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Sample records for haw cactaceae propagation

  1. Phenolic content and antioxidant activity of Pereskia grandifolia Haw. (Cactaceae) extracts

    PubMed Central

    Sim, K. S.; Nurestri, A. M. Sri; Norhanom, A. W.

    2010-01-01

    The leaves of Pereskia grandifolia Haw. (Cactaceae), commonly known as “Jarum Tujuh Bilah” in Malaysia, have been traditionally used as natural remedy in folk medicine by the locals. In the present study, the antioxidant potential of P. grandifolia crude methanol and its fractionated extracts (hexane, ethyl acetate and water) have been investigated, employing three different established testing systems, such as scavenging activity on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals, reducing power assay and β-carotene method. The total phenolic content of the P. grandifolia extracts was also assessed by the Folin-Ciocalteau’s method. The ethyl acetate extract showed significantly the highest total phenolic content, DPPH scavenging ability and antioxidant activity in β-carotene bleaching assay while the hexane extract possessed significantly strongest reducing power. The data obtained in these testing systems clearly establish the antioxidant potency of P. grandifolia. As such, this is the first report on the antioxidant activities of P. grandifolia. PMID:20931088

  2. Use and knowledge of Cactaceae in Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed to record the use, and knowledge that residents from São Francisco community (Paraiba, Brazil) have regarding the Cactaceae. Methods Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 118 informants; 50 men and 68 women. The cacti cited in this study were organised into use categories and use values were calculated. Differences in the values applied to species and use categories by men and women were compared via a G test (Williams). Results The nine species identified were: Cereus jamacaru DC., Melocactus bahiensis (Brtitton & Rose) Luetzelb., Nopalea cochenillifera (L.) Salm-Dyck., Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill, Opuntia stricta (Haw.) Haw., Pilosocereus gounellei (F.A.C. Weber) Byles & Rowley, Pilosocereus pachycladus F. Ritter, Tacinga inamoena (K. Schum) N.P. Taylor & Stuppy, Tacinga palmadora (Britton & Rose) N.P. Taylor & Stuppy. In total, 1,129 use citations were recorded, divided into 11 categories. The use value categories with the highest scores were forage (0.42), food (0.30) and construction (building) (0.25). P. pachycladus showed the greatest use value, versatility and number of plant parts used. Conclusion The survey showed that the Cactaceae is extremely important for several uses and categories attributed to different species. Apart from contributing to the ethnobotanical knowledge of the Cactaceae, another important focus of this study was to reinforce the necessity for further studies that record the traditional knowledge about this plant family, which has been lost in younger generations. PMID:23981911

  3. Dr William Hawes, MD (1736-1808).

    PubMed

    Scott, John Russell

    2006-08-01

    William Hawes was an apothecary in London who took up the cause of resuscitating the nearly drowned in the river, and founded the Royal Humane Society. He became a physician at the age of 45 years and was active in charitable works and literary societies. PMID:16845460

  4. Technical Status Report: Preliminary Glass Formulation Report for INEEL HAW

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.; Reamer, I.; Vienna, J.; Crum, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    This study was performed by a team comprising experts in glass chemistry, glass technology, and statistics at both SRTC and PNNL. This joint effort combined the strengths of each discipline and site to quickly develop a glass formulation for specific INEEL HAW.

  5. Vocalization of Equus asinus: The hees and haws of donkey brays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, David G.; Scheifele, Peter M.

    2001-05-01

    An understanding of the vocalizations of farm animals may provide an important key in the identification of animals under stress. Donkey vocalizations (brays) appear to be unique among the Equidae in that significant sound is produced during both air intake (the hee) and air outflow (the haw). Typically these vocalizations, primarily by males, consist of a series of brays, seemingly mechanically produced with little variation, terminating when the animal becomes short of breath-literally a burst of sound. The acoustic character, duration, and sequence (some hee-haw, while others haw-hee) are unique to each animal. As with other Perissodactyles (horses, zebras), and in contrast to the Artiodactyls (cows, sheep, and goats), there can be a significant frequency variation during a vocalization segment (particularly in the ``haw'' phase). It has not been determined what control (if any) the animal has over this. Further study is being made of possible braying variations for a given animal.

  6. The polymorphic weddellite crystals in three species of Cephalocereus (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Bárcenas-Argüello, María-Luisa; Gutiérrez-Castorena, Ma C-del-Carmen; Terrazas, Teresa

    2015-10-01

    Mineral inclusions in plant cells are genetically regulated, have an ecological function and are used as taxonomic characters. In Cactaceae, crystals in epidermal and cortical tissues have been reported; however, few studies have conducted chemical and morphological analyses on these crystals, and even fewer have reported non-mineral calcium to determine its systematic value. Cephalocereus apicicephalium, C. totolapensis and C. nizandensis are Cactaceae species endemic to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Mexico with abundant epidermal prismatic crystals. In the present study, we characterize the mineral cell inclusions, including their chemical composition and their morphology, for three species of Cephalocereus. Crystals of healthy branches of the three species were isolated and studied. The crystals were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD), their morphology was described using a petrographic and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and their elemental composition was measured with Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDXAR). The three species synthesized weddellite with different degrees of hydration depending on the species. The optical properties of calcium oxalate crystals were different from the core, which was calcium carbonate. We observed a large diversity of predominantly spherical forms with SEM. EDXAR analysis detected different concentrations of Ca and significant amounts of elements, such as Si, Mg, Na, K, Cl, and Fe, which may be related to the edaphic environment of these cacti. The occurrence of weddellite is novel for the genus according to previous reports. The morphological diversity of the crystals may be related to their elemental composition and may be a source of phylogenetic characters.

  7. Carbon Metabolism in Two Species of Pereskia (Cactaceae) 1

    PubMed Central

    Rayder, Lisa; Ting, Irwin P.

    1981-01-01

    The Pereskia are morphologically primitive, leafed members of the Cactaceae. Gas exchange characteristics using a dual isotope porometer to monitor 14CO2 and tritiated water uptake, diurnal malic acid fluctuations, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, and malate dehydrogenase activities were examined in two species of the genus Pereskia, Pereskia grandifolia and Pereskia aculeata. Investigations were done on well watered (control) and water-stressed plants. Nonstressed plants showed a CO2 uptake pattern indicating C3 carbon metabolism. However, diurnal fluctuations in titratable acidity were observed similar to Crassulacean acid metabolism. Plants exposed to 10 days of water stress exhibited stomatal opening only during an early morning period. Titratable acidity, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity, and malate dehydrogenase activity fluctuations were magnified in the stressed plants, but showed the same diurnal pattern as controls. Water stress causes these cacti to shift to an internal CO2 recycling (“idling”) that has all attributes of Crassulacean acid metabolism except nocturnal stomata opening and CO2 uptake. The consequences of this shift, which has been observed in other succulents, are unknown, and some possibilities are suggested. PMID:16661857

  8. Carbon metabolism in two species of pereskia (cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Rayder, L; Ting, I P

    1981-07-01

    The Pereskia are morphologically primitive, leafed members of the Cactaceae. Gas exchange characteristics using a dual isotope porometer to monitor (14)CO(2) and tritiated water uptake, diurnal malic acid fluctuations, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, and malate dehydrogenase activities were examined in two species of the genus Pereskia, Pereskia grandifolia and Pereskia aculeata. Investigations were done on well watered (control) and water-stressed plants. Nonstressed plants showed a CO(2) uptake pattern indicating C(3) carbon metabolism. However, diurnal fluctuations in titratable acidity were observed similar to Crassulacean acid metabolism. Plants exposed to 10 days of water stress exhibited stomatal opening only during an early morning period. Titratable acidity, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity, and malate dehydrogenase activity fluctuations were magnified in the stressed plants, but showed the same diurnal pattern as controls. Water stress causes these cacti to shift to an internal CO(2) recycling ("idling") that has all attributes of Crassulacean acid metabolism except nocturnal stomata opening and CO(2) uptake. The consequences of this shift, which has been observed in other succulents, are unknown, and some possibilities are suggested.

  9. Gynogenesis in the vine cacti Hylocereus and Selenicereus (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Garcia, Reinerio Benega; Cisneros, Aroldo; Schneider, Bert; Tel-Zur, Noemi

    2009-05-01

    Gynogenesis was investigated on the allotetraploid Selenicereus megalanthus and the diploid Hylocereus polyrhizus and Hylocereus undatus vine cactus species. Unpollinated ovules from developing flower buds containing microspores at middle uninucleate developmental stage were cultured on MS basal medium containing 2,4-D/TDZ with different sucrose concentrations. Ovule size increased under dark culture conditions in all the three species and the level of response was species and sucrose concentration dependent. The best responses were achieved in the two S. megalanthus accessions, E-123 and J-80, at 0.18 and 0.26 M sucrose. Only ovule enlargement was obtained in H. undatus and both ovule enlargement and callus were obtained in H. polyrhizus. Development in both species ceased and embryoids were not formed. Plant regeneration was directly and indirectly obtained in both S. megalanthus accessions. Ploidy level was determined for a total of 29 S. megalanthus gynogenic plants using flow cytometry: 15 were found to be dihaploid (plants with the gametophytic chromosome number) and the other 14 were found to have higher ploidy levels. This is the first report of successful gynogenesis in Cactaceae. The dihaploids of S. megalanthus successfully produced by ovule culture techniques opens new perspectives in vine cacti breeding.

  10. Cancer preventive and curative attributes of plants of the Cactaceae family: a review.

    PubMed

    Harlev, Eli; Nevo, Eviatar; Solowey, Elaine; Bishayee, Anupam

    2013-06-01

    The ever-increasing occurrence of cancer and the severe side effects and limited efficacy of current cancer chemotherapy based on chemical drugs shift the attention toward drugs of plant origin. The Cactaceae family comprises more than 1500 species, but until recently only a few of them have been tested for their chemopreventive and anticancer attributes, leaving a wide unexplored area still waiting for researchers to investigate. Considering this fact, and also the promising results obtained with the relatively few plants of this family already tested, it should justly be expected that some plants of the Cactaceae family yet unexplored might possess outstanding anticancer attributes, exceeding those displayed by the plants already tested. This review presents in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence on cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic potential of bioactive phytoconstituents and extracts derived from cactus plants. It also examines the underlying biochemical and molecular mechanisms involved in the antineoplastic effects of plants of the Cactaceae family. Current limitation and future directions of research towards effective use of cacti to develop efficient and side effect-free future cancer-preventive and anticancer drugs are also discussed.

  11. The biological activities and chemical composition of Pereskia species (Cactaceae)--a review.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Nícolas de Castro Campos; Scio, Elita

    2014-09-01

    The exploration of nature as a source of sustainable, novel bioactive substances continues to grow as natural products play a significant role in the search for new therapeutic and agricultural agents. In this context, plants of the genus Pereskia (Cactaceae) have been studied for their biological activities, and are evolving as an interesting subject in the search for new, bioactive compounds. These species are commonly used as human foodstuffs and in traditional medicine to treat a variety of diseases. This review focuses on the bioactivity and chemical composition of the genus Pereskia, and aims to stimulate further studies on the chemistry and biological potential of the genus.

  12. Factors influencing bank geomorphology and erosion of the Haw River, a high order river in North Carolina, since European settlement.

    PubMed

    Macfall, Janet; Robinette, Paul; Welch, David

    2014-01-01

    The Haw River, a high order river in the southeastern United States, is characterized by severe bank erosion and geomorphic change from historical conditions of clear waters and connected floodplains. In 2014 it was named one of the 10 most threatened rivers in the United States by American Rivers. Like many developed areas, the region has a history of disturbance including extensive upland soil loss from agriculture, dams, and upstream urbanization. The primary objective of this study was to identify the mechanisms controlling channel form and erosion of the Haw River. Field measurements including bank height, bankfull height, bank angle, root depth and density, riparian land cover and slope, surface protection, river width, and bank retreat were collected at 87 sites along 43.5 km of river. A Bank Erosion Hazard Index (BEHI) was calculated for each study site. Mean bank height was 11.8 m, mean width was 84.3 m, and bank retreat for 2005/2007-2011/2013 was 2.3 m. The greatest bank heights, BEHI values, and bank retreat were adjacent to riparian areas with low slope (<2). This is in contrast to previous studies which identify high slope as a risk factor for erosion. Most of the soils in low slope riparian areas were alluvial, suggesting sediment deposition from upland row crop agriculture and/or flooding. Bank retreat was not correlated to bank heights or BEHI values. Historical dams (1.2-3 m height) were not a significant factor. Erosion of the Haw River in the study section of the river (25% of the river length) contributed 205,320 m3 of sediment and 3759 kg of P annually. Concentration of suspended solids in the river increased with discharge. In conclusion, the Haw River is an unstable system, with river bank erosion and geomodification potential influenced by riparian slope and varied flows.

  13. Factors Influencing Bank Geomorphology and Erosion of the Haw River, a High Order River in North Carolina, since European Settlement

    PubMed Central

    Macfall, Janet; Robinette, Paul; Welch, David

    2014-01-01

    The Haw River, a high order river in the southeastern United States, is characterized by severe bank erosion and geomorphic change from historical conditions of clear waters and connected floodplains. In 2014 it was named one of the 10 most threatened rivers in the United States by American Rivers. Like many developed areas, the region has a history of disturbance including extensive upland soil loss from agriculture, dams, and upstream urbanization. The primary objective of this study was to identify the mechanisms controlling channel form and erosion of the Haw River. Field measurements including bank height, bankfull height, bank angle, root depth and density, riparian land cover and slope, surface protection, river width, and bank retreat were collected at 87 sites along 43.5 km of river. A Bank Erosion Hazard Index (BEHI) was calculated for each study site. Mean bank height was 11.8 m, mean width was 84.3 m, and bank retreat for 2005/2007-2011/2013 was 2.3 m. The greatest bank heights, BEHI values, and bank retreat were adjacent to riparian areas with low slope (<2). This is in contrast to previous studies which identify high slope as a risk factor for erosion. Most of the soils in low slope riparian areas were alluvial, suggesting sediment deposition from upland row crop agriculture and/or flooding. Bank retreat was not correlated to bank heights or BEHI values. Historical dams (1.2–3 m height) were not a significant factor. Erosion of the Haw River in the study section of the river (25% of the river length) contributed 205,320 m3 of sediment and 3759 kg of P annually. Concentration of suspended solids in the river increased with discharge. In conclusion, the Haw River is an unstable system, with river bank erosion and geomodification potential influenced by riparian slope and varied flows. PMID:25302956

  14. Factors influencing bank geomorphology and erosion of the Haw River, a high order river in North Carolina, since European settlement.

    PubMed

    Macfall, Janet; Robinette, Paul; Welch, David

    2014-01-01

    The Haw River, a high order river in the southeastern United States, is characterized by severe bank erosion and geomorphic change from historical conditions of clear waters and connected floodplains. In 2014 it was named one of the 10 most threatened rivers in the United States by American Rivers. Like many developed areas, the region has a history of disturbance including extensive upland soil loss from agriculture, dams, and upstream urbanization. The primary objective of this study was to identify the mechanisms controlling channel form and erosion of the Haw River. Field measurements including bank height, bankfull height, bank angle, root depth and density, riparian land cover and slope, surface protection, river width, and bank retreat were collected at 87 sites along 43.5 km of river. A Bank Erosion Hazard Index (BEHI) was calculated for each study site. Mean bank height was 11.8 m, mean width was 84.3 m, and bank retreat for 2005/2007-2011/2013 was 2.3 m. The greatest bank heights, BEHI values, and bank retreat were adjacent to riparian areas with low slope (<2). This is in contrast to previous studies which identify high slope as a risk factor for erosion. Most of the soils in low slope riparian areas were alluvial, suggesting sediment deposition from upland row crop agriculture and/or flooding. Bank retreat was not correlated to bank heights or BEHI values. Historical dams (1.2-3 m height) were not a significant factor. Erosion of the Haw River in the study section of the river (25% of the river length) contributed 205,320 m3 of sediment and 3759 kg of P annually. Concentration of suspended solids in the river increased with discharge. In conclusion, the Haw River is an unstable system, with river bank erosion and geomodification potential influenced by riparian slope and varied flows. PMID:25302956

  15. Prebiotic potential of Agave angustifolia Haw fructans with different degrees of polymerization.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Martínez, José Rodolfo; González-Cervantes, Rina M; Hernández-Gallegos, Minerva Aurora; Mendiola, Roberto Campos; Aparicio, Antonio R Jiménez; Ocampo, Martha L Arenas

    2014-01-01

    Inulin-type fructans are the most studied prebiotic compounds because of their broad range of health benefits. In particular, plants of the Agave genus are rich in fructans. Agave-derived fructans have a branched structure with both β-(2→1) and β-(2→6) linked fructosyl chains attached to the sucrose start unit with a degree of polymerization (DP) of up to 80 fructose units. The objective of this work was to assess the prebiotic potential of three Agave angustifolia Haw fructan fractions (AFF) with different degrees of polymerization. The three fructan fractions were extracted from the agave stem by lixiviation and then purified by ultrafiltration and ion exchange chromatography: AFF1, AFF2 and AFF3 with high (3-60 fructose units), medium (2-40) and low (2-22) DP, respectively. The fructan profile was determined with high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD), which confirmed a branched fructan structure. Structural elucidation was performed by Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy. The AFF spectrum shows characteristic fructan bands. The prebiotic effect of these fractions was assessed in vitro through fermentation by Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus strains. Four growth patterns were observed. Some bacteria did not grow with any of the AFF, while other strains grew with only AFF3. Some bacteria grew according to the molecular weight of the AFF and some grew indistinctly with the three fructan fractions. PMID:25153877

  16. Prebiotic potential of Agave angustifolia Haw fructans with different degrees of polymerization.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Martínez, José Rodolfo; González-Cervantes, Rina M; Hernández-Gallegos, Minerva Aurora; Mendiola, Roberto Campos; Aparicio, Antonio R Jiménez; Ocampo, Martha L Arenas

    2014-08-19

    Inulin-type fructans are the most studied prebiotic compounds because of their broad range of health benefits. In particular, plants of the Agave genus are rich in fructans. Agave-derived fructans have a branched structure with both β-(2→1) and β-(2→6) linked fructosyl chains attached to the sucrose start unit with a degree of polymerization (DP) of up to 80 fructose units. The objective of this work was to assess the prebiotic potential of three Agave angustifolia Haw fructan fractions (AFF) with different degrees of polymerization. The three fructan fractions were extracted from the agave stem by lixiviation and then purified by ultrafiltration and ion exchange chromatography: AFF1, AFF2 and AFF3 with high (3-60 fructose units), medium (2-40) and low (2-22) DP, respectively. The fructan profile was determined with high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD), which confirmed a branched fructan structure. Structural elucidation was performed by Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy. The AFF spectrum shows characteristic fructan bands. The prebiotic effect of these fractions was assessed in vitro through fermentation by Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus strains. Four growth patterns were observed. Some bacteria did not grow with any of the AFF, while other strains grew with only AFF3. Some bacteria grew according to the molecular weight of the AFF and some grew indistinctly with the three fructan fractions.

  17. Comparison of measured and calculated dose rates for the Castor HAW 20/28 CG.

    PubMed

    Ringleb, O; Kühl, H; Scheib, H; Rimpler, A

    2005-01-01

    In January 2003 neutron and gamma dose rate measurements at a CASTOR HAW 20/28 CG were performed by the Bundesamt für Strahlenschutz at Gorleben. First, commercial dose rate measurement devices were used, then spectral measurements with a Bonner sphere system were made to verify the results. Axial and circumferential dose rate profiles were measured near the cask surface and spectral measurements were performed for some locations. A shielding analysis of the cask was performed with the MCNP Monte Carlo Code with ENDF/B-VI cross section libraries. The cask was modelled 'as built', i.e. with its real inventory, dimensions and material densities and with the same configuration and position as in the storage facility. The average C/E-ratios are 1.3 for neutron dose rates and 1.4 for gamma dose rates. Both the measured and calculated dose rates show the same qualitative trends in the axial and circumferential direction. The spectral measurements show a variation in the spectra across the cask surface. This correlates with the variation found in the C/E-ratios. At cask midheight good agreement between the Bonner sphere system and the commercial device (LB 6411) is found with a 7% lower derived H*(10) dose rate from the Bonner sphere system. PMID:16604722

  18. Anti-inflammatory activity of copao (Eulychnia acida Phil., Cactaceae) fruits.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Aspee, Felipe; Alberto, Maria Rosa; Quispe, Cristina; Soriano, Maria del Pilar Caramantin; Theoduloz, Cristina; Zampini, Iris Catiana; Isla, Maria Ines; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2015-06-01

    Copao (Eulychnia acida Phil., Cactaceae) is an endemic species occurring in northern Chile. The edible fruits of this plant are valued for its acidic and refreshing taste. Phenolic-enriched extracts from copao fruit pulp and epicarp, collected in the Elqui and Limari river valleys, were assessed by its in vitro ability to inhibit the pro-inflammatory enzymes lipoxygenase (LOX) and cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2). At 100 μg/mL, pulp extracts showed better effect towards LOX than epicarp extract, while COX-2 inhibition was observed for both epicarp and pulp samples. In general, the extracts were inactive towards COX-1. A positive correlation was observed between the anti-inflammatory activity and the main phenolic compounds found in this fruit. Copao fruits from the Limari valley, a main place of collection and commercialization, showed major activity, adding evidence on the possible health-beneficial effects of this native Chilean fruit. PMID:25682221

  19. Anti-inflammatory activity of copao (Eulychnia acida Phil., Cactaceae) fruits.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Aspee, Felipe; Alberto, Maria Rosa; Quispe, Cristina; Soriano, Maria del Pilar Caramantin; Theoduloz, Cristina; Zampini, Iris Catiana; Isla, Maria Ines; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2015-06-01

    Copao (Eulychnia acida Phil., Cactaceae) is an endemic species occurring in northern Chile. The edible fruits of this plant are valued for its acidic and refreshing taste. Phenolic-enriched extracts from copao fruit pulp and epicarp, collected in the Elqui and Limari river valleys, were assessed by its in vitro ability to inhibit the pro-inflammatory enzymes lipoxygenase (LOX) and cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2). At 100 μg/mL, pulp extracts showed better effect towards LOX than epicarp extract, while COX-2 inhibition was observed for both epicarp and pulp samples. In general, the extracts were inactive towards COX-1. A positive correlation was observed between the anti-inflammatory activity and the main phenolic compounds found in this fruit. Copao fruits from the Limari valley, a main place of collection and commercialization, showed major activity, adding evidence on the possible health-beneficial effects of this native Chilean fruit.

  20. Wood chemical composition in species of Cactaceae: the relationship between lignification and stem morphology.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Rivera, Jorge; Canché-Escamilla, Gonzalo; Soto-Hernández, Marcos; Terrazas, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    In Cactaceae, wood anatomy is related to stem morphology in terms of the conferred support. In species of cacti with dimorphic wood, a unique process occurs in which the cambium stops producing wide-band tracheids (WBTs) and produces fibers; this is associated with the aging of individuals and increases in size. Stem support and lignification have only been studied in fibrous tree-like species, and studies in species with WBTs or dimorphic wood are lacking. In this study, we approach this process with a chemical focus, emphasizing the role of wood lignification. We hypothesized that the degree of wood lignification in Cactaceae increases with height of the species and that its chemical composition varies with wood anatomy. To test this, we studied the chemical composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin content) in 13 species (2 WBTs wood, 3 dimorphic, and 8 fibrous) with contrasting growth forms. We also analyzed lignification in dimorphic and fibrous species to determine the chemical features of WBTs and fibers and their relationship with stem support. The lignin contents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. We found that 11 species have a higher percentage (>35%) of lignin in their wood than other angiosperms or gymnosperms. The lignin chemical composition in fibrous species is similar to that of other dicots, but it is markedly heterogeneous in non-fibrous species where WBTs are abundant. The lignification in WBTs is associated with the resistance to high water pressure within cells rather than the contribution to mechanical support. Dimorphic wood species are usually richer in syringyl lignin, and tree-like species with lignified rays have more guaiacyl lignin. The results suggest that wood anatomy and lignin distribution play an important role in the chemical composition of wood, and further research is needed at the cellular level.

  1. Wood Chemical Composition in Species of Cactaceae: The Relationship between Lignification and Stem Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Canché-Escamilla, Gonzalo; Soto-Hernández, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    In Cactaceae, wood anatomy is related to stem morphology in terms of the conferred support. In species of cacti with dimorphic wood, a unique process occurs in which the cambium stops producing wide-band tracheids (WBTs) and produces fibers; this is associated with the aging of individuals and increases in size. Stem support and lignification have only been studied in fibrous tree-like species, and studies in species with WBTs or dimorphic wood are lacking. In this study, we approach this process with a chemical focus, emphasizing the role of wood lignification. We hypothesized that the degree of wood lignification in Cactaceae increases with height of the species and that its chemical composition varies with wood anatomy. To test this, we studied the chemical composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin content) in 13 species (2 WBTs wood, 3 dimorphic, and 8 fibrous) with contrasting growth forms. We also analyzed lignification in dimorphic and fibrous species to determine the chemical features of WBTs and fibers and their relationship with stem support. The lignin contents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. We found that 11 species have a higher percentage (>35%) of lignin in their wood than other angiosperms or gymnosperms. The lignin chemical composition in fibrous species is similar to that of other dicots, but it is markedly heterogeneous in non-fibrous species where WBTs are abundant. The lignification in WBTs is associated with the resistance to high water pressure within cells rather than the contribution to mechanical support. Dimorphic wood species are usually richer in syringyl lignin, and tree-like species with lignified rays have more guaiacyl lignin. The results suggest that wood anatomy and lignin distribution play an important role in the chemical composition of wood, and further research is needed at the cellular level. PMID:25880223

  2. Spatial variation in the community of insects associated with the flowers of Pachycereus weberi (Caryophyllales: Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Castro, Dulce María; Valverde, Pedro Luis; Vite, Fernando; Carrillo-Ruiz, Hortensia

    2014-08-01

    The positive relationship between productivity and species diversity is well-known. Insect communities associated with the flowers of Cactaceae species represent an interesting system to explore the productivity-diversity relationship because branches facing the equator receive more photosynthetically active radiation and have higher productivity. Thus, flowers with contrasting orientations within an individual, and even within a single branch, might differ in productivity. Therefore, higher abundance, species richness, and diversity are expected for the insect communities associated with south-facing flowers. This hypothesis was tested in Pachycereus weberi (J.M. Coulter) Backeberg (Cactaceae). Insects within flowers with contrasting orientations were collected and its abundance, richness, and diversity were estimated. We also asked if insects prefer big flowers. Thus, flower volume was estimated and regression analyses were conducted to test if there is a positive relationship between flower size and insect abundance. Flower orientation did not affect species richness. However, species abundance and diversity were different in flowers with contrasting orientations. In general, species abundance was higher in flowers facing southwards than in north-facing flowers. On the contrary, species diversity was higher in north-facing flowers. Abundance of Coleoptera was explained by flower volume in south-facing flowers. Contrary to our hypothesis, total diversity was greater in the less productive oriented flowers. Three possible explanations are discussed to explain the low diversity found in the highly productive, south-facing flowers. Our study provides evidence for the effects of productivity on the structure of insect communities at a very small-scale.

  3. DNA barcodes for Mexican Cactaceae, plants under pressure from wild collecting.

    PubMed

    Yesson, Chris; Bárcenas, Rolando T; Hernández, Héctor M; Ruiz-Maqueda, María de la Luz; Prado, Alberto; Rodríguez, Víctor M; Hawkins, Julie A

    2011-09-01

    DNA barcodes could be a useful tool for plant conservation. Of particular importance is the ability to identify unknown plant material, such as from customs seizures of illegally collected specimens. Mexican cacti are an example of a threatened group, under pressure because of wild collection for the xeriscaping trade and private collectors. Mexican cacti also provide a taxonomically and geographically coherent group with which to test DNA barcodes. Here, we sample the matK barcode for 528 species of Cactaceae including approximately 75% of Mexican species and test the utility of the matK region for species-level identification. We find that the matK DNA barcode can be used to identify uniquely 77% of species sampled, and 79-87% of species of particular conservation importance. However, this is far below the desired rate of 95% and there are significant issues for PCR amplification because of the variability of primer sites. Additionally, we test the nuclear ITS regions for the cactus subfamily Opuntioideae and for the genus Ariocarpus (subfamily Cactoideae). We observed higher rates of variation for ITS (86% unique for Opuntioideae sampled) but a much lower PCR success, encountering significant intra-individual polymorphism in Ariocarpus precluding the use of this marker in this taxon. We conclude that the matK region should provide useful information as a DNA barcode for Cactaceae if the problems with primers can be addressed, but matK alone is not sufficiently variable to achieve species-level identification. Additional complementary regions should be investigated as ITS is shown to be unsuitable.

  4. Seed Anatomy and Water Uptake in Relation to Seed Dormancy in Opuntia tomentosa (Cactaceae, Opuntioideae)

    PubMed Central

    Orozco-Segovia, A.; Márquez-Guzmán, J.; Sánchez-Coronado, M. E.; Gamboa de Buen, A.; Baskin, J. M.; Baskin, C. C.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims There is considerable confusion in the literature concerning impermeability of seeds with ‘hard’ seed coats, because the ability to take up (imbibe) water has not been tested in most of them. Seeds of Opuntia tomentosa were reported recently to have a water-impermeable seed coat sensu lato (i.e. physical dormancy), in combination with physiological dormancy. However, physical dormancy is not known to occur in Cactaceae. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine if seeds of O. tomentosa are water-permeable or water-impermeable, i.e. if they have physical dormancy. Methods The micromorphology of the seed coat and associated structures were characterized by SEM and light microscopy. Permeability of the seed-covering layers was assessed by an increase in mass of seeds on a wet substrate and by dye-tracking and uptake of tritiated water by intact versus scarified seeds. Key Results A germination valve and a water channel are formed in the hilum–micropyle region during dehydration and ageing in seeds of O. tomentosa. The funicular envelope undoubtedly plays a role in germination of Opuntia seeds via restriction of water uptake and mechanical resistance to expansion of the embryo. However, seeds do not exhibit any of three features characteristic of those with physical dormancy. Thus, they do not have a water-impermeable layer(s) of palisade cells (macrosclereids) or a water gap sensu stricto and they imbibe water without the seed coat being disrupted. Conclusions Although dormancy in seeds of this species can be broken by scarification, they have physiological dormancy only. Further, based on information in the literature, it is concluded that it is unlikely that any species of Opuntia has physical dormancy. This is the first integrative study of the anatomy, dynamics of water uptake and dormancy in seeds of Cactaceae subfamily Opuntioideae. PMID:17298989

  5. [Therapeutic effects and mechanisms of Opuntia dillenii Haw on atherosclerosis of rats].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-chun; Qi, Zhan-peng; Liu, Zhen-zhong; Li, Tao; Cui, Hong-xia; Wang, Bao-qing; Chi, Na

    2015-04-01

    The research aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects and mechanisms of Opuntia dillenii Haw polysaccharide (OPS) on atherosclerosis of rats. First atherosclerotic rat models were established by high-fat and high-calcium diet. Thirty days later, the rats were treated with low dosage of OPS (0.2 g x kg(-1) x d(-1)) or high dosage of OPS (0.4 g x kg(-1) x d(-1)) by intraperitoneal injection for 60 days continuously. At the end of treatment, thoracic aorta rings were prepared and vasorelaxation of rat thoracic aorta in different experiment groups were determined by using 620M multi wire myograph system in vitro. Blood and livers of rats were collected. Then plasma levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) of rats were separately determined using whole automatic biochemical analyzer; protein level of hepatic apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and that of hepatic diglyceride acyltransferase (Dgat1) were measured by Western Blot technique. Results showed that the ability of rat thoracic aorta to relax decreased markedly in the model group compared with that in the normal group, and significant differences existed in vasorelaxation ratios induced by different concentrations of carbamylcholine chloride (Carb) between these two groups (P < 0.01). After OPS treatment, the ability of rat thoracic aorta to relax improved markedly, the vasorelaxation ratios induced by Carb at 5 and 10 μmol x L(-1) were respectively 0.34 ± 0.08 and 0.62 ± 0.15 in the group treated with low dosage of OPS, while the ratios induced by Carb at 1 and 5 μmol x L(-1) were respectively 0.54 ± 0.08 and 0.98 ± 0.02 in the group treated with high dosage of OPS, which were all significantly different with those in the model group (P < 0.01). Plasma contents of TC, TG and LDL reduced significantly by the treatments both with low and high dosages of OPS compared with those in the model group (P < 0.01). Protein level of hepatic ApoB and that of hepatic Dgat1

  6. Lineage-specific evolutionary rate in plants: Contributions of a screening for Cereus (Cactaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Romeiro-Brito, Monique; Moraes, Evandro M.; Taylor, Nigel P.; Zappi, Daniela C.; Franco, Fernando F.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Predictable chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequences have been listed for the shallowest taxonomic studies in plants. We investigated whether plastid regions that vary between closely allied species could be applied for intraspecific studies and compared the variation of these plastid segments with two nuclear regions. Methods: We screened 16 plastid and two nuclear intronic regions for species of the genus Cereus (Cactaceae) at three hierarchical levels (species from different clades, species of the same clade, and allopatric populations). Results: Ten plastid regions presented interspecific variation, and six of them showed variation at the intraspecific level. The two nuclear regions showed both inter- and intraspecific variation, and in general they showed higher levels of variability in almost all hierarchical levels than the plastid segments. Discussion: Our data suggest no correspondence between variation of plastid regions at the interspecific and intraspecific level, probably due to lineage-specific variation in cpDNA, which appears to have less effect in nuclear data. Despite the heterogeneity in evolutionary rates of cpDNA, we highlight three plastid segments that may be considered in initial screenings in plant phylogeographic studies. PMID:26819857

  7. Studies on betaxanthin profiles of vegetables and fruits from the Chenopodiaceae and Cactaceae.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Florian; Graneis, Stephan; Stintzing, Florian C; Carle, Reinhold

    2007-01-01

    The present study provides an update on the betaxanthin (bx) compositions of red and yellow beetroots, yellow-coloured Swiss chard petioles, and yellow-orange cactus pear. Applying RP-HPLC coupled with positive ion electrospray mass spectrometry and by comparison with UV-vis and mass spectrometric characteristics as well as retention times of semi-synthesized reference compounds, 24 betaxanthins were identified in red and yellow beetroot hypocotyls. Twenty-five and thirteen betaxanthins were present in yellow Swiss chard petioles and the cactus pear cultivar 'Gialla', respectively. Ethanolamine-bx and threonine-bx were found to be novel betaxanthins in Chenopodiaceae representatives, which to the best of our knowledge have not been reported as genuine pigments so far. Furthermore, aspartic acid-bx (miraxanthin II), lysine-bx, and methionine-bx, hitherto found in other families, were identified in the Chenopodiaceae for the first time. Additionally, tyrosine-bx (portulacaxanthin II) and tryptophan-bx have not been earlier reported to occur in the Cactaceae. These findings provide valuable phytochemical information and may be useful for a better understanding of the functional properties of betaxanthins in plants.

  8. Classical macroautophagy in Lobivia rauschii (Cactaceae) and possible plastidial autophagy in Tillandsia albida (Bromeliaceae) tapetum cells.

    PubMed

    Papini, Alessio; Mosti, Stefano; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2014-05-01

    The tapetum in anthers is a tissue that undergoes programmed cell death (PCD) during the production of pollen. We observed two types of autophagy prior to cell death. In Lobivia rauschii (Cactaceae), tapetum cells showed plant-type autophagosomes-autolysosomes, which have been found previously exclusively in root meristem cells. The autophagic structures were formed by a network of tubules which apparently merged laterally, thereby sequestering a portion of the cytoplasm. The organelles observed in the sequestered material included multilamellar bodies, which have not been reported earlier in these organelles. By contrast, Tillandsia albida (Bromeliaceae) tapetum cells contained no such organelles but showed plastids that might possibly carry out autophagy, as they contained portions of the cytoplasm similar to the phenomenon reported earlier in Phaseolus and Dendrobium. However, the ultrastructure of the T. albida plastids was different from that in the previous reports. It is concluded that in L. rauschii classical plant macroautophagy was involved in degradation of the cytoplasm, while in T. albida such classical macroautophagy was not observed. Instead, the data in T. albida suggested the hypothesis that plastids are able to carry out degradation of the cytoplasm.

  9. Molecular phylogeny and character evolution in terete-stemmed Andean opuntias (Cactaceae-Opuntioideae).

    PubMed

    Ritz, C M; Reiker, J; Charles, G; Hoxey, P; Hunt, D; Lowry, M; Stuppy, W; Taylor, N

    2012-11-01

    The cacti of tribe Tephrocacteae (Cactaceae-Opuntioideae) are adapted to diverse climatic conditions over a wide area of the southern Andes and adjacent lowlands. They exhibit a range of life forms from geophytes and cushion-plants to dwarf shrubs, shrubs or small trees. To confirm or challenge previous morphology-based classifications and molecular phylogenies, we sampled DNA sequences from the chloroplast trnK/matK region and the nuclear low copy gene phyC and compared the resulting phylogenies with previous data gathered from nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences. The here presented chloroplast and nuclear low copy gene phylogenies were mutually congruent and broadly coincident with the classification based on gross morphology and seed micro-morphology and anatomy. Reconstruction of hypothetical ancestral character states suggested that geophytes and cushion-forming species probably evolved several times from dwarf shrubby precursors. We also traced an increase of embryo size at the expense of the nucellus-derived storage tissue during the evolution of the Tephrocacteae, which is thought to be an evolutionary advantage because nutrients are then more rapidly accessible for the germinating embryo. In contrast to these highly concordant phylogenies, nuclear ribosomal DNA data sampled by a previous study yielded conflicting phylogenetic signals. Secondary structure predictions of ribosomal transcribed spacers suggested that this phylogeny is strongly influenced by the inclusion of paralogous sequence probably arisen by genome duplication during the evolution of this plant group.

  10. How and why does the areole meristem move in Echinocereus (Cactaceae)?

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Daniel; Grego-Valencia, Dalia; Terrazas, Teresa; Arias, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims In Cactaceae, the areole is the organ that forms the leaves, spines and buds. Apparently, the genus Echinocereus develops enclosed buds that break through the epidermis of the stem adjacent to the areole; this trait most likely represents a synapomorphy of Echinocereus. The development of the areole is investigated here in order to understand the anatomical modifications that lead to internal bud development and to supplement anatomical knowledge of plants that do not behave according to classical shoot theory. Methods The external morphology of the areole was documented and the anatomy was studied using tissue clearing, scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy for 50 species that represent the recognized clades and sections of the traditional classification of the genus, including Morangaya pensilis (Echinocereus pensilis). Key Results In Echinocereus, the areole is sealed by the periderm, and the areole meristem is moved and enclosed by the differential growth of the epidermis and surrounding cortex. The enclosed areole meristem is differentiated in a vegetative or floral bud, which develops internally and breaks through the epidermis of the stem. In Morangaya pensilis, the areole is not sealed by the periderm and the areole meristem is not enclosed. Conclusions The enclosed areole meristem and internal bud development are understood to be an adaptation to protect the meristem and the bud from low temperatures. The anatomical evidence supports the hypothesis that the enclosed bud represents one synapomorphy for Echinocereus and also supports the exclusion of Morangaya from Echinocereus. PMID:25399023

  11. A new Anagyrus (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) from Argentina, parasitoid of Hypogeococcus sp. (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) on Harrisia pomanensis (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Triapitsyn, Serguei V; Aguirre, María B; Logarzo, Guillermo A

    2016-05-26

    A new species of Anagyrus Howard (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), A. lapachosus sp. n., is described from Salta Province of Argentina as a parasitoid of Hypogeococcus sp. (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) on Harrisia pomanensis cactus (Cactaceae). It is a candidate "new association" biological control agent for quarantine evaluation and possible following introduction to Puerto Rico (USA) against another Hypogeococcus sp., commonly called the Harrisia cactus mealybug and often misidentified as H. pungens Granara de Willink (according to our unpublished data the latter attacks only Amaranthaceae), which devastates or threatens the native cacti there and also in some other Caribbean islands (Triapitsyn, Aguirre et al. 2014; Carrera-Martínez et al. 2015).

  12. A new Anagyrus (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) from Argentina, parasitoid of Hypogeococcus sp. (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) on Harrisia pomanensis (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Triapitsyn, Serguei V; Aguirre, María B; Logarzo, Guillermo A

    2016-01-01

    A new species of Anagyrus Howard (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), A. lapachosus sp. n., is described from Salta Province of Argentina as a parasitoid of Hypogeococcus sp. (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) on Harrisia pomanensis cactus (Cactaceae). It is a candidate "new association" biological control agent for quarantine evaluation and possible following introduction to Puerto Rico (USA) against another Hypogeococcus sp., commonly called the Harrisia cactus mealybug and often misidentified as H. pungens Granara de Willink (according to our unpublished data the latter attacks only Amaranthaceae), which devastates or threatens the native cacti there and also in some other Caribbean islands (Triapitsyn, Aguirre et al. 2014; Carrera-Martínez et al. 2015). PMID:27395151

  13. Studies on the Biology of Hypogeococcus pungens (sensu stricto) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) in Argentina to Aid the Identification of the Mealybug Pest of Cactaceae in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, M. B.; Diaz-Soltero, H.; Claps, L. E.; Saracho Bottero, A.; Triapitsyn, S.; Hasson, E.; Logarzo, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypogeococcus pungens Granara de Willink, sensu stricto, is a serious pest of cacti in Puerto Rico threating many Caribbean islands. A classical biological control program for H. pungens was initiated for Puerto Rico in 2010 with a survey for natural enemies of H. pungens in its native range of Argentina. Biological differences were observed between populations of H. pungens sampled on Amaranthaceae and Cactaceae. Molecular studies suggested that H. pungens populations from different host plant families are likely a complex of species. Our objective was to study the biology of H. pungens sensu stricto on specimens collected in the same locality and host plant as the holotype [Tucumán Province, Argentina; Alternanthera pungens Kunth (Amaranthaceae)]. We were interested in the reproductive biology of females, longevity and survival of adults, the effect of temperature on the development, and nymph performance (survival and development) on five Cactaceae species. We found that H. pungens s.s. showed marked biological differences from the populations collected on Cactaceae and exported to Australia for the biological control of the cactus Harrisia spp. The main differences were the presence of deuterotoky parthenogenesis and the fact that H. pungens did not attack Cactaceae in the laboratory. Our results provide biological evidence that H. pungens is a species complex. We propose that the population introduced to Australia is neither Hypogeococcus festerianus Lizer y Trelles nor H. pungens, but an undescribed species with three circuli, and that the Hypogeococcus pest of cacti in Puerto Rico is not H. pungens. PMID:27324585

  14. Studies on the Biology of Hypogeococcus pungens (sensu stricto) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) in Argentina to Aid the Identification of the Mealybug Pest of Cactaceae in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, M B; Diaz-Soltero, H; Claps, L E; Saracho Bottero, A; Triapitsyn, S; Hasson, E; Logarzo, G A

    2016-01-01

    Hypogeococcus pungens Granara de Willink, sensu stricto, is a serious pest of cacti in Puerto Rico threating many Caribbean islands. A classical biological control program for H. pungens was initiated for Puerto Rico in 2010 with a survey for natural enemies of H. pungens in its native range of Argentina. Biological differences were observed between populations of H. pungens sampled on Amaranthaceae and Cactaceae. Molecular studies suggested that H. pungens populations from different host plant families are likely a complex of species. Our objective was to study the biology of H. pungens sensu stricto on specimens collected in the same locality and host plant as the holotype [Tucumán Province, Argentina; Alternanthera pungens Kunth (Amaranthaceae)]. We were interested in the reproductive biology of females, longevity and survival of adults, the effect of temperature on the development, and nymph performance (survival and development) on five Cactaceae species. We found that H. pungens s.s showed marked biological differences from the populations collected on Cactaceae and exported to Australia for the biological control of the cactus Harrisia spp. The main differences were the presence of deuterotoky parthenogenesis and the fact that H. pungens did not attack Cactaceae in the laboratory. Our results provide biological evidence that H. pungens is a species complex. We propose that the population introduced to Australia is neither Hypogeococcus festerianus Lizer y Trelles nor H. pungens, but an undescribed species with three circuli, and that the Hypogeococcus pest of cacti in Puerto Rico is not H. pungens.

  15. Studies on the Biology of Hypogeococcus pungens (sensu stricto) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) in Argentina to Aid the Identification of the Mealybug Pest of Cactaceae in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, M B; Diaz-Soltero, H; Claps, L E; Saracho Bottero, A; Triapitsyn, S; Hasson, E; Logarzo, G A

    2016-01-01

    Hypogeococcus pungens Granara de Willink, sensu stricto, is a serious pest of cacti in Puerto Rico threating many Caribbean islands. A classical biological control program for H. pungens was initiated for Puerto Rico in 2010 with a survey for natural enemies of H. pungens in its native range of Argentina. Biological differences were observed between populations of H. pungens sampled on Amaranthaceae and Cactaceae. Molecular studies suggested that H. pungens populations from different host plant families are likely a complex of species. Our objective was to study the biology of H. pungens sensu stricto on specimens collected in the same locality and host plant as the holotype [Tucumán Province, Argentina; Alternanthera pungens Kunth (Amaranthaceae)]. We were interested in the reproductive biology of females, longevity and survival of adults, the effect of temperature on the development, and nymph performance (survival and development) on five Cactaceae species. We found that H. pungens s.s showed marked biological differences from the populations collected on Cactaceae and exported to Australia for the biological control of the cactus Harrisia spp. The main differences were the presence of deuterotoky parthenogenesis and the fact that H. pungens did not attack Cactaceae in the laboratory. Our results provide biological evidence that H. pungens is a species complex. We propose that the population introduced to Australia is neither Hypogeococcus festerianus Lizer y Trelles nor H. pungens, but an undescribed species with three circuli, and that the Hypogeococcus pest of cacti in Puerto Rico is not H. pungens. PMID:27324585

  16. Antioxidant capacity and amino acid analysis of Caralluma adscendens (Roxb.) Haw var. fimbriata (wall.) Grav. & Mayur. aerial parts.

    PubMed

    Maheshu, Vellingiri; Priyadarsini, Deivamarudhachalam Teepica; Sasikumar, Jagathala Mahalingam

    2014-10-01

    Caralluma adscendens (Roxb.) Haw var. fimbriata (wall.) Grav. & Mayur. is a traditional food consumed as vegetable or pickle in arid regions of India and eaten during famines. In Indian traditional medicine, the plant is used to treat diabetes, inflammation and etc. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties (DPPH, TEAC, TAA, FRAP, OH˙ and NO˙ radical scavenging activities) of the different extracts from aerial parts. The levels of total phenolics and flavonoids of the extracts were also determined. The extracts were found to have different levels of antioxidant properties in the test models used. Methanol and water extracts had good total phenolic and flavonoid contents showed potent antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities. The antioxidant activity was correlated well with the amount of total phenolics present in the extracts. The extracts and its components may be used as an additive in food preparations and nutraceuticals. PMID:25328180

  17. Determinate primary root growth as an adaptation to aridity in Cactaceae: towards an understanding of the evolution and genetic control of the trait

    PubMed Central

    Shishkova, Svetlana; Las Peñas, María Laura; Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Matvienko, Marta; Kozik, Alex; Montiel, Jesús; Patiño, Anallely; Dubrovsky, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Species of Cactaceae are well adapted to arid habitats. Determinate growth of the primary root, which involves early and complete root apical meristem (RAM) exhaustion and differentiation of cells at the root tip, has been reported for some Cactoideae species as a root adaptation to aridity. In this study, the primary root growth patterns of Cactaceae taxa from diverse habitats are classified as being determinate or indeterminate, and the molecular mechanisms underlying RAM maintenance in Cactaceae are explored. Genes that were induced in the primary root of Stenocereus gummosus before RAM exhaustion are identified. Methods Primary root growth was analysed in Cactaceae seedlings cultivated in vertically oriented Petri dishes. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified after reverse northern blots of clones from a suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA library. Key Results All species analysed from six tribes of the Cactoideae subfamily that inhabit arid and semi-arid regions exhibited determinate primary root growth. However, species from the Hylocereeae tribe, which inhabit mesic regions, exhibited mostly indeterminate primary root growth. Preliminary results suggest that seedlings of members of the Opuntioideae subfamily have mostly determinate primary root growth, whereas those of the Maihuenioideae and Pereskioideae subfamilies have mostly indeterminate primary root growth. Seven selected transcripts encoding homologues of heat stress transcription factor B4, histone deacetylase, fibrillarin, phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase, cytochrome P450 and gibberellin-regulated protein were upregulated in S. gummosus root tips during the initial growth phase. Conclusions Primary root growth in Cactoideae species matches their environment. The data imply that determinate growth of the primary root became fixed after separation of the Cactiodeae/Opuntioideae and Maihuenioideae/Pereskioideae lineages, and that the genetic regulation of

  18. Is in vitro micrografting a possible valid alternative to traditional micropropagation in Cactaceae? Pelecyphora aselliformis as a case study.

    PubMed

    Badalamenti, Ornella; Carra, Angela; Oddo, Elisabetta; Carimi, Francesco; Sajeva, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Several taxa of Cactaceae are endangered by overcollection for commercial purposes, and most of the family is included in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Fauna and Flora (CITES). Micropropagation may play a key role to keep the pressure off wild populations and contribute to ex situ conservation of endangered taxa. One of the limits of micropropagation is the species-specific requirement of plant regulators for each taxon and sometimes even for different genotypes. With the micrografting technique the rootstock directly provides the scion with the necessary hormonal requirements. In this paper we present data on in vitro grafting of Pelecyphora aselliformis Ehrenberg, an Appendix I CITES listed species critically endangered and sought after by the horticultural trade, on micropropagated Opuntia ficus-indica Miller. Apical and sub-apical scions of P. aselliformis were used to perform micrografting with a successful rate of 97 and 81 % respectively. Survival rate after ex vivo transfer was 85 %. We hypothesize that this method could be applied to other endangered, slow growing taxa of Cactaceae thus contributing to the conservation of this endangered family.

  19. Is in vitro micrografting a possible valid alternative to traditional micropropagation in Cactaceae? Pelecyphora aselliformis as a case study.

