close to the conventional (Fourier-transform-based) power spectrum of the secondary radiation. The details of the high-order-harmonic spectra (HHG spectra) are also analyzed; for many-cycle excitations a clear physical interpretation is given in terms of the Floquet quasienergies. A first step towards the determination of the photon statistics of the high-order-harmonic modes reveals states with slightly super-Poissonian distribution.

  14. Modeling Tides, Planetary Waves, and Equatorial Oscillations in the MLT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengel, J. G.; Mayr, H. G.; Drob, D. P.; Porter, H. S.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Applying Hines Doppler Spread Parameterization for gravity waves (GW), our 3D model reproduces some essential features that characterize the observed seasonal variations of tides and planetary waves in the upper mesosphere. In 2D, our model also reproduces the large Semi-Annual Oscillation (SAO) and Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO) observed in this region at low latitudes. It is more challenging to describe these features combined in a more comprehensive self consistent model, and we give a progress report that outlines the difficulties and reports some success. In 3D, the GW's are partially absorbed by tides and planetary waves to amplify them. Thus the waves are less efficient in generating the QBO and SAO at equatorial latitudes. Some of this deficiency is compensated by the fact that the GW activity is observed to be enhanced at low latitudes. Increasing the GW source has the desired effect to boost the QBO, but the effect is confined primarily to the stratosphere. With increasing altitude, the meridional circulation becomes more important in redistributing the momentum deposited in the background flow by the GW's. Another factor involved is the altitude at which the GW's originate, which we had originally chosen to be the surface. Numerical experiments show that moving this source altitude to the top of the troposphere significantly increases the efficiency for generating the QBO without affecting much the tides and planetary waves in the model. Attention to the details in which the GW source comes into play thus appears to be of critical importance in modeling the phenomenology of the MLT. Among the suite of numerical experiments reported, we present a simulation that produced significant variations of tides and planetary waves in the upper mesosphere. The effect is related to the QBO generated in the model, and GW filtering is the likely cause.

  15. Synchronized Cycles: An allosteric model of the cyanobacterial circadian oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubensky, David; van Zon, J. S.; Altena, P.; Ten Wolde, P. R.

    2007-03-01

    In a remarkable experiment, Nakajima et al. [Science, 2005] showed that the 3 cyanobacterial clock proteins KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC are sufficient to generate circadian phosphorylation of KaiC in vitro. This system is thus a rare example of a functioning biochemical circuit that can be reconstituted in the test tube. Theoretically, it presents the further challenge that the only reactions driven out of equilibrium are those associated with KaiC phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we present a model of the Kai system. At its heart is the assumption, motivated by classical models of allostery, that each KaiC hexamer to tends to be phosphorylated in a cyclic manner. For macroscopic oscillations to be possible, however, the cycles of the different hexamers must be synchronized. We propose a novel synchronisation mechanism that allows us to reproduce a wide range of published data, including temperature compensation of the oscillation period, and to make nontrivial predictions about the effects of varying the concentrations of the Kai proteins.

  16. Modeling oscillations and spiral waves in Dictyostelium populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorbakhsh, Javad; Schwab, David J.; Sgro, Allyson E.; Gregor, Thomas; Mehta, Pankaj

    2015-06-01

    Unicellular organisms exhibit elaborate collective behaviors in response to environmental cues. These behaviors are controlled by complex biochemical networks within individual cells and coordinated through cell-to-cell communication. Describing these behaviors requires new mathematical models that can bridge scales—from biochemical networks within individual cells to spatially structured cellular populations. Here we present a family of "multiscale" models for the emergence of spiral waves in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Our models exploit new experimental advances that allow for the direct measurement and manipulation of the small signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) used by Dictyostelium cells to coordinate behavior in cellular populations. Inspired by recent experiments, we model the Dictyostelium signaling network as an excitable system coupled to various preprocessing modules. We use this family of models to study spatially unstructured populations of "fixed" cells by constructing phase diagrams that relate the properties of population-level oscillations to parameters in the underlying biochemical network. We then briefly discuss an extension of our model that includes spatial structure and show how this naturally gives rise to spiral waves. Our models exhibit a wide range of novel phenomena. including a density-dependent frequency change, bistability, and dynamic death due to slow cAMP dynamics. Our modeling approach provides a powerful tool for bridging scales in modeling of Dictyostelium populations.

  17. Modeling oscillations and spiral waves in Dictyostelium populations.

    PubMed

    Noorbakhsh, Javad; Schwab, David J; Sgro, Allyson E; Gregor, Thomas; Mehta, Pankaj

    2015-06-01

    Unicellular organisms exhibit elaborate collective behaviors in response to environmental cues. These behaviors are controlled by complex biochemical networks within individual cells and coordinated through cell-to-cell communication. Describing these behaviors requires new mathematical models that can bridge scales-from biochemical networks within individual cells to spatially structured cellular populations. Here we present a family of "multiscale" models for the emergence of spiral waves in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Our models exploit new experimental advances that allow for the direct measurement and manipulation of the small signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) used by Dictyostelium cells to coordinate behavior in cellular populations. Inspired by recent experiments, we model the Dictyostelium signaling network as an excitable system coupled to various preprocessing modules. We use this family of models to study spatially unstructured populations of "fixed" cells by constructing phase diagrams that relate the properties of population-level oscillations to parameters in the underlying biochemical network. We then briefly discuss an extension of our model that includes spatial structure and show how this naturally gives rise to spiral waves. Our models exhibit a wide range of novel phenomena. including a density-dependent frequency change, bistability, and dynamic death due to slow cAMP dynamics. Our modeling approach provides a powerful tool for bridging scales in modeling of Dictyostelium populations. PMID:26172740

  18. Harmonic amplitude dependent dynamic stiffness of hydraulic bushings: Alternate nonlinear models and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredette, Luke; Dreyer, Jason T.; Rook, Todd E.; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic stiffness properties of automotive hydraulic bushings exhibit significant amplitude sensitivity which cannot be captured by linear time-invariant models. Quasi-linear and nonlinear models are therefore proposed with focus on the amplitude sensitivity in magnitude and loss angle spectra (up to 50 Hz). Since production bushing model parameters are unknown, dynamic stiffness tests and laboratory experiments are utilized to extract model parameters. Nonlinear compliance and resistance elements are incorporated, including their interactions in order to improve amplitude sensitive predictions. New solution approximations for the new nonlinear system equations refine the multi-term harmonic balance term method. Quasi-linear models yield excellent accuracy but cannot predict trends in amplitude sensitivity since they rely on available dynamic stiffness measurements. Nonlinear models containing both nonlinear resistance and compliance elements yield superior predictions to those of prior models (with a single nonlinearity) while also providing more physical insight. Suggestion for further work is briefly mentioned.

  19. A Harmonic Motion Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, P.; Krakower, Zeev

    2010-01-01

    We present a unit comprising theory, simulation and experiment for a body oscillating on a vertical spring, in which the simultaneous use of a force probe and an ultrasonic range finder enables one to explore quantitatively and understand many aspects of simple and damped harmonic motions. (Contains 14 figures.)

  20. An Empirical Polarizable Force Field Based on the Classical Drude Oscillator Model: Development History and Recent Applications.

    PubMed

    Lemkul, Justin A; Huang, Jing; Roux, Benoît; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2016-05-11

    Molecular mechanics force fields that explicitly account for induced polarization represent the next generation of physical models for molecular dynamics simulations. Several methods exist for modeling induced polarization, and here we review the classical Drude oscillator model, in which electronic degrees of freedom are modeled by charged particles attached to the nuclei of their core atoms by harmonic springs. We describe the latest developments in Drude force field parametrization and application, primarily in the last 15 years. Emphasis is placed on the Drude-2013 polarizable force field for proteins, DNA, lipids, and carbohydrates. We discuss its parametrization protocol, development history, and recent simulations of biologically interesting systems, highlighting specific studies in which induced polarization plays a critical role in reproducing experimental observables and understanding physical behavior. As the Drude oscillator model is computationally tractable and available in a wide range of simulation packages, it is anticipated that use of these more complex physical models will lead to new and important discoveries of the physical forces driving a range of chemical and biological phenomena.

  1. An Empirical Polarizable Force Field Based on the Classical Drude Oscillator Model: Development History and Recent Applications

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanics force fields that explicitly account for induced polarization represent the next generation of physical models for molecular dynamics simulations. Several methods exist for modeling induced polarization, and here we review the classical Drude oscillator model, in which electronic degrees of freedom are modeled by charged particles attached to the nuclei of their core atoms by harmonic springs. We describe the latest developments in Drude force field parametrization and application, primarily in the last 15 years. Emphasis is placed on the Drude-2013 polarizable force field for proteins, DNA, lipids, and carbohydrates. We discuss its parametrization protocol, development history, and recent simulations of biologically interesting systems, highlighting specific studies in which induced polarization plays a critical role in reproducing experimental observables and understanding physical behavior. As the Drude oscillator model is computationally tractable and available in a wide range of simulation packages, it is anticipated that use of these more complex physical models will lead to new and important discoveries of the physical forces driving a range of chemical and biological phenomena. PMID:26815602

  2. Vibratory responses of synthetic, self-oscillating vocal fold models

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Preston R.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The flow-induced responses of four self-oscillating synthetic vocal fold models are compared. All models were life-sized and fabricated using flexible silicone compounds with material properties comparable to those of human vocal fold tissue. Three of the models had two layers of different stiffness to represent the body–cover grouping of vocal fold tissue. Two of the two-layer models were based on the “M5” geometry [Scherer et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 1616–1630 (2001)], while the third was based on magnetic resonance imaging data. The fourth model included several layers, including a thin epithelial layer, an exceedingly flexible superficial lamina propria layer, a ligament layer that included an anteriorly–posteriorly oriented fiber to restrict vertical motion, and a body layer. Measurements were performed with these models in full larynx and hemilarynx configurations. Data included onset pressure, vibration frequency, glottal flow rate, maximum glottal width, and medial surface motion, the latter two of which were acquired using high-speed imaging techniques. The fourth, multi-layer model exhibited onset pressure, frequency, and medial surface motion traits that are comparable to published human vocal fold data. Importantly, the model featured an alternating convergent–divergent glottal profile and mucosal wave-like motion, characteristics which are important markers of human vocal fold vibration. PMID:23145623

  3. A new model for realistic random perturbations of stochastic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieci, Luca; Li, Wuchen; Zhou, Haomin

    2016-08-01

    Classical theories predict that solutions of differential equations will leave any neighborhood of a stable limit cycle, if white noise is added to the system. In reality, many engineering systems modeled by second order differential equations, like the van der Pol oscillator, show incredible robustness against noise perturbations, and the perturbed trajectories remain in the neighborhood of a stable limit cycle for all times of practical interest. In this paper, we propose a new model of noise to bridge this apparent discrepancy between theory and practice. Restricting to perturbations from within this new class of noise, we consider stochastic perturbations of second order differential systems that -in the unperturbed case- admit asymptotically stable limit cycles. We show that the perturbed solutions are globally bounded and remain in a tubular neighborhood of the underlying deterministic periodic orbit. We also define stochastic Poincaré map(s), and further derive partial differential equations for the transition density function.

  4. A NON-RADIAL OSCILLATION MODEL FOR PULSAR STATE SWITCHING

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Thompson, S. E.

    2011-02-10

    Pulsars are unique astrophysical laboratories because of their clock-like timing precision, providing new ways to test general relativity and detect gravitational waves. One impediment to high-precision pulsar timing experiments is timing noise. Recently, Lyne et al. showed that the timing noise in a number of pulsars is due to quasi-periodic fluctuations in the pulsars' spin-down rates and that some of the pulsars have associated changes in pulse profile shapes. Here we show that a non-radial oscillation model based on asteroseismological theory can explain these quasi-periodic fluctuations. Application of this model to neutron stars will increase our knowledge of neutron star emission and neutron star interiors and may improve pulsar timing precision.

  5. Rapid automated superposition of shapes and macromolecular models using spherical harmonics

    PubMed Central

    Konarev, Petr V.; Petoukhov, Maxim V.; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2016-01-01

    A rapid algorithm to superimpose macromolecular models in Fourier space is proposed and implemented (SUPALM). The method uses a normalized integrated cross-term of the scattering amplitudes as a proximity measure between two three-dimensional objects. The reciprocal-space algorithm allows for direct matching of heterogeneous objects including high- and low-resolution models represented by atomic coordinates, beads or dummy residue chains as well as electron microscopy density maps and inhomogeneous multi-phase models (e.g. of protein–nucleic acid complexes). Using spherical harmonics for the computation of the amplitudes, the method is up to an order of magnitude faster than the real-space algorithm implemented in SUPCOMB by Kozin & Svergun [J. Appl. Cryst. (2001 ▸), 34, 33–41]. The utility of the new method is demonstrated in a number of test cases and compared with the results of SUPCOMB. The spherical harmonics algorithm is best suited for low-resolution shape models, e.g. those provided by solution scattering experiments, but also facilitates a rapid cross-validation against structural models obtained by other methods. PMID:27275142

  6. Reference Model 5 (RM5): Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y. H.; Jenne, D. S.; Thresher, R.; Copping, A.; Geerlofs, S.; Hanna, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    This report is an addendum to SAND2013-9040: Methodology for Design and Economic Analysis of Marine Energy Conversion (MEC) Technologies. This report describes an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter (OSWEC) reference model design in a complementary manner to Reference Models 1-4 contained in the above report. A conceptual design for a taut moored oscillating surge wave energy converter was developed. The design had an annual electrical power of 108 kilowatts (kW), rated power of 360 kW, and intended deployment at water depths between 50 m and 100 m. The study includes structural analysis, power output estimation, a hydraulic power conversion chain system, and mooring designs. The results were used to estimate device capital cost and annual operation and maintenance costs. The device performance and costs were used for the economic analysis, following the methodology presented in SAND2013-9040 that included costs for designing, manufacturing, deploying, and operating commercial-scale MEC arrays up to 100 devices. The levelized cost of energy estimated for the Reference Model 5 OSWEC, presented in this report, was for a single device and arrays of 10, 50, and 100 units, and it enabled the economic analysis to account for cost reductions associated with economies of scale. The baseline commercial levelized cost of energy estimate for the Reference Model 5 device in an array comprised of 10 units is $1.44/kilowatt-hour (kWh), and the value drops to approximately $0.69/kWh for an array of 100 units.

  7. Cosmological perturbations in coherent oscillating scalar field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Maroto, A. L.; Jareño, S. J. Núñez

    2016-03-01

    The fact that fast oscillating homogeneous scalar fields behave as perfect fluids in average and their intrinsic isotropy have made these models very fruitful in cosmology. In this work we will analyse the perturbations dynamics in these theories assuming general power law potentials V( ϕ) = λ| ϕ| n /n. At leading order in the wavenumber expansion, a simple expression for the effective sound speed of perturbations is obtained c eff 2 = ω = ( n - 2)/( n + 2) with ω the effective equation of state. We also obtain the first order correction in k 2/ ω eff 2 , when the wavenumber k of the perturbations is much smaller than the background oscillation frequency, ω eff. For the standard massive case we have also analysed general anharmonic contributions to the effective sound speed. These results are reached through a perturbed version of the generalized virial theorem and also studying the exact system both in the super-Hubble limit, deriving the natural ansatz for δϕ; and for sub-Hubble modes, exploiting Floquet's theorem.

  8. Experimental constraints on the neutrino oscillations and a simple model of three-flavor mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Raczka, P.A.; Szymacha, A. ); Tatur, S. )

    1994-02-01

    A simple model of neutrino mixing is considered which contains only one right-handed neutrino field coupled, via the mass term, to the three usual left-handed fields. This is the simplest model that allows for three-flavor neutrino oscillations. The existing experimental limits on the neutrino oscillations are used to obtain constraints on the two free-mixing parameters of the model. A specific sum rule relating the oscillation probabilities of different flavors is derived.

  9. Stalled Pulsing Inertial Oscillation Model for a Tornadic Cyclone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    A supercell storm is a tall, rotating thunderstorm that can generate hail and tornadoes. Two models exist for the development of the storm's rotation or mesocyclone - the conventional splitting-storm model, and the more recent pulsing inertial oscillation (PIO) model, in which a nonlinear pulse represents the supercell. Although data support both models and both could operate in the same supercell, neither model has satisfactorily explained the tornadic cyclone. A tornadic cyclone is an elevated vorticity concentration of Rossby number approximately 1000 that develops within the contracting mesocyclone shortly before a major tornado appears at the surface. We now show that if the internal temperature excess due to latent energy release is limited to the realistic range of -12 K to +12 K, the PIO model can stall part way through the pulse in a state of contraction and spin-up. Should this happen, the stalled-PIO model can evolve into a tornadic cyclone with a central pressure deficit that exceeds 40 mb, which is greater than the largest measured value. This simulation uses data from a major tornadic supercell that occurred over Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, on May 3, 1999. The stalled-PIO mechanism also provides a strategy for human intervention to retard or reverse the development of a tornadic cyclone and its pendant tornado.

