Science.gov

Sample records for harvesting

  1. Harvesting

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since the introduction of the first successful mechanical harvester, mechanized cotton harvest has continued to decrease the cost and man hours required to produce a bale of cotton. Cotton harvesting in the US is completely mechanized and is accomplished by two primary machines, the spindle picker a...

  2. Harvesting

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; Wayne D. Shepperd

    1985-01-01

    Harvesting is the removal of produce from the forest for utilization. It includes cutting, any further initial processing, such as topping and trimming, and extraction (Ford-Robertson 1971). Commercial intermediate cutting, such as commercial thinning, as well as regeneration cutting are included. Harvesting and the income that it produces sometimes is regarded as an...

  3. Harvesting

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The spindle picker and brush-roll stripper are the two machines used to harvest cotton produced in the United States. Adoption of each harvester type is dictated by regional differences in regard to production environment, production practices, cultivar, and yield. The spindle picker is a selectiv...

  4. Stripper harvesting

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cotton produced in the High Plains of Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas and the Blackland, Coastal bend, and Rolling Plains regions of Texas is harvested using brush roll stripper type harvesters. These machines were developed to harvest cotton characterized by low yield, tight boll conformation, and shor...

  5. Tree harvesting

    SciTech Connect

    Badger, P.C.

    1995-12-31

    Short rotation intensive culture tree plantations have been a major part of biomass energy concepts since the beginning. One aspect receiving less attention than it deserves is harvesting. This article describes an method of harvesting somewhere between agricultural mowing machines and huge feller-bunchers of the pulpwood and lumber industries.

  6. INFINITY harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-07

    Lauren Lombard from Benjamin E. Mays Preparatory School in New Orleans enjoys lettuce she helped to harvest at the INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center facility May 7, 2012. The Louisiana students assisted in the first harvest of lettuce from the Controlled Environment Agriculture unit, which uses an aeroponic process that involves no soil and advance LED lighting techniques

  7. INFINITY harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-07

    Shania Etheridge from Benjamin E. Mays Preparatory School in New Orleans shows off the head of lettuce she harvested at the INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center facility May 7, 2012. The Louisiana students assisted in the first harvest of lettuce from the Controlled Environment Agriculture unit, which uses an aeroponic process that involves no soil and advance LED lighting techniques.

  8. Stump Harvesting

    Treesearch

    Dana. Mitchell

    2009-01-01

    Increased use of forest fuel requires larger and larger procurement areas. Inclusion of stump material within the shorter distances could make this unusual source of biomass more economical to harvest. Land clearing activities are also helping to raise interest in stump harvesting. Processing stump material for biomass is an alternative...

  9. INFINITY harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-07

    Janice Hueschen of Innovative Imaging & Research Corp. at Stennis Space Center helps students from Benjamin E. Mays Preparatory School in New Orleans harvest lettuce at the INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center facility May 7, 2012. The Louisiana students assisted in the first harvest of lettuce from the Controlled Environment Agriculture unit, which uses an aeroponic process that involves no soil and advance LED lighting techniques.

  10. INFINITY harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-07

    The Controlled Environment Agriculture unit at the INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center visitor center and museum grows butterhead lettuce using an aeroponic process that involves no soil and advance LED lighting techniques. Students from Benjamin E. Mays Preparatory School in New Orleans helped to harvest the first crop of lettuce during a visit to the facility May 7, 2012.

  11. INFINITY harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-07

    Students from Benjamin E. Mays Preparatory School in New Orleans enjoyed a hands-on experience at the INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center facility May 7, 2012. The Louisiana students assisted in the first harvest of lettuce from the Controlled Environment Agriculture unit, which uses an aeroponic process that involves no soil and advance LED lighting techniques.

  12. Cotton Harvesting

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cotton harvesting is performed in the US using either a spindle picker or brush-roll stripper. This presentation discusses the environmental, economic, geographic, and cultivar specific reasons behind a grower's choice to use either machine. The development of each machine system was discussed. A...

  13. 1972 Oregon timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    J.D. Jr. Lloyd

    1973-01-01

    The 1972 Oregon timber harvest of 9.6 billion board feet was 602 million board feet (6.7 percent) above the 1971 harvest. Western Oregon's harvest rose 8 percent and eastern Oregon's harvest rose 2 percent.

  14. 1971 Oregon timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Wall

    1972-01-01

    The 1971 Oregon timber harvest of 9.03 billion board feet was the highest since 1969 when 9.15 billion board feet was harvested. The 1971 total harvest was 13.1 percent above the 1970 figure. Western Oregon's harvest rose 11-5 percent, and eastern Oregon's harvest rose 18.6 percent.

  15. Switchgrass harvest and storage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The feedstock characteristics of the conversion platform will influence the optimal harvest and post harvest management practices for switchgrass. However, many of the harvest management practices are tied to plant phenology and will be similar across platforms. Proper harvest and storage of switchg...

  16. 1975 Oregon timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    J.D. Jr. Lloyd

    1976-01-01

    The 1975 Oregon timber harvest declined to its lowest level since 1961 with a harvest of 7.37 billion board feet, 991 million board feet (11.9 percent) below the 1974 harvest. The harvest was down in both western Oregon (823 million board feet, 13.2 percent) and eastern Oregon (168 million board feet, 7.7 percent). For the first time since 1961, the harvest on private...

  17. Harvesting wood for energy.

    Treesearch

    Rodger A. Arola; Edwin W. Miyata

    1981-01-01

    Illustrates the potential of harvesting wood for industrial energy, based on the results of five harvesting studies. Presents information on harvesting operations, equipment costs, and productivity. Discusses mechanized thinning of hardwoods, clearcutting of low-value stands and recovery of hardwood tops and limbs. Also includes basic information on the physical and...

  18. 1969 Washington timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Wall

    1970-01-01

    Washington's timber harvest increased slightly in 1969 to a 40-year high of 7 billion board feet. This is slightly below the record timber harvest of 7.38 billion board feet established in 1829. Private timberland owners in western Washington increased their production 10.9 percent, accounting for most of the increase in the 1969 total harvest. In eastern...

  19. 1971 Washington timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Wall

    1972-01-01

    Washington's 1971 timber harvest of 6.45 billion board feet was nearly the same as the 1970 harvest level. The total timber harvest on public lands increased nearly 4 percent with a 30-percent increase in eastern Washington more than offsetting a 5-percent decline in western Washington. Part of the increase in eastern Washington reflects salvage of a large volume...

  20. Harvesting in seasonal environments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cailin; Boyce, Mark S; Daley, Daryl J

    2005-06-01

    Most harvest theory is based on an assumption of a constant or stochastic environment, yet most populations experience some form of environmental seasonality. Assuming that a population follows logistic growth we investigate harvesting in seasonal environments, focusing on maximum annual yield (M.A.Y.) and population persistence under five commonly used harvest strategies. We show that the optimal strategy depends dramatically on the intrinsic growth rate of population and the magnitude of seasonality. The ordered effectiveness of these alternative harvest strategies is given for different combinations of intrinsic growth rate and seasonality. Also, for piecewise continuous-time harvest strategies (i.e., open/closed harvest, and pulse harvest) harvest timing is of crucial importance to annual yield. Optimal timing for harvests coincides with maximal rate of decline in the seasonally fluctuating carrying capacity. For large intrinsic growth rate and small environmental variability several strategies (i.e., constant exploitation rate, linear exploitation rate, and time-dependent harvest) are so effective that M.A.Y. is very close to maximum sustainable yield (M.S.Y.). M.A.Y. of pulse harvest can be even larger than M.S.Y. because in seasonal environments population size varies substantially during the course of the year and how it varies relative to the carrying capacity is what determines the value relative to optimal harvest rate. However, for populations with small intrinsic growth rate but subject to large seasonality none of these strategies is particularly effective with M.A.Y. much lower than M.S.Y. Finding an optimal harvest strategy for this case and to explore harvesting in populations that follow other growth models (e.g., involving predation or age structure) will be an interesting but challenging problem.

  1. Broadband pendulum energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Changwei; Wu, You; Zuo, Lei

    2016-09-01

    A novel electromagnetic pendulum energy harvester with mechanical motion rectifier (MMR) is proposed and investigated in this paper. MMR is a mechanism which rectifies the bidirectional swing motion of the pendulum into unidirectional rotation of the generator by using two one-way clutches in the gear system. In this paper, two prototypes of pendulum energy harvester with MMR and without MMR are designed and fabricated. The dynamic model of the proposed MMR pendulum energy harvester is established by considering the engagement and disengagement of the one way clutches. The simulation results show that the proposed MMR pendulum energy harvester has a larger output power at high frequencies comparing with non-MMR pendulum energy harvester which benefits from the disengagement of one-way clutch during pendulum vibration. Moreover, the proposed MMR pendulum energy harvester is broadband compare with non-MMR pendulum energy harvester, especially when the equivalent inertia is large. An experiment is also conducted to compare the energy harvesting performance of these two prototypes. A flywheel is attached at the end of the generator to make the disengagement more significant. The experiment results also verify that MMR pendulum energy harvester is broadband and has a larger output power at high frequency over the non-MMR pendulum energy harvester.

  2. 1967 Oregon timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Wall

    1968-01-01

    Oregon's timber harvest was 8.4 billion board feet in 1967, 6.3 percent below the 1966 harvest. The total private harvest declined 7 percent in 1967 with a 153-million-board-foot (4.3-percent) decrease in western Oregon and a 138-million-board-foot (22.7-percent) drop in eastern Oregon. Forest industries had the greatest decline in production of all owners; their...

  3. 1968 Oregon timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Wall

    1969-01-01

    Oregon's 1968 timber harvest of 9.74 billion board feet was the largest since 1952, when a record 9.80 billion board feet was produced. Public agencies' harvests increased 25.0 percent in western Oregon and 4.1 percent in eastern Oregon for a total increase of 19.1 percent, 864.9 million board feet above the public harvest in 1967. National Forests had the...

  4. 1969 Oregon timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Wall

    1970-01-01

    The 1969 Oregon timber harvest of 9.15 billion board feet was 6.1 percent below the 1968 16-year peak of 9.74 billion board feet. In western Oregon, the 1969 harvest was down 9.1 percent with public production and private production off 10.8 and 7.2 percent, respectively. By contrast, log harvest in eastern Oregon rose 5 percent, with private production up 13.2 percent...

  5. 1968 Washington timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Wall

    1969-01-01

    Washington's 1968 timber harvest of 6.97 billion board feet was the largest since 1929 when a record 7.38 billion board feet was produced. Private harvests increased 16.5 percent in western Washington and 15.7 percent in eastern Washington for an average increase of 16.5 percent, 45.5 million board feet above the private harvest in 1967. Forest industries in...

  6. 1966 Washington timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Wall

    1967-01-01

    The 1966 Washington timber harvest of 6.1 billion board feet was 6.8 percent below the 1965 level. This was the first decline since 1961. In part, the lower harvest in 1966 was due to completion of salvage logging of the 1962 blowdown. The volume of dead timber salvaged in 1966 was only 6 percent of the total, compared with 15 percent in 1965. The live timber harvest...

  7. 1973 Washington timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    J.D. Jr. Lloyd

    1974-01-01

    Washington's 1973 timber harvest increased 730 million board feet (10.3 percent) above the 1972 harvest to set a record at 7.81 billion board feet. The previous record set in 1929 was 7.38 billion board feet. Nearly all the increase for the State was in western Washington where the harvest was 700 million board feet (11.9 percent) greater than the previous year....

  8. 1967 Washington timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Wall

    1968-01-01

    Washington's 1967 timber harvest declined to 5.9 billion board feet, 2.3 percent below the 1966 harvest. The cut on public lands remained about the same as in 1966 with a 6.7-percent increase in public cut in eastern Washington, offsetting a 2.2-percent decrease in western Washington. The Indian lands had the greatest increase in harvest, up 35 million board feet...

  9. 1970 Washington timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Wall

    1971-01-01

    Washington's 1970 timber harvest of 6.46 billion board feet was 7.8 percent below the near record harvest of 7 billion board feet established in 1969. Timber harvests on all public lands declined 13 percent with a 9.0-percent reduction in western Washington and a 22.9-percent drop in eastern Washington. State lands led the decline in public production with a 142-...

  10. 1966 Oregon timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Wall

    1967-01-01

    The 1966 Oregon timber harvest totaled 8.9 billion board feet, 5 percent less than the harvest in 1965. During 1966, the total public timber harvest declined 10 percent to 4.8 billion board feet. The uncut volume of public timber under contract at the end of 1966 was 7.6 billion board feet, up 1.3 billion board feet from 1965's year end total. National Forest...

  11. Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullerits, T.; Polivka, T.; Sundström, V.

    Photosynthetic organisms utilize (bacterio) chlorophylls and carotenoids as main light-harvesting pigments. In this chapter, we review bacteriochlorophyll light-harvesting in photosynthetic purple bacteria; we discuss intra- and intercomplex energy transfer processes as well as energy trapping by reaction centers. From the viewpoint of light-harvesting, in most organisms carotenoids are accessory pigments absorbing in the blue-green region of the solar spectrum, where chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophylls have weak absorption. Here, we discuss carotenoid light-harvesting in a pigment-protein complex having carotenoids as main lightharvesting pigment, the peridinin chlorophyll protein (PCP).

  12. Harvesting the radial artery

    PubMed Central

    Osterday, Robert M.; Brodman, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    The radial artery (RA) has emerged as an important arterial graft for coronary bypass surgery. With improving five-year patency rates and increasing uptake, great attention has been focused on the optimal conduit harvesting technique. We herein present our approach to RA harvesting. Prerequisites of a successful harvest include adherence to important anatomical landmarks, protection of the sensory innervation to the volar forearm, and meticulous handling of the RA branches. Regardless of the harvesting methodology chosen, adherence to a “no-touch” technique will optimize the patency and durability of the RA conduit. PMID:23977633

  13. 1970 Oregon timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Wall

    1971-01-01

    The 1970 Oregon timber harvest of 7.98 billion board feet was the lowest recorded since the recession year of 1961 when 7.41 billion board feet of timber was produced. The 1970 log production figure was 12.8 percent below the 1969 harvest, the second consecutive year of declining production in Oregon.

  14. 1976 Washington timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    J.D. Jr. Lloyd

    1978-01-01

    The 1976 Washington timber harvest of 6.97 billion board feet was up 12.7 percent from the 8-year low experienced in 1975. Harvest increased about the same percentage in both eastern and western Washington. Production from all owner groups rose except non-industrial private and other Federal (see table headings on page 2).

  15. Rainwater Harvesting and Dengue.

    PubMed

    Arceivala, Soli

    2014-01-01

    As a retired Environmental Health Chief (UN/WHO SEAsia Region) I got involved in rainwater harvesting in India through my Rotary Club a few years ago and my recent experiences have prompted the following observations. I find rainwater harvesting has three specific dangers to public health which get overlooked each year in our anxiety to meet drinking water shortages in our cities.

  16. 1965 Washington timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Wall

    1966-01-01

    Washington's timber harvest increased for the fourth consecutive year in 1965 to 6.5 billion board feet. This 4-percent increase was not as great as the 15 percent experienced in 1964. The total timber harvest reached the highest level since 1929, with most of the increased production occurring in western Washington.

  17. 1974 Washington timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    J.D. Jr. Lloyd

    1976-01-01

    The 1974 timber harvest of 6.88 billion board feet declined 933 million board feet (11.9 percent) below the record 1973 harvest. Decreases occurred in almost all owner groups. In western Washington the decline was 856 million board feet (13.0 percent). In eastern Washington the decline was 76 million board feet (6.3 percent).

  18. 1965 Oregon timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Wall

    1966-01-01

    Oregon maintained its high level of timber harvest in 1965 with an output of 9.4 billion board feet. This was the first time since 1926 that production remained unchanged in 2 consecutive years. The harvest from private lands remained stable at 4 billion feet, or 43 percent of the total. Forest industry's cut declined 2 percent (83 million board feet) from 1964,...

  19. 1964 Washington timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    Brian R. Wall

    1965-01-01

    The 1964 timber harvest was 6.2 billion board feet—an increase of 15 percent over 1963 (table 1). Total timber harvest for both western Washington and the State reached the highest level since 1929. A new all-time high in production was also recorded for eastern Washington—1 billion board feet.

  20. Maple Sugar Harvesting/Wild Rice Harvesting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Public Schools, MN.

    Comprised of two separate booklets, this resource unit assists elementary teachers in explaining how the Ojibwe people harvest maple sugar and wild rice. The first booklet explains the procedure of tapping the maple trees for sap, preparation for boiling the sap, and the three forms the sugar is made into (granulated, "molded," and…

  1. Power Harvesting from Rotation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicone, Carmen; Feng, Z. C.

    2008-01-01

    We show the impossibility of harvesting power from rotational motions by devices attached to the rotating object. The presentation is suitable for students who have studied Lagrangian mechanics. (Contains 2 figures.)

  2. 1977 Washington timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    J.D. Jr. Lloyd

    1979-01-01

    After a near record output in 1976, Washington log production declined 5.4 percent in 1977 to 6.59 billion board feet. Western Washington production was 415 million board feet lower than in 1976; eastern Washington, 36 million board feet higher. The private harvest was 62 percent of the total, the lowest in 4 years. For the past 15 years, the harvest from the western...

  3. [Accidents affecting potato harvesters].

    PubMed

    Hansen, J U

    1993-09-27

    During industrialization in agriculture, many farming machines have been introduced. It is well-known that farming is a dangerous workplace and that farm machinery cause many serious accidents every year. Four cases of accidents with potato harvesters are discussed. In three of four cases the farmers were injured while cleaning the machine without stopping it, which probably was the main cause of the accidents. Farmers are in general not careful enough when using farm machinery. Every year, farmers in Denmark are severely invalided in accidents with potato harvesters. A strategy to lower the accidents is proposed: 1. Information of farmers, farmer schools, machine constructors and importers about mechanisms of injury. 2. A better education of farmers in using potato harvesters (and other farming machines). 3. Better fencing of the potato harvesters. 4. If possibly constructional changes in the potato harvesters so things will not get stuck, or so that the machine will stop if things stuck. 5. Installation of switches on potato harvesters, which can be reached from all positions, stopping the machines immediately, or a remote switch control carried by the farmer.

  4. Veg-01 Plant Harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-10

    Commander Steve Swanson harvests plants for the VEG-01 investigation. He is harvesting them on the Maintenance Work Area (MWA) in the Node 2/Harmony. The Veg-01 hardware validation test investigation utilizes the Veggie facility on ISS. This investigation will assess on-orbit function and performance of the Veggie,and focus on the growth and development of Outredgeous Lettuce (Lactuca sativa ) seedlings in the spaceflight environment and the effects of the spaceflight environment on composition of microbial flora on the Veggie-grown plants and the Veggie facility. Lettuce plants are harvested on-orbit, frozen at <-80oC and returned to the ground for post-flight evaluation. Microbial sampling swabs will be taken of the Veggie facility and plant material, frozen and returned to the ground for environmental microbiological examination. Rooting pillows and water sample syringes will also be returned for microbial sampling and root analysis.

  5. Light harvesting arrays

    DOEpatents

    Lindsey, Jonathan S.

    2002-01-01

    A light harvesting array useful for the manufacture of devices such as solar cells comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2, and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  6. An autoparametric energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecik, K.; Borowiec, M.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of an autoparametric system composed of two elements: a pendulum and an excited nonlinear oscillator. Owing to an inertial coupling between the two elements, different types of motion are possible, from periodic to chaotic. This study examines a linear induction of an energy harvester depending on the pendulum motion. The harvester consists of a cylindrical permanent magnet mounted on a rotor and of four windings fixed to the housing as a stator. When the pendulum is rotating or swinging, the converter is generating energy due to magnetic induction. In this paper, a method utilizing parametrical resonance for harvesting energy from low frequency vibrations is studied. The authors compare energy induced by different types of pendulum motion: swinging, rotation and chaotic dynamics. Additionally, voltage values for different parameters of excitation are estimated.

  7. Kenaf harvest decision matrix or how should I harvest kenaf?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The correct harvest method for kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L., Malvaceae) is dependent on many factors, including production location, equipment availability, storage options, processing plans, plant utilization, and economics. Since its first domestication, kenaf has consistently been hand-harveste...

  8. Magnetoelectric Energy Harvesting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-20

    magnetic fields therethrough. A piezoelectric material capable of a phase transition and a magnetostrictive material capable of a structural change...housing and the combination of the piezoelectric and magnetostrictive materials. Electrical contacts are positioned on the piezoelectric material. A...mechanical energy harvesting device and more particularly relates to such a device that has a magnetostrictive and piezoelectric component. (2

  9. Pepper harvest technology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) include a diverse collection of cultivars produced for a wide variety of end uses. This specialty crop and its processing industry are in the midst of a dual transition driven by labor cost and unavailability. Production and post-harvest processing is either converting to m...

  10. PEPPER HARVESTER DEVELOPMENT

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) include a diverse collection of cultivars produced for a wide variety of end uses. This specialty crop and its processing industry are in the midst of a transition driven by labor cost and unavailability. Production and post-harvest processing is either converting to mechan...

  11. 1972 Washington timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    J.D. Jr. Lloyd

    1973-01-01

    Washington's 1972 timber harvest increased 629 million board feet to 7.08 billion board feet, 9.8 percent above 1971. This was the highest level of production since 1929 when the record was established at 7.38 billion board feet.

  12. 1975 Washington timber harvest.

    Treesearch

    J.D. Jr. Lloyd

    1977-01-01

    In 1975, the Washington timber harvest declined for the 2d year to 6.2 billion board feet, 10 percent below 1974, and the lowest level in 8 years. The decrease, which occurred on almost all ownerships, amounted to 561 million board feet in western Washington and 130 million board feet in eastern Washington.

  13. Adaptive vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Sam; Ward, John; Davidson, Josh

    2007-04-01

    By scavenging energy from their local environment, portable electronic devices such as mobile phones, radios and wireless sensors can achieve greater run-times with potentially lower weight. Vibration energy harvesting is one such approach where energy from parasitic vibrations can be converted into electrical energy, through the use of piezoelectric and electromagnetic transducers. Parasitic vibrations come from a range of sources such as wind, seismic forces and traffic. Existing approaches to vibration energy harvesting typically utilise a rectifier circuit, which is tuned to the resonant frequency of the harvesting structure and the dominant frequency of vibration. We have developed a novel approach to vibration energy harvesting, including adaption to non-periodic vibrations so as to extract the maximum amount of vibration energy available. Experimental results of an experimental apparatus using off-the-shelf transducer (i.e. speaker coil) show mechanical vibration to electrical energy conversion efficiencies of 27 - 34%. However, simulations of a more electro-mechanical efficient and lightly damped transducer show conversion efficiencies in excess of 80%.

  14. Harvesting and utilization

    Treesearch

    A. Seki; D.L. Sirois; T. Kamen

    1982-01-01

    This xction explains the harvesting system selected. based upon topography, soil condition, and tree size. It is a highly mechmized, capital intensive system which includes tracked feller-bunchers to cut and bunch the trees. and trucked forwarders to transport the bunched trees to a whole tree chipper. The chips will be loaded into vans and transported to a designated...

  15. Harvesting equipment to reduce particulate matter emissions from almond harvest.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, William B

    2013-01-01

    Almond harvest accounts for an estimated 12 Gg of PM10 emissions in California each harvest season. Emissions from three new, "low-dust" almond harvesters (Exact Harvest Systems E4000; Flory Industries 8550; Weiss-McNair 9800 California Special) and one exhaust abatement device (Joe DiAnna, Clean Air Concept) were compared to those from a conventional harvester operating in the same orchard. Emissions of TSP and PM10 trended lower for all new harvesters and were significantly lower for most harvesters (alpha < 0.10). Significant reductions in PM2.5 emissions were observed from two harvesters as well. Fractionation analysis was not conducted on nut samples collected in the second year of the project, but differences observed in the composition of material that would be delivered to the huller between the Exact E4000 and conventional harvesters were functionally insignificant. The results of these tests imply that new harvest technologies are able to reduce PM10 emissions from one of the largest sources in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California without affecting product quality. As such, use of these new harvesters should be considered a conservation measure that would help the SJV Air Pollution Control District (SJVAPCD) meet the requirements of their PM10 maintenance plan. The results of this research indicate that new harvesting technologies have the potential to substantially reduce PM emissions from almond harvest operations over traditional harvester designs without negatively affecting product quality. As such, use of these new harvesters could aid the SJVAPCD in maintaining its attainment status for PM10 and should be considered as candidate conservation management practices for producers.

  16. Advancements in Cotton Harvesting Research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cotton harvesting research within USDA ARS is focused on improving harvest productivity, cotton quality, and producer profitability. In recent years, our work has encompassed efforts to improve both spindle picker and brush-roll stripper harvesting systems. Specifically, work with cotton pickers i...

  17. Green Chile Pepper Harvest Mechanization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pungent green chile (genus /Capsicum/, also spelled chili) is a large, fragile fruit growing on berry shrubs. Chile is harvested by hand to maximize yields and minimize fruit damage. Labor for hand harvesting chile is increasingly costly and difficult to obtain. Harvest mechanization is viewed as...

  18. Nanoparticles: potential biomarker harvesters.

    PubMed

    Geho, David H; Jones, Clinton D; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance A

    2006-02-01

    A previously untapped bank of information resides within the low molecular weight proteomic fraction of blood. Intensive efforts are underway to harness this information so that it can be used for early diagnosis of diseases such as cancer. The physicochemical malleability and high surface areas of nanoparticle surfaces make them ideal candidates for developing biomarker harvesting platforms. Given the variety of engineering strategies afforded through nanoparticle technologies, a significant goal is to tailor nanoparticle surfaces to selectively bind a subset of biomarkers, sequestering them for later study using high sensitivity proteomic tests. To date, applications of nanoparticles have largely focused on imaging systems and drug delivery vectors. As such, biomarker harvesting is an underutilized application of nanoparticle technology and is an area of nanotechnology research that will likely undergo substantial growth.

  19. Harvesting contaminants from liquid

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Hunter, Scott R.

    2016-05-31

    Disclosed are examples of apparatuses for evaporative purification of a contaminated liquid. In each example, there is a vessel for storing the contaminated fluid. The vessel includes a surface coated with a layer of superhydrophobic material and the surface is at least partially in contact with the contaminated liquid. The contaminants do not adhere to the surface as the purified liquid evaporates, thus allowing the contaminants to be harvested.

  20. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Caliò, Renato; Rongala, Udaya Bhaskar; Camboni, Domenico; Milazzo, Mario; Stefanini, Cesare; de Petris, Gianluca; Oddo, Calogero Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art in piezoelectric energy harvesting. It presents the basics of piezoelectricity and discusses materials choice. The work places emphasis on material operating modes and device configurations, from resonant to non-resonant devices and also to rotational solutions. The reviewed literature is compared based on power density and bandwidth. Lastly, the question of power conversion is addressed by reviewing various circuit solutions. PMID:24618725

  1. An energy harvesting bracelet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiyi; Tang, Jianhong; Zhang, Xin; Yu, Zhicheng

    2017-07-01

    An energy harvesting bracelet (EHB) based on two mutually exclusive circular motion permanent magnetic movers is demonstrated, which is able to capture energy through the natural motions of the wearer's wrist. The EHB can transform the translational motion in any orientation except the axial into the rotational motion of the movers, which passes through four coil transducers and induces significantly large electro-motive forces across the coils. A prototype EHB is shown to produce power that can charge a capacitor with 470 μF 25 V up to more than 0.81 V during at most 132 ms from any single excitations.

  2. Veg-01 Plant Harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-10

    ISS040-E-009116 (10 June 2014) --- In the International Space Station?s Harmony node, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson, Expedition 40 commander, harvests a crop of red romaine lettuce plants that were grown from seed inside the station?s Veggie facility, a low-cost plant growth chamber that uses a flat-panel light bank for plant growth and crew observation. For the Veg-01 experiment, researchers are testing and validating the Veggie hardware, and the plants will be returned to Earth to determine food safety.

  3. Veg-01 Plant Harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-10

    ISS040-E-009124 (10 June 2014) --- In the International Space Station?s Harmony node, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson, Expedition 40 commander, harvests a crop of red romaine lettuce plants that were grown from seed inside the station?s Veggie facility, a low-cost plant growth chamber that uses a flat-panel light bank for plant growth and crew observation. For the Veg-01 experiment, researchers are testing and validating the Veggie hardware, and the plants will be returned to Earth to determine food safety.

  4. Veg-01 Plant Harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-10

    ISS040-E-009125 (10 June 2014) --- In the International Space Station?s Harmony node, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson, Expedition 40 commander, harvests a crop of red romaine lettuce plants that were grown from seed inside the station?s Veggie facility, a low-cost plant growth chamber that uses a flat-panel light bank for plant growth and crew observation. For the Veg-01 experiment, researchers are testing and validating the Veggie hardware, and the plants will be returned to Earth to determine food safety.

  5. Light harvesting dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Nantalaksakul, Arpornrat; Reddy, D Raghunath; Bardeen, Christopher J; Thayumanavan, S

    2006-01-01

    Tree-like dendrimers with decreasing number of chromophores from periphery to core is an attractive candidate for light-harvesting applications. Numerous dendritic designs with different kinds of light-collecting chromophores at periphery and an energy-sink at the core have been demonstrated with high energy transfer efficiency. These building blocks are now being developed for several applications such as light-emitting diodes, frequency converters and other photonic devices. This review outlines the efforts that are based on both conjugated and non-conjugated dendrimers.

  6. Veg-03 Ground Harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-05

    Inside the Veggie flight laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a research scientist harvests a portion of the 'Outredgeous' red romaine lettuce from the Veg-03 ground control unit. The purpose of the ground Veggie system is to provide a control group to compare against the lettuce grown in orbit on the International Space Station. Veg-03 will continue NASA’s deep space plant growth research to benefit the Earth and the agency’s journey to Mars.

  7. Veg-03 Ground Harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-05

    Inside the Veggie flight laboratory in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Matthew Romeyn, a NASA Pathways intern from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, harvests a portion of the 'Outredgeous' red romaine lettuce from the Veg-03 ground control unit. The purpose of the ground Veggie system is to provide a control group to compare against the lettuce grown in orbit on the International Space Station. Veg-03 will continue NASA’s deep space plant growth research to benefit the Earth and the agency’s journey to Mars.

  8. Stand, Harvest, and Equipment Interactions in Simulated Harvesting Prescriptions

    Treesearch

    Jingxin Wang; W. Dale Greene; Bryce J. Stokes

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated potential interactions of stand type, harvesting method, and equipment in an experiment using interactive simulation. We examined three felling methods (chain saw, feller-buncher, harvester) and two extraction methods (grapple skidder and forwarder) performing clearcuts, sheltenvood cuts, and single-tree selection cuts in both an uneven-aged natural stand...

  9. Harvesting to get a Eucalyptus coppice crop

    Treesearch

    Thomas F. Geary

    1983-01-01

    Coppicing of eucalypts saves replanting after harvesting, but plan for coppice before planting seedlings. Select a species that coppices in the planned season of harvest; plan spacing and harvesting methods so that harvesting will not damage stumps; plan coppice management. Best coppice is produced by spring harvest with chain saws, low stumps, no bark or root damage,...

  10. The Spindle Type Cotton Harvester

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The spindle type cotton picker was commercialized during the mid 1900’s and is currently produced by two US agricultural equipment manufacturers, John Deere and CaseIH. Picking is the predominate machine harvest method used throughout the US and world. Harvesting efficiency of a spindle type cotton ...

  11. Electrochemically driven mechanical energy harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangtae; Choi, Soon Ju; Zhao, Kejie; Yang, Hui; Gobbi, Giorgia; Zhang, Sulin; Li, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Efficient mechanical energy harvesters enable various wearable devices and auxiliary energy supply. Here we report a novel class of mechanical energy harvesters via stress–voltage coupling in electrochemically alloyed electrodes. The device consists of two identical Li-alloyed Si as electrodes, separated by electrolyte-soaked polymer membranes. Bending-induced asymmetric stresses generate chemical potential difference, driving lithium ion flux from the compressed to the tensed electrode to generate electrical current. Removing the bending reverses ion flux and electrical current. Our thermodynamic analysis reveals that the ideal energy-harvesting efficiency of this device is dictated by the Poisson's ratio of the electrodes. For the thin-film-based energy harvester used in this study, the device has achieved a generating capacity of 15%. The device demonstrates a practical use of stress-composition–voltage coupling in electrochemically active alloys to harvest low-grade mechanical energies from various low-frequency motions, such as everyday human activities. PMID:26733282

  12. Electrochemically driven mechanical energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangtae; Choi, Soon Ju; Zhao, Kejie; Yang, Hui; Gobbi, Giorgia; Zhang, Sulin; Li, Ju

    2016-01-06

    Efficient mechanical energy harvesters enable various wearable devices and auxiliary energy supply. Here we report a novel class of mechanical energy harvesters via stress-voltage coupling in electrochemically alloyed electrodes. The device consists of two identical Li-alloyed Si as electrodes, separated by electrolyte-soaked polymer membranes. Bending-induced asymmetric stresses generate chemical potential difference, driving lithium ion flux from the compressed to the tensed electrode to generate electrical current. Removing the bending reverses ion flux and electrical current. Our thermodynamic analysis reveals that the ideal energy-harvesting efficiency of this device is dictated by the Poisson's ratio of the electrodes. For the thin-film-based energy harvester used in this study, the device has achieved a generating capacity of 15%. The device demonstrates a practical use of stress-composition-voltage coupling in electrochemically active alloys to harvest low-grade mechanical energies from various low-frequency motions, such as everyday human activities.

  13. Electrochemically driven mechanical energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangtae; Choi, Soon Ju; Zhao, Kejie; Yang, Hui; Gobbi, Giorgia; Zhang, Sulin; Li, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Efficient mechanical energy harvesters enable various wearable devices and auxiliary energy supply. Here we report a novel class of mechanical energy harvesters via stress-voltage coupling in electrochemically alloyed electrodes. The device consists of two identical Li-alloyed Si as electrodes, separated by electrolyte-soaked polymer membranes. Bending-induced asymmetric stresses generate chemical potential difference, driving lithium ion flux from the compressed to the tensed electrode to generate electrical current. Removing the bending reverses ion flux and electrical current. Our thermodynamic analysis reveals that the ideal energy-harvesting efficiency of this device is dictated by the Poisson's ratio of the electrodes. For the thin-film-based energy harvester used in this study, the device has achieved a generating capacity of 15%. The device demonstrates a practical use of stress-composition-voltage coupling in electrochemically active alloys to harvest low-grade mechanical energies from various low-frequency motions, such as everyday human activities.

  14. Fall Harvest in Kazakhstan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    September 22, the autumnal equinox, marks the beginning of fall in the Northern Hemisphere, but the fall harvest begins early in the harsh continental climate of eastern Kazakhstan. By September 9, 2013, when the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite acquired this image, several fields were already harvested and bare. Others were dark green with pasture grasses or ripening crops. The fields fill the contours of the land, running long and narrow down mountain valleys and spreading in large squares over the plains. Agriculture is an important segment of the economy in Kazakhstan: the country’s dry climate is ideal for producing high quality wheat for export. However, 61 percent of the country’s agricultural land is pasture for livestock. The area shown in this image, far eastern Kazakhstan near the Chinese border, is a minor wheat-growing region and may also produce sunflowers, barley, and other food crops. An artifact of Soviet-era collective farms, most of the farms in Kazakhstan are large, covering more than 5,000 hectares (12,500 acres). Some of the larger fields in the image reflect the big business side of agriculture. However, family farms and small agriculture businesses account for 35 percent of the country’s agricultural production, and some of these are visible as well, particularly in the uneven hills and mountains. Nearly all agriculture in Kazakhstan is rain fed. Farmers in this region have designed their fields to take advantage of rain flowing down hills, allowing the natural shape of the land to channel water to crops. The effect is a mosaic of green and tan with tones matching the natural vegetation in the mountains to the north. NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey. Caption by Holli Riebeek. Instrument: Landsat 8 - OLI More info: 1.usa.gov/16IZ047 NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth

  15. Ocean Wave Energy Harvesting Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    coupled to a suitable buoy platform. 2. The approach of designing a device which meets the requirements for mounting on dogfish and generating...used on the tail of a marine life such as dogfish to harvest energy as it swims. The output power can be used to trickle charge battery packs to power...to be mounted to a dogfish to harvest energy from its motion. Due to the small fish size (approximate 40-50 inches, 25 pounds), the device was

  16. Alternate biomass harvesting systems using conventional equipment

    Treesearch

    Bryce J. Stokes; William F. Watson; I. Winston Savelle

    1985-01-01

    Three harvesting methods were field tested in two stand types. Costs and stand utilization rates were developed for a conventional harvesting system, without energy wood recovery; a two-pass roundwood and energy wood system; and a one-pass system that harvests roundwood and energy wood. The systems harvested 20-acre test blocks in two pine pulpwood plantations and in a...

  17. Harvesting small stems -- A Southern USA perspective

    Treesearch

    William F. Watson; Bryce J. Stokes

    1989-01-01

    Operations that harvest small stems using conventional equipment are discussed. A typical operation consists of rubber-tired feller-bunchers with shear heads, rubber-tired grapple skidders, and in-woods chippers. These systems harvest the small stems either in a pre-harvest, postharvest, or integrated-harvest method.

  18. Comparison of modern cotton harvest systems on irrigated cotton: Harvester performance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Harvester performance, fiber quality, and harvest system costs are important considerations when comparing cotton harvesting systems. Harvester performance was measured as a function of time-in-motion, harvest efficiency, foreign matter content of seed cotton, and lint turnout at the gin at seven ir...

  19. A Hip Implant Energy Harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancharoen, K.; Zhu, D.; Beeby, S. P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a kinetic energy harvester designed to be embedded in a hip implant which aims to operate at a low frequency associated with body motion of patients. The prototype is designed based on the constrained volume available in a hip prosthesis and the challenge is to harvest energy from low frequency movements (< 1 Hz) which is an average frequency during free walking of a patient. The concept of magnetic-force-driven energy harvesting is applied to this prototype considering the hip movements during routine activities of patients. The magnetic field within the harvester was simulated using COMSOL. The simulated resonant frequency was around 30 Hz and the voltage induced in a coil was predicted to be 47.8 mV. A prototype of the energy harvester was fabricated and tested. A maximum open circuit voltage of 39.43 mV was obtained and the resonant frequency of 28 Hz was observed. Moreover, the power output of 0.96 μW was achieved with an optimum resistive load of 250Ω.

  20. Ascorbate metabolism in harvested broccoli.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Fumie; Kato, Masaya; Hyodo, Hiroshi; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Sugiura, Minoru; Yano, Masamichi

    2003-11-01

    The ascorbate content declined rapidly in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) florets, but not in the stem tissue, during post-harvest senescence. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX), ascorbate oxidase (AO), l-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), and glutathione reductase (GR) were investigated in gene expression after harvest in both florets and the stem tissue of broccoli. Cytosolic gene expressions (BO-APX 1, BO-APX 2, BO-AO, BO-MDAR 2, and BO-GR) were stimulated actively in broccoli florets after harvest. By contrast, it was observed that mRNA levels of chloroplastic APX, BO-sAPX and BO-tbAPX, had decreased by 12 h after harvest in broccoli florets, suggesting that the active oxygen species (AOS) scavenging system in chloroplasts was largely abolished in florets during the early hours of the post-harvest period. In addition, gene expressions in GLDH and other chloroplastic enzymes such as BO-MDAR 1 and BO-DHAR decreased rapidly within 24 h after harvest. Ethylene treatment had no effect on the ascorbate level and the expression of all genes investigated. The expressions of BO-GLDH and chloroplastic genes (BO-sAPX, BO-tbAPX, BO-MDAR 1, and BO-DHAR) mRNA were suppressed by treatment with methyl jasmonate (MJ) and abscisic acid (ABA) and were accompanied by the acceleration of ascorbate degradation. These data suggest that ascorbate metabolism tends to be inactivated in chloroplasts by transcriptional regulation, but not in the cytosol, when ascorbate decreases under stress conditions.

  1. A magnetically sprung vibration harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, P.; Mellor, P. H.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2010-04-01

    The use of energy harvesting systems is becoming a more prominent research topic in supplying energy to wireless sensor nodes. The paper will present an analytical 'toolbox' for designing and modeling a vibration energy harvester where the moving mass is suspended magnetically. Calculations from the presented model and measurements from a prototype are compared, and the presence of system non-linearities is shown and discussed. The use of the magnetic suspension and its equivalent hardening spring suspension leads to the system's non-linearity, demonstrating a broad band response and 'jump' phenomenon characteristic. The benefits of these are discussed and the system's performance is compared with those from literature, showing similarity.

  2. Advanced Plant Habitat Test Harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-24

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants are seen inside the growth chamber of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) Flight Unit No. 1 prior to harvest of half the plants. The harvest is part of an ongoing verification test of the APH unit, which is located inside the International Space Station Environmental Simulator in NASA Kennedy Space Center's Space Station Processing Facility. The APH undergoing testing at Kennedy is identical to one on the station and uses red, green and broad-spectrum white LED lights to grow plants in an environmentally controlled chamber. The seeds grown during the verification test will be grown on the station to help scientists understand how these plants adapt to spaceflight.

  3. Harvesting the Ocean: Teachers' Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caton, Albert, Ed.; And Others

    This teaching guide is designed for use with three units of study (presented in separate booklets titled "The Ocean,""The Harvest," and "Using the Sea Wisely"). The multidisciplinary units contain teaching and learning resources designed to provide: students with learning experiences using a variety of thinking…

  4. Nanofluidics for giant power harvesting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Chen, Xiaodong

    2013-07-22

    Nanochannels for power generation: The confinement of fluid motion in a single boron nitride nanotube can provide an efficient means of power harvesting owing to the osmotically driven streaming current under a salt concentration difference (see picture). Devices based on this principle may open a new avenue in the exploration for new sources of renewable energy.

  5. Harvest Moon at NASA Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-18

    September's Harvest Moon as seen around NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. According to folklore, every full Moon has a special name.  There's the Wolf Moon, the Snow Moon, the Worm Moon,  the Sprouting Grass Moon,  the Flower Moon,  the Strawberry Moon, the Thunder Moon,  the Sturgeon Moon, the Harvest Moon, the Hunter's Moon, the Beaver Moon, and the Long Night's Moon. Each name tells us something about the season or month in which the full Moon appears.

This month's full Moon is the Harvest Moon. More about the Harvest Moon from NASA: Science http://1.usa.gov/16lb1eZ Credit: NASA/Goddard/Debbie Mccallum NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  6. Harvest Moon at NASA Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-20

    September's Harvest Moon as seen around NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. According to folklore, every full Moon has a special name.  There's the Wolf Moon, the Snow Moon, the Worm Moon,  the Sprouting Grass Moon,  the Flower Moon,  the Strawberry Moon, the Thunder Moon,  the Sturgeon Moon, the Harvest Moon, the Hunter's Moon, the Beaver Moon, and the Long Night's Moon. Each name tells us something about the season or month in which the full Moon appears.