    PubMed

    Badalamenti, Ornella; Carra, Angela; Oddo, Elisabetta; Carimi, Francesco; Sajeva, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Several taxa of Cactaceae are endangered by overcollection for commercial purposes, and most of the family is included in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Fauna and Flora (CITES). Micropropagation may play a key role to keep the pressure off wild populations and contribute to ex situ conservation of endangered taxa. One of the limits of micropropagation is the species-specific requirement of plant regulators for each taxon and sometimes even for different genotypes. With the micrografting technique the rootstock directly provides the scion with the necessary hormonal requirements. In this paper we present data on in vitro grafting of Pelecyphora aselliformis Ehrenberg, an Appendix I CITES listed species critically endangered and sought after by the horticultural trade, on micropropagated Opuntia ficus-indica Miller. Apical and sub-apical scions of P. aselliformis were used to perform micrografting with a successful rate of 97 and 81 % respectively. Survival rate after ex vivo transfer was 85 %. We hypothesize that this method could be applied to other endangered, slow growing taxa of Cactaceae thus contributing to the conservation of this endangered family. PMID:27026897

  20. Morphological, cytological and metabolic consequences of autopolyploidization in Hylocereus (Cactaceae) species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genome doubling may have multi-level effects on the morphology, viability and physiology of polyploids compared to diploids. We studied the changes associated with autopolyploidization in two systems of somatic newly induced polyploids, diploid-autotetraploid and triploid-autohexaploid, belonging to the genus Hylocereus (Cactaceae). Stomata, fruits, seeds, embryos, and pollen were studied. Fruit pulp and seeds were subjected to metabolite profiling using established gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) Q-TOF-MS/MS (time of flight)-protocols. Results Autopolyploid lines produced lower numbers of tetrads, larger pollen grains with lower viability, larger stomata with lower density, and smaller fruits with lower seed numbers and decreased seed viability. The abundance of sugars was lower in the fruits and seeds of the two duplicated lines than in their donor lines, accompanied by increased contents of amino acids, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates, organic acids and flavonoids. Betacyanins, the major fruit pigments in diploid and triploid donors, decreased following genome doubling. Both autopolyploid Hylocereus lines thus exhibited unfavorable changes, with the outcome being more dramatic in the autohexaploid than in the autotetraploid line. Conclusion Induced autotetraploid and autohexaploid lines exhibited morphological and cytological characteristics that differed from those of their donor plants and that were accompanied by significant metabolic alterations. It is suggested that a developmental arrest occurs in the fruits of the autohexaploid line, since their pericarp shows a greater abundance of acids and of reduced sugars. We conclude that genome doubling does not necessarily confer a fitness advantage and that the extent of alterations induced by autopolyploidization depends on the genetic background of the donor genotype. PMID:24188386

  1. Atmospheric Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Embleton, Tony F. W.; Daigle, Gilles A.

    1991-01-01

    Reviewed here is the current state of knowledge with respect to each basic mechanism of sound propagation in the atmosphere and how each mechanism changes the spectral or temporal characteristics of the sound received at a distance from the source. Some of the basic processes affecting sound wave propagation which are present in any situation are discussed. They are geometrical spreading, molecular absorption, and turbulent scattering. In geometrical spreading, sound levels decrease with increasing distance from the source; there is no frequency dependence. In molecular absorption, sound energy is converted into heat as the sound wave propagates through the air; there is a strong dependence on frequency. In turbulent scattering, local variations in wind velocity and temperature induce fluctuations in phase and amplitude of the sound waves as they propagate through an inhomogeneous medium; there is a moderate dependence on frequency.

  2. Apical meristem organization and lack of establishment of the quiescent center in Cactaceae roots with determinate growth.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José Fernando; Shishkova, Svetlana; Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Dubrovsky, Joseph G

    2003-10-01

    Some species of Cactaceae from the Sonoran Desert are characterized by a determinate growth pattern of the primary root, which is important for rapid lateral-root formation and seedling establishment. An analysis of the determinate root growth can be helpful for understanding the mechanism of meristem maintenance in plants in general. Stenocereus gummosus (Engelm.) Gibson & Horak and Pachycereus pringlei (S. Watson) Britton & Rose are characterized by an open type of root apical meristem. Immunohistochemical analysis of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into S. gummosus showed that the percentage of cells passing through the S-phase in a 24-h period is the same within the zone where a population of relatively slowly proliferating cells could be established and above this zone in the meristem. This indicated the absence of the quiescent center (QC) in S. gummosus. During the second and the third days of growth, in the distal meristem portion of P. pringlei roots, a compact group of cells that had a cell cycle longer than in the proximal meristem was found, indicating the presence of the QC. However, later in development, the QC could not be detected in this species. These data suggest that during post-germination the absence of the establishment of the QC within the apical meristem and limited proliferative activity of initial cells are the main components of a determinate developmental program and that establishment of the QC is required for maintenance of the meristem and indeterminate root growth in plants.

  3. Pollination and seed dispersal of Melocactus ernestii Vaupel subsp. ernestii (Cactaceae) by lizards: an example of double mutualism.

    PubMed

    Gomes, V G N; Quirino, Z G M; Machado, I C

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies show that the mutualistic role of lizards as pollinators and seed dispersers has been underestimated, with several ecological factors promoting such plant-animal interactions, especially on oceanic islands. Our aim is to provide a quantitative assessment of pollination and seed dispersal mutualisms with lizards in continental xeric habitats. We carried out focal observations of natural populations of Melocactus ernestii (Cactaceae) in the Caatinga, a Brazilian semiarid ecosystem, in order to record the frequency of visits, kind of resource searched and behaviour of visiting animals towards flowers and/or fruits. We made a new record of the lizard Tropidurus semitaeniatus foraging on flowers and fruits of M. ernestii. During the search for nectar, T. semitaeniatus contacted the reproductive structures of the flowers and transported pollen attached to its snout. Nectar production started at 14:00 h, with an average volume of 24.4 μl and an average concentration of solutes of 33%. Approximately 80% of the seeds of M. ernestii found in the faeces of T. semitaeniatus germinated under natural conditions. The roles of T. semitaeniatus as pollinator and seed disperser for M. ernestii show a clear relationship of double mutualism between two endemic species, which may result from the environmental conditions to which both species are subject. Seasonality, low water availability and arthropod supply in the environment, high local lizard densities, continuous nectar production by the flower and fruits with juicy pulp may be influencing the visits and, consequently, pollination and seed dispersal by lizards in this cactus.

  4. Novel seed coat lignins in the Cactaceae: structure, distribution and implications for the evolution of lignin diversity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Jackson, Lisa; Nakashima, Jin; Ralph, John; Dixon, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    We have recently described a hitherto unsuspected catechyl lignin polymer (C-lignin) in the seed coats of Vanilla orchid and in cacti of one genus, Melocactus (Chen et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 2012, 109, 1772-1777.). We have now determined the lignin types in the seed coats of 130 different cactus species. Lignin in the vegetative tissues of cacti is of the normal guaiacyl/syringyl (G/S) type, but members of most genera within the subfamily Cactoidae possess seed coat lignin of the novel C-type only, which we show is a homopolymer formed by endwise β-O-4-coupling of caffeyl alcohol monomers onto the growing polymer resulting in benzodioxane units. However, the species examined within the genera Coryphantha, Cumarinia, Escobaria and Mammillaria (Cactoideae) mostly had normal G/S lignin in their seeds, as did all six species in the subfamily Opuntioidae that were examined. Seed coat lignin composition is still evolving in the Cactaceae, as seeds of one Mammillaria species (M. lasiacantha) possess only C-lignin, three Escobaria species (E. dasyacantha, E. lloydii and E. zilziana) contain an unusual lignin composed of 5-hydroxyguaiacyl units, the first report of such a polymer that occurs naturally in plants, and seeds of some species contain no lignin at all. We discuss the implications of these findings for the mechanisms that underlie the biosynthesis of these newly discovered lignin types.

  5. New Alcamide and Anti-oxidant Activity of Pilosocereus gounellei A. Weber ex K. Schum. Bly. ex Rowl. (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Maciel, Jéssica K S; Chaves, Otemberg S; Brito Filho, Severino G; Teles, Yanna C F; Fernandes, Marianne G; Assis, Temilce S; Fernandes, Pedro Dantas; de Andrade, Alberício Pereira; Felix, Leonardo P; Silva, Tania M S; Ramos, Nathalia S M; Silva, Girliane R; de Souza, Maria de Fátima Vanderlei

    2015-12-22

    The Cactaceae family is composed by 124 genera and about 1438 species. Pilosocereus gounellei, popularly known in Brazil as xique-xique, is used in folk medicine to treat prostate inflammation, gastrointestinal and urinary diseases. The pioneering phytochemical study of P. gounellei was performed using column chromatography and HPLC, resulting in the isolation of 10 substances: pinostrobin (1), β-sitosterol (2), a mixture of sitosterol 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside/stigmasterol 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (3a/3b), 13²-hydroxyphaeophytin a (4), phaeophytin a (5), a mixture of β-sitosterol and stigmasterol (6a/6b), kaempferol (7), quercetin (8), 7'-ethoxy-trans-feruloyltyramine (mariannein, 9) and trans-feruloyl tyramine (10). Compound 9 is reported for the first time in the literature. The structural characterization of the compounds was performed by analyses of 1-D and 2-D NMR data. In addition, a phenolic and flavonol total content assay was carried out, and the anti-oxidant potential of P. gounellei was demonstrated.

  6. Influence of Pleistocene glacial/interglacial cycles on the genetic structure of the mistletoe cactus Rhipsalis baccifera (Cactaceae) in Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Ornelas, Juan Francisco; Rodríguez-Gómez, Flor

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographical work on cloud forest-adapted species provides inconsistent evidence on cloud forest dynamics during glacial cycles. A study of Rhipsalis baccifera (Cactaceae), a bird-dispersed epiphytic mistletoe cactus, was conducted to investigate genetic variation at sequence data from nuclear [internal transcribed spacer (ITS), 677 bp] and chloroplast (rpl32-trnL, 1092bp) DNA for 154 individuals across the species range in Mesoamerica to determine if such patterns are consistent with the expansion/contraction model of cloud forest during glacial cycles. We conducted population and spatial genetic analyses as well as gene flow and divergence time estimates between 24 populations comprising the distribution of R. baccifera in Mexico and Guatemala to gain insight of the evolutionary history of these populations, and a complementary species distribution modeling approach to frame information derived from the genetic analyses into an explicit paleoecological context. The results revealed a phylogeographical break at the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, and high levels of genetic diversity among populations and cloud forest areas. Despite the genetic differentiation of some R. baccifera populations, the widespread ITS ribotypes suggest effective nuclear gene flow via pollen and population differentiation shown by the rpl32-trnL suggests more restricted seed flow. Predictions of species distribution models under past last glacial maximum (LGM) climatic conditions and a significant signal of demographic expansion suggest that R. baccifera populations experienced a range expansion tracking the conditions of the cloud forest distribution and shifted to the lowlands with population connectivity during the LGM.

  7. New Alcamide and Anti-oxidant Activity of Pilosocereus gounellei A. Weber ex K. Schum. Bly. ex Rowl. (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Maciel, Jéssica K S; Chaves, Otemberg S; Brito Filho, Severino G; Teles, Yanna C F; Fernandes, Marianne G; Assis, Temilce S; Fernandes, Pedro Dantas; de Andrade, Alberício Pereira; Felix, Leonardo P; Silva, Tania M S; Ramos, Nathalia S M; Silva, Girliane R; de Souza, Maria de Fátima Vanderlei

    2015-01-01

    The Cactaceae family is composed by 124 genera and about 1438 species. Pilosocereus gounellei, popularly known in Brazil as xique-xique, is used in folk medicine to treat prostate inflammation, gastrointestinal and urinary diseases. The pioneering phytochemical study of P. gounellei was performed using column chromatography and HPLC, resulting in the isolation of 10 substances: pinostrobin (1), β-sitosterol (2), a mixture of sitosterol 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside/stigmasterol 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (3a/3b), 13²-hydroxyphaeophytin a (4), phaeophytin a (5), a mixture of β-sitosterol and stigmasterol (6a/6b), kaempferol (7), quercetin (8), 7'-ethoxy-trans-feruloyltyramine (mariannein, 9) and trans-feruloyl tyramine (10). Compound 9 is reported for the first time in the literature. The structural characterization of the compounds was performed by analyses of 1-D and 2-D NMR data. In addition, a phenolic and flavonol total content assay was carried out, and the anti-oxidant potential of P. gounellei was demonstrated. PMID:26703549

  8. Chamber propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, B.

    1991-01-16

    Propagation of a heavy ion beam to the target appears possible under conditions thought to be realizable by several reactor designs. Beam quality at the lens is believed to provide adequate intensity at the target -- but the beam must pass through chamber debris and its self fields along the way. This paper reviews present consensus on propagation modes and presents recent results on the effects of photoionization of the beam ions by thermal x-rays from the heated target. Ballistic propagation through very low densities is a conservative mode. The more-speculative self-pinched mode, at 1 to 10 Torr, offers reactor advantages and is being re-examined by others. 13 refs.

  9. Insect growth regulatory effects of some extracts and sterols from Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) against Spodoptera frugiperda and Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Carlos L; Salazar, J Rodrigo; Martínez, Mariano; Aranda, Eduardo

    2005-10-01

    A methanol extract from the roots and aerial parts of Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) yielded peniocerol 1, macdougallin 2, and chichipegenin 3. The natural products 1, 2 their mixtures, MeOH and CH(2)Cl(2) extracts showed insecticidal and insect growth regulatory activity against fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)], an important insect pest of corn, and [Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera)], a pest of stored grains in Mexico. The most active compounds were 1, 2, and a mixture (M(2)) of 1 and 2 (6:4). All these extracts, compounds and the mixture had insect growth regulating (IGR) activity between 5.0 and 50.0 ppm and insecticidal effects between 50 and 300 ppm in diets. The extracts were insecticidal to larvae, with lethal doses between 100 and 200 ppm. These compounds appear to have selective effects on the pre-emergence metabolism of Coleoptera, because in all treatments of the larvae of T. molitor, pupation were shortened and this process show precociousness in relation to controls. In contrast to S. frugiperda larvae, onset of pupation was noticeably delayed. Emergence in both cases was drastically diminished. In both pupae and in the few adults that were able to emerge, many deformations were observed. The results of these assays indicated that the compounds were more active than other known natural insect growth inhibitors such as gedunin and methanol extracts of Cedrela salvadorensis and Yucca periculosa. Peniocerol, macdougallin and chichipegenin, as well as mixtures of these substances, may be useful as natural insecticidal agents.

  10. Insect growth regulatory effects of some extracts and sterols from Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) against Spodoptera frugiperda and Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Carlos L; Salazar, J Rodrigo; Martínez, Mariano; Aranda, Eduardo

    2005-10-01

    A methanol extract from the roots and aerial parts of Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) yielded peniocerol 1, macdougallin 2, and chichipegenin 3. The natural products 1, 2 their mixtures, MeOH and CH(2)Cl(2) extracts showed insecticidal and insect growth regulatory activity against fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)], an important insect pest of corn, and [Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera)], a pest of stored grains in Mexico. The most active compounds were 1, 2, and a mixture (M(2)) of 1 and 2 (6:4). All these extracts, compounds and the mixture had insect growth regulating (IGR) activity between 5.0 and 50.0 ppm and insecticidal effects between 50 and 300 ppm in diets. The extracts were insecticidal to larvae, with lethal doses between 100 and 200 ppm. These compounds appear to have selective effects on the pre-emergence metabolism of Coleoptera, because in all treatments of the larvae of T. molitor, pupation were shortened and this process show precociousness in relation to controls. In contrast to S. frugiperda larvae, onset of pupation was noticeably delayed. Emergence in both cases was drastically diminished. In both pupae and in the few adults that were able to emerge, many deformations were observed. The results of these assays indicated that the compounds were more active than other known natural insect growth inhibitors such as gedunin and methanol extracts of Cedrela salvadorensis and Yucca periculosa. Peniocerol, macdougallin and chichipegenin, as well as mixtures of these substances, may be useful as natural insecticidal agents. PMID:16122768

  11. The adaptive value of cued seed dispersal in desert plants: Seed retention and release in Mammillaria pectinifera (Cactaceae), a small globose cactus.

    PubMed

    Peters, Edward M; Martorell, Carlos; Ezcurra, Exequiel

    2009-02-01

    Serotiny, or delayed seed dispersal, is common in fluctuating environments because it hedges the risks of establishment. Mammillaria pectinifera (Cactaceae) facultatively expels fruits in the year they are produced or retains them to disperse the seed over several years. We tested whether M. pectinifera increased fruit expulsion as a response to increased rainfall. While no fruit expulsion was observed in 1997, a dry year, in the wetter 1998 around 20% of all fruits formed were expelled from the maternal plant. A greenhouse experiment showed that high moisture results in the plants expelling all their fruits. Because in 1998 establishment was five times higher than in 1997, this response seems to be highly adaptive: Active fruit expulsion and consequent seed release increases the probability of establishment during pulses of high precipitation.

  12. Managing diversity: Domestication and gene flow in Stenocereus stellatus Riccob. (Cactaceae) in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Cruse-Sanders, Jennifer M; Parker, Kathleen C; Friar, Elizabeth A; Huang, Daisie I; Mashayekhi, Saeideh; Prince, Linda M; Otero-Arnaiz, Adriana; Casas, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellite markers (N = 5) were developed for analysis of genetic variation in 15 populations of the columnar cactus Stenocereus stellatus, managed under traditional agriculture practices in central Mexico. Microsatellite diversity was analyzed within and among populations, between geographic regions, and among population management types to provide detailed insight into historical gene flow rates and population dynamics associated with domestication. Our results corroborate a greater diversity in populations managed by farmers compared with wild ones (HE = 0.64 vs. 0.55), but with regional variation between populations among regions. Although farmers propagated S. stellatus vegetatively in home gardens to diversify their stock, asexual recruitment also occurred naturally in populations where more marginal conditions have limited sexual recruitment, resulting in lower genetic diversity. Therefore, a clear-cut relationship between the occurrence of asexual recruitment and genetic diversity was not evident. Two managed populations adjacent to towns were identified as major sources of gene movement in each sampled region, with significant migration to distant as well as nearby populations. Coupled with the absence of significant bottlenecks, this suggests a mechanism for promoting genetic diversity in managed populations through long distance gene exchange. Cultivation of S. stellatus in close proximity to wild populations has led to complex patterns of genetic variation across the landscape that reflects the interaction of natural and cultural processes. As molecular markers become available for nontraditional crops and novel analysis techniques allow us to detect and evaluate patterns of genetic diversity, genetic studies provide valuable insights into managing crop genetic resources into the future against a backdrop of global change. Traditional agriculture systems play an important role in maintaining genetic diversity for plant species. PMID:23762520

  13. The universal propagator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klauder, John R.

    1993-01-01

    For a general Hamiltonian appropriate to a single canonical degree of freedom, a universal propagator with the property that it correctly evolves the coherent-state Hilbert space representatives for an arbitrary fiducial vector is characterized and defined. The universal propagator is explicitly constructed for the harmonic oscillator, with a result that differs from the conventional propagators for this system.

  14. NASA Propagation Studies Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angkasa, Krisjani S.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA propagation studies objective is to enable the development of new commercial satellite communication systems and services by providing timely data and models about propagation of satellite radio signals through the intervening environment and to support NASA missions. In partnership with industry and academia, the program leverages unique NASA assets (currently Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) to obtain propagation data. The findings of the study are disseminated through referred journals, NASA reference publications, workshops, electronic media, and direct interface with industry.

  15. Distinguishing suitable biotypes of Dactylopius tomentosus (Hemiptera: Dactylopiidae) for biological control of Cylindropuntia fulgida var. fulgida (Caryophyllales: Cactaceae) in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mathenge, C W; Holford, P; Hoffmann, J H; Zimmermann, H G; Spooner-Hart, R; Beattie, G A C

    2009-12-01

    Cylindropuntia fulgida (Engelmann) F.M. Knuth var. fulgida (Engelmann) F.M. Knuth (Cff) (Caryophyllales: Cactaceae) is native to Mexico and Arizona and was introduced into South Africa for ornamental purposes. It subsequently became highly invasive, necessitating control. The cochineal insect, Dactylopius tomentosus (Lamarck) (Hemiptera: Dactylopiidae), was selected as a potential biological control agent based on its restricted host range among Cylindropuntia species and previous success in controlling C. imbricata (DC.) F. Knuth (Ci). Eight D. tomentosus provenances (Cholla, Cholla E, Fulgida, Mamillata, Imbricata, Tunicata U, Tunicata V and Rosea) from Cylindropuntia species in their native ranges were reared on Cff, whilst Cholla and Imbricata were also reared on Ci. Large differences were found in the development and survival of crawlers, and in the reproductive capacity of females. Three subjective categories of provenance interaction with host plants were identified based on a fitness index (FI) calculated from data relating to crawler survival, female development time and fecundity: (i) thriving (FI > or = 1) - insects had shorter developmental times, high crawler survival and highly fecund females (Cholla); (ii) surviving (FI<1 but >0) - insects had extended development times, low crawler survival and low fecundity (Imbricata, Fulgida and Mamillata); and (iii) dying (FI = 0) - insects died before or at the second instar (Rosea, Tunicata U and Tunicata V). Cholla, therefore, is highly suitable for biological control of Cff in South Africa. In addition, Cholla thrived on Cff but only survived on Ci whilst, in contrast, Imbricata thrived on Ci but only survived on Cff. This differential ability of provenances to thrive or survive on different host plants demonstrated that host adapted biotypes of D. tomentosus exist; therefore, biotypes should be taken into account when considering this species as a biological control agent of cactus weeds. PMID:19302723

  16. Metabolism of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine by Clostridium bifermentans strain HAW-1 and several other H2-producing fermentative anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-Shen; Paquet, Louise; Halasz, Annamaria; Manno, Dominic; Hawari, Jalal

    2004-08-01

    Several H2-producing fermentative anaerobic bacteria including Clostridium, Klebsiella and Fusobacteria degraded octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) (36 microM) to formaldehyde (HCHO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) with rates ranging from 5 to 190 nmol h(-1)g [dry weight] of cells(-1). Among these strains, C. bifermentans strain HAW-1 grew and transformed HMX rapidly with the detection of the two key intermediates the mononitroso product and methylenedinitramine. Its cellular extract alone did not seem to degrade HMX appreciably, but degraded much faster in the presence of H2, NADH or NADPH. The disappearance of HMX was concurrent with the release of nitrite without the formation of the nitroso derivative(s). Results suggest that two types of enzymes were involved in HMX metabolism: one for denitration and the second for reduction to the nitroso derivative(s).

  17. Limitations in scatter propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, E. W.

    1982-04-01

    A short description of the main scatter propagation mechanisms is presented; troposcatter, meteor burst communication and chaff scatter. For these propagation modes, in particular for troposcatter, the important specific limitations discussed are: link budget and resulting hardware consequences, diversity, mobility, information transfer and intermodulation and intersymbol interference, frequency range and future extension in frequency range for troposcatter, and compatibility with other services (EMC).

  18. NASA Propagation Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  19. NASA propagation information center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1990-07-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  20. Propagation data bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-12-01

    Existing data bases accumulated as the result of experiments to gather propagation data on millimeter wave Earth-space links are described. The satellites used are described and results of the significant experiments conducted in the United States are summarized. The data bases consist primarily of cumulative attenuation statistics, though some depolarization measurements are included. Additional summaries of propagation data are cited.

  1. Propagation research in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakana, Hiromitsu

    1991-01-01

    L-band propagation measurements for land-mobile, maritime, and aeronautical satellite communications have been carried out by using the Japanese Engineering Test Satellite-Five (ETS-5) which was launched in Aug. 1987. This paper presents propagation characteristics for each of the mobile satellite communication channels.

  2. Millimeter wavelength propagation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    The investigations conducted for the Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Studies during the period December, 1966, to June 1974 are reported. These efforts included the preparation for the ATS-5 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment and the subsequent data acquisition and data analysis. The emphasis of the OSU participation in this experiment was placed on the determination of reliability improvement resulting from the use of space diversity on a millimeter wavelength earth-space communication link. Related measurements included the determination of the correlation between radiometric temperature and attenuation along the earth-space propagation path. Along with this experimental effort a theoretical model was developed for the prediction of attenuation statistics on single and spatially separated earth space propagation paths. A High Resolution Radar/Radiometer System and Low Resolution Radar System were developed and implemented for the study of intense rain cells in preparation for the ATS-6 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment.

  3. Wave propagation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenenboom, P. H. L.

    The phenomenon of wave propagation is encountered frequently in a variety of engineering disciplines. It has been realized that for a growing number of problems the solution can only be obtained by discretization of the boundary. Advantages of the Boundary Element Method (BEM) over domain-type methods are related to the reduction of the number of space dimensions and of the modelling effort. It is demonstrated how the BEM can be applied to wave propagation phenomena by establishing the fundamental relationships. A numerical solution procedure is also suggested. In connection with a discussion of the retarded potential formulation, it is shown how the wave propagation problem can be cast into a Boundary Integral Formulation (BIF). The wave propagation problem in the BIF can be solved by time-successive evaluation of the boundary integrals. The example of pressure wave propagation following a sodium-water reaction in a Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor steam generator is discussed.

  4. Cytogeography of the Humifusa clade of Opuntia s.s. Mill. 1754 (Cactaceae, Opuntioideae, Opuntieae): correlations with pleistocene refugia and morphological traits in a polyploid complex

    PubMed Central

    Majure, Lucas C.; Judd, Walter S.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Soltis, Douglas E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Ploidy has been well studied and used extensively in the genus Opuntia to determine species boundaries, detect evidence of hybridization, and infer evolutionary patterns. We carried out chromosome counts for all members of the Humifusa clade to ascertain whether geographic patterns are associated with differences in ploidy. We then related chromosomal data to observed morphological variability, polyploid formation, and consequently the evolutionary history of the clade. We counted chromosomes of 277 individuals from throughout the ranges of taxa included within the Humifusa clade, with emphasis placed on the widely distributed species, Opuntia humifusa (Raf.) Raf., 1820 s.l. and Opuntia macrorhiza Engelm., 1850 s.l. We also compiled previous counts made for species in the clade along with our new counts to plot geographic distributions of the polyploid and diploid taxa. A phylogeny using nuclear ribosomal ITS sequence data was reconstructed to determine whether ploidal variation is consistent with cladogenesis. We discovered that diploids of the Humifusa clade are restricted to the southeastern United States (U.S.), eastern Texas, and southeastern New Mexico. Polyploid members of the clade, however, are much more widely distributed, occurring as far north as the upper midwestern U.S. (e.g., Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin). Morphological differentiation, although sometimes cryptic, is commonly observed among diploid and polyploid cytotypes, and such morphological distinctions may be useful in diagnosing possible cryptic species. Certain polyploid populations of Opuntia humifusa s.l. and Opuntia macrorhiza s.l., however, exhibit introgressive morphological characters, complicating species delineations. Phylogenetically, the Humifusa clade forms two subclades that are distributed, respectively, in the southeastern U.S. (including all southeastern U.S. diploids, polyploid Opuntia abjecta Small, 1923, and polyploid Opuntia pusilla (Haw.) Haw., 1812) and the

  5. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  6. Propagation of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions for environmental noise pollution lie in systematic study of many basic processes such as reflection, scattering, and spreading. Noise propagation processes should be identified in different situations and assessed for their relative importance. (PS)

  7. Wave Propagation Program

    SciTech Connect

    McCandless, Kathleen; Petersson, Anders; Nilsson, Stefan; Sjogreen, Bjorn

    2007-01-08

    WPP is a massively parallel, 3D, C++, finite-difference elastodynamic wave propagation code. Typical applications for wave propagation with WPP include: evaluation of seismic event scenarios and damage from earthquakes, non-destructive evaluation of materials, underground facility detection, oil and gas exploration, predicting the electro-magnetic fields in accelerators, and acoustic noise generation. For more information, see User’s Manual [1].

  8. Database for propagation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1991-01-01

    A propagation researcher or a systems engineer who intends to use the results of a propagation experiment is generally faced with various database tasks such as the selection of the computer software, the hardware, and the writing of the programs to pass the data through the models of interest. This task is repeated every time a new experiment is conducted or the same experiment is carried out at a different location generating different data. Thus the users of this data have to spend a considerable portion of their time learning how to implement the computer hardware and the software towards the desired end. This situation may be facilitated considerably if an easily accessible propagation database is created that has all the accepted (standardized) propagation phenomena models approved by the propagation research community. Also, the handling of data will become easier for the user. Such a database construction can only stimulate the growth of the propagation research it if is available to all the researchers, so that the results of the experiment conducted by one researcher can be examined independently by another, without different hardware and software being used. The database may be made flexible so that the researchers need not be confined only to the contents of the database. Another way in which the database may help the researchers is by the fact that they will not have to document the software and hardware tools used in their research since the propagation research community will know the database already. The following sections show a possible database construction, as well as properties of the database for the propagation research.

  9. NASA Propagation Studies Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angkasa, Krisjani S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes an Internet website which provides information to enable the development of new commerical satellite systems and services by providing timely data and models about the propagation of satellite radio signals. In partnership with industry and academia, the program leverages NASA assets, currently the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), to obtain propagation data. The findings of the study are disseminated through refereed journals, NASA reference publications, workshops, electronic media, and direct interface with industry.

  10. Allozyme Diversity and Morphometrics of Melocactus paucispinus (Cactaceae) and Evidence for Hybridization with M. concinnus in the Chapada Diamantina, North-eastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    LAMBERT, SABRINA MOTA; BORBA, EDUARDO LEITE; MACHADO, MARLON CÂMARA; ANDRADE, SÓNIA CRISTINA DA SILVA

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Melocacatus paucispinus (Cactaceae) is endemic to the state of Bahia, Brazil, and due to its rarity and desirability to collectors it has been considered threatened with extinction. This species is usually sympatric and inter-fertile with M. concinnus, and morphological evidence for hybridization between them is present in some populations. Levels of genetic and morphological variation and sub-structuring in populations of these species were assessed and an attempt was made to verify the occurrence of natural hybridization between them. • Methods Genetic variability was surveyed using allozymes (12 loci) and morphological variability using multivariate morphometric analyses (17 vegetative characters) in ten populations of M. paucispinus and three of M. concinnus occurring in the Chapada Diamantina, Bahia. • Key Results Genetic variability was low in both species (P = 0·0–33·3, A = 1·0–1·6, He = 0·000–0·123 in M. paucispinus; P = 0·0–25·0, A = 1·0–1·4, He = 0·000–0·104 in M. concinnus). Deficit of heterozygotes within the populations was detected in both species, with high values of FIS (0·732 and 0·901 in M. paucispinus and M. concinnus, respectively). Evidence of hybridization was detected by the relative allele frequency in the two diaphorase loci. High levels of genetic (FST = 0·504 in M. paucispinus and 0·349 in M. concinnus) and morphological (A = 0·20 in M. paucispinus and 0·17 in M. concinnus) structuring among populations were found. • Conclusions The Melocactus spp. displayed levels of genetic variability lower than the values reported for other cactus species. The evidence indicates the occurrence of introgression in both species at two sites. The high FST values cannot be explained by geographical substructuring, but are consistent with hybridization. Conversely, morphological differentiation in M. paucispinus, but not in M. concinnus, is probably due to isolation by distance. PMID:16423866

  11. DROMO Propagator Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutxua, H.; Sanjurjo-Rivo, M.; Peláez, J.

    2013-12-01

    In year 2000 a house-made orbital propagator was developed by the SDGUPM (former Grupo de Dinámica de Tethers) based in a set of redundant variables including Euler parameters. This propagator was called DROMO. and it was mainly used in numerical simulations of electrodynamic tethers. It was presented for the first time in the international meeting V Jornadas de Trabajo en Mecánica Celeste, held in Albarracín, Spain, in 2002 (see reference 1). The special perturbation method associated with DROMO can be consulted in the paper.2 In year 1975, Andre Deprit in reference 3 proposes a propagation scheme very similar to the one in which DROMO is based, by using the ideal frame concept of Hansen. The different approaches used in references 3 and 2 gave rise to a small controversy. In this paper we carried out a different deduction of the DROMO propagator, underlining its close relation with the Hansen ideal frame concept, and also the similarities and the differences with the theory carried out by Deprit in 3. Simultaneously we introduce some improvements in the formulation that leads to a more synthetic propagator.

  12. Automatic crack propagation tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Weidner, T. J.; Yehia, N. A. B.; Burd, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element based approach to fully automatic crack propagation tracking is presented. The procedure presented combines fully automatic mesh generation with linear fracture mechanics techniques in a geometrically based finite element code capable of automatically tracking cracks in two-dimensional domains. The automatic mesh generator employs the modified-quadtree technique. Crack propagation increment and direction are predicted using a modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion employing the numerical results obtained by meshes of quadratic displacement and singular crack tip finite elements. Example problems are included to demonstrate the procedure.

  13. DROMO propagator revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutxua, Hodei; Sanjurjo-Rivo, Manuel; Peláez, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    In the year 2000 an in-house orbital propagator called DROMO (Peláez et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 97:131-150, 2007. doi: 10.1007/s10569-006-9056-3) was developed by the Space Dynamics Group of the Technical University of Madrid, based in a set of redundant variables including Euler-Rodrigues parameters. An original deduction of the DROMO propagator is carried out, underlining its close relation with the ideal frame concept introduced by Hansen (Abh der Math-Phys Cl der Kon Sachs Ges der Wissensch 5:41-218, 1857). Based on the very same concept, Deprit (J Res Natl Bur Stand Sect B Math Sci 79B(1-2):1-15, 1975) proposed a formulation for orbit propagation. In this paper, similarities and differences with the theory carried out by Deprit are analyzed. Simultaneously, some improvements are introduced in the formulation, that lead to a more synthetic and better performing propagator. Also, the long-term effect of the oblateness of the primary is studied in terms of DROMO variables, and new numerical results are presented to evaluate the performance of the method.

  14. COBE nonspinning attitude propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D.

    1989-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft will exhibit complex attitude motion consisting of a spin rate of approximately -0.8 revolution per minute (rpm) about the x-axis and simultaneous precession of the spin axis at a rate of one revolution per orbit (rpo) about the nearly perpendicular spacecraft-to-Sun vector. The effect of the combined spinning and precession is to make accurate attitude propagation difficult and the 1-degree (3 sigma) solution accuracy goal problematic. To improve this situation, an intermediate reference frame is introduced, and the angular velocity divided into two parts. The nonspinning part is that which would be observed if there were no rotation about the X-axis. The spinning part is simply the X-axis component of the angular velocity. The two are propagated independently and combined whenever the complete attitude is needed. This approach is better than the usual one-step method because each of the two angular velocities look nearly constant in their respective reference frames. Since the angular velocities are almost constant, the approximations made in discrete time propagation are more nearly true. To demonstrate the advantages of this nonspinning method, attitude is propagated as outlined above and is then compared with the results of the one-step method. Over the 100-minute COBE orbit, the one-step error grows to several degrees while the nonspinning error remains negligible.

  15. Transionospheric Propagation Code (TIPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.; Kelley, T.A.

    1990-10-01

    The Transionospheric Propagation Code is a computer program developed at Los Alamos National Lab to perform certain tasks related to the detection of vhf signals following propagation through the ionosphere. The code is written in Fortran 77, runs interactively and was designed to be as machine independent as possible. A menu format in which the user is prompted to supply appropriate parameters for a given task has been adopted for the input while the output is primarily in the form of graphics. The user has the option of selecting from five basic tasks, namely transionospheric propagation, signal filtering, signal processing, DTOA study, and DTOA uncertainty study. For the first task a specified signal is convolved against the impulse response function of the ionosphere to obtain the transionospheric signal. The user is given a choice of four analytic forms for the input pulse or of supplying a tabular form. The option of adding Gaussian-distributed white noise of spectral noise to the input signal is also provided. The deterministic ionosphere is characterized to first order in terms of a total electron content (TEC) along the propagation path. In addition, a scattering model parameterized in terms of a frequency coherence bandwidth is also available. In the second task, detection is simulated by convolving a given filter response against the transionospheric signal. The user is given a choice of a wideband filter or a narrowband Gaussian filter. It is also possible to input a filter response. The third task provides for quadrature detection, envelope detection, and three different techniques for time-tagging the arrival of the transionospheric signal at specified receivers. The latter algorithms can be used to determine a TEC and thus take out the effects of the ionosphere to first order. Task four allows the user to construct a table of delta-times-of-arrival (DTOAs) vs TECs for a specified pair of receivers.

  16. Florida's propagation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmken, Henry; Henning, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    One of the key goals of the Florida Center is to obtain a maximum of useful information on propagation behavior unique to its subtropical weather and subtropical climate. Such weather data is of particular interest when it is (or has the potential to become) useful for developing and implementing techniques to compensate for adverse weather effects. Also discussed are data observations, current challenges, CDF's, sun movement, and diversity experiments.

  17. PIV uncertainty propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciacchitano, Andrea; Wieneke, Bernhard

    2016-08-01

    This paper discusses the propagation of the instantaneous uncertainty of PIV measurements to statistical and instantaneous quantities of interest derived from the velocity field. The expression of the uncertainty of vorticity, velocity divergence, mean value and Reynolds stresses is derived. It is shown that the uncertainty of vorticity and velocity divergence requires the knowledge of the spatial correlation between the error of the x and y particle image displacement, which depends upon the measurement spatial resolution. The uncertainty of statistical quantities is often dominated by the random uncertainty due to the finite sample size and decreases with the square root of the effective number of independent samples. Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to assess the accuracy of the uncertainty propagation formulae. Furthermore, three experimental assessments are carried out. In the first experiment, a turntable is used to simulate a rigid rotation flow field. The estimated uncertainty of the vorticity is compared with the actual vorticity error root-mean-square, with differences between the two quantities within 5-10% for different interrogation window sizes and overlap factors. A turbulent jet flow is investigated in the second experimental assessment. The reference velocity, which is used to compute the reference value of the instantaneous flow properties of interest, is obtained with an auxiliary PIV system, which features a higher dynamic range than the measurement system. Finally, the uncertainty quantification of statistical quantities is assessed via PIV measurements in a cavity flow. The comparison between estimated uncertainty and actual error demonstrates the accuracy of the proposed uncertainty propagation methodology.

  18. Temporal scaling in information propagation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-01-01

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers. PMID:24939414

  19. Temporal scaling in information propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-01

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  20. Transport with Feynman propagators

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.H.

    1990-11-06

    Richard Feynman's formulation of quantum electrodynamics suggests a Monte Carlo algorithm for calculating wave propagation. We call this the Sum Over All Paths (SOAP) method. The method is applied to calculate diffraction by double slits of finite width and by a reflection grating. Calculations of reflection by plane and parabolic mirrors of finite aperture and from several figured surfaces are shown. An application to a one-dimensional scattering problem is discussed. A variation of SOAP can be applied to the diffusion equation. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Shaping propagation invariant laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soskind, Michael; Soskind, Rose; Soskind, Yakov

    2015-11-01

    Propagation-invariant structured laser beams possess several unique properties and play an important role in various photonics applications. The majority of propagation invariant beams are produced in the form of laser modes emanating from stable laser cavities. Therefore, their spatial structure is limited by the intracavity mode formation. We show that several types of anamorphic optical systems (AOSs) can be effectively employed to shape laser beams into a variety of propagation invariant structured fields with different shapes and phase distributions. We present a propagation matrix approach for designing AOSs and defining mode-matching conditions required for preserving propagation invariance of the output shaped fields. The propagation matrix approach was selected, as it provides a more straightforward approach in designing AOSs for shaping propagation-invariant laser beams than the alternative technique based on the Gouy phase evolution, especially in the case of multielement AOSs. Several practical configurations of optical systems that are suitable for shaping input laser beams into a diverse variety of structured propagation invariant laser beams are also presented. The laser beam shaping approach was applied by modeling propagation characteristics of several input laser beam types, including Hermite-Gaussian, Laguerre-Gaussian, and Ince-Gaussian structured field distributions. The influence of the Ince-Gaussian beam semifocal separation parameter and the azimuthal orientation between the input laser beams and the AOSs onto the resulting shape of the propagation invariant laser beams is presented as well.

  2. An analysis of rumor propagation based on propagation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhen-jun; Liu, Yong-mei; Wang, Ke-xi

    2016-02-01

    A propagation force is introduced into the analysis of rumor propagation to address uncertainty in the process. The propagation force is portrayed as a fuzzy variable, and a category of new parameters with fuzzy variables is defined. The classic susceptible, infected, recovered (SIR) model is modified using these parameters, a fuzzy reproductive number is introduced into the modified model, and the rationality of the fuzzy reproductive number is illuminated through calculation and comparison. Rumor control strategies are also discussed.

  3. ACTS propagation experiment discussion: Ka-band propagation measurements using the ACTS propagation terminal and the CSU-CHILL and Space Communications Technology Center Florida propagation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bringi, V. N.; Chandrasekar, V.; Mueller, Eugene A.; Turk, Joseph; Beaver, John; Helmken, Henry F.; Henning, Rudy

    1993-01-01

    Papers on Ka-band propagation measurements using the ACTS propagation terminal and the Colorado State University CHILL multiparameter radar and on Space Communications Technology Center Florida Propagation Program are discussed. Topics covered include: microwave radiative transfer and propagation models; NASA propagation terminal status; ACTS channel characteristics; FAU receive only terminal; FAU terminal status; and propagation testbed.

  4. The ACTS propagation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakraborty, Dayamoy; Davarian, Faramaz

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) is to demonstrate the feasibility of the Ka-band (20 and 30 GHz) spectrum for satellite communications, as well as to help maintain U.S. leadership in satellite communications. ACTS incorporates such innovative schemes as time division multiple access (TDMA), microwave and baseband switching, onboard regeneration, and adaptive application of coding during rain-fade conditions. The success or failure of the ACTS experiment will depend on how accurately the rain-fade statistics and fade dynamics can be predicted in order to derive an appropriate algorithm that will combat weather vagaries, specifically for links with small terminals, such as very small aperture terminals (VSAT's) where the power margin is a premium. This article describes the planning process and hardware development program that will comply with the recommendations of the ACTS propagation study groups.

  5. Testing for clonal propagation.

    PubMed

    Gregorius, H-R

    2005-02-01

    The conceptual basis for testing clonal propagation is reconsidered with the result that two steps need to be distinguished clearly: (1) specification of the characteristics of multilocus genotype frequencies that result from sexual reproduction together with the kinds of deviations from these characteristics that are produced by clonal propagation, and (2) a statistical method for detecting these deviations in random samples. It is pointed out that a meaningful characterization of sexual reproduction reflects the association of genes in (multilocus) genotypes within the bounds set by the underlying gene frequencies. An appropriate measure of relative gene association is developed which is equivalent to a multilocus generalization of the standardized gametic disequilibrium (linkage disequilibrium). Its application to the characterization of sexually produced multilocus genotypes is demonstrated. The resulting hypothesis on the frequency of a sexually produced genotype is tested with the help of the (significance) probability of obtaining at least two copies of the genotype in question in a random sample of a given size. If at least two copies of the genotype are observed in a sample, and if the probability is significant, then the hypothesis of sexual reproduction is rejected in favor of the assumption that all copies of the genotype belong to the same clone. Common testing approaches rest on the hypothesis of completely independent association of genes in genotypes and on the (significance) probability of obtaining at least as many copies of a genotype as observed in a sample. The validity of these approaches is discussed in relation to the above considerations and recommendations are set out for conducting appropriate tests.

  6. Propagation effects at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, R. K.

    The lower atmosphere can affect millimeter wave communication system performance by producing large variations in signal level. Several different propagation phenomena are responsible absorption by oxygen and water vapor, scattering by turbulent fluctuations in the index of refraction, and attenuation by clouds, fog, or rain. Models are available for the calculation of propagation effects on a path when the meteorological conditions are known. This paper reviews the available propagation models for the prediction of link reliability.

  7. Propagation Terminal Design and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James

    2015-01-01

    The NASA propagation terminal has been designed and developed by the Glenn Research Center and is presently deployed at over 5 NASA and partner ground stations worldwide collecting information on the effects of the atmosphere on Ka-band and millimeter wave communications links. This lecture provides an overview of the fundamentals and requirements of the measurement of atmospheric propagation effects and, specifically, the types of hardware and digital signal processing techniques employed by current state-of-the-art propagation terminal systems.

  8. Modeling turbulent flame propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashurst, W.T.

    1994-08-01

    Laser diagnostics and flow simulation techniques axe now providing information that if available fifty years ago, would have allowed Damkoehler to show how turbulence generates flame area. In the absence of this information, many turbulent flame speed models have been created, most based on Kolmogorov concepts which ignore the turbulence vortical structure, Over the last twenty years, the vorticity structure in mixing layers and jets has been shown to determine the entrainment and mixing behavior and these effects need to be duplicated by combustion models. Turbulence simulations reveal the intense vorticity structure as filaments and simulations of passive flamelet propagation show how this vorticity Creates flame area and defines the shape of the expected chemical reaction surface. Understanding how volume expansion interacts with flow structure should improve experimental methods for determining turbulent flame speed. Since the last decade has given us such powerful new tools to create and see turbulent combustion microscopic behavior, it seems that a solution of turbulent combustion within the next decade would not be surprising in the hindsight of 2004.

  9. Seismic wave propagation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.; Olsen, K.B.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A hybrid, finite-difference technique was developed for modeling nonlinear soil amplification from three-dimensional, finite-fault radiation patters for earthquakes in arbitrary earth models. The method was applied to the 17 January 1994 Northridge earthquake. Particle velocities were computed on a plane at 5-km depth, immediately above the causative fault. Time-series of the strike-perpendicular, lateral velocities then were propagated vertically in a soil column typical of the San Fernando Valley. Suitable material models were adapted from a suite used to model ground motions at the US Nevada Test Site. The effects of nonlinearity reduced relative spectral amplitudes by about 40% at frequencies above 1.5 Hz but only by 10% at lower frequencies. Runs made with source-depth amplitudes increased by a factor of two showed relative amplitudes above 1.5 Hz reduced by a total of 70% above 1.5 Hz and 20% at lower frequencies. Runs made with elastic-plastic material models showed similar behavior to runs made with Masing-Rule models.

  10. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M&O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report.

  11. VLF Waveguide Propagation: The Basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Kenneth J. W.

    2010-10-01

    In recent times, research has moved towards using VLF radio transmissions propagating in the earth-ionosphere waveguide as a detector of a variety of transient geophysical phenomena. A correct interpretation of such results depends critically on understanding the propagation characteristics of the path being monitored. The observed effects will vary depending on time of day, path length, path orientation, magnetic latitude and VLF frequency. This paper provides a brief tutorial of the relevant propagation dependencies for medium to long VLF paths best understood in terms of waveguide mode theory together with results either not previously published, not published in the open scientific literature or whose significance has been little recognised.

  12. The RADLAC beam propagation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Shope, S.L.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Wagner, J.S.; Turman, B.N.; Crist, C.E. ); Welch, D.R.; Struve, K.W. )

    1992-01-01

    The most recent RADLAC experiments studied propagation and hose stability of a high current beam propagating in the atmosphere, and confirmed the convective nature of the hose instability. The unique combination of high beam current and extremely small initial perturbation, allowed saturation of the hose instability to be observed for the first time. Data on high current propagation was needed because the current scaling is more complex than energy scaling. It was important to collect data at atmospheric pressure to insure that subtle air chemistry effects such as avalanche did not distort the experiment. With this philosophy, the results should be directly scaleable to applications at higher energy.

  13. The RADLAC beam propagation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Shope, S.L.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Wagner, J.S.; Turman, B.N.; Crist, C.E.; Welch, D.R.; Struve, K.W.

    1992-06-01

    The most recent RADLAC experiments studied propagation and hose stability of a high current beam propagating in the atmosphere, and confirmed the convective nature of the hose instability. The unique combination of high beam current and extremely small initial perturbation, allowed saturation of the hose instability to be observed for the first time. Data on high current propagation was needed because the current scaling is more complex than energy scaling. It was important to collect data at atmospheric pressure to insure that subtle air chemistry effects such as avalanche did not distort the experiment. With this philosophy, the results should be directly scaleable to applications at higher energy.

  14. The NASA radiowave propagation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the NASA radiowave Propagation Program are to enable new satellite communication applications and to enhance existing satellite communication networks. These objectives are achieved by supporting radio wave propagation studies and disseminating the study results in a timely fashion. Studies initiated by this program in the 1980s enabled the infant concept of conducting mobile communications via satellite to reach a state of relative maturity in 1990. The program also supported the satellite communications community by publishing and revising two handbooks dealing with radio wave propagation effects for frequencies below and above 10 GHz, respectively. The program has served the international community through its support of the International Telecommunications Union. It supports state of the art work at universities. Currently, the program is focusing on the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) and its propagation needs. An overview of the program's involvement in the ACTS project is given.

  15. Reconstruction of nonlinear wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fleischer, Jason W; Barsi, Christopher; Wan, Wenjie

    2013-04-23

    Disclosed are systems and methods for characterizing a nonlinear propagation environment by numerically propagating a measured output waveform resulting from a known input waveform. The numerical propagation reconstructs the input waveform, and in the process, the nonlinear environment is characterized. In certain embodiments, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment facilitates determination of an unknown input based on a measured output. Similarly, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment also facilitates formation of a desired output based on a configurable input. In both situations, the input thus characterized and the output thus obtained include features that would normally be lost in linear propagations. Such features can include evanescent waves and peripheral waves, such that an image thus obtained are inherently wide-angle, farfield form of microscopy.

  16. The NASA radiowave propagation program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davarian, Faramaz

    The objectives of the NASA radiowave Propagation Program are to enable new satellite communication applications and to enhance existing satellite communication networks. These objectives are achieved by supporting radio wave propagation studies and disseminating the study results in a timely fashion. Studies initiated by this program in the 1980s enabled the infant concept of conducting mobile communications via satellite to reach a state of relative maturity in 1990. The program also supported the satellite communications community by publishing and revising two handbooks dealing with radio wave propagation effects for frequencies below and above 10 GHz, respectively. The program has served the international community through its support of the International Telecommunications Union. It supports state of the art work at universities. Currently, the program is focusing on the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) and its propagation needs. An overview of the program's involvement in the ACTS project is given.

  17. Fundamentals of Seismic Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Chris

    2004-08-01

    Presenting a comprehensive introduction to the propagation of high-frequency body-waves in elastodynamics, this volume develops the theory of seismic wave propagation in acoustic, elastic and anisotropic media to allow seismic waves to be modelled in complex, realistic three-dimensional Earth models. The book is a text for graduate courses in theoretical seismology, and a reference for all academic and industrial seismologists using numerical modelling methods. Exercises and suggestions for further reading are included in each chapter.

  18. The physical theory and propagation model of THz atmospheric propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Yao, J. Q.; Xu, D. G.; Wang, J. L.; Wang, P.

    2011-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is extensively applied in diverse fields, such as space communication, Earth environment observation, atmosphere science, remote sensing and so on. And the research on propagation features of THz wave in the atmosphere becomes more and more important. This paper firstly illuminates the advantages and outlook of THz in space technology. Then it introduces the theoretical framework of THz atmospheric propagation, including some fundamental physical concepts and processes. The attenuation effect (especially the absorption of water vapor), the scattering of aerosol particles and the effect of turbulent flow mainly influence THz atmosphere propagation. Fundamental physical laws are illuminated as well, such as Lamber-beer law, Mie scattering theory and radiative transfer equation. The last part comprises the demonstration and comparison of THz atmosphere propagation models like Moliere(V5), SARTre and AMATERASU. The essential problems are the deep analysis of physical mechanism of this process, the construction of atmospheric propagation model and databases of every kind of material in the atmosphere, and the standardization of measurement procedures.

  19. Atmospheric millimeter wave propagation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebe, H. J.

    1983-12-01

    The neutral atmosphere is characterized for the frequency range from 1 to 300 GHz as nonturbulent propagation medium. Attenuation and propagation delay effects are predicated from meteorological data sets: pressure, temperature, humidity, suspended particle concentration, and rain rate. The physical data base of the propagation model consists of four terms: (1) resonance information for 30 water vapor and 48 oxygen absorption lines in the form of intensity coefficients and center frequency for each line; (2) a composite (oxygen, water vapor, and nitrogen) continum spectrum; (3) a hydrosol attenuation term for haze, fog, and cloud conditions; and (4) a rain attenuation model. Oxygen lines extend into the mesosphere, where they behave in a complicated manner due to the Zeeman effect.