  10. Modeling Jupiter's Quasi Quadrennial Oscillation (QQO) with Wave Drag Parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosentino, Rick; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Orton, Glenn S.

    2016-10-01

    The QQO in Jupiter's atmosphere was first discovered after 7.8 micron infrared observations spanning the 1980's and 1990's detected a temperature oscillation near 10 hPa (Orton et al. 1991, Science 252, 537, Leovy et. al. 1991, Nature 354, 380, Friedson 1999, Icarus 137, 34). New observations using the Texas Echelon cross-dispersed Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES), mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope facility (IRTF), have been used to characterize a complete cycle of the QQO between January 2012 and January 2016 (Greathouse et al. 2016, DPS) . These new observations not only show the thermal oscillation at 10 hPa, but they also show that the QQO extends upwards in Jupiter's atmosphere to pressures as high as 0.4 hPa. We incorporated three different wave-drag parameterizations into the EPIC General Circulation Model (Dowling et al. 1998, Icarus 132, 221) to simulate the observed Jovian QQO temperature signatures as a function of latitude, pressure and time using results from the TEXES datasets as new constraints. Each parameterization produces unique results and offers insight into the spectra of waves that likely exist in Jupiter's atmosphere to force the QQO. High-frequency gravity waves produced from convection are extremely difficult to directly observe but likely contribute a significant portion to the QQO momentum budget. We use different models to simulate the effects of waves such as these, to indirectly explore their spectrum in Jupiter's atmosphere by varying their properties. The model temperature outputs show strong correlations to equatorial and mid-latitude temperature fields retrieved from the TEXES datasets at different epochs. Our results suggest the QQO phenomenon could be more than one alternating zonal jet that descends over time in response to Jovian atmospheric forcing (e.g. gravity waves from convection).Research funding provided by the NRAO Grote Reber Pre-Doctoral Fellowship. Computing resources include the NMT PELICAN cluster and the CISL

  11. From ordinary to discrete quantum mechanics: The Charlier oscillator and its coalgebra symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latini, D.; Riglioni, D.

    2016-10-01

    The coalgebraic structure of the harmonic oscillator is used to underline possible connections between continuous and discrete superintegrable models which can be described in terms of SUSY discrete quantum mechanics. A set of 1-parameter algebraic transformations is introduced in order to generate a discrete representation for the coalgebraic harmonic oscillator. This set of transformations is shown to play a role in the generalization of classical orthogonal polynomials to the realm of discrete orthogonal polynomials in the Askey scheme. As an explicit example the connection between Hermite and Charlier oscillators, that share the same coalgebraic structure, is presented and a two-dimensional maximally superintegrable version of the Charlier oscillator is constructed.

  12. The effect of high viscosity on the collapse-like chaotic and regular periodic oscillations of a harmonically excited gas bubble.

    PubMed

    Hegedűs, Ferenc; Klapcsik, Kálmán

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade many industrial applications have emerged based on the rapidly developing ultrasonic technology such as ultrasonic pasteurization, alteration of the viscosity of food systems, and mixing immiscible liquids. The fundamental physical basis of these applications is the prevailing extreme conditions (high temperature, pressure and even shock waves) during the collapse of acoustically excited bubbles. By applying the sophisticated numerical techniques of modern bifurcation theory, the present study intends to reveal the regions in the excitation pressure amplitude-ambient temperature parameter plane where collapse-like motion of an acoustically driven gas bubble in highly viscous glycerine exists. We report evidence that below a threshold temperature the bubble model, the Keller-Miksis equation, becomes an overdamped oscillator suppressing collapse-like behaviour. In addition, we have found periodic windows interspersed with chaotic regions indicating the presence of transient chaos, which is important from application point of view if predictability is required. PMID:26186832

  13. The effect of high viscosity on the collapse-like chaotic and regular periodic oscillations of a harmonically excited gas bubble.

    PubMed

    Hegedűs, Ferenc; Klapcsik, Kálmán

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade many industrial applications have emerged based on the rapidly developing ultrasonic technology such as ultrasonic pasteurization, alteration of the viscosity of food systems, and mixing immiscible liquids. The fundamental physical basis of these applications is the prevailing extreme conditions (high temperature, pressure and even shock waves) during the collapse of acoustically excited bubbles. By applying the sophisticated numerical techniques of modern bifurcation theory, the present study intends to reveal the regions in the excitation pressure amplitude-ambient temperature parameter plane where collapse-like motion of an acoustically driven gas bubble in highly viscous glycerine exists. We report evidence that below a threshold temperature the bubble model, the Keller-Miksis equation, becomes an overdamped oscillator suppressing collapse-like behaviour. In addition, we have found periodic windows interspersed with chaotic regions indicating the presence of transient chaos, which is important from application point of view if predictability is required.

  14. Properties of Coupled Oscillator Model for Bidirectional Associative Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we consider the stationary state and dynamical properties of a coupled oscillator model for bidirectional associative memory. For the stationary state, we apply the replica method to obtain self-consistent order parameter equations. The theoretical results for the storage capacity and overlap agree well with the numerical simulation. For the retrieval process, we apply statistical neurodynamics to include temporal noise correlations. For the successful retrieval process, the theoretical result obtained with the fourth-order approximation qualitatively agrees with the numerical simulation. However, for the unsuccessful retrieval process, higher-order noise correlations suppress severely; therefore, the maximum value of the overlap and the relaxation time are smaller than those of the numerical simulation. The reasons for the discrepancies between the theoretical result and numerical simulation, and the validity of our analysis are discussed.

  15. Kravchuk oscillator revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakishiyeva, Mesuma K.; Atakishiyev, Natig M.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2014-05-01

    The study of irreducible representations of Lie algebras and groups has traditionally considered their action on functions of a continuous manifold (e.g. the 'rotation' Lie algebra so(3) on functions on the sphere). Here we argue that functions of a discrete variable -Kravchuk functions- are on equal footing for that study in the case of so(3). They lead to a discrete quantum model of the harmonic oscillator, and offer a corresponding set of special function relations. The technique is applicable to other special function families of a discrete variable, which stem from low-dimensional Lie algebras and are stationary solutions for the corresponding discrete quantum models.

  16. The Madden-Julian Oscillation in General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R; Gleckler, P J; Doutriaux, C; Groups, A M; Groups, C M; Slingo, J M; Inness, P M; Gualdi, S; Li, W

    2003-10-27

    A methodology is utilized to analyze in a standardized fashion the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in general circulation models. This is attained by projecting 20-100 day bandpass filtered outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) from the models onto the two leading empirical orthogonal functions (EOF's) of observed OLR that characterize the propagation of MJO convection from the Indian Ocean to the central Pacific Ocean. The resulting principal component time series are then screened to isolate boreal winters during which they exhibit a lead-lag relationship consistent with observations. This PC subset is used for linear regression to determine the ability of the models to simulate the observed spacetime variability of the MJO. The vast majority of models underestimate the amplitude of the MJO convective anomalies by a factor of two or more, and the eastward propagation of convection is less coherent than observed, typically. For a given family of models, coupling to an ocean leads to better organization of the large-scale convection. The low-level moisture convergence mechanism for eastward propagation is represented in limited cases, as is the vertical structure of the MJO.

  17. Modelling of soldier fly halteres for gyroscopic oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Parween, Rizuwana; Pratap, Rudra

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nature has evolved a beautiful design for small-scale vibratory rate-gyro in the form of dipteran halteres that detect body rotations via Coriolis acceleration. In most Diptera, including soldier fly, Hermetia illucens, halteres are a pair of special organs, located in the space between the thorax and the abdomen. The halteres along with their connecting joint with the fly's body constitute a mechanism that is used for muscle-actuated oscillations of the halteres along the actuation direction. These oscillations lead to bending vibrations in the sensing direction (out of the haltere's actuation plane) upon any impressed rotation due to the resulting Coriolis force. This induced vibration is sensed by the sensory organs at the base of the haltere in order to determine the rate of rotation. In this study, we evaluate the boundary conditions and the stiffness of the anesthetized halteres along the actuation and the sensing direction. We take several cross-sectional SEM (scanning electron microscope) images of the soldier fly haltere and construct its three dimensional model to get the mass properties. Based on these measurements, we estimate the natural frequency along both actuation and sensing directions, propose a finite element model of the haltere's joint mechanism, and discuss the significance of the haltere's asymmetric cross-section. The estimated natural frequency along the actuation direction is within the range of the haltere's flapping frequency. However, the natural frequency along the sensing direction is roughly double the haltere's flapping frequency that provides a large bandwidth for sensing the rate of rotation to the soldier flies. PMID:25572422

  18. Modelling of soldier fly halteres for gyroscopic oscillations.

    PubMed

    Parween, Rizuwana; Pratap, Rudra

    2015-01-01

    Nature has evolved a beautiful design for small-scale vibratory rate-gyro in the form of dipteran halteres that detect body rotations via Coriolis acceleration. In most Diptera, including soldier fly, Hermetia illucens, halteres are a pair of special organs, located in the space between the thorax and the abdomen. The halteres along with their connecting joint with the fly's body constitute a mechanism that is used for muscle-actuated oscillations of the halteres along the actuation direction. These oscillations lead to bending vibrations in the sensing direction (out of the haltere's actuation plane) upon any impressed rotation due to the resulting Coriolis force. This induced vibration is sensed by the sensory organs at the base of the haltere in order to determine the rate of rotation. In this study, we evaluate the boundary conditions and the stiffness of the anesthetized halteres along the actuation and the sensing direction. We take several cross-sectional SEM (scanning electron microscope) images of the soldier fly haltere and construct its three dimensional model to get the mass properties. Based on these measurements, we estimate the natural frequency along both actuation and sensing directions, propose a finite element model of the haltere's joint mechanism, and discuss the significance of the haltere's asymmetric cross-section. The estimated natural frequency along the actuation direction is within the range of the haltere's flapping frequency. However, the natural frequency along the sensing direction is roughly double the haltere's flapping frequency that provides a large bandwidth for sensing the rate of rotation to the soldier flies.

  19. A Simulation Model for Local Harmonic Motion Monitoring of Focused Ultrasound Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkilae, Janne; Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-14

    A computational model for local harmonic motion (LHM) imaging-based monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is presented. LMH technique is based on a focused ultrasound radiation force excitation, which induces local mechanical vibrations at the focal region. These pulse-echo imaged vibrations are then used to estimate the mechanical properties of the sonication region. LHM has been proven to be feasible for FUS monitoring because changes in the material properties during the coagulation affect the measured displacements. The presented model includes separate models to simulate acoustic fields, sonication induced temperature elevation and mechanical vibrations, and pulse-echo imaging of the induced motions. These simulation models are based on Rayleigh integral, finite element, and spatial impulse response methods. Simulated temperature rise and vibration amplitudes have been compared with in vivo rabbit experiments with noninvasive MRI thermometry.

  20. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective systems. Part II: An idealized model

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q. |; Randall, D.A.

    1995-02-15

    A simple model is used to examine the hypothesis that nonlinear interactions among atmospheric radiation, cumulus convection, and the surface moisture flux can result in a stationary, low-frequency (30-60 day period) oscillating heat source in the tropical atmosphere. The model produces low-frequency oscillations of temperature, moisture, and precipitation. The mechanism that produces these oscillations is identified through analyses of the model and its results. The relevance of this mechanism to understanding the observed Madden-Julian oscillation in the tropical atmosphere over the Indian and western Pacific Oceans is discussed. 17 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The fundamental structure function of oscillator noise models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Continuous-time models of oscillator phase noise x(t) usually have stationary nth differences, for some n. The covariance structure of such a model can be characterized in the time domain by the structure function: D sub n (t;gamma sub 1, gamma sub 2) = E delta (n) sub gamma sub 1 x(s+t) delta(n) sub gamma sub 2 x (s). Although formulas for the special case D sub 2 (0;gamma,gamma) (the Allan variance times 2 gamma(2)) exist for power-law spectral models, certain estimation problems require a more complete knowledge of (0). Exhibited is a much simpler function of one time variable, D(t), from which (0) can easily be obtained from the spectral density by uncomplicated integrations. Believing that D(t) is the simplest function of time that holds the same information as (0), D(t) is called the fundamental structure function. D(t) is computed for several power-law spectral models. Two examples are D(t) = K/t/(3) for random walk FM, D(t) = Kt(2) 1n/t/ for flicker FM. Then, to demonstrate its use, a BASIC program is given that computes means and variances of two Allan variance estimators, one of which incorporates a method of frequency drift estimation and removal.

  2. Oscillating hysteresis in the q-neighbor Ising model.

    PubMed

    Jȩdrzejewski, Arkadiusz; Chmiel, Anna; Sznajd-Weron, Katarzyna

    2015-11-01

    We modify the kinetic Ising model with Metropolis dynamics, allowing each spin to interact only with q spins randomly chosen from the whole system, which corresponds to the topology of a complete graph. We show that the model with q≥3 exhibits a phase transition between ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases at temperature T*, which linearly increases with q. Moreover, we show that for q=3 the phase transition is continuous and that it is discontinuous for larger values of q. For q>3, the hysteresis exhibits oscillatory behavior-expanding for even values of q and shrinking for odd values of q. Due to the mean-field-like nature of the model, we are able to derive the analytical form of transition probabilities and, therefore, calculate not only the probability density function of the order parameter but also precisely determine the hysteresis and the effective potential showing stable, unstable, and metastable steady states. Our results show that a seemingly small modification of the kinetic Ising model leads not only to the switch from a continuous to a discontinuous phase transition, but also to an unexpected oscillating behavior of the hysteresis and a puzzling phenomenon for q=5, which might be taken as evidence for the so-called mixed-order phase transition.

  3. MAVRIC Flutter Model Transonic Limit Cycle Oscillation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Schuster, David M.; Spain, Charles V.; Keller, Donald F.; Moses, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    The Models for Aeroelastic Validation Research Involving Computation semi-span wind-tunnel model (MAVRIC-I), a business jet wing-fuselage flutter model, was tested in NASA Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel with the goal of obtaining experimental data suitable for Computational Aeroelasticity code validation at transonic separation onset conditions. This research model is notable for its inexpensive construction and instrumentation installation procedures. Unsteady pressures and wing responses were obtained for three wingtip configurations of clean, tipstore, and winglet. Traditional flutter boundaries were measured over the range of M = 0.6 to 0.9 and maps of Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO) behavior were made in the range of M = 0.85 to 0.95. Effects of dynamic pressure and angle-of-attack were measured. Testing in both R134a heavy gas and air provided unique data on Reynolds number, transition effects, and the effect of speed of sound on LCO behavior. The data set provides excellent code validation test cases for the important class of flow conditions involving shock-induced transonic flow separation onset at low wing angles, including LCO behavior.

  4. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.; Eriksson, J.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Giacomelli, L.; Girardo, J.-B.; Hellsten, T.; Khilkevitch, E.; Kiptily, V. G.; Koskela, T.; Mantsinen, M.; Nocente, M.; Salewski, M.; Sharapov, S. E.; Shevelev, A. E.; Contributors, JET

    2016-11-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail enhancing DD and D3He fusion reactions. Modelling and measuring the fast deuterium tail accurately is essential for quantifying the fusion products. This paper presents the modelling of the D distribution function resulting from the NBI+ICRF heating scheme, reinforced by a comparison with dedicated JET fast ion diagnostics, showing an overall good agreement. Finally, a sawtooth activity for these experiments has been observed and interpreted using SPOT/RFOF simulations in the framework of Porcelli’s theoretical model, where NBI+ICRH accelerated ions are found to have a strong stabilizing effect, leading to monster sawteeth.

  5. Franck-Condon factors perturbed by damped harmonic oscillators: Solvent enhanced X {sup 1}A{sub g} ↔ A{sup 1}B{sub 1u} absorption and fluorescence spectra of perylene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chen-Wen; Zhu, Chaoyuan Lin, Sheng-Hsien; Yang, Ling; Yu, Jian-Guo

    2014-08-28

    Damped harmonic oscillators are utilized to calculate Franck-Condon factors within displaced harmonic oscillator approximation. This is practically done by scaling unperturbed Hessian matrix that represents local modes of force constants for molecule in gaseous phase, and then by diagonalizing perturbed Hessian matrix it results in direct modification of Huang–Rhys factors which represent normal modes of solute molecule perturbed by solvent environment. Scaling parameters are empirically introduced for simulating absorption and fluorescence spectra of an isolated solute molecule in solution. The present method is especially useful for simulating vibronic spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules in which hydrogen atom vibrations in solution can be scaled equally, namely the same scaling factor being applied to all hydrogen atoms in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The present method is demonstrated in simulating solvent enhanced X {sup 1}A{sub g} ↔ A{sup 1}B{sub 1u} absorption and fluorescence spectra of perylene (medium-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) in benzene solution. It is found that one of six active normal modes v{sub 10} is actually responsible to the solvent enhancement of spectra observed in experiment. Simulations from all functionals (TD) B3LYP, (TD) B3LYP35, (TD) B3LYP50, and (TD) B3LYP100 draw the same conclusion. Hence, the present method is able to adequately reproduce experimental absorption and fluorescence spectra in both gas and solution phases.