This month's full Moon is the Harvest Moon. More about the Harvest Moon from NASA: Science http://1.usa.gov/16lb1eZ Credit: NASA/Goddard/Debbie Mccallum NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  7. Harvesting the Ocean: Teachers' Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caton, Albert, Ed.; And Others

    This teaching guide is designed for use with three units of study (presented in separate booklets titled "The Ocean,""The Harvest," and "Using the Sea Wisely"). The multidisciplinary units contain teaching and learning resources designed to provide: students with learning experiences using a variety of thinking…

  8. Fluid flow nozzle energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Winn, Tyler; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Power generation schemes that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce about 1 Watt average power with long-life (decades) are actively being developed. A variety of proposed energy harvesting schemes could be used to extract energy from this environment but each of these has their own limitations that limit their practical use. Since vibrating piezoelectric structures are solid state and can be driven below their fatigue limit, harvesters based on these structures are capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades); thereby, possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. An initial survey [1] identified that spline nozzle configurations can be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to convert the abundant flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. This paper presents current flow energy harvesting designs and experimental results of specific spline nozzle/ bimorph design configurations which have generated suitable power per nozzle at or above well production analogous flow rates. Theoretical models for non-dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical model are also presented in this paper to optimize the flow harvesting system.

  9. Sustainable Corn Stover Harvest Strategies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn stover has been identified as an important initial source of biomass for conversion to ethanol and other biofuels. This poster presentation outlines on-going cooperative research being conducted near Ames, IA. Our university partner is responsible for developing the one-pass harvester and our I...

  10. Harvest Moon at NASA Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    September's Harvest Moon as seen around NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. According to folklore, every full Moon has a special name. There's the Wolf Moon, the Snow Moon, the Worm Moon, the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Flower Moon, the Strawberry Moon, the Thunder Moon, the Sturgeon Moon, the Harvest Moon, the Hunter's Moon, the Beaver Moon, and the Long Night's Moon. Each name tells us something about the season or month in which the full Moon appears. This month's full Moon is the Harvest Moon. More about the Harvest Moon from NASA: Science 1.usa.gov/16lb1eZ Credit: NASA/Goddard/Debbie Mccallum NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  11. Spreadsheet Analysis of Harvesting Systems

    Treesearch

    R.B. Rummer; B.L. Lanford

    1987-01-01

    Harvesting systems can be modeled and analyzed on microcomputers using commercially available "spreadsheet" software. The effect of system or external variables on the production rate or system cost can be evaluated and alternative systems can be easily examined. The tedious calculations associated with such analyses are performed by the computer. For users...

  12. Fluid Flow Nozzle Energy Harvesters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Walkenmeyer, Phillip; Winn, Tyler; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Power generation schemes that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce about 1 Watt average power with long-life (decades) are actively being developed. A variety of proposed energy harvesting schemes could be used to extract energy from this environment but each of these has their own limitations that limit their practical use. Since vibrating piezoelectric structures are solid state and can be driven below their fatigue limit, harvesters based on these structures are capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades); thereby, possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. An initial survey identified that spline nozzle configurations can be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to convert the abundant flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. This paper presents current flow energy harvesting designs and experimental results of specific spline nozzle/ bimorph design configurations which have generated suitable power per nozzle at or above well production analogous flow rates. Theoretical models for non-dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical model are also presented in this paper to optimize the flow harvesting system.

  13. Can We Sustainably Harvest Ivory?

    PubMed

    Lusseau, David; Lee, Phyllis C

    2016-11-07

    Despite the 1989 ivory trade ban, elephants continue to be killed to harvest their tusks for ivory. Since 2008, this poaching has increased to unprecedented levels driven by consumer demand for ivory products. CITES is now considering the development of a legal ivory trade [1, 2]. The proposal relies on three assumptions: (1) harvest regulation will cease all illegal activities, (2) defined sustainable quotas can be enforced, and (3) we can define meaningful sustainable quotas that come close to the current demand. We know that regulation of harvest does not stop illegal takes. Despite whaling regulation after World War II, illegal whaling continued for decades [3]. The introduction of wolf culls in the US actually increased poaching activities [4], and one-off ivory sales in 1999 and 2008 did nothing to halt elephant poaching. Governance issues over the ivory supply chains, including stockpiling, make enforcing quotas challenging, if not impossible [5, 6]. We have not yet adequately assessed what could be a sustainable ivory yield. To do so, we develop a compartmental model composed of a two-sex age-structured demographic model and an ivory production and harvest model. We applied several offtake and quota strategies to define how much ivory could be sustainably harvested. We found that the sustainability space is very small. Only 100 to 150 kg of ivory could be removed from a reference population of 1,360 elephants, levels well below the current demand. Our study shows that lifting the ivory ban will not address the current poaching challenge. We should instead focus on reducing consumer demand. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Harvest prediction in `Algerie' loquat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, Juan J.; Pérez, Mercedes; Alonso, Francisca; Cuevas, Julián

    2007-05-01

    Plant phenology is in great measure driven by air temperature. To forecast harvest time for ‘Algerie’ loquat accurately, the growing degree days (GDD) needed from bloom to ripening were determined using data from nine seasons. The methods proposed by Zalom et al. (Zalom FG, Goodell PB, Wilson LT, Barnett WW, Bentley W, Degree-days: the calculation and use of heat units in pest management, leaflet no 21373, Division Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California 10 pp, 1983) were compared as regards their ability to estimate heat summation based on hourly records. All the methods gave remarkably similar results for our cultivation area, although the double-sine method showed higher performance when temperatures were low. A base temperature of 3°C is proposed for ‘Algerie’ loquat because it provides a coefficient of variation in GDD among seasons of below 5%, and because of its compatibility with loquat growth. Based on these determinations, ‘Algerie’ loquat requires 1,715 GDD from bloom to harvest; under our conditions this heat is accumulated over an average of 159 days. Our procedure permits the ‘Algerie’ harvest date to be estimated with a mean error of 4.4 days (<3% for the bloom-harvest period). GDD summation did not prove superior to the use of the number of calendar days for predicting ‘Algerie’ harvest under non-limiting growing conditions. However, GDD reflects the developmental rate in water-stressed trees better than calendar days. Trees under deficit irrigation during flower development required more time and more heat to ripen their fruits.

  15. Harvest prediction in 'Algerie' loquat.

    PubMed

    Hueso, Juan J; Pérez, Mercedes; Alonso, Francisca; Cuevas, Julián

    2007-05-01

    Plant phenology is in great measure driven by air temperature. To forecast harvest time for 'Algerie' loquat accurately, the growing degree days (GDD) needed from bloom to ripening were determined using data from nine seasons. The methods proposed by Zalom et al. (Zalom FG, Goodell PB, Wilson LT, Barnett WW, Bentley W, Degree-days: the calculation and use of heat units in pest management, leaflet no 21373, Division Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California 10 pp, 1983) were compared as regards their ability to estimate heat summation based on hourly records. All the methods gave remarkably similar results for our cultivation area, although the double-sine method showed higher performance when temperatures were low. A base temperature of 3 degrees C is proposed for 'Algerie' loquat because it provides a coefficient of variation in GDD among seasons of below 5%, and because of its compatibility with loquat growth. Based on these determinations, 'Algerie' loquat requires 1,715 GDD from bloom to harvest; under our conditions this heat is accumulated over an average of 159 days. Our procedure permits the 'Algerie' harvest date to be estimated with a mean error of 4.4 days (<3% for the bloom-harvest period). GDD summation did not prove superior to the use of the number of calendar days for predicting 'Algerie' harvest under non-limiting growing conditions. However, GDD reflects the developmental rate in water-stressed trees better than calendar days. Trees under deficit irrigation during flower development required more time and more heat to ripen their fruits.

  16. 29 CFR 780.1014 - Harvesting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... harvest evergreens and other forest products to be used in making the wreath. The word harvesting means the removal of evergreens and other forest products from their growing positions in the woods...

  17. 29 CFR 780.1014 - Harvesting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... harvest evergreens and other forest products to be used in making the wreath. The word harvesting means the removal of evergreens and other forest products from their growing positions in the woods...

  18. 29 CFR 780.1014 - Harvesting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... harvest evergreens and other forest products to be used in making the wreath. The word harvesting means the removal of evergreens and other forest products from their growing positions in the woods...

  19. 29 CFR 780.1014 - Harvesting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... harvest evergreens and other forest products to be used in making the wreath. The word harvesting means the removal of evergreens and other forest products from their growing positions in the woods...

  20. 29 CFR 780.1014 - Harvesting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... harvest evergreens and other forest products to be used in making the wreath. The word harvesting means the removal of evergreens and other forest products from their growing positions in the woods...

  1. Nyala and Bushbuck II: A Harvesting Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.; Greeff, Johanna C.

    1999-01-01

    Adds a cropping or harvesting term to the animal overpopulation model developed in Part I of this article. Investigates various harvesting strategies that might suggest a solution to the overpopulation problem without actually culling any animals. (ASK)

  2. Nyala and Bushbuck II: A Harvesting Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.; Greeff, Johanna C.

    1999-01-01

    Adds a cropping or harvesting term to the animal overpopulation model developed in Part I of this article. Investigates various harvesting strategies that might suggest a solution to the overpopulation problem without actually culling any animals. (ASK)

  3. Proso Millet Harvest: A Comparison of Conventional Harvest and Direct Harvest with a Stripper Header

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This research was conducted to determine if proso millet can be harvested with a stripper header. Stripper headers use extremely fast rotating metal teeth to rip the seed off the plant and leave the majority of residue standing in the field as opposed to cutting off the entire plant and running tha...

  4. Energy harvesting devices for harvesting energy from terahertz electromagnetic radiation

    DOEpatents

    Novack, Steven D.; Kotter, Dale K.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2012-10-09

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  5. Energy harvesting devices for harvesting energy from terahertz electromagnetic radiation

    DOEpatents

    Novack, Steven D.; Kotter, Dale K.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2012-10-09

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  6. Harvesting systems for the northern forest hardwoods

    Treesearch

    Chris B. LeDoux

    2011-01-01

    This monograph is a summary of research results and environmental compliance measures for timber harvesting operations. Data are presented from the Northern Research Station's forest inventory and analysis of 20 states in the northern forest hardwoods. Harvesting systems available in the region today are summarized. Equations for estimating harvesting costs are...

  7. 25 CFR 163.12 - Harvesting restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Harvesting restrictions. 163.12 Section 163.12 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.12 Harvesting restrictions. (a) Harvesting timber on commercial forest land...

  8. 25 CFR 163.12 - Harvesting restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Harvesting restrictions. 163.12 Section 163.12 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.12 Harvesting restrictions. (a) Harvesting timber on commercial forest land...

  9. 25 CFR 163.12 - Harvesting restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Harvesting restrictions. 163.12 Section 163.12 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.12 Harvesting restrictions. (a) Harvesting timber on commercial forest land...

  10. 25 CFR 163.12 - Harvesting restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Harvesting restrictions. 163.12 Section 163.12 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.12 Harvesting restrictions. (a) Harvesting timber on commercial forest land...

  11. 25 CFR 163.12 - Harvesting restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Harvesting restrictions. 163.12 Section 163.12 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.12 Harvesting restrictions. (a) Harvesting timber on commercial forest land...

  12. Forest products harvested in Hawaii - 1967

    Treesearch

    Herbert L. Wick

    1968-01-01

    A survey of the primary forest products harvested in Hawaii in 1967 showed a total value of $334,000, a 24 percent increase over the value in the 1958 survey. Compared with the earlier survey, the volume of sawlogs and treefern harvested has gone up while the volume of fuelwood and posts harvested has declined.

  13. Water Harvesting II: Working toward Being Green

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Ness, Daniel; Craven, John A.

    2008-01-01

    As you have read in the previous "After the Bell" column, water harvesting is a process of diverting and collecting rainwater. One of the main reasons to harvest rainwater is to reduce the demand on local sources of water. The objective of the harvesting procedure is to gather water from a weather event that is usually lost as runoff and either…

  14. Water Harvesting II: Working toward Being Green

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Ness, Daniel; Craven, John A.

    2008-01-01

    As you have read in the previous "After the Bell" column, water harvesting is a process of diverting and collecting rainwater. One of the main reasons to harvest rainwater is to reduce the demand on local sources of water. The objective of the harvesting procedure is to gather water from a weather event that is usually lost as runoff and either…

  15. Integration of Biomass Harvesting and Site Preparation

    Treesearch

    Bryce J. Stokes; William F. Watson

    1986-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the costs of various site preparation methods with various levels of harvesting Site impacts, soil compaction and disturbance were examined. Three hawesting methods rare evaluated in pine pulpwood plantation and pine sawtimber stands. The harvesting methods tested were (1) conventional - harvesting all roundwood. (2) two-pass - first...

  16. Fundamental Limits to Nonlinear Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji Hosseinloo, Ashkan; Turitsyn, Konstantin

    2015-12-01

    Linear and nonlinear vibration energy harvesting has been the focus of considerable research in recent years. However, fundamental limits on the harvestable energy of a harvester subjected to an arbitrary excitation force and different constraints is not yet fully understood. Understanding these limits is not only essential for an assessment of the technology potential, but it also provides a broader perspective on the current harvesting mechanisms and guidance in their improvement. Here, we derive the fundamental limits on the output power of an ideal energy harvester for arbitrary excitation waveforms and build on the current analysis framework for the simple computation of this limit for more sophisticated setups. We show that the optimal harvester maximizes the harvested energy through a mechanical analog of a buy-low-sell-high strategy. We also propose a nonresonant passive latch-assisted harvester to realize this strategy for an effective harvesting. It is shown that the proposed harvester harvests energy more effectively than its linear and bistable counterparts over a wider range of excitation frequencies and amplitudes. The buy-low-sell-high strategy also reveals why the conventional bistable harvester works well at low-frequency excitation.

  17. Approaches to automated protein crystal harvesting

    SciTech Connect

    Deller, Marc C. Rupp, Bernhard

    2014-01-28

    Approaches to automated and robot-assisted harvesting of protein crystals are critically reviewed. While no true turn-key solutions for automation of protein crystal harvesting are currently available, systems incorporating advanced robotics and micro-electromechanical systems represent exciting developments with the potential to revolutionize the way in which protein crystals are harvested.

  18. Nonlinear piezomagnetoelastic harvester array for broadband energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadrashta, Deepesh; Yang, Yaowen

    2016-08-01

    This article proposes an array of nonlinear piezomagnetoelastic energy harvesters (NPEHs) for scavenging electrical energy from broadband vibrations with low amplitudes (<2 m/s2). The array consists of monostable NPEHs combined to generate useful power output (˜100 μW) over wide bandwidth. The nonlinearity in each of the NPEHs is induced by the magnetic interaction between an embedded magnet in the tip mass of cantilever and a fixed magnet clamped to the rigid platform. The dynamic responses of two NPEHs, one with attractive configuration and the other with repulsive configuration, are combined to achieve a bandwidth of 3.3 Hz at a power level of 100 μW. A parametric study is carried out to obtain the gap distances between the magnets to achieve wide bandwidth. Experiments are performed to validate the proposed idea, the theoretical predictions, and to demonstrate the advantage of array of NPEHs over the array of linear piezoelectric energy harvesters (LPEHs). The experiments have clearly shown the advantage of NPEH array over its linear counterpart under both harmonic and random excitations. Approximately, 100% increase in the operation bandwidth is achieved by the NPEH array at harmonic excitation level of 2 m/s2. The NPEH array exhibits up to 80% improvement in the accumulated energy under random excitation when compared with the LPEH array. Furthermore, the performance of NPEH array with series and parallel connections between the individual harvesters using standard AC/DC interface circuits is also investigated and compared with its linear counterpart.

  19. Evaluation of modern cotton harvest systems on irrigated cotton: harvester performance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Picker and stripper harvest systems were evaluated on production-scale irrigated cotton on the High Plains of Texas over three harvest seasons. Observations on harvester performance, including time-in-motion, harvest loss, seed cotton composition, and turnout, were conducted at seven locations with...

  20. Toward a semi-mechanical harvesting platform system for harvesting blueberries with fresh-market quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Major concerns related to harvesting blueberries for fresh market with over-the-row (OTR) harvesters are that the quality of the fruit harvested with OTR machines is generally low and ground loss is excessive. Machine-harvested blueberries have more internal bruise and usually soften rapidly in col...

  1. 76 FR 68263 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 92 Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska During the 2012 Season; Proposed Rule #0;#0...-1231-9BPP-L2] RIN 1018-AX55 Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for...

  2. Advanced Plant Habitat Test Harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-24

    John "JC" Carver, a payload integration engineer with NASA Kennedy Space Center's Test and Operations Support Contract, uses a FluorPen to measure the chlorophyll fluorescence of Arabidopsis thaliana plants inside the growth chamber of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) Flight Unit No. 1. Half the plants were then harvested. The harvest is part of an ongoing verification test of the APH unit, which is located inside the International Space Station Environmental Simulator in Kennedy's Space Station Processing Facility. The APH undergoing testing at Kennedy is identical to one on the station and uses red, green and broad-spectrum white LED lights to grow plants in an environmentally controlled chamber. The seeds grown during the verification test will be grown on the station to help scientists understand how these plants adapt to spaceflight.

  3. Advanced Plant Habitat Test Harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-24

    John "JC" Carver, a payload integration engineer with NASA Kennedy Space Center's Test and Operations Support Contract, harvests half the Arabidopsis thaliana plants inside the growth chamber of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) Flight Unit No. 1. The harvest is part of an ongoing verification test of the APH unit, which is located inside the International Space Station Environmental Simulator in Kennedy's Space Station Processing Facility. The APH undergoing testing at Kennedy is identical to one on the station and uses red, green and broad-spectrum white LED lights to grow plants in an environmentally controlled chamber. The seeds grown during the verification test will be grown on the station to help scientists understand how these plants adapt to spaceflight.

  4. Advanced Plant Habitat Test Harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-24

    John "JC" Carver, a payload integration engineer with NASA Kennedy Space Center's Test and Operations Support Contract, opens the door to the growth chamber of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) Flight Unit No. 1 for a test harvest of half of the Arabidopsis thaliana plants growing within. The harvest is part of an ongoing verification test of the APH unit, which is located inside the International Space Station Environmental Simulator in Kennedy's Space Station Processing Facility. The APH undergoing testing at Kennedy is identical to one on the station and uses red, green and broad-spectrum white LED lights to grow plants in an environmentally controlled chamber. The seeds grown during the verification test will be grown on the station to help scientists understand how these plants adapt to spaceflight.

  5. Advanced Plant Habitat Test Harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-24

    John "JC" Carver, a payload integration engineer with NASA Kennedy Space Center's Test and Operations Support Contract, places Arabidopsis thaliana plants harvested from the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) Flight Unit No. 1 into a Mini ColdBag that quickly freezes the plants. The harvest is part of an ongoing verification test of the APH unit, which is located inside the International Space Station Environmental Simulator in Kennedy's Space Station Processing Facility. The APH undergoing testing at Kennedy is identical to one on the station and uses red, green and broad-spectrum white LED lights to grow plants in an environmentally controlled chamber. The seeds grown during the verification test will be grown on the station to help scientists understand how these plants adapt to spaceflight.

  6. Advanced Plant Habitat Test Harvest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-24

    John "JC" Carver, a payload integration engineer with NASA Kennedy Space Center's Test and Operations Support Contract, places Arabidopsis thaliana plants harvested from the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) Flight Unit No. 1 into an Ultra-low Freezer chilled to -150 degrees Celsius. The harvest is part of an ongoing verification test of the APH unit, which is located inside the International Space Station Environmental Simulator in Kennedy's Space Station Processing Facility. The APH undergoing testing at Kennedy is identical to one on the station and uses red, green and broad-spectrum white LED lights to grow plants in an environmentally controlled chamber. The seeds grown during the verification test will be grown on the station to help scientists understand how these plants adapt to spaceflight.

  7. Principles of thermoacoustic energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avent, A. W.; Bowen, C. R.

    2015-11-01

    Thermoacoustics exploit a temperature gradient to produce powerful acoustic pressure waves. The technology has a key role to play in energy harvesting systems. A time-line in the development of thermoacoustics is presented from its earliest recorded example in glass blowing through to the development of the Sondhauss and Rijke tubes to Stirling engines and pulse-tube cryo-cooling. The review sets the current literature in context, identifies key publications and promising areas of research. The fundamental principles of thermoacoustic phenomena are explained; design challenges and factors influencing efficiency are explored. Thermoacoustic processes involve complex multi-physical coupling and transient, highly non-linear relationships which are computationally expensive to model; appropriate numerical modelling techniques and options for analyses are presented. Potential methods of harvesting the energy in the acoustic waves are also examined.

  8. Forage Harvest and Transport Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.; Downing, M.; Turhollow, A.

    1998-12-01

    An engineering-economic approach is used to calculate harvest, in-field transport, and over-the-road transport costs for hay as bales and modules, silage, and crop residues as bales and modules. Costs included are equipment depreciation interest; fuel, lube, and oil; repairs; insurance, housing, and taxes; and labor. Field preparation, pest control, fertilizer, land, and overhead are excluded from the costs calculated Equipment is constrained by power available, throughput or carrying capacity, and field speed.

  9. Timber harvest in interior Alaska.

    Treesearch

    Tricia L. Wurtz; Robert A. Ott; John C. Maisch

    2006-01-01

    The most active period of timber harvesting in the history of Alaska's interior occurred nearly a century ago (Roessler 1997). The beginning of this era was the year 1869, when steam-powered, stern-wheeled riverboats first operated on the Yukon River (Robe 1943). Gold was discovered in Alaska in the 40-Mile River area in 1886, a find that was overshadowed 10 years...

  10. Review of magnetostrictive vibration energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhangxian; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2017-10-01

    The field of energy harvesting has grown concurrently with the rapid development of portable and wireless electronics in which reliable and long-lasting power sources are required. Electrochemical batteries have a limited lifespan and require periodic recharging. In contrast, vibration energy harvesters can supply uninterrupted power by scavenging useful electrical energy from ambient structural vibrations. This article reviews the current state of vibration energy harvesters based on magnetostrictive materials, especially Terfenol-D and Galfenol. Existing magnetostrictive harvester designs are compared in terms of various performance metrics. Advanced techniques that can reduce device size and improve performance are presented. Models for magnetostrictive devices are summarized to guide future harvester designs.

  11. Motorcycle waste heat energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Alexander D.; Anton, Steven R.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2008-03-01

    Environmental concerns coupled with the depletion of fuel sources has led to research on ethanol, fuel cells, and even generating electricity from vibrations. Much of the research in these areas is stalling due to expensive or environmentally contaminating processes, however recent breakthroughs in materials and production has created a surge in research on waste heat energy harvesting devices. The thermoelectric generators (TEGs) used in waste heat energy harvesting are governed by the Thermoelectric, or Seebeck, effect, generating electricity from a temperature gradient. Some research to date has featured platforms such as heavy duty diesel trucks, model airplanes, and automobiles, attempting to either eliminate heavy batteries or the alternator. A motorcycle is another platform that possesses some very promising characteristics for waste heat energy harvesting, mainly because the exhaust pipes are exposed to significant amounts of air flow. A 1995 Kawasaki Ninja 250R was used for these trials. The module used in these experiments, the Melcor HT3-12-30, produced an average of 0.4694 W from an average temperature gradient of 48.73 °C. The mathematical model created from the Thermoelectric effect equation and the mean Seebeck coefficient displayed by the module produced an average error from the experimental data of 1.75%. Although the module proved insufficient to practically eliminate the alternator on a standard motorcycle, the temperature data gathered as well as the examination of a simple, yet accurate, model represent significant steps in the process of creating a TEG capable of doing so.

  12. Autotransplantation donor tooth site harvesting using piezosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ylikontiola, Leena P; Sándor, George K

    2016-01-01

    The harvesting of a tooth as a candidate for tooth autotransplantation requires that the delicate dental tissues around the tooth be minimally traumatized. This is especially so for the periradicular tissues of the tooth root and the follicular tissues surrounding the crown. The aim of this report is to describe the use of piezosurgery as an attempt at morbidity reduction in the harvesting of teeth for autotransplantation. A piezosurgical handpiece and its selection of tips were easily adapted to allow the harvesting and delivery of teeth for autotransplantation purposes. Twenty premolar teeth were harvested using a piezosurgical device. The harvested teeth were subsequently successfully autotransplanted. All twenty teeth healed in a satisfactory manner without excessive mobility or ankyloses. Piezosurgery avoids some of the traumatic aspects of harvesting teeth and removing bone which are associated with thermal damage from the use of conventional rotary instruments or saws. Piezosurgery can be adapted to facilitate the predictable harvesting of teeth for autotransplantation purposes.

  13. Harvesting systems and costs for short rotation poplar

    Treesearch

    B. Rummer; D. Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this review is to compare the cost of coppice and longer rotation poplar harvesting technology. Harvesting technology for short rotation poplar has evolved over the years to address both coppice harvest and single-stem harvest systems. Two potential approaches for coppice harvesting are modified forage harvesters and modified mulcher-balers. Both of...

  14. Harvest and dynamics of duck populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedinger, James S.; Herzog, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    The role of harvest in the dynamics of waterfowl populations continues to be debated among scientists and managers. Our perception is that interested members of the public and some managers believe that harvest influences North American duck populations based on calls for more conservative harvest regulations. A recent review of harvest and population dynamics of North American mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) populations (Pöysä et al. 2004) reached similar conclusions. Because of the importance of this issue, we reviewed the evidence for an impact of harvest on duck populations. Our understanding of the effects of harvest is limited because harvest effects are typically confounded with those of population density; regulations are typically most liberal when populations are greatest. This problem also exists in the current Adaptive Harvest Management Program (Conn and Kendall 2004). Consequently, even where harvest appears additive to other mortality, this may be an artifact of ignoring effects of population density. Overall, we found no compelling evidence for strong additive effects of harvest on survival in duck populations that could not be explained by other factors.

  15. Flow Energy Piezoelectric Bimorph Nozzle Harvester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Walkemeyer, Phillip E. (Inventor); Hall, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Lee, Hyeong Jae (Inventor); Colonius, Tim (Inventor); Tosi, Phillipe (Inventor); Kim, Namhyo (Inventor); Sun, Kai (Inventor); Corbett, Thomas Gary (Inventor); Arrazola, Alvaro Jose (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A flow energy harvesting device having a harvester pipe includes a flow inlet that receives flow from a primary pipe, a flow outlet that returns the flow into the primary pipe, and a flow diverter within the harvester pipe having an inlet section coupled to the flow inlet, a flow constriction section coupled to the inlet section and positioned at a midpoint of the harvester pipe and having a spline shape with a substantially reduced flow opening size at a constriction point along the spline shape, and an outlet section coupled to the constriction section. The harvester pipe may further include a piezoelectric structure extending from the inlet section through the constriction section and point such that the fluid flow past the constriction point results in oscillatory pressure amplitude inducing vibrations in the piezoelectric structure sufficient to cause a direct piezoelectric effect and to generate electrical power for harvesting.

  16. Pyroelectric Energy Harvesting: Model and Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    ARL-TR-7663 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Pyroelectric Energy Harvesting: Model and Experiments by Felisa Sze and...Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-7663 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Pyroelectric Energy Harvesting: Model...2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 07/2015–02/2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pyroelectric Energy Harvesting: Model and

  17. Rooftop level rainwater harvesting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traboulsi, Hayssam; Traboulsi, Marwa

    2015-05-01

    Unfortunately, in Lebanon and other countries in the Middle East region, water becomes scarcer than ever before, and over the last decades the demand on domestic water has increased due to population and economic growth. Although rainwater harvesting is considered to be a safe and reliable alternative source for domestic water, the inconvenience or impracticalities related to the cost and space needed for the construction of ground or underground storage tanks makes this practice not widely common in rural areas and rarely implemented in urban cities. This paper introduces a new technique to rainwater harvesting which can be easily used in both rural and urban areas: it collects and stores rainwater directly in tanks already installed on building roofs and not necessarily in special ground or underground ones. If widely adopted in Lebanon, this technique could help in: (1) collecting around 23 MCM (70 % of the current deficit in the domestic water supply) of rainwater and thus increasing the available water per m2 of building by 0.4 m3 per year, (2) saving around 7 % of the amount of electric energy usually needed to pump water from an aquifer well and ground or underground tank, and (3) considerably reducing the rate of surface runoff of rainwater at the coastal zones where rainwater is not captured at all and goes directly to the sea.

  18. Rooftop level rainwater harvesting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traboulsi, Hayssam; Traboulsi, Marwa

    2017-05-01

    Unfortunately, in Lebanon and other countries in the Middle East region, water becomes scarcer than ever before, and over the last decades the demand on domestic water has increased due to population and economic growth. Although rainwater harvesting is considered to be a safe and reliable alternative source for domestic water, the inconvenience or impracticalities related to the cost and space needed for the construction of ground or underground storage tanks makes this practice not widely common in rural areas and rarely implemented in urban cities. This paper introduces a new technique to rainwater harvesting which can be easily used in both rural and urban areas: it collects and stores rainwater directly in tanks already installed on building roofs and not necessarily in special ground or underground ones. If widely adopted in Lebanon, this technique could help in: (1) collecting around 23 MCM (70 % of the current deficit in the domestic water supply) of rainwater and thus increasing the available water per m2 of building by 0.4 m3 per year, (2) saving around 7 % of the amount of electric energy usually needed to pump water from an aquifer well and ground or underground tank, and (3) considerably reducing the rate of surface runoff of rainwater at the coastal zones where rainwater is not captured at all and goes directly to the sea.

  19. Synthetic polymers for solar harvesting.

    PubMed

    Ghiggino, Kenneth P; Bell, Toby D M; Hooley, Emma N

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic polymers incorporating appropriate chromophores can act as light harvesting antennae for artificial photosynthetic systems. The photophysical processes occurring in a polymer based on phenylene vinylene have been investigated at the single chain level and in bulk solution to study energy transfer processes. Most single chains of an alternating copolymer of 2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene and 1,4-phenylene vinylene (alt-co-MEH-PPV) dispersed in a transparent polymer matrix act as single chromophore emitters demonstrating that energy transfer is an efficient process in these polymers. However for individual polymer chains there are fluctuations in emission intensity ('blinking') and shifts in emission spectra, decay lifetimes and emission dipole orientation occurring on a time-scale of tens of seconds. Fluorescence blinking also occurs on a sub-millisecond time-scale and follows exponential kinetics, whereas the longer blinking is better described by a power law. These observations can be interpreted as arising from environmental relaxation processes and/or changes in the emitter and demonstrate the wide distribution of photophysical behaviours that can be observed among the individual molecules of a polymer sample. The relevance of these studies to the application of polymer materials for solar harvesting is highlighted.

  20. Apparatus and method for harvesting woody plantations

    DOEpatents

    Eggen, D.L.

    1988-11-15

    A tree harvester for harvesting felled trees includes a wheel mounted wood chipper which moves toward the butt ends of the tree stems to be processed. The harvester includes a plurality of rotating alignment discs in front of the chipper. These discs align the tree stems to be processed with the mouth of the chipper. A chipper infeed cylinder is rotatably mounted between the discs and the front end of the chipper, and lifts the tree stem butts up from the ground into alignment with the chipper inlet port. The chips discharge from the chipper and go into a chip hopper which moves with the tree harvester. 8 figs.

  1. Apparatus and method for harvesting woody plantations

    DOEpatents

    Eggen, David L.

    1988-11-15

    A tree harvester for harvesting felled trees includes a wheel mounted wood chipper which moves toward the butt ends of the tree stems to be processed. The harvester includes a plurality of rotating alignment discs in front of the chipper. These discs align the tree stems to be processed with the mouth of the chipper. A chipper infeed cylinder is rotatably mounted between the discs and the front end of the chipper, and lifts the tree stem butts up from the ground into alignment with the chipper inlet port. The chips discharge from the chipper and go into a chip hopper which moves with the tree harvester.

  2. Vibration energy harvester optimization using artificial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Z.; Ondrusek, C.; Kurfurst, J.; Singule, V.

    2011-06-01

    This paper deals with an optimization study of a vibration energy harvester. This harvester can be used as autonomous source of electrical energy for remote or wireless applications, which are placed in environment excited by ambient mechanical vibrations. The ambient energy of vibrations is usually on very low level but the harvester can be used as alternative source of energy for electronic devices with an expected low level of power consumption of several mW. The optimized design of the vibration energy harvester was based on previous development and the sensitivity of harvester design was improved for effective harvesting from mechanical vibrations in aeronautic applications. The vibration energy harvester is a mechatronic system which generates electrical energy from ambient vibrations due to precision tuning up generator parameters. The optimization study for maximization of harvested power or minimization of volume and weight are the main goals of our development. The optimization study of such complex device is complicated therefore artificial intelligence methods can be used for tuning up optimal harvester parameters.

  3. Harvesting costs and environmental impacts associated with skyline yarding shelterwood harvests and thinning in Appalachian hardwoods

    Treesearch

    J. E. Baumgras; C. B. LeDoux; J. R. Sherar

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the potential for moderating the visual impact and soil disturbance associated with timber harvesting on steep-slope hardwood sites, thinning and shelterwood harvests were conducted with a skyline yarding system. Operations were monitored to document harvesting production, residual stand damage, soil disturbance, and visual quality. Yarding costs for...

  4. The effects of shelterwood harvesting on oak regeneration two years after harvest in southern Ohio

    Treesearch

    James D. Downs; Roger A. Williams; Joni A. Downs

    2011-01-01

    This research examines the effects of two intensities of shelterwood harvesting (reduction of stocking levels to 50 and 70 percent of full stocking) on oak regeneration in southeastern Ohio 2 years after harvest. The main goal of this study is to develop an understanding of the relationship between residual stocking (harvesting intensity) and the successful release of...

  5. A new harvest operation cost model to evaluate forest harvest layout alternatives

    Treesearch

    Mark M. Clark; Russell D. Meller; Timothy P. McDonald; Chao Chi Ting

    1997-01-01

    The authors develop a new model for harvest operation costs that can be used to evaluate stands for potential harvest. The model is based on felling, extraction, and access costs, and is unique in its consideration of the interaction between harvest area shapes and access roads. The scientists illustrate the model and evaluate the impact of stand size, volume, and road...

  6. Harvesting Costs For Mechanized Thinning Systems In Slash Pine Plantations

    Treesearch

    James E. Granskog

    1978-01-01

    Harvesting costs of four tree harvester systems are estimated for row thinning slash pine plantations. Systems incorporating a full-tree type harvester had lower harvesting costs per cord than shortwood and tree-length harvester systems in 15-year-old plantations.

  7. Can corals be harvested sustainably?

    PubMed

    Harriott, Vicki J

    2003-03-01

    The international trade in corals has been identified as a potential cause of localized depletion of coral populations in the major coral-exporting countries. The international coral trade is regulated by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES) agreement, which requires that export of corals is not detrimental to the species. The primary coral importing regions (USA and Europe) have threatened to limit or ban coral imports unless sustainable practices can be demonstrated. The spatial and temporal scale at which sustainability is defined is important in evaluating sustainability, e.g. at geological, regional or local scales. Other major issues are: the ecology of the target species; management options including provision of no-take areas; and the potential for coral culture. Implementation of practices that enhance ecological sustainability in the coral harvest fishery is possible, but may be difficult in some developing countries because of limited natural-resource management capacity.

  8. Harvesting microalgae grown on wastewater.

    PubMed

    Udom, Innocent; Zaribaf, Behnaz H; Halfhide, Trina; Gillie, Benjamin; Dalrymple, Omatoyo; Zhang, Qiong; Ergas, Sarina J

    2013-07-01

    The costs and life cycle impacts of microalgae harvesting for biofuel production were investigated. Algae were grown in semi-continuous culture in pilot-scale photobioreactors under natural light with anaerobic digester centrate as the feed source. Algae suspensions were collected and the optimal coagulant dosages for metal salts (alum, ferric chloride), cationic polymer (Zetag 8819), anionic polymer (E-38) and natural coagulants (Moringa Oleifera and Opuntia ficus-indica cactus) were determined using jar tests. The relative dewaterability of the algae cake was estimated by centrifugation. Alum, ferric chloride and cationic polymer could all achieve >91% algae recovery at optimal dosages. Life cycle assessment (LCA) and cost analysis results revealed that cationic polymer had the lowest cost but the highest environmental impacts, while ferric chloride had the highest cost and lowest environmental impacts. Based on the LCA results, belt presses are the recommended algae dewatering technology prior to oil extraction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Light Harvesting for Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Hedley, Gordon J; Ruseckas, Arvydas; Samuel, Ifor D W

    2017-01-25

    The field of organic photovoltaics has developed rapidly over the last 2 decades, and small solar cells with power conversion efficiencies of 13% have been demonstrated. Light absorbed in the organic layers forms tightly bound excitons that are split into free electrons and holes using heterojunctions of electron donor and acceptor materials, which are then extracted at electrodes to give useful electrical power. This review gives a concise description of the fundamental processes in photovoltaic devices, with the main emphasis on the characterization of energy transfer and its role in dictating device architecture, including multilayer planar heterojunctions, and on the factors that impact free carrier generation from dissociated excitons. We briefly discuss harvesting of triplet excitons, which now attracts substantial interest when used in conjunction with singlet fission. Finally, we introduce the techniques used by researchers for characterization and engineering of bulk heterojunctions to realize large photocurrents, and examine the formed morphology in three prototypical blends.

  10. Light Harvesting for Organic Photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The field of organic photovoltaics has developed rapidly over the last 2 decades, and small solar cells with power conversion efficiencies of 13% have been demonstrated. Light absorbed in the organic layers forms tightly bound excitons that are split into free electrons and holes using heterojunctions of electron donor and acceptor materials, which are then extracted at electrodes to give useful electrical power. This review gives a concise description of the fundamental processes in photovoltaic devices, with the main emphasis on the characterization of energy transfer and its role in dictating device architecture, including multilayer planar heterojunctions, and on the factors that impact free carrier generation from dissociated excitons. We briefly discuss harvesting of triplet excitons, which now attracts substantial interest when used in conjunction with singlet fission. Finally, we introduce the techniques used by researchers for characterization and engineering of bulk heterojunctions to realize large photocurrents, and examine the formed morphology in three prototypical blends. PMID:27951633

  11. New processes harvest farm energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-07

    Three facilities in New York, Connecticut and Arkansas installed by Energy Harvest, a Washington D.C. subsidiary of Sheaffer and Roland (Chicago), will produce gas from cattle and poultry wastes to be used primarily to generate electricity. It is estimated that there is a potential market for three million installations in the U.S. with a 1 quad total energy yield. The three facilities are part of a growing effort to develop new energy sources. Various systems under development are mentioned including a glass-fiber cover digester in Harford, N.Y. costing $15,000 that can generate power for less than 3 cents/kwh and the University of Missouri's scaled up version that can produce 3,500 cubic feet/day of methane at 4 cents/kwh.

  12. Setting analyst: A practical harvest planning technique

    Treesearch

    Olivier R.M. Halleux; W. Dale Greene

    2001-01-01

    Setting Analyst is an ArcView extension that facilitates practical harvest planning for ground-based systems. By modeling the travel patterns of ground-based machines, it compares different harvesting settings based on projected average skidding distance, logging costs, and site disturbance levels. Setting Analyst uses information commonly available to consulting...

  13. Ultrasound acoustic wave energy transfer and harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, Shima; Leadenham, Stephen; Guillot, François; Sabra, Karim; Erturk, Alper

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates low-power electricity generation from ultrasound acoustic wave energy transfer combined with piezoelectric energy harvesting for wireless applications ranging from medical implants to naval sensor systems. The focus is placed on an underwater system that consists of a pulsating source for spherical wave generation and a harvester connected to an external resistive load for quantifying the electrical power output. An analytical electro-acoustic model is developed to relate the source strength to the electrical power output of the harvester located at a specific distance from the source. The model couples the energy harvester dynamics (piezoelectric device and electrical load) with the source strength through the acoustic-structure interaction at the harvester-fluid interface. Case studies are given for a detailed understanding of the coupled system dynamics under various conditions. Specifically the relationship between the electrical power output and system parameters, such as the distance of the harvester from the source, dimensions of the harvester, level of source strength, and electrical load resistance are explored. Sensitivity of the electrical power output to the excitation frequency in the neighborhood of the harvester's underwater resonance frequency is also reported.

  14. Linking harvest choices to timber supply

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey P. Prestemon; David N. Wear

    2000-01-01

    Aggregate timber supply by ownership was investigated for a small region by applying stand-level harvest choice models to a representative sample of stands and then aggregating to regional totals using the area-frame of the forest survey. Timber harvest choices were estimated as probit models for three ownership categories in coastal plain southern pine stands of North...

  15. Triple Hybrid Energy Harvesting Interface Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uluşan, H.; Chamanian, S.; Pathirana, W. M. P. R.; Zorlu, Ö.; Muhtaroğlu, A.; Külah, H.

    2016-11-01

    This study presents a novel triple hybrid system that combines simultaneously generated power from thermoelectric (TE), vibration-based electromagnetic (EM) and piezoelectric (PZT) harvesters for a relatively high power supply capability. In the proposed solution each harvesting source utilizes a distinct power management circuit that generates a DC voltage suitable for combining the three parallel supplies. The circuits are designed and implemented in 180 nm standard CMOS technology, and are terminated with a schottky diode to avoid reverse current flow. The harvested AC signal from the EM harvester is rectified with a self-powered AC-DC doubler, which utilizes active diode structures to minimize the forward- bias voltage drop. The PZT interface electronics utilizes a negative voltage converter as the first stage, followed by synchronous power extraction and DC-to-DC conversion through internal switches, and an external inductor. The ultra-low voltage DC power harvested by the TE generator is stepped up through a charge-pump driven by an LC oscillator with fully- integrated center-tapped differential inductors. Test results indicate that hybrid energy harvesting circuit provides more than 1 V output for load resistances higher than 100 kΩ (10 μW) where the stand-alone harvesting circuits are not able to reach 1 V output. This is the first hybrid harvester circuit that simultaneously extracts energy from three independent sources, and delivers a single DC output.

  16. Applying new technologies to transform blueberry harvesting

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The growth of the blueberry industry in the past three decades has been remarkable. However, labor shortage for hand harvesting, increasingly high labor costs, and low harvest efficiencies are becoming bottlenecks for sustainable development of the fresh market blueberry production. In this study ...

  17. Improved harvesting systems for wet sites

    Treesearch

    Bryce J. Stokes; Alvin Schilling

    1997-01-01

    Environmentally acceptable and economical forest operations are needed for sustainable management of forest resources. Improved methods for harvesting and transporting timber are especially needed for wet sites. As the demand for hardwood lumber continues to increase, improved and alternative methods are needed to ensure acceptance of timber harvesting for the wet site...

  18. Forest products harvested in Hawaii-1969

    Treesearch

    Robert E. Burgan; Jr. Wesley H.C. Wong

    1971-01-01

    Primary forest products harvested in Hawaii in 1969 were valued at $331,000-a $3,000 drop from the value of the harvest surveyed in 1967. Sawlogs and veneer logs were the most important products. Koa and robusta eucalyptus were the primary sawlog species. Albizia and robusta eucalyptus provided most of the veneer logs.

  19. 7 CFR 1221.12 - Harvest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.12 Harvest. Harvest means combining or threshing sorghum for grain and/or severing the stalks from the land with...

  20. 7 CFR 1221.12 - Harvest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.12 Harvest. Harvest means combining or threshing sorghum for grain and/or severing the stalks from the land with...

  1. 7 CFR 1221.12 - Harvest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.12 Harvest. Harvest means combining or threshing sorghum for grain and/or severing the stalks from the land with...

  2. 7 CFR 1221.12 - Harvest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.12 Harvest. Harvest means combining or threshing sorghum for grain and/or severing the stalks from the land with...