  20. Dynamical Realism and Uncertainty Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Inkwan

    In recent years, Space Situational Awareness (SSA) has become increasingly important as the number of tracked Resident Space Objects (RSOs) continues their growth. One of the most significant technical discussions in SSA is how to propagate state uncertainty in a consistent way with the highly nonlinear dynamical environment. In order to keep pace with this situation, various methods have been proposed to propagate uncertainty accurately by capturing the nonlinearity of the dynamical system. We notice that all of the methods commonly focus on a way to describe the dynamical system as precisely as possible based on a mathematical perspective. This study proposes a new perspective based on understanding dynamics of the evolution of uncertainty itself. We expect that profound insights of the dynamical system could present the possibility to develop a new method for accurate uncertainty propagation. These approaches are naturally concluded in goals of the study. At first, we investigate the most dominant factors in the evolution of uncertainty to realize the dynamical system more rigorously. Second, we aim at developing the new method based on the first investigation enabling orbit uncertainty propagation efficiently while maintaining accuracy. We eliminate the short-period variations from the dynamical system, called a simplified dynamical system (SDS), to investigate the most dominant factors. In order to achieve this goal, the Lie transformation method is introduced since this transformation can define the solutions for each variation separately. From the first investigation, we conclude that the secular variations, including the long-period variations, are dominant for the propagation of uncertainty, i.e., short-period variations are negligible. Then, we develop the new method by combining the SDS and the higher-order nonlinear expansion method, called state transition tensors (STTs). The new method retains advantages of the SDS and the STTs and propagates

  1. Propagators in polymer quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-González, Ernesto Morales-Técotl, Hugo A. Reyes, Juan D.

    2013-09-15

    Polymer Quantum Mechanics is based on some of the techniques used in the loop quantization of gravity that are adapted to describe systems possessing a finite number of degrees of freedom. It has been used in two ways: on one hand it has been used to represent some aspects of the loop quantization in a simpler context, and, on the other, it has been applied to each of the infinite mechanical modes of other systems. Indeed, this polymer approach was recently implemented for the free scalar field propagator. In this work we compute the polymer propagators of the free particle and a particle in a box; amusingly, just as in the non polymeric case, the one of the particle in a box may be computed also from that of the free particle using the method of images. We verify the propagators hereby obtained satisfy standard properties such as: consistency with initial conditions, composition and Green’s function character. Furthermore they are also shown to reduce to the usual Schrödinger propagators in the limit of small parameter μ{sub 0}, the length scale introduced in the polymer dynamics and which plays a role analog of that of Planck length in Quantum Gravity. -- Highlights: •Formulas for propagators of free and particle in a box in polymer quantum mechanics. •Initial conditions, composition and Green’s function character is checked. •Propagators reduce to corresponding Schrödinger ones in an appropriately defined limit. •Results show overall consistency of the polymer framework. •For the particle in a box results are also verified using formula from method of images.

  2. Yee-e-e-Haw!: Tall Tales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the characteristics of "tall tales." Fills in the historical background of tall tales, from the ancient myth of Gilgamesh to Baron Munchausen, the closest European progenitor of American tall tales. Opines that tall tales appear to have been created as a response to challenges posed by building a new nation. Lists 11 characteristics of…

  3. NASA Propagation Program Status and Propagation Needs of Satcom Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nassar

    1996-01-01

    The program objective is to enable the development of new commercial satellite systems and services and to support NASA's programs by providing timely data and models about propagation of satellite radio signals though the intervening environment. Provisions include new services, higher frequencies, higher data rates, different environments (mobile, indoors, fixed), and different orbits (geostationary, low earth orbit).

  4. Nonstationary noise propagation with sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Benjamin, J. S.; Cohen, L.

    2014-06-01

    We discuss a number of topics relevant to noise propagation in dispersive media. We formulate the problem of pulse propagation with a source term in phase space and show that a four dimensional Wigner distribution is required. The four dimensional Wigner distribution is that of space and time and also wavenumber and frequency. The four dimensional Wigner spectrum is equivalent to the space-time autocorrelation function. We also apply the quantum path method to improve the phase space approximation previously obtained. In addition we discuss motion in a Snell's law medium.

  5. Buckle propagation in tubular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nogueira, A.C.; Tassoulas, J.L.

    1995-12-01

    A novel method for the analysis of buckle propagation in tubes such as tendons of tension leg platforms and pipelines for deep-water applications is presented. Results are reported for the propagation pressure and state deformation in tubes of various materials (SS-304, CS-1010 and X-52 steel tubes) with a wide range of values of the diameter-to-thickness ratio (D/t). Not only the method overcomes the prohibitive computational demands of earlier procedures, but also it is in excellent agreement with experimental data for all values of D/t investigated (from D/t = 78 to as low as D/t = 12.8).

  6. Optical pulse propagation through clouds.

    PubMed

    Matter, J C; Bradley, R G

    1981-02-15

    The cloud impulse response (spatial and temporal) to optical pulse propagation has been measured. Experimental data are reported for the radiance function, pulse stretching, and (the first published) delay time. The results have been confirmed by Monte Carlo modeling. A geometric scattering model is presented explaining the temporal results for the test conditions.

  7. Optical pulse propagation through clouds.

    PubMed

    Matter, J C; Bradley, R G

    1981-07-01

    The cloud impulse response (spatial and temporal) to optical pulse propagation has been measured. Experimental data are reported for the radiance function, pulse stretching, and (the first published) delay time. The results have been confirmed by Monte Carlo modeling. A geometric scattering model is presented explaining the temporal results for the test conditions.

  8. Microwave Propagation in Dielectric Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonc, W. P.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate experiment designed to verify quantitatively the effect of a dielectric fluid's dielectric constant on the observed wavelength of microwave radiation propagating through the fluid. The fluid used is castor oil, and results agree with the expected behavior within 5 percent. (Author/CS)

  9. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, B. W.

    1987-06-01

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity.

  10. Balloon atmospheric propagation experiment measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O.

    1973-01-01

    High altitude balloon measurements on laser beam fading during propagation through turbulent atmosphere show that a correlation between fading strength and stellar scintillation magnitudes exists. Graphs for stellar scintillation as a function of receiver aperture are used to predict fading bit error rates for neodymium-yag laser communication system.

  11. Genetic structure of Pilosocereus gounellei (Cactaceae) as revealed by AFLP marker to guide proposals for improvement and restoration of degraded areas in Caatinga biome.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, E R; Strioto, D K; Meirelles, A C S; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S

    2015-12-15

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was used to evaluate DNA polymorphism in Pilosocereus gounellei with the aim of differentiating samples grown in different Brazilian semiarid regions. Seven primer pairs were used to amplify 703 AFLP markers, of which 700 (99.21%) markers were polymorphic. The percentage of polymorphic markers ranged from 95.3% for the primer combination E-AAG/M-CTT to 100% for E-ACC/M-CAT, E-ACC/M-CAA, E-AGC/M-CAG, E-ACT/M-CTA, and E-AGG/M-CTG. The largest number of informative markers (126) was detected using the primer combination E-AAC/M-CTA. Polymorphism of the amplified DNA fragments ranged from 72.55% (in sample from Piauí State) to 82.79% (in samples from Rio Grande Norte State), with an average of 75.39%. Despite the high genetic diversity of AFLP markers in xiquexique, analysis using the STRUCTURE software identified relatively homogeneous clusters of xiquexique from the same location, indicating a differentiation at the molecular level, among the plant samples from different regions of the Caatinga biome. The AFLP methodology identified genetically homogeneous and contrasting plants, as well as plants from different regions with common DNA markers. Seeds from such plants can be used for further propagation of plants for establishment of biodiversity conservation units and restoration of degraded areas of the Caatinga biome.

  12. Genetic structure of Pilosocereus gounellei (Cactaceae) as revealed by AFLP marker to guide proposals for improvement and restoration of degraded areas in Caatinga biome.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, E R; Strioto, D K; Meirelles, A C S; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S

    2015-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was used to evaluate DNA polymorphism in Pilosocereus gounellei with the aim of differentiating samples grown in different Brazilian semiarid regions. Seven primer pairs were used to amplify 703 AFLP markers, of which 700 (99.21%) markers were polymorphic. The percentage of polymorphic markers ranged from 95.3% for the primer combination E-AAG/M-CTT to 100% for E-ACC/M-CAT, E-ACC/M-CAA, E-AGC/M-CAG, E-ACT/M-CTA, and E-AGG/M-CTG. The largest number of informative markers (126) was detected using the primer combination E-AAC/M-CTA. Polymorphism of the amplified DNA fragments ranged from 72.55% (in sample from Piauí State) to 82.79% (in samples from Rio Grande Norte State), with an average of 75.39%. Despite the high genetic diversity of AFLP markers in xiquexique, analysis using the STRUCTURE software identified relatively homogeneous clusters of xiquexique from the same location, indicating a differentiation at the molecular level, among the plant samples from different regions of the Caatinga biome. The AFLP methodology identified genetically homogeneous and contrasting plants, as well as plants from different regions with common DNA markers. Seeds from such plants can be used for further propagation of plants for establishment of biodiversity conservation units and restoration of degraded areas of the Caatinga biome. PMID:26681043

  13. The Canadian Olympus propagation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, R. L.; Makrakis, D.; Rogers, D. V.; Berube, R. C.; Lam, W. I.; Strickland, J. I.; Antar, Y. M. M.; Albert, J.; Tam, S. Y. K.; Foo, S. L.

    The planning of commercial and military satellite communications systems using the upper SHF and lower EHF bands has resulted in a need for more propagation data and models for these bands. This is especially true for VSAT systems using small attenuation margins for which accurate data are particularly scarce and existing models inaccurate. The Canadian Olympus propagation experiment, designed to obtain such data, is described. The experiment includes simultaneous attenuation and depolarization measurements using the 12-, 20-, and 30-GHz Olympus satellite beacons, radiometric measurements of attenuation at 14, 20, and 30 GHz, and polarimetric radar measurements at 9.6 GHz. One novel feature of the experiment is the attempt to use the radar data to help separate the statistics of melting layer attenuation from beacon-measured total attenuation.

  14. Long-range vertical propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr.; Garber, Donald P.

    1990-01-01

    Development of the advanced turboprop has led to concerns about en route noise. Advanced turboprops generate low-frequency, periodic noise signatures at relatively high levels. As demonstrated in a flight test of NASA Lewis Research Center's Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) airplane in Alabama in October 1987, the noise of an advanced turboprop operating at cruise altitudes can be audible on the ground. The assessment of the en route noise issue is difficult due to the variability in received noise levels caused by atmospheric propagation and the uncertainty in predicting community response to the relatively low-level en route noise, as compared to noise associated with airport operations. The En Route Noise Test was designed to address the atmospheric propagation of advanced turboprop noise from cruise altitudes and consisted of measuring the noise of an advance turboprop at cruise in close proximity to the turboprop and on the ground. Measured and predicted ground noise levels are presented.

  15. Atmospheric propagation of THz radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.

    2005-11-01

    In this investigation, we conduct a literature study of the best experimental and theoretical data available for thin and thick atmospheres on THz radiation propagation from 0.1 to 10 THz. We determined that for thick atmospheres no data exists beyond 450 GHz. For thin atmospheres data exists from 0.35 to 1.2 THz. We were successful in using FASE code with the HITRAN database to simulate the THz transmission spectrum for Mauna Kea from 0.1 to 2 THz. Lastly, we successfully measured the THz transmission spectra of laboratory atmospheres at relative humidities of 18 and 27%. In general, we found that an increase in the water content of the atmosphere led to a decrease in the THz transmission. We identified two potential windows in an Albuquerque atmosphere for THz propagation which were the regions from 1.2 to 1.4 THz and 1.4 to 1.6 THz.

  16. Propagator for finite range potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Moretti, Paolo

    2006-12-15

    The Schroedinger equation in integral form is applied to the one-dimensional scattering problem in the case of a general finite range, nonsingular potential. A simple expression for the Laplace transform of the transmission propagator is obtained in terms of the associated Fredholm determinant, by means of matrix methods; the particular form of the kernel and the peculiar aspects of the transmission problem play an important role. The application to an array of delta potentials is shown.

  17. Calculating Sonic-Boom Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.; Ting, L.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear effects included, enabling more-realistic modeling. Modified Method of Characteristics Sonic Boom Extrapolation Program (MMOC) is computer program for sonic-boom propagation that includes shock coalescence and incorporates effects of asymmetries due to volume and lift. Numerically integrates nonlinear governing equations using data on initial data line approximately one body length from aircraft and yields sonic-boom pressure at ground as function of time or of position at given time. MMOC written in FORTRAN IV.

  18. A database for propagation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.; Suwitra, Krisjani; Le, Chuong

    1995-01-01

    A database of various propagation phenomena models that can be used by telecommunications systems engineers to obtain parameter values for systems design is presented. This is an easy-to-use tool and is currently available for either a PC using Excel software under Windows environment or a Macintosh using Excel software for Macintosh. All the steps necessary to use the software are easy and many times self explanatory.

  19. Light propagation through atomic vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddons, Paul

    2014-05-01

    This tutorial presents the theory necessary to model the propagation of light through an atomic vapour. The history of atom-light interaction theories is reviewed, and examples of resulting applications are provided. A numerical model is developed and results presented. Analytic solutions to the theory are found, based on approximations to the numerical work. These solutions are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements.

  20. Jet propagation through energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P; Poulsen, P

    2004-01-08

    In applications where jets propagate through energetic materials, they have been observed to become sufficiently perturbed to reduce their ability to effectively penetrate subsequent material. Analytical calculations of the jet Bernoulli flow provides an estimate of the onset and extent of such perturbations. Although two-dimensional calculations show the back-flow interaction pressure pulses, the symmetry dictates that the flow remains axial. In three dimensions the same pressure impulses can be asymmetrical if the jet is asymmetrical. The 3D calculations thus show parts of the jet having a significant component of radial velocity. On the average the downstream effects of this radial flow can be estimated and calculated by a 2D code by applying a symmetrical radial component to the jet at the appropriate position as the jet propagates through the energetic material. We have calculated the 3D propagation of a radio graphed TOW2 jet with measured variations in straightness and diameter. The resultant three-dimensional perturbations on the jet result in radial flow, which eventually tears apart the coherent jet flow. This calculated jet is compared with jet radiographs after passage through the energetic material for various material thickness and plate thicknesses. We noted that confinement due to a bounding metal plate on the energetic material extends the pressure duration and extent of the perturbation.

  1. Turbofan Acoustic Propagation and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    2000-01-01

    This document describes progress in the development of finite element codes for the prediction of near and far field acoustic radiation from the inlet and aft fan ducts of turbofan engines. The report consists of nine papers which have appeared in archival journals and conference proceedings, or are presently in review for publication. Topics included are: 1. Aft Fan Duct Acoustic Radiation; 2. Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements for Acoustic Radiation in a Uniformly Moving Medium; 3. A Reflection Free Boundary Condition for Propagation in Uniform Flow Using Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements; 4. A Numerical Comparison Between Multiple-Scales and FEM Solution for Sound Propagation in Lined Flow Ducts; 5. Acoustic Propagation at High Frequencies in Ducts; 6. The Boundary Condition at an Impedance Wall in a Nonuniform Duct with Potential Flow; 7. A Reverse Flow Theorem and Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows; 8. Reciprocity and Acoustics Power in One Dimensional Compressible Potential Flows; and 9. Numerical Experiments on Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows.

  2. Calculations of precursor propagation in dispersive dielectrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Larry Donald

    2003-08-01

    The present study is a numerical investigation of the propagation of electromagnetic transients in dispersive media. It considers propagation in water using Debye and composite Rocard-Powles-Lorentz models for the complex permittivity. The study addresses this question: For practical transmitted spectra, does precursor propagation provide any features that can be used to advantage over conventional signal propagation in models of dispersive media of interest? A companion experimental study is currently in progress that will attempt to measure the effects studied here.

  3. Landscape management and domestication of Stenocereus pruinosus (Cactaceae) in the Tehuacán Valley: human guided selection and gene flow

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    propagules from one another. Multivariate analyses showed morphological differentiation of wild and agriculturally managed populations, mainly due to differences in reproductive characters; however, the phenotypic differentiation indexes were relatively low among all populations studied. Morphological diversity of S. pruinosus (average MD = 0.600) is higher than in other columnar cacti species previously analyzed. Conclusions Artificial selection in favor of high quality fruit promotes morphological variation and divergence because of the continual replacement of plant material propagated and introduction of propagules from other villages and regions. This process is counteracted by high gene flow influenced by natural factors (pollinators and seed dispersers) but also by human management (movement of propagules among populations), all of which determines relatively low phenotypic differentiation among populations. Conservation of genetic resources of S. pruinosus should be based on the traditional forms of germplasm management by local people. PMID:22891978

  4. 49 CFR 195.111 - Fracture propagation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fracture propagation. 195.111 Section 195.111... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.111 Fracture propagation. A carbon dioxide pipeline system must be designed to mitigate the effects of fracture propagation....

  5. 49 CFR 195.111 - Fracture propagation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fracture propagation. 195.111 Section 195.111... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.111 Fracture propagation. A carbon dioxide pipeline system must be designed to mitigate the effects of fracture propagation....

  6. 49 CFR 195.111 - Fracture propagation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fracture propagation. 195.111 Section 195.111... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.111 Fracture propagation. A carbon dioxide pipeline system must be designed to mitigate the effects of fracture propagation....

  7. 49 CFR 195.111 - Fracture propagation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fracture propagation. 195.111 Section 195.111... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.111 Fracture propagation. A carbon dioxide pipeline system must be designed to mitigate the effects of fracture propagation....

  8. 49 CFR 195.111 - Fracture propagation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fracture propagation. 195.111 Section 195.111... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.111 Fracture propagation. A carbon dioxide pipeline system must be designed to mitigate the effects of fracture propagation....

  9. Japanese propagation experiments with ETS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikegami, Tetsushi

    1989-01-01

    Propagation experiments for maritime, aeronautical, and land mobile satellite communications were performed using Engineering Test Satellite-Five (ETS-5). The propagation experiments are one of major mission of Experimental Mobile Satellite System (EMSS) which is aimed for establishing basic technology for future general mobile satellite communication systems. A brief introduction is presented for the experimental results on propagation problems of ETS-5/EMSS.

  10. Slow-Slip Propagation Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. M.; Ampuero, J.

    2007-12-01

    Combined seismic and geodetic data from subduction zones and the Salton Trough have revealed slow slip events with reasonably well-defined propagation speeds. This in turn is suggestive of a more-or-less well- defined front separating nearly locked regions outside the slipping zone from interior regions that slide much more rapidly. Such crack-like nucleation fronts arise naturally in models of rate-and-state friction for lab-like values of a/b, where a and b are the coefficients of the velocity- and state-dependence of the frictional strength (with the surface being velocity-neutral for a/b=1). If the propagating front has a quasi-steady shape, the propagation and slip speeds are kinematically tied via the local slip gradient. Given a sufficiently sharp front, the slip gradient is given dimensionally by Δτp- r/μ', where Δτp-r is the peak-to-residual stress drop at the front and μ' the effective elastic shear modulus. Rate-and-state simulations indicate that Δτp-r is given reasonably accurately by bσ\\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc), where σ is the effective normal stress, Vmax is the maximum slip speed behind the propagating front, θi is the the value of "state" ahead of the propagating front, and Dc is the characteristic slip distance for state evolution. Except for a coefficient of order unity, Δτp-r is independent of the evolution law. This leads to Vprop/Vmax ~μ'/[bσ\\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc)]. For slip speeds a few orders of magnitude above background, \\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc) can with reasonable accuracy be assigned some representative value (~4-5, for example). Subduction zone transients propagate on the order of 10 km/day or 10-1 m/s. Geodetic data constrain the average slip speed to be a few times smaller than 1 cm/day or 10-7 m/s. However, numerical models indicate that the maximum slip speed at the front may be several times larger than the average, over a length scale that is probably too small to resolve geodetically, so a representative value of Vprop/Vmax may be ~106

  11. Wave Propagation in Bimodular Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Maria; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-04-01

    Observations and laboratory experiments show that fragmented or layered geomaterials have the mechanical response dependent on the sign of the load. The most adequate model accounting for this effect is the theory of bimodular (bilinear) elasticity - a hyperelastic model with different elastic moduli for tension and compression. For most of geo- and structural materials (cohesionless soils, rocks, concrete, etc.) the difference between elastic moduli is such that their modulus in compression is considerably higher than that in tension. This feature has a profound effect on oscillations [1]; however, its effect on wave propagation has not been comprehensively investigated. It is believed that incorporation of bilinear elastic constitutive equations within theory of wave dynamics will bring a deeper insight to the study of mechanical behaviour of many geomaterials. The aim of this paper is to construct a mathematical model and develop analytical methods and numerical algorithms for analysing wave propagation in bimodular materials. Geophysical and exploration applications and applications in structural engineering are envisaged. The FEM modelling of wave propagation in a 1D semi-infinite bimodular material has been performed with the use of Marlow potential [2]. In the case of the initial load expressed by a harmonic pulse loading strong dependence on the pulse sign is observed: when tension is applied before compression, the phenomenon of disappearance of negative (compressive) strains takes place. References 1. Dyskin, A., Pasternak, E., & Pelinovsky, E. (2012). Periodic motions and resonances of impact oscillators. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 331(12), 2856-2873. 2. Marlow, R. S. (2008). A Second-Invariant Extension of the Marlow Model: Representing Tension and Compression Data Exactly. In ABAQUS Users' Conference.

  12. Continuous propagation of microalgae. III.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D. T.; Fredrickson, A. G.; Tsuchiya, H. M.

    1971-01-01

    Data are presented which give the specific photosynthetic rate and the specific utilization rates of urea and carbon dioxide as functions of specific growth rate for Chlorella. A mathematical model expresses a set of mass balance relations between biotic and environmental materials. Criteria of validity are used to test this model. Predictive procedures are complemented by a particular model of microbial growth. Methods are demonstrated for predicting substrate utilization rates, production rates of extracellular metabolites, growth limiting conditions, and photosynthetic quotients from propagator variables.

  13. Energy propagation throughout chemical networks.

    PubMed

    Le Saux, Thomas; Plasson, Raphaël; Jullien, Ludovic

    2014-06-14

    In order to maintain their metabolism from an energy source, living cells rely on chains of energy transfer involving functionally identified components and organizations. However, propagation of a sustained energy flux through a cascade of reaction cycles has only been recently reproduced at a steady state in simple chemical systems. As observed in living cells, the spontaneous onset of energy-transfer chains notably drives local generation of singular dissipative chemical structures: continuous matter fluxes are dynamically maintained at boundaries between spatially and chemically segregated zones but in the absence of any membrane or predetermined material structure. PMID:24681890

  14. Ultrasound propagation measurements and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnworth, L. C.; Papadakis, E. P.; Fowler, K. A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews three systems designed for accurately measuring the propagation of ultrasonic pulses. The three systems are presented in order of velocity-measuring precision: + or - 100 ns, + or - 1 ns, + or - 0.2 ns. Also included is a brief discussion of phase and group velocities, with reference to dispersive, highly attenuating materials. Measurement of attenuation by pulse-echo buffer rod techniques is described briefly. These techniques and instruments have been used to measure sound velocity and attenuation in a variety of materials and shapes, over a wide temperature range.

  15. Modification Propagation in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouronte, Mary Luz; Vargas, María Luisa; Moyano, Luis Gregorio; Algarra, Francisco Javier García; Del Pozo, Luis Salvador

    To keep up with rapidly changing conditions, business systems and their associated networks are growing increasingly intricate as never before. By doing this, network management and operation costs not only rise, but are difficult even to measure. This fact must be regarded as a major constraint to system optimization initiatives, as well as a setback to derived economic benefits. In this work we introduce a simple model in order to estimate the relative cost associated to modification propagation in complex architectures. Our model can be used to anticipate costs caused by network evolution, as well as for planning and evaluating future architecture development while providing benefit optimization.

  16. Resource allocation using constraint propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, John S.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of constraint propagation was discussed. Performance increases are possible with careful application of these constraint mechanisms. The degree of performance increase is related to the interdependence of the different activities resource usage. Although this method of applying constraints to activities and resources is often beneficial, it is obvious that this is no panacea cure for the computational woes that are experienced by dynamic resource allocation and scheduling problems. A combined effort for execution optimization in all areas of the system during development and the selection of the appropriate development environment is still the best method of producing an efficient system.

  17. In vitro propagation of chrysanthemum.

    PubMed

    Nencheva, D

    2010-01-01

    Chrysanthemum flowers Chrysanthemum x grandiflorum (Ramat.) Kitam., are commercially significant worldwide as there are large number of cultivars for cut flowers, pot flowers, and garden flowers. Commercial in vitro multiplication of chrysanthemum is often based on stem nodal explants with lateral meristems. This chapter describes a protocol for in vitro propagation from stem nodal explants and by direct organogenesis from pedicel explants producing large number of true-to-type plantlets in 4-8 week on Murashige and Skoog (MS) based media. Also, true mutants with changed flower color are obtained without producing chimeras after gamma-irradiation in mutation breeding.

  18. Burst propagation in Texas Helimak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, F. A. C.; Toufen, D. L.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L.; Gentle, K. W.

    2016-05-01

    We present investigations of extreme events (bursts) propagating in the Texas Helimak, a toroidal plasma device in which the radial electric field can be changed by application of bias. In the experiments analyzed, a large grid of Langmuir probes measuring ion saturation current fluctuations is used to study the burst propagation and its dependence on the applied bias voltage. We confirm previous results reported on the turbulence intermittency in the Texas Helimak, extending them to a larger radial interval with a density ranging from a uniform decay to an almost uniform value. For our analysis, we introduce an improved procedure, based on a multiprobe bidimensional conditional averaging method, to assure precise determination of burst statistical properties and their spatial profiles. We verify that intermittent bursts have properties that vary in the radial direction. The number of bursts depends on the radial position and on the applied bias voltage. On the other hand, the burst characteristic time and size do not depend on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage modifies the vertical and radial burst velocity profiles differently. The burst velocity is smaller than the turbulence phase velocity in almost all the analyzed region.

  19. Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Benny L.; Olsen, Robert O.; Kennedy, Bruce W.

    1993-01-01

    The Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE), performed under the auspices of NATO and the Acoustics Working Group, was conducted at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, USA, during the period 11-28 Jul. 1991. JAPE consisted of 220 trials using various acoustic sources including speakers, propane cannon, various types of military vehicles, helicopters, a 155mm howitzer, and static high explosives. Of primary importance to the performance of these tests was the intensive characterization of the atmosphere before and during the trials. Because of the wide range of interests on the part of the participants, JAPE was organized in such a manner to provide a broad cross section of test configurations. These included short and long range propagation from fixed and moving vehicles, terrain masking, and vehicle detection. A number of independent trials were also performed by individual participating agencies using the assets available during JAPE. These tests, while not documented in this report, provided substantial and important data to those groups. Perhaps the most significant feature of JAPE is the establishment of a permanent data base which can be used by not only the participants but by others interested in acoustics. A follow-on test was performed by NASA LaRC during the period 19-29 Aug. 1991 at the same location. These trials consisted of 59 overflights of supersonic aircraft in order to establish the relationship between atmospheric turbulence and the received sonic boom energy at the surface.

  20. Orbit propagation in Minkowskian geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roa, Javier; Peláez, Jesús

    2015-09-01

    The geometry of hyperbolic orbits suggests that Minkowskian geometry, and not Euclidean, may provide the most adequate description of the motion. This idea is explored in order to derive a new regularized formulation for propagating arbitrarily perturbed hyperbolic orbits. The mathematical foundations underlying Minkowski space-time are exploited to describe hyperbolic orbits. Hypercomplex numbers are introduced to define the rotations, vectors, and metrics in the problem: the evolution of the eccentricity vector is described on the Minkowski plane in terms of hyperbolic numbers, and the orbital plane is described on the inertial reference using quaternions. A set of eight orbital elements is introduced, namely a time-element, the components of the eccentricity vector in , the semimajor axis, and the components of the quaternion defining the orbital plane. The resulting formulation provides a deep insight into the geometry of hyperbolic orbits. The performance of the formulation in long-term propagations is studied. The orbits of four hyperbolic comets are integrated and the accuracy of the solution is compared to other regularized formulations. The resulting formulation improves the stability of the integration process and it is not affected by the perihelion passage. It provides a level of accuracy that may not be reached by the compared formulations, at the cost of increasing the computational time.

  1. OPEX propagation measurements and studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbesser-Rastburg, Bertram

    1990-01-01

    With the launch of the telecommunications Olympus satellite a new area began for the Olympus Propagation Experiments (OPEX) group. The years of preparations are now paying off - the experiments are underway and the co-operative effort is now turning its attention to the processing and analysis of data and to the interpretation of results. The aim here is to give a short review of the accomplishments made since NAPEX 13 and the work planned for the future. When ESA's Olympus was launched in summer of 1989 it carried a payload producing three unmodulated beacons at 12.5, 19.8, and 29.7 GHz. The main purpose of these beacons is to enable scientists to carry out long term slant path propagation experiments at these frequencies. The OPEX group, which was set up under ESA auspices in 1980, had been preparing for this event very carefully. The specifications for the equipment to be used and the elaboration of standard procedures for data processing and analysis have been worked out jointly. Today the OPEX community includes approximately 30 groups of experimenters. Immediately after achieving platform stability at the orbital location at 341 degrees east, ESA performed the In-Orbit Tests. Most measurements were carried out in Belgium using terminals specially developed for this purpose. A summary of the test results is given.

  2. Simplified propagation of standard uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, A.H.

    1997-06-09

    An essential part of any measurement control program is adequate knowledge of the uncertainties of the measurement system standards. Only with an estimate of the standards` uncertainties can one determine if the standard is adequate for its intended use or can one calculate the total uncertainty of the measurement process. Purchased standards usually have estimates of uncertainty on their certificates. However, when standards are prepared and characterized by a laboratory, variance propagation is required to estimate the uncertainty of the standard. Traditional variance propagation typically involves tedious use of partial derivatives, unfriendly software and the availability of statistical expertise. As a result, the uncertainty of prepared standards is often not determined or determined incorrectly. For situations meeting stated assumptions, easier shortcut methods of estimation are now available which eliminate the need for partial derivatives and require only a spreadsheet or calculator. A system of simplifying the calculations by dividing into subgroups of absolute and relative uncertainties is utilized. These methods also incorporate the International Standards Organization (ISO) concepts for combining systematic and random uncertainties as published in their Guide to the Expression of Measurement Uncertainty. Details of the simplified methods and examples of their use are included in the paper.

  3. Progress in front propagation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, Joaquim; Pujol, Toni

    2008-08-01

    We review the progress in the field of front propagation in recent years. We survey many physical, biophysical and cross-disciplinary applications, including reduced-variable models of combustion flames, Reid's paradox of rapid forest range expansions, the European colonization of North America during the 19th century, the Neolithic transition in Europe from 13 000 to 5000 years ago, the description of subsistence boundaries, the formation of cultural boundaries, the spread of genetic mutations, theory and experiments on virus infections, models of cancer tumors, etc. Recent theoretical advances are unified in a single framework, encompassing very diverse systems such as those with biased random walks, distributed delays, sequential reaction and dispersion, cohabitation models, age structure and systems with several interacting species. Directions for future progress are outlined.

  4. Transhorizon propagation of decameter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Yu. K.; Shchelkalin, A. V.

    2013-04-01

    Solutions to the problem of the point source field in a spherically layered medium are analyzed. For a three-layer waveguide model, a solution in the form of the Watson integral was used. A consideration of the singularities in the plane of the integration variable made it possible to represent the integral as a superposition of three waves. Two of them are connected with the interaction of the primary spherical wave with the lower convex and upper concave interfaces. The third wave is connected with the alternate action with both interfaces. The fourth wave is caused by the interaction between the primary wave and random inhomogeneities of the external medium (the ionosphere). Here, simulation was carried out based on Green equations. The considered unique data of flight measurements of the point source field strength indicate the efficiency of simulating the transhorizon propagation of decameter waves based on the superposition of all four aforesaid wave packets.

  5. IBEX - annular beam propagation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarakis, M G; Miller, R B; Shope, S L; Poukey, J W; Ramirez, J J; Ekdahl, C A; Adler, R J

    1983-01-01

    IBEX is a 4-MV, 100-kA, 20-ns cylindrical isolated Blumlein accelerator. In the experiments reported here, the accelerator is fitted with a specially designed foilless diode which is completely immersed in a uniform magnetic field. Several diode geometries have been studied as a function of magnetic field strength. The beam propagates a distance of 50 cm (approx. 10 cyclotron wavelengths) in vacuum before either striking a beam stop or being extracted through a thin foil. The extracted beam was successfully transported 60 cm downstream into a drift pipe filled either with 80 or 640 torr air. The main objectives of this experiment were to establish the proper parameters for the most quiescent 4 MV, 20 to 40 kA annular beam, and to compare the results with available theory and numerical code simulations.

  6. Vibration Propagation in Spider Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Ross; Otto, Andrew; Elias, Damian

    Due to their poor eyesight, spiders rely on web vibrations for situational awareness. Web-borne vibrations are used to determine the location of prey, predators, and potential mates. The influence of web geometry and composition on web vibrations is important for understanding spider's behavior and ecology. Past studies on web vibrations have experimentally measured the frequency response of web geometries by removing threads from existing webs. The full influence of web structure and tension distribution on vibration transmission; however, has not been addressed in prior work. We have constructed physical artificial webs and computer models to better understand the effect of web structure on vibration transmission. These models provide insight into the propagation of vibrations through the webs, the frequency response of the bare web, and the influence of the spider's mass and stiffness on the vibration transmission patterns. Funded by NSF-1504428.

  7. Probabilistic modeling of propagating explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, L.B.; Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.

    1996-03-01

    Weapons containing significant quantities of high explosives (HE) are sometimes located in close proximity to one another. If an explosion occurs in a weapon, the possibility of propagation to one or more additional weapons may exist, with severe consequences possibly resulting. In the general case, a system of concern consists of multiple weapons and various other objects in a complex, three-dimensional geometry. In each weapon, HE is enclosed by (casing) materials that function as protection in the event of a neighbor detonation but become a source of fragments if the HE is initiated. The protection afforded by the casing means that only high-momentum fragments, which occur rarely, are of concern. These fragments, generated in an initial donor weapon are transported to other weapons either directly or by ricochet. Interaction of a fragment with an acceptor weapon can produce a reaction in the acceptor HE and result in a second detonation. In this paper we describe a comprehensive methodology to estimate the probability of various consequences for fragment-induced propagating detonations in arrays of weapons containing HE. Analysis of this problem requires an approach that can both define the circumstances under which rare events can occur and calculate the probability of such occurrences. Our approach is based on combining process tree methodology with Monte Carlo transport simulation. Our Monte Carlo technique very effectively captures important features of these differences. Process tree methodology is described and its use is discussed for a simplified problem and to illustrate the power of Monte Carlo simulation in estimating fragment-induced detonation of an acceptor weapon.

  8. Wave propagation in solids and fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principles of mathematical analysis for wave phenomena in gases, solids, and liquids are presented in an introduction for scientists and engineers. Chapters are devoted to oscillatory phenomena, the physics of wave propagation, partial differential equations for wave propagation, transverse vibration of strings, water waves, and sound waves. Consideration is given to the dynamics of viscous and inviscid fluids, wave propagation in elastic media, and variational methods in wave phenomena. 41 refs.

  9. ETS-V propagation experiments in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, Shingo

    1988-01-01

    Propagation experiments on ship, aircraft, and land mobile earth stations were carried out using the Engineering Test Satellite-V (ETS-V), which was launched in August 1987. The propagation experiments are one of the missions of the Experimental Mobile Satellite System (EMSS). Initial experimental results of ETS-V/EMSS on propagation using ship, aircraft, and land mobiles with ETS-V are given.

  10. Quench propagation velocity for highly stabilized conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G. |; Ogitsu, T. |; Devred, A.

    1995-05-01

    Quench propagation velocity in conductors having a large amount of stabilizer outside the multifilamentary area is considered. It is shown that the current redistribution process between the multifilamentary area and the stabilizer can strongly effect the quench propagation. A criterion is derived determining the conditions under which the current redistribution process becomes significant, and a model of effective stabilizer area is suggested to describe its influence on the quench propagation velocity. As an illustration, the model is applied to calculate the adiabatic quench propagation velocity for a conductor geometry with a multifilamentary area embedded inside the stabilizer.

  11. Neural network construction via back-propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Burwick, T.T.

    1994-06-01

    A method is presented that combines back-propagation with multi-layer neural network construction. Back-propagation is used not only to adjust the weights but also the signal functions. Going from one network to an equivalent one that has additional linear units, the non-linearity of these units and thus their effective presence is then introduced via back-propagation (weight-splitting). The back-propagated error causes the network to include new units in order to minimize the error function. We also show how this formalism allows to escape local minima.

  12. Explosion propagation in inert porous media.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, G

    2012-02-13

    Porous media are often used in flame arresters because of the high surface area to volume ratio that is required for flame quenching. However, if the flame is not quenched, the flow obstruction within the porous media can promote explosion escalation, which is a well-known phenomenon in obstacle-laden channels. There are many parallels between explosion propagation through porous media and obstacle-laden channels. In both cases, the obstructions play a duel role. On the one hand, the obstruction enhances explosion propagation through an early shear-driven turbulence production mechanism and then later by shock-flame interactions that occur from lead shock reflections. On the other hand, the presence of an obstruction can suppress explosion propagation through momentum and heat losses, which both impede the unburned gas flow and extract energy from the expanding combustion products. In obstacle-laden channels, there are well-defined propagation regimes that are easily distinguished by abrupt changes in velocity. In porous media, the propagation regimes are not as distinguishable. In porous media the entire flamefront is affected, and the effects of heat loss, turbulence and compressibility are smoothly blended over most of the propagation velocity range. At low subsonic propagation speeds, heat loss to the porous media dominates, whereas at higher supersonic speeds turbulence and compressibility are important. This blending of the important phenomena results in no clear transition in propagation mechanism that is characterized by an abrupt change in propagation velocity. This is especially true for propagation velocities above the speed of sound where many experiments performed with fuel-air mixtures show a smooth increase in the propagation velocity with mixture reactivity up to the theoretical detonation wave velocity. PMID:22213663

  13. Intense laser propagation in sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Jennifer L.

    When a sufficiently energetic short laser pulse propagates through a medium it can generate an explosive increase in bandwidth leading to the creation of white light; this is known as supercontinuum generation (SCG). Although it is frequently referred to as a single process, SCG is actually the result of many different parallel and competing processes. In this work we investigate the contribution of the individual physical processes underlying the SCG effect, focusing specifically on Raman processes and plasma formation in sapphire. For our experiments we use an amplified Ti:sapphire laser system producing nearly transform limited 60 fs pulses at 800 nm. Typical pulse energies for the experiments are 1--3 muJ/pulse. Using a new experimental technique, the spectrally resolved interferometric double pump, we study the contribution of non-instantaneous Raman effects. We see two distinct Raman contributions in sapphire which are much stronger than indicated in previous work. One Raman process has a period of approximately 185 fs and is related to an available optical phonon; the second Raman process has a period of 20 fs and is related to defect states caused by an oxygen vacancy in the sapphire crystal. Data from the same experiment show that the SCG light is not phase stable at low excitation energies, but that the phase stability is restored and saturates with increasing laser intensity. In a separate experiment we investigate the dynamics of plasma formation using a pump-probe technique. We observe that in sapphire both the formation and the decay of the plasma occur over time scales much longer than predicted by current theory. The plasma rise time is ˜225 fs, while the decay time is ˜150 ps; we also observe that these values do not depend on input pulse energy. In addition to these experiments, we perform a numerical integration of the extended (3 + 1) dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation, which models the propagation of a short laser pulse through a

  14. Propagation of almond rootstocks and trees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Millions of almond trees in production in California and elsewhere were propagated by nurseries using the grafting technique called budding. This gives a uniform orchard and allows the grower to select nut cultivar (scion) and rootstock combinations. Grafting is a form of clonal propagation and resu...

  15. Rapid vegetative propagation method for carob

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many fruit species are propagated by vegetative methods such as budding, grafting, cutting, suckering, layering etc. to avoid heterozygosity. Carob trees (Ceratonia siliqua L.) are of highly economical value and it is among the most difficult-to-propagate fruit species. In this study, air-layering p...

  16. Propagation testing multi-cell batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Orendorff, Christopher J.; Lamb, Joshua; Steele, Leigh Anna Marie; Spangler, Scott Wilmer

    2014-10-01

    Propagation of single point or single cell failures in multi-cell batteries is a significant concern as batteries increase in scale for a variety of civilian and military applications. This report describes the procedure for testing failure propagation along with some representative test results to highlight the potential outcomes for different battery types and designs.

  17. Uncertainty Propagation in an Ecosystem Nutrient Budget.

    EPA Science Inventory

    New aspects and advancements in classical uncertainty propagation methods were used to develop a nutrient budget with associated error for a northern Gulf of Mexico coastal embayment. Uncertainty was calculated for budget terms by propagating the standard error and degrees of fr...

  18. Vehicular sources in acoustic propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Fitzgerald, James; Arruda, Anthony; Parides, George

    1990-01-01

    One of the most important uses of acoustic propagation models lies in the area of detection and tracking of vehicles. Propagation models are used to compute transmission losses in performance prediction models and to analyze the results of past experiments. Vehicles can also provide the means for cost effective experiments to measure acoustic propagation conditions over significant ranges. In order to properly correlate the information provided by the experimental data and the propagation models, the following issues must be taken into consideration: the phenomenology of the vehicle noise sources must be understood and characterized; the vehicle's location or 'ground truth' must be accurately reproduced and synchronized with the acoustic data; and sufficient meteorological data must be collected to support the requirements of the propagation models. The experimental procedures and instrumentation needed to carry out propagation experiments are discussed. Illustrative results are presented for two cases. First, a helicopter was used to measure propagation losses at a range of 1 to 10 Km. Second, a heavy diesel-powered vehicle was used to measure propagation losses in the 300 to 2200 m range.

  19. Diagnostics for the ATA beam propagation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Barletta, W.A.

    1981-11-01

    This report contains a discussion of the diagnostics required for the beam propagation experiment to be done with the ATA accelerator. Included are a list of the diagnostics needed; a description of the ATA experimental environment; the status of beam diagnostics available at Livermore including recent developments, and a prioritized list of accelerator and propagation diagnostics under consideration or in various stages of development.

  20. Propagation modeling for land mobile satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barts, R. Michael; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1988-01-01

    A simplified empirical model for predicting primary fade statistics for a vegetatively shadowed mobile satellite signal is presented, and predictions based on the model are presented using propagation parameter values from experimental data. Results from the empirical model are used to drive a propagation simulator to produce the secondary fade statistics of average fade duration.

  1. Steps toward quantitative infrasound propagation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxler, Roger; Assink, Jelle; Lalande, Jean-Marie; Velea, Doru

    2016-04-01

    Realistic propagation modeling requires propagation models capable of incorporating the relevant physical phenomena as well as sufficiently accurate atmospheric specifications. The wind speed and temperature gradients in the atmosphere provide multiple ducts in which low frequency sound, infrasound, can propagate efficiently. The winds in the atmosphere are quite variable, both temporally and spatially, causing the sound ducts to fluctuate. For ground to ground propagation the ducts can be borderline in that small perturbations can create or destroy a duct. In such cases the signal propagation is very sensitive to fluctuations in the wind, often producing highly dispersed signals. The accuracy of atmospheric specifications is constantly improving as sounding technology develops. There is, however, a disconnect between sound propagation and atmospheric specification in that atmospheric specifications are necessarily statistical in nature while sound propagates through a particular atmospheric state. In addition infrasonic signals can travel to great altitudes, on the order of 120 km, before refracting back to earth. At such altitudes the atmosphere becomes quite rare causing sound propagation to become highly non-linear and attenuating. Approaches to these problems will be presented.

  2. Propagation of a fluidization - combustion wave

    SciTech Connect

    Pron, G.P.; Gusachenko, L.K.; Zarko, V.E.

    1994-05-01

    A fluidization-combustion wave propagating through a fixed and initially cool bed was created by igniting coal at the top surface of the bed. The proposed physical interpretation of the phenomenon is in qualitative agreement with the experimental dependences of the characteristics of the process on determining parameters. A kindling regime with forced wave propagation is suggested.

  3. 3D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    1998-09-23

    E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output.

  4. Nondestructive evaluation of pyroshock propagation using hydrocodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Juho; Hwang, Dae-Hyeon; Jang, Jae-Kyeong; Lee, Jung-Ryul; Han, Jae-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Pyroshock or pyrotechnic shock generated by explosive events of pyrotechnic devices can induce fatal failures in electronic payloads. Therefore, understanding and estimation of pyroshock propagation through complex structures are necessary. However, an experimental approach using real pyrotechnic devices is quite burdensome because pyrotechnic devices can damage test structures and newly manufactured test structures are necessary for each experiment. Besides, pyrotechnic experiments are quite expensive, time-consuming, and dangerous. Consequently, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of pyroshock propagation without using real pyrotechnic devices is necessary. In this study, nondestructive evaluation technique for pyroshock propagation estimation using hydrocodes is proposed. First, pyroshock propagation is numerically analyzed using AUTODYN, a commercial hydrocodes. Hydrocodes can handle stress wave propagation including elastic, plastic, and shock wave in the time domain. Test structures are modeled and pyroshock time history is applied to where the pyroshock propagation originates. Numerical NDE results of pyroshock propagation on test structures are analyzed in terms of acceleration time histories and acceleration shock response spectra (SRS) results. To verify the proposed numerical methodology, impact tests using airsoft gun are performed. The numerical analysis results for the impact tests are compared with experimental results and they show good agreements. The proposed numerical techniques enable us to nondestructively characterize pyroshock propagation.

  5. Wave propagation in magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cissoko, Mahdy

    1987-08-01

    This paper deals within the relativistic framework with the wave propagation in magnetizable fluids, assumed to be perfect, magnetically soft, isotropic, and inhomogeneous with an arbitrary isotropic law χ=χ(T,r,||b||2) (χ,T,r,||b|| being the magnetic susceptibility, the proper temperature, the proper material density, and the strength of the magnetic field, respectively). The characteristic manifolds of the flow are determined in a very elegant and rigorous manner which avoids the extensive algebraic manipulations one usually encounters in the classical methods of characteristics. It is shown that in a magnetic medium there exists a hyperbolic region of nonsteady flows of magnetizable fluids. This implies the existence of magnetosonic waves of the same kind as in nonmagnetic fluids (χ or μ=const), that is, as in ordinary magnetohydrodynamics. However, in magnetic fluids there is the possibility of the development of instabilities similar to that which arise in nonmagnetic fluids with transverse and longitudinal pressure [M. Cissoko, Ann. Mat. Pura Appl. 111, 331 (1976)].

  6. S-Band propagation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briskman, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    A geosynchronous satellite system capable of providing many channels of digital audio radio service (DARS) to mobile platforms within the contiguous United States using S-band radio frequencies is being implemented. The system is designed uniquely to mitigate both multipath fading and outages from physical blockage in the transmission path by use of satellite spatial diversity in combination with radio frequency and time diversity. The system also employs a satellite orbital geometry wherein all mobile platforms in the contiguous United States have elevation angles greater than 20 deg to both of the diversity satellites. Since implementation of the satellite system will require three years, an emulation has been performed using terrestrial facilities in order to allow evaluation of DARS capabilities in advance of satellite system operations. The major objective of the emulation was to prove the feasibility of broadcasting from satellites 30 channels of CD quality programming using S-band frequencies to an automobile equipped with a small disk antenna and to obtain quantitative performance data on S-band propagation in a satellite spatial diversity system.

  7. In vitro propagation of jojoba.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Berta E; Apóstolo, Nancy M

    2013-01-01

    Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis (Link) Schn.) is a nontraditional crop in arid and semi-arid areas. Vegetative propagation can be achieved by layering, grafting, or rooting semi-hardwood cuttings, but the highest number of possible propagules is limited by the size of the plants and time of the year. Micropropagation is highly recommended strategy for obtaining jojoba elite clones. For culture initiation, single-node explants are cultivated on Murashige and Skoog medium (MS) supplemented with Gamborg's vitamins (B5), 11.1 μM BA (N(6)-benzyl-adenine), 0.5 μM IBA (indole-3-butyric acid), and 1.4 μM GA(3) (gibberellic acid). Internodal and apical cuttings proliferate on MS medium containing B5 vitamins and 4.4 μM BA. Rooting is achieved on MS medium (half strength mineral salt) amended with B5 vitamins and 14.7 μM IBA during 7 days and transferred to develop in auxin-free rooting medium. Plantlets are acclimatized using a graduated humidity regime on soil: peat: perlite (5:1:1) substrate. This micropagation protocol produces large numbers of uniform plants from selected genotypes of jojoba. PMID:23179687

  8. In vitro propagation of jojoba.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Berta E; Apóstolo, Nancy M

    2013-01-01

    Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis (Link) Schn.) is a nontraditional crop in arid and semi-arid areas. Vegetative propagation can be achieved by layering, grafting, or rooting semi-hardwood cuttings, but the highest number of possible propagules is limited by the size of the plants and time of the year. Micropropagation is highly recommended strategy for obtaining jojoba elite clones. For culture initiation, single-node explants are cultivated on Murashige and Skoog medium (MS) supplemented with Gamborg's vitamins (B5), 11.1 μM BA (N(6)-benzyl-adenine), 0.5 μM IBA (indole-3-butyric acid), and 1.4 μM GA(3) (gibberellic acid). Internodal and apical cuttings proliferate on MS medium containing B5 vitamins and 4.4 μM BA. Rooting is achieved on MS medium (half strength mineral salt) amended with B5 vitamins and 14.7 μM IBA during 7 days and transferred to develop in auxin-free rooting medium. Plantlets are acclimatized using a graduated humidity regime on soil: peat: perlite (5:1:1) substrate. This micropagation protocol produces large numbers of uniform plants from selected genotypes of jojoba.

  9. S-Band propagation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briskman, Robert D.

    1994-08-01

    A geosynchronous satellite system capable of providing many channels of digital audio radio service (DARS) to mobile platforms within the contiguous United States using S-band radio frequencies is being implemented. The system is designed uniquely to mitigate both multipath fading and outages from physical blockage in the transmission path by use of satellite spatial diversity in combination with radio frequency and time diversity. The system also employs a satellite orbital geometry wherein all mobile platforms in the contiguous United States have elevation angles greater than 20 deg to both of the diversity satellites. Since implementation of the satellite system will require three years, an emulation has been performed using terrestrial facilities in order to allow evaluation of DARS capabilities in advance of satellite system operations. The major objective of the emulation was to prove the feasibility of broadcasting from satellites 30 channels of CD quality programming using S-band frequencies to an automobile equipped with a small disk antenna and to obtain quantitative performance data on S-band propagation in a satellite spatial diversity system.

  10. Topographic effects on infrasound propagation.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Mihan H; Gibson, Robert G; Walker, Bob E; McKenna, Jason; Winslow, Nathan W; Kofford, Aaron S

    2012-01-01

    Infrasound data were collected using portable arrays in a region of variable terrain elevation to quantify the effects of topography on observed signal amplitude and waveform features at distances less than 25 km from partially contained explosive sources during the Frozen Rock Experiment (FRE) in 2006. Observed infrasound signals varied in amplitude and waveform complexity, indicating propagation effects that are due in part to repeated local maxima and minima in the topography on the scale of the dominant wavelengths of the observed data. Numerical simulations using an empirically derived pressure source function combining published FRE accelerometer data and historical data from Project ESSEX, a time-domain parabolic equation model that accounted for local terrain elevation through terrain-masking, and local meteorological atmospheric profiles were able to explain some but not all of the observed signal features. Specifically, the simulations matched the timing of the observed infrasound signals but underestimated the waveform amplitude observed behind terrain features, suggesting complex scattering and absorption of energy associated with variable topography influences infrasonic energy more than previously observed.