  6. Harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.

    2012-12-01

    We show that the Schwabe frequency band of the Zurich sunspot record since 1749 is made of three major cycles that are closely related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (~9.93 year), to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (about 11.86 years) and to a central cycle that may be associated to a quasi-11-year solar dynamo cycle. The central harmonic is approximately synchronized to the average of the two planetary frequencies. A harmonic model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals major beat periods occurring at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. Equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic solar proxy records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene (last 12,000 years) up to now. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium such as the Oort, Wolf, Sporer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as the 17 115-year long oscillations found in a detailed temperature reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere covering the last 2000 years. The millennial three-frequency beat cycle hindcasts equivalent solar and climate cycles for 12,000 years. Finally, the harmonic model herein proposed reconstructs the prolonged solar minima around 1900-1920 and 1960-1980, the secular solar maxima around 1870-1890, 1940-1950 and 1995-2005, and a secular upward trending during the 20th century. The latter modulated trending agrees well with some solar proxy model, with the ACRIM TSI satellite composite and with the global surface temperature modulation since 1850. The model forecasts a new prolonged solar minimum during 2020-2045, which is produced by the minima of both the 61 and 115-year reconstructed cycles. Finally, the model predicts

  7. Solar Cycle Variations and Equatorial Oscillations: Modeling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Drob, D. P.; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar cycle activity effects (SCAE) in the lower and middle atmosphere, reported in several studies, are difficult to explain on the basis of the small changes in solar radiation that accompany the 11-year cycle, It is therefore natural to speculate that dynamical processes may come into play to produce a leverage. Such a leverage may be provided by the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) in the zonal circulation of the stratosphere, which has been linked to solar activity variations. Driven primarily by wave mean flow interaction, the QBO period and its amplitude are variable but are also strongly influenced by the seasonal cycle in the solar radiation. This influence extends to low altitudes referred to as "downward control". Relatively small changes in solar radiative forcing can produce small changes in the period and phase of the QBO, but this in turn can produce measurable differences in the wind field. Thus, the QBO may be an amplifier of solar activity variations and a natural conduit of these variations to lower altitudes. To test this hypothesis, we conducted experiments with a 2D (two-dimensional) version of our Numerical Spectral Model that incorporates Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization for small-scale gravity waves (GW). Solar cycle radiance variations (SCRV) are accounted for by changing the radiative heating rate on a logarithmic scale from 0.1 % at the surface to 1 % at 50 km to 10% at 100 km. With and without SCRV, but with the same GW flux, we then conduct numerical experiments to evaluate the magnitude of the SCAE in the zonal circulation. The numerical results indicate that, under certain conditions, the SCAE is significant and can extend to lower altitudes where the SCRV is inconsequential. At 20-km the differences in the modeled wind velocities are as large as 5 m/s. For a modeled QBO period of 30 months, we find that the seasonal cycle in the solar forcing (through the Semi-annual Oscillation (SAO)) acts as a strong pacemaker to lockup the

  8. Decay of oscillating universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mithani, Audrey Todhunter

    It has been suggested by Ellis et al that the universe could be eternal in the past, without beginning. In their model, the "emergent universe'' exists forever in the past, in an "eternal'' phase before inflation begins. We will show that in general, such an "eternal'' phase is not possible, because of an instability due to quantum tunneling. One candidate model, the "simple harmonic universe'' has been shown by Graham et al to be perturbatively stable; we find that it is unstable with respect to quantum tunneling. We also investigate the stability of a distinct oscillating model in loop quantum cosmology with respect to small perturbations and to quantum collapse. We find that the model has perturbatively stable and unstable solutions, with both types of solutions occupying significant regions of the parameter space. All solutions are unstable with respect to collapse by quantum tunneling to zero size. In addition, we investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and the Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. Finally, we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe. Although the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence in canonical quantum cosmology, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. Here, we apply this approach to the simple harmonic universe, by extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field φ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock''.

  9. A mechanical model to compute elastic modulus of tissues for harmonic motion imaging.

    PubMed

    Shan, Baoxiang; Pelegri, Assimina A; Maleke, Caroline; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2008-07-19

    Numerous experimental and computational methods have been developed to estimate tissue elasticity. The existing testing techniques are generally classified into in vitro, invasive in vivo and non-invasive in vivo. For each experimental method, a computational scheme is accordingly proposed to calculate mechanical properties of soft biological tissues. Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a new technique that performs radio frequency (RF) signal tracking to estimate the localized oscillatory motion resulting from a radiation force produced by focused ultrasound. A mechanical model and computational scheme based on the superposition principle are developed in this paper to estimate the Young's modulus of a tissue mimicking phantom and bovine liver in vitro tissue from the harmonic displacement measured by HMI. The simulation results are verified by two groups of measurement data, and good agreement is shown in each comparison. Furthermore, an inverse function is observed to correlate the elastic modulus of uniform phantoms with amplitude of displacement measured in HMI. The computational scheme is also implemented to estimate 3D elastic modulus of bovine liver in vitro.

  10. Harmonic motion microwave Doppler imaging: a simulation study using a simple breast model.

    PubMed

    Top, Can Bariş; Gençer, Nevzat G

    2014-02-01

    A hybrid method for tissue imaging using dielectric and elastic properties is proposed and investigated with simple bi-layered breast model. In this method, local harmonic motion is generated in the tissue using a focused ultrasound probe. A narrow-band microwave signal is transmitted to the tissue. The Doppler component of the scattered signal, which depends on the dielectric and elastic properties of the vibrating region, is sensed. A plane-wave spectrum technique is used together with reciprocity theorem for calculating the response of a vibrating electrically small spherical tumor in breast tissue. The effects of operating frequency, antenna alignment and distance, and tumor depth on the received signal are presented. The effect of harmonic motion frequency on the vibration amplitude and displacement distribution is investigated with mechanical simulations using the finite element method. The safety of the method is analyzed in terms of microwave and ultrasound exposure of the breast tissue. The results show that the method has a potential in detecting tumors inside fibro-glandular breast tissue.

  11. Synthesis of cervical tissue second harmonic generation images using Markov random field modeling.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, S; Kehtarnavaz, N; Gholipour, A

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical image modeling approach based on Markov random field to synthesize cervical tissue second harmonic generation (SHG) images. Binary images representing fiber and pore areas of the cervix tissue are first obtained from SHG images using an image processing pipeline consisting of noise removal, contrast enhancement and optimal thresholding. These binary images are modeled using a Markov random field whose parameters are estimated via the least squares method. The parameters are then used to synthesize fiber and pore areas of cervical tissue in the form of binary images. The effectiveness of the synthesis is demonstrated by reporting the classification outcome for two classes of cervical SHG images collected from mice at two different stages of normal pregnancy. The developed synthesis allows generation of realistic fiber and pore area binary images for cervical tissue studies.

  12. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry: Proposal of a harmonic solvation model

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Hiromi; Ishikawa, Atsushi

    2014-11-07

    We propose a novel quantum chemical method, called the harmonic solvation model (HSM), for calculating thermochemical parameters in the condensed phase, particularly in the liquid phase. The HSM represents translational and rotational motions of a solute as vibrations interacting with a cavity wall of solvent molecules. As examples, the HSM and the ideal-gas model (IGM) were used for the standard formation reaction of liquid water, combustion reactions of liquid formic acid, methanol, and ethanol, vapor–liquid equilibration of water and ethanol, and dissolution of gaseous CO{sub 2} in water. The numerical results confirmed the reliability and applicability of the HSM. In particular, the temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy of liquid molecules was accurately reproduced by the HSM; for example, the boiling point of water was reasonably determined using the HSM, whereas the conventional IGM treatment failed to obtain a crossing of the two Gibbs energy curves for gaseous and liquid water.

  13. The numerical modelling of a driven nonlinear oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Shew, C.

    1995-11-01

    The torsional oscillator in the Earth Sciences Division was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is the only one of its kind. It was developed to study the way rocks damp vibrations. Small rock samples are tested to determine the seismic properties of rocks, but unlike other traditional methods that propagate high frequency waves through small samples, this machine forces the sample to vibrate at low frequencies, which better models real-life properties of large masses. In this particular case, the rock sample is tested with a small crack in its middle. This forces the rock to twist against itself, causing a {open_quotes}stick-slip{close_quotes} friction, known as stiction. A numerical model that simulates the forced torsional osillations of the machine is currently being developed. The computer simulation implements the graphical language LabVIEW, and is looking at the nonlinear spring effects, the frictional forces, and the changes in amplitude and frequency of the forced vibration. Using LabVIEW allows for quick prototyping and greatly reduces the {open_quotes}time to product{close_quotes} factor. LabVIEW`s graphical environment allows scientists and engineers to use familiar terminology and icons (e.g. knobs, switches, graphs, etc.). Unlike other programming systems that use text-based languages, such as C and Basic, LabVIEW uses a graphical programming language to create programs in block diagram form.

  14. Dynamically Scaled Glottal Flow Through Symmetrically Oscillating Vocal Fold Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halvorson, Lori; Baitinger, Andrew; Sherman, Erica; Krane, Michael; Zhang, Lucy; Wei, Timothy

    2011-11-01

    Experimental results derived from DPIV measurements in a scaled up dynamic human vocal fold model are presented. The 10x scale vocal fold model is a new design that incorporates key features of vocal fold oscillatory motion. This includes coupling of down/upstream rocking as well as the oscillatory open/close motions. Experiments were dynamically scaled to examine a range of frequencies, 100 - 200 Hz, corresponding to the male and female voice. By using water as the working fluid, very high resolution, both spatial and temporal resolution, was achieved. Time resolved movies of flow through symmetrically oscillating vocal folds will be presented. Both individual realizations as well as phase-averaged data will be shown. Key features, such as randomness and development time of the Coanda effect, vortex shedding, and volume flow rate data will be shown. In this talk, effects associated with paralysis of one vocal fold will be discussed. This talk provides the baseline fluid dynamics for the vocal fold paralysis study presented in Sherman, et al. Supported by the NIH.

  15. Matter Effects on Neutrino Oscillations in Different Supernova Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Hu, Li-Jun; Li, Rui-Cheng; Guo, Xin-Heng; Young, Bing-Lin

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, with the development of simulations about supernova explosion, we have a better understanding about the density profiles and the shock waves in supernovae than before. There might be a reverse shock wave, another sudden change of density except the forward shock wave, or even no shock wave, emerging in the supernova. Instead of using the expression of the crossing probability at the high resonance, PH, we have studied the matter effects on neutrino oscillations in different supernova models. In detail, we have calculated the survival probability of ve (Ps) and the conversion probability of vx (Pc) in the Schrödinger equation within a simplified two-flavor framework for a certain case, in which the neutrino transfers through the supernova matter from an initial flavor eigenstate located at the core of the supernova. Our calculations was based on the data of density in three different supernova models obtained from simulations. In our work, we do not steepen the density gradient around the border of the shock wave, which differs to what was done in most of the other simulations. It is found that the mass and the density distribution of the supernova do make a difference on the behavior of Ps and Pc. With the results of Ps and Pc, we can estimate the number of ve (and vx) remained in the beam after they go through the matter in the supernova. Supported by National Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11175020 and 11275025

  16. Inclusion of Higher Order Harmonics in the Modeling of Optimal Low-Thrust Orbit Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kéchichian, Jean A.

    2008-03-01

    The higher fidelity modeling of minimum-time transfers using continuous constant acceleration low-thrust is depicted by including the higher zonal harmonics J 3 and J 4for the Earth gravity model. The inclusion of these higher order harmonics is of great benefit in carrying out accurate transfer simulations, especially for long duration flights dwelling in low altitudes where the effects of these zonals are greatest. The analysis presented here can also be coded in the flight guidance computer of spacecraft for autonomous operations and on ground computers for solution uploads and resetting during low-thrust transfers. Equinoctial elements are used to avoid singularities when orbits are circular or equatorial and the applicability of the theory is of a general nature regardless of the size, shape and spatial orientation of the orbits provided they are not of the parabolic or hyperbolic types. To this end, two sets of dynamic and adjoint differential equations in terms of nonsingular orbital elements are derived by further considering a more accurate perturbation model in the form of the higher order Earth zonal harmonics J 3and J 4. Previous analyses involved only the first-order J 2 term in order to model optimal lowthrust transfers between any two given circular or elliptic orbits. The first formulation uses the eccentric longitude as the sixth element of an equinoctial set of elements while describing the thrust as well as the zonal accelerations in the so called direct equinoctial frame. The second formulation makes use of the true longitude as the sixth element instead while resolving the thrust and the zonal accelerations in the rotating Euler-Hill frame simplifying considerably the algebraic derivations leading to the generation of the nonsingular differential equations that are also free of any singularity for the important zero eccentricity and zero inclination cases often encountered in Earth orbit transfer problems. The derivations of both nonsingular

  17. A Review of Flood Loss Models as Basis for Harmonization and Benchmarking

    PubMed Central

    Kreibich, Heidi; Franco, Guillermo; Marechal, David

    2016-01-01

    presents an approach for a quantitative comparison of disparate models via the reduction to the joint input variables of all models. Harmonization of models for benchmarking and comparison requires profound insight into the model structures, mechanisms and underlying assumptions. Possibilities and challenges are discussed that exist in model harmonization and the application of the inventory in a benchmarking framework. PMID:27454604

  18. A Review of Flood Loss Models as Basis for Harmonization and Benchmarking.

    PubMed

    Gerl, Tina; Kreibich, Heidi; Franco, Guillermo; Marechal, David; Schröter, Kai

    2016-01-01

    an approach for a quantitative comparison of disparate models via the reduction to the joint input variables of all models. Harmonization of models for benchmarking and comparison requires profound insight into the model structures, mechanisms and underlying assumptions. Possibilities and challenges are discussed that exist in model harmonization and the application of the inventory in a benchmarking framework. PMID:27454604

  19. A harmonic transition state theory model for defect initiation in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, T. J.; Cao, P.; Park, H. S.; Zimmerman, J. A.

    2013-03-01

    We outline here a model for the initiation of defects in crystals based upon harmonic transition state theory (hTST). This model combines a previously developed model for zero-temperature defect initiation with a multi-dimensional hTST model that is capable of accurately predicting the effects of temperature and loading rate upon defect initiation. The model has several features that set it apart from previous efforts along these lines, most notably a straightforward method of determining the energy barrier between adjacent equilibrium states that does not depend upon a priori information concerning the nature of the defect. We apply the model to two examples, triaxial stretching of a perfect fcc crystal and nanoindentation of a gold substrate. Very good agreement is found between the predictions of the model and independent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Among other things, the model predicts a strong dependence of the defect initiation behavior upon the loading parameter. A very attractive feature of this model is that it is valid for arbitrarily slow loading rates, in particular loading rates achievable in the laboratory, and suffers from none of the limitations in this regard inherent in MD simulations.

  20. Three-layer model for the surface second-harmonic generation yield including multiple reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Sean M.; Mendoza, Bernardo S.

    2016-09-01

    We present the three-layer model to calculate the surface second-harmonic generation (SSHG) yield. This model considers that the surface is represented by three regions or layers. The first layer is the vacuum region with a dielectric function ɛv(ω ) =1 from where the fundamental electric field impinges on the material. The second layer is a thin layer (ℓ ) of thickness d characterized by a dielectric function ɛℓ(ω ) , and it is in this layer where the SSHG takes place. The third layer is the bulk region denoted by b and characterized by ɛb(ω ) . Both the vacuum and bulk layers are semi-infinite. The model includes the multiple reflections of both the fundamental and the second-harmonic (SH) fields that take place at the thin layer ℓ . We obtain explicit expressions for the SSHG yield for the commonly used s and p polarizations of the incoming 1 ω and outgoing 2 ω electric fields, where no assumptions for the symmetry of the surface are made. These symmetry assumptions ultimately determine which components of the surface nonlinear second-order susceptibility tensor χ (-2 ω ;ω ,ω ) are different from zero, and thus contribute to the SSHG yield. Then, we particularize the results for the most commonly investigated surfaces, the (001), (110), and (111) crystallographic faces, taking their symmetries into account. We use the three-layer model and compare it against the experimental results of a Si(111)(1 ×1 ):H surface, as a test case, and use it to predict the SSHG yield of a Si(001)(2 ×1 ) surface.