  3. 7 CFR 1221.12 - Harvest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.12 Harvest. Harvest means combining or threshing sorghum for grain and/or severing the stalks from the land with...

  4. West Virginia harvest and utilization study, 2008

    Treesearch

    Jan Wiedenbeck; Shawn. Grushecky

    2014-01-01

    Thirty active harvesting operations were part of a harvest and utilization study conducted in West Virginia in 2008. Data were collected on roundwood product and residue yields obtained from trees of different sizes, species, and qualities. This study was modeled after studies conducted on a regular and frequent basis by the Forest Inventory and Analysis unit in the...

  5. Dielectric loss against piezoelectric power harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Junrui; Shu-Hung Chung, Henry; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2014-09-01

    Piezoelectricity is one of the most popular electromechanical transduction mechanisms for constructing kinetic energy harvesting systems. When a standard energy harvesting (SEH) interface circuit, i.e., bridge rectifier plus filter capacitor, is utilized for collecting piezoelectric power, the previous literature showed that the power conversion can be well predicted without much consideration for the effect of dielectric loss. Yet, as the conversion power gets higher by adopting power-boosting interface circuits, such as synchronized switch harvesting on inductor (SSHI), the neglect of dielectric loss might give rise to deviation in harvested power estimation. Given the continuous progress on power-boosting interface circuits, the role of dielectric loss in practical piezoelectric energy harvesting (PEH) systems should receive attention with better evaluation. Based on the integrated equivalent impedance network model, this fast track communication provides a comprehensive study on the susceptibility of harvested power in PEH systems under different conditions. It shows that, dielectric loss always counteracts piezoelectric power harvesting by causing charge leakage across piezoelectric capacitance. In particular, taking corresponding ideal lossless cases as references, the counteractive effect might be aggravated under one of the five conditions: larger dielectric loss tangent, lower vibration frequency, further away from resonance, weaker electromechanical coupling, or using power-boosting interface circuit. These relationships are valuable for the study of PEH systems, as they not only help explain the role of dielectric loss in piezoelectric power harvesting, but also add complementary insights for material, structure, excitation, and circuit considerations towards holistic evaluation and design for practical PEH systems.

  6. Effective kinetic energy harvesting via structural instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji Hosseinloo, Ashkan; Turitsyn, Konstantin

    2017-04-01

    Vibration energy harvesting has been shown as a promising power source for many small-scale applications mainly because of the considerable reduction in the energy consumption of the electronics, ease of fabrication and implementation of smart materials at small scale, and scalability issues of the conventional batteries. However, conventional energy harvesters are not quite robust to changes in excitation or system parameters, suffer from narrow bandwidth, and are very inefficient at small scale for low frequency harvesting. In addition, they have a low power to volume ratio. To remedy the robustness issues, improve their effectiveness, and increase their power density, we propose to exploit structural instabilities, in particular instabilities in multi-layered composites which are inherently non-resonant. The induced large strains as a result of the structural instability could be exploited to give rise to large strains in an attached piezoelectric layer to generate charge and, hence, energy. The regular high-strain morphological patterns occur throughout the whole composite structure that in turn enable harvesting at a larger volume compared to conventional harvesters; hence, harvesting via structural instabilities can significantly improve the harvested power to volume ratio. In this study, we focus on harvesting from wrinkling type of instabilities.

  7. Harvesting, storing, and shipping [Chapter 13

    Treesearch

    Thomas D. Landis; Tara Luna

    2009-01-01

    Plants are ready for harvest and delivery to clients after they have reached target specifications (see Chapter 2, The Target Plant Concept) and have been properly hardened (see Chapter 12, Hardening). Originally, nursery stock was grown in soil in fields; nursery managers would "lift" those seedlings out of the ground to harvest them. That traditional...

  8. Rubber finger stripper harvester for green chile

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Harvest mechanization as a system requires modifying or creating new components including cultivars, production practices, and harvest, transportation and processing plant machinery. New Mexican chile is one of the last segments of the pepper industry to still rely on hand labor. This paper reports ...

  9. A vibration energy harvester using diamagnetic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palagummi, S.; Yuan, F. G.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper a novel electromagnetic vibration type energy harvester which uses a diamagnetic levitation system is conceptualized, designed, fabricated, and tested. The harvester uses two diamagnetic plates made of pyrolytic graphite between which a cylindrical magnet levitates passively. Two archimedean spiral coils are placed in grooves which are engraved in the pyrolytic graphite plates, used to convert the mechanical energy into electrical energy efficiently. The geometric configurations of coils are selected based on the field distribution of the magnet to enhance the efficiency of the harvester. A thorough theoretical analysis is done to compare with the experiment results. At an input power of 103.45 μW and at a frequency of 2.7 Hz, the harvester generated a power of 0.744 μW at an efficiency of 0.72 %. Both theoretical and experimental results show that this new energy harvesting system is efficient and can capture low frequency broadband spectra.

  10. [Harvesting microalgae via flocculation: a review].

    PubMed

    Wan, Chun; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2015-02-01

    Microalgae have been identified as promising candidates for biorefinery of value-added molecules. The valuable products from microalgae include polyunsaturated fatty acids and pigments, clean and sustainable energy (e.g. biodiesel). Nevertheless, high cost for microalgae biomass harvesting has restricted the industrial application of microalgae. Flocculation, compared with other microalgae harvesting methods, has distinguished itself as a promising method with low cost and easy operation. Here, we reviewed the methods of microalgae harvesting using flocculation, including chemical flocculation, physical flocculation and biological flocculation, and the progress and prospect in bio-flocculation are especially focused. Harvesting microalgae via bio-flocculation, especially using bio-flocculant and microalgal strains that is self-flocculated, is one of the eco-friendly, cost-effective and efficient microalgae harvesting methods.

  11. Nanocrystalline ribbons for energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, H.; Å¢ibu, M.; Lupu, N.; Skorvanek, I.; Óvári, T.-A.

    2014-05-01

    An energy harvesting device based on nanocrystalline ribbons, able to convert mechanical vibrations to electrical energy, is presented. Such an energy harvesting device having embedded wireless microsensors can provide continuous monitoring of machines or infrastructure health without using service personnel in different areas with high risks. A multilayer core based on magnetic nanocrystalline ribbons was implemented to build the coil for an electromagnetic energy harvesting device with superior characteristics (voltage and power) compared to piezoelectric or pure magnetostrictive devices. Two different configurations were realized and tested for the energy harvester: vibrating core and vibrating magnets. The highest power density achieved for our harvesters using nanocrystalline ribbons is 45 mW/cm3 at 1 g (resonant frequency 47 Hz) and seems to be among the highest reported in literature.

  12. Sperm harvesting and post-mortem fatherhood.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F

    1995-10-01

    The motives and consequences of harvesting sperm from brain dead males for the purpose of effecting post mortem fatherhood are examined. I argue that sperm harvesting and post mortem fatherhood raise no harms of a magnitude that would justify forbidding the practice outright. Dead men are not obviously harmed by the practice; children need not be harmed by this kind of birth; and the practice enlarges rather than diminishes the reproductive choices of surviving partners. Certain ethical and legal issues nevertheless require attention. As a matter of consistency with other harvesting protocols, there ought to be a mechanism for respecting the wishes of men who when alive do not wish to become fathers post mortem. Mechanisms governing entitlement to harvest and use sperm will also be required. I note that the law is unlikely to recognize the paternity of children born from harvested sperm, though there may be reasons to recognize that paternity in some instances.

  13. Multilayer ferroelectret-based energy harvesting insole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Z.; Zhu, D.; Beeby, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports a flexible energy harvesting insole made of multilayer ferroelectrets, and demonstrates that this insole can power a wireless signal transmission. We have previously studied the energy harvesting characteristics of single and 10-layer ferroelectrets under compressive forces with quantified amplitudes and frequencies. In this work, we fabricate a flexible insole using multilayer ferroelectrets, and increase the number of layers from 10 up to 80, then use this insole to harvest energy from footsteps. We use this insole to power a commercial ZigBee wireless transmitter, and successfully demonstrate that an 8-bit data transmission can be solely powered by the energy harvested from this insole for every 3 to 4 footsteps. It confirms the anticipation from our previous work that the multilayer ferroelectrets are capable of powering the start-up and transmission of a low-power chipset, and shows a potential of using this energy harvesting insole in wearable applications.

  14. HARVEST, a longitudinal patient record summarizer

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Jamie S; Tanenbaum, Jessica S; Lipsky Gorman, Sharon; Liu, Connie; Schmitz, Eric; Hashorva, Dritan; Ervits, Artem; Vawdrey, David; Sturm, Marc; Elhadad, Noémie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe HARVEST, a novel point-of-care patient summarization and visualization tool, and to conduct a formative evaluation study to assess its effectiveness and gather feedback for iterative improvements. Materials and methods HARVEST is a problem-based, interactive, temporal visualization of longitudinal patient records. Using scalable, distributed natural language processing and problem salience computation, the system extracts content from the patient notes and aggregates and presents information from multiple care settings. Clinical usability was assessed with physician participants using a timed, task-based chart review and questionnaire, with performance differences recorded between conditions (standard data review system and HARVEST). Results HARVEST displays patient information longitudinally using a timeline, a problem cloud as extracted from notes, and focused access to clinical documentation. Despite lack of familiarity with HARVEST, when using a task-based evaluation, performance and time-to-task completion was maintained in patient review scenarios using HARVEST alone or the standard clinical information system at our institution. Subjects reported very high satisfaction with HARVEST and interest in using the system in their daily practice. Discussion HARVEST is available for wide deployment at our institution. Evaluation provided informative feedback and directions for future improvements. Conclusions HARVEST was designed to address the unmet need for clinicians at the point of care, facilitating review of essential patient information. The deployment of HARVEST in our institution allows us to study patient record summarization as an informatics intervention in a real-world setting. It also provides an opportunity to learn how clinicians use the summarizer, enabling informed interface and content iteration and optimization to improve patient care. PMID:25352564

  15. Glossary of Terms Used in Timber Harvesting and Forest Engineering

    Treesearch

    Bryce J. Stokes; Colin Ashmore; Cynthia L. Rawlins; Donald L. Sirois

    1989-01-01

    Provides definitions for 1,026 words and terms used in timber harvesting and forest engineering, with an emphasis on temrs related to timber harvesting operations. Terminology dealing with basic forestry, harvesting equipment, and economics is stressed.

  16. Montana's 1988 fuelwood harvest. Forest Service Resource Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    McLain, W.H.

    1990-10-01

    The report highlights the 1988 harvest of fuelwood in Montana by Commercial fuelwood harvesters and those cutting for home consumption. It lists a directory of commercial fuelwood harvesters and describes the methods of data collection and compilation.

  17. Rainwater harvesting state regulations and technical resources

    SciTech Connect

    Loper, Susan A.

    2015-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted in-depth research of state-level rainwater harvesting regulations for the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to help federal agencies strategically identify locations conducive to rainwater harvesting projects. Currently, rainwater harvesting is not regulated by the federal government but rather it is up to individual states to regulate the collection and use of rainwater. There is no centralized information on state-level regulations on rainwater harvesting maintained by a federal agency or outside organization. To fill this information gap, PNNL performed detailed internet searches for each state, which included state agencies, universities, Cooperative Extension Offices, city governments, and related organizations. The state-by-state information on rainwater harvesting regulations was compiled and assembled into an interactive map that is color coded by state regulations. The map provides a visual representation of the general types of rainwater harvesting policies across the country as well as general information on the state programs if applicable. The map allows the user to quickly discern where rainwater harvesting is supported and regulated by the state. This map will be available on the FEMP website by September 2015.

  18. Approaches to automated protein crystal harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Deller, Marc C.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The harvesting of protein crystals is almost always a necessary step in the determination of a protein structure using X-ray crystallographic techniques. However, protein crystals are usually fragile and susceptible to damage during the harvesting process. For this reason, protein crystal harvesting is the single step that remains entirely dependent on skilled human intervention. Automation has been implemented in the majority of other stages of the structure-determination pipeline, including cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and data collection. The gap in automation between crystallization and data collection results in a bottleneck in throughput and presents unfortunate opportunities for crystal damage. Several automated protein crystal harvesting systems have been developed, including systems utilizing microcapillaries, microtools, microgrippers, acoustic droplet ejection and optical traps. However, these systems have yet to be commonly deployed in the majority of crystallography laboratories owing to a variety of technical and cost-related issues. Automation of protein crystal harvesting remains essential for harnessing the full benefits of fourth-generation synchrotrons, free-electron lasers and microfocus beamlines. Furthermore, automation of protein crystal harvesting offers several benefits when compared with traditional manual approaches, including the ability to harvest microcrystals, improved flash-cooling procedures and increased throughput. PMID:24637746

  19. Autotransplantation donor tooth site harvesting using piezosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Ylikontiola, Leena P.; Sándor, George K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The harvesting of a tooth as a candidate for tooth autotransplantation requires that the delicate dental tissues around the tooth be minimally traumatized. This is especially so for the periradicular tissues of the tooth root and the follicular tissues surrounding the crown. The aim of this report is to describe the use of piezosurgery as an attempt at morbidity reduction in the harvesting of teeth for autotransplantation. Methods: A piezosurgical handpiece and its selection of tips were easily adapted to allow the harvesting and delivery of teeth for autotransplantation purposes. Results: Twenty premolar teeth were harvested using a piezosurgical device. The harvested teeth were subsequently successfully autotransplanted. All twenty teeth healed in a satisfactory manner without excessive mobility or ankyloses. Conclusions: Piezosurgery avoids some of the traumatic aspects of harvesting teeth and removing bone which are associated with thermal damage from the use of conventional rotary instruments or saws. Piezosurgery can be adapted to facilitate the predictable harvesting of teeth for autotransplantation purposes. PMID:27563612

  20. Post-harvest proteomics and food security.

    PubMed

    Pedreschi, Romina; Lurie, Susan; Hertog, Maarten; Nicolaï, Bart; Mes, Jurriaan; Woltering, Ernst

    2013-06-01

    To guarantee sufficient food supply for a growing world population, efforts towards improving crop yield and plant resistance should be complemented with efforts to reduce post-harvest losses. Post-harvest losses are substantial and occur at different stages of the food chain in developed and developing countries. In recent years, a substantially increasing interest can be seen in the application of proteomics to understand post-harvest events. In the near future post-harvest proteomics will be poised to move from fundamental research to aiding the reduction of food losses. Proteomics research can help in reducing food losses through (i) identification and validation of gene products associated to specific quality traits supporting marker-assisted crop improvement programmes, (ii) delivering markers of initial quality that allow optimisation of distribution conditions and prediction of remaining shelf-life for decision support systems and (iii) delivering early detection tools of physiological or pathogen-related post-harvest problems. In this manuscript, recent proteomics studies on post-harvest and stress physiology are reviewed and discussed. Perspectives on future directions of post-harvest proteomics studies aiming to reduce food losses are presented. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Isotope Harvesting Opportunities at FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, David

    2017-01-01

    The fragmentation of fast heavy ion beams now at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) and in the future at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) under construction produce an unprecedentedly broad spectrum of radionuclides but only a small fraction are used in the on-line rare-isotope program. Projectile fragmentation facilities provide an electromagnetically purified beam of a single projectile fragment for nuclear physics experiments ranging from low energy astrophysics, through nuclear structure studies, to probing fundamental symmetries. By augmenting the NSCL and FRIB production facilities with complimentary collection and purification of discarded ions, called isotope harvesting with chemical purification, many other nuclides will become available for off-line experiments in parallel with the primary experiment. A growing user community has established a list of key target isotopes and is working with the FRIB design team to allow inclusion of necessary equipment in the future. An overview of the possibilities and the techniques will be presented in this talk. Supported by Office of Science, US DOE and Michigan State University.

  2. ESTIMATING THE DISTRIBUTION OF HARVESTED ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Habitat suitability models are used to forecast how environmental change may affect the abundance or distribution of species of interest. The development of habitat suitability models may be used to estimate the vulnerability of this valued ecosystem good to natural or anthropogenic stressors. Using natural history information, rule-based habitat suitability models were constructed in a GIS for two recreationally harvested bivalve species (cockles Clinocardium nuttallii; softshells Mya arenaria) common to NE Pacific estuaries (N. California to British Columbia). Tolerance limits of each species were evaluated with respect to four parameters that are easy to sample: salinity, depth, sediment grain size, and the presence of bioturbating burrowing shrimp and were determined through literature review. Spatially-explicit habitat maps were produced for Yaquina and Tillamook estuaries (Oregon) using environmental data from multiple studies ranging from 1960 to 2012. Suitability of a given location was ranked on a scale of 1-4 (lowest to highest) depending on the number of variables that fell within a bivalve’s tolerance limits. The models were tested by comparison of the distribution of each suitability class to the observed distribution of bivalves reported in benthic community studies (1996-2012). Results showed that the areas of highest habitat suitability (value=4) within our model contained the greatest proportion of bivalve observations and highest popula

  3. Thermal Energy Harvesting from Wildlife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woias, P.; Schule, F.; Bäumke, E.; Mehne, P.; Kroener, M.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we present the measurement of temperature differences between the ambient air and the body temperature of a sheep (Heidschnucke) and its applicability for thermoelectric energy harvesting from livestock, demonstrated via the test of a specially tailored TEG system in a real-life experiment. In three measurement campaigns average temperature differences were found between 2.5 K and 3.5 K. Analytical models and FEM simulations were carried out to determine the actual thermal resistance of the sheep's fur from comparisons with the temperature measurements. With these data a thermoelectric (TEG) generator was built in a thermally optimized housing with adapted heats sink. The whole TEG system was mounted to a collar, including a data logger for recording temperature and TEG voltage. First measurements at the neck of a sheep were accomplished, with a calculated maximal average power output of 173 μW at the TEG. Taking the necessity of a low-voltage step-up converter into account, an electric output power of 54 μW is available which comes close to the power consumption of a low-power VHF tracking system.

  4. Energy harvesting via ferrofluidic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, J. G.; Vasquez, Erick S.; Aspin, Zachary S.; Fairley, John D.; Walters, Keisha B.; Berg, Matthew J.; Thompson, Scott M.

    2015-05-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to investigate and characterize the concept of ferrofluidic induction - a process for generating electrical power via cyclic oscillation of ferrofluid (iron-based nanofluid) through a solenoid. Experimental parameters include: number of bias magnets, magnet spacing, solenoid core, fluid pulse frequency and ferrofluid-particle diameter. A peristaltic pump was used to cyclically drive two aqueous ferrofluids, consisting of 7-10 nm iron-oxide particles and commercially-available hydroxyl-coated magnetic beads (~800 nm), respectively. The solutions were pulsated at 3, 6, and 10 Hz through 3.2 mm internal diameter Tygon tubing. A 1000 turn copper-wire solenoid was placed around the tube 45 cm away from the pump. The experimental results indicate that the ferrofluid is capable of inducing a maximum electric potential of approximately +/- 20 μV across the solenoid during its cyclic passage. As the frequency of the pulsating flow increased, the ferro-nanoparticle diameter increased, or the bias magnet separation decreased, the induced voltage increased. The type of solenoid core material (copper or plastic) did not have a discernible effect on induction. These results demonstrate the feasibility of ferrofluidic induction and provide insight into its dependence on fluid/flow parameters. Such fluidic/magneto-coupling can be exploited for energy harvesting and/or conversion system design for a variety of applications.

  5. Robotic hair harvesting system: a new proposal.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiang; Nakazawa, Toji; Yasuda, Ryuya; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Sakuma, Ichiro; Liao, Hongen

    2011-01-01

    Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) has become a popular hair transplanting method for solving male-pattern baldness problem. Manually harvesting hairs one by one, however, is a tedious and time-consuming job to doctors. We design an accurate hair harvesting robot with a novel and efficient end-effector which consists of one digital microscope and a punch device. The microscope is first employed to automatically localize target hairs and then guides the punch device for harvesting after shifting. The end-effector shows average bias and precision of 0.014 mm by virtue of a rotary guidance design for the motorized shifting mechanism.

  6. The effects of harvest on waterfowl populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooch, Evan G.; Guillemain, Matthieu; Boomer, G Scott; Lebreton, Jean-Dominique; Nichols, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Overall, there is substantial uncertainty about system dynamics, about the impacts of potential management and conservation decisions on those dynamics, and how to optimise management decisions in the presence of such uncertainties. Such relationships are unlikely to be stationary over space or time, and selective harvest of some individuals can potentially alter life history allocation of resources over time – both of which will potentially influence optimal harvest strategies. These sources of variation and uncertainty argue for the use of adaptive approaches to waterfowl harvest management.

  7. Hybrid piezoelectric energy harvesting transducer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor); Rehrig, Paul W. (Inventor); Hackenberger, Wesley S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid piezoelectric energy harvesting transducer system includes: (a) first and second symmetric, pre-curved piezoelectric elements mounted separately on a frame so that their concave major surfaces are positioned opposite to each other; and (b) a linear piezoelectric element mounted separately on the frame and positioned between the pre-curved piezoelectric elements. The pre-curved piezoelectric elements and the linear piezoelectric element are spaced from one another and communicate with energy harvesting circuitry having contact points on the frame. The hybrid piezoelectric energy harvesting transducer system has a higher electromechanical energy conversion efficiency than any known piezoelectric transducer.

  8. Quasiperiodic energy harvesting in a forced and delayed Duffing harvester device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghouli, Zakaria; Hamdi, Mustapha; Lakrad, Faouzi; Belhaq, Mohamed

    2017-10-01

    This paper studies quasiperiodic vibration-based energy harvesting in a forced nonlinear harvester device in which time delay is inherently present. The harvester consists of a delayed Duffing-type oscillator subject to a harmonic excitation and coupled to a piezoelectric circuit. We consider the case of a monostable system and we use perturbation techniques to approximate quasiperiodic responses and the corresponding averaged power amplitudes near the primary resonance. The influence of different system parameters on the performance of the quasiperiodic vibration-based energy harvesting is examined and the optimal performance of the harvester device in term of time delay parameters is studied. It is shown that in the considered harvester system the induced large-amplitude quasiperiodic vibrations can be used to extract energy over broadband of excitation frequencies away from the resonance, thereby avoiding hysteresis and instability near the resonance.

  9. An effective technique of scrotal harvest.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, R L; Ryan, C M; Tompkins, R G

    1993-01-01

    In male patients with extensive burns, the scrotum is often spared and is potentially a very useful donor site. We describe a technique that simplifies scrotal harvest and facilitates the procurement of clinically useful amounts of split-thickness skin.

  10. Piezoelectric energy harvesting computer controlled test bench.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Rodriguez, M; Jiménez, F J; de Frutos, J; Alonso, D

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a new computer controlled (C.C.) laboratory test bench is presented. The patented test bench is made up of a C.C. road traffic simulator, C.C. electronic hardware involved in automating measurements, and test bench control software interface programmed in LabVIEW™. Our research is focused on characterizing electronic energy harvesting piezoelectric-based elements in road traffic environments to extract (or "harvest") maximum power. In mechanical to electrical energy conversion, mechanical impacts or vibrational behavior are commonly used, and several major problems need to be solved to perform optimal harvesting systems including, but no limited to, primary energy source modeling, energy conversion, and energy storage. It is described a novel C.C. test bench that obtains, in an accurate and automatized process, a generalized linear equivalent electrical model of piezoelectric elements and piezoelectric based energy store harvesting circuits in order to scale energy generation with multiple devices integrated in different topologies.

  11. Innovative Harvesting Systems In Bottomland Hardwoods

    Treesearch

    Bryce J. Stokes; Robert B. Rummer

    1997-01-01

    Current and innovative machines and systems for harvesting bottomland hardwoods are described. Four systems are evaluated for production and costs: (1) grapple skidder, (2) clambunkskidder, (3) tree-length forwarder, and (4) shovel logging.

  12. Red alder harvesting opportunities in western Oregon.

    Treesearch

    Donald R. Gedney

    1990-01-01

    This report presents statistics on the present distribution and ownership of merchantable stands of red alder in western Oregon and the character of these stands as they affect harvesting opportunities.

  13. Piezoelectric energy harvesting computer controlled test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Rodriguez, M.; Jiménez, F. J.; de Frutos, J.; Alonso, D.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a new computer controlled (C.C.) laboratory test bench is presented. The patented test bench is made up of a C.C. road traffic simulator, C.C. electronic hardware involved in automating measurements, and test bench control software interface programmed in LabVIEW™. Our research is focused on characterizing electronic energy harvesting piezoelectric-based elements in road traffic environments to extract (or "harvest") maximum power. In mechanical to electrical energy conversion, mechanical impacts or vibrational behavior are commonly used, and several major problems need to be solved to perform optimal harvesting systems including, but no limited to, primary energy source modeling, energy conversion, and energy storage. It is described a novel C.C. test bench that obtains, in an accurate and automatized process, a generalized linear equivalent electrical model of piezoelectric elements and piezoelectric based energy store harvesting circuits in order to scale energy generation with multiple devices integrated in different topologies.

  14. Piezoelectric and electromagnetic respiratory effort energy harvesters.

    PubMed

    Shahhaidar, Ehsaneh; Padasdao, Bryson; Romine, R; Stickley, C; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The movements of the torso due to normal breathing could be harvested as an alternative, and renewable power source for an ultra-low power electronic device. The same output signal could also be recorded as a physiological signal containing information about breathing, thus enabling self-powered wearable biosensors/harvesters. In this paper, the selection criteria for such a biosensor, optimization procedure, trade-offs, and challenges as a sensor and harvester are presented. The empirical data obtained from testing different modules on a mechanical torso and a human subject demonstrated that an electromagnetic generator could be used as an unobtrusive self-powered medical sensor by harvesting more power, offering reasonable amount of output voltage for rectification purposes, and detecting respiratory effort.

  15. Characterization of Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting MEMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    OF PIEZOELECTRIC ENERGY HARVESTING MEMS by Ryan D. Johnson December 2015 Thesis Advisor: Dragoslav Grbovic Co-Advisor: Fabio Alves THIS...Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CHARACTERIZATION OF PIEZOELECTRIC ENERGY HARVESTING MEMS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Ryan D. Johnson 7...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) Energy conservation and increased efficiency lie at the forefront of defense missions, capabilities

  16. Vibration energy harvesting by magnetostrictive material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yuan, F. G.

    2008-08-01

    A new class of vibration energy harvester based on magnetostrictive material (MsM), Metglas 2605SC, is designed, developed and tested. It contains two submodules: an MsM harvesting device and an energy harvesting circuit. Compared to piezoelectric materials, the Metglas 2605SC offers advantages including higher energy conversion efficiency, longer life cycles, lack of depolarization and higher flexibility to survive in strong ambient vibrations. To enhance the energy conversion efficiency and alleviate the need of a bias magnetic field, Metglas ribbons are transversely annealed by a strong magnetic field along their width direction. To analyze the MsM harvesting device a generalized electromechanical circuit model is derived from Hamilton's principle in conjunction with the normal mode superposition method based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The MsM harvesting device is equivalent to an electromechanical gyrator in series with an inductor. In addition, the proposed model can be readily extended to a more practical case of a cantilever beam element with a tip mass. The energy harvesting circuit, which interfaces with a wireless sensor and accumulates the harvested energy into an ultracapacitor, is designed on a printed circuit board (PCB) with plane dimension 25 mm × 35 mm. It mainly consists of a voltage quadrupler, a 3 F ultracapacitor and a smart regulator. The output DC voltage from the PCB can be adjusted within 2.0-5.5 V. In experiments, the maximum output power and power density on the resistor can reach 200 µW and 900 µW cm-3, respectively, at a low frequency of 58 Hz. For a working prototype under a vibration with resonance frequency of 1.1 kHz and peak acceleration of 8.06 m s-2 (0.82 g), the average power and power density during charging the ultracapacitor can achieve 576 µW and 606 µW cm-3, respectively, which compete favorably with piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters.

  17. Manual harvesting of high population Leucaena stands

    SciTech Connect

    Pecson, R.D.; Van Den Beldt, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Five-year-old giant Leucaena leucocephala, planted at spacing 1x0.5 m, were harvested using bolos (Filipino machetes) and chainsaws. For felling alone, chainsaws took 35% less time than bolos. For the total harvest including delimbing and hauling an average 20 m to the edge of the stand, chainsaws took 20% less time than bolos. Assuming chainsaws are economically viable, it may be advisable to fell with chainsaws in advance of bolo teams that buck and haul. 2 references.

  18. An implantable fluidic vibrational energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, S.; Takahashi, T.; Kumemura, M.; Fujita, H.; Toshiyoshi, H.

    2016-11-01

    Targeting implantable medical devices such as respiratory pace-maker, we have developed a proof-of-concept level energy harvester device that could earn electric power of 44 μW/cm2 by the fluidic motion in a PDMS microchannel placed on a silicon substrate with built-in permanent electrical charges or so-called electrets. The motion of the working fluid will be operated by the heart beat or breathing as a final shape of the energy harvesting system.

  19. Hybrid energy harvesting using active thermal backplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Dong-Gun

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the concept of a new hybrid energy harvesting system by combing solar cells with magneto-thermoelectric generator (MTG, i.e., thermal energy harvesting). The silicon solar cell can easily reach high temperature under normal operating conditions. Thus the heated solar cell becomes rapidly less efficient as the temperature of solar cell rises. To increase the efficiency of the solar cell, air or water-based cooling system is used. To surpass conventional cooling devices requiring additional power as well as large working space for air/water collectors, we develop a new technology of pairing an active thermal backplane (ATB) to solar cell. The ATB design is based on MTG technology utilizing the physics of the 2nd order phase transition of active ferromagnetic materials. The MTG is cost-effective conversion of thermal energy to electrical energy and is fundamentally different from Seebeck TEG devices. The ATB (MTG) is in addition to being an energy conversion system, a very good conveyor of heat through both conduction and convection. Therefore, the ATB can provide dual-mode for the proposed hybrid energy harvesting. One is active convective and conductive cooling for heated solar cell. Another is active thermal energy harvesting from heat of solar cell. These novel hybrid energy harvesting device have potentially simultaneous energy conversion capability of solar and thermal energy into electricity. The results presented can be used for better understanding of hybrid energy harvesting system that can be integrated into commercial applications.

  20. Harvesting Vibrational Energy Using Material Work Functions

    PubMed Central

    Varpula, Aapo; Laakso, Sampo J.; Havia, Tahvo; Kyynäräinen, Jukka; Prunnila, Mika

    2014-01-01

    Vibration energy harvesters scavenge energy from mechanical vibrations to energise low power electronic devices. In this work, we report on vibration energy harvesting scheme based on the charging phenomenon occurring naturally between two bodies with different work functions. Such work function energy harvester (WFEH) is similar to electrostatic energy harvester with the fundamental distinction that neither external power supplies nor electrets are needed. A theoretical model and description of different operation modes of WFEHs are presented. The WFEH concept is tested with macroscopic experiments, which agree well with the model. The feasibility of miniaturizing WFEHs is shown by simulating a realistic MEMS device. The WFEH can be operated as a charge pump that pushes charge and energy into an energy storage element. We show that such an operation mode is highly desirable for applications and that it can be realised with either a charge shuttle or with switches. The WFEH is shown to give equal or better output power in comparison to traditional electrostatic harvesters. Our findings indicate that WFEH has great potential in energy harvesting applications. PMID:25348004

  1. Energy harvesting for dielectric elastomer sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Iain A.; Illenberger, Patrin; O'Brien, Ben M.

    2016-04-01

    Soft and stretchy dielectric elastomer (DE) sensors can measure large strains on robotic devices and people. DE strain measurement requires electric energy to run the sensors. Energy is also required for information processing and telemetering of data to phone or computer. Batteries are expensive and recharging is inconvenient. One solution is to harvest energy from the strains that the sensor is exposed to. For this to work the harvester must also be wearable, soft, unobtrusive and profitable from the energy perspective; with more energy harvested than used for strain measurement. A promising way forward is to use the DE sensor as its own energy harvester. Our study indicates that it is feasible for a basic DE sensor to provide its own power to drive its own sensing signal. However telemetry and computation that are additional to this will require substantially more power than the sensing circuit. A strategy would involve keeping the number of Bluetooth data chirps low during the entire period of energy harvesting and to limit transmission to a fraction of the total time spent harvesting energy. There is much still to do to balance the energy budget. This will be a challenge but when we succeed it will open the door to autonomous DE multi-sensor systems without the requirement for battery recharge.

  2. Study on Pyroelectric Harvesters with Various Geometry.

    PubMed

    Siao, An-Shen; Chao, Ching-Kong; Hsiao, Chun-Ching

    2015-08-11

    Pyroelectric harvesters convert time-dependent temperature variations into electric current. The appropriate geometry of the pyroelectric cells, coupled with the optimal period of temperature fluctuations, is key to driving the optimal load resistance, which enhances the performance of pyroelectric harvesters. The induced charge increases when the thickness of the pyroelectric cells decreases. Moreover, the induced charge is extremely reduced for the thinner pyroelectric cell when not used for the optimal period. The maximum harvested power is achieved when a 100 μm-thick PZT (Lead zirconate titanate) cell is used to drive the optimal load resistance of about 40 MΩ. Moreover, the harvested power is greatly reduced when the working resistance diverges even slightly from the optimal load resistance. The stored voltage generated from the 75 μm-thick PZT cell is less than that from the 400 μm-thick PZT cell for a period longer than 64 s. Although the thinner PZT cell is advantageous in that it enhances the efficiency of the pyroelectric harvester, the much thinner 75 μm-thick PZT cell and the divergence from the optimal period further diminish the performance of the pyroelectric cell. Therefore, the designers of pyroelectric harvesters need to consider the coupling effect between the geometry of the pyroelectric cells and the optimal period of temperature fluctuations to drive the optimal load resistance.

  3. Study on Pyroelectric Harvesters with Various Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Siao, An-Shen; Chao, Ching-Kong; Hsiao, Chun-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Pyroelectric harvesters convert time-dependent temperature variations into electric current. The appropriate geometry of the pyroelectric cells, coupled with the optimal period of temperature fluctuations, is key to driving the optimal load resistance, which enhances the performance of pyroelectric harvesters. The induced charge increases when the thickness of the pyroelectric cells decreases. Moreover, the induced charge is extremely reduced for the thinner pyroelectric cell when not used for the optimal period. The maximum harvested power is achieved when a 100 μm-thick PZT (Lead zirconate titanate) cell is used to drive the optimal load resistance of about 40 MΩ. Moreover, the harvested power is greatly reduced when the working resistance diverges even slightly from the optimal load resistance. The stored voltage generated from the 75 μm-thick PZT cell is less than that from the 400 μm-thick PZT cell for a period longer than 64 s. Although the thinner PZT cell is advantageous in that it enhances the efficiency of the pyroelectric harvester, the much thinner 75 μm-thick PZT cell and the divergence from the optimal period further diminish the performance of the pyroelectric cell. Therefore, the designers of pyroelectric harvesters need to consider the coupling effect between the geometry of the pyroelectric cells and the optimal period of temperature fluctuations to drive the optimal load resistance. PMID:26270666

  4. Production economics of harvesting young hardwood stands in central Appalachia

    Treesearch

    Yaoxiang Li; Jingxin Wang; Gary W. Miller; Joe McNeel

    2004-01-01

    Three harvesting systems of chainsaw/cable skidder, fell-buncher/grapple skidder, and harvester/forwarder were simulated in harvesting three hardwood stands of 30 to 50 years old in central Appalachia. Stands were generated by using a stand generator and harvesting prescriptions included clearcut, shelterwood cut, selective cut, diameter limit cut, and crop tree...

  5. Utah`s 1992 fuelwood harvest. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    McLain, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    Highlights the 1992 harvest of fuelwood in Utah by commercial fuelwood harvesters and those cutting for home consumption. Presents harvest volumes by species, county, and owner. Contains a list of commercial fuelwood harvesters and describes methods of data collection and compilation.

  6. Idaho`s 1990 fuelwood harvest. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    McLain, W.H.

    1996-02-01

    Highlights the 1990 harvest of fuelwood in Idaho by commercial fuelwood harvesters and those cutting for home consumption. Presents harvest volumes by species, county, and owner. Lists a directory of commercial fuelwood harvesters and describes the methods of data collection and compilation.

  7. Comparisons of two methods of harvesting biomass for energy

    Treesearch

    W.F. Watson; B.J. Stokes; I.W. Savelle

    1986-01-01

    Two harvesting methods for utilization of understory biomass were tested against a conventional harvesting method to determine relative costs. The conventional harvesting method tested removed all pine 6 inches diameter at breast height (DBH) and larger and hardwood sawlogs as tree length logs. The two intensive harvesting methods were a one-pass and a two-pass method...

  8. New Hampshire recreational oyster harvesters: profile, perceptions, and attitudes

    Treesearch

    Alberto B. Manalo; Bruce E. Lindsay; George E. Frick

    1992-01-01

    A survey of holders of a 1989 New Hampshire oyster-harvesting license revealed that recreational oyster harvesting is pursued mostly by older men. The 1988 closing of some parts of Great Bay to oyster harvesting resulted in license holders' taking one fewer trip and taking about six minutes longer to harvest one bushel of oysters in 1989. The average annual...

  9. Trends in Harvest Cost in New Hampshire: 1964 to 1983

    Treesearch

    Donald F. Dennis; Susan B. Remington; Susan B. Remington

    1987-01-01

    Timber harvesting costs for New Hampshire from 1964 to 1983 were examined. During this period, real harvesting costs for sawtimber decreased at an average annual rate of 1.2 percent, while stumpage prices increased. Real harvesting costs for pulpwood declined at a 0.8 percent average annual rate. Harvest cost data for fuelwood were available only for 1973 to 1983....

  10. Harvesting electricity from human hair.

    PubMed

    Tulachan, Brindan; Singh, Sushil K; Philip, Deepu; Das, Mainak

    2016-01-01

    continuously hydrating the polymer with water vapor, we prolonged the process. If this interesting aspect of polymer is exploited further and fine tuned, then it will open new avenues for development of sophisticated polymer-based systems, which could be used to harvest electricity from waste heat.

  11. Microalgae harvesting and processing: a literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Shelef, G.; Sukenik, A.; Green, M.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this report is to present a discussion of the literature review performed on methods of harvesting microalgae. There is no single best method of harvesting microalgae. The choice of preferable harvesting technology depends on algae species, growth medium, algae production, end product, and production cost benefit. Algae size is an important factor since low-cost filtration procedures are presently applicable only for harvesting fairly large microalgae. Small microalgae should be flocculated into larger bodies that can be harvested by one of the methods mentioned above. However, the cells' mobility affects the flocculation process, and addition of nonresidual oxidants to stop the mobility should be considered to aid flocculation. The decision between sedimentation or flotation methods depends on the density difference between the algae cell and the growth medium. For oil-laden algae with low cell density, flotation technologies should be considered. Moreover, oxygen release from algae cells and oxygen supersaturation conditions in growth medium support the use of flotation methods. If high-quality algae are to be produced for human consumption, continuous harvesting by solid ejecting or nozzle-type disc centrifuges is recommended. These centrifuges can easily be cleaned and sterilized. They are suitable for all types of microalgae, but their high operating costs should be compared with the benefits from their use. Another basic criterion for selecting the suitable harvesting procedure is the final algae paste concentration required for the next process. Solids requirements up to 30% can be attained by established dewatering processes. For more concentrated solids, drying methods are required. The various systems for algae drying differ both in the extent of capital investment and the energy requirements. Selection of the drying method depends on the scale of operation and the use for which the dried product is intended.

  12. Analog self-powered harvester achieving switching pause control to increase harvested energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makihara, Kanjuro; Asahina, Kei

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a self-powered analog controller circuit to increase the efficiency of electrical energy harvesting from vibrational energy using piezoelectric materials. Although the existing synchronized switch harvesting on inductor (SSHI) method is designed to produce efficient harvesting, its switching operation generates a vibration-suppression effect that reduces the harvested levels of electrical energy. To solve this problem, the authors proposed—in a previous paper—a switching method that takes this vibration-suppression effect into account. This method temporarily pauses the switching operation, allowing the recovery of the mechanical displacement and, therefore, of the piezoelectric voltage. In this paper, we propose a self-powered analog circuit to implement this switching control method. Self-powered vibration harvesting is achieved in this study by attaching a newly designed circuit to an existing analog controller for SSHI. This circuit aims to effectively implement the aforementioned new switching control strategy, where switching is paused in some vibration peaks, in order to allow motion recovery and a consequent increase in the harvested energy. Harvesting experiments performed using the proposed circuit reveal that the proposed method can increase the energy stored in the storage capacitor by a factor of 8.5 relative to the conventional SSHI circuit. This proposed technique is useful to increase the harvested energy especially for piezoelectric systems having large coupling factor.

  13. Tropical forest harvesting and taxation: a dynamic model of harvesting behavior under selective extraction systems

    Treesearch

    Robert F. Conrad; Malcolm Gillis; D. Evan Mercer

    2005-01-01

    A dynamic model of selective harvesting in multi-species,multi-age tropical forests is developed. Forests are predicted to exhibit different optimal harvesting profiles depending on the nature of their joint cost functions and own or cross-species stock effects. The model is applied to the controversy about incentives produced by various taxes. The impacts of specific...

  14. 75 FR 3888 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 92 RIN 1018-AW67 Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska During the 2010 Season AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... Wildlife Service, are reopening the public comment period on our proposed rule to establish migratory bird...

  15. Investigation into the use of picker harvesters on the High Plains of Texas: harvest parameters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Over a fourth of the cotton bales in the U.S. since 2002 have been produced in Texas, with most coming from the High Plains region. Due to the harsh weather conditions of the region, most cotton on the High Plains is of more storm-proof varieties that are harvested using stripper harvesters. Unlike ...

  16. Following the fate of harvest-damaged trees 13 years after harvests

    Treesearch

    Randy G. Jensen; John M. Kabrick

    2014-01-01

    Logging damage to residual trees during harvest operations can reduce the future volume, quality, and value of wood products. Timber harvests in 1996 on the Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project (MOFEP) provided a rare opportunity to follow the fate of trees wounded by felling or by skidding with rubber-tired skidders.

  17. Ecological impacts of energy-wood harvests: lessons from whole-tree harvesting and natural disturbance

    Treesearch

    Alaina L. Berger; Brian Palik; Anthony W. D' Amato; Shawn Fraver; John B. Bradford; Keith Nislow; David King; Robert T. Brooks

    2013-01-01

    Recent interest in using forest residues and small-diameter material for biofuels is generating a renewed focus on harvesting impacts and forest sustainability. The rich legacy of research from whole-tree harvesting studies can be examined in light of this interest. Although this research largely focused on consequences for forest productivity, in particular carbon and...

  18. Double synchronized switch harvesting (DSSH): a new energy harvesting scheme for efficient energy extraction.

    PubMed

    Lallart, Mickaël; Garbuio, Lauric; Petit, Lionel; Richard, Claude; Guyomar, Daniel

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a new technique for optimized energy harvesting using piezoelectric microgenerators called double synchronized switch harvesting (DSSH). This technique consists of a nonlinear treatment of the output voltage of the piezoelectric element. It also integrates an intermediate switching stage that ensures an optimal harvested power whatever the load connected to the microgenerator. Theoretical developments are presented considering either constant vibration magnitude, constant driving force, or independent extraction. Then experimental measurements are carried out to validate the theoretical predictions. This technique exhibits a constant output power for a wide range of load connected to the microgenerator. In addition, the extracted power obtained using such a technique allows a gain up to 500% in terms of maximal power output compared with the standard energy harvesting method. It is also shown that such a technique allows a fine-tuning of the trade-off between vibration damping and energy harvesting.