  11. Topographic effects on infrasound propagation.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Mihan H; Gibson, Robert G; Walker, Bob E; McKenna, Jason; Winslow, Nathan W; Kofford, Aaron S

    2012-01-01

    Infrasound data were collected using portable arrays in a region of variable terrain elevation to quantify the effects of topography on observed signal amplitude and waveform features at distances less than 25 km from partially contained explosive sources during the Frozen Rock Experiment (FRE) in 2006. Observed infrasound signals varied in amplitude and waveform complexity, indicating propagation effects that are due in part to repeated local maxima and minima in the topography on the scale of the dominant wavelengths of the observed data. Numerical simulations using an empirically derived pressure source function combining published FRE accelerometer data and historical data from Project ESSEX, a time-domain parabolic equation model that accounted for local terrain elevation through terrain-masking, and local meteorological atmospheric profiles were able to explain some but not all of the observed signal features. Specifically, the simulations matched the timing of the observed infrasound signals but underestimated the waveform amplitude observed behind terrain features, suggesting complex scattering and absorption of energy associated with variable topography influences infrasonic energy more than previously observed. PMID:22280569

  12. Uncertainty propagation in nuclear forensics.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Jerome, S M; Venchiarutti, C

    2014-07-01

    Uncertainty propagation formulae are presented for age dating in support of nuclear forensics. The age of radioactive material in this context refers to the time elapsed since a particular radionuclide was chemically separated from its decay product(s). The decay of the parent radionuclide and ingrowth of the daughter nuclide are governed by statistical decay laws. Mathematical equations allow calculation of the age of specific nuclear material through the atom ratio between parent and daughter nuclides, or through the activity ratio provided that the daughter nuclide is also unstable. The derivation of the uncertainty formulae of the age may present some difficulty to the user community and so the exact solutions, some approximations, a graphical representation and their interpretation are presented in this work. Typical nuclides of interest are actinides in the context of non-proliferation commitments. The uncertainty analysis is applied to a set of important parent-daughter pairs and the need for more precise half-life data is examined.

  13. Propagation of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Xiong, Q.; Xiong, Z.; Hu, J.; Zhou, F.; Gong, W.; Xian, Y.; Zou, C.; Tang, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y.

    2009-02-15

    The ''plasma bullet'' behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma plumes has recently attracted significant interest. In this paper, a specially designed plasma jet device is used to study this phenomenon. It is found that a helium primary plasma can propagate through the wall of a dielectric tube and keep propagating inside the dielectric tube (secondary plasma). High-speed photographs show that the primary plasma disappears before the secondary plasma starts to propagate. Both plumes propagate at a hypersonic speed. Detailed studies on the dynamics of the plasma plumes show that the local electric field induced by the charges on the surface of the dielectric tube plays an important role in the ignition of the secondary plasma. This indicates that the propagation of the plasma plumes may be attributed to the local electric field induced by the charges in the bulletlike plasma volume.

  14. Boosting domain wall propagation by notches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H. Y.; Wang, X. R.

    2015-08-01

    We report a counterintuitive finding that notches in an otherwise homogeneous magnetic nanowire can boost current-induced domain wall (DW) propagation. DW motion in notch-modulated wires can be classified into three phases: (1) A DW is pinned around a notch when the current density is below the depinning current density. (2) DW propagation velocity is boosted by notches above the depinning current density and when nonadiabatic spin-transfer torque strength β is smaller than the Gilbert damping constant α . The boost can be multifold. (3) DW propagation velocity is hindered when β >α . The results are explained by using the Thiele equation.

  15. Computing Propagation Of Sound In Engine Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saylor, Silvia

    1995-01-01

    Frequency Domain Propagation Model (FREDOM) computer program accounts for acoustic loads applied to components of engines. Models propagation of noise through fluids in ducts between components and through passages within components. Used not only to analyze hardware problems, but also for design purposes. Updated version of FREQPL program easier to use. Devised specifically for use in analyzing acoustic loads in rocket engines. Underlying physical and mathematical concepts implemented also applicable to acoustic propagation in other enclosed spaces; analyzing process plumbing and ducts in industrial buildings with view toward reducing noise in work areas.

  16. Propagation considerations in land mobile satellite transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, W. J.; Smith, E. K.

    1985-01-01

    It appears likely that the Land Mobile Satellite Services (LMSS) will be authorized by the FCC for operation in the 800 to 900 MHz (UHF) and possibly near 1500 MHz (L-band). Propagation problems are clearly an important factor in the effectiveness of this service, but useful measurements are few, and produced contradictory interpretations. A first order overview of existing measurements is presented with particular attention to the first two NASA balloon to mobile vehicle propagation experiments. Some physical insight into the interpretation of propagation effects in LMSS transmissions is provided.

  17. Asymmetric counter propagation of domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade-Silva, I.; Clerc, M. G.; Odent, V.

    2016-07-01

    Far from equilibrium systems show different states and domain walls between them. These walls, depending on the type of connected equilibria, exhibit a rich spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we investigate the asymmetrical counter propagation of domain walls in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the shape and speed of the domain walls. Based on the molecular orientation, we infer that the counter propagative walls have different elastic deformations. These deformations are responsible of the asymmetric counter propagating fronts. Theoretically, based on symmetry arguments, we propose a simple bistable model under the influence of a nonlinear gradient, which qualitatively describes the observed dynamics.

  18. Propagating confined states in phase dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, Helmut R.; Deissler, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical treatment is given to the possibility of the existence of propagating confined states in the nonlinear phase equation by generalizing stationary confined states. The nonlinear phase equation is set forth for the case of propagating patterns with long wavelengths and low-frequency modulation. A large range of parameter values is shown to exist for propagating confined states which have spatially localized regions which travel on a background with unique wavelengths. The theoretical phenomena are shown to correspond to such physical systems as spirals in Taylor instabilities, traveling waves in convective systems, and slot-convection phenomena for binary fluid mixtures.

  19. Propagation of sound through a sheared flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, J. P.; Smith, C. A.; Karamcheti, K.

    1978-01-01

    Sound generated in a moving fluid must propagate through a shear layer in order to be measured by a fixed instrument. These propagation effects were evaluated for noise sources typically associated with single and co-flowing subsonic jets and for subcritical flow over airfoils in such jets. The techniques for describing acoustic propagation fall into two categories: geometric acoustics and wave acoustics. Geometric acoustics is most convenient and accurate for high frequency sound. In the frequency range of interest to the present study (greater than 150 Hz), the geometric acoustics approach was determined to be most useful and practical.

  20. Numerical wave propagation in ImageJ.

    PubMed

    Piedrahita-Quintero, Pablo; Castañeda, Raul; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2015-07-20

    An ImageJ plugin for numerical wave propagation is presented. The plugin provides ImageJ, the well-known software for image processing, with the capability of computing numerical wave propagation by the use of angular spectrum, Fresnel, and Fresnel-Bluestein algorithms. The plugin enables numerical wave propagation within the robust environment provided by the complete set of built-in tools for image processing available in ImageJ. The plugin can be used for teaching and research purposes. We illustrate its use to numerically recreate Poisson's spot and Babinet's principle, and in the numerical reconstruction of digitally recorded holograms from millimeter-sized and pure phase microscopic objects.

  1. Propagation Regime of Iron Dust Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Francois-David; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    A flame propagating through an iron-dust mixture can propagate in two asymptotic regimes. When the characteristic time of heat transfer between particles is much smaller than the characteristic time of particle combustion, the flame propagates in the continuum regime where the heat released by reacting particles can be modelled as a space-averaged function. In contrast, when the characteristic time of heat transfer is much larger than the particle reaction time, the flame can no longer be treated as a continuum due to dominating effects associated with the discrete nature of the particle reaction. The discrete regime is characterized by weak dependence of the flame speed on the oxygen concentration compared to the continuum regime. The discrete regime is observed in flames propagating through an iron dust cloud within a gas mixture containing xenon, while the continuum regime is obtained when xenon is substituted with helium.

  2. Radio wave propagation and acoustic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, S. P.

    Radio wave propagation of the decimetric and centimetric waves depends to a large extent on the boundary layer meteorological conditions which give rise to severe fadings, very often due to multipath propagation. Sodar is one of the inexpensive remote sensing techniques which can be employed to probe the boundary layer structure. In the paper a historical perspective has been given of the simultaneously conducted studies on radio waves and sodar at various places. The radio meteorological information needed for propagation studies has been clearly spelt out and conditions of a ray path especially in the presence of a ducting layer have been defined as giving rise to fading or signal enhancement conditions. Finally the potential of the sodar studies to obtain information about the boundary layer phenomena has been stressed, clearly spelling out the use of acoustic sounding in radio wave propagation studies.

  3. Universal self-similarity of propagating populations.

    PubMed

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    This paper explores the universal self-similarity of propagating populations. The following general propagation model is considered: particles are randomly emitted from the origin of a d-dimensional Euclidean space and propagate randomly and independently of each other in space; all particles share a statistically common--yet arbitrary--motion pattern; each particle has its own random propagation parameters--emission epoch, motion frequency, and motion amplitude. The universally self-similar statistics of the particles' displacements and first passage times (FPTs) are analyzed: statistics which are invariant with respect to the details of the displacement and FPT measurements and with respect to the particles' underlying motion pattern. Analysis concludes that the universally self-similar statistics are governed by Poisson processes with power-law intensities and by the Fréchet and Weibull extreme-value laws.

  4. Universal self-similarity of propagating populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    This paper explores the universal self-similarity of propagating populations. The following general propagation model is considered: particles are randomly emitted from the origin of a d -dimensional Euclidean space and propagate randomly and independently of each other in space; all particles share a statistically common—yet arbitrary—motion pattern; each particle has its own random propagation parameters—emission epoch, motion frequency, and motion amplitude. The universally self-similar statistics of the particles’ displacements and first passage times (FPTs) are analyzed: statistics which are invariant with respect to the details of the displacement and FPT measurements and with respect to the particles’ underlying motion pattern. Analysis concludes that the universally self-similar statistics are governed by Poisson processes with power-law intensities and by the Fréchet and Weibull extreme-value laws.

  5. A solid state lightning propagation speed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Rust, W. David

    1989-01-01

    A device to measure the propagation speeds of cloud-to-ground lightning has been developed. The lightning propagation speed (LPS) device consists of eight solid state silicon photodetectors mounted behind precision horizontal slits in the focal plane of a 50-mm lens on a 35-mm camera. Although the LPS device produces results similar to those obtained from a streaking camera, the LPS device has the advantages of smaller size, lower cost, mobile use, and easier data collection and analysis. The maximum accuracy for the LPS is 0.2 microsec, compared with about 0.8 microsecs for the streaking camera. It is found that the return stroke propagation speed for triggered lightning is different than that for natural lightning if measurements are taken over channel segments less than 500 m. It is suggested that there are no significant differences between the propagation speeds of positive and negative flashes. Also, differences between natural and triggered dart leaders are discussed.

  6. Promoted Combustion Test Propagation Rate Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borstorff, J.; Jones, P.; Lowery, F.

    2002-01-01

    Combustion propagation rate data were examined for potential use in benchmarking a thermal model of the Promoted Combustion Test (PCT), and also for potential use in measuring the repeatability of PCT results.

  7. The ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.; Reinhardt, H.

    2011-05-23

    We present results for a numerical study of the ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge whereby lattice results for the spatial gluon propagator are used as input to solving the ghost Dyson-Schwinger equation. We show that in order to solve completely, the ghost equation must be supplemented by a boundary condition (the value of the inverse ghost propagator dressing function at zero momentum) which determines if the solution is critical (zero value for the boundary condition) or subcritical (finite value). The various solutions exhibit a characteristic behavior where all curves follow the same (critical) solution when going from high to low momenta until 'forced' to freeze out in the infrared to the value of the boundary condition. The boundary condition can be interpreted in terms of the Gribov gauge-fixing ambiguity; we also demonstrate that this is not connected to the renormalization. Further, the connection to the temporal gluon propagator and the infrared slavery picture of confinement is discussed.

  8. ACTS Project and Propagation Program Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Spacecraft operations continue to be nominal and the sixth eclipse season completed. Battery reconditioning to be re-evaluated before the fall eclipse. Other topics covered include: Inclined orbit; Experiments program; Reorganizations; Program timeline; and propagation program status.

  9. Fick's Law Assisted Propagation for Semisupervised Learning.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chen; Tao, Dacheng; Fu, Keren; Yang, Jie

    2015-09-01

    How to propagate the label information from labeled examples to unlabeled examples is a critical problem for graph-based semisupervised learning. Many label propagation algorithms have been developed in recent years and have obtained promising performance on various applications. However, the eigenvalues of iteration matrices in these algorithms are usually distributed irregularly, which slow down the convergence rate and impair the learning performance. This paper proposes a novel label propagation method called Fick's law assisted propagation (FLAP). Unlike the existing algorithms that are directly derived from statistical learning, FLAP is deduced on the basis of the theory of Fick's First Law of Diffusion, which is widely known as the fundamental theory in fluid-spreading. We prove that FLAP will converge with linear rate and show that FLAP makes eigenvalues of the iteration matrix distributed regularly. Comprehensive experimental evaluations on synthetic and practical datasets reveal that FLAP obtains encouraging results in terms of both accuracy and efficiency.

  10. In vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum orchids.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Songjun; Huang, Weichang; Wu, Kunlin; Zhang, Jianxia; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Duan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Paphiopedilum is one of the most popular and rare orchid genera. Members of the genus are sold and exhibited as pot plants and cut flowers. Wild populations of Paphiopedilum are under the threat of extinction due to over-collection and loss of suitable habitats. A reduction in their commercial value through large-scale propagation in vitro is an option to reduce pressure from illegal collection, to attempt to meet commercial needs and to re-establish threatened species back into the wild. Although they are commercially propagated via asymbiotic seed germination, Paphiopedilum are considered to be difficult to propagate in vitro, especially by plant regeneration from tissue culture. This review aims to cover the most important aspects and to provide an up-to-date research progress on in vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum and to emphasize the importance of further improving tissue culture protocols for ex vitro-derived explants. PMID:25582733

  11. Pulse Wave Propagation in the Arterial Tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Vosse, Frans N.; Stergiopulos, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    The beating heart creates blood pressure and flow pulsations that propagate as waves through the arterial tree that are reflected at transitions in arterial geometry and elasticity. Waves carry information about the matter in which they propagate. Therefore, modeling of arterial wave propagation extends our knowledge about the functioning of the cardiovascular system and provides a means to diagnose disorders and predict the outcome of medical interventions. In this review we focus on the physical and mathematical modeling of pulse wave propagation, based on general fluid dynamical principles. In addition we present potential applications in cardiovascular research and clinical practice. Models of short- and long-term adaptation of the arterial system and methods that deal with uncertainties in personalized model parameters and boundary conditions are briefly discussed, as they are believed to be major topics for further study and will boost the significance of arterial pulse wave modeling even more.

  12. The ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, P.; Reinhardt, H.

    2011-05-01

    We present results for a numerical study of the ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge whereby lattice results for the spatial gluon propagator are used as input to solving the ghost Dyson-Schwinger equation. We show that in order to solve completely, the ghost equation must be supplemented by a boundary condition (the value of the inverse ghost propagator dressing function at zero momentum) which determines if the solution is critical (zero value for the boundary condition) or subcritical (finite value). The various solutions exhibit a characteristic behavior where all curves follow the same (critical) solution when going from high to low momenta until `forced' to freeze out in the infrared to the value of the boundary condition. The boundary condition can be interpreted in terms of the Gribov gauge-fixing ambiguity; we also demonstrate that this is not connected to the renormalization. Further, the connection to the temporal gluon propagator and the infrared slavery picture of confinement is discussed.

  13. Gram-Schmidt algorithms for covariance propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, C. L.; Bierman, G. J.

    1975-01-01

    This paper addresses the time propagation of triangular covariance factors. Attention is focused on the square-root free factorization, P = UDU/T/, where U is unit upper triangular and D is diagonal. An efficient and reliable algorithm for U-D propagation is derived which employs Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization. Partitioning the state vector to distinguish bias and colored process noise parameters increases mapping efficiency. Cost comparisons of the U-D, Schmidt square-root covariance and conventional covariance propagation methods are made using weighted arithmetic operation counts. The U-D time update is shown to be less costly than the Schmidt method; and, except in unusual circumstances, it is within 20% of the cost of conventional propagation.

  14. Gram-Schmidt algorithms for covariance propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, C. L.; Bierman, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    This paper addresses the time propagation of triangular covariance factors. Attention is focused on the square-root free factorization, P = UD(transpose of U), where U is unit upper triangular and D is diagonal. An efficient and reliable algorithm for U-D propagation is derived which employs Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization. Partitioning the state vector to distinguish bias and coloured process noise parameters increase mapping efficiency. Cost comparisons of the U-D, Schmidt square-root covariance and conventional covariance propagation methods are made using weighted arithmetic operation counts. The U-D time update is shown to be less costly than the Schmidt method; and, except in unusual circumstances, it is within 20% of the cost of conventional propagation.

  15. In vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum orchids.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Songjun; Huang, Weichang; Wu, Kunlin; Zhang, Jianxia; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Duan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Paphiopedilum is one of the most popular and rare orchid genera. Members of the genus are sold and exhibited as pot plants and cut flowers. Wild populations of Paphiopedilum are under the threat of extinction due to over-collection and loss of suitable habitats. A reduction in their commercial value through large-scale propagation in vitro is an option to reduce pressure from illegal collection, to attempt to meet commercial needs and to re-establish threatened species back into the wild. Although they are commercially propagated via asymbiotic seed germination, Paphiopedilum are considered to be difficult to propagate in vitro, especially by plant regeneration from tissue culture. This review aims to cover the most important aspects and to provide an up-to-date research progress on in vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum and to emphasize the importance of further improving tissue culture protocols for ex vitro-derived explants.

  16. Light propagation in Swiss-cheese cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szybka, Sebastian J.

    2011-08-01

    We study the effect of inhomogeneities on light propagation. The Sachs equations are solved numerically in the Swiss-cheese models with inhomogeneities modeled by the Lemaître-Tolman solutions. Our results imply that, within the models we study, inhomogeneities may partially mimic the accelerated expansion of the Universe provided the light propagates through regions with lower than the average density. The effect of inhomogeneities is small and full randomization of the photons’ trajectories reduces it to an insignificant level.

  17. POPPY: Physical Optics Propagation in PYthon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Marshall; Long, Joseph; Douglas, Ewan; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Slocum, Christine

    2016-02-01

    POPPY (Physical Optics Propagation in PYthon) simulates physical optical propagation including diffraction. It implements a flexible framework for modeling Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction and point spread function formation, particularly in the context of astronomical telescopes. POPPY provides the optical modeling framework for WebbPSF (ascl:1504.007) and was developed as part of a simulation package for JWST, but is available separately and is broadly applicable to many kinds of imaging simulations.

  18. Error Propagation in a System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schloegel, Kirk (Inventor); Bhatt, Devesh (Inventor); Oglesby, David V. (Inventor); Madl, Gabor (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the present subject matter can enable the analysis of signal value errors for system models. In an example, signal value errors can be propagated through the functional blocks of a system model to analyze possible effects as the signal value errors impact incident functional blocks. This propagation of the errors can be applicable to many models of computation including avionics models, synchronous data flow, and Kahn process networks.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  20. Propagation measurements in Alaska using ACTS beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    The placement of an ACTS propagation terminal in Alaska has several distinct advantages. First is the inclusion of a new and important climatic zone to the global propagation model. Second is the low elevation look angle from Alaska to ACTS. These two unique opportunities also present problems unique to the location, such as extreme temperatures and lower power levels. These problems are examined and compensatory solutions are presented.

  1. A Chebychev propagator for inhomogeneous Schroedinger equations

    SciTech Connect

    Ndong, Mamadou; Koch, Christiane P.; Tal-Ezer, Hillel; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2009-03-28

    A propagation scheme for time-dependent inhomogeneous Schroedinger equations is presented. Such equations occur in time dependent optimal control theory and in reactive scattering. A formal solution based on a polynomial expansion of the inhomogeneous term is derived. It is subjected to an approximation in terms of Chebychev polynomials. Different variants for the inhomogeneous propagator are demonstrated and applied to two examples from optimal control theory. Convergence behavior and numerical efficiency are analyzed.

  2. Comments on 'Rapid pulsed microwave propagation'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy-Racs, Adam

    1992-05-01

    Giakos and Ishii (1991) indicated that the leading edge of the pulse-modulated microwaves propagates with the velocity c/cos theta in a direction theta in open space. This is tantamount to a claim that their measurements indicate a propagation velocity faster than the speed of light. Giakos and Ishii reply to all technical points raised in the present comment and defend their experimental observations.

  3. Light propagation in a Penrose unilluminable room.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Takehiro; Sakaguchi, Koichiro; Tokuda, Yasunori

    2015-06-29

    Using the finite-difference time-domain method, propagation of light waves is studied in a Penrose unilluminable room. Such a room always has dark (unilluminated) regions, regardless of the position of a point source in it. However, in contrast to the predictions of ray dynamical simulations, a small amount of light propagates into the unilluminated regions via diffraction. We conjecture that this diffraction effect becomes more prominent as the size of the room decreases.

  4. Uncertainty propagation in an ecosystem nutrient budget.

    PubMed

    Lehrter, John C; Cebrian, Just

    2010-03-01

    New aspects and advancements in classical uncertainty propagation methods were used to develop a nutrient budget with associated uncertainty for a northern Gulf of Mexico coastal embayment. Uncertainty was calculated for budget terms by propagating the standard error and degrees of freedom. New aspects include the combined use of Monte Carlo simulations with classical error propagation methods, uncertainty analyses for GIS computations, and uncertainty propagation involving literature and subjective estimates of terms used in the budget calculations. The methods employed are broadly applicable to the mathematical operations employed in ecological studies involving step-by-step calculations, scaling procedures, and calculations of variables from direct measurements and/or literature estimates. Propagation of the standard error and the degrees of freedom allowed for calculation of the uncertainty intervals around every term in the budget. For scientists and environmental managers, the methods developed herein provide a relatively simple framework to propagate and assess the contributions of uncertainty in directly measured and literature estimated variables to calculated variables. Application of these methods to environmental data used in scientific reporting and environmental management will improve the interpretation of data and simplify the estimation of risk associated with decisions based on ecological studies.

  5. Active Wave Propagation and Sensing in Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghoshal, Anindya; Martin, William N.; Sundaresan, Mannur J.; Schulz, Mark J.; Ferguson, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    Health monitoring of aerospace structures can be done using an active interrogation approach with diagnostic Lamb waves. Piezoelectric patches are often used to generate the waves, and it is helpful to understand how these waves propagate through a structure. To give a basic understanding of the actual physical process of wave propagation, a model is developed to simulate asymmetric wave propagation in a panel and to produce a movie of the wave motion. The waves can be generated using piezoceramic patches of any size or shape. The propagation, reflection, and interference of the waves are represented in the model. Measuring the wave propagation is the second important aspect of damage detection. Continuous sensors are useful for measuring waves because of the distributed nature of the sensor and the wave. Two sensor designs are modeled, and their effectiveness in measuring acoustic waves is studied. The simulation model developed is useful to understand wave propagation and to optimize the type of sensors that might be used for health monitoring of plate-like structures.

  6. Premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Kirill A.

    2016-04-01

    Analytical treatment of the premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes with smooth walls is given. Using the on-shell flame description, equations for a quasi-steady flame with a small but finite front thickness are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that near the limits of inflammability, solutions describing upward flame propagation come in pairs having close propagation speeds and that the effect of gravity is to reverse the burnt gas velocity profile generated by the flame. On the basis of these results, a theory of partial flame propagation driven by a strong gravitational field is developed. A complete explanation is given of the intricate observed behavior of limit flames, including dependence of the inflammability range on the size of the combustion domain, the large distances of partial flame propagation, and the progression of flame extinction. The role of the finite front-thickness effects is discussed in detail. Also, various mechanisms governing flame acceleration in smooth tubes are identified. Acceleration of methane-air flames in open tubes is shown to be a combined effect of the hydrostatic pressure difference produced by the ambient cold air and the difference of dynamic gas pressure at the tube ends. On the other hand, a strong spontaneous acceleration of the fast methane-oxygen flames at the initial stage of their evolution in open-closed tubes is conditioned by metastability of the quasi-steady propagation regimes. An extensive comparison of the obtained results with the experimental data is made.

  7. Making and Propagating Elastic Waves: Overview of the new wave propagation code WPP

    SciTech Connect

    McCandless, K P; Petersson, N A; Nilsson, S; Rodgers, A; Sjogreen, B; Blair, S C

    2006-05-09

    We are developing a new parallel 3D wave propagation code at LLNL called WPP (Wave Propagation Program). WPP is being designed to incorporate the latest developments in embedded boundary and mesh refinement technology for finite difference methods, as well as having an efficient portable implementation to run on the latest supercomputers at LLNL. We are currently exploring seismic wave applications, including a recent effort to compute ground motions for the 1906 Great San Francisco Earthquake. This paper will briefly describe the wave propagation problem, features of our numerical method to model it, implementation of the wave propagation code, and results from the 1906 Great San Francisco Earthquake simulation.

  8. Controls on flood and sediment wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Maarten; Lane, Stuart N.; Costa, Anna; Molnar, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of flood wave propagation - celerity and transformation - through a fluvial system is of generic importance for flood forecasting/mitigation. In association with flood wave propagation, sediment wave propagation may induce local erosion and sedimentation, which will affect infrastructure and riparian natural habitats. Through analysing flood and sediment wave propagation, we gain insight in temporal changes in transport capacity (the flood wave) and sediment availability and transport (the sediment wave) along the river channel. Heidel (1956) was amongst the first to discuss the progressive lag of sediment concentration behind the corresponding flood wave based on field measurements. Since then this type of hysteresis has been characterized in a number of studies, but these were often based on limited amount of floods and measurement sites, giving insufficient insight into associated forcing mechanisms. Here, as part of a project concerned with the hydrological and geomorphic forcing of sediment transfer processes in alpine environments, we model the downstream propagation of short duration, high frequency releases of water and sediment (purges) from a flow intake in the Borgne d'Arolla River in south-west Switzerland. A total of >50 events were measured at 1 minute time intervals using pressure transducers and turbidity probes at a number of sites along the river. We show that flood and sediment wave propagation can be well represented through simple convection diffusion models. The models are calibrated/validated to describe the set of measured waves and used to explain the observed variation in wave celerity and diffusion. In addition we explore the effects of controlling factors including initial flow depth, flood height, flood duration, bed roughness, bed slope and initial sediment concentration, on the wave propagation processes. We show that the effects of forcing mechanisms on flood and sediment wave propagation will lead to different

  9. Markov transitions and the propagation of chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, A.

    1998-12-01

    The propagation of chaos is a central concept of kinetic theory that serves to relate the equations of Boltzmann and Vlasov to the dynamics of many-particle systems. Propagation of chaos means that molecular chaos, i.e., the stochastic independence of two random particles in a many-particle system, persists in time, as the number of particles tends to infinity. We establish a necessary and sufficient condition for a family of general n-particle Markov processes to propagate chaos. This condition is expressed in terms of the Markov transition functions associated to the n-particle processes, and it amounts to saying that chaos of random initial states propagates if it propagates for pure initial states. Our proof of this result relies on the weak convergence approach to the study of chaos due to Sztitman and Tanaka. We assume that the space in which the particles live is homomorphic to a complete and separable metric space so that we may invoke Prohorov's theorem in our proof. We also s how that, if the particles can be in only finitely many states, then molecular chaos implies that the specific entropies in the n-particle distributions converge to the entropy of the limiting single-particle distribution.

  10. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  11. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits.

  12. Effects of fluctuations on propagating fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Debabrata

    Propagating fronts are seen in varieties of nonequilibrium pattern forming systems in Physics, Chemistry and Biology. In the last two decades, many researchers have contributed to the understanding of the underlying dynamics of the propagating fronts. Of these, the deterministic and mean-field dynamics of the fronts were mostly understood in late 1980s and 1990s. On the other hand, although the earliest work on the effect of fluctuations on propagating fronts dates back to early 1980s, the subject of fluctuating fronts did not reach its adolescence until the mid 1990s. From there onwards the last few years witnessed a surge in activities in the effect of fluctuations on propagating fronts. Scores of papers have been written on this subject since then, contributing to a significant maturity of our understanding, and only recently a full picture of fluctuating fronts has started to emerge. This review is an attempt to collect all the works on fluctuating (propagating) fronts in a coherent and cogent manner in proper perspective. It is based on the idea of making our knowledge in this field available to a broader audience, and it is also expected to help to collect bits and pieces of loose thread-ends together for possible further investigation.

  13. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  14. Toward an improved understanding of MCS propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Processes that drive the propagation of elevated mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) have been the topic of a growing body of recent research. Elevated MCSs are responsible for a large percentage of warm season rainfall in the continental United States, and produce flash floods more frequently than other modes of convection. A comprehensive understanding of the dynamics of MCS propagation is important, since propagation sometimes opposes other environmental forces that influence MCS motion. This leads to nearly stationary MCSs that produce prolific local rainfall totals. The ingredients-based Propagation index (IPI) is introduced in this research. IPI is defined as the normalized product of horizontal warm thermal advection (a proxy for lifting), convective available potential energy (CAPE), and relative humidity. Horizontal plots of IPI are useful in identifying regions of probable convective initiation, including the intersections between potentially unstable flow and outflow boundaries, regions of mesoscale lift along the nose of the low-level jet, convectively induced gravity waves, and frontogenesis. Effective inflow-layer shear vectors are also introduced, and found to be useful for scenarios where IPI does yield predictive insight, such as the traditional "RKW" scenario where the forward propagation of an MCS is driven by thunderstorm outflow. It is argued that horizontal maps of IPI and EILS vectors will contribute significantly to short-term (e.g. 1-2 hr) predictions of the movement of MCSs, and to the subsequent assessment of their potential for flash flood production.

  15. Mean stress effect in fatigue crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabeshfar, K.; Williams, T. R. G.

    1980-01-01

    Crack propagation rates in three different grades of mild steel and two types of age hardening aluminium alloys have been measured for different stress ratios. The results show a pronounced stress ratio effect for all these materials. A model of fatigue crack propagation is formulated in terms of the size of the cyclic plastic instability zone at the crack tip rather than the zone of plastic yielding. The micro-plastic instability zone is measured by a parameter involving the ratio of the maximum stress intensity and the stress level at which macro-plastic instability occurs in the {S}/{N} curve of plain fatigue test pieces. Such a parameter provides a means of normalizing crack propagation results obtained for various stress ratios.

  16. Propagation of polarized waves in inhomogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    A parabolic equation for electromagnetic wave propagation in a random medium is extended to include the depolarization effects in the narrow-angle, forward-scattering setting. Closed-form parabolic equations for propagation of the coherence tensor are derived under a Markov approximation model. For a general partially coherent and partially polarized beam wave, this equation can be reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations, allowing a simple numeric solution. An analytical solution exists for statistically homogeneous waves. Estimates based on the perturbation solution support the common knowledge that the depolarization at the optical frequencies is negligible for atmospheric turbulence propagation. These results indicate that the recently published theory [Opt. Lett.40, 3077 (2015)10.1364/OL.40.003077] is not valid for atmospheric turbulence. PMID:27409697

  17. Flame propagation in partially premixed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruetsch, G.; Poinsot, T.; Veynante, D.; Trouvé, A.

    1996-11-01

    Turbulent flame propagation is studied under inhomogenously premixed conditions via data from direct numerical simulations. Departures from the premixed case are studied using four different configurations, ranging from one dimensional unsteady flames to turbulent three-dimensional simulations. Simulations are performed in these cases with various values of the mean equivalence ratio, fluctuations about the mean equivlalence ratio, correlation length scales, and probability denisty functions of the mixture composition. Propagation characteristics are described in terms of the flamelet approach, where the the main contribution of partial premixing on flame propagation is due to flame wrinkling relative to modification of the mean flamelet structure. This behavior is consistent over a broad range of conditions, with the exception being extreme departures from stoichiometric conditions where flamability limits are exceeded and flame quenching is observed.

  18. Asymptotic wave propagation in excitable media.

    PubMed

    Bernus, Olivier; Vigmond, Edward

    2015-07-01

    Wave shape and velocity are important issues in reaction-diffusion systems, and are often the result of competition in media with heterogeneous conduction properties. Asymptotic wave front propagation at maximal conduction velocity has been previously reported in the context of anisotropic cardiac tissue, but it is unknown whether this is a universal property of excitable tissues where conduction velocity can be locally modulated by mechanisms other than anisotropy. Here, we investigate the impact of conduction heterogeneities and boundary effects on wave propagation in excitable media. Following a theoretical analysis, we find that wave-front cusps occur where local velocity is reduced and that asymptotic wave fronts propagate at the maximal translational conduction velocity. Simulations performed in different reaction-diffusion systems, including cardiac tissue, confirm our theoretical findings. We conclude that this property can be found in a wide range of reaction-diffusion systems with excitable dynamics and that asymptotic wave-front shapes can be predicted.

  19. Hepatitis C virus: propagation, quantification, and storage.

    PubMed

    Yi, MinKyung

    2010-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of chronic liver diseases, including chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is well known for its restricted tropism and it does not replicate well in animal species other than humans and chimpanzees. Since classical in vitro propagation of natural HCV isolates is not possible, a protocol for the rescue of infectious virus from cDNA clones (genotype 1a pH77S and genotype 2a pJFH-1) transfected as RNA into permissive cells is described here. Because these two molecular clones behave differently in their ability to propagate and produce infectious virus, different methods for propagation of these two viral strains are described. Methods for infectious virus titration, which can be accomplished by counting foci of infected cells following immunostaining for viral antigen expression in cells infected with serial dilutions of a virus harvest (focus forming unit, or FFU, assay), are also provided.

  20. Weakly propagating unstable modes in unmagnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tautz, R. C.; Lerche, I.

    2007-07-15

    The basic theory of isolated kinetic Weibel modes [Tautz et al., J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39, 13831 (2006)] is extended to include small real frequencies, describing unstable wave modes that propagate while growing. The new method is applicable for all kinds of arbitrary (therefore including symmetric as well as asymmetric) relativistic particle distribution functions, where the axis of wave propagation describes an oblique angle with respect to a symmetry axis. For the two examples of a warm, counterstreaming Cauchy distribution and a cold two-stream distribution it is shown that, although there are now broad regions in wavenumber space of unstable wave modes, the isolated Weibel modes (which, per definition, do not propagate) are recovered. Thus, this phenomenon deserves future investigation, because, in astrophysical plasmas, virtually all distribution functions are likely to be asymmetric, therefore giving rise to isolated Weibel modes.

  1. Shock unsteadiness creation and propagation: experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benay, R.; Alaphilippe, M.; Severac, N.

    2012-09-01

    The possibility of creating unsteady distortions of the tip shock by waves emitted from an aircraft is assessed experimentally. The model chosen is a cylindrical fore body equipped with a spike. This configuration is known for generating an important level of unsteadiness around the spike in supersonic regime. The wind tunnel Mach number is equal to 2. The experiments show that waves emitted from this source propagate along the tip shock and interact with it. It is then assessed that this interaction produces a periodic distortion of the shock that propagates to the external flow. Unsteady pressure sensors, high speed schlieren films, hot wire probing and laser Doppler velocimetry are used as complementary experimental means. The final result is a coherent representation of the complex mechanism of wave propagation that has been evidenced. The principle of creating unsteady shock deformation by onboard equipments could be examined as a possibly promising method of sonic boom control.

  2. Heat pulse propagation studies in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Callen, J.D.; Colchin, R.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Hill, K.W.; Izzo, R.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Monticello, D.A.; McGuire, K.; Bell, J.D.

    1986-02-01

    The time scales for sawtooth repetition and heat pulse propagation are much longer (10's of msec) in the large tokamak TFTR than in previous, smaller tokamaks. This extended time scale coupled with more detailed diagnostics has led us to revisit the analysis of the heat pulse propagation as a method to determine the electron heat diffusivity, chi/sub e/, in the plasma. A combination of analytic and computer solutions of the electron heat diffusion equation are used to clarify previous work and develop new methods for determining chi/sub e/. Direct comparison of the predicted heat pulses with soft x-ray and ECE data indicates that the space-time evolution is diffusive. However, the chi/sub e/ determined from heat pulse propagation usually exceeds that determined from background plasma power balance considerations by a factor ranging from 2 to 10. Some hypotheses for resolving this discrepancy are discussed. 11 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Coherent structures for front propagation in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Kevin; Mahoney, John

    2014-03-01

    Our goal is to characterize the nature of reacting flows by identifying important ``coherent'' structures. We follow the recent work by Haller, Beron-Vera, and Farazmand which formalized the notion of lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) in fluid flows. In this theory, LCSs were derived from the Cauchy-Green strain tensor. We adapt this perspective to analogously define coherent structures in reacting flows. By this we mean a fluid flow with a reaction front propagating through it such that the propagation does not affect the underlying flow. A reaction front might be chemical (Belousov-Zhabotinsky, flame front, etc.) or some other type of front (electromagnetic, acoustic, etc.). While the recently developed theory of burning invariant manifolds (BIMs) describes barriers to front propagation in time-periodic flows, this current work provides an important complement by extending to the aperiodic setting. Funded by NSF Grant CMMI-1201236.

  4. Large scale propagation intermittency in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi, Ali

    2000-11-01

    Long-term (several minutes to hours) amplitude variations observed in outdoor sound propagation experiments at Disneyland, California, in February 1998 are explained in terms of a time varying index of refraction. The experimentally propagated acoustic signals were received and recorded at several locations ranging from 300 meters to 2,800 meters. Meteorological data was taken as a function of altitude simultaneously with the received signal levels. There were many barriers along the path of acoustic propagation that affected the received signal levels, especially at short ranges. In a downward refraction situation, there could be a random change of amplitude in the predicted signals. A computer model based on the Fast Field Program (FFP) was used to compute the signal loss at the different receiving locations and to verify that the variations in the received signal levels can be predicted numerically. The calculations agree with experimental data with the same trend variations in average amplitude.

  5. Propagating unstable wavelets in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Patrick M.; Madhavan, Adarsh; Reid, Matthew P.; Vigmond, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Solitonlike propagating modes have been proposed for excitable tissue, but have never been measured in cardiac tissue. In this study, we simulate an experimental protocol to elicit these propagating unstable wavelets (PUWs) in a detailed three-dimensional ventricular wedge preparation. PUWs appear as fixed-shape wavelets that propagate only in the direction of cardiac fibers, with conduction velocity approximately 40% slower than normal action potential excitation. We investigate their properties, demonstrating that PUWs are not true solitons. The range of stimuli for which PUWs were elicited was very narrow (several orders of magnitude lower than the stimulus strength itself), but increased with reduced sodium conductance and reduced coupling in nonlongitudinal directions. We show that the phenomenon does not depend on the particular membrane representation used or the shape of the stimulating electrode.

  6. Wave propagation into the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirota, I.

    1989-01-01

    Recent observations of various types of waves propagating into the middle atmosphere are reviewed. Emphasis is made on the excitation processes in the lower atmosphere and their vertical propagation through the background flow as a function of the latitude, height and season. The following subjects are discussed: (1) Vertical propagation of quasi-stationary forced Rossby waves into the winter stratosphere in connection with the sudden warming; (2) Spectral distribution and seasonal characteristics of normal mode (free) Rossby waves and the asymmetry of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres; and (3) Seasonal variation of internal gravity waves in the middle atmosphere. Further discussions are presented for future studies based on accumulated observational data during the MAP period.

  7. Thin front propagation in random shear flows.

    PubMed

    Chinappi, M; Cencini, M; Vulpiani, A

    2006-01-01

    Front propagation in time-dependent laminar flows is investigated in the limit of very fast reaction and very thin fronts--i.e., the so-called geometrical optics limit. In particular, we consider fronts stirred by random shear flows, whose time evolution is modeled in terms of Ornstein-Uhlembeck processes. We show that the ratio between the time correlation of the flow and an intrinsic time scale of the reaction dynamics (the wrinkling time tw) is crucial in determining both the front propagation speed and the front spatial patterns. The relevance of time correlation in realistic flows is briefly discussed in light of the bending phenomenon--i.e., the decrease of propagation speed observed at high flow intensities.

  8. Complex singularities in the quark propagator

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Frank, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    The Dyson-Schwinger equation for the quark propagator is being studied in the rainbow approximation using a gluon propagator that incorporates asymptotic freedom and is an entire function. The gluon propagator has a number of parameters that may be varied in order to obtain a good description of low-energy pion observables; such as f{sub {pi}} and the {pi}-{pi} scattering lengths. This provides a direct means of relating hadronic observables to the form of the quark-quark interaction in the infrared and serves as an adjunct and extension of the separable Ansatz approach discussed above. It also provides a means of examining the pole structure of the quark propagator, which may hold the key to understanding quark confinement. The preliminary results are encouraging. It was demonstrated that it is possible to obtain a good description of pion observables in this approach. Further, when the strength of the quark-quark interaction in the infrared becomes larger than a given critical value, the pole in the quark propagator bifurcates into a pair of complex conjugate poles: m{sub q} = m{sub q}{sup R} {plus_minus} im{sub q}{sup I}, which is a signal of confinement. The interpretation in this case is of 1/m{sub q}{sup I} as the distance over which a quark may propagate before fragmenting. Further, there are indications from these studies that T{sub c}{sup D} < T{sub c}{sup {chi}}, where T{sub c}{sup D} is the critical temperature for deconfinement and T{sub c}{sup {chi}} is the critical temperature for chiral symmetry restoration; i.e., indications that deconfinement occurs at a lower temperature than chiral symmetry restoration. Available results from this work will be presented at the Washington meeting of the APS.

  9. The discrete regime of flame propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Francois-David; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew

    The propagation of laminar dust flames in iron dust clouds was studied in a low-gravity envi-ronment on-board a parabolic flight aircraft. The elimination of buoyancy-induced convection and particle settling permitted measurements of fundamental combustion parameters such as the burning velocity and the flame quenching distance over a wide range of particle sizes and in different gaseous mixtures. The discrete regime of flame propagation was observed by substitut-ing nitrogen present in air with xenon, an inert gas with a significantly lower heat conductivity. Flame propagation in the discrete regime is controlled by the heat transfer between neighbor-ing particles, rather than by the particle burning rate used by traditional continuum models of heterogeneous flames. The propagation mechanism of discrete flames depends on the spa-tial distribution of particles, and thus such flames are strongly influenced by local fluctuations in the fuel concentration. Constant pressure laminar dust flames were observed inside 70 cm long, 5 cm diameter Pyrex tubes. Equally-spaced plate assemblies forming rectangular chan-nels were placed inside each tube to determine the quenching distance defined as the minimum channel width through which a flame can successfully propagate. High-speed video cameras were used to measure the flame speed and a fiber optic spectrometer was used to measure the flame temperature. Experimental results were compared with predictions obtained from a numerical model of a three-dimensional flame developed to capture both the discrete nature and the random distribution of particles in the flame. Though good qualitative agreement was obtained between model predictions and experimental observations, residual g-jitters and the short reduced-gravity periods prevented further investigations of propagation limits in the dis-crete regime. The full exploration of the discrete flame phenomenon would require high-quality, long duration reduced gravity environment

  10. Satellite sound broadcast propagation studies and measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Torrence, Geoffrey W.

    1990-01-01

    Satellite Sound Broadcasting is an attractive satellite application. Before regulatory decisions can be made in 1992, the propagation effects encountered have to be characterized. The Electrical Engineering Research Laboratory has nearly completed a system which will allow amplitude measurements to be made over 10 MHz bandwidths in the 800 to 1800 MHz frequency range. The system uses transmission from a transportable tower, and reception inside buildings or in the shadow of trees or utility poles. The goal is to derive propagation models for use by systems engineers who are about to design satellite broadcast systems. The advance of fiber-optics technology has helped to focus future development of satellite services into areas where satellites are uniquely competitive. One of these preferred satellite applications is the broadcasting of high-quality sound for stationary or mobile reception by listeners using low-cost, consumer-grade receivers. Before such services can be provided, however, the political hurdles of spectrum allocation have to be surmounted and the technical questions of standardization for world-wide compatibility have to be resolved. In order to arrive at an optimal system design, efficient in the use of our scarce spectral resources, affordable both to the broadcaster and the listener, and providing predictable performance, the propagation effects to which the service is subjected have to be characterized. Consequently, the objective of the research project is to make basic propagation measurements for direct Satellite Sound Broadcasting Service (SSBS). The data obtained should allow the development of propagation models to be used by communications engineers designing the operational systems. Such models shall describe the effects of shadowing and multipath propagation on SSBS receivers operating in a specified environment, such as inside commercial or residential buildings of various construction and also in the shadow of trees or utility poles

  11. Propagation characteristics of acoustic waves in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Achille; Kapil, Jagdish Chandra; Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg; Or, Dani

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is a promising technique for monitoring snow slope stability with potential for application in early warning systems for avalanches. Current research efforts focus on identification and localization of acoustic emission features preceding snow failure and avalanches. However, our knowledge of sound propagation characteristics in snow is still limited. A review of previous studies showed that significant gaps exist and that the results of the various studies are partly contradictory. Furthermore, sound velocity and attenuation have been determined for the frequency range below 10 kHz, while recent snow failure experiments suggest that the peak frequency is in the ultrasound range between 30 kHz to 500 kHz. We therefore studied the propagation of pencil lead fracture (PLF) signals through snow in the ultrasound frequency range. This was achieved by performing laboratory experiments with columns of artificially produced snow of varying density and temperature. The attenuation constant was obtained by varying the size of the columns to eliminate possible influences of the snow-sensor coupling. The attenuation constant was measured for the entire PLF burst signal and for single frequency components. The propagation velocity was calculated from the arrival time of the acoustic signal. We then modelled the sound propagation for our experimental setup using Biot's model for wave propagation in porous media. The Model results were in good agreement with our experimental results. For the studied samples, the acoustic signals propagated as fast and slow longitudinal waves, but the main part of the energy was carried by the slow waves. The Young's modulus of our snow samples was determined from the sound velocity. This is highly relevant, as the elastic properties of snow are not well known.

  12. Enhancing data locality by using terminal propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.; Van Driessche, R.

    1995-12-31

    Terminal propagation is a method developed in the circuit placement community for adding constraints to graph partitioning problems. This paper adapts and expands this idea, and applies it to the problem of partitioning data structures among the processors of a parallel computer. We show how the constraints in terminal propagation can be used to encourage partitions in which messages are communicated only between architecturally near processors. We then show how these constraints can be handled in two important partitioning algorithms, spectral bisection and multilevel-KL. We compare the quality of partitions generated by these algorithms to each other and to Partitions generated by more familiar techniques.

  13. Displacement of Propagating Squeezed Microwave States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Kirill G.; Zhong, L.; Pogorzalek, S.; Eder, P.; Fischer, M.; Goetz, J.; Xie, E.; Wulschner, F.; Inomata, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Di Candia, R.; Las Heras, U.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Menzel, E. P.; Deppe, F.; Marx, A.; Gross, R.

    2016-07-01

    Displacement of propagating quantum states of light is a fundamental operation for quantum communication. It enables fundamental studies on macroscopic quantum coherence and plays an important role in quantum teleportation protocols with continuous variables. In our experiments, we have successfully implemented this operation for propagating squeezed microwave states. We demonstrate that, even for strong displacement amplitudes, there is no degradation of the squeezing level in the reconstructed quantum states. Furthermore, we confirm that path entanglement generated by using displaced squeezed states remains constant over a wide range of the displacement power.

  14. Enhancement of in vitro Guayule propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dastoor, M. N.; Schubert, W. W.; Petersen, G. R. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method for stimulating in vitro propagation of Guayule from a nutrient medium containing Guayule tissue by adding a substituted trialkyl amine bioinducing agent to the nutrient medium is described. Selective or differentiated propagation of shoots or callus is obtained by varying the amounts of substituted trialky amine present in the nutrient medium. The luxuriant growth provided may be processed for its poly isoprene content or may be transferred to a rooting medium for production of whole plants as identical clones of the original tissue. The method also provides for the production of large numbers of Guayule plants having identical desirable properties such as high polyisoprene levels.

  15. Optimization of directional elastic energy propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreassen, Erik; Chang, Hannah R.; Ruzzene, Massimo; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how topology optimization can be used to design a periodically perforated plate, in order to obtain a tailored anisotropic group velocity profile. The main method is demonstrated on both low and high frequency bending wave propagation in an aluminum plate, but is general in the sense that it could be used to design periodic structures with frequency dependent group velocity profiles for any kind of elastic wave propagation. With the proposed method the resulting design is manufacturable. Measurements on an optimized design compare excellently with the numerical results.

  16. Analytic structure of heavy quark propagators

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    The renormalized quark Dyson-Schwinger equation is studied in the limit of the renormalized current heavy quark mass m{sub R}{r_arrow}{infinity}. We are particularly interested in the analytic pole structure of the heavy quark propagator in the complex momentum plane. Approximations in which the quark-gluon vertex is modelled by either the bare vertex or the Ball-Chiu {ital Ansatz} and the Landau gauge gluon propagator takes either a Gaussian form or a Gaussian form with an ultraviolet asymptotic tail are used. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    SciTech Connect

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Irzhak, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Zizak, Ivo; Erko, Alexei; Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Insepov, Zinetula

    2015-09-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  18. Atmospheric propagation effects relevant to optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaik, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    A number of atmospheric phenomena affect the propagation of light. The effects of clear air turbulence are reviewed as well as atmospheric turbidity on optical communications. Among the phenomena considered are astronomical and random refraction, scintillation, beam broadening, spatial coherence, angle of arrival, aperture averaging, absorption and scattering, and the effect of opaque clouds. An extensive reference list is also provided for further study. Useful information on the atmospheric propagation of light in relation to optical deep space communications to an earth based receiving station is available, however, further data must be generated before such a link can be designed with committed performance.

  19. Atmospheric Propagation Effects Relevant to Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaik, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    A number of atmospheric phenomena affect the propagation of light. This article reviews the effects of clear-air turbulence as well as atmospheric turbidity on optical communications. Among the phenomena considered are astronomical and random refraction, scintillation, beam broadening, spatial coherence, angle of arrival, aperture averaging, absorption and scattering, and the effect of opaque clouds. An extensive reference list is also provided for further study, Useful information on the atmospheric propagation of light in resolution to optical deep-space communications to an earth-based receiving station is available, however, further data must be generated before such a link can be designed with committed performance.

  20. Acceleration and propagation of solar cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, I. M.; Podgorny, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the solar cosmic ray measurements on the Geostationary Orbital Environmental Satellite (GOES) spacecraft indicated that the duration of solar flare relativistic proton large pulses is comparable with the solar wind propagation duration from the Sun to the Earth. The front of the proton flux from flares on the western solar disk approaches the Earth with a flight time along the Archimedean spiral magnetic field line of 15-20 min. The proton flux from eastern flares is registered in the Earth's orbit 3-5 h after the flare onset. These particles apparently propagate across IMF owing to diffusion.

  1. Displacement of Propagating Squeezed Microwave States.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Kirill G; Zhong, L; Pogorzalek, S; Eder, P; Fischer, M; Goetz, J; Xie, E; Wulschner, F; Inomata, K; Yamamoto, T; Nakamura, Y; Di Candia, R; Las Heras, U; Sanz, M; Solano, E; Menzel, E P; Deppe, F; Marx, A; Gross, R

    2016-07-01

    Displacement of propagating quantum states of light is a fundamental operation for quantum communication. It enables fundamental studies on macroscopic quantum coherence and plays an important role in quantum teleportation protocols with continuous variables. In our experiments, we have successfully implemented this operation for propagating squeezed microwave states. We demonstrate that, even for strong displacement amplitudes, there is no degradation of the squeezing level in the reconstructed quantum states. Furthermore, we confirm that path entanglement generated by using displaced squeezed states remains constant over a wide range of the displacement power. PMID:27447495

  2. Displacement of Propagating Squeezed Microwave States.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Kirill G; Zhong, L; Pogorzalek, S; Eder, P; Fischer, M; Goetz, J; Xie, E; Wulschner, F; Inomata, K; Yamamoto, T; Nakamura, Y; Di Candia, R; Las Heras, U; Sanz, M; Solano, E; Menzel, E P; Deppe, F; Marx, A; Gross, R

    2016-07-01

    Displacement of propagating quantum states of light is a fundamental operation for quantum communication. It enables fundamental studies on macroscopic quantum coherence and plays an important role in quantum teleportation protocols with continuous variables. In our experiments, we have successfully implemented this operation for propagating squeezed microwave states. We demonstrate that, even for strong displacement amplitudes, there is no degradation of the squeezing level in the reconstructed quantum states. Furthermore, we confirm that path entanglement generated by using displaced squeezed states remains constant over a wide range of the displacement power.