  1. Generative Models of Cortical Oscillations: Neurobiological Implications of the Kuramoto Model

    PubMed Central

    Breakspear, Michael; Heitmann, Stewart; Daffertshofer, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms governing fluctuating oscillations in large-scale cortical circuits is a crucial prelude to a proper knowledge of their role in both adaptive and pathological cortical processes. Neuroscience research in this area has much to gain from understanding the Kuramoto model, a mathematical model that speaks to the very nature of coupled oscillating processes, and which has elucidated the core mechanisms of a range of biological and physical phenomena. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to the Kuramoto model in its original, rather abstract, form and then focus on modifications that increase its neurobiological plausibility by incorporating topological properties of local cortical connectivity. The extended model elicits elaborate spatial patterns of synchronous oscillations that exhibit persistent dynamical instabilities reminiscent of cortical activity. We review how the Kuramoto model may be recast from an ordinary differential equation to a population level description using the nonlinear Fokker–Planck equation. We argue that such formulations are able to provide a mechanistic and unifying explanation of oscillatory phenomena in the human cortex, such as fluctuating beta oscillations, and their relationship to basic computational processes including multistability, criticality, and information capacity. PMID:21151358

  2. Noisy predator-prey model explains oscillation patterns in sockeye salmon data.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christoph K; Wildner, Christian; Drossel, Barbara

    2016-01-21

    A model of sockeye salmon population dynamics that incorporates predator-prey dynamics in the nursery lakes, salmon migration and stochastic effects is compared to Fraser River sockeye salmon spawner numbers with respect to cyclic dominance. For this comparison we use a method developed by White et al. (2014) to calculate measures for the consistency and strength of cyclic dominance in the time series using its wavelet transform. We find that the model can match the oscillation patterns found in nature, both for persistently oscillating populations and for intermittent oscillations. It matches persistently oscillating populations much better than a model that does not incorporate predator-prey interaction. Persistent oscillations are more likely to occur in the model if the growth conditions for the sockeye fry are good and the coupling to the predator is strong. PMID:26551158

  3. Noisy predator-prey model explains oscillation patterns in sockeye salmon data.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christoph K; Wildner, Christian; Drossel, Barbara

    2016-01-21

    A model of sockeye salmon population dynamics that incorporates predator-prey dynamics in the nursery lakes, salmon migration and stochastic effects is compared to Fraser River sockeye salmon spawner numbers with respect to cyclic dominance. For this comparison we use a method developed by White et al. (2014) to calculate measures for the consistency and strength of cyclic dominance in the time series using its wavelet transform. We find that the model can match the oscillation patterns found in nature, both for persistently oscillating populations and for intermittent oscillations. It matches persistently oscillating populations much better than a model that does not incorporate predator-prey interaction. Persistent oscillations are more likely to occur in the model if the growth conditions for the sockeye fry are good and the coupling to the predator is strong.

  4. Human brain networks function in connectome-specific harmonic waves.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, Selen; Donnelly, Isaac; Pearson, Joel

    2016-01-21

    A key characteristic of human brain activity is coherent, spatially distributed oscillations forming behaviour-dependent brain networks. However, a fundamental principle underlying these networks remains unknown. Here we report that functional networks of the human brain are predicted by harmonic patterns, ubiquitous throughout nature, steered by the anatomy of the human cerebral cortex, the human connectome. We introduce a new technique extending the Fourier basis to the human connectome. In this new frequency-specific representation of cortical activity, that we call 'connectome harmonics', oscillatory networks of the human brain at rest match harmonic wave patterns of certain frequencies. We demonstrate a neural mechanism behind the self-organization of connectome harmonics with a continuous neural field model of excitatory-inhibitory interactions on the connectome. Remarkably, the critical relation between the neural field patterns and the delicate excitation-inhibition balance fits the neurophysiological changes observed during the loss and recovery of consciousness.

  5. Human brain networks function in connectome-specific harmonic waves

    PubMed Central

    Atasoy, Selen; Donnelly, Isaac; Pearson, Joel

    2016-01-01

    A key characteristic of human brain activity is coherent, spatially distributed oscillations forming behaviour-dependent brain networks. However, a fundamental principle underlying these networks remains unknown. Here we report that functional networks of the human brain are predicted by harmonic patterns, ubiquitous throughout nature, steered by the anatomy of the human cerebral cortex, the human connectome. We introduce a new technique extending the Fourier basis to the human connectome. In this new frequency-specific representation of cortical activity, that we call ‘connectome harmonics', oscillatory networks of the human brain at rest match harmonic wave patterns of certain frequencies. We demonstrate a neural mechanism behind the self-organization of connectome harmonics with a continuous neural field model of excitatory–inhibitory interactions on the connectome. Remarkably, the critical relation between the neural field patterns and the delicate excitation–inhibition balance fits the neurophysiological changes observed during the loss and recovery of consciousness. PMID:26792267

  6. Deep-UV 236.5  nm laser by fourth-harmonic generation of a single-crystal fiber Nd:YAG oscillator.

    PubMed

    Deyra, Loïc; Martial, Igor; Didierjean, Julien; Balembois, François; Georges, Patrick

    2014-04-15

    We demonstrate a deep-UV laser at 236.5 nm based on extracavity fourth-harmonic generation of a Q-switched Nd:YAG single-crystal fiber laser at 946 nm. We first compare two nonlinear crystals available for second-harmonic generation: LBO and BiBO. The best results at 473 nm are obtained with a BiBO crystal, with an average output power of 3.4 W at 20 kHz, corresponding to a second-harmonic generation efficiency of 38%. This blue laser is frequency-converted to 236.5 nm in a BBO crystal with an overall fourth-harmonic generation yield of 6.5%, corresponding to an average output power of 600 mW at 20 kHz. This represents an order of magnitude increase in average power and energy compared to previously reported pulsed lasers at 236.5 nm. This work opens the possibility of LIDAR detection of dangerous compounds for military or civilian applications.

  7. Bayesian population analysis of a harmonized physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of trichloroethylene and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Hack, C Eric; Chiu, Weihsueh A; Jay Zhao, Q; Clewell, Harvey J

    2006-10-01

    Bayesian population analysis of a harmonized physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for trichloroethylene (TCE) and its metabolites was performed. In the Bayesian framework, prior information about the PBPK model parameters is updated using experimental kinetic data to obtain posterior parameter estimates. Experimental kinetic data measured in mice, rats, and humans were available for this analysis, and the resulting posterior model predictions were in better agreement with the kinetic data than prior model predictions. Uncertainty in the prediction of the kinetics of TCE, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and trichloroethanol (TCOH) was reduced, while the kinetics of other key metabolites dichloroacetic acid (DCA), chloral hydrate (CHL), and dichlorovinyl mercaptan (DCVSH) remain relatively uncertain due to sparse kinetic data for use in this analysis. To help focus future research to further reduce uncertainty in model predictions, a sensitivity analysis was conducted to help identify the parameters that have the greatest impact on various internal dose metric predictions. For application to a risk assessment for TCE, the model provides accurate estimates of TCE, TCA, and TCOH kinetics. This analysis provides an important step toward estimating uncertainty of dose-response relationships in noncancer and cancer risk assessment, improving the extrapolation of toxic TCE doses from experimental animals to humans.

  8. An alternative approach to exact wave functions for time-dependent coupled oscillator model of charged particle in variable magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Menouar, Salah; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2010-08-15

    The quantum states of time-dependent coupled oscillator model for charged particles subjected to variable magnetic field are investigated using the invariant operator methods. To do this, we have taken advantage of an alternative method, so-called unitary transformation approach, available in the framework of quantum mechanics, as well as a generalized canonical transformation method in the classical regime. The transformed quantum Hamiltonian is obtained using suitable unitary operators and is represented in terms of two independent harmonic oscillators which have the same frequencies as that of the classically transformed one. Starting from the wave functions in the transformed system, we have derived the full wave functions in the original system with the help of the unitary operators. One can easily take a complete description of how the charged particle behaves under the given Hamiltonian by taking advantage of these analytical wave functions.

  9. The extratropical 40-day oscillation in the UCLA general circulation model. Part 1: Atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, S. L.; Ghil, M.; Dickey, J. O.

    1994-01-01

    Variations in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) are examined in a three-year simulation of the large-scale atmosphere with perpetual January forcing. The simulation is performed with a version of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) general circulation model that contains no tropical Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). In addition, the results of three shorter experiments with no topography are analyzed. The three-year standard topography run contains no significant intraseasonal AAM periodicity in the tropics, consistent with the lack of the MJO, but produces a robust, 42-day AAM oscillation in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) extratropics. The model tropics undergoes a barotropic, zonally symmetric oscillation, driven by an exchange of mass with the NH extratropics. No intraseasonal periodicity is found in the average tropical latent heating field, indicating that the model oscillation is dynamically rather than thermodynamically driven. The no-mountain runs fail to produce an intraseasonal AAM oscillation, consistent with a topographic origin for the NH extratropical oscillation in the standard model. The spatial patterns of the oscillation in the 500-mb height field, and the relationship of the extratropical oscillation to intraseasonal variations in the tropics, will be discussed in Part 2 of this study.

  10. The stratopause semiannual oscillation in the NCAR Community Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassi, Fabrizio; Garcia, Roland R.; Boville, Byron A.

    1993-01-01

    The middle atmospheric version of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2) has been used to study the development of the equatorial semiannual oscillation (SAO) in the stratosphere. The model domain extends from the ground to about 80 km, with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Transport of nitrous oxide (N2O) with simplified photochemistry is included in the calculation to illustrate the influence of tropical circulations on the distribution of trace species. Diagnosis of model output reveals two distinct phases in the evolution of the zonal mean state on the equator. In early December, a strong and broad easterly jet appears near the stratopause in connection with a midlatitude wave event (sudden stratospheric warming) that reverses the winter westerlies of the Northern Hemisphere throughout the upper stratosphere. When the wave forcing dies out, the radiative drive allows the westerlies to recover at midlatitudes, while easterlies persist in the tropics. The resulting strong meridional gradient of the zonal mean wind provides favorable conditions for the development of inertial instability at lower latitudes. The meridional circulation associated with the instability shapes the 'nose' of the easterly jet, reducing the extension of the unstable region. In equinoctial conditions, a jet of westerlies appears in the lower equatorial mesosphere and descends to lower altitudes; positive accelerations associated with the descending westerlies are due primarily to Kelvin waves. The descent of the westerly jet does not reproduce well the observed behavior of the SAO westerly phase, either in amplitude or in the extent of downward propagation. As a consequence, the model does not simulate the 'double peak' observed in the tropical distribution of N2O. Comparison of wave amplitudes in the model with those derived from satellite observations shows that the calculated amplitudes are larger than observed in the upper stratosphere. It follows that inadequate Kelvin wave forcing is

  11. Modeling helicopter near-horizon harmonic noise due to transient maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickenberger, Richard D.

    A new first principles model has been developed to estimate the external harmonic noise radiation for a helicopter performing transient maneuvers in the longitudinal plane. This model, which simulates the longitudinal fuselage dynamics, main rotor blade flapping, and far field acoustics, was validated using in-flight measurements and recordings from ground microphones during a full-scale flight test featuring a Bell 206B-3 helicopter. The flight test was specifically designed to study transient maneuvers. The validated model demonstrated that the flapping of the main rotor blades does not significantly affect the acoustics radiated by the helicopter during maneuvering flight. Furthermore, the model also demonstrated that Quasi-Static Acoustic Mapping (Q-SAM) methods can be used to reliably predict the noise radiated during transient maneuvers. The model was also used to identify and quantify the contributions of main rotor thickness noise, low frequency loading noise, and blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise during maneuvering flight for the Bell 206B-3 helicopter. Pull-up and push-over maneuvers from pure longitudinal cyclic and pure collective control inputs were investigated. The contribution of thickness noise and low frequency loading noise during maneuvering flight was found to depend on the orientation of the tip-path plane relative to the observer. The contribution of impulsive BVI noise during maneuvering flight was found to depend on the inflow through the main rotor and the orientation of the tip-path plane relative to the observer.

  12. Local harmonic motion monitoring of focused ultrasound surgery--a simulation model.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Janne; Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a computational model for localized harmonic motion (LHM) imaging-based monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is presented. The LHM technique is based on a focused, time-varying ultrasound radiation force excitation, which induces local oscillatory motions at the focal region. These vibrations are tracked, using pulse-echo imaging, and then, used to estimate the mechanical properties of the sonication region. LHM is feasible for FUS monitoring because changes in the material properties during the coagulation process affect the measured displacements. The presented model includes separate models to simulate acoustic sonication fields, sonication-induced temperature elevation and mechanical motion, and pulse-echo imaging of the induced motions. These 3-D simulation models are based on Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral, finite element, and spatial impulse response methods. Simulated-tissue temperature elevation and mechanical motion were compared with previously published in vivo measurements. Finally, the simulation model was used to simulate coagulation and LHM monitoring, as would occur with multiple, neighbouring sonication locations covering a large tumor.

  13. Modeling the lateral pedestrian force on a rigid floor by a self-sustained oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlicher, Silvano; Trovato, Andrea; Argoul, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    The main goal of this paper is the definition of a nonlinear single-degree-of-freedom oscillator able to accurately predict the lateral walking force of a pedestrian. The force exerted on the floor corresponds to its restoring force. The rigid floor case is analyzed, leading to an autonomous oscillator. Even though such an oscillator is a simplified representation of the human body, it should be able to reproduce two experimentally observed phenomena: (i) the time-history of lateral force is an approximately periodic signal; (ii) the walking motion is self-sustained, in the sense that the pedestrian/oscillator produces by itself the energy needed to sustain its motion. This implies that such an oscillator must be self-sustained. In addition, the self-sustained character entails that the autonomous oscillation has a natural amplitude and frequency, representing the natural walking amplitude and frequency of the pedestrian. An original model is proposed by modifying the so-called hybrid Van der Pol/Rayleigh oscillator, already used for applications in the field of robotics. A dynamic analysis of this oscillator is then performed through an energetic approach and a perturbation technique in order to get the stable limit cycle. The model parameters are finally identified from the experimental force signals, resulting from a test campaign on a population of 12 pedestrians: the agreement between model and experimental results is very good.

  14. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  15. Exact Solutions of Schrödinger Equation with Improved Ring-Shaped Non-Spherical Harmonic Oscillator and Coulomb Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndem Ikot, Akpan; Akpan, Ita O.; Abbey, T. M.; Hassanabadi, Hassan

    2016-05-01

    We propose improved ring shaped like potential of the form, V(r, θ) = V(r) + (ħ2/2Mr2)[(β sin2 θ + γ cos2 θ + λ) / sin θ cos θ]2 and its exact solutions are presented via the Nikiforov–Uvarov method. The angle dependent part V(θ) = (ħ2 / 2 Mr2)[(β sin2 θ + γ cos2 θ + λ) / sin θ cos θ]2, which is reported for the first time embodied the novel angle dependent (NAD) potential and harmonic novel angle dependent potential (HNAD) as special cases. We discuss in detail the effects of the improved ring shaped like potential on the radial parts of the spherical harmonic and Coulomb potentials.

  16. Model-driven harmonic parameterization of the cortical surface: HIP-HOP.

    PubMed

    Auzias, G; Lefèvre, J; Le Troter, A; Fischer, C; Perrot, M; Régis, J; Coulon, O

    2013-05-01

    In the context of inter subject brain surface matching, we present a parameterization of the cortical surface constrained by a model of cortical organization. The parameterization is defined via an harmonic mapping of each hemisphere surface to a rectangular planar domain that integrates a representation of the model. As opposed to previous landmark-based registration methods we do not match folds between individuals but instead optimize the fit between cortical sulci and specific iso-coordinate axis in the model. This strategy overcomes some limitation to sulcus-based registration techniques such as topological variability in sulcal landmarks across subjects. Experiments on 62 subjects with manually traced sulci are presented and compared with the result of the Freesurfer software. The evaluation involves a measure of dispersion of sulci with both angular and area distortions. We show that the model-based strategy can lead to a natural, efficient and very fast (less than 5 min per hemisphere) method for defining inter subjects correspondences. We discuss how this approach also reduces the problems inherent to anatomically defined landmarks and open the way to the investigation of cortical organization through the notion of orientation and alignment of structures across the cortex. PMID:23358957

  17. Model-driven harmonic parameterization of the cortical surface: HIP-HOP.

    PubMed

    Auzias, G; Lefèvre, J; Le Troter, A; Fischer, C; Perrot, M; Régis, J; Coulon, O

    2013-05-01

    In the context of inter subject brain surface matching, we present a parameterization of the cortical surface constrained by a model of cortical organization. The parameterization is defined via an harmonic mapping of each hemisphere surface to a rectangular planar domain that integrates a representation of the model. As opposed to previous landmark-based registration methods we do not match folds between individuals but instead optimize the fit between cortical sulci and specific iso-coordinate axis in the model. This strategy overcomes some limitation to sulcus-based registration techniques such as topological variability in sulcal landmarks across subjects. Experiments on 62 subjects with manually traced sulci are presented and compared with the result of the Freesurfer software. The evaluation involves a measure of dispersion of sulci with both angular and area distortions. We show that the model-based strategy can lead to a natural, efficient and very fast (less than 5 min per hemisphere) method for defining inter subjects correspondences. We discuss how this approach also reduces the problems inherent to anatomically defined landmarks and open the way to the investigation of cortical organization through the notion of orientation and alignment of structures across the cortex.