  19. A hydrostatic pressure-cycle energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, Michael W.; Hahn, Gregory; Morgan, Eric

    2015-04-01

    There have been a number of new applications for energy harvesting with the ever-decreasing power consumption of microelectronic devices. In this paper we explore a new area of marine animal energy harvesting for use in powering tags known as bio-loggers. These devices record data about the animal or its surroundings, but have always had limited deployment times due to battery depletion. Reduced solar irradiance below the water's surface provides the impetus to explore other energy harvesting concepts beyond solar power for use on marine animals. We review existing tag technologies in relation to this application, specifically relating to energy consumption. Additionally, we propose a new idea for energy harvesting, using hydrostatic pressure changes as a source for energy production. We present initial testing results of a bench-top model and show that the daily energy harvesting potential from this technology can meet or exceed that consumed by current marine bio-logging tags. The application of this concept in the arena of bio-logging technology could substantially increase bio-logger deployment lifetimes, allowing for longitudinal studies over the course of multiple breeding and/or migration cycles.

  20. Triboelectric Nanogenerators for Blue Energy Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Khan, Usman; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2016-07-26

    Blue energy in the form of ocean waves offers an enormous energy resource. However, it has yet to be fully exploited in order to make it available for the use of mankind. Blue energy harvesting is a challenging task as the kinetic energy from ocean waves is irregular in amplitude and is at low frequencies. Though electromagnetic generators (EMGs) are well-known for harvesting mechanical kinetic energies, they have a crucial limitation for blue energy conversion. Indeed, the output voltage of EMGs can be impractically low at the low frequencies of ocean waves. In contrast, triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are highly suitable for blue energy harvesting as they can effectively harvest mechanical energies from low frequencies (<1 Hz) to relatively high frequencies (∼kHz) and are also low-cost, lightweight, and easy to fabricate. Several important steps have been taken by Wang's group to develop TENG technology for blue energy harvesting. In this Perspective, we describe some of the recent progress and also address concerns related to durable packaging of TENGs in consideration of harsh marine environments and power management for an efficient power transfer and distribution for commercial applications.

  1. An energy harvesting type ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangqing; Xu, Wentan; Gao, Shuaishuai; Yang, Binqiang; Lu, Guoli

    2017-03-01

    An energy harvesting type ultrasonic motor is presented in this work. The novel motor not only can drive and/or position the motion mechanism, but also can harvest and convert the vibration-induced energy of the stator into electric energy to power small electronic devices. In the new motor, the stator is a sandwich structure of two PZT rings and an elastic metal body. The PZT ring bonded on the bottom surface is used to excite the stator metal body to generate a traveling wave with converse piezoelectric effect, and the other PZT ring bonded on top surface is used to harvest and convert the vibration-induced energy of the stator into electric energy with direct piezoelectric effect. Finite element method is adopted to analyze the vibration characteristics and the energetic characteristic. After the fabrication of a prototype, the mechanical output and electric energy output abilities are measured. The maximum no-load speed and maximum output torque of the prototype are 117rpm and 0.65Nm at an exciting voltage with amplitude of 134 Vp-p and frequency of 40kHz, and the maximum harvesting output power of per sector area of the harvesting PZT is 327mW under an optimal equivalent load resistance of 6.9kΩ.

  2. Energy harvesting from hydraulic pressure fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunefare, K. A.; Skow, E. A.; Erturk, A.; Savor, J.; Verma, N.; Cacan, M. R.

    2013-02-01

    State-of-the-art hydraulic hose and piping systems employ integral sensor nodes for structural health monitoring to avoid catastrophic failures. Energy harvesting in hydraulic systems could enable self-powered wireless sensor nodes for applications such as energy-autonomous structural health monitoring and prognosis. Hydraulic systems inherently have a high energy intensity associated with the mean pressure and flow. Accompanying the mean pressure is the dynamic pressure ripple, which is caused by the action of pumps and actuators. Pressure ripple is a deterministic source with a periodic time-domain behavior conducive to energy harvesting. An energy harvester prototype was designed for generating low-power electricity from pressure ripples. The prototype employed an axially-poled off-the-shelf piezoelectric stack. A housing isolated the stack from the hydraulic fluid while maintaining a mechanical coupling allowing for dynamic-pressure-induced deflection of the stack. The prototype exhibited an off-resonance energy harvesting problem since the fundamental resonance of the piezoelectric stack was much higher than the frequency content of the pressure ripple. The prototype was designed to provide a suitable power output for powering sensors with a maximum output of 1.2 mW. This work also presents electromechanical model simulations and experimental characterization of the piezoelectric power output from the pressure ripple in terms of the force transmitted into the harvester.

  3. Flat inductors for human motion energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blums, Juris; Terlecka, Galina; Gornevs, Ilgvars; Vilumsone, Ausma

    2013-05-01

    The human motion energy harvesting is under investigation. The aim of this investigation: to develop electromagnetic human motion energy harvester that will consist only from flat elements and is integrable into the apparel. Main parts of the developed human motion energy harvester are flat, spiral-shaped inductors. Voltage pulses in such flat inductors can be induced during the motion of a permanent magnet along it. Due to the flat structure, inductors can be completely integrated into the parts of the clothes and it is not necessary to keep empty place for the movement of the magnet, as in usual electromagnetic harvesters. The prototype of the clothing, jacket with integrated electromagnetic human motion energy harvester with flat inductors is tested. The theoretical model for the induction of the electromotive force due to the magnet's movement is created for the basic shapes (round, rhombic, square) of the inductive elements and the results (shape of voltage pulse and generated energy) of the calculations are in a good qualitative and quantitative coincidence with an experimental research.

  4. Acquiring geographical data with web harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dramowicz, K.

    2016-04-01

    Many websites contain very attractive and up to date geographical information. This information can be extracted, stored, analyzed and mapped using web harvesting techniques. Poorly organized data from websites are transformed with web harvesting into a more structured format, which can be stored in a database and analyzed. Almost 25% of web traffic is related to web harvesting, mostly while using search engines. This paper presents how to harvest geographic information from web documents using the free tool called the Beautiful Soup, one of the most commonly used Python libraries for pulling data from HTML and XML files. It is a relatively easy task to process one static HTML table. The more challenging task is to extract and save information from tables located in multiple and poorly organized websites. Legal and ethical aspects of web harvesting are discussed as well. The paper demonstrates two case studies. The first one shows how to extract various types of information about the Good Country Index from the multiple web pages, load it into one attribute table and map the results. The second case study shows how script tools and GIS can be used to extract information from one hundred thirty six websites about Nova Scotia wines. In a little more than three minutes a database containing one hundred and six liquor stores selling these wines is created. Then the availability and spatial distribution of various types of wines (by grape types, by wineries, and by liquor stores) are mapped and analyzed.

  5. Wind-driven pyroelectric energy harvesting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Mengying; Zabek, Daniel; Bowen, Chris; Abdelmageed, Mostafa; Arafa, Mustafa

    2016-12-01

    Pyroelectric materials have recently received attention for harvesting waste heat owing to their potential to convert temperature fluctuations into useful electrical energy. One of the main challenges in designing pyroelectric energy harvesters is to provide a means to induce a temporal heat variation in a pyroelectric material autonomously from a steady heat source. To address this issue, we propose a new form of wind-driven pyroelectric energy harvester, in which a propeller is set in rotational motion by an incoming wind stream. The speed of the propeller’s shaft is reduced by a gearbox to drive a slider-crank mechanism, in which a pyroelectric material is placed on the slider. Thermal cycling is obtained as the reciprocating slider moves the pyroelectric material across alternative hot and cold zones created by a stationary heat lamp and ambient temperature, respectively. The open-circuit voltage and closed-circuit current are investigated in the time domain at various wind speeds. The device was experimentally tested under wind speeds ranging from 1.1 to 1.6 m s-1 and charged an external 100 nF capacitor through a signal conditioning circuit to demonstrate its effectiveness for energy harvesting. Unlike conventional wind turbines, the energy harvested by the pyroelectric material is decoupled from the wind flow and no mechanical power is drawn from the transmission; hence the system can operate at low wind speeds (<2 m s-1).

  6. Ecological impacts of energy-wood harvests: lessons from whole-tree harvesting and natural disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, Alaina L.; Palik, Brian; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Fraver, Shawn; Bradford, John B.; Nislow, Keith H.; King, David; Brooks, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent interest in using forest residues and small-diameter material for biofuels is generating a renewed focus on harvesting impacts and forest sustainability. The rich legacy of research from whole-tree harvesting studies can be examined in light of this interest. Although this research largely focused on consequences for forest productivity, in particular carbon and nutrient pools, it also has relevance for examining potential consequences for biodiversity and aquatic ecosystems. This review is framed within a context of contrasting ecosystem impacts from whole-tree harvesting because it represents a high level of biomass removal. Although whole-tree harvesting does not fully use the nonmerchantable biomass available, it indicates the likely direction and magnitude of impacts that can occur through energy-wood harvesting compared with less-intensive conventional harvesting and to dynamics associated with various natural disturbances. The intent of this comparison is to gauge the degree of departure of energy-wood harvesting from less intensive conventional harvesting. The review of the literature found a gradient of increasing departure in residual structural conditions that remained in the forest when conventional and whole-tree harvesting was compared with stand-replacing natural disturbance. Important stand- and landscape-level processes were related to these structural conditions. The consequence of this departure may be especially potent because future energy-wood harvests may more completely use a greater range of forest biomass at potentially shortened rotations, creating a great need for research that explores the largely unknown scale of disturbance that may apply to our forest ecosystems.

  7. Thermal energy harvesting plasmonic based chemical sensors.

    PubMed

    Karker, Nicholas; Dharmalingam, Gnanaprakash; Carpenter, Michael A

    2014-10-28

    Detection of gases such as H2, CO, and NO2 at 500 °C or greater requires materials with thermal stability and reliability. One of the major barriers toward integration of plasmonic-based chemical sensors is the requirement of multiple components such as light sources and spectrometers. In this work, plasmonic sensing results are presented where thermal energy is harvested using lithographically patterned Au nanorods, replacing the need for an external incident light source. Gas sensing results using the harvested thermal energy are in good agreement with sensing experiments, which used an external incident light source. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the wavelength parameter space from 665 variables down to 4 variables with similar levels of demonstrated selectivity. The combination of a plasmonic-based energy harvesting sensing paradigm with PCA analysis offers a novel path toward simplification and integration of plasmonic-based sensing methods.

  8. On energy harvesting for augmented tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allane, Dahmane; Duroc, Yvan; Andia Vera, Gianfranco; Touhami, Rachida; Tedjini, Smail

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the harmonic signals generated by UHF RFID chips, usually considered as spurious effects and unused, are exploited. Indeed, the harmonic signals are harvested to feed a supplementary circuitry associated with a passive RFID tag. Two approaches are presented and compared. In the first one, the third-harmonic signal is combined with an external 2.45-GHz Wi-Fi signal. The integration is done in such a way that the composite signal boosts the conversion efficiency of the energy harvester. In the second approach, the third-harmonic signal is used as the only source of a harvester that energizes a commercial temperature sensor associated with the tag. The design procedures of the two "augmented-tag" approaches are presented. The performance of each system is simulated with ADS software, and using Harmonic Balance tool (HB), the results obtained in simulation and measurements are compared also. xml:lang="fr"

  9. Energy harvesting devices, systems, and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K.

    2016-10-18

    Energy harvesting devices include a substrate and a plurality of resonance elements coupled to the substrate. Each resonance element is configured to collect energy in the visible and infrared light spectra and to reradiate energy having a wavelength in the range of about 0.8 .mu.m to about 0.9 .mu.m. The resonance elements are arranged in groups of two or more resonance elements. Systems for harvesting electromagnetic radiation include a substrate, a plurality of resonance elements including a conductive material carried by the substrate, and a photovoltaic material coupled to the substrate and to at least one resonance element. The resonance elements are arranged in groups, such as in a dipole, a tripole, or a bowtie configuration. Methods for forming an energy harvesting device include forming groups of two or more discrete resonance elements in a substrate and coupling a photovoltaic material to the groups of discrete resonance elements.

  10. High elaeophorosis prevalence among harvested Colorado moose.

    PubMed

    LeVan, Ivy K; Fox, Karen A; Miller, Michael W

    2013-07-01

    Infection with Elaeophora schneideri, a filarial parasite, occurs commonly in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), but seemingly less so in moose (Alces alces). Of 109 carotid artery samples from moose harvested throughout Colorado, USA, in 2007, 14 (13%; 95% binomial confidence interval [bCI]=7-21%) showed gross and 91 (83%; 95% bCI=75-90%) showed histologic evidence of elaeophorosis. Although neither blindness nor other clinical signs associated with elaeophorosis were reported among the harvested moose we examined, the pervasiveness of this parasite may motivate further study of the potential effects of elaeophorosis on moose survival and population performance in the southern Rocky Mountains. Our data suggest histopathology may be more sensitive than gross examination in detecting elaeophorosis in harvested moose.

  11. Solar cells incorporating light harvesting arrays

    DOEpatents

    Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Meyer, Gerald J.

    2003-07-22

    A solar cell incorporates a light harvesting array that comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: ##EQU1## wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2 ; and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  12. Mandatory urban rainwater harvesting: learning from experience.

    PubMed

    Gabe, Jeremy; Trowsdale, Sam; Mistry, Diveshkumar

    2012-01-01

    Rainwater harvesting is effectively mandated in several urban areas of New Zealand. To understand the costs and benefits of rainwater harvesting from an end-user perspective, semistructured interviews were conducted with 14 homeowners in northern Auckland affected by these regulations. Residents report differences in four aspects of urban rainwater infrastructure - security of supply, water quality, the learning process and financial costs - that could represent key values for public acceptance. When responses are examined from the perspective of experience that has built empirical knowledge, participants explained how their satisfaction with rainwater harvesting increased over time. We hypothesise that for those lacking experience, urban rainwater consumption is a function of empirical knowledge and has initially rising marginal utility. Regulation that recognises the costs of social learning is likely to be a more effective pathway towards maximising the social benefits associated with integrated urban water management.

  13. Piezoelectric monolayers as nonlinear energy harvesters.

    PubMed

    López-Suárez, Miquel; Pruneda, Miguel; Abadal, Gabriel; Rurali, Riccardo

    2014-05-02

    We study the dynamics of h-BN monolayers by first performing ab-initio calculations of the deformation potential energy and then solving numerically a Langevine-type equation to explore their use in nonlinear vibration energy harvesting devices. An applied compressive strain is used to drive the system into a nonlinear bistable regime, where quasi-harmonic vibrations are combined with low-frequency swings between the minima of a double-well potential. Due to its intrinsic piezoelectric response, the nonlinear mechanical harvester naturally provides an electrical power that is readily available or can be stored by simply contacting the monolayer at its ends. Engineering the induced nonlinearity, a 20 nm2 device is predicted to harvest an electrical power of up to 0.18 pW for a noisy vibration of 5 pN.

  14. Energy harvesting from an autoparametric vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhimiao; Hajj, Muhammad R.

    2015-11-01

    The combined control and energy harvesting characteristics of an autoparametric vibration absorber consisting of a base structure subjected to the external force and a cantilever beam with a tip mass are investigated. The piezoelectric sheets are attached to the cantilever beam to convert the vibrations of the base structure into electrical energy. The coupled nonlinear representative model is developed by using the extended Hamiton’s principle. The effects of the electrical load resistance on the frequency and damping ratio of the cantilever beam are analyzed. The impacts of the external force and load resistance on the structural displacements of the base structure and the beam and on the level of harvested energy are determined. The results show that the initial conditions have a significant impact on the system’s response. The relatively high level of energy harvesting is not necessarily accompanied with the minimum displacements of the base structure.

  15. Performance comparison of implantable piezoelectric energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Changki; Radziemski, Leon J.; Clark, William W.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents experimental results that demonstrate energy generating performance of circular piezoelectric diaphragm harvesters for use in implantable medical devices. The piezoelectric energy generators are designed to transfer internal biomechanical forces into electrical energy that can be stored and used to power other in vivo devices. Such energy harvesters can eliminate complicated procedures for replacement of batteries in active implants by possibly increasing the longevity or capacity of batteries. Experimental results indicated that the PZT circular diaphragm harvesters generated enough power to meet requirements for specific implantable medical devices. It is also found that edge condition, thickness of bonding layer, and a degree of symmetry in fabrication for the unimorph circular diaphragms affect the energy generating performance significantly.

  16. Solar cells incorporating light harvesting arrays

    DOEpatents

    Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Meyer, Gerald J.

    2002-01-01

    A solar cell incorporates a light harvesting array that comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2 ; and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  17. Flexible energy harvesting from hard piezoelectric beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delnavaz, Aidin; Voix, Jérémie

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents design, multiphysics finite element modeling and experimental validation of a new miniaturized PZT generator that integrates a bulk piezoelectric ceramic onto a flexible platform for energy harvesting from the human body pressing force. In spite of its flexibility, the mechanical structure of the proposed device is simple to fabricate and efficient for the energy conversion. The finite element model involves both mechanical and piezoelectric parts of the device coupled with the electrical circuit model. The energy harvester prototype was fabricated and tested under the low frequency periodic pressing force during 10 seconds. The experimental results show that several nano joules of electrical energy is stored in a capacitor that is quite significant given the size of the device. The finite element model is validated by observing a good agreement between experimental and simulation results. the validated model could be used for optimizing the device for energy harvesting from earcanal deformations.

  18. Harvesting of microalgae by bio-flocculation.

    PubMed

    Salim, Sina; Bosma, Rouke; Vermuë, Marian H; Wijffels, René H

    2011-10-01

    The high-energy input for harvesting biomass makes current commercial microalgal biodiesel production economically unfeasible. A novel harvesting method is presented as a cost and energy efficient alternative: the bio-flocculation by using one flocculating microalga to concentrate the non-flocculating microalga of interest. Three flocculating microalgae, tested for harvesting of microalgae from different habitats, improved the sedimentation rate of the accompanying microalga and increased the recovery of biomass. The advantages of this method are that no addition of chemical flocculants is required and that similar cultivation conditions can be used for the flocculating microalgae as for the microalgae of interest that accumulate lipids. This method is as easy and effective as chemical flocculation which is applied at industrial scale, however in contrast it is sustainable and cost-effective as no costs are involved for pre-treatment of the biomass for oil extraction and for pre-treatment of the medium before it can be re-used.

  19. Subwavelength resonant antennas enhancing electromagnetic energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oumbe Tekam, Gabin; Ginis, Vincent; Seetharamdoo, Divitha; Danckaert, Jan

    2016-04-01

    In this work, an electromagnetic energy harvester operating at microwave frequencies is designed based on a cut- wire metasurface. This metamaterial is known to contain a quasistatic electric dipole resonator leading to a strong resonant electric response when illuminated by electromagnetic fields.1 Starting from an equivalent electrical circuit, we analytically design the parameters of the system to tune the resonance frequency of the harvester at the desired frequency band. Subsequently, we compare these results with numerical simulations, which have been obtained using finite elements numerical simulations. Finally, we optimize the design by investigating the best arrangement for energy harvesting by coupling in parallel and in series many single layers of cut-wire metasurfaces. We also discuss the implementation of different geometries and sizes of the cut-wire metasurface for achieving different center frequencies and bandwidths.

  20. Water flow energy harvesters for autonomous flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisseau, Sebastien; Duret, Alexandre-Benoit; Perez, Matthias; Jallas, Emmanuel; Jallas, Eric

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on a water flow energy harvester exploiting a horizontal axis turbine with distributed magnets of alternate polarities at the rotor periphery and air coils outside the pipe. The energy harvester operates down to 1.2L/min with an inlet section of 20mm of diameter and up to 25.2mW are provided at 20L/min in a 2.4V NiMH battery through a BQ25504 power management circuit. The pressure loss induced by the insertion of the energy harvester in the hydraulic circuit and by the extraction of energy has been limited to 0.05bars at 30L/min, corresponding to a minor loss coefficient of KEH=3.94.

  1. The effects of harvest regulations on behaviors of duck hunters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugen, Matthew T.; Powell, Larkin A.; Vrtiska, Mark P.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty exists as to how duck harvest regulations influence waterfowl hunter behavior. We used the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Parts Collection Survey to examine how harvest regulations affected behaviors of Central Flyway duck hunters. We stratified hunters into ranked groups based on seasonal harvest and identified three periods (1975–1984, 1988–1993, 2002–2011) that represented different harvest regulations (moderate, restrictive, and liberal, respectively; season length and daily bag limits smallest in restrictive seasons and largest in liberal seasons). We examined variability of seven measures of duck hunter behaviors across the periods: days harvesting ducks, daily harvest, hunter mobility, mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) selectivity, gender selectivity, daily female mallard harvest, and timing of harvest. Hunters reported harvesting ducks on more days, at a higher efficiency, and in slightly more counties during liberal seasons relative to restrictive and moderate seasons. We provide evidence to suggest that future regulation change will affect hunter behaviors.

  2. [Optimum harvest study of Gentiana crassicaulis in Ludian].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yu; Chen, Xing-Fu; Zou, Yuan-Feng; Song, Jiu-Hua; Yang, Wen-Yu; Cheng, Tao

    2014-07-01

    The paper is aimed to study the difference in yield and quality at different harvest time and determine the optimum harvest of planting Gentiana in Ludian traditional harvest period. The authors analyzed the variation in fresh weight, dry weight, dry discount rate, length, diameter, volume and the content of gentiopicroside, loganin acid, alcohol-soluble extract and total ash and made a comprehensive appraisal of yield, appearance quality and intrinsic quality by gray relational distance ideal Comprehensive Evaluation method. The results showed that there is a big difference in yield and quality both 2-year-old and 3-year-old Gentiana harvested in traditional harvest period and the comprehensive evaluation more better when harvested more later. It can be seen, Gentiana harvested the later had a better yield and quality in Ludian traditional harvest period. The harvest of Gentiana can be appropriate delayed depending on the particular circumstances of production.

  3. Managing harvest and habitat as integrated components

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osnas, Erik; Runge, Michael C.; Mattsson, Brady J.; Austin, Jane E.; Boomer, G. S.; Clark, R. G.; Devers, P.; Eadie, J. M.; Lonsdorf, E. V.; Tavernia, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, several important initiatives in the North American waterfowl management community called for an integrated approach to habitat and harvest management. The essence of the call for integration is that harvest and habitat management affect the same resources, yet exist as separate endeavours with very different regulatory contexts. A common modelling framework could help these management streams to better understand their mutual effects. Particularly, how does successful habitat management increase harvest potential? Also, how do regional habitat programmes and large-scale harvest strategies affect continental population sizes (a metric used to express habitat goals)? In the ensuing five years, several projects took on different aspects of these challenges. While all of these projects are still on-going, and are not yet sufficiently developed to produce guidance for management decisions, they have been influential in expanding the dialogue and producing some important emerging lessons. The first lesson has been that one of the more difficult aspects of integration is not the integration across decision contexts, but the integration across spatial and temporal scales. Habitat management occurs at local and regional scales. Harvest management decisions are made at a continental scale. How do these actions, taken at different scales, combine to influence waterfowl population dynamics at all scales? The second lesson has been that consideration of the interface of habitat and harvest management can generate important insights into the objectives underlying the decision context. Often the objectives are very complex and trade-off against one another. The third lesson follows from the second – if an understanding of the fundamental objectives is paramount, there is no escaping the need for a better understanding of human dimensions, specifically the desires of hunters and nonhunters and the role they play in conservation. In the end, the compelling question is

  4. Particulate residue separators for harvesting devices

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Wright, Christopher T.; Hess, John R.

    2010-06-29

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include a plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams which are formed by the harvesting device and which travel, at least in part, along the plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly which is located in partially occluding relation relative to the plenum, and which substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  5. How Quantum Coherence Assists Photosynthetic Light Harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Strümpfer, J; Şener, M; Schulten, K

    2012-01-01

    This perspective examines how hundreds of pigment molecules in purple bacteria cooperate through quantum coherence to achieve remarkable light harvesting efficiency. Quantum coherent sharing of excitation, which modifies excited state energy levels and combines transition dipole moments, enables rapid transfer of excitation over large distances. Purple bacteria exploit the resulting excitation transfer to engage many antenna proteins in light harvesting, thereby increasing the rate of photon absorption and energy conversion. We highlight here how quantum coherence comes about and plays a key role in the photosynthetic apparatus of purple bacteria. PMID:22844553

  6. Broadband magnetic levitation-based nonlinear energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nammari, Abdullah; Doughty, Seth; Savage, Dustin; Weiss, Leland; Jaganathan, Arun; Bardaweel, Hamzeh

    2016-05-01

    In this work, development of a broadband nonlinear electromagnetic energy harvester is described. The energy harvester consists of a casing housing stationary magnets, a levitated magnet, oblique mechanical springs, and a coil. Magnetic and oblique springs introduce nonlinear behavior into the energy harvester. A mathematical model of the proposed device is developed and validated. The results show good agreement between model and experiment. The significance of adding oblique mechanical springs to the energy harvester design is investigated using the model simulation. The results from the model suggest that adding oblique springs to the energy harvester will improve the performance and increase the frequency bandwidth and amplitude response of the energy harvester.

  7. Harvesting Atlantic Cod under Climate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremus, K. L.

    2016-12-01

    Previous literature links the growth of a fishery to climate variability. This study uses an age-structured bioeconomic model to compare optimal harvest in the Gulf of Maine Atlantic cod fishery under a variable climate versus a static climate. The optimal harvest path depends on the relationship between fishery growth and the interest rate, with higher interest rates dictating greater harvests now at the cost of long-term stock sustainability. Given the time horizon of a single generation of fishermen under assumptions of a static climate, the model finds that the economically optimal management strategy is to harvest the entire stock in the short term and allow the fishery to collapse. However, if the biological growth of the fishery is assumed to vary with climate conditions, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation, there will always be pulses of high growth in the stock. During some of these high-growth years, the growth of the stock and its economic yield can exceed the growth rate of the economy even under high interest rates. This implies that it is not economically optimal to exhaust the New England cod fishery if NAO is included in the biological growth function. This finding may have theoretical implications for the management of other renewable yet exhaustible resources whose growth rates are subject to climate variability.

  8. Recovery efficiency of whole-tree harvesting

    Treesearch

    Bryce J. Stokes; William F. Watson

    1988-01-01

    The recovery of total tree biomass and most components of a stand is a practical economic and management alternative to tree-length harvesting. First, the increased utilization of woody biomass provides additional revenues from the site. Second, the removal and utilization of the stems and crowns reduces site preparation costs and makes tree planting easier. Third,...

  9. Attitudes toward Posthumous Harvesting and Reproduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hans, Jason D.

    2008-01-01

    Attitudes toward posthumous harvesting of reproductive material and beliefs about medical professionals' obligation to assist were examined using a multiple segment factorial vignette survey design with 407 randomly selected respondents from a southern state. Attitudes and beliefs were primarily shaped by the vignette couple's marital status,…

  10. Machine rates for selected forest harvesting machines

    Treesearch

    R.W. Brinker; J. Kinard; Robert Rummer; B. Lanford

    2002-01-01

    Very little new literature has been published on the subject of machine rates and machine cost analysis since 1989 when the Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station Circular 296, Machine Rates for Selected Forest Harvesting Machines, was originally published. Many machines discussed in the original publication have undergone substantial changes in various aspects, not...

  11. Carbon sequestration in harvested wood products

    Treesearch

    K. Skog

    2013-01-01

    Carbon is continuously cycled among these storage pools and between forest ecosystems and the atmosphere as a result of biological processes in forests (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration, growth, mortality, decomposition, and disturbances such as fires or pest outbreaks) and anthropogenic activities (e.g., harvesting, thinning, clearing, and replanting). As trees...

  12. 50 CFR 654.21 - Harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STONE CRAB FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO Management Measures § 654.21 Harvest limitations. (a) Claw size. No person may remove from a stone crab in or from the management area, or possess... stone crabs. An egg-bearing stone crab in or from the management area must be returned immediately to...

  13. 50 CFR 654.21 - Harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STONE CRAB FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO Management Measures § 654.21 Harvest limitations. (a) Claw size. No person may remove from a stone crab in or from the management area...-bearing stone crabs. An egg-bearing stone crab in or from the management area must be returned immediately...

  14. Endovascular vein harvest: systemic carbon dioxide absorption.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Andrew M; Schwartz, Carl S; Bert, Arthur; Hurlburt, Peter; Gough, Jeffrey; Stearns, Gary; Singh, Arun K

    2006-06-01

    Endovascular vein harvest (EDVH) requires CO(2) insufflation to expand the subcutaneous space, allowing visualization and dissection of the saphenous vein. The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of CO(2) absorption during EDVH. Prospective observational study. Single tertiary care hospital. Sixty patients (30 EDVH and 30 open-vein harvest) undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Hemodynamic, procedural, and laboratory data were collected prior to (baseline), during, and at it the conclusion (final) of vein harvesting. Data were also collected during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Data were compared by using t tests, analysis of variance, and correlation statistics when needed. There were significant increases in arterial CO(2) (PaCO(2), 35%) and decreases in pH (1.35%) during EDVH. These were associated with increases in heart rate, mean blood pressure, and cardiac output. Within the EDVH group, greater elevations (>10 mmHg) in PaCO2 were more likely during difficult harvest procedures, and these patients exhibited greater increase in heart rate. Elevated CO(2) persisted during CPB, requiring higher systemic gas flows and greater use of phenylephrine to maintain desired hemodynamics. EDVH was associated with systemic absorption of CO(2). Greater absorption was more likely in difficult procedures and was associated with greater hemodynamic changes requiring medical therapy.

  15. 50 CFR 300.112 - Harvesting permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... issued a harvesting permit do not require a separate permit, but are covered by the permit issued the... against the launching vessel. (2) Permits issued under this section do not authorize vessels or persons... mammals. No marine mammals may be taken in the course of commercial fishing operations unless the...

  16. 50 CFR 300.112 - Harvesting permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... issued a harvesting permit do not require a separate permit, but are covered by the permit issued the... against the launching vessel. (2) Permits issued under this section do not authorize vessels or persons... mammals. No marine mammals may be taken in the course of commercial fishing operations unless the...

  17. Mechanized systems for harvesting eastern hardwoods

    Treesearch

    Chris B. LeDoux

    2010-01-01

    In the central Appalachian region, hardwoods traditionally have been harvested by chainsaw felling with trees and logs extracted from the forest to landings by rubber-tired skidders, bulldozers, and crawler tractors. In recent years, mechanized systems that include feller bunchers and cut-to-length (CTL) processors coupled with forwarders and clambunk and grapple...

  18. Leveraging OAI Harvesting To Disseminate Theses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suleman, Hussein; Fox, Edward A.

    2003-01-01

    The Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD), supports the production and archiving of electronic theses and dissertations. While working with the Open Archives Initiative (OAI) to develop and test the metadata harvesting standard, the authors set up and actively maintain a central NDLTD metadata collection and multiple user…

  19. 50 CFR 300.112 - Harvesting permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ensure stable recruitment. (3) Cause changes or increase the risk of changes in the marine ecosystem that..., the effects of associated activities on the marine ecosystem and of the effects of environmental... REGULATIONS Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.112 Harvesting permits. (a) General. (1) Every...

  20. 50 CFR 300.112 - Harvesting permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ensure stable recruitment. (3) Cause changes or increase the risk of changes in the marine ecosystem that..., the effects of associated activities on the marine ecosystem and of the effects of environmental... REGULATIONS Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.112 Harvesting permits. (a) General. (1) Every...

  1. 50 CFR 300.112 - Harvesting permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ensure stable recruitment. (3) Cause changes or increase the risk of changes in the marine ecosystem that..., the effects of associated activities on the marine ecosystem and of the effects of environmental... REGULATIONS Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.112 Harvesting permits. (a) General. (1) Every...

  2. 50 CFR 622.225 - Harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Coral, Coral Reefs, and Live/Hard Bottom Habitats of the South Atlantic Region § 622.225 Harvest limitations... over naturally occurring reef outcrops, limestone ledges, coral reefs, or vegetated areas. (B) Must...

  3. 50 CFR 622.75 - Harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Coral and Coral Reefs of the Gulf of Mexico § 622.75 Harvest limitations. (a) Aquacultured live rock. In the Gulf... aquaculture site— (A) May not be placed over naturally occurring reef outcrops, limestone ledges, coral...

  4. 50 CFR 622.225 - Harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Coral, Coral Reefs, and Live/Hard Bottom Habitats of the South Atlantic Region § 622.225 Harvest limitations... over naturally occurring reef outcrops, limestone ledges, coral reefs, or vegetated areas. (B) Must...

  5. 50 CFR 622.75 - Harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Coral and Coral Reefs of the Gulf of Mexico § 622.75 Harvest limitations. (a) Aquacultured live rock. In the Gulf... aquaculture site— (A) May not be placed over naturally occurring reef outcrops, limestone ledges, coral...

  6. Erosional consequences of timber harvesting: An appraisal

    Treesearch

    R. M. Rice; J. S. Rothacher; W. F. Megahan

    1972-01-01

    Abstract - This paper summarizes our current understanding of the effects of timber harvesting on erosion. Rates of erosion on mountain watersheds vary widely but the relative importance of different types of erosion and the consequences of disturbances remain fairly consistent. Therefore these conclusions seem to be valid for most circumstances: Most of man's...

  7. Vibration energy harvesting for unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, Steven R.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2008-03-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are a critical component of many military operations. Over the last few decades, the evolution of UAVs has given rise to increasingly smaller aircraft. Along with the development of smaller UAVs, termed mini UAVs, has come issues involving the endurance of the aircraft. Endurance in mini UAVs is problematic because of the limited size of the fuel systems that can be incorporated into the aircraft. A large portion of the total mass of many electric powered mini UAVs, for example, is the rechargeable battery power source. Energy harvesting is an attractive technology for mini UAVs because it offers the potential to increase their endurance without adding significant mass or the need to increase the size of the fuel system. This paper investigates the possibility of harvesting vibration and solar energy in a mini UAV. Experimentation has been carried out on a remote controlled (RC) glider aircraft with a 1.8 m wing span. This aircraft was chosen to replicate the current electric mini UAVs used by the military today. The RC glider was modified to include two piezoelectric patches placed at the roots of the wings and a cantilevered piezoelectric beam installed in the fuselage to harvest energy from wing vibrations and rigid body motions of the aircraft, as well as two thin film photovoltaic panels attached to the top of the wings to harvest energy from sunlight. Flight testing has been performed and the power output of the piezoelectric and photovoltaic devices has been examined.

  8. Timber harvests in Alaska: 1910-2006

    Treesearch

    Allen M. Brackley; Richard W. Haynes; Susan J. Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This publication provides estimates of total softwood harvest, by owner, for Alaska for 1910-2006. This information is a mix of reported and estimated data. These data are being used to develop assumptions needed in forest planning by both public and private forest managers.

  9. Florida harvest and utilization study, 2008

    Treesearch

    James W. Bentley; Tony G. Johnson

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 82 operationsthroughout Florida. There were 2,114 total trees measured: 1,670 or79 percent were softwood, while 444 or 21 percent were hardwood. Resultsfrom this study showed that 85 percent of the total softwood volumemeasured was...

  10. Virginia harvest and utilization study, 2007

    Treesearch

    James W. Bentley; Tony G. Johnson

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 81 operationsthroughout Virginia. There were 2,016 total trees measured; 1,086 or54 percent were softwood, while 930 or 46 percent were hardwood. Resultsfrom this study showed that 86 percent of the total softwood volumemeasured was...

  11. 3-dimensional fabrication of soft energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Thomas; Walters, Peter; Rossiter, Jonathan; O'Brien, Benjamin; Anderson, Iain

    2013-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEG) provide an opportunity to harvest energy from low frequency and aperiodic sources. Because DEG are soft, deformable, high energy density generators, they can be coupled to complex structures such as the human body to harvest excess mechanical energy. However, DEG are typically constrained by a rigid frame and manufactured in a simple planar structure. This planar arrangement is unlikely to be optimal for harvesting from compliant and/or complex structures. In this paper we present a soft generator which is fabricated into a 3 Dimensional geometry. This capability will enable the 3-dimensional structure of a dielectric elastomer to be customised to the energy source, allowing efficient and/or non-invasive coupling. This paper demonstrates our first 3 dimensional generator which includes a diaphragm with a soft elastomer frame. When the generator was connected to a self-priming circuit and cyclically inflated, energy was accumulated in the system, demonstrated by an increased voltage. Our 3D generator promises a bright future for dielectric elastomers that will be customised for integration with complex and soft structures. In addition to customisable geometries, the 3D printing process may lend itself to fabricating large arrays of small generator units and for fabricating truly soft generators with excellent impedance matching to biological tissue. Thus comfortable, wearable energy harvesters are one step closer to reality.

  12. Systemic nicotine exposure in tobacco harvesters.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, A; Benowitz, N L; Muzi, G; Eisner, M D; Filiberto, S; Fantozzi, P; Montanari, L; Abbritti, G

    2001-01-01

    Several epidemics of nicotine intoxication have been described among tobacco harvesters; however, little is known about nicotine absorption under typical working conditions. To assess systemic nicotine absorption during a regular working shift, the authors performed an observational field study. Included in the study were 10 healthy, nonsmoking, female tobacco harvesters and a control group of 5 healthy, nonsmoking, female hospital workers. Nicotine and cotinine were measured in sequential samples of blood and urine during a regular workshift. Blood nicotine levels rose from a nadir value of 0.79 +/- 0.12 ng/ml to a peak value of 3.45 +/- 0.84 ng/ml (p < .05 [Tukey's modified t test]) in the exposed group. In the control group, levels were stable at 0.1 +/- 0.1 ng/ml (p < .01). Moreover, the mean blood nicotine level measured 3 mo following the end of exposure in 6 of 10 exposed subjects was 0.24 +/- 0.12 ng/ml (p < .01). Corresponding higher values of urine nicotine and urine cotinine were observed in the exposed versus control group (comparative p values were < .01 and < .05, respectively). Overall, tobacco harvesters absorbed approximately 0.8 mg of nicotine daily. Given that nicotine can induce adverse health effects, the authors believe that prevention of nicotine absorption in tobacco harvesters should be sought and that workers should be informed about occupational risks.

  13. Multi-source energy harvester power management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Alexander D.; Tiwari, Rashi; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2011-03-01

    Much of the work on improving energy harvesting systems currently focuses on tasks beyond geometric optimization and has shifted to using complex feedback control circuitry. While the specific technique and effectiveness of the circuits have varied, an important goal is still out of reach for many desired applications: to produce sufficient and sustained power. This is due in part to the power requirements of the control circuits themselves. One method for increasing the robustness and versatility of energy harvesting systems which has started to receive some attention would be to utilize multiple energy sources simultaneously. If some or all of the present energy sources were harvested, the amount of constant power which could be provided to the system electronics would increase dramatically. This work examines two passive circuit topologies, parallel and series, for combining multiple piezoelectric energy harvesters onto a single storage capacitor using an LTspice simulation. The issue of the relative phase between the two piezoelectric signals is explored to show that the advantages of both configurations are significantly affected by increased relative phase values.

  14. 50 CFR 640.21 - Harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Management Measures § 640.21 Harvest limitations. (a) Berried lobsters. A berried (egg-bearing) spiny lobster or slipper lobster in or from the EEZ must be returned immediately to the water unharmed. If found in a trap in...

  15. 50 CFR 640.21 - Harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Management Measures § 640.21 Harvest limitations. (a) Berried lobsters. A berried (egg-bearing) spiny lobster in or... berried spiny lobster may not be retained in the trap. A berried spiny lobster in or from the EEZ may...

  16. 50 CFR 640.21 - Harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Management Measures § 640.21 Harvest limitations. (a) Berried lobsters. A berried (egg-bearing) spiny lobster or slipper lobster in or from the EEZ must be returned immediately to the water unharmed. If found in a...

  17. Harvesting the High-Hanging Fruit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenton, Jay D.

    2014-01-01

    For many years, higher education institutions have been harvesting the low-hanging fruit when it comes to budget reductions and adjustments. Easier changes have often been made--such as cutting administration, using more adjunct faculty, contracting out inefficient or non effective auxiliary operations and so forth. Until recently such strategies,…

  18. Short rotation forestry harvesting - systems and costs

    Treesearch

    Bruce R. Hartsough; Bryce J. Stokes

    1997-01-01

    Single stem short rotation plantations in the United States are largely dedicated to pulp production, with fuel as a secondary product. There are very limited plantings for fuel production, and others where the primary purpose is treatment of various wastewater's. All production harvesting of single stem plantations is conducted with conventional forestry...

  19. A New Technique for Conchal Cartilage Harvest

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Young; Jeong, Ji Won

    2017-01-01

    The goal of auricular cartilage harvest is to obtain a sufficient amount for reconstruction and to minimize the change in ear shape. The cartilage can be harvested by a posterior or anterior approach, and each method has advantages and disadvantages. The posterior approach presents the advantage of scar concealment, but there are limits to the amount of cymba cartilage that may be harvested. In contrast, the anterior approach may cause a noticeable scar. However, as cartilage is collected, the anterior approach provides a view that facilitates the preservation ear structure. In addition, it is possible to obtain a greater amount of cartilage. From January 2014 to December 2015, we harvested auricular cartilage graft material in 17 patients. To prevent the development of trapdoor scars or linear scar contracture, short incisions were made on the superior border of the cymba and cavum. Two small and narrow incisions were made, resulting in suboptimal exposure of the surgical site, which heightens the potential for damaging the cartilage when using existing tools. To minimize this, the authors used a newly invented ball-type elevator. All patients recovered without complications after surgery and reported satisfaction with the shape of the ear. PMID:28352607

  20. Harvesting the High-Hanging Fruit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenton, Jay D.

    2014-01-01

    For many years, higher education institutions have been harvesting the low-hanging fruit when it comes to budget reductions and adjustments. Easier changes have often been made--such as cutting administration, using more adjunct faculty, contracting out inefficient or non effective auxiliary operations and so forth. Until recently such strategies,…

  1. A hybrid nonlinear vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Towfighian, Shahrzad

    2017-06-01

    Vibration energy harvesting converts mechanical energy from ambient sources to electricity to power remote sensors. Compared to linear resonators that have poor performance away from their natural frequency, nonlinear vibration energy harvesters perform better because they use vibration energy over a broader spectrum. We present a hybrid nonlinear energy harvester that combines bi-stability with internal resonance to increase the frequency bandwidth. A two-fold increase in the frequency bandwidth can be obtained compared to a bi-stable system with fixed magnets. The harvester consists of a piezoelectric cantilever beam carrying a movable magnet facing a fixed magnet. A spring allows the magnet to move along the beam and it provides an extra stored energy to further increase the amplitude of vibration acting as a mechanical amplifier. An electromechanically coupled mathematical model of the system is presented to obtain the dynamic response of the cantilever beam, the movable magnet and the output voltage. The perturbation method of multiple scales is applied to solve these equations and obtain approximate analytical solutions. The effects of various system parameters on the frequency responses are investigated. The numerical approaches of the long time integration (Runge-Kutta method) and the shooting technique are used to verify the analytical results. The results of this study can be used to improve efficiency in converting wasted mechanical vibration to useful electrical energy by broadening the frequency bandwidth.