  3. Laser propagation in underdense plasmas: Scaling arguments

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    The propagation of an intense laser beam in the underdense plasma is modelled by treating the plasma as a relativistic, zero temperature, charged fluid. For paraxial propagation and a sufficiently underdense plasma ({omega}p/{omega} {much_lt} 1), a multiple-scales technique is used to expand the exact equations in powers of the small parameter {theta} {equivalent_to} {omega}p/{omega}. The zeroth order equations are used in a critical examination of previous work on this problem, and to derive a scaling law for the threshold power required for cavitation.

  4. Uncertainty Propagation with Fast Monte Carlo Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochman, D.; van der Marck, S. C.; Koning, A. J.; Sjöstrand, H.; Zwermann, W.

    2014-04-01

    Two new and faster Monte Carlo methods for the propagation of nuclear data uncertainties in Monte Carlo nuclear simulations are presented (the "Fast TMC" and "Fast GRS" methods). They are addressing the main drawback of the original Total Monte Carlo method (TMC), namely the necessary large time multiplication factor compared to a single calculation. With these new methods, Monte Carlo simulations can now be accompanied with uncertainty propagation (other than statistical), with small additional calculation time. The new methods are presented and compared with the TMC methods for criticality benchmarks.

  5. Comments on 'Rapid pulsed microwave propagation'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.; Rodrigue, George P.

    1992-01-01

    Giakos and Ishii (1991) claim conclusive experimental evidence that microwave pulse propagation in waveguides and in air occurs at velocities exceeding the free-space speed of light, and assert that it is possible to transmit both energy and information in a non-TEM waveguiding medium at the lightspeed-exceeding phase velocity. The present analysis of their results reveals several significant potential sources of error in both their laboratory findings and those findings' interpretation. Giakos and Ishii reply that the accuracy of the propagation measurements presented in their study exceeds 0.2 percent.

  6. Comments on 'Rapid pulsed microwave propagation'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffes, Paul G.; Rodrigue, George P.

    1992-05-01

    Giakos and Ishii (1991) claim conclusive experimental evidence that microwave pulse propagation in waveguides and in air occurs at velocities exceeding the free-space speed of light, and assert that it is possible to transmit both energy and information in a non-TEM waveguiding medium at the lightspeed-exceeding phase velocity. The present analysis of their results reveals several significant potential sources of error in both their laboratory findings and those findings' interpretation. Giakos and Ishii reply that the accuracy of the propagation measurements presented in their study exceeds 0.2 percent.

  7. Light propagation in the South Pole ice

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dawn; Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is located in the ice near the geographic South Pole. Particle showers from neutrino interactions in the ice produce light which is detected by IceCube modules, and the amount and pattern of deposited light are used to reconstruct the properties of the incident neutrino. Since light is scattered and absorbed by ice between the neutrino interaction vertex and the sensor, IceCube event reconstruction depends on understanding the propagation of light through the ice. This paper presents the current status of modeling light propagation in South Pole ice, including the recent observation of an azimuthal anisotropy in the scattering.

  8. Conductivity dependent surface plasmon polariton propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Arshad; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Jabar, M. S. Abdul; Khan, Anwar Ali; Uddin, Rafi; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2016-09-01

    Conductivity-dependent surface plasmon polariton (SPP) propagation is investigated at the interface between a metal and a tripod-type atomic medium. Our theoretical investigations show that the SPP propagation depends on the conductivity of the metallic medium and the coherent driving fields applied in the atomic medium up to a saturation limit. Further, the SPPs drag and rotate with collective spinning of the proposed structure. The rotation is modified with the spin angular velocity of the whole structure. A maximum rotation of  ±4 microradians is observed. Our results may find applications in plasmonster technology.

  9. Pancreatic pseudocyst propagating into retroperitoneum and mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Z; Jakab, F

    1997-01-01

    The extrahepatic pseudocysts of pancreatic origin sometimes propagate into mediastinum and retroperitoneum. A large pseudocyst of pancreatic origin propagating into the mediastinum up to the aortic arch is published. The surgical intervention has been urged by the dislocation of the heart, by the danger of autodigestion of the mediastinal aorta and by the danger of rupture. Attention is directed to the external drainage operation which is suitable for emptying of the pseudocyst not independently from the ripeness of pseudocyst wall and the characteristics of the pseudocyst content. Should the time short after the exacerbation and should the amylase content high in the cyst, the immediate result of external drainage better and reliable safe.

  10. Atmospheric propagation issues relevant to optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churnside, James H.; Shaik, Kamran

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric propagation issues relevant to space-to-ground optical communications for near-earth applications are studied. Propagation effects, current optical communication activities, potential applications, and communication techniques are surveyed. It is concluded that a direct-detection space-to-ground link using redundant receiver sites and temporal encoding is likely to be employed to transmit earth-sensing satellite data to the ground some time in the future. Low-level, long-term studies of link availability, fading statistics, and turbulence climatology are recommended to support this type of application.

  11. Underwater Sound Propagation from Marine Pile Driving.

    PubMed

    Reyff, James A

    2016-01-01

    Pile driving occurs in a variety of nearshore environments that typically have very shallow-water depths. The propagation of pile-driving sound in water is complex, where sound is directly radiated from the pile as well as through the ground substrate. Piles driven in the ground near water bodies can produce considerable underwater sound energy. This paper presents examples of sound propagation through shallow-water environments. Some of these examples illustrate the substantial variation in sound amplitude over time that can be critical to understand when computing an acoustic-based safety zone for aquatic species.

  12. Proceedings of the Thirteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 13)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. The meeting was organized into three technical sessions: the first focused on mobile satellite propagation; the second examined the propagation effects for frequencies above 10 GHz; and the third addressed studies devoted exclusively to the Olympus/Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Program.

  13. Future changes in propagating and non-propagating diurnal rainfall over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wan-Ru; Wang, S.-Y. Simon

    2016-09-01

    The characteristics of diurnal rainfall in the East Asian continent consist of a propagating regime over the Yangtze River and a non-propagating regime in southeast China. Simulations of these two diurnal rainfall regimes by 18 CMIP5 models were evaluated from the historical experiment of 1981-2005. The evaluation led to the identification of one model, the CMCC-CM that replicated the key characteristics of diurnal rainfall regimes including the propagation of moisture convergence. Using the CMCC-CM to assess the future (2076-2100) change of diurnal evolution and propagation projected by the RCP4.5 experiment, it was found that propagating diurnal rainfall will enhance and expand southward into the non-propagating regime in southeast China. This change in diurnal rainfall is attributed to the intensification of diurnal land-sea thermal contrast over eastern China and the southward shift of the upper-level jet stream over 20°-30°N. Similar projected changes in diurnal rainfall and associated large-scale dynamical mechanisms were also depicted by four other models (GFDL-ESM2G, GFDL-ESM2M, MRI-CGCM3, and MRI-ESM1) showing a higher skill in representing the diurnal rainfall regimes over East Asia. If such model projection holds true, southeast China will experience an increase in the eastward propagating diurnal rainfall, which could further impact Taiwan.

  14. Wave propagation on a random lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sahlmann, Hanno

    2010-09-15

    Motivated by phenomenological questions in quantum gravity, we consider the propagation of a scalar field on a random lattice. We describe a procedure to calculate the dispersion relation for the field by taking a limit of a periodic lattice. We use this to calculate the lowest order coefficients of the dispersion relation for a specific one-dimensional model.

  15. Propagating double layers in electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Meige, A.; Plihon, N.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Boeuf, J.-P.; Chabert, P.; Boswell, R. W.

    2007-05-15

    Double layers have been observed to propagate from the source region to the diffusion chamber of a helicon-type reactor filled up with a low-pressure mixture of Ar/SF{sub 6} [N. Plihon et al., J. Appl. Phys. 98, 023306 (2005)]. In the present paper the most significant and new experimental results are reported. A fully self-consistent hybrid model in which the electron energy distribution function, the electron temperature, and the various source terms are calculated is developed to investigate these propagating double layers. The spontaneous formation of propagating double layers is only observed in the simulation for system in which the localized inductive heating is combined with small diameter chambers. The conditions of formation and the properties of the propagating double layers observed in the simulation are in good agreement with that of the experiment. By correlating the results of the experiment and the simulation, a formation mechanism compatible with ion two-stream instability is proposed.

  16. Application of Taylor's series to trajectory propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, R. H.; Berryman, K. W.; Breckheimer, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the propagation of trajectories by the application of the preprocessor ATOMCC which uses Taylor's series to solve initial value problems in ordinary differential equations. Comparison of the results obtained with those from other methods are presented. The current studies indicate that the ATOMCC preprocessor is an easy, yet fast and accurate method for generating trajectories.

  17. Smooth relativistic two-body propagators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, E. D.; Jennings, B. K.

    1988-06-01

    In this paper we develop two-body propagators for use in relativistic systems. The starting point is the observation of Thies that the success of the Dirac approach may be attributed to the cancellation of short-range structure generated by the iteration of a momentum dependent potential in the Lippmann-Schwinger equation. We elevate this observation to a principle and look for two-body propagators that have as little short-range structure as possible. The propagators so found treat the two particles symmetrically, reduce to the correct relativistic equation when either one of the two particles becomes very massive and have the correct contribution from the two-body cut. For the pi-nucleon system we find that both the soft-pion theorems and unitarity can be easily satisfied. For proton-nucleus or electron-nucleus scattering we get a simple method of including nuclear recoil. The present approach generates propagators similar to those of Todorov and of Crater and Van Alstine.

  18. ACTS propagation terminal prototype planning and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz; Pergal, F.; Chakraborty, D.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1990-01-01

    The planning and design of a prototype propagation receiving terminal for beacon signals at 27 and 20 GHz bands are examined. The developmental plan is discussed, followed by technical design considerations including, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) system salient features and frequency plan, beacon signal parameters and specifications, system calculations, and terminal hardware design issues.

  19. PROPAGATION AND LINKAGE OF OCEANIC RIDGE SEGMENTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, David D.; Aydin, Atilla

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was made of spreading ridges and the development of structures that link ridge segments using an analogy between ridges and cracks in elastic plates. The ridge-propagation force and a path factor that controls propagation direction were calculated for echelon ridge segments propagating toward each other. The ridge-propagation force increases as ridge ends approach but then declines sharply as the ends pass, so ridge segments may overlap somewhat. The sign of the path factor changes as ridge ends approach and pass, so the overlapping ridge ends may diverge and then converge following a hook-shaped path. The magnitudes of shear stresses in the plane of the plate and orientations of maximum shear planes between adjacent ridge segments were calculated to study transform faulting. For different loading conditions simulating ridge push, plate pull, and ridge suction, a zone of intense mechanical interaction between adjacent ridge ends in which stresses are concentrated was identified. The magnitudes of mean stresses in the plane of the plate and orientations of principal stress planes were also calculated.

  20. Antenna Construction and Propagation of Radio Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on antenna construction and propagation of radio waves is designed to provide communicators with instructions in the selection and/or construction of the proper antenna(s) for use with current field radio equipment. Introductory materials include…

  1. Detonation propagation in a high loss configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott I; Shepherd, Joseph E

    2009-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study of detonation wave propagation in tubes with inner diameters (ID) comparable to the mixture cell size. Propane-oxygen mixtures were used in two test section tubes with inner diameters of 1.27 mm and 6.35 mm. For both test sections, the initial pressure of stoichiometric mixtures was varied to determine the effect on detonation propagation. For the 6.35 mm tube, the equivalence ratio {phi} (where the mixture was {phi} C{sub 3}H{sub 8} + 50{sub 2}) was also varied. Detonations were found to propagate in mixtures with cell sizes as large as five times the diameter of the tube. However, under these conditions, significant losses were observed, resulting in wave propagation velocities as slow as 40% of the CJ velocity U{sub CJ}. A review of relevant literature is presented, followed by experimental details and data. Observed velocity deficits are predicted using models that account for boundary layer growth inside detonation waves.

  2. Vertical laser beam propagation through the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O.; Bufton, J. L.; Schaefer, W. H.; Grolemund, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the earth's atmosphere and its effects upon laser beams was investigated in a series of balloon borne, optical propagation experiments. These experiments were designed to simulate the space to ground laser link. An experiment to determine the amplitude fluctuation, commonly called scintillation, caused by the atmosphere was described.

  3. Cosmic Ray Origin, Acceleration and Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes highlights of the OG3.1, 3.2 and 3.3 sessions of the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference in Salt Lake City, which were devoted to issues of origin/composition, acceleration and propagation.

  4. Propagation of Innovations in Networked Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Winter A.; Jones, Andy; Goldstone, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    A novel paradigm was developed to study the behavior of groups of networked people searching a problem space. The authors examined how different network structures affect the propagation of information in laboratory-created groups. Participants made numerical guesses and received scores that were also made available to their neighbors in the…

  5. Blast noise propagation above a snow cover.

    PubMed

    Albert, D G; Hole, L R

    2001-06-01

    A porous medium model of a snow cover, rather than a viscoelastic treatment, has been used to simulate measured, horizontally traveling acoustic waveform propagation above a dry snow cover 11-20 cm thick. The waveforms were produced by explosions of 1-kg charges at propagation distances of 100 to 1400 m. These waveforms, with a peak frequency around 30 Hz, show pulse broadening effects similar to those previously seen for higher-frequency waves over shorter propagation distances. A rigid-ice-frame porous medium ("rigid-porous") impedance model, which includes the effect of the pores within the snow but ignores any induced motion of the ice particles, is shown to produce much better agreement with the measured waveforms compared with a viscoelastic solid treatment of the snow cover. From the acoustic waveform modeling, the predicted average snow cover depth of 18 cm and effective flow resistivities of 16-31 kPa s m(-2) agree with snow pit observations and with previous acoustic measurements over snow. For propagation in the upwind direction, the pulse broadening caused by the snow cover interaction is lessened, but the overall amplitude decay is greater because of refraction of the blast waves. PMID:11425110

  6. Propagation handbook, frequencies above 10 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ippolito, Louis J.

    1988-08-01

    The progress and accomplishments in the developmet of the Fourth Edition of the NASA Propagation Effects Handbook for Satellite Systems Design, for frequencies 10 to 100 GHz, NASA Reference Publication 1082(04), dated May 1988, prepared by Westighouse Electric Corporation for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are discussed.

  7. Propagation handbook, frequencies above 10 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, Louis J.

    1988-01-01

    The progress and accomplishments in the developmet of the Fourth Edition of the NASA Propagation Effects Handbook for Satellite Systems Design, for frequencies 10 to 100 GHz, NASA Reference Publication 1082(04), dated May 1988, prepared by Westighouse Electric Corporation for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are discussed.

  8. Velocity of propagation in diffusional quantum theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kostin, M.D.

    1986-11-01

    An equation of diffusional quantum theory which takes into account the finite velocity of propagation is derived from Kelvin's telegraph equation and Fuerth's relation. The equation is then used to derive the ground state of quantum systems and to derive the Sommerfeld-Dirac expression for the ionization potential of hydrogen-like ions.

  9. Fluxon propagation on a Josephson transmission line

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, A.; Kawakami, T.

    1983-08-22

    Fluxon propagation profiles for Josephson transmission lines have been directly measured. Single--input-pulse dissociation into multifluxon as well as velocity-dependent wave forms have actually been observed. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical results if a large rf loss term is assumed.

  10. Using Least Squares for Error Propagation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2015-01-01

    The method of least-squares (LS) has a built-in procedure for estimating the standard errors (SEs) of the adjustable parameters in the fit model: They are the square roots of the diagonal elements of the covariance matrix. This means that one can use least-squares to obtain numerical values of propagated errors by defining the target quantities as…

  11. Longitudinal nonlinear wave propagation through soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Valdez, M; Balachandran, B

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, wave propagation through soft tissue is investigated. A primary aim of this investigation is to gain a fundamental understanding of the influence of soft tissue nonlinear material properties on the propagation characteristics of stress waves generated by transient loadings. Here, for computational modeling purposes, the soft tissue is modeled as a nonlinear visco-hyperelastic material, the geometry is assumed to be one-dimensional rod geometry, and uniaxial propagation of longitudinal waves is considered. By using the linearized model, a basic understanding of the characteristics of wave propagation is developed through the dispersion relation and in terms of the propagation speed and attenuation. In addition, it is illustrated as to how the linear system can be used to predict brain tissue material parameters through the use of available experimental ultrasonic attenuation curves. Furthermore, frequency thresholds for wave propagation along internal structures, such as axons in the white matter of the brain, are obtained through the linear analysis. With the nonlinear material model, the authors analyze cases in which one of the ends of the rods is fixed and the other end is subjected to a loading. Two variants of the nonlinear model are analyzed and the associated predictions are compared with the predictions of the corresponding linear model. The numerical results illustrate that one of the imprints of the nonlinearity on the wave propagation phenomenon is the steepening of the wave front, leading to jump-like variations in the stress wave profiles. This phenomenon is a consequence of the dependence of the local wave speed on the local deformation of the material. As per the predictions of the nonlinear material model, compressive waves in the structure travel faster than tensile waves. Furthermore, it is found that wave pulses with large amplitudes and small elapsed times are attenuated over shorter spans. This feature is due to the elevated

  12. Wave propagation in negative index materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aylo, Rola

    Properties of electromagnetic propagation in materials with negative permittivities and permeabilities were first studied in 1968. In such metamaterials, the electric field vector, the magnetic field vector, and the propagation vector form a left hand triad, thus the name left hand materials. Research in this area was practically non-existent, until about 10 years ago, a composite material consisting of periodic metallic rods and split-ring resonators showed left-handed properties. Because the dimension of the constituents of the metamaterial are small compared to the operating wavelength, it is possible to describe the electromagnetic properties of the composite using the concept of effective permittivity and permeability. In this dissertation, the basic properties of electromagnetic propagation through homogenous left hand materials are first studied. Many of the basic properties of left hand materials are in contrast to those in right hand materials, viz., negative refraction, perfect lensing, and the inverse Doppler effect. Dispersion relations are used to study wave propagation in negative index materials. For the first time to the best of our knowledge, we show that a reduced dispersion relation, obtained from the frequency dependence of the propagation constant by neglecting a linear frequency dependent term, obeys causality. Causality of the propagation constant enables us to use a novel and simple operator formalism approach to derive the underlying partial differential equations for baseband and envelope wave propagation. Various tools for understanding and characterizing left-handed materials are thereafter presented. The transfer matrix method is used to analyze periodic and random structures composed of positive and negative index materials. By random structures we mean randomness in layer position, index of refraction, and thickness. As an application of alternating periodic negative index and positive index structures, we propose a novel sensor using

  13. Proceedings of the Twentieth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX XX) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nassar (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) Meeting and associated Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop convene yearly to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications (satcom)industry, academia, and government with an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation have peer discussion of work in progress, disseminate propagation results, and interact with the satcom industry. NAPEX XX, in Fairbanks, Alaska, June 4-5, 1996, had three sessions: (1) "ACTS Propagation Study: Background, Objectives, and Outcomes," covered results from thirteen station-years of Ka-band experiments; (2) "Propagation Studies for Mobile and Personal Satellite Applications," provided the latest developments in measurement, modeling, and dissemination of propagation phenomena of interest to the mobile, personal, and aeronautical satcom industry; and (3)"Propagation Research Topics," covered a range of topics including space/ground optical propagation experiments, propagation databases, the NASA Propagation Web Site, and revision plans for the NASA propagation effects handbooks. The ACTS Miniworkshop, June 6, 1996, covered ACTS status, engineering support for ACTS propagation terminals, and the ACTS Propagation Data Center. A plenary session made specific recommendations for the future direction of the program.

  14. NASA Lunar Base Wireless System Propagation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Upanavage, Matthew; Sham, Catherine C.

    2007-01-01

    There have been many radio wave propagation studies using both experimental and theoretical techniques over the recent years. However, most of studies have been in support of commercial cellular phone wireless applications. The signal frequencies are mostly at the commercial cellular and Personal Communications Service bands. The antenna configurations are mostly one on a high tower and one near the ground to simulate communications between a cellular base station and a mobile unit. There are great interests in wireless communication and sensor systems for NASA lunar missions because of the emerging importance of establishing permanent lunar human exploration bases. Because of the specific lunar terrain geometries and RF frequencies of interest to the NASA missions, much of the published literature for the commercial cellular and PCS bands of 900 and 1800 MHz may not be directly applicable to the lunar base wireless system and environment. There are various communication and sensor configurations required to support all elements of a lunar base. For example, the communications between astronauts, between astronauts and the lunar vehicles, between lunar vehicles and satellites on the lunar orbits. There are also various wireless sensor systems among scientific, experimental sensors and data collection ground stations. This presentation illustrates the propagation analysis of the lunar wireless communication and sensor systems taking into account the three dimensional terrain multipath effects. It is observed that the propagation characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of the lunar terrain. The obtained results indicate the lunar surface material, terrain geometry and antenna location are the important factors affecting the propagation characteristics of the lunar wireless systems. The path loss can be much more severe than the free space propagation and is greatly affected by the antenna height, surface material and operating frequency. The

  15. Amplitude-Preserving Propagator and its Applications in Computational Wave Propagation and Seismic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslaminia, Mehran

    A novel method is developed to approximately solve acoustic wave equation in the frequency domain. The key idea of the method is to partition the domain into smaller subdomains and solve for the wavefield in each subdomain sequentially, which is facilitated by special interface (continuity) conditions. The sequential solution is performed in two steps: First the downward propagating wavefield is computed considering only downward propagation and transmission at the interfaces. The wavefield is then corrected by adding the upward propagating wavefield resulting from reflections and body forces. It is shown that the proposed method results in accurate amplitudes for downward propagation and primary reflections and is hence called the Amplitude-Preserving Propagator. This novel wave propagator leads to three disparate contributions in large scale computational wave modeling and seismic imaging: forward modeling, migration imaging and full waveform inversion. Forward Modeling: The amplitude-preserving propagator is implemented as a preconditioner to iteratively solve the Helmholtz equation. The effectiveness of the proposed preconditioner is studied using various numerical experiments. We show three significant properties of the proposed preconditioner. First, number of iterations grows very slowly with increasing frequency which is a significant advantage compared to other methods, e.g. sweeping preconditioner. Second, the mesh size (i.e. number of elements per wavelength) does not change number of iterations. Third, and the most important one, the computational time is much less than many other preconditioners. Migration Imaging: In the context of migration imaging, the amplitude-preserving propagator is implemented as an efficient forward solver to perform wave propagation simulation in the frequency domain. We show that the propagator results in a new migration algorithm that is almost as accurate as full-wave migration, while being significantly more efficient

  16. Proceedings of the Seventeenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 17) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX) is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investors from domestic and international organizations. NAPEX 17 was held on 15 June 1993. The meeting was organized into two technical sessions. The first session was dedicated to slant path propagation studies and experiments. The second session focused on propagation studies for mobile and personal communications. Preceding NAPEX 17, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop was held on 14 June 1993 to review ACTS propagation activities with emphasis on ACTS experiments status and data collection, processing, and exchange.

  17. Anisotropy of light propagation in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickell, Stephan; Hermann, Marcus; Essenpreis, Matthias; Farrell, Thomas J.; Krämer, Uwe; Patterson, Michael S.

    2000-10-01

    Using spatially resolved, steady state diffuse reflectometry, a directional dependence was found in the propagation of visible and near infrared light through human skin in vivo. The skin's reduced scattering coefficient µ's varies by up to a factor of two between different directions of propagation at the same position. This anisotropy is believed to be caused by the preferential orientation of collagen fibres in the dermis, as described by Langer's skin tension lines. Monte Carlo simulations that examine the effect of partial collagen fibre orientation support this hypothesis. The observation has consequences for non-invasive diagnostic methods relying on skin optical properties, and it could be used non-invasively to determine the direction of lines of cleavage in order to minimize scars due to surgical incisions.

  18. In vitro propagation of Berberis buxifolia Lam.

    PubMed

    Arena, M E; Martínez Pastur, G; Vater, G

    2000-04-01

    Berberis buxifolia is a native shrub of Patagonia with a great importance due to its crop production as soon its medicinal and tinctorial applications. The aim of this work was to develop a protocol for in vitro propagation of B. buxifolia, with special emphasys on the rooting stage. The culture of the explants on Murashige and Skoog (1962) medium added with 0.55 microM BA allowed to attain a multiplication rate of 1:4.7 at day 63. Rooted shoots were obtained on Murashige and Skoog medium with half strength of macronutrient salts. The culture of the shoots with a period of 4 days of darkness at the beginning of the rooting, on a medium with 1.25 microM IBA for 7 days, followed by a IBA free medium until day 28, allowed to attain 80% rooting. These results show that B. buxifolia can be in vitro propagated.

  19. Atmospheric effects on CO2 laser propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. S. R.; Bilbro, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was made of the losses encountered in the propagation of CO2 laser radiation through the atmosphere, particularly as it applies to the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center Pulsed Laser Doppler System. As such it addresses three major areas associated with signal loss: molecular absorption, refractive index changes in a turbulent environment, and aerosol absorption and scattering. In particular, the molecular absorption coefficients of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and nitrous oxide are calculated for various laser lines in the region of 10.6 mu m as a function of various pressures and temperatures. The current status in the physics of low-energy laser propagation through a turbulent atmosphere is presented together with the analysis and evaluation of the associated heterodyne signal power loss. Finally, aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients are calculated for various aerosol distributions and the results incorporated into the signal-to-noise ratio equation for the Marshall Space Flight Center system.

  20. The stratospheric arrival pair in infrasound propagation.

    PubMed

    Waxler, Roger; Evers, Läslo G; Assink, Jelle; Blom, Phillip

    2015-04-01

    The ideal case of a deep and well-formed stratospheric duct for long range infrasound propagation in the absence of tropospheric ducting is considered. A canonical form, that of a pair of arrivals, for ground returns of impulsive signals in a stratospheric duct is determined. The canonical form is derived from the geometrical acoustics approximation, and is validated and extended through full wave modeling. The full caustic structure of the field of ray paths is found and used to determine phase relations between the contributions to the wavetrain from different propagation paths. Finally, comparison with data collected from the 2005 fuel gas depot explosion in Buncefield, England is made. The correspondence between the theoretical results and the observations is shown to be quite good. PMID:25920837

  1. Spacetime and Quantum Propagation From Digital Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ord, Garnet. N.

    2013-09-01

    Minkowski spacetime predates quantum mechanics and is frequently regarded as an extension of the classical paradigm of Newtonian physics, rather than a harbinger of quantum mechanics. By inspecting how discrete clocks operate in a relativistic world we show that this view is misleading. Discrete relativistic clocks implicate classical spacetime provided a continuum limit is taken in such a way that successive ticks of the clock yield a smooth worldline. The classical picture emerges but does so by confining unitary propagation into spacetime regions between ticks that have zero area in the continuum limit. Clocks allowed a continuum limit that does not force inter-event intervals to zero, satisfy the Dirac equation. This strongly suggests that the origin of quantum propagation is to be found in the shift from Newton's absolute time to Minkowski's frame dependent time and is ultimately relativistic in origin.

  2. Vegetative propagation of Cecropia obtusifolia (Cecropiaceae).

    PubMed

    LaPierre, L M

    2001-01-01

    Cecropia is a relatively well-known and well-studied genus in the Neotropics. Methods for the successful propagation of C. obtusifolia Bertoloni, 1840 from cuttings and air layering are described, and the results of an experiment to test the effect of two auxins, naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) and indole butyric acid (IBA), on adventitious root production in cuttings are presented. In general, C. obtusifolia cuttings respond well to adventitious root production (58.3% of cuttings survived to root), but air layering was the better method (93% of cuttings survived to root). The concentration of auxins used resulted in an overall significantly lower quality of roots produced compared with cuttings without auxin treatment. Future experiments using Cecropia could benefit from the use of isogenic plants produced by vegetative propagation. PMID:12189829

  3. Scout trajectory error propagation computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, T. R.

    1982-01-01

    Since 1969, flight experience has been used as the basis for predicting Scout orbital accuracy. The data used for calculating the accuracy consists of errors in the trajectory parameters (altitude, velocity, etc.) at stage burnout as observed on Scout flights. Approximately 50 sets of errors are used in Monte Carlo analysis to generate error statistics in the trajectory parameters. A covariance matrix is formed which may be propagated in time. The mechanization of this process resulted in computer program Scout Trajectory Error Propagation (STEP) and is described herein. Computer program STEP may be used in conjunction with the Statistical Orbital Analysis Routine to generate accuracy in the orbit parameters (apogee, perigee, inclination, etc.) based upon flight experience.

  4. Crack propagation in bamboo's hierarchical cellular structure.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Meisam K; Lu, Yang

    2014-07-07

    Bamboo, as a natural hierarchical cellular material, exhibits remarkable mechanical properties including excellent flexibility and fracture toughness. As far as bamboo as a functionally graded bio-composite is concerned, the interactions of different constituents (bamboo fibers; parenchyma cells; and vessels.) alongside their corresponding interfacial areas with a developed crack should be of high significance. Here, by using multi-scale mechanical characterizations coupled with advanced environmental electron microscopy (ESEM), we unambiguously show that fibers' interfacial areas along with parenchyma cells' boundaries were preferred routes for crack growth in both radial and longitudinal directions. Irrespective of the honeycomb structure of fibers along with cellular configuration of parenchyma ground, the hollow vessels within bamboo culm affected the crack propagation too, by crack deflection or crack-tip energy dissipation. It is expected that the tortuous crack propagation mode exhibited in the present study could be applicable to other cellular natural materials as well.

  5. Outwardly Propagating Flames at Elevated Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.; Rozenchan, G.; Tse, S. D.; Zhu, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Spherical, outwardly-propagating flames of CH4-O2-inert and H2-O2-inert mixtures were experimentally studied in a high pressure apparatus. Stretch-free flame speeds and Markstein lengths were extracted for a wide range of pressures and equivalence ratios for spherically-symmetric, smooth flamefronts and compared to numerical computations with detailed chemistry and transport, as well as existing data in the literature. Wrinkle development was examined for propagating flames that were unstable under our experimental conditions. Hydrodynamic cells developed for most H2-air and CH4-air flames at elevated pressures, while thermal-diffusive instabilities were also observed for lean and near-stoichiometric hydrogen flames at pressures above atmospheric. Strategies in suppressing or delaying the onset of cell formation have been assessed. Buoyancy effects affected sufficiently off-stoichiometric CH4 mixtures at high pressures.

  6. Experiments on the Propagation of Plasma Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Noam; Egedal, Jan; Fox, Will; Le, Ari; Porkolab, Miklos

    2008-07-04

    We investigate experimentally the motion and structure of isolated plasma filaments propagating through neutral gas. Plasma filaments, or 'blobs,' arise from turbulent fluctuations in a range of plasmas. Our experimental geometry is toroidally symmetric, and the blobs expand to a larger major radius under the influence of a vertical electric field. The electric field, which is caused by {nabla}B and curvature drifts in a 1/R magnetic field, is limited by collisional damping on the neutral gas. The blob's electrostatic potential structure and the resulting ExB flow field give rise to a vortex pair and a mushroom shape, which are consistent with nonlinear plasma simulations. We observe experimentally this characteristic mushroom shape for the first time. We also find that the blob propagation velocity is inversely proportional to the neutral density and decreases with time as the blob cools.

  7. Inferring network topology via the propagation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, An

    2013-11-01

    Inferring the network topology from the dynamics is a fundamental problem, with wide applications in geology, biology, and even counter-terrorism. Based on the propagation process, we present a simple method to uncover the network topology. A numerical simulation on artificial networks shows that our method enjoys a high accuracy in inferring the network topology. We find that the infection rate in the propagation process significantly influences the accuracy, and that each network corresponds to an optimal infection rate. Moreover, the method generally works better in large networks. These finding are confirmed in both real social and nonsocial networks. Finally, the method is extended to directed networks, and a similarity measure specific for directed networks is designed.

  8. Laser beam shaping profiles and propagation.

    PubMed

    Shealy, David L; Hoffnagle, John A

    2006-07-20

    We consider four families of functions--the super-Gaussian, flattened Gaussian, Fermi-Dirac, and super-Lorentzian--that have been used to describe flattened irradiance profiles. We determine the shape and width parameters of the different distributions, when each flattened profile has the same radius and slope of the irradiance at its half-height point, and then we evaluate the implicit functional relationship between the shape and width parameters for matched profiles, which provides a quantitative way to compare profiles described by different families of functions. We conclude from an analysis of each profile with matched parameters using Kirchhoff-Fresnel diffraction theory and M2 analysis that the diffraction patterns as they propagate differ by small amounts, which may not be distinguished experimentally. Thus, beam shaping optics is designed to produce either of these four flattened output irradiance distributions with matched parameters will yield similar irradiance distributions as the beam propagates.

  9. Model of Blue Jet Formation and Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, Gennadiy; Shneider, Mikhail; Mokrov, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Upward-propagating luminous flashes above thunderstorms were discovered two decades ago. They were named blue jets (BJ) due to primarily blue color. It is broadly accepted that BJ are produced by a lightning leader running upward in the nonuniform atmosphere. It is also suggested that formation of a leader is governed by the contraction of the current of a streamer flash into a small radius channel. The paper presents results of simulations of the current contraction in the air as a function of the pressure, and convective heat removal time. It was shown that transition to the contracted state occurs in hysteresis mode in which contracted and diffusive stable states exist simultaneously. The critical current for the phase transition was obtained. Similarity methods were applied to the simulations of the critical contraction current, along with chosen observations of BJ, to study BJ formation and propagation in the atmosphere.

  10. Belief-propagation reconstruction for discrete tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouillart, E.; Krzakala, F.; Mézard, M.; Zdeborová, L.

    2013-03-01

    We consider the reconstruction of a two-dimensional discrete image from a set of tomographic measurements corresponding to the Radon projection. Assuming that the image has a structure where neighbouring pixels have a larger probability of taking the same value, we follow a Bayesian approach and introduce a fast message-passing reconstruction algorithm based on belief propagation. For numerical results, we specialize to the case of binary tomography. We test the algorithm on binary synthetic images with different length scales and compare our results against a more usual convex optimization approach. We investigate the reconstruction error as a function of the number of tomographic measurements, corresponding to the number of projection angles. The belief-propagation algorithm turns out to be more efficient than the convex-optimization algorithm, both in terms of recovery bounds for noise-free projections and reconstruction quality when moderate Gaussian noise is added to the projections.

  11. Propagating Resource Constraints Using Mutual Exclusion Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Sanchez, Romeo; Do, Minh B.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the most recent techniques for propagating resource constraints in Constraint Based scheduling is Energy Constraint. This technique focuses in precedence based scheduling, where precedence relations are taken into account rather than the absolute position of activities. Although, this particular technique proved to be efficient on discrete unary resources, it provides only loose bounds for jobs using discrete multi-capacity resources. In this paper we show how mutual exclusion reasoning can be used to propagate time bounds for activities using discrete resources. We show that our technique based on critical path analysis and mutex reasoning is just as effective on unary resources, and also shows that it is more effective on multi-capacity resources, through both examples and empirical study.

  12. Propagation mechanism of polymer optical fiber fuse.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hayashi, Neisei; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Kentaro; Todoroki, Shin-ichi

    2014-04-25

    A fiber fuse phenomenon in polymer optical fibers (POFs) has recently been observed, and its unique properties such as slow propagation, low threshold power density, and the formation of a black oscillatory damage curve, have been reported. However, its characterization is still insufficient to well understand the mechanism and to avoid the destruction of POFs. Here, we present detailed experimental and theoretical analyses of the POF fuse propagation. First, we clarify that the bright spot is not a plasma but an optical discharge, the temperature of which is ~3600 K. We then elucidate the reasons for the oscillation of the damage curve along with the formation of newly-observed gas bubbles as well as for the low threshold power density. We also present the idea that the POF fuse can potentially be exploited to offer a long photoelectric interaction length.

  13. The Joint African Radiometric Propagation Measurement Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbesser-Rastburg, B.; Zaks, C.; Rogers, D. V.; McCarthy, D. K.; Allnutt, J. E.

    1990-06-01

    This paper summarizes the principal aspects of a major cooperative radiowave propagation experiment that was designed to collect data for improving rain attenuation prediction models for tropical Africa. A pressing need for such data had previously been identified by Resolution 79 of the CCIR. In a unique joint arrangement with three African governments, Intelsat, Comsat, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the U.S. National Telecommunications and Information Administration and the U.S. Telecommunications Training Institute (USTTI) collaborated in setting up a Ku-band radiometric measurement campaign in Cameroon, Kenya and Nigeria. A brief historical overview is given, together with the major technical parameters of the sites and the equipment installed there. The anticipated characteristics of the three locations are outlined with regard to meteorological and propagation conditions, and some preliminary indications of the results are presented based on an inspection of the early event data.

  14. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1996-11-26

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator includes an evacuated chamber having a gun for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam or ion beam. The beam is discharged through a beam exit in the chamber into a higher pressure region. A plasma interface is disposed at the beam exit and includes a plasma channel for bounding a plasma maintainable between a cathode and an anode disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel is coaxially aligned with the beam exit for propagating the beam from the chamber, through the plasma, and into the higher pressure region. The plasma is effective for pumping down the beam exit for preventing pressure increase in the chamber and provides magnetic focusing of the beam discharged into the higher pressure region 24. 7 figs.

  15. Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE-91) Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr. (Compiler); Chestnutt, David (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE), was conducted at the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, USA, during the period 11-28 Jul. 1991. JAPE consisted of various short and long range propagation experiments using various acoustic sources including speakers, propane cannons, helicopters, a 155 mm howitzer, and static high explosives. Of primary importance to the performance of theses tests was the extensive characterization of the atmosphere during these tests. This atmospheric characterization included turbulence measurements. A workshop to disseminate the results of JAPE-91 was held in Hampton, VA, on 28 Apr. 1993. This report is a compilation of the presentations made at the workshop along with a list of attendees and the agenda.

  16. Propagation mechanism of polymer optical fiber fuse

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hayashi, Neisei; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Kentaro; Todoroki, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    A fiber fuse phenomenon in polymer optical fibers (POFs) has recently been observed, and its unique properties such as slow propagation, low threshold power density, and the formation of a black oscillatory damage curve, have been reported. However, its characterization is still insufficient to well understand the mechanism and to avoid the destruction of POFs. Here, we present detailed experimental and theoretical analyses of the POF fuse propagation. First, we clarify that the bright spot is not a plasma but an optical discharge, the temperature of which is ~3600 K. We then elucidate the reasons for the oscillation of the damage curve along with the formation of newly-observed gas bubbles as well as for the low threshold power density. We also present the idea that the POF fuse can potentially be exploited to offer a long photoelectric interaction length. PMID:24762949

  17. Propagating Qualitative Values Through Quantitative Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Deepak

    1992-01-01

    In most practical problems where traditional numeric simulation is not adequate, one need to reason about a system with both qualitative and quantitative equations. In this paper, we address the problem of propagating qualitative values represented as interval values through quantitative equations. Previous research has produced exponential-time algorithms for approximate solution of the problem. These may not meet the stringent requirements of many real time applications. This paper advances the state of art by producing a linear-time algorithm that can propagate a qualitative value through a class of complex quantitative equations exactly and through arbitrary algebraic expressions approximately. The algorithm was found applicable to Space Shuttle Reaction Control System model.

  18. Propagation of waves along an impedance boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the scalar wave field due to a point source above a plane impedance boundary is presented. A surface wave is found to be an essential component of the total wave field. It is shown that, as a result of ducting of energy by the surface wave, the amplitude of the total wave near the boundary can be greater than it would be if the boundary were perfectly reflecting. Asymptotic results, valid near the boundary, are obtained both for the case of finite impedance (the soft-boundary case) and for the limiting case in which the impedance becomes infinite (the hard-boundary case). In the latter, the wave amplitude in the farfield decreases essentially inversely as the horizontal propagation distance; in the former (if the surface-wave term is neglected), it decreases inversely as the square of the horizontal propagation distance.

  19. Sources, Propagators, and Sinks of Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, William D.

    2006-01-01

    Space Weather is a complex web of sources, propagators, and sinks of energy, mass, and momentum. A complete understanding of Space Weather requires specifying, and an ability to predict, each link in this web. One important problem in Space Weather is ranking the importance of a particular measurement or model in a research program. One way to do this ranking is to examine the simplest linked diagram of the sources, propagators, and sinks and produce. By analyzing only those components that contribute to a particular area the individual contributions can be better appreciated. Several such diagrams will be shown and used to discuss how long-term effects of Space Weather can be separated from the impulsive effects.

  20. Belief Propagation Algorithm for Portfolio Optimization Problems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The typical behavior of optimal solutions to portfolio optimization problems with absolute deviation and expected shortfall models using replica analysis was pioneeringly estimated by S. Ciliberti et al. [Eur. Phys. B. 57, 175 (2007)]; however, they have not yet developed an approximate derivation method for finding the optimal portfolio with respect to a given return set. In this study, an approximation algorithm based on belief propagation for the portfolio optimization problem is presented using the Bethe free energy formalism, and the consistency of the numerical experimental results of the proposed algorithm with those of replica analysis is confirmed. Furthermore, the conjecture of H. Konno and H. Yamazaki, that the optimal solutions with the absolute deviation model and with the mean-variance model have the same typical behavior, is verified using replica analysis and the belief propagation algorithm. PMID:26305462

  1. Propagation of light in a Dense Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, Samina; Saleem, Iram

    Propagation of light is studied in a very dense system. Renormalization scheme of QED is used to understand the propagation of light in a hot and dense medium. We consider a medium of a very large chemical potential with relatively small temperature. The generalized results of vacuum polarization of photon in a hot and dense medium is used to study the behavior of light in such a system. Our hypothetical system corresponds to a heat bath of electrons at an equilibrium temperature and the density of electrons is larger as compared to the temperature of the medium. Such type of systems have previously been identified as classical systems because the chemical potential is large enough to dominate temperature.

  2. Cavitation propagation in water under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noblin, Xavier; Yip Cheung Sang, Yann; Pellegrin, Mathieu; Materials and Complex Fluids Team

    2012-11-01

    Cavitation appears when pressure decreases below vapor pressure, generating vapor bubbles. It can be obtain in dynamical ways (acoustic, hydraulic) but also in quasi-static conditions. This later case is often observed in nature, in trees, or during the ejection of ferns spores. We study the cavitation bubbles nucleation dynamics and its propagation in a confined microfabricated media. This later is an ordered array of microcavities made in hydrogel filled with water. When the system is put into dry air, it dehydrates, water leaves the cavities and tension (negative pressure) builds in the cavities. This can be sustained up to a critical pressure (of order -20 MPa), then cavitation bubbles appear. We follow the dynamics using ultra high speed imaging. Events with several bubbles cavitating in a few microseconds could be observed along neighboring cells, showing a propagation phenomenon that we discuss. ANR CAVISOFT 2010-JCJC-0407 01.

  3. Obliquely propagating dust-density waves

    SciTech Connect

    Piel, A.; Arp, O.; Klindworth, M.; Melzer, A.

    2008-02-15

    Self-excited dust-density waves are experimentally studied in a dusty plasma under microgravity. Two types of waves are observed: a mode inside the dust volume propagating in the direction of the ion flow and another mode propagating obliquely at the boundary between the dusty plasma and the space charge sheath. The dominance of oblique modes can be described in the frame of a fluid model. It is shown that the results fom the fluid model agree remarkably well with a kinetic electrostatic model of Rosenberg [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996)]. In the experiment, the instability is quenched by increasing the gas pressure or decreasing the dust density. The critical pressure and dust density are well described by the models.

  4. Experimental study of turbulent flame kernel propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, Mohy; Peters, Norbert; Schrader, Lars-Uve

    2008-07-15

    Flame kernels in spark ignited combustion systems dominate the flame propagation and combustion stability and performance. They are likely controlled by the spark energy, flow field and mixing field. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the structure and propagation of the flame kernel in turbulent premixed methane flow using advanced laser-based techniques. The spark is generated using pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 20 mJ pulse energy in order to avoid the effect of the electrodes on the flame kernel structure and the variation of spark energy from shot-to-shot. Four flames have been investigated at equivalence ratios, {phi}{sub j}, of 0.8 and 1.0 and jet velocities, U{sub j}, of 6 and 12 m/s. A combined two-dimensional Rayleigh and LIPF-OH technique has been applied. The flame kernel structure has been collected at several time intervals from the laser ignition between 10 {mu}s and 2 ms. The data show that the flame kernel structure starts with spherical shape and changes gradually to peanut-like, then to mushroom-like and finally disturbed by the turbulence. The mushroom-like structure lasts longer in the stoichiometric and slower jet velocity. The growth rate of the average flame kernel radius is divided into two linear relations; the first one during the first 100 {mu}s is almost three times faster than that at the later stage between 100 and 2000 {mu}s. The flame propagation is slightly faster in leaner flames. The trends of the flame propagation, flame radius, flame cross-sectional area and mean flame temperature are related to the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The relations obtained in the present work allow the prediction of any of these parameters at different conditions. (author)

  5. Propagation experiments in low-visibility atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Paik, W H; Tebyani, M; Epstein, D J; Kennedy, R S; Shapiro, J H

    1978-03-15

    An experimental program aimed at measuring critical channel parameters of atmospheric optical communication channels under low-visibility weather conditions is described. Multipath and angular spectrum measurements made under a variety of weather conditions over a 13.6-km line-of-sight propagation path are reported. The latter measurements are used to examine the dependence of scattered plus unscattered optical transmission on optical thickness.

  6. LMSS drive simulator for multipath propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishakantaiah, Praveen; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional drive simulator for the prediction of Land Mobile Satellite Service (LMSS) multipath propagation was developed. It is based on simple physical and geometrical rules and can be used to evaluate effects of scatterer numbers and positions, receiving antenna pattern, and satellite frequency and position. It is shown that scatterers close to the receiver have the most effect and that directive antennas suppress multipath interference.

  7. Faraday Pilot-Waves: Generation and Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano-Rios, Carlos; Milewski, Paul; Nachbin, André; Bush, John

    2015-11-01

    We examine the dynamics of drops bouncing on a fluid bath subjected to vertical vibration. We solve a system of linear PDEs to compute the surface wave generation and propagation. Waves are triggered at each bounce, giving rise to the Faraday pilot-wave field. The model captures several of the behaviors observed in the laboratory, including transitions between a variety of bouncing and walking states, the Doppler effect, and droplet-droplet interactions. Thanks to the NSF.

  8. Comments on 'Rapid pulsed microwave propagation'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Roger B.

    1992-05-01

    An evaluation is conducted of the Giakos and Ishii (1991) report of experimental evidence purporting the propagation of EM pulses at a speed faster than that of light. It is established that such experimental results contradict Maxwell's equations. An examination is conducted of the limitations inherent to the experiment of Giakos and Ishii (1991). Giakos and Ishii reply that their experimental results are consistent with the Maxwell equations.

  9. Propagation considerations for the Odyssey system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Hau H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Odyssey system with special emphasis given to the link availability for both mobile link and feeder link. The Odyssey system design provides high link availability, typically 98 percent in the primary service areas, and better than 95 percent availability in other service areas. Strategies for overcoming Ka-band feeder link rain fades are presented. Mobile link propagation study results and summary link budgets are also presented.

  10. Harmonic plane wave propagation in gyroelectric media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillion, Pierre

    2006-05-01

    We analyse the behaviour of harmonic plane waves in unbounded gyroelectric media once the refractive index in the direction of propagation is known from the Fresnel equation. We get, for the electric and magnetic fields, analytical expressions simple enough to use in a plane wave spectrum representation of more structured electromagnetic fields in these media. We also discuss the reflection and refraction of harmonic plane waves at the boundary between an isotropic medium and a gyroelectric material.

  11. 47 CFR 80.767 - Propagation curve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... propagation graph, § 80.767 Graph 1, must be used in computing the service area contour. The graph provides...: Transmitter output power in watts is converted to dBk by Pt=10 −30. Also see § 80.761 Graph 1 for a conversion graph. G=Antenna gain in dB referred to a standard half-wave dipole, in the direction of each...

  12. Asexual propagation and regeneration in colonial ascidians.

    PubMed

    Kürn, Ulrich; Rendulic, Snjezana; Tiozzo, Stefano; Lauzon, Robert J

    2011-08-01

    Regeneration is widely distributed among the metazoans. However, clear differences exist as to the degree of regenerative capacity: some phyla can only replace missing body parts, whereas others can generate entirely new individuals. Ascidians are animals that possess a remarkable regenerative plasticity and exhibit a great diversity of mechanisms for asexual propagation and survival. They are marine invertebrate members of the subphylum Tunicata and represent modern-day descendants of the chordate ancestor; in their tadpole stage they exhibit a chordate body plan that is resorbed during metamorphosis. Solitary species grow into an adult that can reach several centimeters in length, whereas colonial species grow by asexual propagation, creating a colony of genetically identical individuals. In this review, we present an overview of the biology of colonial ascidians as a paradigm for study in stem cell and regenerative biology. Focusing on botryllid ascidians, we introduce the potential roles played by multipotent epithelia and multipotent/pluripotent stem cells as source of asexual propagation and regenerative plasticity in the different budding mechanisms, and consider the putative mechanism of body repatterning in a non-embryonic scenario. We also discuss the involvement of intra-colony homeostatic processes in regulating budding potential, and the functional link between allorecognition, chimerism, and regenerative potential.

  13. Dimensional analysis of acoustically propagated signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Scott D.; Thomson, Dennis W.

    1993-01-01

    Traditionally, long term measurements of atmospherically propagated sound signals have consisted of time series of multiminute averages. Only recently have continuous measurements with temporal resolution corresponding to turbulent time scales been available. With modern digital data acquisition systems we now have the capability to simultaneously record both acoustical and meteorological parameters with sufficient temporal resolution to allow us to examine in detail relationships between fluctuating sound and the meteorological variables, particularly wind and temperature, which locally determine the acoustic refractive index. The atmospheric acoustic propagation medium can be treated as a nonlinear dynamical system, a kind of signal processor whose innards depend on thermodynamic and turbulent processes in the atmosphere. The atmosphere is an inherently nonlinear dynamical system. In fact one simple model of atmospheric convection, the Lorenz system, may well be the most widely studied of all dynamical systems. In this paper we report some results of our having applied methods used to characterize nonlinear dynamical systems to study the characteristics of acoustical signals propagated through the atmosphere. For example, we investigate whether or not it is possible to parameterize signal fluctuations in terms of fractal dimensions. For time series one such parameter is the limit capacity dimension. Nicolis and Nicolis were among the first to use the kind of methods we have to study the properties of low dimension global attractors.