  18. Distributed parameter model and experimental validation of a compressive-mode energy harvester under harmonic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. T.; Yang, Z.; Zu, J.; Qin, W. Y.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the modeling and parametric analysis of the recently proposed nonlinear compressive-mode energy harvester (HC-PEH) under harmonic excitation. Both theoretical and experimental investigations are performed in this study over a range of excitation frequencies. Specially, a distributed parameter electro-elastic model is analytically developed by means of the energy-based method and the extended Hamilton's principle. An analytical formulation of bending and stretching forces are derived to gain insight on the source of nonlinearity. Furthermore, the analytical model is validated against with experimental data and a good agreement is achieved. Both numerical simulations and experiment illustrate that the harvester exhibits a hardening nonlinearity and hence a broad frequency bandwidth, multiple coexisting solutions and a large-amplitude voltage response. Using the derived model, a parametric study is carried out to examine the effect of various parameters on the harvester voltage response. It is also shown from parametric analysis that the harvester's performance can be further improved by selecting the proper length of elastic beams, proof mass and reducing the mechanical damping.

  19. Multi-scale harmonic model for solar and climate cyclical variation throughout the Holocene based on Jupiter-Saturn tidal frequencies plus the 11-year solar dynamo cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2012-05-01

    The Schwabe frequency band of the Zurich sunspot record since 1749 is found to be made of three major cycles with periods of about 9.98, 10.9 and 11.86 years. The side frequencies appear to be closely related to the spring tidal period of Jupiter and Saturn (range between 9.5 and 10.5 years, and median 9.93 years) and to the tidal sidereal period of Jupiter (about 11.86 years). The central cycle may be associated to a quasi-11-year solar dynamo cycle that appears to be approximately synchronized to the average of the two planetary frequencies. A simplified harmonic constituent model based on the above two planetary tidal frequencies and on the exact dates of Jupiter and Saturn planetary tidal phases, plus a theoretically deduced 10.87-year central cycle reveals complex quasi-periodic interference/beat patterns. The major beat periods occur at about 115, 61 and 130 years, plus a quasi-millennial large beat cycle around 983 years. We show that equivalent synchronized cycles are found in cosmogenic records used to reconstruct solar activity and in proxy climate records throughout the Holocene (last 12,000 years) up to now. The quasi-secular beat oscillations hindcast reasonably well the known prolonged periods of low solar activity during the last millennium such as the Oort, Wolf, Spörer, Maunder and Dalton minima, as well as the 17 115-year long oscillations found in a detailed temperature reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere covering the last 2000 years. The millennial three-frequency beat cycle hindcasts equivalent solar and climate cycles for 12,000 years. Finally, the harmonic model herein proposed reconstructs the prolonged solar minima that occurred during 1900-1920 and 1960-1980 and the secular solar maxima around 1870-1890, 1940-1950 and 1995-2005 and a secular upward trending during the 20th century: this modulated trending agrees well with some solar proxy model, with the ACRIM TSI satellite composite and with the global surface temperature

  20. Investigating Magnetic Oscillations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brueningsen, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    Studies magnetic oscillation using an air track. Ceramic magnets are attached to the cart and also are used as dampeners in place of the springs. The resulting oscillations are fairly sinusoidal and is a good example of simple harmonic motion. (MVL)

  1. Modeling of Soft Poroelastic Tissue in Time-Harmonic MR Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Perriñez, Phillip R.; Kennedy, Francis E.; Van Houten, Elijah E. W.; Weaver, John B.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    Elastography is an emerging imaging technique that focuses on assessing the resistance to deformation of soft biological tissues in vivo. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) uses measured displacement fields resulting from low-amplitude, low-frequency (10 Hz–1 kHz) time-harmonic vibration to recover images of the elastic property distribution of tissues including breast, liver, muscle, prostate, and brain. While many soft tissues display complex time-dependent behavior not described by linear elasticity, the models most commonly employed in MRE parameter reconstructions are based on elastic assumptions. Further, elasticity models fail to include the interstitial fluid phase present in vivo. Alternative continuum models, such as consolidation theory, are able to represent tissue and other materials comprising two distinct phases, generally consisting of a porous elastic solid and penetrating fluid. MRE reconstructions of simulated elastic and poroelastic phantoms were performed to investigate the limitations of current-elasticity-based methods in producing accurate elastic parameter estimates in poroelastic media. The results indicate that linearly elastic reconstructions of fluid-saturated porous media at amplitudes and frequencies relevant to steady-state MRE can yield misleading effective property distributions resulting from the complex interaction between their solid and fluid phases. PMID:19272864

  2. Application of the spherical harmonic gravity model in high precision inertial navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Gongliu; Li, Xiangyun; Zhou, Xiao

    2016-09-01

    The spherical harmonic gravity model (SHM) may, in general, be considered as a suitable alternative to the normal gravity model (NGM), because it represents the Earth’s gravitational field more accurately. However, the high-resolution SHM has never been used in current inertial navigation systems (INSs) due to its extremely complex expression. In this paper, the feasibility and accuracy of a truncated SHM are discussed for application in a real-time free-INS with a precision demand better than 0.8 nm h‑1. In particular, the time and space complexity are analyzed mathematically to verify the feasibility of the SHM. Also, a test on a typical navigation computer shows a storable range of cut-off degrees. To further evaluate the appropriate degree and accuracy of the truncated SHM, analyses of covariance and truncation error are proposed. Finally, a SHM of degree 12 is demonstrated to be the appropriate model for routine INSs in the precision range of 0.4–0.75 nm h‑1. Flight simulations and road tests show its outstanding performance over the traditional NGM.

  3. Application of the spherical harmonic gravity model in high precision inertial navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Gongliu; Li, Xiangyun; Zhou, Xiao

    2016-09-01

    The spherical harmonic gravity model (SHM) may, in general, be considered as a suitable alternative to the normal gravity model (NGM), because it represents the Earth’s gravitational field more accurately. However, the high-resolution SHM has never been used in current inertial navigation systems (INSs) due to its extremely complex expression. In this paper, the feasibility and accuracy of a truncated SHM are discussed for application in a real-time free-INS with a precision demand better than 0.8 nm h-1. In particular, the time and space complexity are analyzed mathematically to verify the feasibility of the SHM. Also, a test on a typical navigation computer shows a storable range of cut-off degrees. To further evaluate the appropriate degree and accuracy of the truncated SHM, analyses of covariance and truncation error are proposed. Finally, a SHM of degree 12 is demonstrated to be the appropriate model for routine INSs in the precision range of 0.4-0.75 nm h-1. Flight simulations and road tests show its outstanding performance over the traditional NGM.

  4. Neutrino Oscillations, the Higgs Boson, and the Private Higgs Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BenTov, Jonathan

    "CESR, PEP, PETRA, ISABELLE, p-bar p colliders, LEP, the tevatron, and ep machines are at various levels of design or construction. They will study the properties of b-matter, see weak intermediaries, and perhaps find the t-quark and the Higgs boson. Never before was there such a bestiary waiting to be discovered; and what surprises will be found!" - S. L. Glashow ("The Future of Elementary Particle Physics," Quarks and Leptons, NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series Volume 61, 1980, pp 687-713) The situation in 1980 was clearly different from the present situation in 2013, in which we face the very real possibilty that no new degrees of freedom will ever again be within reach of a collider. In an intriguing twist of fate, this very fact results in a sharp paradox for fundamental physics: the Higgs mass should be MP/m h ˜ 1017 times larger than it actually is, and the vacuum energy density of the universe should be (M P/A)4 ˜ (1031)4 times larger than it actually is, and apparently nature refuses to give us any more clues as to why. These together are what I would call the main problem of 21st century physics: despite all of the predictive success of particle physics so far, we must find a way to suitably modify the rules of quantum field theory, lest we accept the unproductive defeatist attitude that our universe is simply fine-tuned. In the meantime, there is much interesting work to be done in more "traditional" particle physics: we have learned that neutrinos actually have tiny but nonzero masses, which is clear and unambiguous evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. I will allocate the first third of this document to phenomena related to neutrino oscillations. In particular, I would like to argue that some of the apparent differences between neutrino mixing and quark mixing are to an extent illusory, and actually many aspects of the two sectors can be understood in a coherent framework for extending the Standard Model. The remaining two-thirds of this

  5. Computational Models Describing Possible Mechanisms for Generation of Excessive Beta Oscillations in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pavlides, Alex; Hogan, S. John; Bogacz, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    In Parkinson’s disease, an increase in beta oscillations within the basal ganglia nuclei has been shown to be associated with difficulty in movement initiation. An important role in the generation of these oscillations is thought to be played by the motor cortex and by a network composed of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the external segment of globus pallidus (GPe). Several alternative models have been proposed to describe the mechanisms for generation of the Parkinsonian beta oscillations. However, a recent experimental study of Tachibana and colleagues yielded results which are challenging for all published computational models of beta generation. That study investigated how the presence of beta oscillations in a primate model of Parkinson’s disease is affected by blocking different connections of the STN-GPe circuit. Due to a large number of experimental conditions, the study provides strong constraints that any mechanistic model of beta generation should satisfy. In this paper we present two models consistent with the data of Tachibana et al. The first model assumes that Parkinsonian beta oscillation are generated in the cortex and the STN-GPe circuits resonates at this frequency. The second model additionally assumes that the feedback from STN-GPe circuit to cortex is important for maintaining the oscillations in the network. Predictions are made about experimental evidence that is required to differentiate between the two models, both of which are able to reproduce firing rates, oscillation frequency and effects of lesions carried out by Tachibana and colleagues. Furthermore, an analysis of the models reveals how the amplitude and frequency of the generated oscillations depend on parameters. PMID:26683341

  6. Source Processes Revealed at Two Guatemalan Volcanoes: Insights from Multidisciplinary Observations of Harmonic Tremor and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, K. A.; Waite, G. P.

    2012-12-01

    Tremor signals at volcanoes are typically attributed to fluid movement within the system. Characteristics of harmonic tremor (i.e. duration, frequency content, polarization) can convey detailed information about source processes from which they emanate, but decoding these signals poses great challenges due to the complexity of volcanic environments. We recorded instances of harmonic tremor at both Santiaguito and Fuego volcanoes Guatemala, Central America. The instances of harmonic tremor occur both independent from and contemporaneous with explosions, and last anywhere from 30 seconds to tens of minutes. The signals have fundamental frequencies between 0.3 and 2.5 Hz, with as many as 20 overtones, and exhibit spectral gliding of up to 0.75 Hz over the course of an event, changing as quickly as 0.1 Hz/second. Field observations; video recordings; and time-lapse, ultraviolet, and thermal imagery; collected simultaneously with acoustic and seismic recordings allow us to constrain source locations and processes beyond what would otherwise be possible just acoustic and seismic recordings. We propose that the harmonic tremor signals are generated by nonlinear excitation of fracture walls as gas vents out of the systems. Additionally, we investigate the complex wavefield generated by harmonic tremor and the heterogeneous volcanic media. Particle motions at both volcanoes are typically elliptical, but vary dramatically over time as the fundamental frequency glides up and down (see figure). In addition, the particle motions of harmonics often have different polarities from each other and the fundamental frequency. Through finite difference modeling, we isolate the effects of near-field terms, topography, and source mechanism to explore each of these factors' contribution to the unexpected behavior.

  7. Pulse-transmission Oscillators: Autonomous Boolean Models and the Yeast Cell Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevim, Volkan; Gong, Xinwei; Socolar, Joshua

    2010-03-01

    Models of oscillatory gene expression typically involve a constitutively expressed or positively autoregulated gene which is repressed by a negative feedback loop. In Boolean representations of such systems, which include the repressilator and relaxation oscillators, dynamical stability stems from the impossibility of satisfying all of the Boolean rules at once. We consider a different class of networks, in which oscillations are due to the transmission of a pulse of gene activation around a ring. Using autonomous Boolean modeling methods, we show how the circulating pulse can be stabilized by decoration of the ring with certain feedback and feed-forward motifs. We then discuss the relation of these models to ODE models of transcriptional networks, emphasizing the role of explicit time delays. Finally, we show that a network recently proposed as a generator of cell cycle oscillations in yeast contains the motifs required to support stable transmission oscillations.

  8. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, John C.; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A.; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number. PMID:21461402

  9. A flux-controlled model of meminductor and its application in chaotic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guang-Yi; Jin, Pei-Pei; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Shen, Yi-Ran; Yuan, Fang; Wang, Xiao-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    A meminductor is a new type of memory device developed from the memristor. We present a mathematical model of a flux-controlled meminductor and its equivalent circuit model for exploring the properties of the meminductor in a nonlinear circuit. We explore the response characteristics of the meminductor under the exciting signals of sinusoidal, square, and triangular waves by using theoretical analysis and experimental tests, and design a meminductor-based oscillator based on the model. Theoretical analysis and experiments show that the meminductor-based oscillator possesses complex bifurcation behaviors and can generate periodic and chaotic oscillations. A special phenomenon called the co-existent oscillation that can generate multiple oscillations (such as chaotic, periodic oscillations as well as stable equilibrium) with the same parameters and different initial conditions occurs. We also design an analog circuit to realize the meminductor-based oscillator, and the circuit experiment results are in accordance with the theory analysis. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61271064, 61401134, and 60971046), the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant Nos. LZ12F01001 and LQ14F010008), and the Program for Zhejiang Leading Team of S&T Innovation, China (Grant No. 2010R50010).

  10. A flux-controlled model of meminductor and its application in chaotic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guang-Yi; Jin, Pei-Pei; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Shen, Yi-Ran; Yuan, Fang; Wang, Xiao-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    A meminductor is a new type of memory device developed from the memristor. We present a mathematical model of a flux-controlled meminductor and its equivalent circuit model for exploring the properties of the meminductor in a nonlinear circuit. We explore the response characteristics of the meminductor under the exciting signals of sinusoidal, square, and triangular waves by using theoretical analysis and experimental tests, and design a meminductor-based oscillator based on the model. Theoretical analysis and experiments show that the meminductor-based oscillator possesses complex bifurcation behaviors and can generate periodic and chaotic oscillations. A special phenomenon called the co-existent oscillation that can generate multiple oscillations (such as chaotic, periodic oscillations as well as stable equilibrium) with the same parameters and different initial conditions occurs. We also design an analog circuit to realize the meminductor-based oscillator, and the circuit experiment results are in accordance with the theory analysis. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61271064, 61401134, and 60971046), the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant Nos. LZ12F01001 and LQ14F010008), and the Program for Zhejiang Leading Team of S&T Innovation, China (Grant No. 2010R50010).

  11. Fluctuations in a coupled-oscillator model of the cardiovascular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Jorge A.; Suárez-Vargas, Jose J.; Stefanovska, Aneta; McClintock, Peter V. E.

    2007-06-01

    We present a model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) based on a system of coupled oscillators. Using this approach we can describe several complex physiological phenomena that can have a range of applications. For instance, heart rate variability (HRV), can have a new deterministic explanation. The intrinsic dynamics of the HRV is controlled by deterministic couplings between the physiological oscillators in our model and without the need to introduce external noise as is commonly done. This new result provides potential applications not only for physiological systems but also for the design of very precise electronic generators where the frequency stability is crucial. Another important phenomenon is that of oscillation death. We show that in our CVS model the mechanism leading to the quenching of the oscillations can be controlled, not only by the coupling parameter, but by a more general scheme. In fact, we propose that a change in the relative current state of the cardiovascular oscillators can lead to a cease of the oscillations without actually changing the strength of the coupling among them. We performed real experiments using electronic oscillators and show them to match the theoretical and numerical predictions. We discuss the relevance of the studied phenomena to real cardiovascular systems regimes, including the explanation of certain pathologies, and the possible applications in medical practice.

  12. A New Physical Model for Pulsars as Gravitational Shielding and Oscillating Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2014-06-01

    Pulsars are fast rotating neutron stars that synchronously emit periodic Dirac delta shape pulses of radio-frequency radiation and Lorentzian shape oscillations of X-rays. The acceleration of particles near the magnetic poles, which derivate from the rotating axis produces coherent beams of radio emissions that are viewed as pulses of radiation whenever the magnetic poles sweep the viewers. However, the conventional lighthouse model of pulsars is only conceptual. The physical mechanism through which particles are accelerated to produce coherent beams of radio emissions is still poorly understood. The process for periodically oscillating X-rays to emit from hot spots at the inner edge of accretion disks of pulsars is also remained as an unsolved mystery. Recently, a new physical model of pulsars is proposed by the author to quantitatively interpret the emission characteristics of pulsars, in accordance with his well-developed five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein gravitational shielding theory and the physics of thermal and accelerating charged particle radiation. The results indicate that with the significant gravitational shielding by scalar field a neutron star nonlinearly oscillates and produces synchronous periodically Dirac delta shape pulse-like radio-frequency radiation (emitted by the oscillating or accelerating charged particles) as well as periodically Lorentzian shape oscillating X-rays (as the thermal radiation of neutron stars that temperature varies due to the oscillation). This physical model of pulsars as gravitational shielding and oscillating neutron stars broadens our understanding of neutron stars and develops an innovative mechanism to disclose the mystery of pulsars. In this presentation, I will show the results obtained from the quantitative studies of this new physical model of pulsars for the oscillations of neutron stars and the powers of radio pulse-like emissions and oscillating X-rays.