  2. Energy harvesting wireless piezoelectric resonant force sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mehdi

    The piezoelectric energy harvester has become a new powering option for some low-power electronic devices such as MEMS (Micro Electrical Mechanical System) sensors. Piezoelectric materials can collect the ambient vibrations energy and convert it to electrical energy. This thesis is intended to demonstrate the behavior of a piezoelectric energy harvester system at elevated temperature from room temperature up to 82°C, and compares the system's performance using different piezoelectric materials. The systems are structured with a Lead Magnesium Niobate-Lead Titanate (PMN-PT) single crystal patch bonded to an aluminum cantilever beam, Lead Indium Niobate-Lead Magnesium Niobate-Lead Titanate (PIN-PMN-PT) single crystal patch bonded to an aluminum cantilever beam and a bimorph cantilever beam which is made of Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT). The results of this experimental study show the effects of the temperature on the operation frequency and output power of the piezoelectric energy harvesting system. The harvested electrical energy has been stored in storage circuits including a battery. Then, the stored energy has been used to power up the other part of the system, a wireless resonator force sensor, which uses frequency conversion techniques to convert the sensor's ultrasonic signal to a microwave signal in order to transmit the signal wirelessly.

  3. Human Motion Energy Harvesting for AAL Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ylli, K.; Hoffmann, D.; Becker, P.; Willmann, A.; Folkmer, B.; Manoli, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Research and development into the topic of ambient assisted living has led to an increasing range of devices that facilitate a person's life. The issue of the power supply of these modern mobile systems however has not been solved satisfactorily yet. In this paper a flat inductive multi-coil harvester for integration into the shoe sole is presented. The device is designed for ambient assisted living (AAL) applications and particularly to power a self-lacing shoe. The harvester exploits the horizontal swing motion of the foot to generate energy. Stacks of opposing magnets move through a number of equally spaced coils to induce a voltage. The requirement of a flat structure which can be integrated into the shoe sole is met by a reduced form factor of the magnet stack. In order to exploit the full width of the shoe sole, supporting structures are used to parallelize the harvester and therefore increase the number of active elements, i.e. magnets and coils. The development and characterization of different harvester variations is presented with the best tested design generating an average power of up to 2.14 mW at a compact device size of 75 × 41.5 × 15 mm3 including housing.

  4. Economics of residue harvest: Regional partnership evaluation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Economic analyses on the viability of corn (Zea mays, L.) stover harvest for bioenergy production have largely been based on simulation modeling. While some studies have utilized field research data, most field-based analyses have included a limited number of sites and a narrow geographic distributi...

  5. Energy budget for an energywood harvesting system

    Treesearch

    W.F. Watson; D.E. Miller; B.J. Stokes; M.L. Broussard

    1987-01-01

    The fuel and energy requirements for alternative energywood harvesting operations were determined from field operations. Comparisons were made among the total energy requirements including transportation for conventional operation and one- and two-pass energywood operations. The two-pass energywood operation requlred more energy per green ton than the other operations...

  6. Harvesting considerations for ecosystem restoration projects

    Treesearch

    Dana Mitchell; John. Klepac

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to identify and develop cost effective harvesting systems for ecosystem restoration projects. In the Western United States, pinyon-juniper woodlands are expanding into sagebrush and rangeland ecosystems. In many areas, this growth negatively impacts water, wildlife habitat, biodiversity, and other resources. In other areas, such as Texas and Oklahoma,...

  7. Assessment of bias in US waterfowl harvest estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Padding, Paul I.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Context. North American waterfowl managers have long suspected that waterfowl harvest estimates derived from national harvest surveys in the USA are biased high. Survey bias can be evaluated by comparing survey results with like estimates from independent sources. Aims. We used band-recovery data to assess the magnitude of apparent bias in duck and goose harvest estimates, using mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and Canada geese (Branta canadensis) as representatives of ducks and geese, respectively. Methods. We compared the number of reported mallard and Canada goose band recoveries, adjusted for band reporting rates, with the estimated harvests of banded mallards and Canada geese from the national harvest surveys. Weused the results of those comparisons to develop correction factors that can be applied to annual duck and goose harvest estimates of the national harvest survey. Key results. National harvest survey estimates of banded mallards harvested annually averaged 1.37 times greater than those calculated from band-recovery data, whereas Canada goose harvest estimates averaged 1.50 or 1.63 times greater than comparable band-recovery estimates, depending on the harvest survey methodology used. Conclusions. Duck harvest estimates produced by the national harvest survey from 1971 to 2010 should be reduced by a factor of 0.73 (95% CI = 0.71–0.75) to correct for apparent bias. Survey-specific correction factors of 0.67 (95% CI = 0.65–0.69) and 0.61 (95% CI = 0.59–0.64) should be applied to the goose harvest estimates for 1971–2001 (duck stamp-based survey) and 1999–2010 (HIP-based survey), respectively. Implications. Although this apparent bias likely has not influenced waterfowl harvest management policy in the USA, it does have negative impacts on some applications of harvest estimates, such as indirect estimation of population size. For those types of analyses, we recommend applying the appropriate correction factor to harvest estimates.

  8. Two degrees of freedom piezoelectric vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Shengsheng; Cao, Junyi; Zhou, Shengxi; Lin, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Recently, vibration energy harvesting from surrounding environments to power wearable devices and wireless sensors in structure health monitoring has received considerable interest. Piezoelectric conversion mechanism has been employed to develop many successful energy harvesting devices due to its simple structure, long life span, high harvesting efficiency and so on. However, there are many difficulties of microscale cantilever configurations in energy harvesting from low frequency ambient. In order to improve the adaptability of energy harvesting from ambient vibrations, a two degrees of freedom (2-DOF) magnetic-coupled piezoelectric energy harvester is proposed in this paper. The electromechanical governing models of the cantilever and clamped hybrid energy harvester are derived to describe the dynamic characteristics for 2-DOF magnetic-coupled piezoelectric vibration energy harvester. Numerical simulations based on Matlab and ANSYS software show that the proposed magnetically coupled energy harvester can enhance the effective operating frequency bandwidth and increase the energy density. The experimental voltage responses of 2-DOF harvester under different structure parameters are acquired to demonstrate the effectiveness of the lumped parameter model for low frequency excitations. Moreover, the proposed energy harvester can enhance the energy harvesting performance over a wider bandwidth of low frequencies and has a great potential for broadband vibration energy harvesting.

  9. Sunflower production, harvesting, drying and storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, V.; Berglund, D.; Hellevang, K.

    1982-01-01

    Sunflower, produced for its edible oil, has recently evolved as an important cash crop for the Dakotas and Minnesota. This oilseed crop has increased from 81,000 hectares in the mid-1960's to over 1,620,000 hectares in 1981. Over 90% of the sunflower crop planted in the United States is of oilseed varieties. Sunflower tends to fit well in small grain cropping rotation. Sunflower is planted after small grains in the spring and harvested in the fall, following small grain harvest. Planting of sunflower is recommended from May 20 to May 31. Soil temperature should be between 4/sup 0/C and 10/sup 0/C for germinaton. Diseases occurring in sunflower can greatly reduce yield and hinder harvest operations. A sunflower crop is normally ready for harvest about 120 days after planting. Combines suitable for treshing small gains can be adapted to harvest sunflower. Sunflower can be dried in conventional crop dryers; bin, batch and continuous flow dryers have been used successfully. Sunflower dries easily due to the relatively small amount of water removed. Drying temperatures up to 104/sup 0/C do not have an adverse affect on the oil percentage or fatty acid composition of oil type sunflower. A serious fire hazard exists when drying sunflower. The storage of sunflower is similar to any other crop. The recommended storage moisture content is 8% for oil seeds and 10% for confectionary. Cooling the sunflower seed greatly increases the storability and decreases insect damage. Sunflower should be cooled to about 0/sup 0/C which nearly stops microbial activity. The sunflower should be checked at least weekly. 9 figures, 1 table. (DP)

  10. Big bluestem and switchgrass feedstock harvest timing: Nitrous oxide response to feedstock harvest timing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and big bluestem (Andropogon gerdardii Vitman) are potential bioenergy feedstocks. Feedstock storage limitations, labor constraints for harvest, and environmental benefits provided by perennials are rationales for developing localized perennial feedstock as an alter...

  11. Life Cycle Assessment of Domestic and Agricultural Rainwater Harvesting Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    To further understanding of the environmental implications of rainwater harvesting and its water savings potential relative to conventional U.S. water delivery infrastructure, we present a method to perform life cycle assessment of domestic rainwater harvesting (DRWH) and agricul...

  12. HARVEST STATES GRAIN COOPERATIVES, SUPERIOR WISCONSIN; CONSTRUCTED OVER VARIOUS DATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HARVEST STATES GRAIN COOPERATIVES, SUPERIOR WISCONSIN; CONSTRUCTED OVER VARIOUS DATES BEGINNING IN 1942; LEFT SLIP (HUGHITT AVENUE) RIGHT SLIP (TOWER AVENUE) - Cenex-Harvest States Grain Cooperatives, Dock Street between Hughitt Avenue & Tower Avenue slips, Superior, Douglas County, WI

  13. Life Cycle Assessment of Domestic and Agricultural Rainwater Harvesting Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    To further understanding of the environmental implications of rainwater harvesting and its water savings potential relative to conventional U.S. water delivery infrastructure, we present a method to perform life cycle assessment of domestic rainwater harvesting (DRWH) and agricul...

  14. Critical evaluation and modeling of algal harvesting using dissolved air flotation. DAF Algal Harvesting Modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Hewson, John C.; Amendola, Pasquale; ...

    2014-07-14

    In our study, Chlorella zofingiensis harvesting by dissolved air flotation (DAF) was critically evaluated with regard to algal concentration, culture conditions, type and dosage of coagulants, and recycle ratio. Harvesting efficiency increased with coagulant dosage and leveled off at 81%, 86%, 91%, and 87% when chitosan, Al3+, Fe3+, and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used at dosages of 70, 180, 250, and 500 mg g-1, respectively. The DAF efficiency-coagulant dosage relationship changed with algal culture conditions. In evaluating the influence of the initial algal concentration and recycle ratio revealed that, under conditions typical for algal harvesting, we found that itmore » is possible that the number of bubbles is insufficient. A DAF algal harvesting model was developed to explain this observation by introducing mass-based floc size distributions and a bubble limitation into the white water blanket model. Moreover, the model revealed the importance of coagulation to increase floc-bubble collision and attachment, and the preferential interaction of bubbles with larger flocs, which limited the availability of bubbles to the smaller sized flocs. The harvesting efficiencies predicted by the model agree reasonably with experimental data obtained at different Al3+ dosages, algal concentrations, and recycle ratios. Based on this modeling, critical parameters for efficient algal harvesting were identified.« less

  15. Critical evaluation and modeling of algal harvesting using dissolved air flotation. DAF Algal Harvesting Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Hewson, John C.; Amendola, Pasquale; Reynoso, Monica; Sommerfeld, Milton; Chen, Yongsheng; Hu, Qiang

    2014-07-14

    In our study, Chlorella zofingiensis harvesting by dissolved air flotation (DAF) was critically evaluated with regard to algal concentration, culture conditions, type and dosage of coagulants, and recycle ratio. Harvesting efficiency increased with coagulant dosage and leveled off at 81%, 86%, 91%, and 87% when chitosan, Al3+, Fe3+, and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used at dosages of 70, 180, 250, and 500 mg g-1, respectively. The DAF efficiency-coagulant dosage relationship changed with algal culture conditions. In evaluating the influence of the initial algal concentration and recycle ratio revealed that, under conditions typical for algal harvesting, we found that it is possible that the number of bubbles is insufficient. A DAF algal harvesting model was developed to explain this observation by introducing mass-based floc size distributions and a bubble limitation into the white water blanket model. Moreover, the model revealed the importance of coagulation to increase floc-bubble collision and attachment, and the preferential interaction of bubbles with larger flocs, which limited the availability of bubbles to the smaller sized flocs. The harvesting efficiencies predicted by the model agree reasonably with experimental data obtained at different Al3+ dosages, algal concentrations, and recycle ratios. Based on this modeling, critical parameters for efficient algal harvesting were identified.

  16. High relative humidity pre-harvest reduces post-harvest proliferation of Salmonella in tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Marvasi, Massimiliano; Giurcanu, Mihai C; Hochmuth, George J; Speybroeck, Niko; Havelaar, Arie H; Teplitski, Max

    2017-09-01

    Outbreaks of human illness caused by enteric pathogens such as Salmonella are increasingly linked to the consumption of fruits and vegetables. Knowledge on the factors affecting Salmonella proliferation on fresh produce therefore becomes increasingly important to safeguard public health. Previous experiments showed a limited impact of pre-harvest production practices on Salmonella proliferation on tomatoes, but suggested a significant effect of harvest time. We explored the data from two previously published and one unpublished experiment using regression trees, which allowed overcoming the interpretational difficulties of classical statistical models with higher order interactions. We assessed the effect of harvest time by explicitly modeling the climatic conditions at harvest time and by performing confirmatory laboratory experiments. Across all datasets, regression trees confirmed the dominant effect of harvest time on Salmonella proliferation, with humidity-related factors emerging as the most important underlying climatic factors. High relative humidity the week prior to harvest was consistently associated with lower Salmonella proliferation. A controlled lab experiment confirmed that tomatoes containing their native epimicrobiota supported significantly lower Salmonella proliferation when incubated at higher humidity prior to inoculation. The complex interactions between environmental conditions and the native microbiota of the tomato crop remain to be fully understood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Energy Harvesting From Low Frequency Applications Using Piezoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huidong; Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun

    2014-11-06

    This paper reviewed the state of research on piezoelectric energy harvesters. Various types of harvester configurations, piezoelectric materials, and techniques used to improve the mechanical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency were discussed. Most of the piezoelectric energy harvesters studied today have focused on scavenging mechanical energy from vibration sources due to their abundance in both natural and industrial environments. Cantilever beams have been the most studied structure for piezoelectric energy harvester to date because of the high responsiveness to small vibrations.

  18. Relationship Between Site Disturbance and Forest Harvesting Equipment Traffic

    Treesearch

    Tim McDonald; Emily Carter; Steve Taylor; John Tobert

    1998-01-01

    A study was done to evaluate the use of global positioning systems (GPS) to track the position of forest harvesting equipment and use the information to assess site impacts. GPS units were attached to tree-length harvesting machinery in two clearcuts (1 feller-buncher, 2 skidders). Position of the equipment was recorded at 2-second intervals throughout the harvest of...

  19. Social and biophysical variation in regional timber harvest regimes

    Treesearch

    Jonathan R. Thompson; Charles D. Canham; Luca Morreale; David B. Kittredge; Brett Butler

    2017-01-01

    In terms of adult tree mortality, harvesting is the most prevalent disturbance in northeastern United States forests. Previous studies have demonstrated that stand structure and tree species composition are important predictors of harvest. We extend this work to investigate how social factors further influence harvest regimes. By coupling the Forest Inventory and...

  20. Estimating and validating harvesting system production through computer simulation

    Treesearch

    John E. Baumgras; Curt C. Hassler; Chris B. LeDoux

    1993-01-01

    A Ground Based Harvesting System Simulation model (GB-SIM) has been developed to estimate stump-to-truck production rates and multiproduct yields for conventional ground-based timber harvesting systems in Appalachian hardwood stands. Simulation results reflect inputs that define harvest site and timber stand attributes, wood utilization options, and key attributes of...

  1. 50 CFR 680.21 - Crab harvesting cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crab harvesting cooperatives. 680.21... ZONE OFF ALASKA Management Measures § 680.21 Crab harvesting cooperatives. This section governs the formation and operation of crab harvesting cooperatives. The regulations in this section apply only to crab...

  2. 50 CFR 680.21 - Crab harvesting cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab harvesting cooperatives. 680.21... ZONE OFF ALASKA Management Measures § 680.21 Crab harvesting cooperatives. This section governs the formation and operation of crab harvesting cooperatives. The regulations in this section apply only to crab...

  3. 50 CFR 680.21 - Crab harvesting cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Crab harvesting cooperatives. 680.21... ZONE OFF ALASKA Management Measures § 680.21 Crab harvesting cooperatives. This section governs the formation and operation of crab harvesting cooperatives. The regulations in this section apply only to crab...

  4. 50 CFR 680.21 - Crab harvesting cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Crab harvesting cooperatives. 680.21... ZONE OFF ALASKA Management Measures § 680.21 Crab harvesting cooperatives. This section governs the formation and operation of crab harvesting cooperatives. The regulations in this section apply only to crab...

  5. 50 CFR 680.21 - Crab harvesting cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crab harvesting cooperatives. 680.21... ZONE OFF ALASKA Management Measures § 680.21 Crab harvesting cooperatives. This section governs the formation and operation of crab harvesting cooperatives. The regulations in this section apply only to crab...

  6. 50 CFR 20.20 - Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program... IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Taking § 20.20 Migratory Bird Harvest... information will be used to provide a sampling frame for the national Migratory Bird Harvest Survey. Response...

  7. 50 CFR 20.20 - Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program... IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Taking § 20.20 Migratory Bird Harvest... information will be used to provide a sampling frame for the national Migratory Bird Harvest Survey. Response...

  8. Research and simulation of anti - rollover technology of harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shizhuang; Cao, Shukun

    2017-09-01

    The structural characteristics of our country’s corn harvester are narrow-track, high centroid and existence of eccentric distance, so rollover accident is easily to occur when going up and down the hills mountainous and hilly regions for complex terrain. In the previous paper, we introduced the Hydro-Pneumatic Suspension to prevent the roller of the harvester, and took ADAMS simulation on the left and right roller, and obtained that the use of Hydro-Pneumatic Suspension can improve the side angle of the harvester for 5°. At the same time, we continue to use the Hydro-Pneumatic Suspension as the key part of the anti-roller system of the harvester. In the uphill and downhill case of the harvester, we respectively simulated the anti-roller performance on the traditional harvester and the harvester installing the Hydro-Pneumatic Suspension. Finally, we got that the anti-roller angle of the harvester installed Hydro-Pneumatic Suspension is obviously higher than the traditional harvester, which indicates that the anti-rollover performance of the harvester installed Hydro-Pneumatic Suspension is better than the traditional harvester. The data obtained from this experiment will provide technical support for the following structure optimization of the harvester.

  9. 50 CFR 622.383 - Limited harvest species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Limited harvest species. 622.383 Section... Migratory Pelagic Resources (Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic) § 622.383 Limited harvest species. (a... species is harvested by a vessel operating under a commercial vessel permit. The operator of a vessel that...

  10. Simulating cut-to-length harvesting operations in Appalachian hardwoods

    Treesearch

    Jingxin Wang; Chris B. LeDoux; Yaoxiang Li

    2005-01-01

    Cut-to-length (CTL) harvesting systems involving small and large harvesters and a forwarder were simulated using a modular computer simulation model. The two harvesters simulated were a modified John Deere 988 tracked excavator with a single grip sawhead and a Timbco T425 based excavator with a single grip sawhead. The forwarder used in the simulations was a Valmet 524...

  11. Evaluating timber harvesting impacts on wildlife habitat suitability using FOREX

    Treesearch

    Chris B. LeDoux

    1997-01-01

    Precommercial, commercial, and final harvesting operations can impact wildlife habitat suitability by altering the vegetation composition on a given site. Harvesting operations remove trees and many times provide the necessary perturbation to trigger successional conditions different from those that existed prior to the harvest. Although these new successional changes...

  12. PRESTO: online calculation of carbon in harvested wood products

    Treesearch

    Coeli M. Hoover; Sarah J. Beukema; Donald C.E. Robinson; Katherine M. Kellock; Diana A. Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Carbon stored in harvested wood products is recognized under international carbon accounting protocols, and some crediting systems may permit the inclusion of harvested wood products when calculating carbon sequestration. For managers and landowners, however, estimating carbon stored in harvested wood products may be difficult. PRESTO (PRoduct EStimation Tool Online)...

  13. Quantum physics of photosynthetic light-harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damjanovic, Ana

    2001-12-01

    Absorption of light by light harvesting complexes and transfer of electronic excitation to the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) constitutes the primary step of photosynthesis, i.e., the light harvesting process. A model for an atomic level structure of a so-called photosynthetic unit of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been established recently. The photosynthetic unit (PSU) of purple bacterium combines a nanometric assembly of three protein complexes: (i)the photosynthetic reaction center, (ii)a ring-shaped light harvesting complex LH-I, and (iii)multiple copies of a similar complex, LH-II. The model describes in detail the organization of pigments involved in primary light absorption and excitation transfer: a hierarchy of ring- shaped chlorophyll-carotenoid aggregates which surround four centrally located chlorophylls of the photosynthetic reaction center. This thesis presents a quantum- mechanical description of the light harvesting process in the PSU, based on the atomic level model. Excitation transfer rates for various excitation transfer steps have been determined through Fermi's golden rule. To describe electronic excitations of the strongly coupled chlorophyll aggregate in LH-II, an effective Hamiltonian has been established. This Hamiltonian has further been extended to describe also the LH-II --> LH-II --> LH-I --> RC cascade of excitation transfer. The results suggest that, in the absence of disorder, the electronic excitations in LH-II are coherently delocalizaed over the ring, and that such excitonic states speed up the light-harvesting process. Influence of thermal disorder on exciton coherence has been studied by means of a combined molecular dynamics/quantum chemistry approach. The results indicate a significant loss of coherence due to thermal effects. Excitation transfer between carotenoids and chlorophylls has been investigated in two light-harvesting complexes; LH-II of the purple bacterium Rhodospirillum

  14. Ten years of recreational diving fatalities in the United States and Canada: harvesters vs non-harvesters.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Brittany M; Buzzacott, Peter; Denoble, Petar J

    2016-07-01

    Adult male recreational diver fatalities (n = 698) in North America from 2004 to 2013 were examined. Compared with non-harvesters, boat (86 vs 59%), solo (26 vs 13%) and night diving (10 vs 3%) were more common among harvesters. Of the divers who were low-on or out-of air, 20% were harvesters and 11% non-harvesters (OR = 2.0, P = 0.03).

  15. Traditional plant harvesting in contemporary fragmented and urban landscapes.

    PubMed

    Wehi, Priscilla M; Wehi, William L

    2010-04-01

    Ecosystem fragmentation and destruction can lead to restrictive administration policies on traditional harvesting by indigenous peoples from remaining ecosystem tracts. In New Zealand, concerns about endangered species and governmental policies that focus on species and ecosystem preservation have resulted in severely curtailed traditional harvesting rights. Although provision has been made for limited gathering of traditional plants from government-administered conservation lands, it is unclear how much harvesting is undertaken on these lands and elsewhere and what this harvest might consist of. We interviewed seven expert Maori elders from the Waikato, New Zealand, to identify plant species they currently harvested and from where. We compared these data with the data we collected on permits issued for plant collecting on conservation lands in the same region. We sought to gain information on indigenous plant harvesting to determine the extent of permitted harvesting from conservation lands in the Waikato and to identify issues that might affect plant harvesting and management. Elders identified 58 species they harvest regularly or consider culturally important; over 50% of these species are harvested for medicinal use. Permit data from 1996 to 2006 indicated no apparent relationship between species of reported cultural significance and the number of permits issued for each of these species. Currently, few plant species are harvested from conservation lands, although some unofficial harvesting occurs. Elders instead reported that medicinal plants are frequently collected from urban and other public areas. They reported that plant species used for dyeing, carving, and weaving are difficult to access. Elders also discussed concerns such as spraying of roadsides, which resulted in the death of medicinal species, and use of commercial hybrids in urban planning. Local government may have an increasingly important role in supporting native traditions through urban

  16. A New Grain Harvesting System for Single Pass Grain Harvest, Biomass Collection, Crop Residue Sizing and Grain Segregation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A cereal grain harvesting system is introduced that combines existing technologies in a unique way to improve cereal grain harvest performance, profitability and efficiently collect biomass. The harvesting system is comprised of three machines – one to gather the crop and prepare the residue for no...

  17. A New Grain Harvesting System for Single-Pass Grain Harvest, Biomass Collection, Crop Residue Sizing, and Grain Segregation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A cereal grain harvesting system is introduced that combines existing technologies in a unique way to improve cereal grain harvest performance, profitability and efficiently collect biomass. The harvesting system is comprised of three machines – one to gather the crop and prepare the residue for no...

  18. Quantum Chemical Studies of Light Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Curutchet, Carles; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2017-01-25

    The design of optimal light-harvesting (supra)molecular systems and materials is one of the most challenging frontiers of science. Theoretical methods and computational models play a fundamental role in this difficult task, as they allow the establishment of structural blueprints inspired by natural photosynthetic organisms that can be applied to the design of novel artificial light-harvesting devices. Among theoretical strategies, the application of quantum chemical tools represents an important reality that has already reached an evident degree of maturity, although it still has to show its real potentials. This Review presents an overview of the state of the art of this strategy, showing the actual fields of applicability but also indicating its current limitations, which need to be solved in future developments.

  19. Dielectric elastomer energy harvesting undergoing polarization saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liwu; Luo, Xiaojian; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2012-04-01

    Mechanical energy can be converted into electrical energy by using a dielectric elastomer generator. The elastomer is susceptible to various models of failure, including electrical breakdown, electromechanical instability, loss of tension, and rupture by stretching. The models of failure define a cycle of maximal energy that can be converted. On the other hand, when subjected to voltage, the charge will be induced on a dielectric elastomer. When the voltage is small, the charge increases with the voltage. Along with the continuously increase of voltage, when the charge approaches a certain value, it would become saturated. This paper develops a thermodynamic model of dielectric elastomers undergoing polarization saturation. We studied the typical failure model with three variables of Gent Model silicone energy harvester and obtained an analytical solution of the constitutive equation of dielectric elastomer undergoing polarization saturation. These results can be used to facilitate the design and manufacture of dielectric elastomer energy harvesters.

  20. Triboelectret-based aeroelastic flutter energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Matthias; Boisseau, Sebastien; Geisler, Matthias; Despesse, Ghislain; Reboud, Jean Luc

    2016-11-01

    This paper highlights some experimental results on several electrostatic membranes tested in a wind tunnel between 0 and 20m.s-1 for airflow energy harvesting. The main idea is to use the aeroelastic behavior of thin flexible films to induce simultaneously the capacitance variations and the polarization required by the triboelectric/electrostatic conversion. This technology provides thin and flexible devices and avoids the issue of electrets discharge. Our prototypes (<16cm2) allowed a quick startup (from 3ms-1), an electrical power-flux density from 0.1μW.cm-2 to 60μW.cm-2. In order to complete the energy harvesting chain, we have used a wireless sensor with temperature and acceleration measures coupled to a low power transmission (Bluetooth Low Energy) with reception on a smartphone.

  1. Lessons from nature about solar light harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholes, Gregory D.; Fleming, Graham R.; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2011-10-01

    Solar fuel production often starts with the energy from light being absorbed by an assembly of molecules; this electronic excitation is subsequently transferred to a suitable acceptor. For example, in photosynthesis, antenna complexes capture sunlight and direct the energy to reaction centres that then carry out the associated chemistry. In this Review, we describe the principles learned from studies of various natural antenna complexes and suggest how to elucidate strategies for designing light-harvesting systems. We envisage that such systems will be used for solar fuel production, to direct and regulate excitation energy flow using molecular organizations that facilitate feedback and control, or to transfer excitons over long distances. Also described are the notable properties of light-harvesting chromophores, spatial-energetic landscapes, the roles of excitonic states and quantum coherence, as well as how antennas are regulated and photoprotected.

  2. Design principles of photosynthetic light-harvesting.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Graham R; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S; Amarnath, Kapil; Zaks, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms are capable of harvesting solar energy with near unity quantum efficiency. Even more impressively, this efficiency can be regulated in response to the demands of photosynthetic reactions and the fluctuating light-levels of natural environments. We discuss the distinctive design principles through which photosynthetic light-harvesting functions. These emergent properties of photosynthesis appear both within individual pigment-protein complexes and in how these complexes integrate to produce a functional, regulated apparatus that drives downstream photochemistry. One important property is how the strong interactions and resultant quantum coherence, produced by the dense packing of photosynthetic pigments, provide a tool to optimize for ultrafast, directed energy transfer. We also describe how excess energy is quenched to prevent photodamage under high-light conditions, which we investigate through theory and experiment. We conclude with comments on the potential of using these features to improve solar energy devices.

  3. Vibration energy harvesting with polyphase AC transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullagh, James J.; Scruggs, Jeffrey T.; Asai, Takehiko

    2016-04-01

    Three-phase transduction affords certain advantages in the efficient electromechanical conversion of energy, especially at higher power scales. This paper considers the use of a three-phase electric machine for harvesting energy from vibrations. We consider the use of vector control techniques, which are common in the area of industrial electronics, for optimizing the feedback loops in a stochastically-excited energy harvesting system. To do this, we decompose the problem into two separate feedback loops for direct and quadrature current components, and illustrate how each might be separately optimized to maximize power output. In a simple analytical example, we illustrate how these techniques might be used to gain insight into the tradeoffs in the design of the electronic hardware and the choice of bus voltage.

  4. Opportunities for energy harvesting in automobile factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegoke, E. I.; Edwards, R. M.; Whittow, Will; Bindel, Axel; Peca, Marco

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the opportunities of deploying distributed sensors within the manufacturing environment of a large scale automobile plant using energy harvesting techniques. Measurements were taken in three domains at the plant in order to characterize ambient energy. Due to the location of the plant, the RF power density for radio access technologies present varied between -127 dBm/cm2 and -113 dBm/cm2. The maximum temperature difference measured within accessible distance from machine parts on the production lines surveyed was 10°C. Indoor lighting was dominant at the plant via fluorescent tubes, with average irradiance of 1 W/m2. The results obtained from this measurement campaign showed that indoor lighting was the most suitable ambient source for energy harvesting.

  5. Energy harvesting in high voltage measuring techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żyłka, Pawel; Doliński, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    The paper discusses selected problems related to application of energy harvesting (that is, generating electricity from surplus energy present in the environment) to supply autonomous ultra-low-power measurement systems applicable in high voltage engineering. As a practical example of such implementation a laboratory model of a remote temperature sensor is presented, which is self-powered by heat generated in a current-carrying busbar in HV- switchgear. Presented system exploits a thermoelectric harvester based on a passively cooled Peltier module supplying micro-power low-voltage dc-dc converter driving energy-efficient temperature sensor, microcontroller and a fibre-optic transmitter. Performance of the model in laboratory simulated conditions are presented and discussed.

  6. North Carolina harvest and utilization study, 2002

    Treesearch

    James W. Bentley; Tony G. Johnson

    2006-01-01

    In 2002, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 108 operations throughout North Carolina. There were 2,926 total trees measured; 1,693, or 58 percent, were softwood, while 1,233, or 42 percent, were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 86 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 14 percent was left as logging...

  7. Development and Analysis of SRIC Harvesting Systems

    Treesearch

    Bryce J. Stokes; Bruce R. Hartsough

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews several machine combinations for harvesting short-rotation, intensive-culture (SRIC) plantations. Productivity and cost information for individual machines was obtained from published sources. Three felling and skidding systems were analyzed for two stands, a 7.6-cm (3-in) average d.b.h. sycamore and a 15.2-cm (6-in) average d.b.h. eucalyptus. The...

  8. Carbon sequestration in harvested wood products.

    Treesearch

    K. Skog

    2011-01-01

    This section quantifies the net changes in C stocks in the five forest C pools and two harvested wood pools. The net change in stocks for each pool is estimated, and then the changes in stocks are summed over all pools to estimate total net flux. The focus on C implies that all C-based greenhouse gases are included, and the focus on stock change suggests that specific...

  9. Harvesting understory biomass with a baler

    Treesearch

    J. Klepac; B. Rummer

    2010-01-01

    A model WB-55 Biobaler was evaluated while operating in a pine plantation to remove understory biomass. The harvested material was formed into round bales which averaged 1004 lbs. Mean heat content was approximately 8560 Btu/lb oven-dry. Time-study data revealed a productivity of 14.7 bales/PMH with a mean travel distance of 752 feet between bales. In-woods cost was...

  10. South Carolina harvest and utilization study, 2011

    Treesearch

    Kerry J.W. Dooley; Jason A. Cooper; James W. Bentley

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 80 operations throughout South Carolina. There were 1,974 total trees measured; 1,317 or 67 percent were softwood, while 657 or 33 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 86 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 14 percent was left as logging residue....

  11. Recent Advancements in Nanogenerators for Energy Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fei; Cai, Qian; Liao, Fan; Shao, Mingwang; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2015-11-11

    Nanomaterial-based generators are a highly promising power supply for micro/nanoscale devices, capable of directly harvesting energy from ambient sources without the need for batteries. These generators have been designed within four main types: piezoelectric, triboelectric, thermoelectric, and electret effects, and consist of ZnO-based, silicon-based, ferroelectric-material-based, polymer-based, and graphene-based examples. The representative achievements, current challenges, and future prospects of these nanogenerators are discussed.

  12. Georgia harvest and utilization study, 2009

    Treesearch

    James W. Bentley

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 80 operations throughout Georgia. There were 1,981 total trees measured: 1,453 or 73 percent were softwood, while 528 or 27 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 88 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 12 percent was left as logging residue. Seventy-...

  13. South Carolina harvest and utilization study, 2006

    Treesearch

    James W. Bentley; Tony G. Johnson

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 99 operations throughout South Carolina. There were 2,904 total trees measured; 1,763 or 61 percent were softwood, while 1,141 or 39 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 87 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 13 percent was left as logging residue....

  14. Kentucky harvest and utilization study, 2007

    Treesearch

    Jason A. Cooper; James W. Bentley

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 53 operations in Kentucky. There were 1,310 total trees measured: 263 or 20 percent were softwood, while 1,047 or 80 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 82 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 18 percent was left as logging residue. Seventy-two...

  15. North Carolina harvest and utilization study, 2007

    Treesearch

    James W. Bentley; Tony G. Johnson

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 83 operations throughout North Carolina. There were 2,119 total trees measured: 1,323 or 62 percent were softwood, while 796 or 38 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 85 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 15 percent was left as logging residue....

  16. Alabama harvest and utilization study, 2008

    Treesearch

    James W. Bentley; Tony G. Johnson

    2008-01-01

    In 2008, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 80 operations throughout Alabama. There were 2,100 total trees measured; 1,433 or 68 percent were softwood, while 667 or 32 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 88 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 12 percent was left as logging residue. Seventy-...

  17. Georgia harvest and utilization study, 2004

    Treesearch

    James W. Bentley; Richard a. Harper

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 96 operations throughout Georgia. There were 2,368 total trees measured, 1,581 or 67 percent were softwood, while 787 or 33 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 86 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, while the other 14 percent was left as logging...

  18. Development of a biomechanical energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingguo; Naing, Veronica; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2009-06-23

    Biomechanical energy harvesting-generating electricity from people during daily activities-is a promising alternative to batteries for powering increasingly sophisticated portable devices. We recently developed a wearable knee-mounted energy harvesting device that generated electricity during human walking. In this methods-focused paper, we explain the physiological principles that guided our design process and present a detailed description of our device design with an emphasis on new analyses. Effectively harvesting energy from walking requires a small lightweight device that efficiently converts intermittent, bi-directional, low speed and high torque mechanical power to electricity, and selectively engages power generation to assist muscles in performing negative mechanical work. To achieve this, our device used a one-way clutch to transmit only knee extension motions, a spur gear transmission to amplify the angular speed, a brushless DC rotary magnetic generator to convert the mechanical power into electrical power, a control system to determine when to open and close the power generation circuit based on measurements of knee angle, and a customized orthopaedic knee brace to distribute the device reaction torque over a large leg surface area. The device selectively engaged power generation towards the end of swing extension, assisting knee flexor muscles by producing substantial flexion torque (6.4 Nm), and efficiently converted the input mechanical power into electricity (54.6%). Consequently, six subjects walking at 1.5 m/s generated 4.8 +/- 0.8 W of electrical power with only a 5.0 +/- 21 W increase in metabolic cost. Biomechanical energy harvesting is capable of generating substantial amounts of electrical power from walking with little additional user effort making future versions of this technology particularly promising for charging portable medical devices.

  19. Nanoscale Based ThermalMagnetic Energy Harvesting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-30

    Superparamagnetic size ~20 nm ? Multiferroic Energy Transfer Spaldin and Fiebig, Science, 2005 PMN-PT,PZN-PT, PZT …… Ferroelectric Ni, Gd, Terfenol-D...Si substrate Covering layer for FIB Magnetocrystalline , function of temp. x y XRD: Textured crystal structure a) T < TSR b) T > TSR Easy...to spin-reorientation harvesting 2012 Textured Gd Thin Flims: UCLA Change of MCA energy in Gd • The easy axis of magnetization is dependent on

  20. Bioinspired Breathable Architecture for Water Harvesting

    PubMed Central

    von Spreckelsen, Rowan M.; Harris, Matthew T.; Wigzell, James M.; Fraser, Rebekah C.; Carletto, Andrea; Mosquin, Daniel P. K.; Justice, Douglas; Badyal, Jas Pal S.

    2015-01-01

    Thuja plicata is a coniferous tree which displays remarkable water channelling properties. In this article, an easily fabricated mesh inspired by the hierarchical macro surface structure of Thuja plicata branchlets is described which emulates this efficient water collection behaviour. The key parameters are shown to be the pore size, pore angle, mesh rotation, tilt angle (branch droop) and layering (branch overlap). Envisaged societal applications include water harvesting and low cost breathable architecture for developing countries. PMID:26577768

  1. Eastern Texas harvest and utilization study, 2003

    Treesearch

    James W. Bentley; Tony G. Johnson

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 81 operations throughout eastern Texas. There were 2,072 total trees measured, 1,557 or 75 percent were softwood, while 515 or 25 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 87 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, while the other 13 percent was left as logging...

  2. Environmental effects of harvesting forests for energy

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hook, R. I.; Johnson, D. W.; West, D. C.; Mann, L. K.

    1980-01-01

    Present interest in decreasing US dependence on foreign oil by increasing the use of wood for energy may bring about a change in our forest utilization policies. In the past, forests have been removed in areas believed to be suited for agriculture, or sawtimber and pulp have been the only woody material removed in any quantity from land not generally considered tillable. The new demands on wood for energy are effecting a trend toward (1) removing all woody biomass from harvested areas, (2) increasing the frequency of harvesting second growth forests, and (3) increasing production with biomass plantations. Considering the marginal quality of much of the remaining forested land, the impacts of these modes of production could be significant. For example, it is anticipated that increased losses of nutrients and carbon will occur by direct forest removal and through erosion losses accelerated by forest clearing. There are, however, control measures that can be utilized in minimizing both direct and indirect effects of forest harvesting while maximizing woody biomass production.

  3. Photosynthetic light harvesting: excitons and coherence.

    PubMed

    Fassioli, Francesca; Dinshaw, Rayomond; Arpin, Paul C; Scholes, Gregory D

    2014-03-06

    Photosynthesis begins with light harvesting, where specialized pigment-protein complexes transform sunlight into electronic excitations delivered to reaction centres to initiate charge separation. There is evidence that quantum coherence between electronic excited states plays a role in energy transfer. In this review, we discuss how quantum coherence manifests in photosynthetic light harvesting and its implications. We begin by examining the concept of an exciton, an excited electronic state delocalized over several spatially separated molecules, which is the most widely available signature of quantum coherence in light harvesting. We then discuss recent results concerning the possibility that quantum coherence between electronically excited states of donors and acceptors may give rise to a quantum coherent evolution of excitations, modifying the traditional incoherent picture of energy transfer. Key to this (partially) coherent energy transfer appears to be the structure of the environment, in particular the participation of non-equilibrium vibrational modes. We discuss the open questions and controversies regarding quantum coherent energy transfer and how these can be addressed using new experimental techniques.

  4. Triplet Harvesting with a Simple Aromatic Carbonyl.

    PubMed

    Torres Ziegenbein, Christian; Fröbel, Sascha; Glöß, Maria; Nobuyasu, Roberto S; Data, Przemyslaw; Monkman, Andrew; Gilch, Peter

    2017-09-06

    The efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes crucially depends on triplet harvesters. These accept energy from triplet correlated electron hole pairs and convert it into light. Here, experimental evidence is given that simple aromatic carbonyls, such as thioxanthone, could serve this purpose. In these compounds, the emissive (1) ππ* excitation may rapidly equilibrate with an upper triplet state ((3) nπ*). This equilibrium may persist for nanoseconds. Population of the (3) nπ* state via energy transfer from an electron hole pair should result in fluorescence emission and thereby triplet harvesting. To demonstrate the effect, solutions of 1,4-dichlorobenzene (triplet sensitizer) and thioxanthone (harvester) were excited at 266 nm with a nanosecond laser. The emission decay reveals a 100 ns decay absent in the thioxanthone only sample. This matches predictions for an energy transfer limited by diffusion and gives clear evidence that thioxanthone can convert triplet excitations into light. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Flexible piezoelectric energy harvesting from jaw movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delnavaz, Aidin; Voix, Jérémie

    2014-10-01

    Piezoelectric fiber composites (PFC) represent an interesting subset of smart materials that can function as sensor, actuator and energy converter. Despite their excellent potential for energy harvesting, very few PFC mechanisms have been developed to capture the human body power and convert it into an electric current to power wearable electronic devices. This paper provides a proof of concept for a head-mounted device with a PFC chin strap capable of harvesting energy from jaw movements. An electromechanical model based on the bond graph method is developed to predict the power output of the energy harvesting system. The optimum resistance value of the load and the best stretch ratio in the strap are also determined. A prototype was developed and tested and its performances were compared to the analytical model predictions. The proposed piezoelectric strap mechanism can be added to all types of head-mounted devices to power small-scale electronic devices such as hearing aids, electronic hearing protectors and communication earpieces.

  6. Harvesting the biosphere: the human impact.

    PubMed

    Smil, Vaclav

    2011-01-01

    The human species has evolved to dominate the biosphere: global anthropomass is now an order of magnitude greater than the mass of all wild terrestrial mammals. As a result, our dependence on harvesting the products of photosynthesis for food, animal feed, raw materials, and energy has grown to make substantial global impacts. During the past two millennia these harvests, and changes of land use due to deforestation and conversions of grasslands and wetlands, have reduced the stock of global terrestrial plant mass by as much as 45 percent, with the twentieth-century reduction amounting to more than 15 percent. Current annual harvests of phytomass have been a significant share of the global net primary productivity (NPP, the total amount of new plant tissues created by photosynthesis). Some studies put the human appropriation of NPP (the ratio of these two variables) as high as 40 percent but the measure itself is problematic. Future population growth and improved quality of life will result in additional claims on the biosphere, but options to accommodate these demands exist without severely compromising the irreplaceable biospheric services.