  14. Nonlinear guided wave propagation in prestressed plates.

    PubMed

    Pau, Annamaria; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    The measurement of stress in a structure presents considerable interest in many fields of engineering. In this paper, the diagnostic potential of nonlinear elastic guided waves in a prestressed plate is investigated. To do so, an analytical model is formulated accounting for different aspects involved in the phenomenon. The fact that the initial strains can be finite is considered using the Green Lagrange strain tensor, and initial and final configurations are not merged, as it would be assumed in the infinitesimal strain theory. Moreover, an appropriate third-order expression of the strain energy of the hyperelastic body is adopted to account for the material nonlinearities. The model obtained enables to investigate both the linearized case, which gives the variation of phase and group velocity as a function of the initial stress, and the nonlinear case, involving second-harmonic generation as a function of the initial state of stress. The analysis is limited to Rayleigh-Lamb waves propagating in a plate. Three cases of initial prestress are considered, including prestress in the direction of the wave propagation, prestress orthogonal to the direction of wave propagation, and plane isotropic stress.

  15. Wave propagation in spatially modulated tubes.

    PubMed

    Ziepke, A; Martens, S; Engel, H

    2016-09-01

    We investigate wave propagation in rotationally symmetric tubes with a periodic spatial modulation of cross section. Using an asymptotic perturbation analysis, the governing quasi-two-dimensional reaction-diffusion equation can be reduced into a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion-advection equation. Assuming a weak perturbation by the advection term and using projection method, in a second step, an equation of motion for traveling waves within such tubes can be derived. Both methods predict properly the nonlinear dependence of the propagation velocity on the ratio of the modulation period of the geometry to the intrinsic width of the front, or pulse. As a main feature, we observe finite intervals of propagation failure of waves induced by the tube's modulation and derive an analytically tractable condition for their occurrence. For the highly diffusive limit, using the Fick-Jacobs approach, we show that wave velocities within modulated tubes are governed by an effective diffusion coefficient. Furthermore, we discuss the effects of a single bottleneck on the period of pulse trains. We observe period changes by integer fractions dependent on the bottleneck width and the period of the entering pulse train.

  16. Light propagation in the averaged universe

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, Samae; Schwarz, Dominik J. E-mail: dschwarz@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2014-10-01

    Cosmic structures determine how light propagates through the Universe and consequently must be taken into account in the interpretation of observations. In the standard cosmological model at the largest scales, such structures are either ignored or treated as small perturbations to an isotropic and homogeneous Universe. This isotropic and homogeneous model is commonly assumed to emerge from some averaging process at the largest scales. We assume that there exists an averaging procedure that preserves the causal structure of space-time. Based on that assumption, we study the effects of averaging the geometry of space-time and derive an averaged version of the null geodesic equation of motion. For the averaged geometry we then assume a flat Friedmann-Lemaître (FL) model and find that light propagation in this averaged FL model is not given by null geodesics of that model, but rather by a modified light propagation equation that contains an effective Hubble expansion rate, which differs from the Hubble rate of the averaged space-time.

  17. Propagation of disturbances in degenerate quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancellor, Nicholas; Haas, Stephan

    2011-07-01

    Disturbances in gapless quantum many-body models are known to travel an unlimited distance throughout the system. Here, we explore this phenomenon in finite clusters with degenerate ground states. The specific model studied here is the one-dimensional J1-J2 Heisenberg Hamiltonian at and close to the Majumdar-Ghosh point. Both open and periodic boundary conditions are considered. Quenches are performed using a local magnetic field. The degenerate Majumdar-Ghosh ground state allows disturbances which carry quantum entanglement to propagate throughout the system and thus dephase the entire system within the degenerate subspace. These disturbances can also carry polarization, but not energy, as all energy is stored locally. The local evolution of the part of the system where energy is stored drives the rest of the system through long-range entanglement. We also examine approximations for the ground state of this Hamiltonian in the strong field limit and study how couplings away from the Majumdar-Ghosh point affect the propagation of disturbances. We find that even in the case of approximate degeneracy, a disturbance can be propagated throughout a finite system.

  18. Nonlinear propagation of light in Dirac matter.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Bengt; Shukla, P K

    2011-09-01

    The nonlinear interaction between intense laser light and a quantum plasma is modeled by a collective Dirac equation coupled with the Maxwell equations. The model is used to study the nonlinear propagation of relativistically intense laser light in a quantum plasma including the electron spin-1/2 effect. The relativistic effects due to the high-intensity laser light lead, in general, to a downshift of the laser frequency, similar to a classical plasma where the relativistic mass increase leads to self-induced transparency of laser light and other associated effects. The electron spin-1/2 effects lead to a frequency upshift or downshift of the electromagnetic (EM) wave, depending on the spin state of the plasma and the polarization of the EM wave. For laboratory solid density plasmas, the spin-1/2 effects on the propagation of light are small, but they may be significant in superdense plasma in the core of white dwarf stars. We also discuss extensions of the model to include kinetic effects of a distribution of the electrons on the nonlinear propagation of EM waves in a quantum plasma. PMID:22060507

  19. Wave propagation in metamaterial lattice sandwich plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xin; Wen, Jihong; Yin, Jianfei; Yu, Dianlong

    2016-04-01

    This paper designed a special acoustic metamaterial 3D Kagome lattice sandwich plate. Dispersion properties and vibration responses of both traditional plate and metamaterial plate are investigated based on FEA methods. The traditional plate does not have low-frequency complete bandgaps, but the metamaterial plate has low-frequency complete bandgap (at 620Hz) coming from the symmetrical local cantilever resonators. The bandgap frequency is approximate to the first-order natural frequency of the oscillator. Complex wave modes are analyzed. The dispersion curves of longitudinal waves exist in the flexural bandgap. The dispersion properties demonstrate the metamaterial design is advantageous to suppress the low-frequency flexural wave propagation in lattice sandwich plate. The flexural vibrations near the bandgap are also suppressed efficiently. The longitudinal excitation stimulates mainly longitudinal waves and lots of low-frequency flexural vibration modes are avoided. Furthermore, the free edge effects in metamaterial plate provide new method for damping optimizations. The influences of damping on vibrations of the metamaterial sandwich plate are studied. Damping has global influence on the wave propagation; stronger damping will induce more vibration attenuation. The results enlighten us damping and metamaterial design approaches can be unite in the sandwich plates to suppress the wave propagations.

  20. Model-scale sound propagation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a scale model propagation experiment to investigate grazing propagation above a finite impedance boundary are reported. In the experiment, a 20 x 25 ft ground plane was installed in an anechoic chamber. Propagation tests were performed over the plywood surface of the ground plane and with the ground plane covered with felt, styrofoam, and fiberboard. Tests were performed with discrete tones in the frequency range of 10 to 15 kHz. The acoustic source and microphones varied in height above the test surface from flush to 6 in. Microphones were located in a linear array up to 18 ft from the source. A preliminary experiment using the same ground plane, but only testing the plywood and felt surfaces was performed. The results of this first experiment were encouraging, but data variability and repeatability were poor, particularly, for the felt surface, making comparisons with theoretical predictions difficult. In the main experiment the sound source, microphones, microphone positioning, data acquisition, quality of the anechoic chamber, and environmental control of the anechoic chamber were improved. High-quality, repeatable acoustic data were measured in the main experiment for all four test surfaces. Comparisons with predictions are good, but limited by uncertainties of the impedance values of the test surfaces.

  1. Wave propagation in spatially modulated tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziepke, A.; Martens, S.; Engel, H.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate wave propagation in rotationally symmetric tubes with a periodic spatial modulation of cross section. Using an asymptotic perturbation analysis, the governing quasi-two-dimensional reaction-diffusion equation can be reduced into a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion-advection equation. Assuming a weak perturbation by the advection term and using projection method, in a second step, an equation of motion for traveling waves within such tubes can be derived. Both methods predict properly the nonlinear dependence of the propagation velocity on the ratio of the modulation period of the geometry to the intrinsic width of the front, or pulse. As a main feature, we observe finite intervals of propagation failure of waves induced by the tube's modulation and derive an analytically tractable condition for their occurrence. For the highly diffusive limit, using the Fick-Jacobs approach, we show that wave velocities within modulated tubes are governed by an effective diffusion coefficient. Furthermore, we discuss the effects of a single bottleneck on the period of pulse trains. We observe period changes by integer fractions dependent on the bottleneck width and the period of the entering pulse train.

  2. Instability and Turbulence of Propagating Particulate Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandar, S.

    2015-11-01

    Propagation of particle-laden fluid into an ambient is a common fluid mechanical process that can be observed in many industrial and environmental applications. Sedimentation fronts, volcanic plumes, dust storms, powder snow avalanches, submarine turbidity currents, explosive powder dispersal and supernovae offer fascinating examples of advancing particulate fronts. The propagating interface can undergo Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz and double-diffusive instabilities and result in the formation of lobes and clefts, spikes and bubbles, and particulate fingers. The interplay between suspended particles and turbulence is often complex due to interaction of competing mechanisms. In problems such as turbidity currents, turbulence controls sediment concentration through resuspension and settling of particles at the bed. Also, turbulent entrainment at the propagating front is observed to be influenced by the sediments. Stable stratification due to suspended sediment concentration can damp and even kill turbulence. This complex turbulence-sediment interaction offers possible explanation for massive sediment deposits observed in nature. The talk will also address challenges and recent advancements in the modeling and simulation of such particle-laden turbulent flows.

  3. Nonlinear guided wave propagation in prestressed plates.

    PubMed

    Pau, Annamaria; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    The measurement of stress in a structure presents considerable interest in many fields of engineering. In this paper, the diagnostic potential of nonlinear elastic guided waves in a prestressed plate is investigated. To do so, an analytical model is formulated accounting for different aspects involved in the phenomenon. The fact that the initial strains can be finite is considered using the Green Lagrange strain tensor, and initial and final configurations are not merged, as it would be assumed in the infinitesimal strain theory. Moreover, an appropriate third-order expression of the strain energy of the hyperelastic body is adopted to account for the material nonlinearities. The model obtained enables to investigate both the linearized case, which gives the variation of phase and group velocity as a function of the initial stress, and the nonlinear case, involving second-harmonic generation as a function of the initial state of stress. The analysis is limited to Rayleigh-Lamb waves propagating in a plate. Three cases of initial prestress are considered, including prestress in the direction of the wave propagation, prestress orthogonal to the direction of wave propagation, and plane isotropic stress. PMID:25786963

  4. Premixed Turbulent Flame Propagation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1999-01-01

    A combined numerical-experimental study has been carried out to investigate the structure and propagation characteristics of turbulent premixed flames with and without the influence of buoyancy. Experimentally, the premixed flame characteristics are studied in the wrinkled regime using a Couette flow facility and an isotropic flow facility in order to resolve the scale of flame wrinkling. Both facilities were chosen for their ability to achieve sustained turbulence at low Reynolds number. This implies that conventional diagnostics can be employed to resolve the smallest scales of wrinkling. The Couette facility was also built keeping in mind the constraints imposed by the drop tower requirements. Results showed that the flow in this Couette flow facility achieves full-developed turbulence at low Re and all turbulence statistics are in good agreement with past measurements on large-scale facilities. Premixed flame propagation studies were then carried out both using the isotropic box and the Couette facility. Flame imaging showed that fine scales of wrinkling occurs during flame propagation. Both cases in Ig showed significant buoyancy effect. To demonstrate that micro-g can remove this buoyancy effect, a small drop tower was built and drop experiments were conducted using the isotropic box. Results using the Couette facility confirmed the ability to carry out these unique reacting flow experiments at least in 1g. Drop experiments at NASA GRC were planned but were not completed due to termination of this project.

  5. Propagation of seismic waves in tall buildings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    1998-01-01

    A discrete-time wave propagation formulation of the seismic response of tall buildings is introduced. The building is modeled as a layered medium, similar to a layered soil medium, and is subjected to vertically propagating seismic shear waves. Soil layers and the bedrock under the foundation are incorporated in the formulation as additional layers. Seismic response is expressed in terms of the wave travel times between the layers, and the wave reflection and transmission coefficients at the layer interfaces. The equations account for the frequency-dependent filtering effects of the foundation and floor masses. The calculation of seismic response is reduced to a pair of simple finite-difference equations for each layer, which can be solved recursively starting from the bedrock. Compared to the commonly used vibration formulation, the wave propagation formulation provides several advantages, including simplified calculations, better representation of damping, ability to account for the effects of the soil layers under the foundation, and better tools for identification and damage detection from seismic records. Examples presented show the versatility of the method. ?? 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Wave Propagation in Jointed Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Antoun, T

    2009-12-17

    Predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in a jointed geologic media remain a modern day scientific frontier. In part this is due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of the complex physical processes associated with the transient response of geologic material, and in part it is due to numerical challenges that prohibit accurate representation of the heterogeneities that influence the material response. Constitutive models whose properties are determined from laboratory experiments on intact samples have been shown to over-predict the free field environment in large scale field experiments. Current methodologies for deriving in situ properties from laboratory measured properties are based on empirical equations derived for static geomechanical applications involving loads of lower intensity and much longer durations than those encountered in applications of interest involving wave propagation. These methodologies are not validated for dynamic applications, and they do not account for anisotropic behavior stemming from direcitonal effects associated with the orientation of joint sets in realistic geologies. Recent advances in modeling capabilities coupled with modern high performance computing platforms enable physics-based simulations of jointed geologic media with unprecedented details, offering a prospect for significant advances in the state of the art. This report provides a brief overview of these modern computational approaches, discusses their advantages and limitations, and attempts to formulate an integrated framework leading to the development of predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in jointed and fractured geologic materials.

  7. Modeling Light Propagation in Luminescent Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Derya

    This study presents physical, computational and analytical modeling approaches for light propagation in luminescent random media. Two different approaches are used, namely (i) a statistical approach: Monte-Carlo simulations for photon transport and (ii) a deterministic approach: radiative transport theory. Both approaches account accurately for the multiple absorption and reemission of light at different wavelengths and for anisotropic luminescence. The deterministic approach is a generalization of radiative transport theory for solving inelastic scattering problems in random media. We use the radiative transport theory to study light propagation in luminescent media. Based on this theory, we also study the optically thick medium. Using perturbation methods, a corrected diffusion approximation with asymptotically accurate boundary conditions and a boundary layer solution are derived. The accuracy and the efficacy of this approach is verified for a plane-parallel slab problem. In particular, we apply these two approaches (MC and radiative transport theory) to model light propagation in semiconductor-based luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). The computational results for both approaches are compared with each other and found to agree. The results of this dissertation present practical and reliable techniques to use for solving forward/inverse inelastic scattering problems arising in various research areas such as optics, biomedical engineering, nuclear engineering, solar science and material science.

  8. Wave propagation in spatially modulated tubes.

    PubMed

    Ziepke, A; Martens, S; Engel, H

    2016-09-01

    We investigate wave propagation in rotationally symmetric tubes with a periodic spatial modulation of cross section. Using an asymptotic perturbation analysis, the governing quasi-two-dimensional reaction-diffusion equation can be reduced into a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion-advection equation. Assuming a weak perturbation by the advection term and using projection method, in a second step, an equation of motion for traveling waves within such tubes can be derived. Both methods predict properly the nonlinear dependence of the propagation velocity on the ratio of the modulation period of the geometry to the intrinsic width of the front, or pulse. As a main feature, we observe finite intervals of propagation failure of waves induced by the tube's modulation and derive an analytically tractable condition for their occurrence. For the highly diffusive limit, using the Fick-Jacobs approach, we show that wave velocities within modulated tubes are governed by an effective diffusion coefficient. Furthermore, we discuss the effects of a single bottleneck on the period of pulse trains. We observe period changes by integer fractions dependent on the bottleneck width and the period of the entering pulse train. PMID:27608990

  9. Nonlinear propagation of light in Dirac matter.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Bengt; Shukla, P K

    2011-09-01

    The nonlinear interaction between intense laser light and a quantum plasma is modeled by a collective Dirac equation coupled with the Maxwell equations. The model is used to study the nonlinear propagation of relativistically intense laser light in a quantum plasma including the electron spin-1/2 effect. The relativistic effects due to the high-intensity laser light lead, in general, to a downshift of the laser frequency, similar to a classical plasma where the relativistic mass increase leads to self-induced transparency of laser light and other associated effects. The electron spin-1/2 effects lead to a frequency upshift or downshift of the electromagnetic (EM) wave, depending on the spin state of the plasma and the polarization of the EM wave. For laboratory solid density plasmas, the spin-1/2 effects on the propagation of light are small, but they may be significant in superdense plasma in the core of white dwarf stars. We also discuss extensions of the model to include kinetic effects of a distribution of the electrons on the nonlinear propagation of EM waves in a quantum plasma.

  10. Force propagation and force generation in cells.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Oliver; Duschl, Claus

    2010-09-01

    Determining how forces are produced by and propagated through the cytoskeleton (CSK) of the cell is of great interest as dynamic processes of the CSK are intimately correlated with many molecular signaling pathways. We are presenting a novel approach for integrating measurements on cell elasticity, transcellular force propagation, and cellular force generation to obtain a comprehensive description of dynamic and mechanical properties of the CSK under force loading. This approach uses a combination of scanning force microscopy (SFM) and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We apply well-defined loading schemes onto the apical cell membrane of fibroblasts using the SFM and simultaneously use TIRF microscopy to image the topography of the basal cell membrane. The locally distinct changes of shape and depth of the cytoskeletal imprints onto the basal membrane are interpreted as results of force propagation through the cytoplasm. This observation provides evidence for the tensegrity model and demonstrates the usefulness of our approach that does not depend on potentially disturbing marker compounds. We confirm that the actin network greatly determines cell stiffness and represents the substrate that mediates force transduction through the cytoplasm of the cell. The latter is an essential feature of tensegrity. Most importantly, our new finding that, both intact actin and microtubule networks are required for enabling the cell to produce work, can only be understood within the framework of the tensegrity model. We also provide, for the first time, a direct measurement of the cell's mechanical power output under compression at two femtowatts. PMID:20607861

  11. Model-scale sound propagation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr.

    1988-04-01

    The results of a scale model propagation experiment to investigate grazing propagation above a finite impedance boundary are reported. In the experiment, a 20 x 25 ft ground plane was installed in an anechoic chamber. Propagation tests were performed over the plywood surface of the ground plane and with the ground plane covered with felt, styrofoam, and fiberboard. Tests were performed with discrete tones in the frequency range of 10 to 15 kHz. The acoustic source and microphones varied in height above the test surface from flush to 6 in. Microphones were located in a linear array up to 18 ft from the source. A preliminary experiment using the same ground plane, but only testing the plywood and felt surfaces was performed. The results of this first experiment were encouraging, but data variability and repeatability were poor, particularly, for the felt surface, making comparisons with theoretical predictions difficult. In the main experiment the sound source, microphones, microphone positioning, data acquisition, quality of the anechoic chamber, and environmental control of the anechoic chamber were improved. High-quality, repeatable acoustic data were measured in the main experiment for all four test surfaces. Comparisons with predictions are good, but limited by uncertainties of the impedance values of the test surfaces.

  12. Modelling and observing Jovian electron propagation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toit Strauss, Du; Potgieter, Marius; Kopp, Andreas; Heber, Bernd

    2012-07-01

    During the Pioneer 10 Jovian encounter, it was observed that the Jovian magnetosphere is a strong source of low energy electrons. These electrons are accelerated in the Jovian magnetosphere and then propagate through the interplanetary medium to reach Earth, sampling the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) and its embedded turbulence. With the current constellation of near Earth spacecraft (STEREO, SOHO, ACE, ect.) various aspects of Jovian electron transport at/near Earth can be studied in 3D (spatially). During a CME, the plasma between the Earth and Jupiter becomes more disturbed, inhibiting the transport of these electrons to Earth. With the passage of the CME beyond Jupiter, quite-time transport conditions persist and increases of the electron flux at Earth are observed (so-called quite time increases). Using multi-spacecraft observation during such an event, we are able to infer the propagation time of these electrons from Jupiter to Earth. Using a state-of-the-art electron transport model, we study the transport of these electrons from Jupiter and Earth, focusing on their propagation times. These computed values are also compared with observations. We discuss the implications of these results from a particle transport point-of-view.

  13. Propagation properties of cylindrical sinc Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyyuboğlu, Halil T.; Bayraktar, Mert

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the propagation properties of cylindrical sinc Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere. Since an analytic solution is hardly derivable, the study is carried out with the aid of random phase screens. Evolutions of the beam intensity profile, beam size and kurtosis parameter are analysed. It is found that on the source plane, cylindrical sinc Gaussian beam has a dark hollow appearance, where the side lobes also start to emerge with increase in width parameter and Gaussian source size. During propagation, beams with small width and Gaussian source size exhibit off-axis behaviour, losing the dark hollow shape, accumulating the intensity asymmetrically on one side, whereas those with large width and Gaussian source size retain dark hollow appearance even at long propagation distances. It is seen that the beams with large widths expand more in beam size than the ones with small widths. The structure constant values chosen do not seem to alter this situation. The kurtosis parameters of the beams having small widths are seen to be larger than the ones with the small widths. Again the choice of the structure constant does not change this trend.

  14. Modeling Propagation of Shock Waves in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Molitoris, J D

    2005-08-19

    We present modeling results for the propagation of strong shock waves in metals. In particular, we use an arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE3D) code to model the propagation of strong pressure waves (P {approx} 300 to 400 kbars) generated with high explosives in contact with aluminum cylinders. The aluminum cylinders are assumed to be both flat-topped and have large-amplitude curved surfaces. We use 3D Lagrange mechanics. For the aluminum we use a rate-independent Steinberg-Guinan model, where the yield strength and shear modulus depend on pressure, density and temperature. The calculation of the melt temperature is based on the Lindermann law. At melt the yield strength and shear modulus is set to zero. The pressure is represented as a seven-term polynomial as a function of density. For the HMX-based high explosive, we use a JWL, with a program burn model that give the correct detonation velocity and C-J pressure (P {approx} 390 kbars). For the case of the large-amplitude curved surface, we discuss the evolving shock structure in terms of the early shock propagation experiments by Sakharov.

  15. Cosmic ray propagation with CRPropa 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves Batista, R.; Erdmann, M.; Evoli, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kuempel, D.; Mueller, G.; Sigl, G.; Van Vliet, A.; Walz, D.; Winchen, T.

    2015-05-01

    Solving the question of the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) requires the development of detailed simulation tools in order to interpret the experimental data and draw conclusions on the UHECR universe. CRPropa is a public Monte Carlo code for the galactic and extragalactic propagation of cosmic ray nuclei above ∼ 1017 eV, as well as their photon and neutrino secondaries. In this contribution the new algorithms and features of CRPropa 3, the next major release, are presented. CRPropa 3 introduces time-dependent scenarios to include cosmic evolution in the presence of cosmic ray deflections in magnetic fields. The usage of high resolution magnetic fields is facilitated by shared memory parallelism, modulated fields and fields with heterogeneous resolution. Galactic propagation is enabled through the implementation of galactic magnetic field models, as well as an efficient forward propagation technique through transformation matrices. To make use of the large Python ecosystem in astrophysics CRPropa 3 can be steered and extended in Python.

  16. Polarizability corrections in stimulated Raman propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Johnson, M.A.; Lowder, S.

    1991-07-30

    Traditional descriptions of stimulated Raman scattering relate the various Stokes and anti-Stokes fields to the incident pump field by means of a polarizability (tensor). This description is usable for pulsed radiation but it fails when the pump carrier frequency coincides with a resonant frequency of the medium. We here describe a simple procedure for correcting the traditional polarizability approximation for pulse envelopes so as to account for effects of finite pump bandwidth. The correction amounts to the introduction of an auxiliary field envelope that incorporates pump dispersion. We apply this procedure to the equations for a degenerate, Doppler broadened ensemble of three-level atoms, in which the uppermost (virtual) level is close to resonance with the pump carrier frequency. This system becomes a two-level Raman system, but with a correction to the Raman Hamiltonian and the propagation equation. The plane-wave propagation equations presented include dispersive as well as Raman effects, and allow arbitrary combinations of field polarizations. We comment on several incidental aspects of Raman propagation, including dynamic Stark shifts, sublevel averages and fluence equations.

  17. Wavepacket propagation using time-sliced semiclassical initial value methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Brett B.; Reimers, Jeffrey R.

    2004-12-22

    A new semiclassical initial value representation (SC-IVR) propagator and a SC-IVR propagator originally introduced by Kay [J. Chem. Phys. 100, 4432 (1994)], are investigated for use in the split-operator method for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. It is shown that the SC-IVR propagators can be derived from a procedure involving modified Filinov filtering of the Van Vleck expression for the semiclassical propagator. The two SC-IVR propagators have been selected for investigation because they avoid the need to perform a coherent state basis set expansion that is necessary in other time-slicing propagation schemes. An efficient scheme for solving the propagators is introduced and can be considered to be a semiclassical form of the effective propagators of Makri [Chem. Phys. Lett. 159, 489 (1989)]. Results from applications to a one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional Hamiltonian for a double-well potential are presented.

  18. Fatigue crack layer propagation in silicon-iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birol, Y.; Welsch, G.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation in metal is almost always accompanied by plastic deformation unless conditions strongly favor brittle fracture. The analysis of the plastic zone is crucial to the understanding of crack propagation behavior as it governs the crack growth kinetics. This research was undertaken to study the fatigue crack propagation in a silicon iron alloy. Kinetic and plasticity aspects of fatigue crack propagation in the alloy were obtained, including the characterization of damage evolution.

  19. Common omissions and misconceptions of wave propagation in turbulence: discussion.

    PubMed

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2012-05-01

    This review paper addresses typical mistakes and omissions that involve theoretical research and modeling of optical propagation through atmospheric turbulence. We discuss the disregard of some general properties of narrow-angle propagation in refractive random media, the careless use of simplified models of turbulence, and omissions in the calculations of the second moment of the propagating wave. We also review some misconceptions regarding short-exposure imaging, propagation of polarized waves, and calculations of the scintillation index of the beam waves.

  20. New approaches to nonlinear diffractive field propagation.

    PubMed

    Christopher, P T; Parker, K J

    1991-07-01

    In many domains of acoustic field propagation, such as medical ultrasound imaging, lithotripsy shock treatment, and underwater sonar, a realistic calculation of beam patterns requires treatment of the effects of diffraction from finite sources. Also, the mechanisms of loss and nonlinear effects within the medium are typically nonnegligible. The combination of diffraction, attenuation, and nonlinear effects has been treated by a number of formulations and numerical techniques. A novel model that incrementally propagates the field of baffled planar sources with substeps that account for the physics of diffraction, attenuation, and nonlinearity is presented. The model accounts for the effect of refraction and reflection (but not multiple reflections) in the case of propagation through multiple, parallel layers of fluid medium. An implementation of the model for axis symmetric sources has been developed. In one substep of the implementation, a new discrete Hankel transform is used with spatial transform techniques to propagate the field over a short distance with diffraction and attenuation. In the other substep, the temporal frequency domain solution to Burgers' equation is implemented to account for the nonlinear accretion and depletion of harmonics. This approach yields a computationally efficient procedure for calculating beam patterns from a baffled planar, axially symmetric source under conditions ranging from quasilinear through shock. The model is not restricted by the usual parabolic wave approximation and the field's directionality is explicitly accounted for at each point. Useage of a harmonic-limiting scheme allows the model to propagate some previously intractable high-intensity nonlinear fields. Results of the model are shown to be in excellent agreement with measurements performed on the nonlinear field of an unfocused 2.25-MHz piston source, even in the near field where the established parabolic wave approximation model fails. Next, the model is used to

  1. Mineral replacement front propagation in deformed rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Koehn, Daniel; Kelka, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Fluid migrations are a major agent of contaminant transport leading to mineral replacement in rocks, impacting their properties as porosity, permeability, and rheology. Understanding the physical and chemical mechanisms that govern mineralogical replacement during and after deformation is required to better understand complex interplays between fluid and rocks that are involved in faulting, seismic cycle, and resource distribution in the upper crust. Dolomitization process related to hydrothermal fluid flow is one of the most studied and debated replacement processes in earth sciences. Dolomitization of limestone is of economic importance as well, as it stands as unconventional oil reservoirs and is systematically observed in Mississippian-Valley Type ore deposit. Despite recent breakthrough about dolomitization processes at large-scale, the small-scale propagation of the reaction front remains unclear. It is poorly documented in the occurrence of stylolites and fractures in the medium while pressure-solution and fracture network development are the most efficient deformation accomodation mechanism in limestone from early compaction to layer-parallel shortening. Thus, the impact of such network on geometry of replaced bodies and on replacement front propagation deserves specific attention. This contribution illustrates the role of fracture and stylolites on the propagation of a reaction front. In a 2 dimensional numerical model we simulate the dolomitization front propagation in a heterogeneous porous medium. The propagation of the reaction front is governed by the competition between advection and diffusion processes, and takes into account reaction rates, disorder in the location of the potential replacement seeds, and permeability heterogeneities. We add stylolites and fractures that can act as barriers or drains to fluid flow according to their orientation and mineralogical content, which can or cannot react with the contaminant. The patterns produced from

  2. EFFECT OF CREVICE FORMER ON CORROSION DAMAGE PROPAGATION

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Payer; U. Landau; X. Shan; A.S. Agarwal

    2006-03-01

    The objectives of this report are: (1) To determine the effect of the crevice former on the localized corrosion damage propagation; (2) FOCUS on post initiation stage, crevice propagation and arrest processes; (3) Determine the evolution of damage--severity, shape, location/distribution, damage profile; and (4) Model of crevice corrosion propagation, i.e. the evolution of the crevice corrosion damage profile.

  3. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Particle propagators on discrete spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Steven

    2008-10-01

    A quantum mechanical description of particle propagation on the discrete spacetime of a causal set is presented. The model involves a discrete path integral in which trajectories within the causal set are summed over to obtain a particle propagator. The sum-over-trajectories is achieved by a matrix geometric series. For causal sets generated by sprinkling points into 1+1 and 3+1 dimensional Minkowski spacetime the propagator calculated on the causal set is shown to agree, in a suitable sense, with the causal retarded propagator for the Klein Gordon equation. The particle propagator described here is a step towards quantum field theory on causal set spacetime.

  4. Speeding up tsunami wave propagation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentyev, Mikhail; Romanenko, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    Trans-oceanic wave propagation is one of the most time/CPU consuming parts of the tsunami modeling process. The so-called Method Of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) software package, developed at PMEL NOAA USA (Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA), is widely used to evaluate the tsunami parameters. However, it takes time to simulate trans-ocean wave propagation, that is up to 5 hours CPU time to "drive" the wave from Chili (epicenter) to the coast of Japan (even using a rather coarse computational mesh). Accurate wave height prediction requires fine meshes which leads to dramatic increase in time for simulation. Computation time is among the critical parameter as it takes only about 20 minutes for tsunami wave to approach the coast of Japan after earthquake at Japan trench or Sagami trench (as it was after the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011). MOST solves numerically the hyperbolic system for three unknown functions, namely velocity vector and wave height (shallow water approximation). The system could be split into two independent systems by orthogonal directions (splitting method). Each system can be treated independently. This calculation scheme is well suited for SIMD architecture and GPUs as well. We performed adaptation of MOST package to GPU. Several numerical tests showed 40x performance gain for NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU vs. single core of Intel i7 processor. Results of numerical experiments were compared with other available simulation data. Calculation results, obtained at GPU, differ from the reference ones by 10^-3 cm of the wave height simulating 24 hours wave propagation. This allows us to speak about possibility to develop real-time system for evaluating tsunami danger.

  5. Laminar flame propagation in a stratified charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra, Youngchul

    The propagation of laminar flame from a rich or stoichiometric mixture to a lean mixture in a stratified methane-air charge was investigated experimentally and numerically. Emphasis was on the understanding of the flame behavior in the transition region; in particular, on the mechanism of burning velocity enhancement in this region. In the experimental setup, mixtures of two different equivalence ratios were separated by a soap bubble in a spherical constant volume combustion vessel. The richer mixture inside the bubble was ignited by a focused laser beam. The flame development was observed by Schlieren technique and flame speeds were measured by heat release analysis of the pressure data. An one-dimensional, time- dependant numerical simulation of the flame propagation in a charge with step-stratification was used to interpret the experimental results. Both the experimental and numerical studies showed that the instantaneous flame speed depended on the previous flame history. Thus a `strong' (with mixture equivalence ratio close to stoichiometric) flame can sustain propagation into finite regions of substantially lean equivalence ratio. Both thermal and chemical effects were crucial for explaining the mechanism of the flame speed enhancement in the transition period. Because of the presence of this `back- support' effect, the usual concept of specifying the burning velocity as a function of the end gas state is inadequate for a stratified charge. A simple correlation for instantaneous flame velocity based on the local burned gas temperature is developed. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253- 1690.)

  6. Calibration of seismic wave propagation in Jordan

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Husien, A; Amrat, A; Harris, D; Mayeda, K; Nakanishi, K; Rodgers, A; Ruppert, S; Ryall, F; Skinnell, K; Yazjeen, T

    1999-07-23

    The Natural Resources Authority of Jordan (NRA), the USGS and LLNL have a collaborative project to improve the calibration of seismic propagation in Jordan and surrounding regions. This project serves common goals of CTBT calibration and earthquake hazard assessment in the region. These objectives include accurate location of local and regional earthquakes, calibration of magnitude scales, and the development of local and regional propagation models. In the CTBT context, better propagation models and more accurately located events in the Dead Sea rift region can serve as (potentially GT5) calibration events for generating IMS location corrections. The detection and collection of mining explosions underpins discrimination research. The principal activity of this project is the deployment of two broadband stations at Hittiyah (south Jordan) and Ruweishid (east Jordan). These stations provide additional paths in the region to constrain structure with surface wave and body wave tomography. The Ruweishid station is favorably placed to provide constraints on Arabian platform structure. Waveform modeling with long-period observations of larger earthquakes will provide constraints on 1-D velocity models of the crust and upper mantle. Data from these stations combined with phase observations from the 26 short-period stations of the Jordan National Seismic Network (JNSN) may allow the construction of a more detailed velocity model of Jordan. The Hittiyah station is an excellent source of ground truth information for the six phosphate mines of southern Jordan and Israel. Observations of mining explosions collected by this station have numerous uses: for definition of templates for screening mining explosions, as ground truth events for calibrating travel-time models, and as explosion populations in development and testing discriminants. Following previously established procedures for identifying explosions, we have identified more than 200 explosions from the first 85 days of

  7. Crack propagation modeling using Peridynamic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafezi, M. H.; Alebrahim, R.; Kundu, T.

    2016-04-01

    Crack propagation and branching are modeled using nonlocal peridynamic theory. One major advantage of this nonlocal theory based analysis tool is the unifying approach towards material behavior modeling - irrespective of whether the crack is formed in the material or not. No separate damage law is needed for crack initiation and propagation. This theory overcomes the weaknesses of existing continuum mechanics based numerical tools (e.g. FEM, XFEM etc.) for identifying fracture modes and does not require any simplifying assumptions. Cracks grow autonomously and not necessarily along a prescribed path. However, in some special situations such as in case of ductile fracture, the damage evolution and failure depend on parameters characterizing the local stress state instead of peridynamic damage modeling technique developed for brittle fracture. For brittle fracture modeling the bond is simply broken when the failure criterion is satisfied. This simulation helps us to design more reliable modeling tool for crack propagation and branching in both brittle and ductile materials. Peridynamic analysis has been found to be very demanding computationally, particularly for real-world structures (e.g. vehicles, aircrafts, etc.). It also requires a very expensive visualization process. The goal of this paper is to bring awareness to researchers the impact of this cutting-edge simulation tool for a better understanding of the cracked material response. A computer code has been developed to implement the peridynamic theory based modeling tool for two-dimensional analysis. A good agreement between our predictions and previously published results is observed. Some interesting new results that have not been reported earlier by others are also obtained and presented in this paper. The final objective of this investigation is to increase the mechanics knowledge of self-similar and self-affine cracks.

  8. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Chan, Tak-Ming; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2013-09-01

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k=8∼10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/∼wkc/kmerHMM. PMID:23814189

  9. Tests for assessing beam propagation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Bryan D.

    2011-10-01

    Given a beam propagation algorithm, whether it is a commercial implementation or some other in-house or research implementation, it is not trivial to determine whether it is suitable either for a wide range of applications or even for a specific application. In this paper, we describe a range of tests with "known" results; these can be used to exercise beam propagation algorithms and assess their robustness and accuracy. Three different categories of such tests are discussed. One category is tests of self-consistency. Such tests often rely on symmetry to make guarantees about some aspect of the resulting field. While passing such tests does not guarantee correct results in detail, they can nonetheless point towards problems with an algorithm when they fail, and build confidence when they pass. Another category of tests compares the complex field to values that have been experimentally measured. While the experimental data is not always known in precisely, and the experimental setup might not always be accessible, these tests can provide reasonable quantitative comparisons that can also point towards problems with the algorithm. The final category of tests discussed is those for which the propagated complex field can be computed independently. The test systems for this category tend to be relatively simple, such as diffraction through apertures in free space or in the pupil of an ideal imaging system. Despite their relative simplicity, there are a number of advantages to these tests. For example, they can provide quantitative measures of accuracy. These tests also allow one to develop an understanding of how the execution time (or similarly, memory usage) scales as the region-of-interest over which one desires the field is changed.

  10. Foam front propagation in anisotropic oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Grassia, P; Torres-Ulloa, C; Berres, S; Mas-Hernández, E; Shokri, N

    2016-04-01

    The pressure-driven growth model is considered, describing the motion of a foam front through an oil reservoir during foam improved oil recovery, foam being formed as gas advances into an initially liquid-filled reservoir. In the model, the foam front is represented by a set of so-called "material points" that track the advance of gas into the liquid-filled region. According to the model, the shape of the foam front is prone to develop concave sharply curved concavities, where the orientation of the front changes rapidly over a small spatial distance: these are referred to as "concave corners". These concave corners need to be propagated differently from the material points on the foam front itself. Typically the corner must move faster than those material points, otherwise spurious numerical artifacts develop in the computed shape of the front. A propagation rule or "speed up" rule is derived for the concave corners, which is shown to be sensitive to the level of anisotropy in the permeability of the reservoir and also sensitive to the orientation of the corners themselves. In particular if a corner in an anisotropic reservoir were to be propagated according to an isotropic speed up rule, this might not be sufficient to suppress spurious numerical artifacts, at least for certain orientations of the corner. On the other hand, systems that are both heterogeneous and anisotropic tend to be well behaved numerically, regardless of whether one uses the isotropic or anisotropic speed up rule for corners. This comes about because, in the heterogeneous and anisotropic case, the orientation of the corner is such that the "correct" anisotropic speed is just very slightly less than the "incorrect" isotropic one. The anisotropic rule does however manage to keep the corner very slightly sharper than the isotropic rule does.

  11. High Flux Propagation Through The Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, James P.

    1983-07-01

    Discussions are presented on laser-induced plasma generation in free air propagation (no target surface present). Plasmas can be generated with very high flux levels (for clean air) or with much lower flux levels (for dust-laden air). Pure water aerosols have not proven to substantially reduce air breakdown thresholds below those for clean air. Clean air breakdown at laser wavelengths has been predicted successfully for many years using theories developed for microwave wavelengths. By directly extending those theories to laser wavelengths, the dependencies on ambient pressure, spot size, wavelength and intensities have been predicted with favorable comparison to experimental data. Pure water aerosols (fogs, rain, clouds) have been investigated as to the phenomenology to be expected when irradiated by pulsed and CW laser devices at CO2 and DF laser wave-lengths. These aerosols are shown to heat, vaporize and/or shatter at various incident flux and fluence levels. The data base appears to substantiate this phenomology, but no substantive reduction of clean air breakdown thresholds has been observed when water aerosols are present. Dry solid single-material aerosols (e.g., Si02 dust) have been examined, both analytically and experimentally, for verification of phenomenology at various flux and fluence levels. Air breakdown induced by the onset of substantial vaporization rates of the irradiated particulate has been shown to be coincident with the onset of dirty air break-down. Real-world and man-made aerosol clouds have not been studied extensively, if at all, to the author's knowledge. Of particular importance are the effects on high energy laser beams of dust, vehicle exhaust, smoke, road dust and maritime aerosols (e.g., sea spray, sea fogs, etc.). For these important components of the HEL propagation story, no substantial HEL propagation data base exists.

  12. Orbital Propagation of Momentum Exchange Tether Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westerhoff, John

    2002-01-01

    An advanced concept in in-space transportation currently being studied is the Momentum-Exchange/Electrodynamic Reboost Tether System (MXER). The system acts as a large momentum wheel, imparting a Av to a payload in low earth orbit (LEO) at the expense of its own orbital energy. After throwing a payload, the system reboosts itself using an electrodynamic tether to push against Earth's magnetic field and brings itself back up to an operational orbit to prepare for the next payload. The ability to reboost itself allows for continued reuse of the system without the expenditure of propellants. Considering the cost of lifting propellant from the ,ground to LEO to do the same Av boost at $10000 per pound, the system cuts the launch cost of the payload dramatically, and subsequently, the MXER system pays for itself after a small number of missions.1 One of the technical hurdles to be overcome with the MXER concept is the rendezvous maneuver. The rendezvous window for the capture of the payload is on the order of a few seconds, as opposed to traditional docking maneuvers, which can take as long ets necessary to complete a precise docking. The payload, therefore, must be able to match its orbit to meet up with the capture device on the end of the tether at a specific time and location in the future. In order to be able to determine that location, the MXER system must be numerically propagated forward in time to predict where the capture device will be at that instant. It should be kept in mind that the propagation computation must be done faster than real-time. This study focuses on the efforts to find and/or build the tools necessary to numerically propagate the motion of the MXER system as accurately as possible.

  13. DECIMETRIC TYPE III BURSTS: GENERATION AND PROPAGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.; Yan, Y. H.

    2011-09-01

    Simulations are presented for decimetric type III radio bursts at 2f{sub p} , where f{sub p} is the local electron plasma frequency. The simulations show that 2f{sub p} radiation can be observed at Earth in two scenarios for the radiation's generation and propagation. In Scenario A, radiation is produced and propagates in warm plasmas in the lower corona that are caused by previous magnetic reconnection outflows and/or chromospheric evaporation. In Scenario B radiation is generated in normal plasmas, then due to its natural directivity pattern and refraction, radiation partly propagates into nearby regions, which are hot because of previous reconnection/evaporation. The profiles of plasma density n{sub e} (r) and electron temperature T{sub e} (r) in the lower corona (r - R{sub sun} {approx}< 100 Mm) are found to be crucial to whether radiation can be produced and escape at observable levels against the effects of free-free absorption, where r is the heliocentric distance. Significantly, the observed wide ranges of radiation properties (e.g., drift rates) require n{sub e} (r) with a large range of scale heights h{sub s} , consistent nonetheless for Scenario B with short observed EUV loops. This is relevant to problems with large h{sub s} inferred from tall EUV loops. The simulations suggest: (1) n{sub e} (r) with small h{sub s} , such as n{sub e} (r){proportional_to}(r - R{sub sun}){sup -2.38} for flaring regions, are unexpectedly common deep in the corona. This result is consistent with recent work on n{sub e} (r) for r {approx} (1.05-2)R{sub sun} extracted from observed metric type IIIs. (2) The dominance of reverse-slope bursts over normal bursts sometimes observed may originate from asymmetric reconnection/acceleration, which favors downgoing beams.

  14. Foam front propagation in anisotropic oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Grassia, P; Torres-Ulloa, C; Berres, S; Mas-Hernández, E; Shokri, N

    2016-04-01

    The pressure-driven growth model is considered, describing the motion of a foam front through an oil reservoir during foam improved oil recovery, foam being formed as gas advances into an initially liquid-filled reservoir. In the model, the foam front is represented by a set of so-called "material points" that track the advance of gas into the liquid-filled region. According to the model, the shape of the foam front is prone to develop concave sharply curved concavities, where the orientation of the front changes rapidly over a small spatial distance: these are referred to as "concave corners". These concave corners need to be propagated differently from the material points on the foam front itself. Typically the corner must move faster than those material points, otherwise spurious numerical artifacts develop in the computed shape of the front. A propagation rule or "speed up" rule is derived for the concave corners, which is shown to be sensitive to the level of anisotropy in the permeability of the reservoir and also sensitive to the orientation of the corners themselves. In particular if a corner in an anisotropic reservoir were to be propagated according to an isotropic speed up rule, this might not be sufficient to suppress spurious numerical artifacts, at least for certain orientations of the corner. On the other hand, systems that are both heterogeneous and anisotropic tend to be well behaved numerically, regardless of whether one uses the isotropic or anisotropic speed up rule for corners. This comes about because, in the heterogeneous and anisotropic case, the orientation of the corner is such that the "correct" anisotropic speed is just very slightly less than the "incorrect" isotropic one. The anisotropic rule does however manage to keep the corner very slightly sharper than the isotropic rule does. PMID:27090239

  15. Synaptic Contacts Enhance Cell-to-Cell Tau Pathology Propagation.

    PubMed

    Calafate, Sara; Buist, Arjan; Miskiewicz, Katarzyna; Vijayan, Vinoy; Daneels, Guy; de Strooper, Bart; de Wit, Joris; Verstreken, Patrik; Moechars, Diederik

    2015-05-26

    Accumulation of insoluble Tau protein aggregates and stereotypical propagation of Tau pathology through the brain are common hallmarks of tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Propagation of Tau pathology appears to occur along connected neurons, but whether synaptic contacts between neurons are facilitating propagation has not been demonstrated. Using quantitative in vitro models, we demonstrate that, in parallel to non-synaptic mechanisms, synapses, but not merely the close distance between the cells, enhance the propagation of Tau pathology between acceptor hippocampal neurons and Tau donor cells. Similarly, in an artificial neuronal network using microfluidic devices, synapses and synaptic activity are promoting neuronal Tau pathology propagation in parallel to the non-synaptic mechanisms. Our work indicates that the physical presence of synaptic contacts between neurons facilitate Tau pathology propagation. These findings can have implications for synaptic repair therapies, which may turn out to have adverse effects by promoting propagation of Tau pathology.

  16. Experimental study on flames propagating through zirconium particle clouds.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yi; Sun, Jinhua; Ding, Yibin; Guo, Song; He, Xuechao

    2009-10-15

    To reveal the mechanisms of flame propagation through the hardly volatile metal dust clouds clearly, the flame propagating through zirconium particle clouds has been examined experimentally. A high-speed video camera was used to record the propagation process of the flame. Combustion zone temperature was detected by a fine thermocouple. Based on the experimental results, structure of flame and combustion courses of zirconium particles were analyzed, the combustion propagation in zirconium dust was investigated, and the velocity and temperature characteristics of the combustion zone were also elucidated. The combustion zone propagating through zirconium particle clouds consists of luminous particles. Particle concentration plays an important role in the combustion zone propagation process. With the increase of zirconium particle concentration, the maximum temperature of the combustion zone increases at the lower concentration, takes a maximum value, and then decreases at the higher concentration. It is also found that the propagation velocity of the combustion zone has a linear relationship with its maximum temperature.

  17. Propagation equation for tight-focusing by a parabolic mirror.

    PubMed

    Couairon, A; Kosareva, O G; Panov, N A; Shipilo, D E; Andreeva, V A; Jukna, V; Nesa, F

    2015-11-30

    Part of the chain in petawatt laser systems may involve extreme focusing conditions for which nonparaxial and vectorial effects have high impact on the propagation of radiation. We investigate the possibility of using propagation equations to simulate numerically the focal spot under these conditions. We derive a unidirectional propagation equation for the Hertz vector, describing linear and nonlinear propagation under situations where nonparaxial diffraction and vectorial effects become significant. By comparing our simulations to the results of vector diffraction integrals in the case of linear tight-focusing by a parabolic mirror, we establish a practical criterion for the critical f -number below which initializing a propagation equation with a parabolic input phase becomes inaccurate. We propose a method to find suitable input conditions for propagation equations beyond this limit. Extreme focusing conditions are shown to be modeled accurately by means of numerical simulations of the unidirectional Hertz-vector propagation equation initialized with suitable input conditions.

  18. Propagation equation for tight-focusing by a parabolic mirror.

    PubMed

    Couairon, A; Kosareva, O G; Panov, N A; Shipilo, D E; Andreeva, V A; Jukna, V; Nesa, F

    2015-11-30

    Part of the chain in petawatt laser systems may involve extreme focusing conditions for which nonparaxial and vectorial effects have high impact on the propagation of radiation. We investigate the possibility of using propagation equations to simulate numerically the focal spot under these conditions. We derive a unidirectional propagation equation for the Hertz vector, describing linear and nonlinear propagation under situations where nonparaxial diffraction and vectorial effects become significant. By comparing our simulations to the results of vector diffraction integrals in the case of linear tight-focusing by a parabolic mirror, we establish a practical criterion for the critical f -number below which initializing a propagation equation with a parabolic input phase becomes inaccurate. We propose a method to find suitable input conditions for propagation equations beyond this limit. Extreme focusing conditions are shown to be modeled accurately by means of numerical simulations of the unidirectional Hertz-vector propagation equation initialized with suitable input conditions. PMID:26698752

  19. Propagation of optical beams in two transverse gradient index media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Ruiz, A.; Martín-Heredia, J.; Ruiz-Ochoa, L. A.; Chan-López, E.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the propagation of optical beams in two gradient index inhomogeneous media. The Green's function for paraxial propagation in an inhomogeneous medium is derived as a Feynman path integral involving summation over real rays. We use a simple method based on discontinuous functions, which is similar to that used in General Relativity when studying metric discontinuities across an hypersurface, to study the propagation in two transverse refractive index gradients which are coupled in the propagation direction. We show that this method is consistent with the geometric-optics ray theory, and then with the definition of the coupled Green's function. The propagation of Gaussian beams in two homogeneous media with different refractive indices is analyzed. We also study the propagation of Airy beams in two media with different linear transverse refractive index gradients. We demonstrate that by controlling the gradient strength of the media it is possible to reduce to zero their acceleration, yielding an Airy beam that propagates linearly.

  20. Directional crack propagation of granular water systems.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Tsuyoshi; Nishimoto, Akihiro; Kitsunezaki, So; Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Aoki, Ichio

    2005-05-01

    Pattern dynamics of directional crack propagation phenomena observed in drying process of starch-water mixture is investigated. To visualize the three-dimensional structure of the drying-fracture process two kinds of experiments are performed, i.e., resin solidification planing method and real-time measurement of water content distribution with MR instruments. A cross section with polygonal structure is visualized in both experiments. The depth dependency of cell size is measured. The phenomenological model for water transportation is also discussed.

  1. Reconstructing propagation networks with temporal similarity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An

    2015-01-01

    Node similarity significantly contributes to the growth of real networks. In this paper, based on the observed epidemic spreading results we apply the node similarity metrics to reconstruct the underlying networks hosting the propagation. We find that the reconstruction accuracy of the similarity metrics is strongly influenced by the infection rate of the spreading process. Moreover, there is a range of infection rate in which the reconstruction accuracy of some similarity metrics drops nearly to zero. To improve the similarity-based reconstruction method, we propose a temporal similarity metric which takes into account the time information of the spreading. The reconstruction results are remarkably improved with the new method. PMID:26086198

  2. Approximate Bruechner orbitals in electron propagator calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, J.V.

    1999-12-01

    Orbitals and ground-state correlation amplitudes from the so-called Brueckner doubles approximation of coupled-cluster theory provide a useful reference state for electron propagator calculations. An operator manifold with hold, particle, two-hole-one-particle and two-particle-one-hole components is chosen. The resulting approximation, third-order algebraic diagrammatic construction [2ph-TDA, ADC (3)] and 3+ methods. The enhanced versatility of this approximation is demonstrated through calculations on valence ionization energies, core ionization energies, electron detachment energies of anions, and on a molecule with partial biradical character, ozone.