  13. Recent advances of harmonic delay models for the neutral atmosphere (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, M.; Böhm, J.; Pain, G.

    2013-12-01

    The path delay caused by the neutral atmosphere is one of the main factors limiting the accuracy of positioning products from the analysis of space geodetic observations, like those from GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems). For a precise account of this effect, the slant path delays are typically separated into a hydrostatic part and a wet part with each of them being the product of the zenith delay and a mapping function. If available, the analyst is advised to determine the zenith hydrostatic delay from pressure values recorded at the site, to derive the mapping functions from operational analysis fields of numerical weather models, and to estimate the zenith wet delay within the least-squares adjustment. If neither local pressure values nor operational mapping functions can be accessed, it is recommended to use so-called blind models which are based on harmonic functions and do not need any parameters other than approximate position and date. We outline the recent advances made in this field of empirical models for tropospheric slant delays by reference to GPT2, an improved version of the Global Pressure and Temperature (GPT) model and the Global Mapping Functions (GMF). Characterized by an increased horizontal resolution of 5 degrees, a temporal variability down to semi-annual periodicities, and an extended set of meteorological parameters, the model's excellent usability for GNSS applications is demonstrated by validation against in-situ pressure and temperature observations as well as ray-traced delays. In addition, real time positioning and navigation applications profit from another, currently developed augmentation of GPT2 in terms of accurate a priori estimates for zenith wet delays. We discuss the subtleties of this extension and assess its performance by comparing to zenith total delays from GNSS solutions in 2011-2012.

  14. Modeling non-harmonic behavior of materials from experimental inelastic neutron scattering and thermal expansion measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bansal, Dipanshu; Aref, Amjad; Dargush, Gary; Delaire, Olivier A.

    2016-07-20

    Based on thermodynamic principles, we derive expressions quantifying the non-harmonic vibrational behavior of materials, which are rigorous yet easily evaluated from experimentally available data for the thermal expansion coefficient and the phonon density of states. These experimentally-derived quantities are valuable to benchmark first-principles theoretical predictions of harmonic and non-harmonic thermal behaviors using perturbation theory, ab initio molecular-dynamics, or Monte-Carlo simulations. In this study, we illustrate this analysis by computing the harmonic, dilational, and anharmonic contributions to the entropy, internal energy, and free energy of elemental aluminum and the ordered compound FeSi over a wide range of temperature. Our results agreemore » well with previous data in the literature and provide an efficient approach to estimate anharmonic effects in materials.« less

  15. Self-Consistent Calculation of Half-Harmonic Emission with an Electromagnetic Zakharov Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Maximov, A. V.; Short, R. W.; Dubois, D. F.; Russell, D. A.; Vu, H. X.

    2015-11-01

    Half-harmonic emission has been regarded as a signal of two-plasmon decay or stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). Experimental observations at the Omega Laser Facility show both blue and red shifts of half-harmonic light. The red shift might be a powerful diagnostic tool to measure electron temperature near quarter-critical density. However, the interpretation of the half-harmonics spectrum is difficult because of its complicated generation mechanism. To resolve this problem, a self-consistent electromagnetic Zakharov code that is able to calculate half harmonics emission has been developed, including all the possible generation mechanisms such as absolute SRS, Thomson down-scattering, linear mode conversion, and nonlinear mode conversion. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  16. Modeling non-harmonic behavior of materials from experimental inelastic neutron scattering and thermal expansion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Dipanshu; Aref, Amjad; Dargush, Gary; Delaire, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Based on thermodynamic principles, we derive expressions quantifying the non-harmonic vibrational behavior of materials, which are rigorous yet easily evaluated from experimentally available data for the thermal expansion coefficient and the phonon density of states. These experimentally-derived quantities are valuable to benchmark first-principles theoretical predictions of harmonic and non-harmonic thermal behaviors using perturbation theory, ab initio molecular-dynamics, or Monte-Carlo simulations. We illustrate this analysis by computing the harmonic, dilational, and anharmonic contributions to the entropy, internal energy, and free energy of elemental aluminum and the ordered compound \\text{FeSi} over a wide range of temperature. Results agree well with previous data in the literature and provide an efficient approach to estimate anharmonic effects in materials.

  17. Renewable Diesel from Algal Lipids: An Integrated Baseline for Cost, Emissions, and Resource Potential from a Harmonized Model

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.; Fishman, D.; Frank, E. D.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Aden, A.; Coleman, A. M.; Pienkos, P. T.; Skaggs, R. J.; Venteris, E. R.; Wang, M. Q.

    2012-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Biomass Program has begun an initiative to obtain consistent quantitative metrics for algal biofuel production to establish an 'integrated baseline' by harmonizing and combining the Program's national resource assessment (RA), techno-economic analysis (TEA), and life-cycle analysis (LCA) models. The baseline attempts to represent a plausible near-term production scenario with freshwater microalgae growth, extraction of lipids, and conversion via hydroprocessing to produce a renewable diesel (RD) blendstock. Differences in the prior TEA and LCA models were reconciled (harmonized) and the RA model was used to prioritize and select the most favorable consortium of sites that supports production of 5 billion gallons per year of RD. Aligning the TEA and LCA models produced slightly higher costs and emissions compared to the pre-harmonized results. However, after then applying the productivities predicted by the RA model (13 g/m2/d on annual average vs. 25 g/m2/d in the original models), the integrated baseline resulted in markedly higher costs and emissions. The relationship between performance (cost and emissions) and either productivity or lipid fraction was found to be non-linear, and important implications on the TEA and LCA results were observed after introducing seasonal variability from the RA model. Increasing productivity and lipid fraction alone was insufficient to achieve cost and emission targets; however, combined with lower energy, less expensive alternative technology scenarios, emissions and costs were substantially reduced.

  18. Seismic model of Mars. 2. Free oscillations and travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudkova, Tamara; Lognonne, Philippe; Raevskiy, Sergey; Zharkov, Vladimir

    When constructing an interior structure model of a planet, it is common used method to describe the model by a restricted set of parameters: the thickness of the crust, the location of phase transitions, the core radius. The variation of these parameters originates from the uncertainties in temperature profile, composition, elastic and anelastic properties of relevant minerals. Water content should also be considered as a compositional variable in the mantle. Olivine and its high pressure phases, wadsleyite and ringwoodite are particularly important as they constitute about 60 wt% of the Martian mantle and have probably large capacity for water in the Martian mantle (Zharkov and Gudkova, 2014). At present Mars’ internal density distribution is constrained by the recent estimates of the moment of inertia and the Love number k _{2} (Konoplive et al., 2011). Below we use the data from Earth studies and laboratory data (Mao et al., 2010, 2011, 2012,extrapolated for P-T conditions in Mars, and show how the admixture of water in the main Martian minerals influences velocity drops at phase transition boundaries in Martian interiors and study the effects of hydration on the periods of free oscillations and travel times for P, PcP, S, ScS waves , which could serve as additional constraints, if upcoming seismic experiments are successful, as they can potentially constrain mantle composition and make more precise the location of transition zones. It is of importance to determine the depth of the phase transitions in the mantle, as it will fix the temperature profile in Mars. Our analysis is based on a trial seismic model M14_3 from (Zharkov et al., 2009). The crust is 50 km thick (with density of 2.9 g/cm (3) ), the molar ratio Fe/(Fe+Mg) in the mantle is 0.20, the Fe-Ni core contains 70 mol % H in addition to 14 wt % S with radius of 1800 km. The bulk Fe/Si ratio is close to chondritic 1.7. The upper mantle extends down to 1590 km depth. Olivine-wadsleite transition zone

  19. Ultracold atomic collisions in tight harmonic traps: Quantum-defect model and application to metastable helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Peach, Gillian; Whittingham, Ian B.; Beams, Timothy J.

    2004-09-01

    We analyze a system of two colliding ultracold atoms under strong harmonic confinement from the viewpoint of quantum defect theory and formulate a generalized self-consistent method for determining the allowed energies. We also present two highly efficient computational methods for determining the bound state energies and eigenfunctions of such systems. The perturbed harmonic oscillator problem is characterized by a long asymptotic region beyond the effective range of the interatomic potential. The first method, which is based on quantum defect theory and is an adaptation of a technique developed by one of the authors (G.P.) for highly excited states in a modified Coulomb potential, is very efficient for integrating through this outer region. The second method is a direct numerical solution of the radial Schroedinger equation using a discrete variable representation of the kinetic energy operator and a scaled radial coordinate grid. The methods are applied to the case of trapped spin-polarized metastable helium atoms. The calculated eigenvalues agree very closely for the two methods, and with the eigenvalues computed using the generalized self-consistent method.

  20. Is the Langevin phase equation an efficient model for oscillating neurons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Keisuke; Tsunoda, Takamasa; Omori, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Shigeo; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Okada, Masato; Aonishi, Toru

    2009-12-01

    The Langevin phase model is an important canonical model for capturing coherent oscillations of neural populations. However, little attention has been given to verifying its applicability. In this paper, we demonstrate that the Langevin phase equation is an efficient model for neural oscillators by using the machine learning method in two steps: (a) Learning of the Langevin phase model. We estimated the parameters of the Langevin phase equation, i.e., a phase response curve and the intensity of white noise from physiological data measured in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. (b) Test of the estimated model. We verified whether a Fokker-Planck equation derived from the Langevin phase equation with the estimated parameters could capture the stochastic oscillatory behavior of the same neurons disturbed by periodic perturbations. The estimated model could predict the neural behavior, so we can say that the Langevin phase equation is an efficient model for oscillating neurons.

  1. Observation of tendon repair in animal model using second-harmonic-generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Eiji; Minamikawa, Takeo; Sato, Katsuya; Takahashi, Mitsuhiko; Yasui, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Tendon rupture is a trauma difficult to recover the condition before injury. In previous researches, tensile test and staining method have been widely used to elucidate the mechanism of the repair process from the viewpoints of the mechanical property and the histological findings. However, since both methods are destructive and invasive, it is difficult to obtain both of them for the same sample. If both the mechanical property and the histological findings can be obtained from the same sample, one may obtain new findings regarding mechanisms of tendon repairing process. In this paper, we used second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy, showing high selectivity and good image contrast to collagen molecules as well as high spatial resolution, optical three-dimensional sectioning, deep penetration, and without additional staining. Since SHG light intensity sensitively reflects the structural maturity of collagen molecule and its aggregates, it will be a good indicator for the repairing degree of the ruptured tendon. From comparison of SHG images between the 4-weeks-repaired tendon and the sound tendon in the animal model, we confirmed that SHG light intensity of the repaired tendon was significantly lower than that of the sound tendon, indicating that the collagen structure in the repaired tendon is still immature. Furthermore, we performed both SHG imaging and the tensile test for the same sample, and confirmed a correlation between them. This result shows a potential of SHG light for an indicator of the histological and mechanical recovery of the ruptured tendon.

  2. Second harmonic generation imaging of skin wound healing and scarring in a rabbit ear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yiyan; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Skin wound healing and scarring in rabbit ears was examined by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Rabbit ear wound model was created by punching from the ventral surface with removal of epidermis, dermis and perichondrium. The samples were collected weekly, and cut into 100 μm thickness sections for SHG imaging. SHG imaging system was operated at 810 nm, producing SHG signals at half the excitation wavelength 405 nm. A Plan-Neofluar objective (x40 and NA=0.75) was employed for focusing the excitation beam into tissue samples and was also used to collect the backscattered intrinsic SHG signals. Our results showed apparent difference in collagen content and microstructure at various wound healing and scarring time points. It suggested that SHG signals from collagen can serve as a good indicator for characterization of wound status. With the advancement on miniaturization, microscopy based on SHG will become a valuable tool for monitoring the wound healing and scarring in vivo, and help to guide the improvement of scar appearance with appropriate and subtle modulation during wound healing based on better understanding of scarring response mechanism.

  3. Magnetic measurement system for harmonic analysis of LBL SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) model dipoles and quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.I.; Barale, P.J.; Gilbert, W.S.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Nelson, D.H.; Taylor, C.E.; Travis, N.J.; Van Dyke, D.A.

    1987-09-01

    Specialized hardware and software have been developed to facilitate harmonic error analysis measurements of one-meter-long Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) model dipole and quadrupole magnets. Cold bore measurements feature cryogenic search-coil arrays with high bucking ratios that also have sufficient sensitivity to make room-temperature measurements at the low magnet currents of approx.10 A. Three sets of search coils allow measurements of the center, either end, and/or the axially integrated field. Signals from the search coils are digitally integrated by means of a voltage-to-frequency converter feeding an up-down counter. The data are drift corrected, Fourier analyzed, converted to physical quantities, and printed and plotted. A cycle of measurements including data acquisition, processing, and the generation of tabular and graphic output requires 80 seconds. The vast amount of data generated (several hundred measurement cycles for each magnet) has led to the development of postprocessing programs and procedures. Spreadsheets allow easy manipulation and comparison of results within a test series and between magnets. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Numerical Verification of an Analytical Model for Phase Noise in MEMS Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, D K; Bizzarri, F; Brambilla, A; Seshia, A A

    2016-08-01

    A new analytical formulation for phase noise in MEMS oscillators was recently presented encompassing the role of essential nonlinearities in the electrical and mechanical domains. In this paper, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed analytical formulation with respect to the unified theory developed by Demir et al. describing phase noise in oscillators. In particular, it is shown that, over a range of the second-order mechanical nonlinear stiffness of the MEMS resonator, both models exhibit an excellent match in the phase diffusion coefficient calculation for a square-wave MEMS oscillator. PMID:27295660

  5. Numerical Verification of an Analytical Model for Phase Noise in MEMS Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, D K; Bizzarri, F; Brambilla, A; Seshia, A A

    2016-08-01

    A new analytical formulation for phase noise in MEMS oscillators was recently presented encompassing the role of essential nonlinearities in the electrical and mechanical domains. In this paper, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed analytical formulation with respect to the unified theory developed by Demir et al. describing phase noise in oscillators. In particular, it is shown that, over a range of the second-order mechanical nonlinear stiffness of the MEMS resonator, both models exhibit an excellent match in the phase diffusion coefficient calculation for a square-wave MEMS oscillator.

  6. Neurodynamic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espinosa, Ismael; Gonzalez, Hortensia; Quiza, Jorge; Gonazalez, J. Jesus; Arroyo, Ruben; Lara, Ritaluz

    1995-01-01

    Oscillation of electrical activity has been found in many nervous systems, from invertebrates to vertebrates including man. There exists experimental evidence of very simple circuits with the capability of oscillation. Neurons with intrinsic oscillation have been found and also neural circuits where oscillation is a property of the network. These two types of oscillations coexist in many instances. It is nowadays hypothesized that behind synchronization and oscillation there is a system of coupled oscillators responsible for activities that range from locomotion and feature binding in vision to control of sleep and circadian rhythms. The huge knowledge that has been acquired on oscillators from the times of Lord Rayleigh has made the simulation of neural oscillators a very active endeavor. This has been enhanced with more recent physiological findings about small neural circuits by means of intracellular and extracellular recordings as well as imaging methods. The future of this interdisciplinary field looks very promising; some researchers are going into quantum mechanics with the idea of trying to provide a quantum description of the brain. In this work we describe some simulations using neuron models by means of which we form simple neural networks that have the capability of oscillation. We analyze the oscillatory activity with root locus method, cross-correlation histograms, and phase planes. In the more complicated neural network models there is the possibility of chaotic oscillatory activity and we study that by means of Lyapunov exponents. The companion paper shows an example of that kind.

  7. Dynamics of glass-forming liquids. XX. Third harmonic experiments of non-linear dielectric effects versus a phenomenological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pyeongeun; Young-Gonzales, Amanda R.; Richert, Ranko

    2016-08-01

    We have re-measured the third harmonic non-linear dielectric response of supercooled glycerol using zero-bias sinusoidal electric fields, with the aim of comparing the resulting susceptibilities with a phenomenological model of non-linear dielectric responses. In the absence of known chemical effects in this liquid, the present model accounts for three sources of non-linear behavior: dielectric saturation, field induced entropy reduction, and energy absorption from the time dependent field. Using parameters obtained from static high field results, the present model reproduces the characteristic features observed in the third harmonic susceptibility spectra: a low frequency plateau originating from dielectric saturation and a peak positioned below the loss peak frequency whose amplitude increases with decreasing temperature. Semi-quantitative agreement is achieved between experiment and the present model, which does not involve spatial scales or dynamical correlations explicitly. By calculating the three contributions separately, the model reveals that the entropy effect is the main source of the "hump" feature of this third harmonic response.