  7. Photosynthetic light harvesting: excitons and coherence

    PubMed Central

    Fassioli, Francesca; Dinshaw, Rayomond; Arpin, Paul C.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis begins with light harvesting, where specialized pigment–protein complexes transform sunlight into electronic excitations delivered to reaction centres to initiate charge separation. There is evidence that quantum coherence between electronic excited states plays a role in energy transfer. In this review, we discuss how quantum coherence manifests in photosynthetic light harvesting and its implications. We begin by examining the concept of an exciton, an excited electronic state delocalized over several spatially separated molecules, which is the most widely available signature of quantum coherence in light harvesting. We then discuss recent results concerning the possibility that quantum coherence between electronically excited states of donors and acceptors may give rise to a quantum coherent evolution of excitations, modifying the traditional incoherent picture of energy transfer. Key to this (partially) coherent energy transfer appears to be the structure of the environment, in particular the participation of non-equilibrium vibrational modes. We discuss the open questions and controversies regarding quantum coherent energy transfer and how these can be addressed using new experimental techniques. PMID:24352671

  8. Microalgae harvesting and subsequent biodiesel conversion.

    PubMed

    Tran, Dang-Thuan; Le, Bich-Hanh; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chen, Ching-Lung; Wang, Hsiang-Yu; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2013-07-01

    Chlorella vulgaris ESP-31 containing 22.7% lipid was harvested by coagulation (using chitosan and polyaluminium chloride (PACl) as the coagulants) and centrifugation. The harvested ESP-31 was directly employed as the oil source for biodiesel production via transesterification catalyzed by immobilized Burkholderia lipase and by a synthesized solid catalyst (SrO/SiO2). Both enzymatic and chemical transesterification were significantly inhibited in the presence of PACl, while the immobilized lipase worked well with wet chitosan-coagulated ESP-31, giving a high biodiesel conversion of 97.6% w/w oil, which is at a level comparable to that of biodiesel conversion from centrifugation-harvested microalgae (97.1% w/w oil). The immobilized lipase can be repeatedly used for three cycles without significant loss of its activity. The solid catalyst SrO/SiO2 worked well with water-removed centrifuged ESP-31 with a biodiesel conversion of 80% w/w oil, but the conversion became lower (55.7-61.4% w/w oil) when using water-removed chitosan-coagulated ESP-31 as the oil source.

  9. Photon echo studies of photosynthetic light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Read, Elizabeth L; Lee, Hohjai; Fleming, Graham R

    2009-01-01

    The broad linewidths in absorption spectra of photosynthetic complexes obscure information related to their structure and function. Photon echo techniques represent a powerful class of time-resolved electronic spectroscopy that allow researchers to probe the interactions normally hidden under broad linewidths with sufficient time resolution to follow the fastest energy transfer events in light harvesting. Here, we outline the technical approach and applications of two types of photon echo experiments: the photon echo peak shift and two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform photon echo spectroscopy. We review several extensions of these techniques to photosynthetic complexes. Photon echo peak shift spectroscopy can be used to determine the strength of coupling between a pigment and its surrounding environment including neighboring pigments and to quantify timescales of energy transfer. Two-dimensional spectroscopy yields a frequency-resolved map of absorption and emission processes, allowing coupling interactions and energy transfer pathways to be viewed directly. Furthermore, 2D spectroscopy reveals structural information such as the relative orientations of coupled transitions. Both classes of experiments can be used to probe the quantum mechanical nature of photosynthetic light-harvesting: peak shift experiments allow quantification of correlated energetic fluctuations between pigments, while 2D techniques measure quantum beating directly, both of which indicate the extent of quantum coherence over multiple pigment sites in the protein complex. The mechanistic and structural information obtained by these techniques reveals valuable insights into the design principles of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes, and a multitude of variations on the methods outlined here.

  10. Nature's moisture harvesters: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Malik, F T; Clement, R M; Gethin, D T; Krawszik, W; Parker, A R

    2014-09-01

    Nature has adapted different methods for surviving dry, arid, xeric conditions. It is the focus of this comparative review to pull together the relevant information gleaned from the literature that could be utilized to design moisture harvesting devices informed by biomimetics. Most water harvesting devices in current use are not informed by nature and those that do are usually based on a biomimetic principle that has been based on one species only. This review draws on the published literature to establish a list of species (animals (vertebrates/invertebrates) and plants) whose habitat is in mainly dry or arid regions and that are known to harvest airborne moisture. Key findings have been outlined and review comments and discussion set out. Following this, surface feature convergences have been identified, namely hexagonal microstructures, groove-like and cone-like geometries. This has been coupled with direction of water flow that is driven by surface energy. As far as the authors are aware, this convergent evolution has not been brought together in this manner before. In the future this information could be translated into an engineered device for collecting water from airborne sources.

  11. Optimum harvest maturity for Leymus chinensis seed

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jixiang; Wang, Yingnan; Qi, Mingming; Li, Xiaoyu; Yang, Chunxue; Wang, Yongcui

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Timely harvest is critical to achieve maximum seed viability and vigour in agricultural production. However, little information exists concerning how to reap the best quality seeds of Leymus chinensis, which is the dominant and most promising grass species in the Songnen Grassland of Northern China. The objective of this study was to investigate and evaluate possible quality indices of the seeds at different days after peak anthesis. Seed quality at different development stages was assessed by the colours of the seed and lemmas, seed weight, moisture content, electrical conductivity of seed leachate and germination indices. Two consecutive years of experimental results showed that the maximum seed quality was recorded at 39 days after peak anthesis. At this date, the colours of the seed and lemmas reached heavy brown and yellow, respectively. The seed weight was highest and the moisture content and the electrical conductivity of seed leachate were lowest. In addition, the seed also reached its maximum germination percentage and energy at this stage, determined using a standard germination test (SGT) and accelerated ageing test (AAT). Thus, Leymus chinensis can be harvested at 39 days after peak anthesis based on the changes in parameters. Colour identification can be used as an additional indicator to provide a more rapid and reliable measure of optimum seed maturity; approximately 10 days after the colour of the lemmas reached yellow and the colour of the seed reached heavy brown, the seed of this species was suitable for harvest. PMID:27170257

  12. Broadband electrostatic device for power harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksek, N. S.; Feng, Z. C.; Almasri, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces a prototype energy harvester device with integrated MEMS capacitive plate and two impact oscillators for transferring energy from low frequency structural vibration with varying mechanical spectra to a vibration of a high resonance frequency cantilever. The use of the two impact oscillators not only harvested energy at low frequencies but also had demonstrated exceptionally sufficient and optimum dynamic responses to a broad frequency bandwidth between 13 Hz and 39 Hz, the bandwidth covering wide range of residual vibrations in structures and systems, without reduction in output power. The device was designed with a MEMS capacitor fixed at the free end of an aluminium cantilever clamped at one side, with a high resonance frequency of 605 Hz matched with the single-cavity capacitor, and two cantilevers made of Al sheet with low resonance frequencies of 18 Hz and 25 Hz. The results clearly demonstrates the device's ability for frequency up- conversion and harvesting power on a wide range from 13 Hz to 39 Hz at 1g excitation.

  13. Prolonged energy harvesting for ingestible devices

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Phillip; El-Damak, Dina; Glettig, Dean; Kong, Yong Lin; Mo, Stacy; Cleveland, Cody; Booth, Lucas; Roxhed, Niclas; Langer, Robert; Chandrakasan, Anantha P.; Traverso, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Ingestible electronics have revolutionized the standard of care for a variety of health conditions. Extending the capacity and safety of these devices, and reducing the costs of powering them, could enable broad deployment of prolonged monitoring systems for patients. Although prior biocompatible power harvesting systems for in vivo use have demonstrated short minute-long bursts of power from the stomach, not much is known about the capacity to power electronics in the longer term and throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we report the design and operation of an energy-harvesting galvanic cell for continuous in vivo temperature sensing and wireless communication. The device delivered an average power of 0.23 μW per mm2 of electrode area for an average of 6.1 days of temperature measurements in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs. This power-harvesting cell has the capacity to provide power for prolonged periods of time to the next generation of ingestible electronic devices located in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:28458955

  14. Prolonged energy harvesting for ingestible devices.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Phillip; El-Damak, Dina; Glettig, Dean; Kong, Yong Lin; Mo, Stacy; Cleveland, Cody; Booth, Lucas; Roxhed, Niclas; Langer, Robert; Chandrakasan, Anantha P; Traverso, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Ingestible electronics have revolutionized the standard of care for a variety of health conditions. Extending the capacity and safety of these devices, and reducing the costs of powering them, could enable broad deployment of prolonged monitoring systems for patients. Although prior biocompatible power harvesting systems for in vivo use have demonstrated short minute-long bursts of power from the stomach, not much is known about the capacity to power electronics in the longer term and throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we report the design and operation of an energy-harvesting galvanic cell for continuous in vivo temperature sensing and wireless communication. The device delivered an average power of 0.23 μW per mm(2) of electrode area for an average of 6.1 days of temperature measurements in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs. This power-harvesting cell has the capacity to provide power for prolonged periods of time to the next generation of ingestible electronic devices located in the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. Vibrational energy harvesting by exploring structural benefits and nonlinear characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chongfeng; Jing, Xingjian

    2017-07-01

    Traditional energy harvesters are often of low efficiency due to very limited energy harvesting bandwidth, which should also be enough close to the ambient excitation frequency. To overcome this difficulty, some attempts can be seen in the literature typically with the purposes of either increasing the energy harvesting bandwidth with a harvester array, or enhancing the energy harvesting bandwidth and peak with nonlinear coupling effect etc. This paper presents an alternative way which can achieve tuneable resonant frequency (from high frequency to ultralow frequency) and improved energy harvesting bandwidth and peak simultaneously by employing special structural benefits and advantageous displacement-dependent nonlinear damping property. The proposed energy harvesting system employs a lever systems combined with an X-shape supporting structure and demonstrates very adjustable stiffness and unique nonlinear damping characteristics which are very beneficial for energy harvesting. It is shown that the energy harvesting performance of the proposed system is directly determined by several easy-to-tune structural parameters and also by the relative displacement in a special nonlinear manner, which provides a great flexibility and/or a unique tool for tuning and improving energy harvesting efficiency via matching excitation frequencies and covering a broader frequency band. This study potentially provides a new insight into the design of energy harvesting systems by employing structural benefits and geometrical nonlinearities.

  16. Harvesting under transient conditions: harvested energy as a proxy for optimal resonance frequency detuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynds, Taylor D.; Kauffman, Jeffrey L.

    2015-04-01

    Piezoelectric-based vibration energy harvesting is of interest in a wide range of applications, and a number of harvesting schemes have been proposed and studied { primarily when operating under steady state conditions. However, energy harvesting behavior is rarely studied in systems with transient excitations. This paper will work to develop an understanding of this behavior within the context of a particular vibration reduction technique, resonance frequency detuning. Resonance frequency detuning provides a method of reducing mechanical response at structural resonances as the excitation frequency sweeps through a given range. This technique relies on switching the stiffness state of a structure at optimal times to detune its resonance frequency from that of the excitation. This paper examines how this optimal switch may be triggered in terms of the energy harvested, developing a normalized optimal switch energy that is independent of the open- and short-circuit resistances. Here the open- and short-circuit shunt resistances refer to imposed conditions that approximate the open- and short-circuit conditions, via high and low resistance shunts. These conditions are practically necessary to harvest the small amounts of power needed to switch stiffness states, as open-circuit and closed-circuit refer to infinite resistance and zero resistance, respectively, and therefore no energy passes through the harvesting circuit. The limiting stiffness states are then defined by these open- and short-circuit resistances. The optimal switch energy is studied over a range of sweep rates, damping ratios, and coupling coefficients; it is found to increase with the coupling coefficient and decrease as the sweep rate and damping ratio increase, behavior which is intuitive. Higher coupling means more energy is converted by the piezoelectric material, and therefore more energy is harvested in a given time; an increased sweep rate means resonance is reached sooner, and there will less

  17. Design guidelines of triboelectric nanogenerator for water wave energy harvesters.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Abdelsalam; Hassan, Islam; Jiang, Tao; Youssef, Khalid; Liu, Lian; Hedaya, Mohammad; Yazid, Taher Abu; Zu, Jean; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-05-05

    Ocean waves are one of the cleanest and most abundant energy sources on earth, and wave energy has the potential for future power generation. Triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) technology has recently been proposed as a promising technology to harvest wave energy. In this paper, a theoretical study is performed on a duck-shaped TENG wave harvester recently introduced in our work. To enhance the design of the duck-shaped TENG wave harvester, the mechanical and electrical characteristics of the harvester's overall structure, as well as its inner configuration, are analyzed, respectively, under different wave conditions, to optimize parameters such as duck radius and mass. Furthermore, a comprehensive hybrid 3D model is introduced to quantify the performance of the TENG wave harvester. Finally, the influence of different TENG parameters is validated by comparing the performance of several existing TENG wave harvesters. This study can be applied as a guideline for enhancing the performance of TENG wave energy harvesters.

  18. Enhancing ability of harvesting energy from random vibration by decreasing the potential barrier of bistable harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chunbo; Qin, Weiyang

    2017-02-01

    When a bistable energy harvester (BEH) is driven by weak random excitation, its harvesting efficiency will decrease due to the seldom occurrence of interwell motion. To overcome this defect, we developed an improved bistable energy harvester (IBEH) from BEH by adding a small magnet at the middle of two fixed magnets. It is proved that the attractive force originated from the additional magnet can pull down the potential barrier and shallow the potential well, but still keep the middle position of beam unstable. This can make jumping between potential wells easier. Thus IBEH can realize snap-through even at fairly weak excitation. The magnetic potential energy is given and the electromechanical equations are derived. Then the harvesting performance of IBEH under random excitation is studied. Validation experiments are designed and carried out. Comparisons prove that IBEH is preferable to BEH in harvesting random energy and can give out a high output voltage even at weak excitation. The size of additional magnet can be optimized to reach the best performance of IBEH.

  19. Analysis of five simulated straw harvest scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Stephen, Jamie; Stumborg, Mark; Fenton, James; Mani, Sudhagar

    2008-01-01

    Almost 36 million tonnes (t) of cereal grains are harvested annually on more than 16 million hectares (ha) in Canada. The net straw production varies year by year depending upon weather patterns, crop fertility, soil conservation measures, harvest method, and plant variety. The net yield of straw, after discounting for soil conservation, averages approximately 2.5 dry (d)t ha-1. Efficient equipment is needed to collect and package the material as a feedstock for industrial applications. This paper investigates the costs, energy input, and emissions from power equipment used for harvesting straw. Five scenarios were investigated: (1) large square bales, (2) round bales, (3) large compacted stacks (loafs), (4) dried chops, and (5) wet chops. The baled or loafed biomass is stacked next to the farm. Dry chop is collected in a large pile and wet chop is ensiled. The baling and stacking cost was $21.47 dt-1 (dry tonne), with little difference between round and large square baling. Loafing was the cheapest option at $17.08 dt-1. Dry chop and piling was $23.90 dt-1 and wet chop followed by ensiling was $59.75 dt-1. A significant portion of the wet chop cost was in ensiling. Energy input and emissions were proportional to the costs for each system, except for loafing, which required more energy input than the baling systems. As a fraction of the energy content of biomass (roughly 16 GJ dt-1), the energy input ranged from 1.2% for baling to 3.2% for ensiling. Emissions from the power equipment ranged from 20.3 kg CO2e dt-1 to more than 40 kg CO2e dt-1. A sensitivity analysis on the effect of yield on collection costs showed that a 33% increase in yield reduced the cost by 20%. Similarly a sensitivity analysis on weather conditions showed that a 10oC cooler climate extended the harvest period by 5-10 days whereas a 10oC warmer climate shortened the harvest period by 2-3 days.

  20. An optimal staggered harvesting strategy for herbaceous biomass energy crops

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, M.G.; English, B.C.

    1993-12-31

    Biofuel research over the past two decades indicates lignocellulosic crops are a reliable source of feedstock for alternative energy. However, under the current technology of producing, harvesting and converting biomass crops, the cost of biofuel is not competitive with conventional biofuel. Cost of harvesting biomass feedstock is a single largest component of feedstock cost so there is a cost advantage in designing a biomass harvesting system. Traditional farmer-initiated harvesting operation causes over investment. This study develops a least-cost, time-distributed (staggered) harvesting system for example switch grass, that calls for an effective coordination between farmers, processing plant and a single third-party custom harvester. A linear programming model explicitly accounts for the trade-off between yield loss and benefit of reduced machinery overhead cost, associated with the staggered harvesting system. Total cost of producing and harvesting switch grass will decline by 17.94 percent from conventional non-staggered to proposed staggered harvesting strategy. Harvesting machinery cost alone experiences a significant reduction of 39.68 percent from moving from former to latter. The net return to farmers is estimated to increase by 160.40 percent. Per tonne and per hectare costs of feedstock production will decline by 17.94 percent and 24.78 percent, respectively. These results clearly lend support to the view that the traditional system of single period harvesting calls for over investment on agricultural machinery which escalates the feedstock cost. This social loss to the society in the form of escalated harvesting cost can be avoided if there is a proper coordination among farmers, processing plant and custom harvesters as to when and how biomass crop needs to be planted and harvested. Such an institutional arrangement benefits producers, processing plant and, in turn, end users of biofuels.

  1. Monsoon harvests: the living legacies of rainwater harvesting systems in South India.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, Kimberly J; Basu, Nandita B; Tate, Eric; Wyckoff, Joseph

    2014-04-15

    Rainwater harvesting, a "soft path" approach toward water management, is increasingly recognized as a key strategy toward ensuring food security and alleviating problems of water scarcity. Interestingly this "modern" approach has been in use for millennia in numerous older civilizations. This article uses India as a case study to explore the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of agricultural rainwater harvesting ponds, and evaluates the viability of these centuries-old systems under current climate and population pressures. A holistic watershed-scale approach that accounts for trade-offs in water availability and socioeconomic wellbeing is recommended for assessing the sustainability of these systems.

  2. Experimental evaluation of a cruciform piezoelectric energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, Karina M.; Rade, Domingos A.; Finzi Neto, Roberto M.; Cavalini, Aldemir A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the development and experimental evaluation of a particular type of piezoelectric energy harvester, composed of four aluminum cantilever blades to which piezoelectric patches are bonded, in such way that electric energy is generated when the blades undergo bending vibrations. Concentrated masses, whose values can be varied, are attached to the tips of the blades. Due to the geometric shape of the harvester, in which the four blades are oriented forming right angles, the harvester is named cruciform. As opposed to the large majority of previous works on the subject, in which harvesters are excited at their bases by prescribed acceleration, herein the harvester is connected to a vibrating structure excited by an imbalance force. Hence, the amount of harvested energy depends upon the dynamic interaction between the harvester and the host structure. Laboratory experiments were carried-out on a prototype connected to a tridimensional truss. The experimental setup includes a force generator consisting of an imbalanced disc driven by an electrical motor whose rotation is controlled electronically, a voltage rectifier circuit, and a battery charged with the harvested energy. After characterization of the dynamic behavior of the harvester and the host structure, both numerically and experimentally, the results of experiments are presented and discussed in terms of the voltage output of the piezoelectric transducers as function of the excitation frequency and the values of the tip masses. Also, the capacity of the harvester to charge a Lithium battery is evaluated.

  3. Investigation of an energy harvesting small unmanned air vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magoteaux, Kyle C.; Sanders, Brian; Sodano, Henry A.

    2008-03-01

    The addition of energy harvesting is investigated to determine the benefits of its integration into a small unmanned air vehicle (UAV). Specifically, solar and piezoelectric energy harvesting techniques were selected and their basic functions analyzed. The initial investigation involved using a fundamental law of thermodynamics, entropy generation, to analyze the small UAV with and without energy harvesting. A notional mission was developed for the comparison that involved the aircraft performing a reconnaissance mission. The analysis showed that the UAV with energy harvesting generated less entropy. However, the UAV without energy harvesting outperformed the other UAV in total flight time at the target. The analysis further looked at future energy harvesting technologies and their effect on the energy harvesting UAV to conduct the mission. The results of the mission using the advanced solar technology showed that the effectiveness of the energy harvesting vehicle would increase. Designs for integrating energy harvesting into the small UAV system were also developed and tests were conducted to show how the energy harvesting designs would perform. It was demonstrated that the addition of the solar and piezoelectric devices would supply usable power for charging batteries and sensors and that it would be advantageous to implement them into a small UAV.

  4. Duck harvest on public hunting areas in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilmer, D.S.; Hicks, J.M.; Fleskes, J.P.; Connelly, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    We summarized hunter visits and success, and the magnitude and species composition of the duck harvest recorded on California public hunting areas (PHAs) during 1950-87. Hunter visits and harvest increased during 1950-74 as new PHAs were added, then declined concurrently with duck populations. Of six geographic regions, the Sacramento Valley, with numerous PHAs and the largest duck concentrations, accounted for the largest portion of PHA hunter visits (28%) and harvest (35%). Duck population levels, regulations, and hunter numbers affected PHA hunter success. Success was highest during 1955-59 but declined with no consistent trend after 1960. Species vulnerability, abundance, distribution, and hunter preference affected harvest composition. Northern pintails, Anas acuta, averaged 27% of the PHA harvest but declined in importance after 1974. Green-winged teal, A. crecca, the most important species in southern regions, averaged 21% of the PHA harvest. Mallards, A. platyrhynchos, averaged 16% of the PHA harvest but increased in importance after 1974 to become the most common duck bagged after 1983. PHA harvest comprised a small (4-16%) portion of the total state harvest. However, this portion increased from 1950-70 because of increased hunter visits to new PHAs and after 1970 because hunter success on PHAs did not decline as on other areas. PHA hunters tended to harvest fewer preferred species and more vulnerable species, as proportions of total bag, than did other hunters. The continued decline in numbers of waterfowl hunters presents important challenges for management of waterfowl areas in California.

  5. Mallard harvest distributions in the Mississippi and Central Flyways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, A.W.; Krementz, D.G.

    2008-01-01

    The mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) is the most harvested duck in North America. A topic of debate among hunters, especially those in Arkansas, USA, is whether wintering distributions of mallards have changed in recent years. We examined distributions of mallards in the Mississippi (MF) and Central Flyways during hunting seasons 1980-2003 to determine if and why harvest distributions changed. We used Geographic Information Systems to analyze spatial distributions of band recoveries and harvest estimated using data from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service Parts Collection Survey. Mean latitudes of band recoveries and harvest estimates showed no significant trends across the study period. Despite slight increases in band recoveries and harvest on the peripheries of kernel density estimates, most harvest occurred in eastern Arkansas and northwestern Mississippi, USA, in all years. We found no evidence for changes in the harvest distributions of mallards. We believe that the late 1990s were years of exceptionally high harvest in the lower MF and that slight shifts northward since 2000 reflect a return to harvest distributions similar to those of the early 1980s. Our results provide biologists with possible explanations to hunter concerns of fewer mallards available for harvest.

  6. Spatial assessment of conjunctive water harvesting potential in watershed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekar, I.; Randhir, T. O.

    2007-02-01

    SummaryWater harvesting can be used to minimize water loss and to augment water supplies in watershed systems. This effort is increasingly being recognized as critical in regions experiencing urbanization and facing uneven water supplies. Water harvesting requires a careful assessment of geographic locations in a watershed and evaluation of surface and groundwater hydrology. In this paper, we develop a spatially explicit method to evaluate costs of harvesting and potential benefits in water harvesting in the Taunton River Watershed in Eastern Massachusetts, USA. A spatial analysis is used to assess surface storage and groundwater recharge potentials in developed and undeveloped regions of the watershed. Distributed parameters used in the analysis include runoff coefficients, land use, soil properties, precipitation, aquifer, and land price. Prioritization maps were developed to characterize conjunctive harvesting potential that is based on benefits and costs. The results demonstrate that a spatially variable harvesting strategy can be used to minimize runoff loss and to augment water supplies. The potential harvest areas were clustered in specific locations that satisfy feasibility and economic criteria. In some subwatersheds, potential harvest locations were dispersed. A spatially variable approach that incorporates economic criteria to hydrologic assessment can be used to enhance efficiency related to water harvest and supply management. Given the increasing demand for clean water, a distributed and conjunctive harvesting strategy could be effective in several urbanizing watersheds. The model has potential for further extension into complex situations of biophysical and socioeconomic conditions at watershed level.

  7. Development of a biomechanical energy harvester

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingguo; Naing, Veronica; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2009-01-01

    Background Biomechanical energy harvesting–generating electricity from people during daily activities–is a promising alternative to batteries for powering increasingly sophisticated portable devices. We recently developed a wearable knee-mounted energy harvesting device that generated electricity during human walking. In this methods-focused paper, we explain the physiological principles that guided our design process and present a detailed description of our device design with an emphasis on new analyses. Methods Effectively harvesting energy from walking requires a small lightweight device that efficiently converts intermittent, bi-directional, low speed and high torque mechanical power to electricity, and selectively engages power generation to assist muscles in performing negative mechanical work. To achieve this, our device used a one-way clutch to transmit only knee extension motions, a spur gear transmission to amplify the angular speed, a brushless DC rotary magnetic generator to convert the mechanical power into electrical power, a control system to determine when to open and close the power generation circuit based on measurements of knee angle, and a customized orthopaedic knee brace to distribute the device reaction torque over a large leg surface area. Results The device selectively engaged power generation towards the end of swing extension, assisting knee flexor muscles by producing substantial flexion torque (6.4 Nm), and efficiently converted the input mechanical power into electricity (54.6%). Consequently, six subjects walking at 1.5 m/s generated 4.8 ± 0.8 W of electrical power with only a 5.0 ± 21 W increase in metabolic cost. Conclusion Biomechanical energy harvesting is capable of generating substantial amounts of electrical power from walking with little additional user effort making future versions of this technology particularly promising for charging portable medical devices. PMID:19549313

  8. Power management for energy harvesting wireless sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arms, S. W.; Townsend, C. P.; Churchill, D. L.; Galbreath, J. H.; Mundell, S. W.

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate smart wireless sensing nodes capable of operation at extremely low power levels. These systems were designed to be compatible with energy harvesting systems using piezoelectric materials and/or solar cells. The wireless sensing nodes included a microprocessor, on-board memory, sensing means (1000 ohm foil strain gauge), sensor signal conditioning, 2.4 GHz IEEE 802.15.4 radio transceiver, and rechargeable battery. Extremely low power consumption sleep currents combined with periodic, timed wake-up was used to minimize the average power consumption. Furthermore, we deployed pulsed sensor excitation and microprocessor power control of the signal conditioning elements to minimize the sensors" average contribution to power draw. By sleeping in between samples, we were able to demonstrate extremely low average power consumption. At 10 Hz, current consumption was 300 microamps at 3 VDC (900 microwatts); at 5 Hz: 400 microwatts, at 1 Hz: 90 microwatts. When the RF stage was not used, but data were logged to memory, consumption was further reduced. Piezoelectric strain energy harvesting systems delivered ~2000 microwatts under low level vibration conditions. Output power levels were also measured from two miniature solar cells; which provided a wide range of output power (~100 to 1400 microwatts), depending on the light type & distance from the source. In summary, system power consumption may be reduced by: 1) removing the load from the energy harvesting & storage elements while charging, 2) by using sleep modes in between samples, 3) pulsing excitation to the sensing and signal conditioning elements in between samples, and 4) by recording and/or averaging, rather than frequently transmitting, sensor data.

  9. System for harvesting water wave energy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Su, Yanjie; Zhu, Guang; Chen, Jun

    2016-07-19

    A generator for harvesting energy from water in motion includes a sheet of a hydrophobic material, having a first side and an opposite second side, that is triboelectrically more negative than water. A first electrode sheet is disposed on the second side of the sheet of a hydrophobic material. A second electrode sheet is disposed on the second side of the sheet of a hydrophobic material and is spaced apart from the first electrode sheet. Movement of the water across the first side induces an electrical potential imbalance between the first electrode sheet and the second electrode sheet.

  10. Energy harvesting using a thermoelectric material

    DOEpatents

    Nersessian, Nersesse; Carman, Gregory P.; Radousky, Harry B.

    2008-07-08

    A novel energy harvesting system and method utilizing a thermoelectric having a material exhibiting a large thermally induced strain (TIS) due to a phase transformation and a material exhibiting a stress induced electric field is introduced. A material that exhibits such a phase transformation exhibits a large increase in the coefficient of thermal expansion over an incremental temperature range (typically several degrees Kelvin). When such a material is arranged in a geometric configuration, such as, for a example, a laminate with a material that exhibits a stress induced electric field (e.g. a piezoelectric material) the thermally induced strain is converted to an electric field.

  11. Electrochemical systems configured to harvest heat energy

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Seok Woo; Yang, Yuan; Ghasemi, Hadi; Chen, Gang; Cui, Yi

    2017-01-31

    Electrochemical systems for harvesting heat energy, and associated electrochemical cells and methods, are generally described. The electrochemical cells can be configured, in certain cases, such that at least a portion of the regeneration of the first electrochemically active material is driven by a change in temperature of the electrochemical cell. The electrochemical cells can be configured to include a first electrochemically active material and a second electrochemically active material, and, in some cases, the absolute value of the difference between the first thermogalvanic coefficient of the first electrochemically active material and the second thermogalvanic coefficient of the second electrochemically active material is at least about 0.5 millivolts/Kelvin.

  12. Non-timber forest product harvest in variable environments: modeling the effect of harvesting as a stochastic sequence.

    PubMed

    Gaoue, Orou G; Horvitz, Carol C; Ticktin, Tamara

    2011-07-01

    With increasing reports of overexploitation of wild plants for timber and non-timber forest products, there has been an increase in the number of studies investigating the effect of harvest on the dynamics of harvested populations. However, most studies have failed to account for temporal and spatial variability in the ecological conditions in which these species occur, as well as variability in the patterns of harvest intensity. In reality, local harvesters harvest at variable rather than fixed intensity over time. Here we used Markov chains to investigate how different patterns of harvesting intensity (summarized as return time to high harvest) affected the stochastic population growth rate (lambda(s)) and its elasticity to perturbation of means and variances of vital rates. We studied the effect of bark and foliage harvest from African mahogany Khaya senegalensis in two contrasting ecological regions in Benin. Khaya populations declined regardless of time between harvests of high intensity. Moreover, lambda(s) increased with decreasing harvesting pressure in the dry region but, surprisingly, declined in the moist region toward lambda(s) = 0.956. The stochastic elasticity was dominated by the stasis of juveniles and adults. The declining growth rate with decreasing harvest pressure in the moist region was mainly driven by the declining mean survival rates of juveniles and adults. Our results suggest that modeling the temporal variability of harvest intensity as a Markov chain better mimics local practices and provides insights that are missed when temporal variability in harvest intensity is modeled as independent over time and drawn from a fixed distribution.

  13. Multi-source energy harvester for wildlife tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, You; Zuo, Lei; Zhou, Wanlu; Liang, Changwei; McCabe, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Sufficient power supply to run GPS machinery and transmit data on a long-term basis remains to be the key challenge for wildlife tracking technology. Traditional way of replacing battery periodically is not only time and money consuming but also dangerous to live-trapping wild animals. In this paper, an innovative wildlife tracking device with multi-source energy harvester with advantage of high efficiency and reliability is investigated and developed. This multi-source energy harvester entails a solar energy harvester and an innovative rotational electromagnetic energy harvester is mounted on the "wildlife tracking collar" which will remarkably extend the duration of wild life tracking. A feedforward and feedback control of DC-DC converter circuit is adopted to passively realize the Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) logic for the solar energy harvester. The rotational electromagnetic energy harvester can mechanically rectify the irregular bidirectional motion into unidirectional motion has been modeled and demonstrated.

  14. Data from selective harvests underestimate temporal trends in quantitative traits.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Fanie; Festa-Bianchet, Marco; Jorgenson, Jon T

    2012-10-23

    Human harvests can select against phenotypes favoured by natural selection, and natural resource managers should evaluate possible artificial selection on wild populations. Because the required genetic data are extremely difficult to gather, however, managers typically rely on harvested animals to document temporal trends. It is usually unknown whether these data are unbiased. We explore our ability to detect a decline in horn size of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) by comparing harvested males with all males in a population where evolutionary changes owing to trophy hunting were previously reported. Hunting records underestimated the temporal decline, partly because of an increasing proportion of rams that could not be harvested because their horns were smaller than the threshold set by hunting regulations. If harvests are selective, temporal trends measured from harvest records will underestimate the magnitude of changes in wild populations.

  15. Design guidelines of triboelectric nanogenerator for water wave energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Abdelsalam; Hassan, Islam; Jiang, Tao; Youssef, Khalid; Liu, Lian; Hedaya, Mohammad; Abu Yazid, Taher; Zu, Jean; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-05-01

    Ocean waves are one of the cleanest and most abundant energy sources on earth, and wave energy has the potential for future power generation. Triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) technology has recently been proposed as a promising technology to harvest wave energy. In this paper, a theoretical study is performed on a duck-shaped TENG wave harvester recently introduced in our work. To enhance the design of the duck-shaped TENG wave harvester, the mechanical and electrical characteristics of the harvester’s overall structure, as well as its inner configuration, are analyzed, respectively, under different wave conditions, to optimize parameters such as duck radius and mass. Furthermore, a comprehensive hybrid 3D model is introduced to quantify the performance of the TENG wave harvester. Finally, the influence of different TENG parameters is validated by comparing the performance of several existing TENG wave harvesters. This study can be applied as a guideline for enhancing the performance of TENG wave energy harvesters.

  16. Water quality management of rooftop rainwater harvesting systems.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Tasneem; Abbasi, S A

    2009-10-01

    The ancient technique of harvesting rainwater falling on rooftops, which had been forgotten after the advent of large-scale centralized water resource systems like dam-based reservoirs, has staged a global comeback in the post-modern era. It is expected that in the near future all dwellings everywhere will be equipped to harvest and use rainwater. Such widespread use of rooftop rainwater harvesting makes it very important that the water quality aspects associated with it are clearly understood and managed. The present paper addresses the related issues. The pathways by which pollutants can enter in a rainwater harvest have been traced and the strategies to manage the water quality, at pre-harvest as well as post-harvest stages, have been discussed.

  17. Models for 31-Mode PVDF Energy Harvester for Wearable Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingjing; You, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Currently, wearable electronics are increasingly widely used, leading to an increasing need of portable power supply. As a clean and renewable power source, piezoelectric energy harvester can transfer mechanical energy into electric energy directly, and the energy harvester based on polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) operating in 31-mode is appropriate to harvest energy from human motion. This paper established a series of theoretical models to predict the performance of 31-mode PVDF energy harvester. Among them, the energy storage one can predict the collected energy accurately during the operation of the harvester. Based on theoretical study and experiments investigation, two approaches to improve the energy harvesting performance have been found. Furthermore, experiment results demonstrate the high accuracies of the models, which are better than 95%. PMID:25114981

  18. Technical and anatomical considerations of face harvest in face transplantation.

    PubMed

    Baccarani, Alessio; Follmar, Keith E; Baumeister, Steffen P; Marcus, Jeffrey R; Erdmann, Detlev; Levin, L Scott

    2006-11-01

    Total face transplantation may become a reconstructive option in the treatment of patients with acquired facial deformity. Here, 2 face-harvesting techniques are presented in a fresh human cadaver model. In technique 1, the skin and soft tissue of the face is harvested by dissecting in a subgaleal, sub-SMAS, subplatysmal plane. In technique 2, the entire soft tissue and the bony structures of the midface are harvested by dissecting in a subperiosteal plane and performing a Le Fort III osteotomy. Each face was harvested successfully as a bipedicled flap based on the external carotid arteries, the external jugular veins, and the facial veins. Each of these 2 techniques is a theoretically viable approach to face harvest for composite allograft transplantation. These techniques represent the 2 extremes of which tissues can be harvested while maintaining vascular integrity. Each will address different reconstructive needs.

  19. Flexible Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting from Mouse Click Motions

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Youngsu; Hong, Jin; Lee, Jaemin; Park, Jung-Min; Kim, Keehoon

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study energy harvesting from the mouse click motions of a robot finger and a human index finger using a piezoelectric material. The feasibility of energy harvesting from mouse click motions is experimentally and theoretically assessed. The fingers wear a glove with a pocket for including the piezoelectric material. We model the energy harvesting system through the inverse kinematic framework of parallel joints in a finger and the electromechanical coupling equations of the piezoelectric material. The model is validated through energy harvesting experiments in the robot and human fingers with the systematically varying load resistance. We find that energy harvesting is maximized at the matched load resistance to the impedance of the piezoelectric material, and the harvested energy level is tens of nJ. PMID:27399705

  20. Piezomagnetoelastic broadband energy harvester: Nonlinear modeling and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind Kumar, K.; Ali, S. F.; Arockiarajan, A.

    2015-11-01

    Piezomagnetoelastic energy harvesters are one among the widely explored configurations to improve the broadband characteristics of vibration energy harvesters. Such nonlinear harvesters follow a Moon beam model with two magnets at the base and one at the tip of the beam. The present article develops a geometric nonlinear mathematical model for the broadband piezomagnetoelastic energy harvester. The electromechanical coupling and the nonlinear magnetic potential equations are developed from the dimensional system parameters to describe the nonlinear dynamics exhibited by the system. The developed model is capable of characterizing the monostable, bistable and tristable operating regimes of the piezomagnetoelastic energy harvester, which are not explicit in the Duffing representation of the system. Bifurcations and attractor motions are analyzed as nonlinear functions of the distance between base magnets and the field strength of the tip magnet. The model is further used to characterize the potential wells and stable states, with due focus on the performance of the system in broadband energy harvesting.

  1. Variance estimation for the Federal Waterfowl Harvest Surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Federal Waterfowl Harvest Surveys provide estimates of waterfowl harvest by species for flyways and states, harvests of most other migratory game bird species (by waterfowl hunters), crippling losses for ducks, geese, and coots, days hunted, and bag per hunter. The Waterfowl Hunter Questionnaire Survey separately estimates the harvest of ducks and geese using cluster samples of hunters who buy duck stamps at sample post offices. The Waterfowl Parts Collection estimates species, age, and sex ratios from parts solicited from successful hunters who responded to the Waterfowl Hunter Questionnaire Survey in previous years. These ratios are used to partition the duck and goose harvest into species, age, and sex specific harvest estimates. Annual estimates are correlated because successful hunters who respond to the Questionnaire Survey in one year may be asked to contribute to the Parts Collection for the next three years. Bootstrap variance estimates are used because covariances among years are difficult to estimate.

  2. Research and simulation on the rollover system of corn harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shizhuang; Cao, Shukun

    2017-01-01

    The structural characteristics of our country's corn harvester are narrow-track, high centroid and existence of eccentric distance, so rollover accident is easily to occur when driving in mountainous and hilly regions. In order to improve the design quality of corn harvester and enhance the security of operation, it is of great significance to research the rollover prevention system of the corn harvester. Hydro-pneumatic suspension has powerful function of adjusting the balance of automobile body and good shock absorption function. In this paper, hydro-pneumatic suspension is applied to the rollover prevention system of the corn harvester to improve the ability of anti-rollover. At last using ADAMS simulation technology to simulate the roll stability of traditional corn harvester and the corn harvester with hydro pneumatic suspension, then calculating the heeling angle in both cases.

  3. Flexible Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting from Mouse Click Motions.

    PubMed

    Cha, Youngsu; Hong, Jin; Lee, Jaemin; Park, Jung-Min; Kim, Keehoon

    2016-07-06

    In this paper, we study energy harvesting from the mouse click motions of a robot finger and a human index finger using a piezoelectric material. The feasibility of energy harvesting from mouse click motions is experimentally and theoretically assessed. The fingers wear a glove with a pocket for including the piezoelectric material. We model the energy harvesting system through the inverse kinematic framework of parallel joints in a finger and the electromechanical coupling equations of the piezoelectric material. The model is validated through energy harvesting experiments in the robot and human fingers with the systematically varying load resistance. We find that energy harvesting is maximized at the matched load resistance to the impedance of the piezoelectric material, and the harvested energy level is tens of nJ.

  4. Energy harvesting and wireless energy transmission for embedded sensor nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinholt, Kevin; Taylor, Stuart; Miller, Nathan; Sifuentes, Wilfredo; Moro, Erik; Park, Gyuhae; Farrar, Charles; Flynn, Eric; Mascarenas, David; Todd, Michael

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we present experimental investigations using energy harvesting and wireless energy transmission to operate embedded structural health monitoring sensor nodes. The goal of this study is to develop sensing systems that can be permanently embedded within a host structure without the need for an on-board power source. With this approach the required energy will be harvested from the ambient environment, or periodically delivered by a RF energy source to supplement conventional harvesting approaches. This approach combines several transducer types to harvest energy from multiple sources, providing a more robust solution that does not rely on a single energy source. Both piezoelectric and thermoelectric transducers are considered as energy harvesters to extract the ambient energy commonly available on civil structures such as bridges. Methods of increasing the efficiency, energy storage medium, target applications and the integrated use of energy harvesting sources with wireless energy transmission will be discussed.

  5. Effects of horseshoe crab harvest in delaware bay on red knots: Are harvest restrictions working?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niles, L.J.; Bart, J.; Sitters, H.P.; Dey, A.D.; Clark, K.E.; Atkinson, P.W.; Baker, Allan J.; Bennett, K.A.; Kalasz, K.S.; Clark, N.A.; Clark, J.; Gillings, S.; Gates, A.S.; Gonzalez, P.M.; Hernandez, D.E.; Minton, C.D.T.; Morrison, R.I.G.; Porter, R.R.; Ross, R.K.; Veitch, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Each May, red knots (Calidris canutus rufa) congregate in Delaware Bay during their northward migration to feed on horseshoe crab eggs (Limulus polyphemus) and refuel for breeding in the Arctic. During the 1990s, the Delaware Bay harvest of horseshoe crabs for bait increased 10-fold, leading to a more than 90% decline in the availability of their eggs for knots. The proportion of knots achieving weights of more than 180 grams by 26-28 May, their main departure period, dropped from 0.6-0.8 to 0.14-0.4 over 1997-2007. During the same period, the red knot population stopping in Delaware Bay declined by more than 75%, in part because the annual survival rate of adult knots wintering in Tierra del Fuego declined. Despite restrictions, the 2007 horseshoe crab harvest was still greater than the 1990 harvest, and no recovery of knots was detectable. We propose an adaptive management strategy with recovery goals and annual monitoring that, if adopted, will both allow red knot and horseshoe crab populations to recover and permit a sustainable harvest of horseshoe crabs.

  6. 77 FR 17353 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... reduce the potential for shooting mortality or injury of closed species. These conservation measures..., meetings, radio shows, signs, school visits, and one-on-one contacts. We also recognize that no listed..., and in-season verification of the harvest. Our primary strategy to reduce the threat of shooting...

  7. Risk factors of musculoskeletal disorders among oil palm fruit harvesters during early harvesting stage.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yee Guan; Mohd Tamrin, Shamsul Bahri; Mohd Yusoff, Irwan Syah; Hashim, Zailina; Deros, Baba M D; Abu Bakar, Shahriman; How, Vivien

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study intends to investigate the associations of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among foreign labourers on a socio-economic background, occupational exposure, social lifestyle, and postures adopted during harvesting tasks. A total of 446 male respondents (263 FFB cutters; 183 FFB collectors) were studied using an interview-assisted questionnaire. OWAS was used to determine the severity of awkward posture based on videos of harvesting tasks recorded for each respondent. Analysis found that increasingly educated respondents had higher risk of developing MSDs. Shorter daily work duration and longer resting duration appear to increase the risk of neck and shoulder disorders among harvesters, which may be attributable to organizational work design. Awkward posture was a particularly significant risk factor of MSDs among FFB collectors. Among the results of the study, occupational exposure, postures and certain socio-demographic backgrounds explained some, but not all, the risk factor of MSDs among harvesters. An in-depth investigation, preferably a longitudinal study investigating the dynamic of work activities and other risk factors, such as psychosocial risk factors, are recommended.

  8. Vine-Kill Treatment and Harvest Date Have Persistant Effects on Tuber Physiology After Harvest

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potato tuber development follows a genetically programmed progression from tuber initiation to maturation. Most grower activities nurture this process, but vine kill and harvest are exceptions that have the potential to affect the quality of the crop. Experiments conducted for two years determined t...