  3. Parton Propagation and Fragmentation in QCD Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alberto Accardi, Francois Arleo, William Brooks, David D'Enterria, Valeria Muccifora

    2009-12-01

    We review recent progress in the study of parton propagation, interaction and fragmentation in both cold and hot strongly interacting matter. Experimental highlights on high-energy hadron production in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering, proton-nucleus and heavy-ion collisions, as well as Drell-Yan processes in hadron-nucleus collisions are presented. The existing theoretical frameworks for describing the in-medium interaction of energetic partons and the space-time evolution of their fragmentation into hadrons are discussed and confronted to experimental data. We conclude with a list of theoretical and experimental open issues, and a brief description of future relevant experiments and facilities.

  4. D region predictions. [effects on radio propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrane, E. V.; Chakrabarty, D. K.; Deshpande, S. D.; Doherty, R. H.; Gregory, J. B.; Hargreaves, J. K.; Lastovicka, J.; Morris, P.; Piggott, W. R.; Reagan, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Present knowledge of D region phenomena is briefly reviewed and the status of current methods of predicting their effects on radio propagation considered. The ELF, VLF and LF navigational and timing systems depend on the stability of the lower part of the D layer where these waves are reflected, whereas MF and HF waves are absorbed as they penetrate the region, in most cases mainly in the upper part of the layer. Possible methods of improving predictions, warnings, and real time operations are considered with particular stress on those which can be implemented in the near future.

  5. Reconstructing propagation networks with temporal similarity.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An

    2015-01-01

    Node similarity significantly contributes to the growth of real networks. In this paper, based on the observed epidemic spreading results we apply the node similarity metrics to reconstruct the underlying networks hosting the propagation. We find that the reconstruction accuracy of the similarity metrics is strongly influenced by the infection rate of the spreading process. Moreover, there is a range of infection rate in which the reconstruction accuracy of some similarity metrics drops nearly to zero. To improve the similarity-based reconstruction method, we propose a temporal similarity metric which takes into account the time information of the spreading. The reconstruction results are remarkably improved with the new method. PMID:26086198

  6. Quasiparticle virtual orbitals in electron propagator calculations.

    PubMed

    Flores-Moreno, R; Ortiz, J V

    2008-04-28

    The computational limits of accurate electron propagator methods for the calculation of electron binding energies of large molecules are usually determined by the rank of the virtual orbital space. Electron density difference matrices that correspond to these transition energies in the second-order quasiparticle approximation may be used to obtain a virtual orbital space of reduced rank that introduces only minor deviations with respect to the results produced with the full, original set of virtual orbitals. Numerical tests show the superior accuracy and efficiency of this approach compared to the usual practice of omission of virtual orbitals with the highest energies.

  7. Human adenoviruses: propagation, purification, quantification, and storage.

    PubMed

    Green, Maurice; Loewenstein, Paul M

    2006-01-01

    Detailed protocols are described for the propagation of adenoviruses (Ads) and adenovirus (Ad) vectors and their purification by CsCl equilibrium density gradient centrifugation. A discussion of monolayer and spinner cell culture techniques suitable, respectively, for small- and large-scale growth of adenoviruses is provided. Protocols for cloning into and growth of Ad replication-deficient vectors using a convenient commercially available system are described. Lastly, time-tested plaque titration protocols for the accurate and convenient measurement of the infectivity of adenoviruses and adenovirus vectors are provided in detail.

  8. Nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    A model problem that simulates an atmospheric acoustic wave propagation situation that is nonlinear is considered. The model is derived from the basic Euler equations for the atmospheric flow and from the regular perturbations for the acoustic part. The nonlinear effects are studied by obtaining two successive linear problems in which the second one involves the solution of the first problem. Well posedness of these problems is discussed and approximations of the radiation boundary conditions that can be used in numerical simulations are presented.

  9. Nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper a model problem is considered that simulates an atmospheric acoustic wave propagation situation that is nonlinear. The model is derived from the basic Euler equations for the atmospheric flow and from the regular perturbations for the acoustic part. The nonlinear effects are studied by obtaining two successive linear problems in which the second one involves the solution of the first problem. Well-posedness of these problems is discussed and approximations of the radiation boundary conditions that can be used in numerical simulations are presented.

  10. Supersaturation of vertically propagating internal gravity waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    The usual assumption that vertically propagating internal gravity waves will cease growing with height once their amplitudes are such as to permit convective instability anywhere within the wave is reexamined. Two factors lead to amplitude limitation: (1) wave clipping associated with convective mixing, and (2) energetic constraints associated with the rate at which the wave can supply energy to the convection. It is found that these two factors limit supersaturation to about 50 percent for waves with short horizontal wavelengths and high relative phase speeds. Usually the degree of supersaturation will be much less. These factors also lead to a gradual, rather than sudden, cessation of wave growth with height.

  11. Femtosecond pulses propagation through pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveira, Lucas; Sokolov, Alexei; Byeon, Joong-Hyeok; Kattawar, George

    2007-10-01

    Recently, considerable attention has been dedicated to the field of optical precursors, which can possibly be applied to long-distance underwater communications. Input beam intensities have been carefully adjusted to keep experiments in the linear regime, and some experiments have shown violation of the Beer-Lambert law. We are presently carrying out experiments using femtosecond laser pulses propagating through pure water strictly in the linear regime to study this interesting and important behavior. We are also employing several new and innovative schemes to more clearly define the phenomena.

  12. Probes of Lorentz violation in neutrino propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, John; Harries, Nicholas; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Sakharov, Alexander S.

    2008-08-01

    It has been suggested that the interactions of energetic particles with the foamy structure of space-time thought to be generated by quantum-gravitational (QG) effects might violate Lorentz invariance, so that they do not propagate at a universal speed of light. We consider the limits that may be set on a linear or quadratic violation of Lorentz invariance in the propagation of energetic neutrinos, v/c=[1{+-}(E/M{sub {nu}}{sub QG1})] or [1{+-}(E/M{sub {nu}}{sub QG2}){sup 2}], using data from supernova explosions and the OPERA long-baseline neutrino experiment. Using the SN1987a neutrino data from the Kamioka II, IMB, and Baksan experiments, we set the limits M{sub {nu}}{sub QG1}>2.7(2.5)x10{sup 10} GeV for subluminal (superluminal) propagation and M{sub {nu}}{sub QG2}>4.6(4.1)x10{sup 4} GeV at the 95% confidence level. A future galactic supernova at a distance of 10 kpc would have sensitivity to M{sub {nu}}{sub QG1}>2(4)x10{sup 11} GeV for subluminal (superluminal) propagation and M{sub {nu}}{sub QG2}>2(4)x10{sup 5} GeV. With the current CERN neutrinos to Gran Sasso extraction spill length of 10.5 {mu}s and with standard clock synchronization techniques, the sensitivity of the OPERA experiment would reach M{sub {nu}}{sub QG1}{approx}7x10{sup 5} GeV (M{sub {nu}}{sub QG2}{approx}8x10{sup 3} GeV) after 5 years of nominal running. If the time structure of the super proton synchrotron radio frequency bunches within the extracted CERN neutrinos to Gran Sasso spills could be exploited, these figures would be significantly improved to M{sub {nu}}{sub QG1}{approx}5x10{sup 7} GeV (M{sub {nu}}{sub QG2}{approx}4x10{sup 4} GeV). These results can be improved further if a similar time resolution can be achieved with neutrino events occurring in the rock upstream of the OPERA detector: we find potential sensitivities to M{sub {nu}}{sub QG1}{approx}4x10{sup 8} GeV and M{sub {nu}}{sub QG2}{approx}7x10{sup 5} GeV.

  13. Propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, R. R.; Stephens, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of a model for analyzing the propagation of cosmic rays are discussed. The requirements for analyzing the relevant observational data on cosmic rays are defines as: (1) the chemical and isotopic composition of cosmic rays as a function of energy, (2) the flux and energy spectrum of the individual nucleonic components, (3) the flux and energy spectrum of the electronic component, (4) the cosmic ray prehistory, and (5) the degree of isotropy in their arrival directions as a function of energy. It is stated that the model which has been able to bring to pass the greatest measure of success is the galactic confinement model.

  14. Belief propagation in genotype-phenotype networks.

    PubMed

    Moharil, Janhavi; May, Paul; Gaile, Daniel P; Blair, Rachael Hageman

    2016-03-01

    Graphical models have proven to be a valuable tool for connecting genotypes and phenotypes. Structural learning of phenotype-genotype networks has received considerable attention in the post-genome era. In recent years, a dozen different methods have emerged for network inference, which leverage natural variation that arises in certain genetic populations. The structure of the network itself can be used to form hypotheses based on the inferred direct and indirect network relationships, but represents a premature endpoint to the graphical analyses. In this work, we extend this endpoint. We examine the unexplored problem of perturbing a given network structure, and quantifying the system-wide effects on the network in a node-wise manner. The perturbation is achieved through the setting of values of phenotype node(s), which may reflect an inhibition or activation, and propagating this information through the entire network. We leverage belief propagation methods in Conditional Gaussian Bayesian Networks (CG-BNs), in order to absorb and propagate phenotypic evidence through the network. We show that the modeling assumptions adopted for genotype-phenotype networks represent an important sub-class of CG-BNs, which possess properties that ensure exact inference in the propagation scheme. The system-wide effects of the perturbation are quantified in a node-wise manner through the comparison of perturbed and unperturbed marginal distributions using a symmetric Kullback-Leibler divergence. Applications to kidney and skin cancer expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data from different mus musculus populations are presented. System-wide effects in the network were predicted and visualized across a spectrum of evidence. Sub-pathways and regions of the network responded in concert, suggesting co-regulation and coordination throughout the network in response to phenotypic changes. We demonstrate how these predicted system-wide effects can be examined in connection with

  15. Wave propagation analysis using the variance matrix.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Richa; Ivan, J Solomon; Narayanamurthy, C S

    2014-10-01

    The propagation of a coherent laser wave-field through a pseudo-random phase plate is studied using the variance matrix estimated from Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor data. The uncertainty principle is used as a tool in discriminating the data obtained from the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Quantities of physical interest such as the twist parameter, and the symplectic eigenvalues, are estimated from the wavefront sensor measurements. A distance measure between two variance matrices is introduced and used to estimate the spatial asymmetry of a wave-field in the experiment. The estimated quantities are then used to compare a distorted wave-field with its undistorted counterpart. PMID:25401243

  16. Shallow water sound propagation with surface waves.

    PubMed

    Tindle, Chris T; Deane, Grant B

    2005-05-01

    The theory of wavefront modeling in underwater acoustics is extended to allow rapid range dependence of the boundaries such as occurs in shallow water with surface waves. The theory allows for multiple reflections at surface and bottom as well as focusing and defocusing due to reflection from surface waves. The phase and amplitude of the field are calculated directly and used to model pulse propagation in the time domain. Pulse waveforms are obtained directly for all wavefront arrivals including both insonified and shadow regions near caustics. Calculated waveforms agree well with a reference solution and data obtained in a near-shore shallow water experiment with surface waves over a sloping bottom.

  17. Target & Propagation Models for the FINDER Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, Vaughn; Lux, James; Haque, Salmon

    2013-01-01

    Finding persons still alive in piles of rubble following an earthquake, a severe storm, or other disaster is a difficult problem. JPL is currently developing a victim detection radar called FINDER (Finding Individuals in Emergency and Response). The subject of this paper is directed toward development of propagation & target models needed for simulation & testing of such a system. These models are both physical (real rubble piles) and numerical. Early results from the numerical modeling phase show spatial and temporal spreading characteristics when signals are passed through a randomly mixed rubble pile.

  18. Earth-Space Propagation Data Bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper, designed for the newcomer rather than the expert, will take a rather broad view of what is meant by 'propagation data bases' in that it will take the term to mean both the actual measurements and models of Earth-space paths. The text will largely be drawn from International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR) reports, now annexed to the Recommendations of the International Telecommunications Union-R Study Group 3, plus some experience with a course taught at the University of Colorado.

  19. Propagation characteristics of superconducting microstrip lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S.G.; Ke, J.Y.; Chen, C.H.

    1996-01-01

    The modified spectral-domain approach is applied to study the propagation characteristics of high temperature superconducting microstrip lines whose signal strip and ground plane are of arbitrary thickness. In this study, numerical results for effective dielectric constant, attenuation constant, and strip current distribution are presented to discuss the effects due to frequency, temperature, strip thickness, and substrate loss tangent. In particular, the conductor and dielectric attenuation constants of superconducting microstrip line are depicted separately to discuss the mechanism of the line losses. A comparison with published theoretical and experimental results is also included to check the accuracy of the new approach`s results.

  20. Propagating torsion in the Einstein frame

    SciTech Connect

    Poplawski, Nikodem J.

    2006-11-15

    The Einstein-Cartan-Saa theory of torsion modifies the spacetime volume element so that it is compatible with the connection. The condition of connection compatibility gives constraints on torsion, which are also necessary for the consistence of torsion, minimal coupling, and electromagnetic gauge invariance. To solve the problem of positivity of energy associated with the torsionic scalar, we reformulate this theory in the Einstein conformal frame. In the presence of the electromagnetic field, we obtain the Hojman-Rosenbaum-Ryan-Shepley theory of propagating torsion with a different factor in the torsionic kinetic term.

  1. Convective lyapunov exponents and propagation of correlations

    PubMed

    Giacomelli; Hegger; Politi; Vassalli

    2000-10-23

    We conjecture that in one-dimensional spatially extended systems the propagation velocity of correlations coincides with a zero of the convective Lyapunov spectrum. This conjecture is successfully tested in three different contexts: (i) a Hamiltonian system (a Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain of oscillators); (ii) a general model for spatiotemporal chaos (the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation); (iii) experimental data taken from a CO2 laser with delayed feedback. In the last case, the convective Lyapunov exponent is determined directly from the experimental data.

  2. 27 CFR 9.214 - Haw River Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the unnamed road known locally as Baynes Road 2 miles to its intersection with North Carolina State Highway 119 at Baynes in Caswell County; then (16) Proceed generally south-southeast along North...

  3. Fermentation of Opuntia stricta (Haw.) fruits for betalains concentration.

    PubMed

    Castellar, M R; Obón, J M; Alacid, M; Fernández-López, J A

    2008-06-11

    Fermentation of juice and homogenized fruits of Opuntia stricta fruits has been developed and optimized. The aim was to obtain the red food colorant betanin from prickly pear, at high concentration and low viscosity. Among three strains assayed, Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. bayanus AWRI 796 has been the optimum for this process. The optimum temperature value was found to be 35 degrees C for both sugar consumption and pigment preservation. After fermentation, biomass and residual vegetal tissue were discarded by centrifugation. Supernatant was concentrated under vacuum. Therefore, liquid concentrated betanin was obtained, with low viscosity and being sugar free. Besides, bioethanol was obtained as byproduct. Characteristics of the final product obtained were pH 3.41, 5.2 degrees Brix, 9.65 g/L betanin, color strength of 10.8, and viscosity of 52.5 cP. These values are better than obtained by other procedures.

  4. Propagation of ultrashort laser pulses through water.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianchao; Alexander, Dennis R; Zhang, Haifeng; Parali, Ufuk; Doerr, David W; Bruce, John C; Wang, Hao

    2007-02-19

    In this paper, propagation of ultrashort pulses through a long 3.5 meter water channel was studied. Of particular interest was the attenuation of the beam at various lengths along the variable path length and to find an explanation of why the attenuation deviates from typical Beer Lambert law around 3 meters for ultrashort laser pulse transmission. Laser pulses of 10 fs at 75 MHz, 100 fs at 80 MHz and 300 fs at 1 KHz were employed to investigate the effects of pulse duration, spectrum and repetition rate on the attenuation after propagating through water up to 3 meters. Stretched pulse attenuation measurements produced from 10 fs at a frequency of 75 MHz were compared with the 10 fs attenuation measurements. Results indicate that the broad spectrum of the ultrashort pulse is the dominant reason for the observed decrease in attenuation after 3 meters of travel in a long water channel. The repetition rate is found not to play a significant role at least for the long pulse scenario in this reported attenuation studies. PMID:19532433

  5. Solitary wave propagation influenced by submerged breakwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Zuo, Qi-hua; Wang, Deng-ting; Shukrieva, Shirin

    2013-10-01

    The form of Boussinesq equation derived by Nwogu (1993) using velocity at an arbitrary distance and surface elevation as variables is used to simulate wave surface elevation changes. In the numerical experiment, water depth was divided into five layers with six layer interfaces to simulate velocity at each layer interface. Besides, a physical experiment was carried out to validate numerical model and study solitary wave propagation. "Water column collapsing" method (WCCM) was used to generate solitary wave. A series of wave gauges around an impervious breakwater were set-up in the flume to measure the solitary wave shoaling, run-up, and breaking processes. The results show that the measured data and simulated data are in good agreement. Moreover, simulated and measured surface elevations were analyzed by the wavelet transform method. It shows that different wave frequencies stratified in the wavelet amplitude spectrum. Finally, horizontal and vertical velocities of each layer interface were analyzed in the process of solitary wave propagation through submerged breakwater.

  6. Nonlinear biochemical signal processing via noise propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Hyuk; Qian, Hong; Sauro, Herbert M.

    2013-10-01

    Single-cell studies often show significant phenotypic variability due to the stochastic nature of intra-cellular biochemical reactions. When the numbers of molecules, e.g., transcription factors and regulatory enzymes, are in low abundance, fluctuations in biochemical activities become significant and such "noise" can propagate through regulatory cascades in terms of biochemical reaction networks. Here we develop an intuitive, yet fully quantitative method for analyzing how noise affects cellular phenotypes based on identifying a system's nonlinearities and noise propagations. We observe that such noise can simultaneously enhance sensitivities in one behavioral region while reducing sensitivities in another. Employing this novel phenomenon we designed three biochemical signal processing modules: (a) A gene regulatory network that acts as a concentration detector with both enhanced amplitude and sensitivity. (b) A non-cooperative positive feedback system, with a graded dose-response in the deterministic case, that serves as a bistable switch due to noise-induced ultra-sensitivity. (c) A noise-induced linear amplifier for gene regulation that requires no feedback. The methods developed in the present work allow one to understand and engineer nonlinear biochemical signal processors based on fluctuation-induced phenotypes.

  7. Light propagation and large-scale inhomogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Brouzakis, Nikolaos; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Tzavara, Eleftheria E-mail: ntetrad@phys.uoa.gr

    2008-04-15

    We consider the effect on the propagation of light of inhomogeneities with sizes of order 10 Mpc or larger. The Universe is approximated through a variation of the Swiss-cheese model. The spherical inhomogeneities are void-like, with central underdensities surrounded by compensating overdense shells. We study the propagation of light in this background, assuming that the source and the observer occupy random positions, so that each beam travels through several inhomogeneities at random angles. The distribution of luminosity distances for sources with the same redshift is asymmetric, with a peak at a value larger than the average one. The width of the distribution and the location of the maximum increase with increasing redshift and length scale of the inhomogeneities. We compute the induced dispersion and bias of cosmological parameters derived from the supernova data. They are too small to explain the perceived acceleration without dark energy, even when the length scale of the inhomogeneities is comparable to the horizon distance. Moreover, the dispersion and bias induced by gravitational lensing at the scales of galaxies or clusters of galaxies are larger by at least an order of magnitude.

  8. Propagation style controls lava-snow interactions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, B R; Belousov, A; Belousova, M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding interactions between volcanic eruptions and the cryosphere (a.k.a. glaciovolcanism) is important for climate reconstructions as well as for hazard mitigation at ice-clad volcanoes. Here we present unique field observations of interactions between snowpack and advancing basaltic lava flows during the 2012-13 eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Our observations show that lava-snow heat transfer is slow, and that styles of lava propagation control snowpack responses. 'A'a and sheet lava flows advance in a rolling caterpillar-track motion on top of the rigid, snowpack substrate with minor lava-snow interaction. In contrast, pahoehoe lava propagates by inflation of lobes beneath/inside the snowpack, producing rigorous lava-snow interaction via meltwater percolation down into the incandescent lava causing production of voluminous steam, rapid surface cooling and thermal shock fragmentation. The textures produced by pahoehoe-snowpack interactions are distinctive and, where observed at other sites, can be used to infer syn-eruption seasonality and climatic conditions. PMID:25514031

  9. The propagation of the nerve impulse.

    PubMed

    Jurisic, N

    1987-05-01

    A partial differential equation for the propagated action potential is derived using symmetry, charge conservation, and Ohm's law. Charge conservation analysis explicitly includes the gating charge when applied in the laboratory frame. When applied in the system of reference in which capacitive currents are zero, it yields a relation between orthogonal components of the ionic current allowing us to express the nonlinear ionic current in terms of the voltage-dependent membrane capacitance C(V) and the axial current that satisfies Ohm's law. The ionic current is shown to behave as C(V)V[C(V)V2]' at the foot of the action potential while the gating current behaves as C(V)V[Cg(V)V]' where Cg(V) is the capacitance associated with gating. Improved knowledge of the nonlinear current makes it possible to describe the propagated action potential in an approximated way with quasilinear partial differential equations. These equations have analytical solutions that travel with constant velocity, retain their shape, and account for other properties of the action potential. Furthermore, the quasilinear approximation is shown to be equivalent to the FitzHugh-Nagumo equation without recovery making apparent its physical content.

  10. Error Propagation Analysis for Quantitative Intracellular Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Tillack, Jana; Paczia, Nicole; Nöh, Katharina; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Noack, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Model-based analyses have become an integral part of modern metabolic engineering and systems biology in order to gain knowledge about complex and not directly observable cellular processes. For quantitative analyses, not only experimental data, but also measurement errors, play a crucial role. The total measurement error of any analytical protocol is the result of an accumulation of single errors introduced by several processing steps. Here, we present a framework for the quantification of intracellular metabolites, including error propagation during metabolome sample processing. Focusing on one specific protocol, we comprehensively investigate all currently known and accessible factors that ultimately impact the accuracy of intracellular metabolite concentration data. All intermediate steps are modeled, and their uncertainty with respect to the final concentration data is rigorously quantified. Finally, on the basis of a comprehensive metabolome dataset of Corynebacterium glutamicum, an integrated error propagation analysis for all parts of the model is conducted, and the most critical steps for intracellular metabolite quantification are detected. PMID:24957773

  11. Crack propagation directions in unfilled resins.

    PubMed

    Baran, G; Sadeghipour, K; Jayaraman, S; Silage, D; Paul, D; Boberick, K

    1998-11-01

    Posterior composite restorative materials undergo accelerated wear in the occlusal contact area, primarily through a fatigue mechanism. To facilitate the timely development of new and improved materials, a predictive wear model is desirable. The objective of this study was to develop a finite element model enabling investigators to predict crack propagation directions in resins used as the matrix material in composites, and to verify these predictions by observing cracks formed during the pin-on-disc wear of a 60:40 BISGMA:TEGDMA resin and an EBPADMA resin. Laser confocal scanning microscopy was used to measure crack locations. Finite element studies were done by means of ABAQUS software, modeling a cylinder sliding on a material with pre-existing surface-breaking cracks. Variables included modulus, cylinder/material friction coefficient, crack face friction, and yield behavior. Experimental results were surprising, since most crack directions were opposite previously published observations. The majority of surface cracks, though initially orthogonal to the surface, changed direction to run 20 to 30 degrees from the horizontal in the direction of indenter movement. Finite element modeling established the importance of subsurface shear stresses, since calculations provided evidence that cracks propagate in the direction of maximum K(II)(theta), in the same direction as the motion of the indenter, and at an angle of approximately 20 degrees. These findings provide the foundation for a predictive model of sliding wear in unfilled glassy resins.

  12. Damage Propagation Modeling for Aircraft Engine Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai; Simon, Don; Eklund, Neil

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how damage propagation can be modeled within the modules of aircraft gas turbine engines. To that end, response surfaces of all sensors are generated via a thermo-dynamical simulation model for the engine as a function of variations of flow and efficiency of the modules of interest. An exponential rate of change for flow and efficiency loss was imposed for each data set, starting at a randomly chosen initial deterioration set point. The rate of change of the flow and efficiency denotes an otherwise unspecified fault with increasingly worsening effect. The rates of change of the faults were constrained to an upper threshold but were otherwise chosen randomly. Damage propagation was allowed to continue until a failure criterion was reached. A health index was defined as the minimum of several superimposed operational margins at any given time instant and the failure criterion is reached when health index reaches zero. Output of the model was the time series (cycles) of sensed measurements typically available from aircraft gas turbine engines. The data generated were used as challenge data for the Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) data competition at PHM 08.

  13. Structure of Propagating and Attached Hydrocarbon Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath

    2004-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations with C3-chemistry and radiative heat-loss models have been performed to reveal the internal structure of propagating and attached flames in an axisymmetric fuel jet of methane, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, or propane in air under normal and zero gravity. Observations of the flames were also made at the NASA Glenn 2.2-Second Drop Tower. In computations, the fuel issued into quasi-quiescent air for a fixed mixing time before it was ignited along the centerline at stoichiometry. The edge of the flame propagated through a flammable layer at the laminar flame speed of the stoichiometric fuel-air mixture independent of gravity. For all cases, a peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, was formed in the flame base, thereby holding a trailing diffusion flame. The location of the reaction kernel in the attached flames depended inversely on the reactivity. The reaction-kernel correlations between the reactivity and the velocity were developed further using variables related to local Damkahler and Peclet numbers.

  14. Wave propagation in random granular chains.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, Mohith; Awasthi, Amnaya P; Geubelle, Philippe H

    2012-03-01

    The influence of randomness on wave propagation in one-dimensional chains of spherical granular media is investigated. The interaction between the elastic spheres is modeled using the classical Hertzian contact law. Randomness is introduced in the discrete model using random distributions of particle mass, Young's modulus, or radius. Of particular interest in this study is the quantification of the attenuation in the amplitude of the impulse associated with various levels of randomness: two distinct regimes of decay are observed, characterized by an exponential or a power law, respectively. The responses are normalized to represent a vast array of material parameters and impact conditions. The virial theorem is applied to investigate the transfer from potential to kinetic energy components in the system for different levels of randomness. The level of attenuation in the two decay regimes is compared for the three different sources of randomness and it is found that randomness in radius leads to the maximum rate of decay in the exponential regime of wave propagation. PMID:22587093

  15. Nonlinear biochemical signal processing via noise propagation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hyuk; Qian, Hong; Sauro, Herbert M

    2013-10-14

    Single-cell studies often show significant phenotypic variability due to the stochastic nature of intra-cellular biochemical reactions. When the numbers of molecules, e.g., transcription factors and regulatory enzymes, are in low abundance, fluctuations in biochemical activities become significant and such "noise" can propagate through regulatory cascades in terms of biochemical reaction networks. Here we develop an intuitive, yet fully quantitative method for analyzing how noise affects cellular phenotypes based on identifying a system's nonlinearities and noise propagations. We observe that such noise can simultaneously enhance sensitivities in one behavioral region while reducing sensitivities in another. Employing this novel phenomenon we designed three biochemical signal processing modules: (a) A gene regulatory network that acts as a concentration detector with both enhanced amplitude and sensitivity. (b) A non-cooperative positive feedback system, with a graded dose-response in the deterministic case, that serves as a bistable switch due to noise-induced ultra-sensitivity. (c) A noise-induced linear amplifier for gene regulation that requires no feedback. The methods developed in the present work allow one to understand and engineer nonlinear biochemical signal processors based on fluctuation-induced phenotypes.

  16. Propagation style controls lava-snow interactions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, B R; Belousov, A; Belousova, M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding interactions between volcanic eruptions and the cryosphere (a.k.a. glaciovolcanism) is important for climate reconstructions as well as for hazard mitigation at ice-clad volcanoes. Here we present unique field observations of interactions between snowpack and advancing basaltic lava flows during the 2012-13 eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Our observations show that lava-snow heat transfer is slow, and that styles of lava propagation control snowpack responses. 'A'a and sheet lava flows advance in a rolling caterpillar-track motion on top of the rigid, snowpack substrate with minor lava-snow interaction. In contrast, pahoehoe lava propagates by inflation of lobes beneath/inside the snowpack, producing rigorous lava-snow interaction via meltwater percolation down into the incandescent lava causing production of voluminous steam, rapid surface cooling and thermal shock fragmentation. The textures produced by pahoehoe-snowpack interactions are distinctive and, where observed at other sites, can be used to infer syn-eruption seasonality and climatic conditions.

  17. Propagation style controls lava-snow interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, B. R.; Belousov, A.; Belousova, M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding interactions between volcanic eruptions and the cryosphere (a.k.a. glaciovolcanism) is important for climate reconstructions as well as for hazard mitigation at ice-clad volcanoes. Here we present unique field observations of interactions between snowpack and advancing basaltic lava flows during the 2012-13 eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Our observations show that lava-snow heat transfer is slow, and that styles of lava propagation control snowpack responses. ‧A‧a and sheet lava flows advance in a rolling caterpillar-track motion on top of the rigid, snowpack substrate with minor lava-snow interaction. In contrast, pahoehoe lava propagates by inflation of lobes beneath/inside the snowpack, producing rigorous lava-snow interaction via meltwater percolation down into the incandescent lava causing production of voluminous steam, rapid surface cooling and thermal shock fragmentation. The textures produced by pahoehoe-snowpack interactions are distinctive and, where observed at other sites, can be used to infer syn-eruption seasonality and climatic conditions.

  18. Line spread instrumentation for propagation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, W. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A line spread device capable of yielding direct measure of a laser beam's line spread function (LSF) was developed and employed in propagation tests conducted in a wind tunnel to examine optimal acoustical suppression techniques for laser cavities exposed to simulated aircraft aerodynamic environments. Measurements were made on various aerodynamic fences and cavity air injection techniques that effect the LSF of a propagating laser. Using the quiescent tunnel as a control, the relative effect of each technique on laser beam quality was determined. The optical instrument employed enabled the comparison of relative beam intensity for each fence or mass injection. It was found that fence height had little effect on beam quality but fence porosity had a marked effect, i.e., 58% porosity alleviated cavity resonance and degraded the beam the least. Mass injection had little effect on the beam LSF. The use of a direct LSF measuring device proved to be a viable means of determining aerodynamic seeing qualities of flow fields.

  19. Acoustic propagation in a thermally stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanmoorhem, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the activities during the fifth six month period of the investigation of acoustic propagation in the atmosphere with a realistic temperature profile. Progress has been achieved in two major directions: comparisons between the lapse model and experimental data taken by NASA during the second tower experiment, and development of a model propagation in an inversion. Data from the second tower experiment became available near the end of 1984 and some comparisons have been carried out, but this work is not complete. Problems with the temperature profiler during the experiment have produced temperature profiles that are difficult to fit the assumed variation of temperature with height, but in cases where reasonable fits have been obtained agreement between the model and the experiments are close. The major weaknesses in the model appear to be the presence of discontinuities in some regions, the low sound levels predicted near the source height, and difficulties with the argument of the Hankel function being outside the allowable range. Work on the inversion model has progressed slowly, and the rays for that case are discussed along with a simple energy conservation model of sound level enhancement in the inversion case.

  20. Wave propagation in random granular chains.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, Mohith; Awasthi, Amnaya P; Geubelle, Philippe H

    2012-03-01

    The influence of randomness on wave propagation in one-dimensional chains of spherical granular media is investigated. The interaction between the elastic spheres is modeled using the classical Hertzian contact law. Randomness is introduced in the discrete model using random distributions of particle mass, Young's modulus, or radius. Of particular interest in this study is the quantification of the attenuation in the amplitude of the impulse associated with various levels of randomness: two distinct regimes of decay are observed, characterized by an exponential or a power law, respectively. The responses are normalized to represent a vast array of material parameters and impact conditions. The virial theorem is applied to investigate the transfer from potential to kinetic energy components in the system for different levels of randomness. The level of attenuation in the two decay regimes is compared for the three different sources of randomness and it is found that randomness in radius leads to the maximum rate of decay in the exponential regime of wave propagation.

  1. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    1996-11-26

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator 14,14b includes an evacuated chamber 16a,b having a gun 18,18b for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam 12 or ion beam 12b. The beam 12,12b is discharged through a beam exit 22 in the chamber 16a,b into a higher pressure region 24. A plasma interface 34 is disposed at the beam exit 22 and includes a plasma channel 38 for bounding a plasma 40 maintainable between a cathode 42 and an anode 44 disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel 38 is coaxially aligned with the beam exit 22 for propagating the beam 12,12b from the chamber 16a,b, through the plasma 40, and into the higher pressure region 24. The plasma 40 is effective for pumping down the beam exit 22 for preventing pressure increase in the chamber 16a,b, and provides magnetic focusing of the beam 12,12b discharged into the higher pressure region 24.

  2. Propagation of electromagnetic radiation in mitochondria?

    PubMed

    Thar, Roland; Kühl, Michael

    2004-09-21

    Mitochondria are the main source of ultra-weak chemiluminescence generated by reactive oxygen species, which are continuously formed during the mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. Vertebrate cells show typically filamentous mitochondria associated with the microtubules of the cytoskeleton, forming together a continuous network (mitochondrial reticulum). The refractive index of both mitochondria and microtubules is higher than the surrounding cytoplasm, which results that the mitochondrial reticulum can act as an optical waveguide, i.e. electromagnetic radiation can propagate within the network. A detailed analysis of the inner structure of mitochondria shows, that they can be optically modelled as a multi-layer system with alternating indices of refraction. The parameters of this multi-layer system are dependent on the physiologic state of the mitochondria. The effect of the multi-layer system on electromagnetic radiation propagating along the mitochondrial reticulum is analysed by the transfer-matrix method. If induced light emission could take place in mitochondria, the multi-layer system could lead to lasing action like it has been realized in technical distributed feedback laser. Based on former reports about the influence of external illumination on the physiology of mitochondria it is speculated whether there exists some kind of long-range interaction between individual mitochondria mediated by electromagnetic radiation.

  3. Designing microcapsule arrays that propagate chemical signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Balazs, Anna C.

    2010-08-01

    Using analysis and simulation, we show how ordered arrays of microcapsules in solution can be harnessed to propagate chemical signals in directed and controllable ways, allowing the signals to be transmitted over macroscopic distances. The system encompasses two types of capsules that are localized on an adhesive surface. The “signaling” capsules release inducer molecules, which trigger “targets” to release nanoparticles. The released nanoparticles can bind to the underlying surface and thus, create adhesion gradients, which then propel the signaling capsules to shuttle between neighboring targets. This arrangement acts like a relay, so that triggering target capsules at a particular location in the array also triggers target capsules in adjacent locations. For an array containing two target columns, our simulations and analysis show that steady input signal leads to a sustained periodic output. For an array containing multiple target columns, we show that by introducing a prescribed ratio of nanoparticle release rates between successive target columns, a chemical signal can be propagated along the array without dissipation. We also demonstrate that similar signal transmission cannot be performed via diffusion alone.

  4. Proceedings of the Eighteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 18) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. Participants included representatives from Canada, the Netherlands, England, and the United States, including researchers from universities, government agencies, and private industry. The meeting was organized into two technical sessions. The first session was dedicated to slant path propagation studies and experiments. The second session focused on propagation studies for mobile, personal, and sound broadcast systems. In total, 14 technical papers and some informal contributions were presented. Preceding NAPEX_17, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop was held to review ACTS propagation activities.

  5. Theoretical models for ultrashort electromagnetic pulse propagation in nonlinear metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Shuangchun; Xiang, Yuanjiang; Dai, Xiaoyu; Tang, Zhixiang; Su, Wenhua; Fan, Dianyuan

    2007-03-15

    A metamaterial (MM) differs from an ordinary optical material mainly in that it has a dispersive magnetic permeability and offers greatly enhanced design freedom to alter the linear and nonlinear properties. This makes it possible for us to control the propagation of ultrashort electromagnetic pulses at will. Here we report on generic features of ultrashort electromagnetic pulse propagation and demonstrate the controllability of both the linear and nonlinear parameters of models for pulse propagation in MMs. First, we derive a generalized system of coupled three-dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger equations (NLSEs) suitable for few-cycle pulse propagation in a MM with both nonlinear electric polarization and nonlinear magnetization. The coupled equations recover previous models for pulse propagation in both ordinary material and a MM under the same conditions. Second, by using the coupled NLSEs in the Drude dispersive model as an example, we identify the respective roles of the dispersive electric permittivity and magnetic permeability in ultrashort pulse propagation and disclose some additional features of pulse propagation in MMs. It is shown that, for linear propagation, the sign and magnitude of space-time focusing can be controlled through adjusting the linear dispersive permittivity and permeability. For nonlinear propagation, the linear dispersive permittivity and permeability are incorporated into the nonlinear magnetization and nonlinear polarization, respectively, resulting in controllable magnetic and electric self-steepening effects and higher-order dispersively nonlinear terms in the propagation models.

  6. Pathogen Propagation Model with Superinfection in Vegetatively Propagated Plants on Lattice Space.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yuma; Takada, Takenori

    2016-01-01

    Many clonal plants have two reproductive patterns, seed propagation and vegetative propagation. By vegetative propagation, plants reproduce the genetically identical offspring with a low mortality, because resources are supplied from the other individuals through interconnected ramets at vegetative-propagated offspring. However, the ramets transport not only resources but also systemic pathogen. Pathogens evolve to establish and spread widely within the plant population. The superinfection, which is defined as the ability that an established pathogen spreads widely by infecting to already-infected individuals with other strains of a pathogen, is important to the evolution of pathogens. We examine the dynamics of plant reproduction and pathogen propagation considering spatial structure and the effect of superinfection on genetic diversity of pathogen by analysis of several models, 1-strain and multiple-strain models, on two-dimensional square lattice. In the analysis of 1-strain model, we derive equilibrium value by mean-field approximation and pair approximation, and its local stability by Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion. In the multiple-strain models, we analyze the dynamics by numerical simulation of mean-field approximation, pair approximation and Monte Carlo simulation. Through the analyses, we show the effect of parameter values to dynamics of models, such as transition of dominant strain of pathogen, competition between plants and pathogens and density of individuals. As a result, (i) The strain with intermediate cost becomes dominant when both superinfection rate and growth rate are low. (ii) The competition between plants and pathogens occurs in the phase of coexistence of various strains by pair approximation and Monte Carlo simulation. (iii) Too high growth rate leads to the decrease of plant population in all models. (iv) Pathogens are easy to maintain their genetic diversity with low superinfection rate. However, if they do not superinfect, the

  7. Pathogen Propagation Model with Superinfection in Vegetatively Propagated Plants on Lattice Space

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Yuma; Takada, Takenori

    2016-01-01

    Many clonal plants have two reproductive patterns, seed propagation and vegetative propagation. By vegetative propagation, plants reproduce the genetically identical offspring with a low mortality, because resources are supplied from the other individuals through interconnected ramets at vegetative-propagated offspring. However, the ramets transport not only resources but also systemic pathogen. Pathogens evolve to establish and spread widely within the plant population. The superinfection, which is defined as the ability that an established pathogen spreads widely by infecting to already-infected individuals with other strains of a pathogen, is important to the evolution of pathogens. We examine the dynamics of plant reproduction and pathogen propagation considering spatial structure and the effect of superinfection on genetic diversity of pathogen by analysis of several models, 1-strain and multiple-strain models, on two-dimensional square lattice. In the analysis of 1-strain model, we derive equilibrium value by mean-field approximation and pair approximation, and its local stability by Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion. In the multiple-strain models, we analyze the dynamics by numerical simulation of mean-field approximation, pair approximation and Monte Carlo simulation. Through the analyses, we show the effect of parameter values to dynamics of models, such as transition of dominant strain of pathogen, competition between plants and pathogens and density of individuals. As a result, (i) The strain with intermediate cost becomes dominant when both superinfection rate and growth rate are low. (ii) The competition between plants and pathogens occurs in the phase of coexistence of various strains by pair approximation and Monte Carlo simulation. (iii) Too high growth rate leads to the decrease of plant population in all models. (iv) Pathogens are easy to maintain their genetic diversity with low superinfection rate. However, if they do not superinfect, the

  8. Adaptive laser link reconfiguration using constraint propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crone, M. S.; Julich, P. M.; Cook, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes Harris AI research performed on the Adaptive Link Reconfiguration (ALR) study for Rome Lab, and focuses on the application of constraint propagation to the problem of link reconfiguration for the proposed space based Strategic Defense System (SDS) Brilliant Pebbles (BP) communications system. According to the concept of operations at the time of the study, laser communications will exist between BP's and to ground entry points. Long-term links typical of RF transmission will not exist. This study addressed an initial implementation of BP's based on the Global Protection Against Limited Strikes (GPALS) SDI mission. The number of satellites and rings studied was representative of this problem. An orbital dynamics program was used to generate line-of-site data for the modeled architecture. This was input into a discrete event simulation implemented in the Harris developed COnstraint Propagation Expert System (COPES) Shell, developed initially on the Rome Lab BM/C3 study. Using a model of the network and several heuristics, the COPES shell was used to develop the Heuristic Adaptive Link Ordering (HALO) Algorithm to rank and order potential laser links according to probability of communication. A reduced set of links based on this ranking would then be used by a routing algorithm to select the next hop. This paper includes an overview of Constraint Propagation as an Artificial Intelligence technique and its embodiment in the COPES shell. It describes the design and implementation of both the simulation of the GPALS BP network and the HALO algorithm in COPES. This is described using a 59 Data Flow Diagram, State Transition Diagrams, and Structured English PDL. It describes a laser communications model and the heuristics involved in rank-ordering the potential communication links. The generation of simulation data is described along with its interface via COPES to the Harris developed View Net graphical tool for visual analysis of communications

  9. Seismic Wave Propagation on the Tablet Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emoto, K.

    2015-12-01

    Tablet computers widely used in recent years. The performance of the tablet computer is improving year by year. Some of them have performance comparable to the personal computer of a few years ago with respect to the calculation speed and the memory size. The convenience and the intuitive operation are the advantage of the tablet computer compared to the desktop PC. I developed the iPad application of the numerical simulation of the seismic wave propagation. The numerical simulation is based on the 2D finite difference method with the staggered-grid scheme. The number of the grid points is 512 x 384 = 196,608. The grid space is 200m in both horizontal and vertical directions. That is the calculation area is 102km x 77km. The time step is 0.01s. In order to reduce the user waiting time, the image of the wave field is drawn simultaneously with the calculation rather than playing the movie after the whole calculation. P and S wave energies are plotted on the screen every 20 steps (0.2s). There is the trade-off between the smooth simulation and the resolution of the wave field image. In the current setting, it takes about 30s to calculate the 10s wave propagation (50 times image updates). The seismogram at the receiver is displayed below of the wave field updated in real time. The default medium structure consists of 3 layers. The layer boundary is defined by 10 movable points with linear interpolation. Users can intuitively change to the arbitrary boundary shape by moving the point. Also users can easily change the source and the receiver positions. The favorite structure can be saved and loaded. For the advance simulation, users can introduce the random velocity fluctuation whose spectrum can be changed to the arbitrary shape. By using this application, everyone can simulate the seismic wave propagation without the special knowledge of the elastic wave equation. So far, the Japanese version of the application is released on the App Store. Now I am preparing the

  10. Propagation Characteristics of International Space Station Wireless Local Area Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sham, Catherine C.; Hwn, Shian U.; Loh, Yin-Chung

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (UTD) for Space Station Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) indoor propagation characteristics analysis. The verification results indicate good correlation between UTD computed and measured signal strength. It is observed that the propagation characteristics are quite different in the Space Station modules as compared with those in the typical indoor WLANs environment, such as an office building. The existing indoor propagation models are not readily applicable to the Space Station module environment. The Space Station modules can be regarded as oversized imperfect waveguides. Two distinct propagation regions separated by a breakpoint exist. The propagation exhibits the guided wave characteristics. The propagation loss in the Space Station, thus, is much smaller than that in the typical office building. The path loss model developed in this paper is applicable for Space Station WLAN RF coverage and link performance analysis.

  11. Fourth International Symposium on Long-Range Sound Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Long range sound propagation is an aspect of many acoustical problems ranging from en route aircraft noise to the acoustic detection of aircraft. Over the past decade, the University of Mississippi and the Open University of England, together with a third institution, have held a symposium approx. every 2 years so that experts in the field of long range propagation could exchange information on current research, identify areas needing additional work, and coordinate activities as much as possible. The Fourth International Symposium on Long Range Sound Propagation was jointly sponsored by the University of Mississippi, the Open University of England, and NASA. Papers were given in the following areas: ground effects on propagation; infrasound propagation; and meteorological effects on sound propagation. A compilation of the presentations made at the symposium is presented along with a list of attendees, and the agenda.

  12. Simulation of sound propagation over porous barriers of arbitrary shapes.

    PubMed

    Ke, Guoyi; Zheng, Z C

    2015-01-01

    A time-domain solver using an immersed boundary method is investigated for simulating sound propagation over porous and rigid barriers of arbitrary shapes. In this study, acoustic propagation in the air from an impulse source over the ground is considered as a model problem. The linearized Euler equations are solved for sound propagation in the air and the Zwikker-Kosten equations for propagation in barriers as well as in the ground. In comparison to the analytical solutions, the numerical scheme is validated for the cases of a single rigid barrier with different shapes and for two rigid triangular barriers. Sound propagations around barriers with different porous materials are then simulated and discussed. The results show that the simulation is able to capture the sound propagation behaviors accurately around both rigid and porous barriers. PMID:25618061

  13. Wave Propagation in Expanding Cell Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utuje, Kazage J. Christophe; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2014-03-01

    The coordinated migration of groups of cells drives important biological processes, such as wound healing and morphogenesis. In this talk we present a minimal continuum model of an expanding cell monolayer coupling elastic deformations to myosin-based activity in the cells. The myosin-driven contractile activity is quantified by the chemical potential difference for the process of ATP hydrolysis by myosin motors. A new ingredient of the model is a feedback of the local strain rate of the monolayer on contractility that naturally yields a mechanism for viscoelasticity of the cellular medium. By combining analytics and numerics we show that this simple model reproduces qualitatively many experimental findings, including the build-up of contractile stresses at the center of the cell monolayer, and the existence of traveling mechanical waves that control spreading dynamics and stress propagation in the cell monolayer. KJCU and MCM were supported by the NSF through grants DMR-1004789 and DGE-1068780.

  14. Digital signal processing for ionospheric propagation diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rino, Charles L.; Groves, Keith M.; Carrano, Charles S.; Gunter, Jacob H.; Parris, Richard T.

    2015-08-01

    For decades, analog beacon satellite receivers have generated multifrequency narrowband complex data streams that could be processed directly to extract total electron content (TEC) and scintillation diagnostics. With the advent of software-defined radio, modern digital receivers generate baseband complex data streams that require intermediate processing to extract the narrowband modulation imparted to the signal by ionospheric structure. This paper develops and demonstrates a processing algorithm for digital beacon satellite data that will extract TEC and scintillation components. For algorithm evaluation, a simulator was developed to generate noise-limited multifrequency complex digital signal realizations with representative orbital dynamics and propagation disturbances. A frequency-tracking procedure is used to capture the slowly changing frequency component. Dynamic demodulation against the low-frequency estimate captures the scintillation. The low-frequency reference can be used directly for dual-frequency TEC estimation.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann model for wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianying; Yan, Guangwu; Shi, Xiubo

    2009-08-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model for two-dimensional wave equation is proposed by using the higher-order moment method. The higher-order moment method is based on the solution of a series of partial differential equations obtained by using multiscale technique and Chapman-Enskog expansion. In order to obtain the lattice Boltzmann model for the wave equation with higher-order accuracy of truncation errors, we removed the second-order dissipation term and the third-order dispersion term by employing the moments up to fourth order. The reversibility in time appears owing to the absence of the second-order dissipation term and the third-order dispersion term. As numerical examples, some classical examples, such as interference, diffraction, and wave passing through a convex lens, are simulated. The numerical results show that this model can be used to simulate wave propagation.

  16. Front propagation and rejuvenation in flipping processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-naim, Eli; Krapivsky, P I; Antal, T; Ben - Avrahm, D

    2008-01-01

    We study a directed flipping process that underlies the performance of the random edge simplex algorithm. In this stochastic process, which takes place on a one-dimensional lattice whose sites may be either occupied or vacant, occupied sites become vacant at a constant rate and simultaneously cause all sites to the right to change their state. This random process exhibits rich phenomenology. First, there is a front, defined by the position of the leftmost occupied site, that propagates at a nontrivial velocity. Second, the front involves a depletion zone with an excess of vacant sites. The total excess {Delta}{sub k} increases logarithmically, {Delta}{sub k} {approx_equal}ln k, with the distance k from the front. Third, the front exhibits ageing -- young fronts are vigorous but old fronts are sluggish. We investigate these phenomena using a quasi-static approximation, direct solutions of small systems and numerical simulations.

  17. Poliovirus: Generation, Quantification, Propagation, Purification, and Storage

    PubMed Central

    Burrill, Cecily P.; Strings, Vanessa R.; Andino, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) is the prototypical picornavirus. It is a non-enveloped RNA virus with a small (~7.5 kb) genome of positive polarity. It has long served as a model to study RNA virus biology, pathogenesis, and evolution. cDNA clones of several strains are available, and infectious virus can be produced by the transfection of in vitro transcribed viral genomes into an appropriate host cell. PV infects many human and non-human primate cell lines including HeLa and HeLa S3 cells, and can grow to high titer in culture. Protocols for the production, propagation, quantification, and purification of PV are presented. A separate chapter concerning the generation and characterization of PV mutants will also be presented. PMID:23686830

  18. Influence of plasma turbulence on microwave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhn, A.; Holzhauer, E.; Leddy, J.; Thomas, M. B.; Vann, R. G. L.

    2016-11-01

    It is not fully understood how electromagnetic waves propagate through plasma density fluctuations when the size of the fluctuations is comparable with the wavelength of the incident radiation. In this paper, the perturbing effect of a turbulent plasma density layer on a traversing microwave beam is simulated with full-wave simulations. The deterioration of the microwave beam is calculated as a function of the characteristic turbulence structure size, the turbulence amplitude, the depth of the interaction zone and the size of the waist of the incident beam. The maximum scattering is observed for a structure size on the order of half the vacuum wavelength. The scattering and beam broadening was found to increase linearly with the depth of the turbulence layer and quadratically with the fluctuation strength. Consequences for experiments and 3D effects are considered.

  19. Radial propagation of geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, Robert; Hallatschek, Klaus

    2009-07-15

    The GAM group velocity is estimated from the ratio of the radial free energy flux to the total free energy applying gyrokinetic and two-fluid theory. This method is much more robust than approaches that calculate the group velocity directly and can be generalized to include additional physics, e.g., magnetic geometry. The results are verified with the gyrokinetic code GYRO[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the two-fluid code NLET[K. Hallatschek and A. Zeiler, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2554 (2000)], and analytical calculations. GAM propagation must be kept in mind when discussing the windows of GAM activity observed experimentally and the match between linear theory and experimental GAM frequencies.

  20. Detonation Propagation through Nitromethane Embedded Metal Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberthal, Brandon; Maines, Warren R.; Stewart, D. Scott

    2015-11-01

    There is considerable interest in developing a better understanding of dynamic behaviors of multicomponent systems. We report results of Eulerian hydrodynamic simulations of shock waves propagating through metal foam at approximately 20% relative density and various porosities using a reactive flow model in the ALE3D software package. We investigate the applied pressure and energy of the shock wave and its effects on the fluid and the inert material interface. By varying pore sizes, as well as metal impedance, we predict the overall effects of heterogeneous material systems at the mesoscale. In addition, we observe a radially expanding blast front in these heterogeneous models and apply the theory of Detonation Shock Dynamics to the convergence behavior of the lead shock.