  8. Asymmetric oscillations during phase separation under continuous cooling: A simple model.

    PubMed

    Hayase, Yumino; Kobayashi, Mika; Vollmer, Doris; Pleiner, Harald; Auernhammer, Günter K

    2008-11-14

    We investigate the phase separation of binary mixtures under continuous cooling using the Cahn-Hilliard equation including the effect of gravity. In our simple model, sedimentation is accounted for by instantaneously "removing" droplets from the supersaturated mixture into the coexisting phase once the droplets have reached a defined maximum size. Our model predicts an oscillatory variation of turbidity. Depending on the composition, either both phases oscillate (symmetric oscillations) or only one of the phases oscillates (asymmetric oscillations). In the asymmetric case, droplet sedimentation from the majority phase into the minority phase reduces supersaturation in the minority phase. This inhibits droplet formation in the minority phase. The cooling rate dependence of the period agrees with experimental results. PMID:19045388

  9. Scaling, cluster dynamics and complex oscillations in a multispecies Lattice Lotka-Volterra Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabunin, A. V.; Efimov, A.; Tsekouras, G. A.; Provata, A.

    2005-03-01

    The cluster formation in the cyclic (4+1)-Lattice Lotka-Volterra Model is studied by Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on a square lattice support. At the Mean Field level this model demonstrates conservative four-dimensional oscillations which, depending on the parameters, can be chaotic or quasi-periodic. When the system is realized on a square lattice substrate the various species organize in domains (clusters) with fractal boundaries and this is consistent with dissipative dynamics. For small lattice sizes, the entire lattice oscillates in phase and the size distribution of the clusters follows a pure power law distribution. When the system size is large many independently oscillating regions are formed and as a result the cluster size distribution in addition to the power law, acquires a exponential decay dependence. This combination of power law and exponential decay of distributions and correlations is indicative, in this case, of mixing and superposition of regions oscillating asynchronously.

  10. Properties of finite difference models of non-linear conservative oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    Finite-difference (FD) approaches to the numerical solution of the differential equations describing the motion of a nonlinear conservative oscillator are investigated analytically. A generalized formulation of the Duffing and modified Duffing equations is derived and analyzed using several FD techniques, and it is concluded that, although it is always possible to contstruct FD models of conservative oscillators which are themselves conservative, caution is required to avoid numerical solutions which do not accurately reflect the properties of the original equation.

  11. Analysis of Types of Oscillations in Goodwin's Model of Business Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, A. O.; Reznik, S. N.; Todorov, M. D.

    2010-11-01

    Types of solutions of the Goodwin business cycle model with the fixed investment time lag have been numerically studied. It is shown that the long-periodic Goodwin's oscillations are excited by the independent investment A in case A exceeds a threshold. If A falls below the threshold, then there are only sawtooth oscillations with a period equal to the investment time lag. Near the threshold, the time behavior of the income is irregular.

  12. CW blue laser emission by second harmonic generation of 900-nm oscillation of Nd-doped strontium and lanthanum aluminate (ASL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varona, C.; Loiseau, P.; Aka, G.; Ferrand, B.; Lupei, V.

    2006-04-01

    Nd-doped strontium and lanthanum (ASL) crystals Sr 1-xLa x-yNd yMg xAl 12-xO 19 (0.05 <= x <= 0.5; y = 0.05) were grown by Czochralski pulling technique. Up to 1.67W of 900nm IR output laser power for an absorbed power of 2.53W was obtained under Ti:sapphire pumping at 792nm. Intracavity second harmonic generation experiments led to 320mW of blue laser power at 450nm with a 10mm-long BiB 3O 6 nonlinear crystal. Other nonlinear crystals were also evaluated such as LBO.

  13. A single ion anharmonic mechanical oscillator with nonlinear dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Kotler, Shlomi; Glickman, Yinnon; Keselman, Anna; Dallal, Yehonatan; Ozeri, Roee

    2010-03-01

    A driven, damped, nearly harmonic oscillator with a small cubic term in the force, is known as the Duffing oscillator. The Duffing oscillator shows various interesting features of non-linear response such as bistability and hysteresis. Several features of the Duffing instability have been recently measured using superconducting qubits and nano-mechanical resonators. Linear Paul traps can be well approximated as harmonic but have a small an-harmonicity due to their deviation from an ideal quadruple geometry. We study the steady state motion of a single trapped Sr^+ ion, subject to a near-resonance drive and dissipation in a linear Paul trap with a small anharmonicity. The driving force is applied by an oscillating voltage on the trap end-caps. Dissipation is the result of laser Doppler cooling. We measure both the amplitude and phase of the driven oscillations and find a good agreement with the Duffing oscillator model. When the cooling laser is close to resonance the standard Duffing model has to be extended to account for non-linearity in the dissipative force. Both the linear and the nonlinear terms of the dissipative force for various cooling laser detunings are determined by the line-shape of the - cooling transition and the cooling laser intensity and can therefore be conveniently controlled.

  14. Stuttering Min oscillations within E. coli bacteria: a stochastic polymerization model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Supratim; Derr, Julien; Sain, Anirban; Rutenberg, Andrew D.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a 3D off-lattice stochastic polymerization model to study the subcellular oscillation of Min proteins in the bacteria Escherichia coli, and used it to investigate the experimental phenomenon of Min oscillation stuttering. Stuttering was affected by the rate of immediate rebinding of MinE released from depolymerizing filament tips (processivity), protection of depolymerizing filament tips from MinD binding and fragmentation of MinD filaments due to MinE. Processivity, protection and fragmentation each reduce stuttering, speed oscillations and MinD filament lengths. Neither processivity nor tip protection were, on their own, sufficient to produce fast stutter-free oscillations. While filament fragmentation could, on its own, lead to fast oscillations with infrequent stuttering; high levels of fragmentation degraded oscillations. The infrequent stuttering observed in standard Min oscillations is consistent with short filaments of MinD, while we expect that mutants that exhibit higher stuttering frequencies will exhibit longer MinD filaments. Increased stuttering rate may be a useful diagnostic to find observable MinD polymerization under experimental conditions.

  15. Neural representation of concurrent harmonic sounds in monkey primary auditory cortex: implications for models of auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Yonatan I; Steinschneider, Mitchell; Micheyl, Christophe

    2014-09-10

    The ability to attend to a particular sound in a noisy environment is an essential aspect of hearing. To accomplish this feat, the auditory system must segregate sounds that overlap in frequency and time. Many natural sounds, such as human voices, consist of harmonics of a common fundamental frequency (F0). Such harmonic complex tones (HCTs) evoke a pitch corresponding to their F0. A difference in pitch between simultaneous HCTs provides a powerful cue for their segregation. The neural mechanisms underlying concurrent sound segregation based on pitch differences are poorly understood. Here, we examined neural responses in monkey primary auditory cortex (A1) to two concurrent HCTs that differed in F0 such that they are heard as two separate "auditory objects" with distinct pitches. We found that A1 can resolve, via a rate-place code, the lower harmonics of both HCTs, a prerequisite for deriving their pitches and for their perceptual segregation. Onset asynchrony between the HCTs enhanced the neural representation of their harmonics, paralleling their improved perceptual segregation in humans. Pitches of the concurrent HCTs could also be temporally represented by neuronal phase-locking at their respective F0s. Furthermore, a model of A1 responses using harmonic templates could qualitatively reproduce psychophysical data on concurrent sound segregation in humans. Finally, we identified a possible intracortical homolog of the "object-related negativity" recorded noninvasively in humans, which correlates with the perceptual segregation of concurrent sounds. Findings indicate that A1 contains sufficient spectral and temporal information for segregating concurrent sounds based on differences in pitch.

  16. Intraseasonal Oscillations over South America: A Study with a Regional Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Baode; Chao, Winston

    2003-01-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) regional climate model version 2 (RegCM2) is used to investigate the observed characteristics of intraseasonal oscillations over South America. Our study is mainly concentrated on an intraseaonal mode, which is observed to account for a large portion of the intraseasonal variation, to have a standing feature and to be independent of the MJO. The NCEPDOE AMIP-II reanalysis is utilized to provide initial and lateral boundary conditions for the RegCM2 based upon the OOZ, 062, 122 and 182 data.Our results indicate that the intraseasonal oscillation still exists with time- averaged lateral boundary condition, which prevents the MJO and other outside disturbances from entering the model's domain, suggesting a locally forced oscillation responsible for ths intraseasonal mode independent of the MJO. Further experiments show that the annual and daily variabilities and a radiative-convective interaction are not essential to the locally forced intraseasonal oscillation. The intraseasonal oscillations over Amazon in our model essentially result from interactions among atmospheric continental- scale circulation, surface radiation, surface sensible and latent heat fluxes, and cumulus convection. The wavelet analyses of various surface energy fluxes and surface energy budget also verify that the primary cause of intraseasonal oscillation is the interaction of land surface processes with the atmosphere.

  17. Two-oscillator Kantowski-Sachs model of the Schwarzschild black hole interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, Goran S.; Nesic, Ljubisa; Radovancevic, Darko

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the interior of the Schwarzschild black hole, which is presented as a vacuum, homogeneous and anisotropic Kantowski-Sachs minisuperspace cosmological model, is considered. Lagrangian of the model is reduced by a suitable coordinate transformation to Lagrangian of two decoupled oscillators with the same frequencies and with zero energy in total (an oscillator-ghost-oscillator system). The model is presented in a classical, a p-adic and a noncommutative case. Then, within the standard quantum approach Wheeler-DeWitt equation and its general solutions, i.e. a wave function of the model is written, and then an adelic wave function is constructed. Finally, thermodynamics of the model is studied by using the Feynman-Hibbs procedure.

  18. Multielectron Correlation in High-Harmonic Generation: A 2D Model Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sukiasyan, Suren; McDonald, Chris; Destefani, Carlos; Brabec, Thomas; Ivanov, Misha Yu.

    2009-06-05

    We analyze the role of multielectron dynamics in high-harmonic generation spectroscopy, using an example of a two-electron system. We identify and systematically quantify the importance of correlation and exchange effects. One of the main sources for correlation is identified to be the polarization of the ion by the recombining continuum electron. This effect, which plays an important qualitative and quantitative role, seriously undermines the validity of the standard approaches to high-harmonic generation, which ignore the contribution of excited ionic states to the radiative recombination of the continuum electron.

  19. Spontaneous oscillations, signal amplification and synchronization in a model of active hair bundle mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lijuan; Neiman, Alexander B.

    2010-01-01

    We study spontaneous dynamics and signal transduction in a model of active hair bundle mechanics of sensory hair cells. The hair bundle motion is subjected to internal noise resulted from thermal fluctuations and stochastic dynamics of mechano-electrical transduction ion channels. Similar to other studies we found that in the presence of noise the coherence of stochastic oscillations is maximal at a point on the bifurcation diagram away from the Andronov-Hopf bifurcation and is close to the point of maximum sensitivity of the system to weak periodic mechanical perturbations. Despite decoherent effect of noise the stochastic hair bundle oscillations can be synchronized by external periodic force of few pN amplitude in a finite range of control parameters. We then study effects of receptor potential oscillations on mechanics of the hair bundle and show that the hair bundle oscillations can be synchronized by oscillating receptor voltage. Moreover, using a linear model for the receptor potential we show that bi-directional coupling of the hair bundle and the receptor potential results in significant enhancement of the coherence of spontaneous oscillations and of the sensitivity to the external mechanical perturbations. PMID:20481759

  20. Spontaneous oscillations, signal amplification, and synchronization in a model of active hair bundle mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lijuan; Neiman, Alexander B.

    2010-04-01

    We study spontaneous dynamics and signal transduction in a model of active hair bundle mechanics of sensory hair cells. The hair bundle motion is subjected to internal noise resulted from thermal fluctuations and stochastic dynamics of mechanoelectrical transduction ion channels. Similar to other studies we found that in the presence of noise the coherence of stochastic oscillations is maximal at a point on the bifurcation diagram away from the Andronov-Hopf bifurcation and is close to the point of maximum sensitivity of the system to weak periodic mechanical perturbations. Despite decoherent effect of noise the stochastic hair bundle oscillations can be synchronized by external periodic force of few pN amplitude in a finite range of control parameters. We then study effects of receptor potential oscillations on mechanics of the hair bundle and show that the hair bundle oscillations can be synchronized by oscillating receptor voltage. Moreover, using a linear model for the receptor potential we show that bidirectional coupling of the hair bundle and the receptor potential results in significant enhancement of the coherence of spontaneous oscillations and of the sensitivity to the external mechanical perturbations.

  1. Modeling the relationship between climate oscillations and drought by a multivariate GARCH model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, R.; Ouarda, T. B. M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Typical multivariate time series models may exhibit comovement in mean but not in variance of hydrologic and climatic variables. This paper introduces multivariate generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (GARCH) models to capture the comovement of the variance or the conditional covariance between two hydroclimatic time series. The diagonal vectorized and Baba-Engle-Kroft-Kroner models are developed to evaluate the covariance between drought and two atmospheric circulations, Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) time series during 1954-2000. The univariate generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity model indicates a strong persistency level in conditional variance for NAO and a moderate persistency level for SOI. The conditional variance of short-term drought index indicates low level of persistency, while the long-term index drought indicates high level of persistency in conditional variance. The estimated conditional covariance between drought and atmospheric indices is shown to be weak and negative. It is also observed that the covariance between drought and atmospheric indices is largely dependent on short-run variance of atmospheric indices rather than their long-run variance. The nonlinearity and stationarity tests show that the conditional covariances are nonlinear but stationary. However, the degree of nonlinearity is higher for the covariance between long-term drought and atmospheric indices. It is also observed that the nonlinearity of NAO is higher than that for SOI, in contrast to the stationarity which is stronger for SOI time series.

  2. Coupling mechanism in the gate and oscillator model of the SCN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zengrong

    2016-09-01

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is considered as the master circadian pacemaker. The SCN is divided into two subgroups of gate and oscillator cells: the ventrolateral (VL) neurons, which receive the periodic light-dark (LD) signal, and the dorsomedial (DM) neurons, which are coupled to the VL cells. The fundamental question is how the individual cellular oscillators, expressing a wide range of periods, interact and assemble to create an integrated pacemaker that can govern behavioral and physiological rhythmicity and be reset by environmental light. The key is that the heterogeneous network formed by the cellular clocks within the SCN must synchronize to maintain timekeeping activity. Based on the structural and functional heterogeneity of the SCN, the authors bring forward a mathematical model including gate cells and oscillator cells with a wide range of periods. The gate neurons offer daily injection to oscillator neurons and the activation of gate is determined by the output of the oscillator neurons. In this model, the authors consider two kinds of coupling: interior coupling among the oscillator cells and exterior coupling from the gate cells to the oscillator cells. The authors mainly analyze the combined effects of these two kinds of coupling on the entrainment of the oscillator cells in the DM part. It is found that the interior coupling is conducive to entrainment, but a stronger coupling is not beneficial to entrainment. The gate mechanism in exterior coupling is more propitious to entrainment than continuous coupling. This study helps to understand collective circadian rhythm in the mammals.

  3. Connecting experiment with theory: A model-independent parameterization of neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Doris Jeanne

    1997-09-01

    Many experiments are currently looking for evidence of neutrino mass in the form of neutrino oscillations. Oscillation probabilities are non-linear functions of the neutrino mixing matrix elements, so most comparisons of data to theory are based on simplifying models of the mixing matrix. We begin this dissertation with a review of neutrino interactions and a few of the popular models describing neutrino masses and mixing. Next we present our model-independent description of neutrino oscillations and derive the predictions of various models in terms of our new 'box' parameterization. Finally, we use our boxes to find mixing matrices consistent with existing neutrino data. As more definitive data becomes available, these solutions will probably need to be adjusted; when such a need arises, our box notation will provide a convenient method for finding new solutions.

  4. Laryngeal muscle activity in giggle: a damped oscillation model.

    PubMed

    Titze, Ingo R; Finnegan, Eileen M; Laukkanen, Anne-Maria; Fuja, Megan; Hoffman, Henry

    2008-11-01

    The acoustic properties of giggle, a mild form of laughter, were studied. The purpose was to determine if there is some uniqueness to the frequency and number of vocalization bursts in giggle. The underlying hypothesis was that a neuromechanical oscillator serves as an activator for rhythmic vocalizations, as in vibrato, with a pair of agonist-antagonist adductor muscles alternating in a 180 degrees phase relationship. Electromyographic activity of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle was always measured, in conjunction with either lateral cricoarytenoid or thyroarytenoid muscle activity. Results indicate that muscle activations do alternate and that these activations do not diminish during successive bursts, even though the amplitude and duty ratio of the bursts decreases. It is reasoned that reduced lung pressure and lung volume limit the number of bursts and their duty ratio, while speed of intrinsic laryngeal muscle contraction dictates the burst frequency. PMID:17509825

  5. Analytic model of bunched beams for harmonic generation in thelow-gain free electron laser regime

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, G.; Reinsch, M.; Wurtele, J.S.