  9. Investigating why recycling gravity harvested algae increases harvestability and productivity in high rate algal ponds.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Shilton, A N

    2013-09-15

    It has previously been shown that recycling gravity harvested algae promotes Pediastrum boryanum dominance and improves harvestability and biomass production in pilot-scale High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAPs) treating domestic wastewater. In order to confirm the reproducibility of these findings and investigate the mechanisms responsible, this study utilized twelve 20 L outdoor HRAP mesocosms operated with and without algal recycling. It then compared the recycling of separated solid and liquid components of the harvested biomass against un-separated biomass. The work confirmed that algal recycling promoted P. boryanum dominance, improved 1 h-settleability by >20% and increased biomass productivity by >25% compared with controls that had no recycling. With regard to the improved harvestability, of particular interest was that recycling the liquid fraction alone caused a similar improvement in settleability as recycling the solid fraction. This may be due to the presence of extracellular polymeric substances in the liquid fraction. While there are many possible mechanisms that could account for the increased productivity with algal recycling, all but two were systematically eliminated: (i) the mean cell residence time was extended thereby increasing the algal concentration and more fully utilizing the incident sunlight and, (ii) the relative proportions of algal growth stages (which have different specific growth rates) was changed, resulting in a net increase in the overall growth rate of the culture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Energy Harvesting & Recapture from Human Subjects: Dual-Stage MEMS Cantilever Energy Harvester

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    55 IV. Analysis and Results...a self-powered autonomous sensor [6] ........... 12 Figure 4. Vibrational energy harvesting system diagram [1...The bimetal operates by first converting thermal energy 4 to mechanical energy. The piezoelectric membrane captures the mechanical energy of the

  11. Simulating stand-level harvest prescriptions across landscapes: LANDIS PRO harvest module design

    Treesearch

    Jacob S. Fraser; Hong S. He; Stephen R. Shifley; Wen J. Wang; Frank R. Thompson

    2013-01-01

    Forest landscape models (FLMs) are an important tool for assessing the long-term cumulative effects of harvest over large spatial extents. However, they have not been commonly used to guide forest management planning and on-the-ground operations. This is largely because FLMs track relatively simplistic vegetation information such as age cohort presence/absence, forest...

  12. Do biomass harvesting guidelines influence herpetofauna following harvests of logging residues for renewable energy?.

    PubMed

    Fritts, Sarah; Moorman, Christopher; Grodsky, Steven; Hazel, Dennis; Homyack, Jessica; Farrell, Chris; Castleberry, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Forests are a major supplier of renewable energy; however, gleaning logging residues for use as woody biomass feedstock could negatively alter habitat for species dependent on downed wood. Biomass Harvesting Guidelines (BHGs) recommend retaining a portion of woody biomass on the forest floor following harvest. Despite BHGs being developed to help ensure ecological sustainability, their contribution to biodiversity has not been evaluated experimentally at operational scales. We compared herpetofauanal evenness, diversity, and richness and abundance of Anaxyrus terrestris and Gastrophryne carolinensis among six treatments that varied in volume and spatial arrangement of woody biomass retained after clearcutting loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations in North Carolina, USA (n = 4), 2011-2014 and Georgia (n = 4), USA 2011-2013. Treatments were: (1) biomass harvest with no BHGs, (2) 15% retention with biomass clustered, (3) 15% retention with biomass dispersed, (4) 30% retention with biomass clustered, (5) 30% retention with biomass dispersed, and (6) no biomass harvest. We captured individuals with drift fence arrays and compared evenness, diversity, and richness metrics among treatments with repeated-measure, linear mixed-effects models. We determined predictors of A. terrestris and G. carolinensis abundances using a priori candidate N-mixture models with woody biomass volume, vegetation structure, and groundcover composition as covariates. We had 206 captures of 25 reptile species and 8710 captures of 17 amphibian species during 53690 trap nights. Herpetofauna diversity, evenness, and richness were similar among treatments. A. terrestris abundance was negatively related to volume of retained woody biomass in treatment units in North Carolina in 2013. G. carolinensis abundance was positively related with volume of retained woody debris in treatment units in Georgia in 2012. Other relationships between A. terrestris and G. carolinensis abundances and habitat metrics

  13. A full body mathematical model of an oil palm harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumit, NP; Rambely, A. S.; BMT, Shamsul; Shahriman A., B.; Ng Y., G.; Deros, B. M.; Zailina, H.; Goh Y., M.; Arumugam, Manohar; Ismail I., A.; Abdul Hafiz A., R.

    2015-09-01

    The main purpose of this article is to develop a mathematical model of human body during harvesting via Kane's method. This paper is an extension model of previous biomechanical model representing a harvester movement during harvesting a Fresh Fruit Bunch (FFB) from a palm oil tree. The ten segment model consists of foot, leg, trunk, the head and the arms segment. Finally, the inverse dynamic equations are represented in a matrix form.

  14. Superhydrophobic surfaces’ influence on streaming current based energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouché, Florent; Dargent, Thomas; Coffinier, Yannick; Treizebré, Anthony; Vlandas, Alexis; Senez, Vincent

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the design, fabrication and characterization of silicon-based microfluidic channels with superhydrophobic walls for energy harvesting. We present the fabrication step of silicon based streaming current energy harvester and the nanostructuration of the microchannel walls. We characterize the superhydrophobic properties of the surface in a closed system. Our preliminary results on the electrical characterization of the device show a 43% increase of power harvested with our superhydrophobic surface compared to a planar hydrophobic surface.

  15. Productivity and cost of conventional understory biomass harvesting systems

    Treesearch

    Douglas E. Miller; Thomas J. Straka; Bryce J. Stokes; William Watson

    1987-01-01

    Conventional harvesting equipment was tested for removing forest understory biomass (energywood) for use as fuel. Two types of systems were tested--a one-pass system and a two-pass system. In the one-pass system, the energywood and pulpwood were harvested simultaneously. In the two-pass system, the energywood was harvested in a first pass through the stand, and the...

  16. Harvesting impacts as a function of removal intensity

    Treesearch

    Bryce J. Stokes; R.A. Kluender; J.F. Klepac; D.A. Lortz

    1997-01-01

    Single-tree selection, group selection, shelterwood, seed-tree, and clearcut harvesting methods were evaluated for residual site impacts. The stands were harvested during the summer of 1993 on the Ouachita National Forest in Arkansas. Manual felling and rubber-tired skidders were used to harvest all 23 stands. Percentage of area in primary skid trails was 8.2, 9.6, 13....

  17. Mems-Based Waste Vibration and Acoustic Energy Harvesters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    VIBRATION AND ACOUSTIC ENERGY HARVESTERS by Timothy J. Householder December 2014 Thesis Advisor: Dragoslav Grbovic Co-Advisor: Bruce...2014 Master’ s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS MEMS-BASED WASTE VIBRATION AND ACOUSTIC ENERGY HARVESTERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Timothy J...be retumed to the system. Utilizing an anay of piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices to harvest this othe1wise wasted energy

  18. Review of the application of energy harvesting in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiko, J. W.; Grabham, N. J.; Beeby, S. P.; Tudor, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    This review presents the state of the art of the application of energy harvesting in commercial and residential buildings. Electromagnetic (optical and radio frequency), kinetic, thermal and airflow-based energy sources are identified as potential energy sources within buildings and the available energy is measured in a range of buildings. Suitable energy harvesters are discussed and the available and the potential harvested energy calculated. Calculations based on these measurements, and the technical specifications of state-of-the-art harvesters, show that typical harvested powers are: (1) indoor solar cell (active area of 9 cm2, volume of 2.88 cm3): ˜300 µW from a light intensity of 1000 lx; (2) thermoelectric harvester (volume of 1.4 cm3): 6 mW from a thermal gradient of 25 °C (3) periodic kinetic energy harvester (volume of 0.15 cm3): 2 µW from a vibration acceleration of 0.25 m s-2 at 45 Hz (4) electromagnetic wave harvester (13 cm antenna length and conversion efficiency of 0.7): 1 µW with an RF source power of -25 dBm; and (5) airflow harvester (wind turbine blade of 6 cm diameter and generator efficiency of 0.41): 140 mW from an airflow of 8 m s-1. These results highlight the high potential of energy harvesting technology in buildings and the relative attractions of various harvester technologies. The harvested power could either be used to replace batteries or to prolong the life of rechargeable batteries for low-power (˜1 mW) electronic devices.

  19. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting in Internal Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Colonius, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA) showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph’s clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well. PMID:26473879

  20. Synchronized switch harvesting applied to piezoelectric flags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeirua, Miguel; Michelin, Sébastien; Vasic, Dejan; Doaré, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    In this article the energy transfer between a flow and a fluttering piezoelectric plate is investigated. In particular, the benefits of the use of a synchronized switch harvesting on inductor (SSHI) circuit are studied. Both wind tunnel experiments and numerical simulations are conducted in order to analyze the influence of the switching process on the dynamics and the efficiency of the system. Numerical simulations consist of a weakly nonlinear model of a plate in axial flow equipped with a single pair of piezoelectric patches, discretized using a Galerkin method where basis functions are the modes of the plate in vacuum. The discretized model is then integrated in time. The results presented in this paper show that a significant improvement of the harvested energy can be obtained using SSHI circuits compared to basic resistive circuits. It is also shown that for strongly coupled systems, the switching process inherent to he SSHI circuit has a significant impact on the dynamics of the flag, which tends to decrease the relative efficiency gain.

  1. Harvesting microalgae with microwave synthesized magnetic microparticles.

    PubMed

    Prochazkova, Gita; Safarik, Ivo; Branyik, Tomas

    2013-02-01

    To make magnetic harvesting a more viable option, a suspension of inexpensive iron oxide magnetic microparticles (IOMMs) prepared by microwave treatment is presented as a new agent for separating Chlorella vulgaris from a highly diluted suspension. Separation efficiencies were tested under various conditions (model environment, cultivation media, different pH), revealing not only a dependency on the pH and amount of IOMMs, but also the influence of the ions present in the culture medium. Phosphorus ions were identified as the medium component interfering with algae-IOMMs interactions that are essential for magnetic cell separations in the culture medium. Phosphorus limited C. vulgaris cells were magnetically separated from the medium at separation efficiencies of over 95% at a 3:1 mass ratio of IOMMs to microalgae. A rapid and complete demagnetization of harvested algae was achieved by acidic treatment (10vol.% H(2)SO(4)) at 40°C under the influence of ultrasound. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Harvesting microalgal biomass using submerged microfiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Bilad, M R; Vandamme, D; Foubert, I; Muylaert, K; Vankelecom, Ivo F J

    2012-05-01

    This study was performed to investigate the applicability of submerged microfiltration as a first step of up-concentration for harvesting both a freshwater green algae species Chlorella vulgaris and a marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum using three lab-made membranes with different porosity. The filtration performance was assessed by conducting the improved flux step method (IFM) and batch up-concentration filtrations. The fouling autopsy of the membranes was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The cost analysis was estimated based on the data of a related full-scale submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR). Overall results suggest that submerged microfiltration for algal harvesting is economically feasible. The IFM results indicate a low degree of fouling, comparable to the one obtained for a submerged MBR. By combining the submerged microfiltration with centrifugation to reach a final concentration of 22% w/v, the energy consumption to dewater C. vulgaris and P. tricornutum is 0.84 kW h/m(3) and 0.91 kW h/m(3), respectively.

  3. Chalcogenide Perovskites for Solar Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Samanthe

    Methylammonium Lead halide perovskites have recently emerged as a promising candidate for realizing high efficient low cost photovoltaic modules. Charge transport properties of the solution processed halide perovskites are comparable to some of the existing absorbers used in the current PV industry which require sophisticated processing techniques. Due to this simple processing required to achieve high efficiencies, halide perovskites have become an active field of research. As a result, perovskite solar cells are rapidly reaching towards theoretical efficiency limit of close to 30%. It's believed that ionicity inherent to perovskite materials is one of the contributing factors for the excellent charge transport properties of perovskites. Despite the growing interest for solar energy harvesting purposes, these halide perovskites have serious limitations such as toxicity and instability that need to be addressed in order to commercialize the solar cells incorporating them. This dissertation focuses on a new class of ionic semiconductors, chalcogenide perovskites for solar energy harvesting purposes. Coming from the family perovskites they are expected to have same excellent charge transport properties inherent to perovskites due to the ionicity. Inspired by few theoretical studies on chalcogenide perovskites, BaZrS3 and its Ti alloys were synthesized by sulfurizing the oxide counterpart. Structural characterizations have confirmed the predicted distorted perovskite phase. Optical characterizations have verified the direct band gap suitable for thin film single junction solar cells. Anion alloying was demonstrated by synthesizing oxysulfides with widely tunable band gap suitable for applications such as solid state lighting and sensing.

  4. Estimated harvesting on jellyfish in Sarawak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujang, Noriham; Hassan, Aimi Nuraida Ali

    2017-04-01

    There are three species of jellyfish recorded in Sarawak which are the Lobonema smithii (white jellyfish), Rhopilema esculenta (red jellyfish) and Mastigias papua. This study focused on two particular species which are L.smithii and R.esculenta. This study was done to estimate the highest carrying capacity and the population growth rate of both species by using logistic growth model. The maximum sustainable yield for the harvesting of this species was also determined. The unknown parameters in the logistic model were estimated using center finite different method. As for the results, it was found that the carrying capacity for L.smithii and R.esculenta were 4594.9246456819 tons and 5855.9894242086 tons respectively. Whereas, the population growth rate for both L.smithii and R.esculenta were estimated at 2.1800463754 and 1.144864086 respectively. Hence, the estimated maximum sustainable yield for harvesting for L.smithii and R.esculenta were 2504.2872047638 tons and 1676.0779949431 tons per year.

  5. Jumping-droplet electrostatic energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel J.; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2014-07-01

    Micro- and nanoscale wetting phenomena have been an active area of research due to its potential for improving engineered system performance involving phase change. With the recent advancements in micro/nanofabrication techniques, structured surfaces can now be designed to allow condensing coalesced droplets to spontaneously jump off the surface due to the conversion of excess surface energy into kinetic energy. In addition to being removed at micrometric length scales (˜10 μm), jumping water droplets also attain a positive electrostatic charge (˜10-100 fC) from the hydrophobic coating/condensate interaction. In this work, we take advantage of this droplet charging to demonstrate jumping-droplet electrostatic energy harvesting. The charged droplets jump between superhydrophobic copper oxide and hydrophilic copper surfaces to create an electrostatic potential and generate power during formation of atmospheric dew. We demonstrated power densities of ˜15 pW/cm2, which, in the near term, can be improved to ˜1 μW/cm2. This work demonstrates a surface engineered platform that promises to be low cost and scalable for atmospheric energy harvesting and electric power generation.

  6. Application of Plasmonics in Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dawei

    This thesis studies the application of plasmonics in solar energy conversion and near field thermal energy harvesting. The efficiency of semiconductor solar cell is limited by the inability of absorbing photons with energy below the bandgap. By designing plasmonic nanograting with resonance at the absorption edge, ~10% overall absorption improvement is achieved. Both localized and propagating surface plasmon modes are observed in the device. Their interaction, and the influence on overall solar cell absorption performance are studied in details. In addition, this thesis studies the upconversion materials which can convert unabsorbed near infrared photons by semiconductor solar cells into well absorbed visible photons. By tuning the surface plasmon resonance at the upconversion frequency with silver nanograting structure, the photoluminescence of upconversion material can be improved by 39-fold maximum. The rate equation analysis reveals that the improvement is attributed to roughly 3-fold absorption enhancement and 2-fold energy transfer enhancement with plasmonics. This thesis also explores the application of plasmonics to enhanced near field thermal radiation harvesting. I designed metamaterial to excite the spoof surface plasmon in the terahertz frequency for strongly enhanced thermal radiation. The FDTD simulation developed from the fluctuation electrodynamics demonstrates several hundredfold enhancement of thermally excited electromagnetic energy in the near field.

  7. Momentum harvesting techniques for solar system travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willoughby, Alan J.

    1990-01-01

    Astronomers are lately estimating there are 400,000 Earth visiting asteroids larger than 100 meters in diameter. These asteroids are accessible sources of building materials, propellants, oxygen, water, and minerals which also constitute a huge momentum reserve, potentially usable for travel throughout the solar system. To use this momentum, these stealthy objects must be tracked and the extraction of the momentum wanted must be learned. Momentum harvesting by momentum transfer from asteroid to spacecraft, and by using the momentum of the extraterrestrial material to help deliver itself to the destination are discussed. A net and tether concept is the suggested means of asteroid capture, the basic momentum exchange process. The energy damping characteristics of the tether will determine the velocity mismatch that can be tolerated, and hence the amount of momentum that can be harvested per capture. As it plays out of its reel, drag on the tether steadily accelerates the spacecraft. A variety of concepts for riding and using the asteroid after capture are discussed. The hitchhiker uses momentum transfer only. The beachcomber, the caveman, the swinger, the prospector, and the rock wrecker also take advantage of raw asteroidal materials. The chemist and the hijacker go further, they process the asteroid into propellant. Or, an 'asteroid railway system' could evolve with each hijacked asteroid becoming a scheduled train. Travelers could board the space railway system assured that water, oxygen, and propellants await them.

  8. Flow energy piezoelectric bimorph nozzle harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Hasenoehrl, Jennifer; Hall, Jeffrey L.; Colonius, Tim; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Arrazola, Alvaro; Kim, Namhyo; Sun, Kai; Corbett, Gary

    2014-04-01

    There is a need for a long-life power generation scheme that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce 1 Watt average power. There are a variety of existing or proposed energy harvesting schemes that could be used in this environment but each of these has its own limitations. The vibrating piezoelectric structure is in principle capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades) thereby possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. In order to determine the feasibility of using piezoelectrics to produce suitable flow energy harvesting, we surveyed experimentally a variety of nozzle configurations that could be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to enable conversion of flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. These included reed structures, spring mass-structures, drag and lift bluff bodies and a variety of nozzles with varying flow profiles. Although not an exhaustive survey we identified a spline nozzle/piezoelectric bimorph system that experimentally produced up to 3.4 mW per bimorph. This paper will discuss these results and present our initial analyses of the device using dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical modeling. The analysis suggests that an order-of-magnitude improvement in power generation from the current design is possible.

  9. A Nonlinear Energy Sink with Energy Harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Daniel

    The transfer of energy between systems is a natural process, manifesting in many different ways. In engineering transferable energy can be considered wanted or unwanted. Specifically in mechanical systems, energy transfer can occur as unwanted vibrations, passing from a source to a receiver. In electrical systems, energy transfer can be desirable, where energy from a source may be used elsewhere. This work proposes a method to combine the two, converting unwanted mechanical energy into useable electrical energy. A nonlinear energy sink (NES) is a vibration absorber that passively localizes vibrational energy, removing mechanical energy from a primary system. Consisting of a mass-spring-damper such that the stiffness is essentially nonlinear, a NES can localize vibrational energy from a source and dissipate it through damping. Replacing the NES mass with a series of magnets surrounded by coils fixed to the primary mass, the dissipated energy can be directly converted to electrical energy. A NES with energy harvesting properties is constructed and introduced. The system parameters are identified, with the NES having an essentially cubic nonlinear stiffness. A transduction factor is quantified linking the electrical and mechanical systems. An analytic analysis is carried out studying the transient and harmonically excited response of the system. It is found that the energy harvesting does not reduce the vibrational absorption capabilities of the NES. The performance of the system in both transient and harmonically excited responses is found to be heavily influenced by input energies. The system is tested, with good match to analytic results.

  10. Quantum mechanical light harvesting mechanisms in photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholes, Gregory

    2012-02-01

    More than 10 million billion photons of light strike a leaf each second. Incredibly, almost every red-coloured photon is captured by chlorophyll pigments and initiates steps to plant growth. Last year we reported that marine algae use quantum mechanics in order to optimize photosynthesis [1], a process essential to its survival. These and other insights from the natural world promise to revolutionize our ability to harness the power of the sun. In a recent review [2] we described the principles learned from studies of various natural antenna complexes and suggested how to utilize that knowledge to shape future technologies. We forecast the need to develop ways to direct and regulate excitation energy flow using molecular organizations that facilitate feedback and control--not easy given that the energy is only stored for a billionth of a second. In this presentation I will describe new results that explain the observation and meaning of quantum-coherent energy transfer. [4pt] [1] Elisabetta Collini, Cathy Y. Wong, Krystyna E. Wilk, Paul M. G. Curmi, Paul Brumer, and Gregory D. Scholes, ``Coherently wired light-harvesting in photosynthetic marine algae at ambient temperature'' Nature 463, 644-648 (2010).[0pt] [2] Gregory D. Scholes, Graham R. Fleming, Alexandra Olaya-Castro and Rienk van Grondelle, ``Lessons from nature about solar light harvesting'' Nature Chem. 3, 763-774 (2011).

  11. Selective Harvesting of Marginating-pulmonary Leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Shaashua, Lee; Sorski, Liat; Melamed, Rivka; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2016-03-11

    Marginating-pulmonary (MP) leukocytes are leukocytes that adhere to the inner endothelium of the lung capillaries. MP-leukocytes were shown to exhibit unique composition and characteristics compared to leukocytes of other immune compartments. Evidence suggests higher cytotoxicity of natural killer cells, and a distinct pro- and anti-inflammatory profile of the MP-leukocyte population compared to circulating or splenic immunocytes. The method presented herein enables selective harvesting of MP-leukocytes by forced perfusion of the lungs in either mice or rats. In contrast to other methods used to extract lung-leukocytes, such as tissue grinding and biological degradation, this method exclusively yields leukocytes from the lung capillaries, uncontaminated with parenchymal, interstitial, and broncho-alveolar cells. In addition, the perfusion technique better preserves the integrity and the physiological milieu of MP-leukocytes, without inducing physiological responses due to tissue processing. This unique MP leukocyte population is strategically located to identify and react towards abnormal circulating cells, as all circulating malignant cells and infected cells are detained while passing through the lung capillaries, physically interacting with endothelial cells and resident leukocytes,. Thus, selective harvesting of MP-leukocytes and their study under various conditions may advance our understanding of their biological and clinical significance, specifically with respect to controlling circulating aberrant cells and lung-related diseases.

  12. Piezoelectric energy harvesting in internal fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Colonius, Tim

    2015-10-14

    We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA) showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph's clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well.

  13. Flow Energy Piezoelectric Bimorph Nozzle Harvester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Kim, Namhyo; Sun, Kai; Corbett, Gary; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Hasenoehrl, Jennifer; Hall, Jeffery L.; Colonius, Tim; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; hide

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for a long-life power generation scheme that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce 1 Watt average power. There are a variety of existing or proposed energy harvesting schemes that could be used in this environment but each of these has its own limitations. The vibrating piezoelectric structure is in principle capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades) thereby possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. In order to determine the feasibility of using piezoelectrics to produce suitable flow energy harvesting, we surveyed experimentally a variety of nozzle configurations that could be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to enable conversion of flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. These included reed structures, spring mass-structures, drag and lift bluff bodies and a variety of nozzles with varying flow profiles. Although not an exhaustive survey we identified a spline nozzle/piezoelectric bimorph system that experimentally produced up to 3.4 mW per bimorph. This paper will discuss these results and present our initial analyses of the device using dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical modeling. The analysis suggests that an order-of-magnitude improvement in power generation from the current design is possible.

  14. Selective Harvesting of Marginating-hepatic Leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Sorski, Liat; Shaashua, Lee; Melamed, Rivka; Matzner, Pini; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2016-07-21

    Marginating-hepatic (MH) leukocytes (leukocytes adhering to the sinusoids of the liver), were shown to exhibit unique composition and characteristics compared to leukocytes of other immune compartments. Specifically, evidence suggests a distinct pro- and anti-inflammatory profile of the MH-leukocyte population and higher cytotoxicity of liver-specific NK cells (namely, pit cells) compared to circulating or splenic immunocytes in both mice and rats. The method presented herein enables selective harvesting of MH leukocytes by forced perfusion of the liver in mice and rats. In contrast to other methods used to extract liver-leukocytes, including tissue grinding and biological degradation, this method exclusively yields leukocytes from the liver sinusoids, uncontaminated by cells from other liver compartments. In addition, the perfusion technique better preserves the integrity and the physiological milieu of MH leukocytes, sparing known physiological responses to tissue processing. As many circulating malignant cells and infected cells are detained while passing through the liver sinusoids, physically interacting with endothelial cells and resident leukocytes, the unique MH leukocyte population is strategically located to interact, identify, and react towards aberrant circulating cells. Thus, selective harvesting of MH-leukocytes and their study under various conditions may advance our understanding of the biological and clinical significance of MH leukocytes, specifically with respect to circulating aberrant cells and liver-related diseases and cancer metastases.

  15. Frequency adjustable MEMS vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podder, P.; Constantinou, P.; Amann, A.; Roy, S.

    2016-10-01

    Ambient mechanical vibrations offer an attractive solution for powering the wireless sensor nodes of the emerging “Internet-of-Things”. However, the wide-ranging variability of the ambient vibration frequencies pose a significant challenge to the efficient transduction of vibration into usable electrical energy. This work reports the development of a MEMS electromagnetic vibration energy harvester where the resonance frequency of the oscillator can be adjusted or tuned to adapt to the ambient vibrational frequency. Micro-fabricated silicon spring and double layer planar micro-coils along with sintered NdFeB micro-magnets are used to construct the electromagnetic transduction mechanism. Furthermore, another NdFeB magnet is adjustably assembled to induce variable magnetic interaction with the transducing magnet, leading to significant change in the spring stiffness and resonance frequency. Finite element analysis and numerical simulations exhibit substantial frequency tuning range (25% of natural resonance frequency) by appropriate adjustment of the repulsive magnetic interaction between the tuning and transducing magnet pair. This demonstrated method of frequency adjustment or tuning have potential applications in other MEMS vibration energy harvesters and micromechanical oscillators.

  16. Vein harvesting and techniques for infrainguinal bypass.

    PubMed

    Albäck, Anders; Saarinen, Eva; Venermo, Maarit

    2016-04-01

    In order to achieve good long term results after bypass surgery, alongside with good inflow and outflow arteries, the bypass graft material also has an important role. The best patency and limb salvage rates are achieved with autologous vein. If great saphenous vein is not available, acceptable long-term results can be achieved with arm veins and lesser saphenous vein. The quality and size of the vein are important. A small-caliber vein, increased wall thickness, postphlebitic changes and varicosities are associated with a risk of early failure. Preoperative vein mapping with ultrasound reduces readmissions and postoperative surgical site infections. During the mapping, the vein to be used and its main tributaries are marked with a permanent marker pen. To reduce wound complication rates we recommend bridged incisions in vein harvesting. Endoscopic vein harvesting seems to have no benefit compared to open techniques in lower limb bypasses, and has been associated with higher risk of primary patency loss at one year. With deep tunneling of the graft the problems caused by wound infection can be avoided.

  17. Sustainable Harvest for Food and Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Grosshans, Raymond R.; Kostelnik, Kevin, M.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

    2007-04-01

    The DOE Biomass Program recently implemented the Biofuels Initiative, or 30x30 program, with the dual goal of reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil by making cellulosic ethanol cost competitive with gasoline by 2012 and by replacing 30 percent of gasoline consumption with biofuels by 2030. Experience to date with increasing ethanol production suggests that it distorts agricultural markets and therefore raises concerns about the sustainability of the DOE 30 X 30 effort: Can the U.S. agricultural system produce sufficient feedstocks for biofuel production and meet the food price and availability expectations of American consumers without causing environmental degradation that would curtail the production of both food and fuel? Efforts are underway to develop computer-based modeling tools that address this concern and support the DOE 30 X 30 goals. Beyond technical agronomic and economic concerns, however, such models must account for the publics’ growing interest in sustainable agriculture and in the mitigation of predicted global climate change. This paper discusses ongoing work at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies that investigates the potential consequences and long-term sustainability of projected biomass harvests by identifying and incorporating “sustainable harvest indicators” in a computer modeling strategy.

  18. Social and biophysical variation in regional timber harvest regimes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jonathan R; Canham, Charles D; Morreale, Luca; Kittredge, David B; Butler, Brett

    2017-04-01

    In terms of adult tree mortality, harvesting is the most prevalent disturbance in northeastern United States forests. Previous studies have demonstrated that stand structure and tree species composition are important predictors of harvest. We extend this work to investigate how social factors further influence harvest regimes. By coupling the Forest Inventory and Analysis database to U.S. Census and National Woodland Owner Survey (NWOS) data, we quantify social and biophysical variation in the frequency and intensity of harvesting throughout a 20-state region in the northeastern United States. Among social factors, ownership class is most predictive of harvest frequency and intensity. The annual probability of a harvest event within privately owned forest (3%/yr) is twice as high as within publicly owned forests (1.5%/yr). Among private owner classes, the annual harvest probability on corporate-owned forests (3.6%/yr) is 25% higher than on private woodlands (2.9%/yr). Among public owner classes, the annual probability of harvest is highest on municipally owned forests (2.4%/ yr), followed by state-owned forests (1.6%/yr), and is lowest on federal forests (1%/yr). In contrast, corporate, state, and municipal forests all have similar distributions of harvest intensity; the median percentage of basal area removed during harvest events is approximately 40% in these three owner groups. Federal forests are similar to private woodlands with median harvest intensities of 23% and 20%, respectively. Social context variables, including local home prices, population density and the distance to a road, help explain the intensity, but not the frequency, of harvesting. Private woodlands constitute the majority of forest area; however, demographic data about their owners (e.g., their age, educational attainment, length of land tenure, retired status) show little relationship to aggregate harvest behavior. Instead, significant predictors for harvesting on private woodlands

  19. Energy harvesting for self-powered aerostructure actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Matthew; Pizzonia, Matthew; Mehallow, Michael; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2014-04-01

    This paper proposes and experimentally investigates applying piezoelectric energy harvesting devices driven by flow induced vibrations to create self-powered actuation of aerostructure surfaces such as tabs, flaps, spoilers, or morphing devices. Recently, we have investigated flow-induced vibrations and limit cycle oscillations due to aeroelastic flutter phenomena in piezoelectric structures as a mechanism to harvest energy from an ambient fluid flow. We will describe how our experimental investigations in a wind tunnel have demonstrated that this harvested energy can be stored and used on-demand to actuate a control surface such as a trailing edge flap in the airflow. This actuated control surface could take the form of a separate and discrete actuated flap, or could constitute rotating or deflecting the oscillating energy harvester itself to produce a non-zero mean angle of attack. Such a rotation of the energy harvester and the associated change in aerodynamic force is shown to influence the operating wind speed range of the device, its limit cycle oscillation (LCO) amplitude, and its harvested power output; hence creating a coupling between the device's performance as an energy harvester and as a control surface. Finally, the induced changes in the lift, pitching moment, and drag acting on a wing model are quantified and compared for a control surface equipped with an oscillating energy harvester and a traditional, static control surface of the same geometry. The results show that when operated in small amplitude LCO the energy harvester adds negligible aerodynamic drag.

  20. Bone Graft Harvest Using a New Intramedullary System

    PubMed Central

    Belthur, Mohan V.; Jindal, Gaurav; Ranade, Ashish; Herzenberg, John E.

    2008-01-01

    Obtaining autogenous bone graft from the iliac crest can entail substantial morbidity. Alternatively, bone graft can be harvested from long bones using an intramedullary (IM) harvesting system. We measured bone graft volume obtained from the IM canals of the femur and tibia and documented the complications of the harvesting technique. Donor site pain and the union rate were compared between the IM and the traditional iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) harvest. Forty-one patients (23 male, 18 female) with an average age of 44.9 years (range, 15–78 years) had graft harvested from long bones using an IM harvest system (femoral donor site, 37 patients; tibial donor site, four patients). Forty patients (23 male, 17 female; average age, 46.4 years; range, 15–77 years) underwent anterior ICBG harvest. We administered patient surveys to both groups to determine pain intensity and frequency. IM group reported lower pain scores than the ICBG group during all postoperative periods. Mean graft volume for the IM harvest group was 40.3 mL (range, 25–75 mL) (graft volume was not obtained for the ICBG group). Using an intramedullary system to harvest autogenous bone graft from the long bones is safe provided a meticulous technique is used. Level of Evidence: Level III, retrospective comparative study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18841433

  1. Simulation of thinning with a single-grip harvester

    SciTech Connect

    Eliasson, L. )

    1999-02-01

    A simulation model of a single-grip harvester was constructed to evaluate different silvicultural treatments and to compare different machine concepts with a minimum of confounding factors. The model simulates machine movement, boom movement, felling, delimbing, and cross-cutting in stands where both size and position of each tree are known. To validate the model, model output was compared with data from recent time studies. Effects on harvester productivity of three harvesting intensities (extraction of 30, 40, and 50% of the basal area when thinning from below) and four distances between machine positions were studied. Productivity increased when harvesting intensity and with distance between machine positions.

  2. Effect of garment design on piezoelectricity harvesting from joint movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin-Hee; Cho, Hyun-Seung; Park, Seon-Hyung; Song, Seung-Hwan; Yun, Kwang-Seok; Lee, Joo Hyeon

    2016-03-01

    The harvesting of piezoelectricity through the human body involves the conversion of mechanical energy, mostly generated by the repeated movements of the body, to electrical energy, irrespective of the time and location. In this research, it was expected that the garment design would play an important role in increasing the efficiency of piezoelectricity scavenged in a garment because the mechanical deformation imposed on the energy harvester could increase through an optimal design configuration for the garment parts supporting a piezoelectricity harvester. With this expectation, this research aimed to analyze the effect of the clothing factors, and that of human factors on the efficiency of piezoelectricity harvesting through clothing in joint movements. These analyses resulted in that the efficiency of the piezoelectricity harvesting was affected from both two clothing factors, tightness level depending upon the property of the textile material and design configuration of the garment part supporting the piezoelectricity harvesting. Among the three proposed designs of the garment part supporting the piezoelectricity harvesting, ‘reinforced 3D module design,’ which maximized the value of radius in the piezoelectricity harvester, showed the highest efficiency across all areas of the joints in the human body. The two human factors, frequency of movement and body part, affected the efficiency of the piezoelectricity harvesting as well.

  3. Characterizing the effective bandwidth of tri-stable energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panyam, Meghashyam; Daqaq, Mohammed F.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that nonlinear vibratory energy harvesters possessing a tri-stable potential function are capable of harvesting energy efficiently over a wider range of frequencies in comparison to harvesters with a double-well potential function. However, the effect of the design parameters of the harvester on the dynamic response and the effective bandwidth of such devices remains uninvestigated. To fill this void, this paper establishes an analytical approach to characterize the effective frequency bandwidth of harvesters that possess a hexic potential energy function. To achieve this goal, the method of multiple scales is utilized to construct analytical solutions describing the amplitude and stability of the intra- and inter-well dynamics of the harvester. Using these solutions, critical bifurcations in the parameter's space are identified and used to define an effective frequency bandwidth of the harvester. The influence of the electric parameters, namely, the time constant ratio (ratio between the period of the mechanical system and the time constant of the harvesting circuit) and the electromechanical coupling, on the effective frequency bandwidth is analyzed. Experimental studies performed on the harvester are presented to validate some of the theoretical findings.

  4. Stochastic resonance energy harvesting from general rotating shaft vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hongjip; Tai, Wei Che; Zuo, Lei

    2017-04-01

    Many vibration energy harvesters have been developed in the past to harvest energy from rotating systems. Yet most of these harvesters are linear resonance-based harvesters whose output power drops dramatically under random excitation. This poses a serious problem because a lot of vibrations of rotating systems are stochastic. In this paper, an advanced energy harvesting mechanism is proposed to magnify power output when the excitation is random. Large power output can be produced with stochastic resonance by inputting weak periodic signal and noise excitation into a bistable system. Stick-slip and whirling vibrations which are inherently existing in various rotating shaft systems, are used to make periodic signal and noise excitation. Energy harvester with external magnet was used to compensate biased periodic force from rotating shaft. The proposed energy harvesting approach is particularly useful for high friction and low speed application such as oil drilling. Detailed analysis is conducted to prove the effectiveness of the proposed energy harvesting concept. In addition, experiments were performed to verify the feasibility of this energy harvesting strategy.

  5. Piezoelectric energy harvesting: State-of-the-art and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toprak, Alperen; Tigli, Onur

    2014-09-01

    Piezoelectric energy harvesting has attracted wide attention from researchers especially in the last decade due to its advantages such as high power density, architectural simplicity, and scalability. As a result, the number of studies on piezoelectric energy harvesting published in the last 5 years is more than twice the sum of publications on its electromagnetic and electrostatic counterparts. This paper presents a comprehensive review on the history and current state-of-the art of piezoelectric energy harvesting. A brief theory section presents the basic principles of piezoelectric energy conversion and introduces the most commonly used mechanical architectures. The theory section is followed by a literature survey on piezoelectric energy harvesters, which are classified into three groups: (i) macro- and mesoscale, (ii) MEMS scale, and (iii) nanoscale. The size of a piezoelectric energy harvester affects a variety of parameters such as its weight, fabrication method, achievable power output level, and potential application areas. Consequently, size-based classification provides a reliable and effective basis to study various piezoelectric energy harvesters. The literature survey on each scale group is concluded with a summary, potential application areas, and future directions. In a separate section, the most prominent challenges in piezoelectric energy harvesting and the studies focusing on these challenges are discussed. The conclusion part summarizes the current standing of piezoelectric energy harvesters as possible candidates for various applications and discusses the issues that need to be addressed for realization of practical piezoelectric energy harvesting devices.

  6. Comparison of postoperative pain relief by intercostal block between pre-rib harvest and post-rib harvest groups.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Muhammad Mustehsan; Shahzad, Muhammad Ateeq; Yousaf, Muhammad Nadeem; Khan, Bilal Ahmad; Khan, Farid Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    To compare intercostal nerve block before and after rib harvest in terms of mean postoperative pain score and mean postoperative tramadol usage. Randomized controlled trial. Department of Plastic Surgery, Mayo Hospital, KEMU, Lahore, from January 2011 to July 2012. Patients (n = 120) of either gender with ASA class-I and II requiring autogenous costal cartilage graft were inducted. Patients having history of local anaesthetic hypersensitivity and age < 15 years or > 60 years were excluded. Subjects were randomly assigned to pre-rib harvest (group-1) and post-rib harvest (group-2). Local anaesthetic mixture was prepared by adding 10 milliliters 2% lidocaine to 10 milliliters 0.5% bupivacaine to obtain a total 20 ml solution. Group-1 received local anaesthetic infiltration along the proposed incision lines and intercostals block before the rib harvest. Group-2 received the infiltration and block after rib harvest. Postoperative consumption of tramadol and pain scores were measured at 6 and 12 hours postoperatively using VAS. Mean age was 31.43 ± 10.78 years. The mean pain scores at 6 hours postoperatively were 1.033 ± 0.609 and 2.4667 ± 0.812 in pre-rib harvest and post-rib harvest groups respectively (p < 0.0001). The mean pain scores at 12 hours postoperatively were 1.45 ± 0.565 and 3.65 ± 0.633 in pre-rib harvest and post-rib harvest groups respectively (p < 0.0001). The mean tramadol used postoperatively in first 24 hours was 169 ± 29.24 mg and 255 ± 17.70 mg in prerib harvest and post-rib harvest groups respectively (p < 0.0001). Intercostal block administered before rib harvest as preemptive strategy result in decreased postoperative pain scores and narcotic use.

  7. Magnetic microparticles for harvesting Dunaliella tertiolecta microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, Emmanouil; Manariotis, Ioannis D.

    2016-04-01

    Microalgae based biofuels have been considered as a sustainable alternative to traditional fuels due to the higher biomass yield and lipid productivity, and the ability to be cultivated in non arable land making them not antagonistic with food supply chain. Due to the dilute nature of algal cultures and the small size of algae cells, the cost of microalgae harvesting is so far a bottleneck in microalgal based biofuel production. It is estimated that the algal recovery cost is at least 20-30% of the total biomass production cost. Various processes have been employed for the recovery of microalgal biomass, which include centrifugation, gravity separation, filtration, flocculation, and flotation. Recently, magnetophoric harvesting has received increased attention for algal separation, although it has been first applied for algal removal since the mid of 1970s. The magnetic separation process is based on bringing in contact the algal cells with the magnetic particles, and separating them from the liquid by an external magnetic force. The aim of this work was to investigate the harvesting of microalgae cells using Fe3O4 magnetic microparticles (MPs). Dunaliella tertiolecta was selected as a representative for marine microalgae. D. tertiolecta was cultivated under continuous artificial light, in 20 L flasks. Fe3O4 MPs were prepared by microwave irradiation of FeSO4 7H2O in an alkaline solution. Numerous batch and flow-through experiments were conducted in order to investigate the effect of the magnetic material addition on microalgae removal. Batch experiments were conducted examining different initial algal and MPs concentration, and algal culture volume. Flow-through experiments were conducted in a laboratory scale column made of Plexiglass. External magnetic field was applied by arranging at various points across the column length NdFeB magnets. Algal removal in flow-through experiments ranged from 70 to 85% depending on the initial MPs concentration and the hydraulic

  8. Multi-mechanism vibration harvester combining inductive and piezoelectric mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Anthony; Priya, Shashank

    2012-04-01

    With increasing demand for wireless sensor nodes in automobile, aircraft and rail applications, the need for energy harvesters has been growing. In these applications, energy harvesters provide a more robust and inexpensive power solution than batteries. In order to enhance the power density of existing energy harvesters, a variety of multimodal energy harvesting techniques have been proposed. Multi-modal energy harvesters can be categorized as: (i) Multi-Source Energy Harvester (MSEH), (ii) Multi-Mechanism Energy Harvester (MMEH), and (iii) Single Source Multi-Mode Energy Harvester (S2M2EH). In this study, we focus on developing MMEH which combines the inductive and piezoelectric mechanisms. The multi-mechanism harvester was modeled using FEM techniques and theoretically analyzed to optimize the performance and reduce the overall shape and size similar to that of AA battery. The theoretical model combining analytical and FEM modeling techniques provides the system dynamics and output power for specific generator and cymbal geometry at various source conditions. In the proposed design, a cylindrical tube contains a magnetic levitation cavity where a center magnet oscillates through a copper coil. Piezoelectric cymbal transducers were mounted on the top and bottom sections of the cylindrical shell. In response to the external vibrations, electrical energy was harvested from the relative motion between magnet and coil through Faraday's effect and from the piezoelectric material through the direct piezoelectric effect. Experimental results validate the predictions from theoretical model and show the promise of multimodal harvester for powering wireless sensor nodes in automobile, aircraft, and rail applications.

  9. Protocol and practice in the adaptive management of waterfowl harvests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, F.; Williams, K.

    1999-01-01

    Waterfowl harvest management in North America, for all its success, historically has had several shortcomings, including a lack of well-defined objectives, a failure to account for uncertain management outcomes, and inefficient use of harvest regulations to understand the effects of management. To address these and other concerns, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service began implementation of adaptive harvest management in 1995. Harvest policies are now developed using a Markov decision process in which there is an explicit accounting for uncontrolled environmental variation, partial controllability of harvest, and structural uncertainty in waterfowl population dynamics. Current policies are passively adaptive, in the sense that any reduction in structural uncertainty is an unplanned by-product of the regulatory process. A generalization of the Markov decision process permits the calculation of optimal actively adaptive policies, but it is not yet clear how state-specific harvest actions differ between passive and active approaches. The Markov decision process also provides managers the ability to explore optimal levels of aggregation or "management scale" for regulating harvests in a system that exhibits high temporal, spatial, and organizational variability. Progress in institutionalizing adaptive harvest management has been remarkable, but some managers still perceive the process as a panacea, while failing to appreciate the challenges presented by this more explicit and methodical approach to harvest regulation. Technical hurdles include the need to develop better linkages between population processes and the dynamics of landscapes, and to model the dynamics of structural uncertainty in a more comprehensive fashion. From an institutional perspective, agreement on how to value and allocate harvests continues to be elusive, and there is some evidence that waterfowl managers have overestimated the importance of achievement-oriented factors in setting hunting

  10. Vibration energy harvesting from random force and motion excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiudong; Zuo, Lei

    2012-07-01

    A vibration energy harvester is typically composed of a spring-mass system with an electromagnetic or piezoelectric transducer connected in parallel with a spring. This configuration has been well studied and optimized for harmonic vibration sources. Recently, a dual-mass harvester, where two masses are connected in series by the energy transducer and a spring, has been proposed. The dual-mass vibration energy harvester is proved to be able to harvest more power and has a broader bandwidth than the single-mass configuration, when the parameters are optimized and the excitation is harmonic. In fact, some dual-mass vibration energy harvesters, such as regenerative vehicle suspensions and buildings with regenerative tuned mass dampers (TMDs), are subjected to random excitations. This paper is to investigate the dual-mass and single-mass vibration harvesters under random excitations using spectrum integration and the residue theorem. The output powers for these two types of vibration energy harvesters, when subjected to different random excitations, namely force, displacement, velocity and acceleration, are obtained analytically with closed-form expressions. It is also very interesting to find that the output power of the vibration energy harvesters under random excitations depends on only a few parameters in very simple and elegant forms. This paper also draws some important conclusions on regenerative vehicle suspensions and buildings with regenerative TMDs, which can be modeled as dual-mass vibration energy harvesters. It is found that, under white-noise random velocity excitation from road irregularity, the harvesting power from vehicle suspensions is proportional to the tire stiffness and road vertical excitation spectrum only. It is independent of the chassis mass, tire-wheel mass, suspension stiffness and damping coefficient. Under random wind force excitation, the power harvested from buildings with regenerative TMD will depends on the building mass only, not

  11. Removal intensity and tree size effects on harvesting cost and profitability

    Treesearch

    R. Kluender; D. Lortz; W. McCoy; B. Stokes; J. Klepac

    1997-01-01

    Sixteen stands were harvested at intensities (proportion of basal area removed) ranging from 0.27 to 1.00. Logging contractors used chain saws and rubber-tired skidders. Harvested sites were similar in slope and tree size. Harvest cost per hundred cubic feet of wood (CCF) was inversely related to harvest intensity and tree size. Harvesting profitability per CCF was...

  12. Felling and skidding productivity and harvesting cost in southern pine forests

    Treesearch

    R.A. Kluender; B.J. Stokes

    1996-01-01

    Sixteen stands were harvested at various levels of basal area removed (intensity). Chainsaw felling productivity was more sensitive to stem diameter than harvest intensity. Skidding productivity was highest when removing large trees at high intensity. Harvesting cost was more sensitive to stem size than harvest intensity, although harvest intensity was a very important...

  13. 36 CFR 242.6 - Licenses, permits, harvest tickets, tags, and reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... permits (Federal Subsistence Registration Permit or Federal Designated Harvester Permit) required by... Registration Permit or Federal Designated Harvester Permit or designate someone to harvest fish or wildlife for you under a Federal Designated Harvester Permit, you must be old enough to reasonably harvest...

  14. MEMS based pyroelectric thermal energy harvester

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Scott R; Datskos, Panagiotis G

    2013-08-27

    A pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting apparatus for generating an electric current includes a cantilevered layered pyroelectric capacitor extending between a first surface and a second surface, where the first surface includes a temperature difference from the second surface. The layered pyroelectric capacitor includes a conductive, bimetal top electrode layer, an intermediate pyroelectric dielectric layer and a conductive bottom electrode layer. In addition, a pair of proof masses is affixed at a distal end of the layered pyroelectric capacitor to face the first surface and the second surface, wherein the proof masses oscillate between the first surface and the second surface such that a pyroelectric current is generated in the pyroelectric capacitor due to temperature cycling when the proof masses alternately contact the first surface and the second surface.

  15. Adaptive harvest management: Adjustments for SEIS 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boomer, Scott; Johnson, Fred A.; Zimmerman, Guthrie S.

    2015-01-01

    This report provides a summary of revised methods and assessment results based on updated adaptive harvest management (AHM) protocols developed in response to the preferred alternative specified in the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement on the Issuance of Annual Regulations Permitting the Hunting of Migratory Birds (SEIS; U.S. Department of the Interior 2013). We describe necessary changes to optimization procedures and decision processes for the implementation of AHM for midcontinent, eastern and western mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), northern pintails (Anas acuta), and scaup (Aythya affinis, A. marila) decision frameworks. We present this final report for communication purposes, and acknowledge that any use of trade, firm, or product names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

  16. Magnetically levitated autoparametric broadband vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmann, L.; Jia, Y.; Manoli, Y.; Woias, P.

    2016-11-01

    Some of the lingering challenges within the current paradigm of vibration energy harvesting (VEH) involve narrow operational frequency range and the inevitable non-resonant response from broadband noise excitations. Such VEHs are only suitable for limited applications with fixed sinusoidal vibration, and fail to capture a large spectrum of the real world vibration. Various arraying designs, frequency tuning schemes and nonlinear vibratory approaches have only yielded modest enhancements. To fundamentally address this, the paper proposes and explores the potentials in using highly nonlinear magnetic spring force to activate an autoparametric oscillator, in order to realize an inherently broadband resonant system. Analytical and numerical modelling illustrate that high spring nonlinearity derived from magnetic levitation helps to promote the 2:1 internal frequency matching required to activate parametric resonance. At the right internal parameters, the resulting system can intrinsically exhibit semi-resonant response regardless of the bandwidth of the input vibration, including broadband white noise excitation.

  17. A MEMS turbine prototype for respiration harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goreke, U.; Habibiabad, S.; Azgin, K.; Beyaz, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    The design, manufacturing, and performance characterization of a MEMS-scale turbine prototype is reported. The turbine is designed for integration into a respiration harvester that can convert normal human breathing into electrical power through electromagnetic induction. The device measures 10 mm in radius, and employs 12 blades located around the turbine periphery along with ball bearings around the center. Finite element simulations showed that an average torque of 3.07 μNm is induced at 12 lpm airflow rate, which lies in normal breathing levels. The turbine and a test package were manufactured using CNC milling on PMMA. Tests were performed at respiration flow rates between 5-25 lpm. The highest rotational speed was measured to be 9.84 krpm at 25 lpm, resulting in 8.96 mbar pressure drop across the device and 370 mW actuation power.

  18. Characterization of a variable reluctance harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, M.; Moll, N.; Ravindran, S. K. T.; Mehne, P.; Woias, P.

    2014-11-01

    In our last year's PowerMEMS contribution we presented a proof-of-concept of a variable reluctance harvester for the application in a railroad surveillance system. It was shown that intermittently closing a magnetic circuit could supply power output in the range of mW's. The test setup used showed unwanted energy pickup from the electro motor used. In this paper we present thorough measurements of the reluctance circuit with a compressed air motor to exclude the effects of the above mentioned magnetic stray fields. The effects of eddy currents and moment of inertia on the output power, the optimal coil position on the stators, and effects of different magnetic field strengths are studied. The gap width is set to a fixed value of 14 mm, representing a realistic scenario.

  19. Looped energy harvester for human motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, M.; Boisseau, S.; Gasnier, P.; Willemin, J.; Gobbo, C.; Despesse, G.; Ait-Ali, I.; Perraud, S.

    2017-10-01

    The development of energy harvesters for smart wearables is a challenging topic, with a difficult combination of ergonomics constraints, lifetime and electrical requirements. In this work, we focus on an inertial inductive structure, composed of a magnetic ball circulating inside a closed-loop guide and converting the kinetic energy of the user’s limbs into electricity during the run. A specific induction issue related to the free self-rotation of the ball is underlined and addressed using a ferromagnetic ‘rail’ component. From a 2 g moving ball, a 5 cm-diameter 21 cm3 prototype generated up to 4.8 mW of average power when worn by someone running at 8 km h‑1. This device is demonstrated to charge a 2.4 V NiMH battery and supply an acceleration and temperature Wireless Sensor Node at 20 Hz.

  20. Enhancing energy harvesting by coupling monostable oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Rosselló, Julián I.; Wio, Horacio S.; Deza, Roberto R.; Hänggi, Peter

    2017-02-01

    The performance of a ring of linearly coupled, monostable nonlinear oscillators is optimized towards its goal of acting as energy harvester - through piezoelectric transduction - of mesoscopic fluctuations, which are modeled as Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noises. For a single oscillator, the maximum output voltage and overall efficiency are attained for a soft piecewise-linear potential (providing a weak attractive constant force) but they are still fairly large for a harmonic potential. When several harmonic springs are linearly and bidirectionally coupled to form a ring, it is found that counter-phase coupling can largely improve the performance while in-phase coupling worsens it. Moreover, it turns out that few (two or three) coupled units perform better than more.

  1. Applications of textured surfaces for light harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocilovo, Byron

    Surface textures add another dimension to optical design. They can be used to redirect light, isolate spectral bands, and enhance optical fields. They effectively take up no space, so can be applied to any optical surface -- from intermediary elements to substrates. Here I present three applications of textured surfaces for light harvesting. The first project places scattering textures inside a film that can be applied to windows to scatter infrared light towards solar cells at the edges. The collected energy is then used to power tinting films. The second project uses modular diffractive structures to increase the absorption in solar cells. Lastly, structured silver surfaces are used to enhance plasmonics fields and increase two-photon excitation fluorescence.

  2. PS2004 Light-harvesting Systems Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Robert E. Blankenship

    2005-11-01

    This special issue of the international scientific research journal Photosynthesis Research consists of 25 original peer-reviewed contributions from participants in the PS 2004 Lisht-Harvesting Systems Workshop. This workshop was held from 26-29, 2004 at Hotel Le Chantecler, Sainte-Adele, Quebec, Canada. The workshop was a satellite meeting of the XIII International Congress on Photosynthesis held August 29-September 3, 2004 in Montreal, Canada. The workshope dealt with all types of photosynthetic antenna systems and types of organisms, including anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, algae and higher plants, as well as in vitro studies of isolated pigments. This collection of papers is a good representation of the highly interdisciplinary nature of modern research on photosynthetic antenna complexes, utilizing techniques of advanced spectroscopy, biochemistry, molecular biology, synthetic chemistry and structural determination to understand these diverse and elegant molecular complexes.

  3. Nanogenerators for Human Body Energy Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Proto, Antonino; Penhaker, Marek; Conforto, Silvia; Schmid, Maurizio

    2017-07-01

    Humans generate remarkable quantities of energy while performing daily activities, but this energy usually dissipates into the environment. Here, we address recent progress in the development of nanogenerators (NGs): devices that are able to harvest such body-produced biomechanical and thermal energies by exploiting piezoelectric, triboelectric, and thermoelectric physical effects. In designing NGs, the end-user's comfort is a primary concern. Therefore, we focus on recently developed materials giving flexibility and stretchability to NGs. In addition, we summarize common fabrics for NG design. Finally, the mid-2020s market forecasts for these promising technologies highlight the potential for the commercialization of NGs because they may help contribute to the route of innovation for developing self-powered systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Energy Harvesting Using PVDF Piezoelectric Nanofabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafii, Chakameh Shafii

    Energy harvesting using piezoelectric nanomaterial provides an opportunity for advancement towards self-powered electronics. The fabrication complexities and limited power output of these nano/micro generators have hindered these advancements thus far. This thesis presents a fabrication technique with electrospinning using a grounded cylinder as the collector. This method addresses the difficulties with the production and scalability of the nanogenerators. The non-aligned nanofibers are woven into a textile form onto the cylindrical drum that can be easily removed. The electrical poling and mechanical stretching induced by the electric field and the drum rotation increase the concentration of the piezoelectric beta phase in the PVDF nanofabric. The nanofabric is placed between two layers of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) that have interdigitated electrodes painted on them with silver paint. Applying continuous load onto the flexible PVDF nanofabric at 35Hz produces a peak voltage of 320 mV and maximum power of 2200 pW/(cm2) .

  5. Performance of a multipurpose piezoelectric energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Kangqi; Wang, Liansong; Zhu, Yingmin; Liu, Zhaohui; Yu, Bo

    2017-03-01

    Harvesting energy from the surrounding environment through piezoelectric conversion is a promising method for implementing self-sustained low-power devices. To date, most piezoelectric energy harvesters (PEHs) developed can only scavenge energy from the unidirectional mechanical vibration. This deficiency severely limits the adaptability of PEHs because the real-world excitations may involve different mechanical motions and the mechanical vibration may come from various directions. To tackle this issue, we proposed a multipurpose PEH, which is composed of a ferromagnetic ball, a cylindrical track and four piezoelectric cantilever beams. In this paper, theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to examine the performance of the multipurpose PEH. The experimental results indicate that, under the vibrations that are perpendicular to the ground, the maximum peak voltage is increased by 3.2 V and the bandwidth of the voltage above 4 V is expanded by more than 4 Hz by the proposed PEH as compared to its linear counterpart; the maximum power output of 0.8 mW is attained when the PEH is excited at 39.5 Hz. Under the sway motion around different directions on the horizontal plane, significant power outputs, varying from 0.05 mW to 0.18 mW, are also generated by the multipurpose PEH when the sway angle is larger than 5∘ and the sway frequency is smaller than 2.8 Hz. In addition, the multipurpose PEH demonstrates the capacity of collecting energy from the rotation motion, and approximately 0.14 mW power output is achieved when the rotation frequency is 1 Hz.

  6. Momentum harvesting techniques for solar system travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willoughby, Alan J.

    1991-01-01

    Astronomers are lately estimating there are 400,000 earth visiting asteroids larger than 100 meters in diameter. These asteroids are uniquely accessible sources of building materials, propellants, oxygen, water, and minerals. They also constitute a huge momentum reserve, potentially usable for travel throughout the solar system. To use this momentum, these stealthy objects must be tracked and the ability to extract the desired momentum obtained. Momentum harvesting by momentum transfer from asteroid to spacecraft, and by using the momentum of the extraterrestrial material to help deliver itself to its destination is discussed. The purpose is neither to quantify nor justify the momentum exchange processes, but to stimulate collective imaginations with some intriguing possibilities which emerge when momentum as well as material is considered. A net and tether concept is the suggested means of asteroid capture, the basic momentum exchange process. The energy damping characteristics of the tether determines the velocity mismatch that can be tolerated, and hence the amount of momentum that can be harvested per capture. As the tether plays out of its reel, drag on the tether steadily accelerates the spacecraft and dilutes, in time, the would-be collision. A variety of concepts for riding and using asteroids after capture are introduced. The hitchhiker uses momentum transfer only. The beachcomber, the caveman, the swinger, the prospector, and the rock wrecker also take advantage of raw asteroid materials. The chemist and the hijacker go further, they process the asteroid into propellants. Or, an asteroid railway system could be constructed with each hijacked asteroid becoming a scheduled train. Travelers could board this space railway system assured that water, oxygen propellants, and shielding await them. Austere space travel could give way to comforts, with a speed and economy impossible without nature's gift of earth visiting asteroids.

  7. Rainwater harvesting systems for low demanding applications.

    PubMed

    Sanches Fernandes, Luís F; Terêncio, Daniela P S; Pacheco, Fernando A L

    2015-10-01

    A rainwater harvesting system (RHS) was designed for a waste treatment facility located near the town of Mirandela (northern Portugal), to be used in the washing of vehicles and other equipment, the cleaning of outside concrete or asphalt floors, and the watering of green areas. Water tank volumes representing 100% efficiency (Vr) were calculated by the Ripple method with different results depending on two consumption scenarios adopted for irrigation. The RHS design was based on a precipitation record spanning a rather long period (3 decades). The calculated storage capacities fulfilled the water demand even when prolonged droughts occurred during that timeframe. However, because the drought events have been rather scarce the Vr values were considered oversized and replaced by optimal volumes. Notwithstanding the new volumes were solely half of the original Vr values, the projected RHS efficiency remained very high (around 90%) while the probability of system failure (efficiency<100%) stayed very low (in the order of 5%). In both scenarios, the economic savings related to the optimization of Vr were noteworthy, while the investment's return periods decreased substantially from the original to the optimized solutions. A high efficiency with a low storage capacity is typical of low demanding applications of rainwater harvesting, where water availability (Vw) largely exceeds water demand (Cw), that is to say where demand fractions (Cw/Vw) are very low. Based on the results of a literature review covering an ample geographic distribution and describing a very large number of demand fraction scenarios, a Cw/Vw=0.8 was defined as the threshold to generally distinguish the low from the high demanding RHS applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Momentum harvesting techniques for solar system travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willoughby, Alan J.

    1991-01-01

    Astronomers are lately estimating there are 400,000 earth visiting asteroids larger than 100 meters in diameter. These asteroids are uniquely accessible sources of building materials, propellants, oxygen, water, and minerals. They also constitute a huge momentum reserve, potentially usable for travel throughout the solar system. To use this momentum, these stealthy objects must be tracked and the ability to extract the desired momentum obtained. Momentum harvesting by momentum transfer from asteroid to spacecraft, and by using the momentum of the extraterrestrial material to help deliver itself to its destination is discussed. The purpose is neither to quantify nor justify the momentum exchange processes, but to stimulate collective imaginations with some intriguing possibilities which emerge when momentum as well as material is considered. A net and tether concept is the suggested means of asteroid capture, the basic momentum exchange process. The energy damping characteristics of the tether determines the velocity mismatch that can be tolerated, and hence the amount of momentum that can be harvested per capture. As the tether plays out of its reel, drag on the tether steadily accelerates the spacecraft and dilutes, in time, the would-be collision. A variety of concepts for riding and using asteroids after capture are introduced. The hitchhiker uses momentum transfer only. The beachcomber, the caveman, the swinger, the prospector, and the rock wrecker also take advantage of raw asteroid materials. The chemist and the hijacker go further, they process the asteroid into propellants. Or, an asteroid railway system could be constructed with each hijacked asteroid becoming a scheduled train. Travelers could board this space railway system assured that water, oxygen propellants, and shielding await them. Austere space travel could give way to comforts, with a speed and economy impossible without nature's gift of earth visiting asteroids.

  9. Feasibility of harvesting southern hardwood trees by extraction

    Treesearch

    Donald L. Sirois

    1977-01-01

    A Rome TXH Tree Extractor was used to explore the harvesting of four species of southern hardwoods by extraction. The test indicate that harvesting by extraction is feasible for harvestang, if tree size is limited to 9 inches DBH or less. Stump and below ground biomass averaged 18 percent of total tree biomass.

  10. A computer program for analysis of fuelwood harvesting costs

    Treesearch

    George B. Harpole; Giuseppe Rensi

    1985-01-01

    The fuelwood harvesting computer program (FHP) is written in FORTRAN 60 and designed to select a collection of harvest units and systems from among alternatives to satisfy specified energy requirements at a lowest cost per million Btu's as recovered in a boiler, or thousand pounds of H2O evaporative capacity kiln drying. Computed energy costs are used as a...

  11. The Effect of Urban Sprawls on Timber Harvesting

    Treesearch

    Stephen A. Barlow; Ian A Munn; David A. Cleaves; David L. Evans

    1998-01-01

    In Mississippi and Alabama, urban population growth is pushing development into rural areas. To study the impact of urbanization on timber harvesting, census and forest inventory data were combined in a geographic information system, and a logistic regression model was used to estimate the relationship between several variables and harvest probabilities....

  12. Value recovery with harvesters in southeastern USA pine stands

    Treesearch

    Ian P. Conradie; W. Dale Greene; Glen E. Murphy

    2003-01-01

    Cut-to-Iength is not the harvesting system of choice in the southeastern USA although it is perceived to be more environmentally friendly and to have the ability to recover more value from cut stems. In this paper we address the value recovery aspect of harvesters by comparing the optimal recoverable value, as calculated by optimization software, to the actual value...

  13. Phospohorus and calcium retention in serially harvested cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Data from 3 serial harvest trials were utilized to calculate phosphorus and calcium retention in cattle. Trial 1 evaluated the effect of three rates of gain during a growing period followed by a common finishing diet utilizing British crossbred steers. Four steers were harvested from each treatmen...

  14. MAP - a mapping and analysis program for harvest planning

    Treesearch

    Robert N. Eli; Chris B. LeDoux; Penn A. Peters

    1984-01-01

    The Northeastern Forest Experiment Station and the Department of Civil Engineering at West Virginia University are cooperating in the development of a Mapping and Analysis Program, to be named MAP. The goal of this computer software package is to significantly improve the planning and harvest efficiency of small to moderately sized harvest units located in mountainous...

  15. Effect of harvest timing and leaf hairiness on fiber quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent concerns over leaf grades have generated questions of how both time of day cotton is harvested, as well as leaf hairiness levels of certain varieties, influence fiber quality. To address this, two smooth leaf varieties and two varieties with higher levels of leaf pubescence were harvested at...

  16. Harvested wood products : basis for future methodological development

    Treesearch

    Kenneth E. Skog

    2003-01-01

    The IPCC Guidelines (IPCC 1997) provide an outline of how harvested wood could be treated in national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories. This section shows the relation of that outline to the approaches and estimation methods to be presented in this Appendix. Wood and paper products are referred to as harvested wood products (HWP). It does not include carbon in...

  17. Comparison between Canadian Canola Harvest and Export Surveys.

    PubMed

    Barthet, Véronique J

    2016-07-20

    Parameters, such as oil, protein, glucosinolates, chlorophyll content and fatty acid composition, were determined using reference methods for both harvest survey samples and Canadian Canola exports. Canola harvest survey and export data were assessed to evaluate if canola harvest survey data can be extrapolated to predict the quality of the Canadian canola exports. There were some differences in some measured parameters between harvest and export data, while other parameters showed little difference. Protein content and fatty acid composition showed very similar data for harvest and export averages. Canadian export data showed lower oil content when compared to the oil content of harvest survey was mainly due to a diluting effect of dockage in the export cargoes which remained constant over the years (1.7% to 1.9%). Chlorophyll was the least predictable parameter; dockage quality as well as commingling of the other grades in Canola No. 1 Canada affected the chlorophyll content of the exports. Free fatty acids (FFA) were also different for the export and harvest survey. FFA levels are affected by storage conditions; they increase during the shipping season and, therefore, are difficult to predict from their harvest survey averages.

  18. Scale of harvesting by non-industrial private forest landowners

    Treesearch

    Melinda Vokoun; Gregory S. Amacher; David N. Wear

    2006-01-01

    We examine the intensity of harvesting decision by non-industrial landowners at the lowest price offer they deem acceptable, using a multiple bounded discrete choice stated preference approach that draws upon and connects two subfields of forestry, one identifying characteristics of landowners important to past harvesting or reforestation decisions, and another...

  19. An Interactive Simulation System for Modeling Stands, Harvests, and Machines

    Treesearch

    Jingxin Wang; W. Dale Greene

    1999-01-01

    A interactive computer simulation program models stands, harvest, and machine factors and evaluates their interatcitons while performing felling, skidding, or fowarding activities. A stand generator allows the user to generate either natural or planted stands. Fellings with chainsaw, drive-to-tree feller-bunchers, or harvesters and extraction with grapple skidders or...

  20. Chile stand management for mechanical green chile harvest

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Currently the red chile crop is mechanically harvested. Because the pods will be dehydrated before consumption, breakage and bruising of red pods is not a concern. Green chile, however, is currently hand harvested because of the fragile nature of the fruit and the need to avoid pod damage. Hand h...

  1. Basis for managing the harvest of Chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reisenbichler, R.R.; Phelps, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    On the basis of estimated spawner-recruit relations for populations of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha from British Columbia to California, harvest fractions of 60-70% may be reasonable for stocks for which the productivities are not known. Care should be taken to detect and to avoid excessive harvest from stocks with low productivity.

  2. Idaho's forest products industry and timber harvest, 2006

    Treesearch

    Jason P. Brandt; Todd A. Morgan; Charles E. Keegan; Jon M. Songster; Timothy P. Spoelma; Larry T. DeBlander

    2012-01-01

    This report traces the flow of Idaho's 2006 timber harvest through the primary wood-using industries; describes the structure, capacity, and condition of Idaho's primary forest products industry; and quantifies volumes and uses of wood fiber. Wood products industry historical trends and changes in harvest, production, employment, and sales are also examined...

  3. Cut-to-length harvesting of short-rotation Eucalyptus

    Treesearch

    Bruce R. Hartsough; David J. Cooper

    1999-01-01

    Traditional whole-tree harvesting systems work well in short-rotation hardwood plantations, but other methods are needed where it is desirable to leave the residues on the site. We tested a system consisting of a cut-to-length harvester, forwarder, mobile chipper, and chip screen to clearcut a 7-year-old plantation of Eucalyptus viminalis. Three...

  4. 25 CFR 163.26 - Forest product harvesting permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Forest product harvesting permits. 163.26 Section 163.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.26 Forest product harvesting permits. (a) Except as provided in...

  5. 25 CFR 163.26 - Forest product harvesting permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Forest product harvesting permits. 163.26 Section 163.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.26 Forest product harvesting permits. (a) Except as provided in...

  6. 25 CFR 163.26 - Forest product harvesting permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Forest product harvesting permits. 163.26 Section 163.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.26 Forest product harvesting permits. (a) Except as provided in...

  7. 25 CFR 163.26 - Forest product harvesting permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Forest product harvesting permits. 163.26 Section 163.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.26 Forest product harvesting permits. (a) Except as provided in...

  8. 25 CFR 163.26 - Forest product harvesting permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forest product harvesting permits. 163.26 Section 163.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.26 Forest product harvesting permits. (a) Except as provided in...

  9. Mechanics of flexible and stretchable piezoelectrics for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Lu, BingWei; Ou, DaPeng; Feng, Xue

    2015-09-01

    As rapid development in wearable/implantable electronic devices benefit human life in daily health monitoring and disease treatment medically, all kinds of flexible and/or stretchable electronic devices are booming, together with which is the demanding of energy supply with similar mechanical property. Due to its ability in converting mechanical energy lying in human body into electric energy, energy harvesters based on piezoelectric materials are promising for applications in wearable/ implantable device's energy supply in a renewable, clean and life-long way. Here the mechanics of traditional piezoelectrics in energy harvesting is reviewed, including why piezoelectricity is the choice for minor energy harvesting to power the implantable/wearable electronics and how. Different kinds of up to date flexible piezoelectric devices for energy harvesting are introduced, such as nanogenerators based on ZnO and thin and conformal energy harvester based on PZT. A detailed theoretical model of the flexible thin film energy harvester based on PZT nanoribbons is summarized, together with the in vivo demonstration of energy harvesting by integrating it with swine heart. Then the initial researches on stretchable energy harvesters based on piezoelectric material in wavy or serpentine configuration are introduced as well.

  10. Early harvest affects sugarcane ratooning ability in Louisiana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The number of sugarcane processors in Louisiana has decreased over time forcing growers to begin the harvest season earlier for fear of complete cane loss at the end of the harvest period due to freezing temperatures during this period of late winter. Experiments were conducted to investigate effec...

  11. Recent Rates of Forest Harvest and Conversion in North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, Jeffrey G.; Cohen, Warren B.; Leckie, Donald; Wulder, Michael A.; Vargas, Rodrigo; de Jong, Ben; Healey, Sean; Law, Beverly; Birdsey, Richard; Houghton, R. A.; Mildrexler, David; Goward, Samuel; Smith, W. Brad

    2011-01-01

    Incorporating ecological disturbance into biogeochemical models is critical for estimating current and future carbon stocks and fluxes. In particular, anthropogenic disturbances, such as forest conversion and wood harvest, strongly affect forest carbon dynamics within North America. This paper summarizes recent (2000.2008) rates of extraction, including both conversion and harvest, derived from national forest inventories for North America (the United States, Canada, and Mexico). During the 2000s, 6.1 million ha/yr were affected by harvest, another 1.0 million ha/yr were converted to other land uses through gross deforestation, and 0.4 million ha/yr were degraded. Thus about 1.0% of North America fs forests experienced some form of anthropogenic disturbance each year. However, due to harvest recovery, afforestation, and reforestation, the total forest area on the continent has been roughly stable during the decade. On average, about 110 m3 of roundwood volume was extracted per hectare harvested across the continent. Patterns of extraction vary among the three countries, with U.S. and Canadian activity dominated by partial and clear ]cut harvest, respectively, and activity in Mexico dominated by conversion (deforestation) for agriculture. Temporal trends in harvest and clearing may be affected by economic variables, technology, and forest policy decisions. While overall rates of extraction appear fairly stable in all three countries since the 1980s, harvest within the United States has shifted toward the southern United States and away from the Pacific Northwest.

  12. Potential Ambient Energy-Harvesting Sources and Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildiz, Faruk

    2009-01-01

    Ambient energy harvesting is also known as energy scavenging or power harvesting, and it is the process where energy is obtained from the environment. A variety of techniques are available for energy scavenging, including solar and wind powers, ocean waves, piezoelectricity, thermoelectricity, and physical motions. For example, some systems…

  13. Spatial simulation of forest succession and timber harvesting using LANDIS

    Treesearch

    Eric J. Gustafson; Stephen R. Shifley; David J. Mladenoff; Kevin K. Nimerfro; Hong S. He

    2000-01-01

    The LANDIS model simulates ecological dynamics, including forest succession, disturbance, seed dispersal and establishment, fire and wind disturbance, and their interactions. We describe the addition to LANDIS of capabilities to simulate forest vegetation management, including harvest. Stands (groups of cells) are prioritized for harvest using one of four ranking...

  14. The effects of group selection harvest size on logging productivity

    Treesearch

    Curt C. Hassler; Shawn T. Grushecky; Chris B. LeDoux

    2000-01-01

    Because increasing demands are being placed on industry to harvest timber by aesthetically, economically, and ecologically acceptable means, we investigated the effects of a ground-based group selection harvest on logging productivity. Results show that size of opening had little or no effect on skidding productivity. However, significant skidder operator differences...

  15. Harvesting short rotation woody crops with a shear

    Treesearch

    Wellington Cardoso; Dana Mitchell; Tom Gallagher; Daniel. and de Souza

    2014-01-01

    A time and motion study was performed on a skid steer equipped with a 14-inch tree shear attachment. The machine was used to install initial coppice harvesting treatments on three stands across the south. The study included one willow and two cottonwood sites. The stands averaged from 2 to 4 years old. Approximately 200 trees were shear harvested from each of the...

  16. Lumbar Herniation of Kidney following Iliac Crest Bone Harvest

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The iliac crest is a popular source for autogenous bone harvesting, but the process is rife with complications. This case report presents a patient that experienced incisional lumbar herniation of her kidney following an iliac crest bone harvesting procedure. A discussion is included on the underappreciated complications of this procedure and recommendations for improving outcomes with more thorough evaluation and documentation. PMID:28042490

  17. Biomass harvesters: a new challenge for equipment designers

    SciTech Connect

    Bagnall, L.O.

    1985-09-01

    The major economic and technical impediment to commercial production of methane from biomass has been the system for harvesting the plants and preparing them for digestion. Several harvesters are described, some of which are in early development and some ready for commercialization.

  18. Energy harvesting for human wearable and implantable bio-sensors.

    PubMed

    Mitcheson, Paul D

    2010-01-01

    There are clear trade-offs between functionality, battery lifetime and battery volume for wearable and implantable wireless-biosensors which energy harvesting devices may be able to overcome. Reliable energy harvesting has now become a reality for machine condition monitoring and is finding applications in chemical process plants, refineries and water treatment works. However, practical miniature devices that can harvest sufficient energy from the human body to power a wireless bio-sensor are still in their infancy. This paper reviews the options for human energy harvesting in order to determine power availability for harvester-powered body sensor networks. The main competing technologies for energy harvesting from the human body are inertial kinetic energy harvesting devices and thermoelectric devices. These devices are advantageous to some other types as they can be hermetically sealed. In this paper the fundamental limit to the power output of these devices is compared as a function of generator volume when attached to a human whilst walking and running. It is shown that the kinetic energy devices have the highest fundamental power limits in both cases. However, when a comparison is made between the devices using device effectivenesses figures from previously demonstrated prototypes presented in the literature, the thermal device is competitive with the kinetic energy harvesting device when the subject is running and achieves the highest power density when the subject is walking.

  19. Relationships between harvest of American ginseng and hardwood timber production

    Treesearch

    Stephen P. Prisley; James Chamberlain; Michael McGuffin

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this research was to quantify the relationship between American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) and timber inventory and harvest. This was done through compilation and analysis of county-level data from public datasets: ginseng harvest data from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, US Forest Service (USFS) forest inventory and analysis (FIA)...

  20. Nitrogen dynamics post-harvest: the role of woody residues

    Treesearch

    Kathryn Piatek

    2007-01-01

    The role of woody residues in N dynamics in harvested forests has not been fully elucidated. Woody residues have been found to be an N sink, N source, and N neutral in different studies. To understand the implications of each of these scenarios, post-harvest N dynamics in high- and no- woody residue treatments were modeled for a Douglas-fir ecosystem. Nitrogen...

  1. Ecology and management of commercially harvested chanterelle mushrooms.

    Treesearch

    David Pilz; Lorelei Norvell; Eric Danell; Randy. Molina

    2003-01-01

    During the last two decades, the chanterelle mushroom harvest from Pacific Northwest forests has become a multimillion dollar industry, yet managers, harvesters, and scientists lack a current synthesis of information about chanterelles. We define chanterelles and then discuss North American species, their place among chanterelle species around the world, international...

  2. Phosphorus and calcium retention in serially harvested cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Data from 3 serial harvest trials were utilized to calculate phosphorus and calcium retention in cattle. Trial 1 evaluated three rates of gain during a growing period followed by a common finishing diet utilizing British crossbred steers. Four steers were harvested from each treatment following th...

  3. Evaluation of Mechanical Tomato Harvesting Using Wireless Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Arazuri, Silvia; Arana, Ignacio; Jaren, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    The harvesting of processing tomatoes is fully mechanised and it is well known that during harvest, fruits are subjected to mechanical stress causing physical injuries, including skin punctures, pulp and cell rupture. Some wireless sensors have been used for research during recent years with the main purpose of reducing the quality loss of tomato fruits by diminishing the number and intensity of impacts. In this study the IRD (impact recorder device) sensor was used to evaluate several tomato harvesters. The specific objectives were to evaluate the impacts during mechanical harvest using a wireless sensor, to determine the critical points at which damage occurs, and to assess the damage levels. Samples were taken to determine the influence of mechanical harvest on texture, or on other quality characteristics including percentage of damages. From the obtained data it has been possible to identify the critical points where the damages were produced for each one of the five harvester models examined. The highest risk of damage was in zone 1 of the combine—from the cutting system to the colour selector—because the impacts were of higher intensity and hit less absorbing surfaces than in zone 2—from colour selector to discharge. The shaker and exit from the shaker are two of the harvester elements that registered the highest intensity impacts. By adjusting, in a specific way each harvester model, using the results from this research, it has been possible to reduce the tomato damage percentage from 20 to 29% to less than 10%. PMID:22163516

  4. 50 CFR 300.132 - Lobster harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lobster harvest limitations. 300.132... FISHERIES REGULATIONS Vessels of the United States Fishing in Colombian Treaty Waters § 300.132 Lobster harvest limitations. (a) Berried lobsters. A berried (egg-bearing) lobster in treaty waters may not...

  5. 50 CFR 300.132 - Lobster harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lobster harvest limitations. 300.132... FISHERIES REGULATIONS Vessels of the United States Fishing in Colombian Treaty Waters § 300.132 Lobster harvest limitations. (a) Berried lobsters. A berried (egg-bearing) lobster in treaty waters may not...

  6. 50 CFR 697.20 - Size, harvesting and landing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... length. (1) The minimum carapace length for all American lobsters harvested in or from the EEZ Nearshore... length for all American lobsters landed, harvested, or possessed by vessels issued a Federal limited access American lobster permit fishing in or electing to fish in the Nearshore Management Area 1 or...

  7. 50 CFR 697.20 - Size, harvesting and landing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... length. (1) The minimum carapace length for all American lobsters harvested in or from the EEZ Nearshore... length for all American lobsters landed, harvested, or possessed by vessels issued a Federal limited access American lobster permit fishing in or electing to fish in the Nearshore Management Area 1 or...

  8. 50 CFR 300.132 - Lobster harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lobster harvest limitations. 300.132... FISHERIES REGULATIONS Vessels of the United States Fishing in Colombian Treaty Waters § 300.132 Lobster harvest limitations. (a) Berried lobsters. A berried (egg-bearing) lobster in treaty waters may not...

  9. 50 CFR 697.20 - Size, harvesting and landing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... length. (1) The minimum carapace length for all American lobsters harvested in or from the EEZ Nearshore... length for all American lobsters landed, harvested, or possessed by vessels issued a Federal limited access American lobster permit fishing in or electing to fish in the Nearshore Management Area 1 or...

  10. 50 CFR 697.20 - Size, harvesting and landing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... length. (1) The minimum carapace length for all American lobsters harvested in or from the EEZ Nearshore... length for all American lobsters landed, harvested, or possessed by vessels issued a Federal limited access American lobster permit fishing in or electing to fish in the Nearshore Management Area 1 or...

  11. 50 CFR 300.132 - Lobster harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lobster harvest limitations. 300.132... FISHERIES REGULATIONS Vessels of the United States Fishing in Colombian Treaty Waters § 300.132 Lobster harvest limitations. (a) Berried lobsters. A berried (egg-bearing) lobster in treaty waters may not...

  12. 50 CFR 300.132 - Lobster harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lobster harvest limitations. 300.132... FISHERIES REGULATIONS Vessels of the United States Fishing in Colombian Treaty Waters § 300.132 Lobster harvest limitations. (a) Berried lobsters. A berried (egg-bearing) lobster in treaty waters may not...

  13. 50 CFR 697.20 - Size, harvesting and landing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... length. (1) The minimum carapace length for all American lobsters harvested in or from the EEZ Nearshore... length for all American lobsters landed, harvested, or possessed by vessels issued a Federal limited access American lobster permit fishing in or electing to fish in the Nearshore Management Area 1 or...

  14. Harvest impacts on soil carbon storage in temperate forests

    Treesearch

    L.E. Nave; E.D. Vance; C.W. Swanston; P.S. Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Forest soil carbon (C) storage is a significant component of the global C cycle, and is important for sustaining forest productivity. Although forest management may have substantial impacts on soil C storage, experimental data from forest harvesting studies have not been synthesized recently. To quantify the effects of harvesting on soil C, and to identify sources of...

  15. Harvest choice and timber supply models for forest forecasting

    Treesearch

    Maksym Polyakov; David N Wear

    2010-01-01

    Timber supply has traditionally been modeled using aggregate data, whereas individual harvest choices have been shown to be sensitive to the vintage and condition of forest capital stocks. In this article, we build aggregate supply models for four roundwood products in a seven-state region of the US South directly from stand-level harvest choice models applied to...

  16. Recent Rates of Forest Harvest and Conversion in North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, Jeffrey G.; Cohen, Warren B.; Leckie, Donald; Wulder, Michael A.; Vargas, Rodrigo; de Jong, Ben; Healey, Sean; Law, Beverly; Birdsey, Richard; Houghton, R. A.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Incorporating ecological disturbance into biogeochemical models is critical for estimating current and future carbon stocks and fluxes. In particular, anthropogenic disturbances, such as forest conversion and wood harvest, strongly affect forest carbon dynamics within North America. This paper summarizes recent (2000.2008) rates of extraction, including both conversion and harvest, derived from national forest inventories for North America (the United States, Canada, and Mexico). During the 2000s, 6.1 million ha/yr were affected by harvest, another 1.0 million ha/yr were converted to other land uses through gross deforestation, and 0.4 million ha/yr were degraded. Thus about 1.0% of North America fs forests experienced some form of anthropogenic disturbance each year. However, due to harvest recovery, afforestation, and reforestation, the total forest area on the continent has been roughly stable during the decade. On average, about 110 m3 of roundwood volume was extracted per hectare harvested across the continent. Patterns of extraction vary among the three countries, with U.S. and Canadian activity dominated by partial and clear ]cut harvest, respectively, and activity in Mexico dominated by conversion (deforestation) for agriculture. Temporal trends in harvest and clearing may be affected by economic variables, technology, and forest policy decisions. While overall rates of extraction appear fairly stable in all three countries since the 1980s, harvest within the United States has shifted toward the southern United States and away from the Pacific Northwest.

  17. Sustainability of corn stover harvest strategies in Pennsylvania

    Treesearch

    Paul R. Adler; Benjamin M. Rau; Gregory W. Roth

    2015-01-01

    Pennsylvania farmers have a long history of harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover after grain harvest for animal bedding and feed or as a component of mushroom compost, or as silage for dairy cattle feed. With the shallow soils and rolling topography, soil erosion and carbon losses have been minimized through extensive use of cover crops, no-till, and...

  18. Forest soil biology-timber harvesting relationships: a perspective

    Treesearch

    M. F. Jurgensen; M. J. Larsen; A. E. Harvey

    1979-01-01

    Timber harvesting has a pronounced effect on the soil microflora by wood removal and changing properties. This paper gives a perspective on soil biology-harvesting relationships with emphasis on the northern Rocky Mountain region. Of special significance to forest management operations are the effects of soil micro-organisms on: the availability of soil nutrients,...

  19. Accounting carbon storage in decaying root systems of harvested forests.

    PubMed

    Wang, G Geoff; Van Lear, David H; Hu, Huifeng; Kapeluck, Peter R

    2012-05-01

    Decaying root systems of harvested trees can be a significant component of belowground carbon storage, especially in intensively managed forests where harvest occurs repeatedly in relatively short rotations. Based on destructive sampling of root systems of harvested loblolly pine trees, we estimated that root systems contained about 32% (17.2 Mg ha(-1)) at the time of harvest, and about 13% (6.1 Mg ha(-1)) of the soil organic carbon 10 years later. Based on the published roundwood output data, we estimated belowground biomass at the time of harvest for loblolly-shortleaf pine forests harvested between 1995 and 2005 in South Carolina. We then calculated C that remained in the decomposing root systems in 2005 using the decay function developed for loblolly pine. Our calculations indicate that the amount of C stored in decaying roots of loblolly-shortleaf pine forests harvested between 1995 and 2005 in South Carolina was 7.1 Tg. Using a simple extrapolation method, we estimated 331.8 Tg C stored in the decomposing roots due to timber harvest from 1995 to 2005 in the conterminous USA. To fully account for the C stored in the decomposing roots of the US forests, future studies need (1) to quantify decay rates of coarse roots for major tree species in different regions, and (2) to develop a methodology that can determine C stock in decomposing roots resulting from natural mortality.

  20. Spec2Harv: Converting Spectrum output to HARVEST input

    Treesearch

    Eric J. Gustafson; Luke V. Rasmussen; Larry A. Leefers

    2003-01-01

    Spec2Harv was developed to automate the conversion of harvest schedules generated by the Spectrum model into script files that can be used by the HARVEST simulation model to simulate the implementation of the Spectrum schedules in a spatially explicit way.