    2006-02-20

    One scheme for harmonic generation employs free electron lasers (FELs) with two undulators: the first uses a seed laser to modulate the energy of the electron beam; following a dispersive element which acts to bunch the beam, the second undulator radiates at a higher harmonic. These processes are currently evaluated using extensive calculations or simulation codes which can be slow to evaluate and difficult to set up. We describe a simple algorithm to predict the output of a harmonic generation beamline in the low-gain FEL regime, based on trial functions for the output radiation. Full three-dimensional effects are included. This method has been implemented as a Mathematica package, named CAMPANILE, which runs rapidly and can be generalized to include effects such as asymmetric beams and misalignments. This method is compared with simulation results using the FEL code GENESIS, both for single stages of harmonic generation and for the LUX project, a design concept for an ultrafast X-ray facility, where multiple stages upshift the input laser frequency by factors of up to 200.

  6. Determination of a coupling function in multicoupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Jun; Kinoshita, Shuichi

    2006-05-19

    A new method to determine a coupling function in a phase model is theoretically derived for coupled self-sustained oscillators and applied to Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) oscillators. The synchronous behavior of two coupled BZ reactors is explained extremely well in terms of the coupling function thus obtained. This method is expected to be applicable to weakly coupled multioscillator systems, in which mutual coupling among nearly identical oscillators occurs in a similar manner. The importance of higher-order harmonic terms involved in the coupling function is also discussed.

  7. HARMONIZATION AND COMMUNICATION OF PBPK MODELS USING THE EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE MODEL (ERDEM) SYSTEM: TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of the trichloroethylene (TCE) risk assessment for the Office of Air and Radiation, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, and Office of Water, NERL and NCEA are developing an updated physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The PBPK modeling effor...

  8. HARMONIZATION AND COMMUNICATION OF PBPK MODELS USING THE EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATION MODEL (ERDEM) SYSTEM: TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of the trichloroethylene (TCE) risk assessment for the Office of Air and Radiation, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, and Office of Water, NERL and NCEA are developing an updated physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The PBPK modeling effort ...

  9. Issues and Importance of "Good" Starting Points for Nonlinear Regression for Mathematical Modeling with Maple: Basic Model Fitting to Make Predictions with Oscillating Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, William

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our modeling effort is to predict future outcomes. We assume the data collected are both accurate and relatively precise. For our oscillating data, we examined several mathematical modeling forms for predictions. We also examined both ignoring the oscillations as an important feature and including the oscillations as an important…

  10. MODELING OF GYROSYNCHROTRON RADIO EMISSION PULSATIONS PRODUCED BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC LOOP OSCILLATIONS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Mossessian, George; Fleishman, Gregory D.

    2012-04-01

    A quantitative study of the observable radio signatures of the sausage, kink, and torsional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillation modes in flaring coronal loops is performed. Considering first non-zero order effect of these various MHD oscillation modes on the radio source parameters such as magnetic field, line of sight, plasma density and temperature, electron distribution function, and the source dimensions, we compute time-dependent radio emission (spectra and light curves). The radio light curves (of both flux density and degree of polarization) at all considered radio frequencies are then quantified in both time domain (via computation of the full modulation amplitude as a function of frequency) and in Fourier domain (oscillation spectra, phases, and partial modulation amplitude) to form the signatures specific to a particular oscillation mode and/or source parameter regime. We found that the parameter regime and the involved MHD mode can indeed be distinguished using the quantitative measures derived in the modeling. We apply the developed approach to analyze radio burst recorded by Owens Valley Solar Array and report possible detection of the sausage mode oscillation in one (partly occulted) flare and kink or torsional oscillations in another flare.

  11. [Interaction of Membrane and Calcium Oscillators in Cardiac Pacemaker Cells: Mathematical Modeling].

    PubMed

    Ryvkin, A M; Zorin, N M; Moskvin, A S; Solovyova, O E; Markhasin, V S

    2015-01-01

    An integrative model of the calcium dynamics in cardiac pacemaker cells is developed taking into account a synergetic effect of the interaction between an outer membrane oscillator and an intracellular calcium oscillator ("membrane and Ca(2+)-clock"). The main feature of the model is a description of the stochastic dynamics of Ca2+ release units within the electron-conformational mechanism of the functioning of ryanodine-sensitive calcium channels. It is shown that interaction of two cellular oscillators provides a stable action potential generation in the cardiac pacemaker cells even in the case of the stochastic Ca2+ dynamics. We studied in detail the effect of ryanodine channels sensitivity to an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration in sarcoplasmic reticulum and in the dyadic space on the behavior of calcium-release system. A parametric analysis of the integrative model of pacemaker cells is performed. PMID:26841508

  12. An exactly solvable model of an oscillator with nonlinear coupling and zeros of Bessel functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodonov, V. V.; Klimov, A. B.

    1993-01-01

    We consider an oscillator model with nonpolynomial interaction. The model admits exact solutions for two situations: for energy eigenvalues in terms of zeros of Bessel functions, that were considered as functions of the continuous index; and for the corresponding eigenstates in terms of Lommel polynomials.

  13. Application of the anisotropic bond model to second-harmonic generation from amorphous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adles, E. J.; Aspnes, D. E.

    2008-04-01

    As a step toward analyzing second-harmonic generation (SHG) from crystalline Si nanospheres in glass, we develop an anisotropic bond model (ABM) that expresses SHG in terms of physically meaningful parameters and provide a detailed understanding of the basic physics of SHG on the atomic scale. Nonlinear-optical (NLO) responses are calculated classically via the four fundamental steps of optics: evaluate the local field at a given bond site, solve the force equation for the acceleration of the charge, calculate the resulting radiation, then superpose the radiation from all charges. Because the emerging NLO signals are orders of magnitude weaker and occur at wavelengths different from that of the pump beam, these steps are independent. Paradoxically, the treatment of NLO is therefore simpler than that of linear optics (LO), where these calculations must be done self-consistently. The ABM goes beyond previous bond models by including the complete set of underlying contributions: retardation (RD), spatial-dispersion (SD), and magnetic (MG) effects, in addition to the anharmonic restoring force acting on the bond charge. Transverse as well as longitudinal motion is also considered. We apply the ABM to obtain analytic expressions for SHG from amorphous materials under Gaussian-beam excitation. These materials represent an interesting test case not only because they are ubiquitous but also because the anharmonic-force contribution that dominates the SHG response of crystalline materials and ordered interfaces vanishes by symmetry. The remaining contributions, and hence the SHG signals, are entirely functions of the LO response and beam geometry, so the only new information available is the anisotropy of the LO response at the bond level. The RD, SD, and MG contributions are all of the same order of magnitude, so none can be ignored. Diffraction is important in determining not only the pattern of the emerging beam but also the phases and amplitudes of the different terms

  14. Data Assimilation and Adjusted Spherical Harmonic Model of VTEC Map over Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinngam, Somjai; Maruyama, Takashi; Tsugawa, Takuya; Ishii, Mamoru; Supnithi, Pornchai; Chiablaem, Athiwat

    2016-07-01

    The global navigation satellite system (GNSS) and high frequency (HF) communication are vulnerable to the ionospheric irregularities, especially when the signal travels through the low-latitude region and around the magnetic equator known as equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) region. In order to study the ionospheric effects to the communications performance in this region, the regional map of the observed total electron content (TEC) can show the characteristic and irregularities of the ionosphere. In this work, we develop the two-dimensional (2D) map of vertical TEC (VTEC) over Thailand using the adjusted spherical harmonic model (ASHM) and the data assimilation technique. We calculate the VTEC from the receiver independent exchange (RINEX) files recorded by the dual-frequency global positioning system (GPS) receivers on July 8th, 2012 (quiet day) at 12 stations around Thailand: 0° to 25°E and 95°N to 110°N. These stations are managed by Department of Public Works and Town & Country Planning (DPT), Thailand, and the South East Asia Low-latitude ionospheric Network (SEALION) project operated by National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), Japan, and King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang (KMITL). We compute the median observed VTEC (OBS-VTEC) in the grids with the spatial resolution of 2.5°x5° in latitude and longitude and time resolution of 2 hours. We assimilate the OBS-VTEC with the estimated VTEC from the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI-VTEC) as well as the ionosphere map exchange (IONEX) files provided by the International GNSS Service (IGS-VTEC). The results show that the estimation of the 15-degree ASHM can be improved when both of IRI-VTEC and IGS-VTEC are weighted by the latitude-dependent factors before assimilating with the OBS-VTEC. However, the IRI-VTEC assimilation can improve the ASHM estimation more than the IGS-VTEC assimilation. Acknowledgment: This work is partially funded by the

  15. Modeling Solar Coronal Bright-point Oscillations with Multiple Nanoflare Heated Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrashekhar, K.; Sarkar, Aveek

    2015-09-01

    Intensity oscillations of coronal bright points (BPs) have been studied for the past several years. It has been known for a while that these BPs are closed magnetic loop-like structures. However, the initiation of such intensity oscillations is still an enigma. There have been many suggestions to explain these oscillations, but so far modeling such BPs has not been explored. Using a multithreaded nanoflare heated loop model we study the behavior of such BPs in this work. We compute typical loop lengths of BPs using potential field-line extrapolation of available data, and set this as the length of our simulated loops. We produce intensity-like observables through forward modeling and analyze the intensity time series using wavelet analysis, as was done by previous observers. The result reveals similar intensity oscillation periods reported in past observations. It is suggested these oscillations are actually shock wave propagations along the loop. We also show that if one considers different background subtractions, one can extract adiabatic standing modes from the intensity time-series data as well, both from the observed and simulated data.

  16. Subthreshold oscillations and resonant frequency in guinea-pig cortical neurons: physiology and modelling.

    PubMed

    Gutfreund, Y; yarom, Y; Segev, I

    1995-03-15

    1. Intracellular recordings were made from neurons in slices from guinea-pig frontal cortex. In 50% of the cells, sustained subthreshold voltage oscillations were evoked by long (> 6 s) depolarizing pulses. The peak-to-peak amplitude of these oscillations was less than 5 mV and the frequency was voltage dependent, increasing with depolarization from 4 (near rest) to 20 Hz (at 30 mV depolarization). 2. The impedance-frequency relationship of both oscillating and non-oscillating cells was studied by intracellular injection of sinusoidal current with linearly changing frequency. In most cells, a peak in the impedance magnitude (resonant behaviour) was observed at depolarized levels. The frequency of the peak impedance (peak frequency) increased with depolarization from 3 (near rest) to 15 Hz (at 30 mV depolarization). 3. Application of TTX (10(-6) M) significantly decreased the impedance magnitude near the peak frequency. The subthreshold oscillations, however, as well as the action potentials, were fully blocked by TTX. On the other hand, TEA (15 mM) and Cs+ (5 mM) abolished both the subthreshold oscillations and the resonant behaviour. Replacing Ca2+ with Co2+ (5 mM) or Ni2+ (1 mM) did not abolish the subthreshold oscillations. The peak in the frequency-response curve was only slightly reduced. 4. An isopotential membrane model, consisting of a leak current, a fast persistent sodium current, a slow non-inactivating potassium current (with the kinetics of the M-current) and membrane capacitance, is sufficient to produce both voltage oscillations and resonant behaviour. The kinetics of the K+ current by itself is sufficient to produce resonance behaviour. The Na+ current amplifies the peak impedance magnitude and is essential for the generation of subthreshold oscillation. The model correctly predicted the behaviour of the frequency response before and after TTX and TEA application, as well as the relation between the expected passive impedance and the experimental

  17. Subthreshold oscillations and resonant frequency in guinea-pig cortical neurons: physiology and modelling.

    PubMed Central

    Gutfreund, Y; yarom, Y; Segev, I

    1995-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were made from neurons in slices from guinea-pig frontal cortex. In 50% of the cells, sustained subthreshold voltage oscillations were evoked by long (> 6 s) depolarizing pulses. The peak-to-peak amplitude of these oscillations was less than 5 mV and the frequency was voltage dependent, increasing with depolarization from 4 (near rest) to 20 Hz (at 30 mV depolarization). 2. The impedance-frequency relationship of both oscillating and non-oscillating cells was studied by intracellular injection of sinusoidal current with linearly changing frequency. In most cells, a peak in the impedance magnitude (resonant behaviour) was observed at depolarized levels. The frequency of the peak impedance (peak frequency) increased with depolarization from 3 (near rest) to 15 Hz (at 30 mV depolarization). 3. Application of TTX (10(-6) M) significantly decreased the impedance magnitude near the peak frequency. The subthreshold oscillations, however, as well as the action potentials, were fully blocked by TTX. On the other hand, TEA (15 mM) and Cs+ (5 mM) abolished both the subthreshold oscillations and the resonant behaviour. Replacing Ca2+ with Co2+ (5 mM) or Ni2+ (1 mM) did not abolish the subthreshold oscillations. The peak in the frequency-response curve was only slightly reduced. 4. An isopotential membrane model, consisting of a leak current, a fast persistent sodium current, a slow non-inactivating potassium current (with the kinetics of the M-current) and membrane capacitance, is sufficient to produce both voltage oscillations and resonant behaviour. The kinetics of the K+ current by itself is sufficient to produce resonance behaviour. The Na+ current amplifies the peak impedance magnitude and is essential for the generation of subthreshold oscillation. The model correctly predicted the behaviour of the frequency response before and after TTX and TEA application, as well as the relation between the expected passive impedance and the experimental

  18. A salt oscillator in the glacial northern Atlantic? part II: A 'scale analysis' model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchfield, G. Edward; Broecker, Wallace S.

    1990-12-01

    A proposal has been made by Broecker et al. (1990) that rapid changes on a time scale of a thousand years or so, seen over much of the last major glacial in the Greenland ice core record, represent significant climate changes and are caused by a salt oscillator in the glacial Atlantic. This proposal is examined in terms of a rudimentary quantitative model. Scale analysis asserts that heat transported to the high-latitude atmosphere when the thermohaline circulation is turned on, is large enough to produce the melting rates found by Fairbanks (1989) for the time interval around that of the Younger Dryas event and that these melting rates are of the same order of magnitude as the mass flux associated with water vapor flux to the Pacific Ocean estimated by Broecker (1989). Scale analysis also suggests that the salinity fluxes associated with 1) the water vapor flux mechanism, 2) the rapid melting episodes of Fairbanks, 3) possibly ice sheet growth events, 4) net transport by the thermohaline circulation and 5) net transport by turbulent eddy mixing are roughly of the same order of magnitude and therefore may be important mechanisms for producing salinity oscillations on a time scale of a few thousands of years, (see Broecker, 1990). By integration of simple salt conservation equations, it is found that model oscillations with a period of a few thousand years occur over a significant range of salinity fluxes; estimated fluxes fall well within the range for which oscillations exist. The model also suggests that there may exist close coupling between the European-Scandinavian ice sheets and the bimodal response of the oscillator; that is, significant increases or decreases in continental ice volume may accompany each complete cycle of the oscillator. In addition, it appears that continental ice may be required for the salt oscillator to function. A crucial element, which cannot adequately be investigated with the present model, concerns the local effect of salinity

  19. Raindrop oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, K. V.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the change in shape of a raindrop is presented. Raindrops measured by two orthogonal cameras were classified by shape and orientation to determine the nature of the oscillation. A physical model based on potential energy was then developed to study the amplitude variation of oscillating drops. The model results show that oscillations occur about the equilibrium axis ratio, but the time average axis ratio if significantly more spherical for large amplitudes because of asymmetry in the surface potential energy. A generalization of the model to oscillations produced by turbulence yields average axis ratios that are consistent with the camera measurements. The model results for average axis ratios were applied to rainfall studies with a dual polarized radar.

  20. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. (VI) HFODD (v2.40h): A new version of the program

    SciTech Connect

    Dobaczewski, Jacek; Satula, W.; Sarich, J.; Schunck, Nicolas F; Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, Mario

    2009-01-01

    We describe the new version (v2.40h) of the code hfodd which solves the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock or Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented: (i) projection on good angular momentum (for the Hartree-Fock states), (ii) calculation of the GCM kernels, (iii) calculation of matrix elements of the Yukawa interaction, (iv) the BCS solutions for state-dependent pairing gaps, (v) the HFB solutions for broken simplex symmetry, (vi) calculation of Bohr deformation parameters, (vii) constraints on the Schiff moments and scalar multipole moments, (viii) the D{sub 2h}{sup T} transformations and rotations of wave functions, (ix) quasiparticle blocking for the HFB solutions in odd and odd-odd nuclei, (x) the Broyden method to accelerate the convergence, (xi) the Lipkin-Nogami method to treat pairing correlations, (xii) the exact Coulomb exchange term, (xiii) several utility options, and we have corrected three insignificant errors.