  1. Propagation of detonations in hydrazine vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    In the range of greater hydrazine vapor pressure, detonation speed depends exclusively on the extent of the ammonia decomposition in the second reaction stage. As vapor pressure decreases, the ammonia disintegration speed becomes increasingly slower and the reaction reached in the reaction zone increasingly decreases until finally, in the vapor pressure range between 53 and 16 Torr, the contribution of the second stage to detonation propagation disappears, and only the first stage remains active. Since the disintegration speed of the hydrazine in this pressure range has decreased markedly as well, no level, but rather only spinning, detonations occur. Temporary separations of the impact front and the reaction zone in the process lead to fluctuations of the detonation speed.

  2. Single-photon propagation through dielectric bandgaps.

    PubMed

    Borjemscaia, Natalia; Polyakov, Sergey V; Lett, Paul D; Migdall, Alan

    2010-02-01

    Theoretical models of photon traversal through quarter-wave dielectric stack barriers that arise due to Bragg reflection predict the saturation of the propagation time with the barrier length, known as the Hartman effect. This saturation is sensitive to the addition of single dielectric layers, varying significantly from sub-luminal to apparently super-luminal and vice versa. Our research tests the suitability of photonic bandgaps as an optical model for the tunneling process. Of particular importance is our observation of subtle structural changes in dielectric stacks drastically affecting photon traversal times, allowing for apparent sub- and super-luminal effects. We also introduce a simple model to link HOM visibility to wavepacket distortion that allows us to exclude this as a possible cause of the loss of contrast in the barrier penetration process. PMID:20174056

  3. Slow crack propagation in heterogeneous materials.

    PubMed

    Kierfeld, J; Vinokur, V M

    2006-05-01

    Statistics and thermally activated dynamics of crack nucleation and propagation in a two-dimensional heterogeneous material containing quenched randomly distributed defects are studied theoretically. Using the generalized Griffith criterion we derive the equation of motion for the crack tip position accounting for dissipation, thermal noise, and the random forces arising from the defects. We find that aggregations of defects generating long-range interaction forces (e.g., clouds of dislocations) lead to anomalously slow creep of the crack tip or even to its complete arrest. We demonstrate that heterogeneous materials with frozen defects contain a large number of arrested microcracks and that their fracture toughness is enhanced to the experimentally accessible time scales.

  4. Nonlinear Propagation of Infrasound from Large Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric explosions release immense quantities of infrasound energy that can be detected at receivers located from hundreds to thousands of kilometers from the origin. This has led to the deployment of a global 60-station network of micro-barometer arrays to aid in nuclear explosion monitoring. Current methods of estimating the radiated source energy from remote recordings of infrasound signals use simplified empirical source-yield relations that account for stratospheric winds along the source-receiver path. These formulations apply only to direct and stratospherically ducted arrivals. More recently, considerable progress has been made in applying numerical modeling techniques to develop more accurate source-yield formulations for realistic sound and wind speed profiles. However, these methods assume linear infrasound propagation along the travel path even though nonlinear effects - which arise when the amplitude of the acoustic pressure perturbation is a finite fraction of the ambient atmospheric pressure - are known to significantly alter infrasound frequencies, velocities and amplitudes, and thus can affect derived source yield estimates. For realistic atmospheric profiles, nonlinearity can be significant both in the vicinity of a large explosive source as well as at much greater distances. Within the stratosphere, nonlinearity may arise at caustics created by ducting; in the thermosphere, nonlinearity may arise due to very low ambient pressures at high altitudes. In this study, the effects of nonlinearity on infrasound signal amplitudes and frequencies are simulated using a nonlinear finite difference, time-domain (FDTD) method. The key features that allow for accurate and efficient nonlinear synthesis of infrasound propagation through realistic media are that 1) it includes for atmospheric viscosity, and 2) the environmental models are constrained to have axial symmetry, yielding solutions relevant to a point source in a fully 3D model with rotational

  5. Tau neutrino propagation and tau energy loss

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Sharada Iyer; Huang Yiwen; Reno, Mary Hall

    2005-07-01

    Electromagnetic energy loss of tau leptons is an important ingredient for eventual tau neutrino detection from high energy astrophysical sources. Proposals have been made to use mountains as neutrino converters, in which the emerging tau decays in an air shower. We use a stochastic evaluation of both tau neutrino conversion to taus and of tau electromagnetic energy loss. We examine the effects of the propagation for monoenergetic incident tau neutrinos as well as for several neutrino power-law spectra. Our main result is a parameterization of the tau electromagnetic energy loss parameter {beta}. We compare the results from the analytic expression for the tau flux using this {beta} with other parameterizations of {beta}.

  6. Acoustic propagation in a thermally stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanmoorhem, W. K.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in an atmosphere with a specific form of temperature profile has been investigated by analytical means. The temperature profile used is representative of an actual atmospheric profile and contains three free parameters. Both lapse and inversion cases have been considered. Although ray solution have been considered the primary emphasis has been on solutions of the acoustic wave equation with point force where the sound speed varies with height above the ground corresponding to the assumed temperature profile. The method used to obtain the solution of the wave equation is based on Hankel transformation of the wave equation, approximate solution of the transformed equation for wavelength small compared to the scale of the temperature (or sound speed) profile, and approximate or numerical inversion of the Hankel transformed solution. The solution displays the characteristics found in experimental data but extensive comparison between the models and experimental data has not been carried out.

  7. Acoustic propagation in a thermally stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanmoorhem, W. K.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in an atmosphere with a specific form of a temperature profile has been investigated by analytical means. The temperature profile used is representative of an actual atmospheric profile and contains three free parameters. Both lapse and inversion cases have been considered. Although ray solutions have been considered, the primary emphasis has been on solutions of the acoustic wave equation with point source where the sound speed varies with height above the ground corresponding to the assumed temperature profile. The method used to obtain the solution of the wave equation is based on Hankel transformation of the wave equation, approximate solution of the transformed equation for wavelength small compared to the scale of the temperature (or sound speed) profile, and approximate or numerical inversion of the Hankel transformed solution. The solution displays the characteristics found in experimental data but extensive comparison between the models and experimental data has not been carried out.

  8. Epidemic Propagation In Overlaid Wireless Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Yanmaz, Evsen

    2008-01-01

    Witb tbe emergence of computer worms tbat can spread over air interfaces, wireless ad boc and sensor networks can be vulnerable to node compromises even if the deployed network is not connected to the backbone. Depending on the physical topology of the wireless network, even a single infected node can compromise the whole network. In this work, epidemic (e.g., worm) propagation in a static wireless network is studied, where a number of inCected mobile nodes are injected over the existing network. It is shown that the epidemic spread threshold and size depend on the physical topology of the underlying static wireless network as well as the mobility model employed by the infected mobile nodes. More specifically, results show that in a Cully-connected static wirelessnctwork targeted attacks are more effective, wbereas Cor a random topology random attacks can be sufficient to compromise the whole network.

  9. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation.

    PubMed

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B

    2015-01-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs. PMID:25819404

  10. Safe Laser Beam Propagation for Interplanetary Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Keith E.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-to-space laser uplinks to Earth–orbiting satellites and deep space probes serve both as a beacon and an uplink command channel for deep space probes and Earth-orbiting satellites. An acquisition and tracking point design to support a high bandwidth downlink from a 20-cm optical terminal on an orbiting Mars spacecraft typically calls for 2.5 kW of 1030-nm uplink optical power in 40 micro-radians divergent beams.2 The NOHD (nominal ocular hazard distance) of the 1030nm uplink is in excess of 2E5 km, approximately half the distance to the moon. Recognizing the possible threat of high power laser uplinks to the flying public and to sensitive Earth-orbiting satellites, JPL developed a three-tiered system at its Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) to ensure safe laser beam propagation through navigational and near-Earth space.

  11. Acoustic pulse propagation in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Donald G.; Liu, Lanbo

    2005-04-01

    Experimental measurements conducted in a full-scale artificial village show that complex signatures are formed by multiple reflections and diffractions from buildings along the propagation path. A two-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation running on a personal computer allows this wave interaction to be studied in detail. Time reversal processing to locate a sound source in an urban area is investigated using this simulation method. The results demonstrate that as few as three non-line-of-sight sensors are sufficient to determine the source location, and that errors on the order of a meter in the building or sensor locations still allow the correct source location to be determined. [Work supported by U.S. Army.

  12. Propagation and nucleosynthesis of ultraheavy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giler, M.; Wibig, T.

    1985-01-01

    The observed fluxes of cosmic ray (C.R.) ultraheavy elements depend on their charge and mass spectrum at the sources and on the propagation effects, on the distribution of path lengths traversed by the particles on their way from the sources to the observation point. The effect of different path length distributions (p.l.d.) on the infered source abunances is analyzed. It seems that it is rather difficult to fit a reasonable p.l.d. so that the obtained source spectrum coincides with the Solar System (SS) abundances in more detail. It suggests that the nucleosynthesis conditions for c.r. nuclei may differ from that for SS matter. The nucleosynthesis of ultraheavy elements fitting its parameters to get the c.r. source abundances is calculated. It is shown that it is possible to get a very good agreement between the predicted and the observed source abundance.

  13. Propagation modeling in a manufacturing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell, J.D.; Horn, R.D.; Rader, M.S.; Shourbaji, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Wireless sensors which utilize low power spread spectrum data transmission have significant potential in industrial environments due to low cabling and installation costs. In addition, this technology imposes fewer constraints upon placement due to cable routing, allowing sensors to be installed in areas with poor access. Limitations are imposed on sensor and receiver placement by electromagnetic propagation effects in the industrial environment, including multipath and the presence of absorbing media. This paper explores the electromagnetic analysis of potential wireless sensor applications using commercially available finite element software. In addition, since the applications environment is often at least partially specified in electronic form using computer-aided drafting software, the importation of information from this software is discussed. Both three-dimensional and two-dimensional examples are presented which demonstrate the utility and limitations of the method.

  14. Effective propagation in a perturbed periodic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurel, Agnès; Pagneux, Vincent

    2008-08-01

    In a recent paper [D. Torrent, A. Hakansson, F. Cervera, and J. Sánchez-Dehesa, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 204302 (2006)] inspected the effective parameters of a cluster containing an ensemble of scatterers with a periodic or a weakly disordered arrangement. A small amount of disorder is shown to have a small influence on the characteristics of the acoustic wave propagation with respect to the periodic case. In this Brief Report, we inspect further the effect of a deviation in the scatterer distribution from the periodic distribution. The quasicrystalline approximation is shown to be an efficient tool to quantify this effect. An analytical formula for the effective wave number is obtained in one-dimensional acoustic medium and is compared with the Berryman result in the low-frequency limit. Direct numerical calculations show a good agreement with the analytical predictions.

  15. Effective propagation in a perturbed periodic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Maurel, Agnes; Pagneux, Vincent

    2008-08-01

    In a recent paper [D. Torrent, A. Hakansson, F. Cervera, and J. Sanchez-Dehesa, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 204302 (2006)] inspected the effective parameters of a cluster containing an ensemble of scatterers with a periodic or a weakly disordered arrangement. A small amount of disorder is shown to have a small influence on the characteristics of the acoustic wave propagation with respect to the periodic case. In this Brief Report, we inspect further the effect of a deviation in the scatterer distribution from the periodic distribution. The quasicrystalline approximation is shown to be an efficient tool to quantify this effect. An analytical formula for the effective wave number is obtained in one-dimensional acoustic medium and is compared with the Berryman result in the low-frequency limit. Direct numerical calculations show a good agreement with the analytical predictions.

  16. Quantum propagation in single mode fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joneckis, Lance G.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a theory for quantum light propagation in a single-mode fiber which includes the effects of the Kerr nonlinearity, group-velocity dispersion, and linear loss. The theory reproduces the results of classical self-phase modulation, quantum four-wave mixing, and classical solution physics, within their respective regions of validity. It demonstrates the crucial role played by the Kerr-effect material time constant, in limiting the quantum phase shifts caused by the broadband zero-point fluctuations that accompany any quantized input field. Operator moment equations - approximated, numerically, via a terminated cumulant expansion - are used to obtain results for homodyne-measurement noise spectra when dispersion is negligible. More complicated forms of these equations can be used to incorporate dispersion into the noise calculations.

  17. Quantification and Propagation of Nuclear Data Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rising, Michael E.

    The use of several uncertainty quantification and propagation methodologies is investigated in the context of the prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) uncertainties and its impact on critical reactor assemblies. First, the first-order, linear Kalman filter is used as a nuclear data evaluation and uncertainty quantification tool combining available PFNS experimental data and a modified version of the Los Alamos (LA) model. The experimental covariance matrices, not generally given in the EXFOR database, are computed using the GMA methodology used by the IAEA to establish more appropriate correlations within each experiment. Then, using systematics relating the LA model parameters across a suite of isotopes, the PFNS for both the uranium and plutonium actinides are evaluated leading to a new evaluation including cross-isotope correlations. Next, an alternative evaluation approach, the unified Monte Carlo (UMC) method, is studied for the evaluation of the PFNS for the n(0.5 MeV)+Pu-239 fission reaction and compared to the Kalman filter. The UMC approach to nuclear data evaluation is implemented in a variety of ways to test convergence toward the Kalman filter results and to determine the nonlinearities present in the LA model. Ultimately, the UMC approach is shown to be comparable to the Kalman filter for a realistic data evaluation of the PFNS and is capable of capturing the nonlinearities present in the LA model. Next, the impact that the PFNS uncertainties have on important critical assemblies is investigated. Using the PFNS covariance matrices in the ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data library, the uncertainties of the effective multiplication factor, leakage, and spectral indices of the Lady Godiva and Jezebel critical assemblies are quantified. Using principal component analysis on the PFNS covariance matrices results in needing only 2-3 principal components to retain the PFNS uncertainties. Then, using the polynomial chaos expansion (PCE) on the uncertain output

  18. Robust object tracking using linear neighborhood propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chen; Fu, Keren; Tu, Enmei; Yang, Jie; He, Xiangjian

    2013-01-01

    Object tracking is widely used in many applications such as intelligent surveillance, scene understanding, and behavior analysis. Graph-based semisupervised learning has been introduced to deal with specific tracking problems. However, existing algorithms following this idea solely focus on the pairwise relationship between samples and hence could decrease the classification accuracy for unlabeled samples. On the contrary, we regard tracking as a one-class classification issue and present a novel graph-based semisupervised tracker. The proposed tracker uses linear neighborhood propagation, which aims to exploit the local information around each data point. Moreover, the manifold structure embedded in the whole sample set is discovered to allow the tracker to better model the target appearance, which is crucial to resisting the appearance variations of the object. Experiments on some public-domain sequences show that the proposed tracker can exhibit reliable tracking performance in the presence of partial occlusions, complicated background, and appearance changes, etc.

  19. Wave propagation in a random medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. W.; Harp, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    A simple technique is used to derive statistical characterizations of the perturbations imposed upon a wave (plane, spherical or beamed) propagating through a random medium. The method is essentially physical rather than mathematical, and is probably equivalent to the Rytov method. The limitations of the method are discussed in some detail; in general they are restrictive only for optical paths longer than a few hundred meters, and for paths at the lower microwave frequencies. Situations treated include arbitrary path geometries, finite transmitting and receiving apertures, and anisotropic media. Results include, in addition to the usual statistical quantities, time-lagged functions, mixed functions involving amplitude and phase fluctuations, angle-of-arrival covariances, frequency covariances, and other higher-order quantities.

  20. Meshfree Simulations of Ductile Crack Propagations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaofan; Simonsen, Cerup B.

    2005-03-01

    In this work, a meshfree method is used to simulate ductile crack growth and propagation under finite deformation and large scale yielding conditions. A so-called parametric visibility condition and its related particle splitting procedure have been developed to automatically adapt the evolving strong continuity or fracture configuration due to an arbitrary crack growth in ductile materials. It is shown that the proposed meshfree crack adaption and re-interpolation procedure is versatile in numerical simulations, and it can capture some essential features of ductile fracture and ductile crack surface morphology, such as the rough zig-zag pattern of crack surface and the ductile crack front damage zone, which have been difficult to capture in previous numerical simulations.

  1. Improving the algorithm of temporal relation propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jifeng; Xu, Dan; Liu, Tongming

    2005-03-01

    In the military Multi Agent System, every agent needs to analyze the temporal relationships among the tasks or combat behaviors, and it"s very important to reflect the battlefield situation in time. The temporal relation among agents is usually very complex, and we model it with interval algebra (IA) network. Therefore an efficient temporal reasoning algorithm is vital in battle MAS model. The core of temporal reasoning is path consistency algorithm, an efficient path consistency algorithm is necessary. In this paper we used the Interval Matrix Calculus (IMC) method to represent the temporal relation, and optimized the path consistency algorithm by improving the efficiency of propagation of temporal relation based on the Allen's path consistency algorithm.

  2. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-03-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs.

  3. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  4. Skewon field and cosmic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Wei-Tou

    2014-03-01

    We study the propagation of the Hehl-Obukhov-Rubilar skewon field in weak gravity field/dilute matter or with weak violation of the Einstein Equivalence Principle (EEP), and further classify it into Type I and Type II skewons. From the dispersion relation we show that no dissipation/no amplification condition implies that the additional skewon field must be of Type II. For Type I skewon field, the dissipation/amplification is proportional to the frequency and the CMB spectrum would deviate from Planck spectrum. From the high precision agreement of the CMB spectrum with 2.755 K Planck spectrum, we constrain the Type I cosmic skewon field |χijkl(SkI)| to ⩽ a few ×10-35. The skewon part of constitutive tensor constructed from asymmetric metric is of Type II, hence it is allowed. This study may also be applied to macroscopic electrodynamics in the case of laser pumped medium or dissipative medium.

  5. Isolation, propagation, and analysis of biological nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Linnes, Michael P; Shiekh, Farooq A; Hunter, Larry W; Miller, Virginia M; Lieske, John C

    2011-01-01

    Calcifying biologic nanoparticles (NPs) have been implicated as nucleation points for a number of -pathologic events that include vascular calcification and the formation of kidney stones. In order to study these potential relationships, reproducible isolation of well-characterized biologic NPs is a necessity. Our group has isolated and propagated calcifying NPs from several human tissues and renal stones. Specific proteins that could nucleate a calcium phosphate shell under physiologic conditions have been identified as part of their structure, including elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and fetuin-A. Visualization, using advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunofluorescence microscopy, and nuclear and antibody staining in conjunction with flow cytometry, can further elucidate NPs composition and their role in pathology. In order to allow uniform investigation by others, the isolation, culture, and handling procedures for biologic NPs from human calcified vascular tissue and kidney stones are reported in detail. PMID:21948421

  6. Feynman propagator for spin foam quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Oriti, Daniele

    2005-03-25

    We link the notion causality with the orientation of the spin foam 2-complex. We show that all current spin foam models are orientation independent. Using the technology of evolution kernels for quantum fields on Lie groups, we construct a generalized version of spin foam models, introducing an extra proper time variable. We prove that different ranges of integration for this variable lead to different classes of spin foam models: the usual ones, interpreted as the quantum gravity analogue of the Hadamard function of quantum field theory (QFT) or as inner products between quantum gravity states; and a new class of causal models, the quantum gravity analogue of the Feynman propagator in QFT, nontrivial function of the orientation data, and implying a notion of "timeless ordering".

  7. Propagation and damping of broadband upstream whistlers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlowski, D. S.; Russell, C. T.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.; Thomsen, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that damping rates of upstream whistlers strongly depend on the details of the electron distribution function. Moreover, detailed analysis of Doppler-shift and whistler dispersion relation indicated that upstream whistlers propagate obliquely in a broad band. In this paper we present results of a kinetic calculation of damping lengths of wide-band whistlers using the sum of 7-drifting bi-Maxwellian electron distributions as a best fit to the International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) 1 electron data. For 2 cases, when upstream whistlers are observed, convective damping lengths derived from ISEE magnetic field and ephemeris data are compared with theoretical results. We find that the calculated convective damping lengths are consistent with the data and that upstream whistlers remain marginally stable. We also show that the slope of plasma frame spectra of upstream whistlers, obtained by direct fitting of the observed spectra is between 5 and 7 with a sharp lower frequency cutoff corresponding to a wavelength of about one ion inertial length. When the solar wind velocity is directed largely along the wave normal of the upstream whistlers the polariztion of the right hand waves becomes reversed and low frequencies are switched to high resulting in a peaked spectrum with a strong high frequency cutoff. The overall spectral, wave and particle characteristics, proximity to the shock as well as propagation and damping properties indicate that these waves cannot be generated locally. Instead the observed upstream whistlers arise in the shock ramp most likely by a variety of cross-field drift and/or anisotropy driven instabilities.

  8. Seismic wave propagation in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancredi, Gonzalo; López, Francisco; Gallot, Thomas; Ginares, Alejandro; Ortega, Henry; Sanchís, Johnny; Agriela, Adrián; Weatherley, Dion

    2016-10-01

    Asteroids and small bodies of the Solar System are thought to be agglomerates of irregular boulders, therefore cataloged as granular media. It is a consensus that many asteroids might be considered as rubble or gravel piles.Impacts on their surface could produce seismic waves which propagate in the interior of these bodies, thus causing modifications in the internal distribution of rocks and ejections of particles and dust, resulting in a cometary-type comma.We present experimental and numerical results on the study of propagation of impact-induced seismic waves in granular media, with special focus on behavior changes by increasing compression.For the experiment, we use an acrylic box filled with granular materials such as sand, gravel and glass spheres. Pressure inside the box is controlled by a movable side wall and measured with sensors. Impacts are created on the upper face of the box through a hole, ranging from free-falling spheres to gunshots. We put high-speed cameras outside the box to record the impact as well as piezoelectic sensors and accelerometers placed at several depths in the granular material to detect the seismic wave.Numerical simulations are performed with ESyS-Particle, a software that implements the Discrete Element Method. The experimental setting is reproduced in the numerical simulations using both individual spherical particles and agglomerates of spherical particles shaped as irregular boulders, according to rock models obtained with a 3D scanner. The numerical experiments also reproduces the force loading on one of the wall to vary the pressure inside the box.We are interested in the velocity, attenuation and energy transmission of the waves. These quantities are measured in the experiments and in the simulations. We study the dependance of these three parameters with characteristics like: impact speed, properties of the target material and the pressure in the media.These results are relevant to understand the outcomes of impacts in

  9. Azimuthal Spoke Propagation in Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Brown, Daniel L.; Hofer, Richard R.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Spokes are azimuthally propagating perturbations in the plasma discharge of Hall Effect Thrusters (HETs) that travel in the E x B direction and have been observed in many different systems. The propagation of azimuthal spokes are investigated in a 6 kW HET known as the H6 using ultra-fast imaging and azimuthally spaced probes. A spoke surface is a 2-D plot of azimuthal light intensity evolution over time calculated from 87,500 frames/s videos. The spoke velocity has been determined using three methods with similar results: manual fitting of diagonal lines on the spoke surface, linear cross-correlation between azimuthal locations and an approximated dispersion relation. The spoke velocity for three discharge voltages (300, 400 and 450 V) and three anode mass flow rates (14.7, 19.5 and 25.2 mg/s) yielded spoke velocities between 1500 and 2200 m/s across a range of normalized magnetic field settings. The spoke velocity was inversely dependent on magnetic field strength for low B-field settings and asymptoted at B-field higher values. The velocities and frequencies are compared to standard drifts and plasma waves such as E x B drift, electrostatic ion cyclotron, magnetosonic and various drift waves. The empirically approximated dispersion relation yielded a characteristic velocity that matched the ion acoustic speed for 5 eV electrons that exist in the near-anode and near-field plume regions of the discharge channel based on internal measurements. Thruster performance has been linked to operating mode where thrust-to-power is maximized when azimuthal spokes are present so investigating the underlying mechanism of spokes will benefit thruster operation.

  10. Charge Generation and Propagation in Igneous Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann

    2000-01-01

    Resistivity changes, ground potentials, electromagnetic (EM) and luminous signals prior to or during earthquakes have been reported, in addition to ground uplift and tilt, and to changes in the seismic wave propagation parameters. However, no physical model exists that ties these diverse phenomena together. Through time-resolved impacts experiments it has been observed that, when igneous rocks (gabbro, diorite, granite) are impacted at low velocities (approx. 100 m/sec), highly mobile electronic charge carriers are generated, spreading from a small volume near the impact point, causing electric potentials, EM and light emission. The rock becomes momentarily conductive. When impacted at higher velocities (approx. 1.5 km/sec), the propagation of the P and S waves is registered through the transient piezoelectric response of quartz. At the same time, the rock volume is filled with mobile charge carriers, and a positive surface potential is registered. During the next 1-2 msec the surface potential oscillates, due to electron injection from ground. These observations are consistent with positive holes, e.g. defect electrons in the O(2-) sublattice, that can travel via the O 2p-dominated valence band of the silicate minerals at the speed of a phonon-mediated charge transfer. Before activation, the positive hole charge carriers lay dormant in form of positive hole pairs, PHP, electrically inactive, chemically equivalent to peroxy links in the structures of constituent minerals. PHPs are introduced by way of hydroxyl (O3Si-OH) incorporated into nominally anhydrous minerals when they crystallize in water-laden environments. Given that sound waves of even relatively low intensity appear to cause PHPs dissociation, thus generating mobile positive holes, it is proposed that microfracturing during rock deformation cause PHP dissociation. Depending on where and how much the rock volume is stressed, the positive holes are expected to form fluctuating charge clouds in the

  11. Outdoor propagation analysis of ultrawideband signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavone, Guy A.; Wahid, Parveen; Palaniappan, Ravi; Tracy, Judd; Van Doorn, Eric; Lonske, Benjamin

    2003-08-01

    An ultra wide band (UWB) signal is defined as any radiation in which the 3-dB bandwidth is greater than 25% of the center frequency. UWB signals are characterized by extreme low powers and large bandwidths, which can be used for data, voice and video communication. Since UWB waveforms have very short time duration, they are relatively immune to multi-path cancellation effects. In this paper we test the performance of a simulation to model the propagation of an UWB signal in outdoor forested environment. The simulation uses a combination of Finite Difference Time Domain and ray tracing methods to simulate the UWB wave propagation. The model takes into consideration the dielectric constants of the materials of the trees and measures the signal strength for vertical and horizontal polarizations of the UWB antennas placed at various heights and distances from each other. The results of the simulation are compared to measurements obtained from tests conducted at a wooded area in Seneca Creek State Park, Gaithersburg, Maryland. It was observed that upto 150 ft distance between the transmitter and receiver, the horizontally polarized antenna system gave better signal-to-noise ratio, but at greater distances the vertically polarized antenna system gave a better signal-to-noise ration performance. Three dimensional plots of the signal strengths and the signal-to-noise ratio for various transmitter and receiver distances are plotted for the system. These are compared with experimental results and the simulation closely matched the experimental data. The results of the simulation and measurements will be used for further developing an UWB location and tracking system for outdoor environments.

  12. Uncertainty Propagation in Hypersonic Vehicle Aerothermoelastic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamorte, Nicolas Etienne

    Hypersonic vehicles face a challenging flight environment. The aerothermoelastic analysis of its components requires numerous simplifying approximations. Identifying and quantifying the effect of uncertainties pushes the limits of the existing deterministic models, and is pursued in this work. An uncertainty quantification framework is used to propagate the effects of identified uncertainties on the stability margins and performance of the different systems considered. First, the aeroelastic stability of a typical section representative of a control surface on a hypersonic vehicle is examined. Variability in the uncoupled natural frequencies of the system is modeled to mimic the effect of aerodynamic heating. Next, the stability of an aerodynamically heated panel representing a component of the skin of a generic hypersonic vehicle is considered. Uncertainty in the location of transition from laminar to turbulent flow and the heat flux prediction is quantified using CFD. In both cases significant reductions of the stability margins are observed. A loosely coupled airframe--integrated scramjet engine is considered next. The elongated body and cowl of the engine flow path are subject to harsh aerothermodynamic loading which causes it to deform. Uncertainty associated with deformation prediction is propagated to the engine performance analysis. The cowl deformation is the main contributor to the sensitivity of the propulsion system performance. Finally, a framework for aerothermoelastic stability boundary calculation for hypersonic vehicles using CFD is developed. The usage of CFD enables one to consider different turbulence conditions, laminar or turbulent, and different models of the air mixture, in particular real gas model which accounts for dissociation of molecules at high temperature. The system is found to be sensitive to turbulence modeling as well as the location of the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Real gas effects play a minor role in the

  13. Neutrino propagation in a fluctuating sun

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, C.P.; Michaud, D.

    1997-05-01

    We adapt to neutrino physics a general formulation for particle propagation in fluctuating media, initially developed for applications to electromagnetism and neutron optics. In leading approximation this formalism leads to the usual MSW effective Hamiltonian governing neutrino propagation through a medium. Next-to-leading contributions describe deviations from this description, which arise due to neutrino interactions with fluctuations in the medium. We compute these corrections for two types of fluctuations: (i) microscopic thermal fluctuations and (ii) macroscopic fluctuations in the medium{close_quote}s density. While the first of these reproduces standard estimates, which are negligible for applications to solar neutrinos, we find that the second can be quite large, since it grows in size with the correlation length of the fluctuation. We consider two models in some detail. For fluctuations whose correlations extend only over a local region in space of length l, appreciable effects for MSW oscillations arise if ({delta}n/n){sup 2}l{approx_gt}100m or so. Alternatively, a crude model of helioseismic p-waves gives appreciable effects only when ({delta}n/n){approx_gt}1{percent}. In general the dominant effect is to diminish the quality of the resonance, making the suppression of the {sup 7}Be neutrinos a good experimental probe of fluctuations deep within the sun. Fluctuations can also provide a new mechanism for reducing the solar neutrino flux, giving an energy-independent suppression factor of 1/2 away from the resonant region, even for small vacuum mixing angles. {copyright} 1997 Academic Press, Inc.

  14. Nonperturbative gluon and ghost propagators in d = 3

    SciTech Connect

    Papavassiliou, Joannis

    2011-05-23

    We study the nonperturbative gluon and ghost propagators in d = 3 Yang-Mills, using the Schwinger-Dyson equations of the pinch technique. The use of the Schwinger mechanism leads to the dynamical generation of a gluon mass, which, in turn, gives rise to an infrared finite gluon propagator and ghost dressing function. The propagators obtained are in very good agreement with the results of SU(2) lattice simulations.

  15. Noise-assisted spike propagation in myelinated neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochab-Marcinek, Anna; Schmid, Gerhard; Goychuk, Igor; Hänggi, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We consider noise-assisted spike propagation in myelinated axons within a multicompartment stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley model. The noise originates from a finite number of ion channels in each node of Ranvier. For the subthreshold internodal electric coupling, we show that (i) intrinsic noise removes the sharply defined threshold for spike propagation from node to node and (ii) there exists an optimum number of ion channels which allows for the most efficient signal propagation and it corresponds to the actual physiological values.

  16. Behavior of ultrasounds crossing perfluorocarbon liquids and random propagation times.

    PubMed

    Lacaze, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Random propagation times are able to model waves attenuation and velocity. It is true for electromagnetic waves (light, radar, guided propagation) and also for acoustics and ultrasounds (acoustics for high frequencies). About the latter, it can be shown that stable probability laws are well-fitted for frequencies up to dozens of megahertz in numerous cases. Nowadays, medical applications are performed using propagation through perfluorocarbon (PFC). Experiments were done to measure attenuations and phase changes. Using these results, this paper addresses the question to know if stable probability laws can be used to characterize the propagation of ultrasounds through PFC liquids. PMID:26163738

  17. Against dogma: On superluminal propagation in classical electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherall, James Owen

    2014-11-01

    It is deeply entrenched dogma that relativity theory prohibits superluminal propagation. It is also experimentally well-established that under some circumstances, classical electromagnetic fields propagate through a dielectric medium with superluminal group velocities and superluminal phase velocities. But it is usually claimed that these superluminal velocities do not violate the relativistic prohibition. Here I analyze electromagnetic fields in a dielectric medium within a framework for understanding superluminal propagation recently developed by Geroch (1996, 2011) and elaborated by Earman (2014). I will argue that for some parameter values, electromagnetic fields do propagate superluminally in the Geroch-Earman sense.

  18. Behavior of ultrasounds crossing perfluorocarbon liquids and random propagation times.

    PubMed

    Lacaze, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Random propagation times are able to model waves attenuation and velocity. It is true for electromagnetic waves (light, radar, guided propagation) and also for acoustics and ultrasounds (acoustics for high frequencies). About the latter, it can be shown that stable probability laws are well-fitted for frequencies up to dozens of megahertz in numerous cases. Nowadays, medical applications are performed using propagation through perfluorocarbon (PFC). Experiments were done to measure attenuations and phase changes. Using these results, this paper addresses the question to know if stable probability laws can be used to characterize the propagation of ultrasounds through PFC liquids.

  19. Linear and nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Yu, Ping

    1988-01-01

    The investigation of the acoustic wave propagation theory and numerical implementation for the situation of an isothermal atmosphere is described. A one-dimensional model to validate an asymptotic theory and a 3-D situation to relate to a realistic situation are considered. In addition, nonlinear wave propagation and the numerical treatment are included. It is known that the gravitational effects play a crucial role in the low frequency acoustic wave propagation. They propagate large distances and, as such, the numerical treatment of those problems become difficult in terms of posing boundary conditions which are valid for all frequencies.

  20. Modeling Passive Propagation of Malwares on the WWW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunbo, Liu; Chunfu, Jia

    Web-based malwares host in websites fixedly and download onto user's computers automatically while users browse. This passive propagation pattern is different from that of traditional viruses and worms. A propagation model based on reverse web graph is proposed. In this model, propagation of malwares is analyzed by means of random jump matrix which combines orderness and randomness of user browsing behaviors. Explanatory experiments, which has single or multiple propagation sources respectively, prove the validity of the model. Using this model, people can evaluate the hazardness of specified websites and take corresponding countermeasures.

  1. A Study of Malware Propagation via Online Social Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghani, Mohammad Reza; Nguyen, Uyen Trang

    The popularity of online social networks (OSNs) have attracted malware creators who would use OSNs as a platform to propagate automated worms from one user's computer to another's. On the other hand, the topic of malware propagation in OSNs has only been investigated recently. In this chapter, we discuss recent advances on the topic of malware propagation by way of online social networking. In particular, we present three malware propagation techniques in OSNs, namely cross site scripting (XSS), Trojan and clickjacking types, and their characteristics via analytical models and simulations.

  2. Seismotectonics of mid-ocean ridge propagation in Hess Deep.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Jacqueline S; Tolstoy, Maya; Mutter, John C; Scholz, Christopher H

    2002-11-29

    Hydroacoustic data from the eastern equatorial Pacific reveal low-magnitude seismicity concentrated at the propagating tip of the Galapagos Rise in Hess Deep. The patterns of seismicity and faulting are similar to those observed in the process zone of laboratory-scale propagating tensile cracks. Because the fracture energy required for propagation scales with crack length and process zone size, it follows that ridges can propagate stably in the brittle crust without exceptional resisting forces as proposed by previous models based on linear elastic fracture mechanics.

  3. Proceedings of the Fifteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 15) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. The meeting was organized into three technical sessions. The first session was dedicated to Olympus and ACTS studies and experiments, the second session was focused on the propagation studies and measurements, and the third session covered computer-based propagation model development. In total, sixteen technical papers and some informal contributions were presented. Following NAPEX 15, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) miniworkshop was held on 29 Jun. 1991, to review ACTS propagation activities, with emphasis on ACTS hardware development and experiment planning. Five papers were presented.

  4. Proceedings of the Fourteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 14) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. NAPEX XIV was held on May 11, 1990, at the Balcones Research Centers, University of Texas, Austin, Texas. The meeting was organized into two technical sessions: Satellite (ACTS) and the Olympus Spacecraft, while the second focused on the fixed and mobile satellite propagation studies and experiments. Following NAPEX XIV, the ACTS Miniworkshop was held at the Hotel Driskill, Austin, Texas, on May 12, 1990, to review ACTS propagation activities since the First ACTS Propagation Studies Workshop was held in Santa Monica, California, on November 28 and 29, 1989.

  5. Proceedings of the Twentieth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 20) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) Meeting is convened each year to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications (satcom) industry, academia, and government who have an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation are invited to NAPEX meetings for discussions and exchange of information. The reports delivered at these meetings by program managers and investigators present recent activities and future plans. This forum provides an opportunity for peer discussion of work in progress, timely dissemination of propagation results, and close interaction with the satcom industry.

  6. Propagation and stability of expanding spherical flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomaas, Grunde

    High-fidelity experiments were conducted to determine the laminar flame speeds of various fuels, to define the transition boundaries of both cellular and spiral flame front instabilities that develop over the flame surface, and to determine the cellular flame acceleration constants for outwardly propagating spherical flames in a near-constant pressure environment up to 60 atmospheres. The flame front movement was monitored using schlieren cinematography and recorded with a high-speed digital camera. Experiments were conducted for a wide range of pressures and equivalence ratios to yield flame speed data for acetylene, ethylene, ethane, propylene, propane, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen/carbon monoxide in air. These data were post-processed in order to account for stretch effects, yielding laminar, unstretched flame speeds and Markstein lengths. The results were compared with existing chemical kinetics mechanisms and used to suggest improvements. The instant of transition to cellularity was experimentally determined for various fuels and fuel mixtures and subsequently interpreted on the basis of hydrodynamic and diffusional-thermal instabilities. Experimental results show that the transition Peclet number, Pec = Rc/ℓL, assumes an almost constant value for the near-equidiffusive acetylene and ethylene flames with wide ranges in the mixture stoichiometry, oxygen concentration, and pressure, where Rc is the flame radius at transition and ℓL the laminar flame thickness. However, for the non-equidiffusive hydrogen and propane flames, Pec respectively increases and decreases somewhat linearly with the mixture equivalence ratio. Evaluation of Pec using the theory of Bechtold and Matalon show complete qualitative agreement and satisfactory quantitative agreement, demonstrating the insensitivity of Pec to all system parameters for equidiffusive mixtures, and the dominance of the Markstein number, Ze(Le-1), in destabilization for non-equidiffusive mixtures, where Ze is the

  7. Volcanotectonic earthquakes induced by propagating dikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-04-01

    Volcanotectonic earthquakes are of high frequency and mostly generated by slip on faults. During chamber expansion/contraction earthquakes are distribution in the chamber roof. Following magma-chamber rupture and dike injection, however, earthquakes tend to concentrate around the dike and follow its propagation path, resulting in an earthquake swarm characterised by a number of earthquakes of similar magnitudes. I distinguish between two basic processes by which propagating dikes induce earthquakes. One is due to stress concentration in the process zone at the tip of the dike, the other relates to stresses induced in the walls and surrounding rocks on either side of the dike. As to the first process, some earthquakes generated at the dike tip are related to pure extension fracturing as the tip advances and the dike-path forms. Formation of pure extension fractures normally induces non-double couple earthquakes. There is also shear fracturing in the process zone, however, particularly normal faulting, which produces double-couple earthquakes. The second process relates primarily to slip on existing fractures in the host rock induced by the driving pressure of the propagating dike. Such pressures easily reach 5-20 MPa and induce compressive and shear stresses in the adjacent host rock, which already contains numerous fractures (mainly joints) of different attitudes. In piles of lava flows or sedimentary beds the original joints are primarily vertical and horizontal. Similarly, the contacts between the layers/beds are originally horizontal. As the layers/beds become buried, the joints and contacts become gradually tilted so that the joints and contacts become oblique to the horizontal compressive stress induced by a driving pressure of the (vertical) dike. Also, most of the hexagonal (or pentagonal) columnar joints in the lava flows are, from the beginning, oblique to an intrusive sheet of any attitude. Consequently, the joints and contacts function as potential shear

  8. Wave Propagation in Fractured Anisotropic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, S.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2012-12-01

    Discontinuities such as fractures, joints and faults occur in the Earth's crusts in a variety of rock types. While much theoretical, experimental and computational research have examined seismic wave propagation in fractured isotropic rock, few experimental studies have investigated seismic wave propagation in fractured anisotropic media. The co-existence of fractures and layers can complicate the interpretation of seismic properties because of the discrete guided modes that propagate along or are confined by the fractures. In this study, we use seismic arrays and acoustic wavefront imaging techniques to examine the competing sources of seismic anisotropy from fractures and from layers. Samples with textural anisotropy (100 mm x 100 mm x 100 mm) were fabricated from garolite, an epoxy - cloth laminate, with layer thickness 0f ~ 0.5 mm. Two sets of fractured samples were fabricated: (1) two single fractured samples with one fracture either parallel or (and) perpendicular to layers, and (2) four multi-fractured samples with 5 parallel fractures oriented either parallel, 30 degrees, 60 degrees or perpendicular to the layers. An intact sample containing no fractures was used as a standard orthorhombic medium for reference. Seismic arrays were used on the first set of samples to measure bulk waves and fracture interface waves as a function of stress. The seismic array contained two compressional and five shear-wave source-receiver pairs with a central frequency of 1 MHz. Shear wave transducers were polarized both perpendicular and parallel to the layering as well as to the fracture. Measurements were made for a range of stresses (0.4 - 4MPa). From these measurements it was observed that a fractured layered medium appears more isotropic or anisotropic than the orthorhombic background, depending on the orientation of the fracture relative to layers. The matrix anisotropy was recovered by increasing the normal stress on a fracture (i.e., by closing the fracture). For the

  9. Propagation of gravity waves across the tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, Vera; Spichtinger, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The tropopause region is characterised by strong gradients in various atmospheric quantities that exhibit different properties in the troposphere compared to the stratosphere. The temperature lapse rate typically changes from negative to near-zero values resulting in a strong increase in stability. Accordingly, the buoyancy frequency often undergoes a jump at the tropopause. Analysis of radiosounding data also shows the existence of a strong inversion layer (tropopause inversion layer, TIL) characterised by a strong maximum in buoyancy frequency just above the tropopause, see e.g. Birner et al. (2002). Additionally, the magnitude of the vertical wind shear of the horizontal wind maximizes at the tropopause and the region also exhibits characteristical gradients of trace gases. Vertically propagating gravity waves can be excited in the troposphere by several mechanisms, e.g. by flow over topography (e.g. Durran, 1990), by jets and fronts (for a recent review: Plougonven and Zhang, 1990) or by convection (e.g. Clark et al., 1986). When these waves enter the tropopause region, their properties can be changed drastically by the changing stratification and strong wind shear. Within this work, the EULAG (Eulerian/semi-Lagrangian fluid solver, see e.g. Smolarkiewicz and Margolin, 1997) model is used to investigate the impact of the tropopause on vertically propagating gravity waves excited by flows over topography. The choice of topography (sine-shaped mountains, bell-shaped mountain) along with horizontal wind speed and tropospheric value of buoyancy frequency determine the spectrum of waves (horizontal and vertical wavelengths) that is excited in the tropsphere. In order to analyse how these spectra change for several topographies when a tropopause is present, we investigate different idealized cases in a two-dimensional domain. By varying the vertical profiles of buoyancy frequency (step-wise vs. continuos change, including TIL) and wind shear, the tropopause

  10. Estimation of the propagation characteristics of elastic waves propagating through a partially saturated sand soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, M.; Kawakata, H.; Doi, I.; Takahashi, N.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, landslides due to heavy rain and/or earthquakes have been increasing and severe damage occurred in Japan in some cases (e.g., Chigira et al., 2013, Geomorph.). One of the principle factors activating landslides is groundwater. Continuous measurements of moisture in soil and/or pore pressure are performed to investigate the groundwater behavior. However, such measurements give information on only local behavior of the groundwater. To monitor the state of target slope, it is better to measure signals affected by the behavior of groundwater in a widely surrounding region. The elastic waves propagating through the medium under the target slope are one of candidates of such signals. In this study, we measure propagating waves through a sand soil made in laboratory, injecting water into it from the bottom. We investigate the characteristics of the propagating waves. We drop sand particles in a container (750 mm long, 300 mm wide and 400 mm high) freely and made a sand soil. The sand soil consists of two layers. One is made of larger sand particles (0.2-0.4 mm in diameter) and the other is made of smaller sand particles (0.05-0.2 mm in diameter). The dry density of these sand layers is about 1.45 g/cm3. We install a shaker for generating elastic waves, accelerometers and pore pressure gauges in the sand soil. We apply small voltage steps repeatedly, and we continuously measure elastic waves propagating through the sand soil at a sampling rate of 51.2 ksps for a period including the water injection period. We estimate the spatio-temporal variation in the maximum cross-correlation coefficients and the corresponding time lags, using template waveforms recorded in the initial period as references. The coefficient for the waveforms recorded at the accelerometer attached to the tip of the shaker is almost stable in high values with a slight decrease down to 0.94 in the period when the sand particles around the shaker are considered to become wet. On the other hand

  11. Unified formalism for TE and TM beam propagators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poladian, Leon; Ladouceur, Francois J.

    1998-07-01

    The unification of transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) beam propagation algorithms is made possible through a transformation which converts the wave equation for TM fields in planar waveguides into a form identical to the corresponding TE wave equation. The transformation can be applied to any smoothly varying waveguide. This transformation can be made independently of any paraxial or other approximations. Thus, any TE propagation algorithm can also be applied immediately to TM fields without additional approximations. This includes the classical fast Fourier transform beam propagator, which has not previously been applied successfully to TM propagation. We also specifically develop a Finite Difference Beam Propagation Method that applies to both TE and TM propagation in 1D (planar) geometry. Previous implementations for the TM case involve an approximation that in certain circumstances leads to severe errors (including the totally unphysical occurrence of field amplification). This is the first TM propagator which exactly conserves power. We also investigate the role of the reference background wavenumber (or index) and clarify its role as it is dynamically adapted. The algorithms proposed are easily adaptable to wide-angle beam propagators and to modern transparent boundary conditions. The extension of these ideas to rapidly varying structures (such as Bragg gratings) is also briefly discussed.

  12. Wigner Measure Propagation and Conical Singularity for General Initial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermanian-Kammerer, Clotilde; Gérard, Patrick; Lasser, Caroline

    2013-07-01

    We study the evolution of Wigner measures of a family of solutions of a Schrödinger equation with a scalar potential displaying a conical singularity. Under a genericity assumption, classical trajectories exist and are unique, thus the question of the propagation of Wigner measures along these trajectories becomes relevant. We prove the propagation for general initial data.

  13. Anisotropic propagation of Ca2+ waves in isolated cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Engel, J; Fechner, M; Sowerby, A J; Finch, S A; Stier, A

    1994-01-01

    Digital imaging microscopy of fluor-3 fluorescence was used to study the propagation of intracellular Ca2+ waves in isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes from 17 to 37 degrees C. Ca2+ waves spread in both transverse and longitudinal direction of a myocyte. Transverse propagation was pronounced in waves starting from a focus at the edge of a myocyte and in waves following an irregular, curved path (spiral waves). For the former type of waves, propagation velocities were determined. Both transverse and longitudinal wave components propagated at constant velocity ranging from 30 to 125 micron/s. Myocytes were anisotropic with respect to wave propagation: waves propagated faster in the longitudinal than in the transverse direction. The ratio between longitudinal and transverse velocity increased from 1.30 at 17 degrees C to 1.55 at 37 degrees C. Apparent activation energies for transverse and longitudinal wave propagation were estimated to be -20 kJ/mol, suggesting that these processes are limited by diffusion of Ca2+. Direction-dependent propagation velocities are interpreted to result from the highly ordered structure of the myocytes, especially from the anisotropic arrangement of diffusion obstacles such as myofilaments and mitochondria. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 PMID:8075316

  14. Effects of nonlinear propagation in ultrasound contrast agent imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Meng-Xing; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Eckersley, Robert J

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates two types of nonlinear propagation and their effects on image intensity and contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in contrast ultrasound images. Previous studies have shown that nonlinear propagation can occur when ultrasound travels through tissue and microbubble clouds, making tissue farther down the acoustic path appear brighter in pulse inversion (PI) images, thus reducing CTR. In this study, the effect of nonlinear propagation through tissue or microbubbles on PI image intensity and CTR are compared at low mechanical index. A combination of simulation and experiment with SonoVue microbubbles were performed using a microbubble dynamics model, a laboratory ultrasound system and a clinical prototype scanner. The results show that, close to the bubble resonance frequency, nonlinear propagation through a bubble cloud of a few centimeter thickness with a modest concentration (1:10000 dilution of SonoVue microbubbles) is much more significant than through tissue-mimicking material. Consequently, CTR in regions distal to the imaging probe is greatly reduced for nonlinear propagation through the bubble cloud, with as much as a 12-dB reduction compared with nonlinear propagation through tissue-mimicking material. Both types of nonlinear propagation cause only a small change in bubble PI signals at the bubble resonance frequency. When the driving frequency increases beyond bubble resonance, nonlinear propagation through bubbles is greatly reduced in absolute values. However because of a greater reduction in nonlinear scattering from bubbles at higher frequencies, the corresponding CTR is much lower than that at bubble resonance frequency.

  15. Kink Wave Propagation in Thin Isothermal Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopin, I. P.; Nagorny, I. G.; Nippolainen, E.

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the propagation of kink waves in thin and isothermal expanding flux tubes in cylindrical geometry. By using the method of radial expansion for fluctuating variables we obtained a new kink wave equation. We show that including the radial component of the tube magnetic field leads to cutoff-free propagation of kink waves along thin flux tubes.

  16. Protein classification based on propagation of unrooted binary trees.

    PubMed

    Kocsor, András; Busa-Fekete, Róbert; Pongor, Sándor

    2008-01-01

    We present two efficient network propagation algorithms that operate on a binary tree, i.e., a sparse-edged substitute of an entire similarity network. TreeProp-N is based on passing increments between nodes while TreeProp-E employs propagation to the edges of the tree. Both algorithms improve protein classification efficiency.

  17. Proceedings of the Twelfth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 12)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting was convened on June 9 and 10, 1988. Pilot Field Experiments propagation studies, mobile communication systems, signal fading, communication satellites rain gauge network measurements, atmospheric attenuation studies, optical communication through the atmosphere, and digital beacon receivers were among the topics discussed.

  18. The propagation approach for computing biochemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Henzinger, Thomas A; Mateescu, Maria

    2013-01-01

    We introduce propagation models (PMs), a formalism able to express several kinds of equations that describe the behavior of biochemical reaction networks. Furthermore, we introduce the propagation abstract data type (PADT), which separates concerns regarding different numerical algorithms for the transient analysis of biochemical reaction networks from concerns regarding their implementation, thus allowing for portable and efficient solutions. The state of a propagation abstract data type is given by a vector that assigns mass values to a set of nodes, and its next operator propagates mass values through this set of nodes. We propose an approximate implementation of the next operator, based on threshold abstraction, which propagates only "significant" mass values and thus achieves a compromise between efficiency and accuracy. Finally, we give three use cases for propagation models: the chemical master equation (CME), the reaction rate equation (RRE), and a hybrid method that combines these two equations. These three applications use propagation models in order to propagate probabilities and/or expected values and variances of the model's variables.

  19. A new propagation method for the radial Schroedinger equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, P. L.

    1979-01-01

    A new method for propagating the solution of the radial Schroedinger equation is derived from a Taylor series expansion of the wavefunction and partial re-summation of the infinite series. Truncation of the series yields an approximation to the exact propagator which is applied to a model calculation and found to be highly convergent.

  20. Forecasting the path of a laterally propagating dike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimisson, Elías Rafn; Hooper, Andrew; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn

    2015-12-01

    An important aspect of eruption forecasting is predicting the path of propagating dikes. We show how lateral dike propagation can be forecast using the minimum potential energy principle. We compare theory to observed propagation paths of dikes originating at the Bárðarbunga volcano, Iceland, in 2014 and 1996, by developing a probability distribution for the most likely propagation path. The observed propagation paths agree well with the model prediction. We find that topography is very important for the model, and our preferred forecasting model considers its influence on the potential energy change of the crust and magma. We tested the influence of topography by running the model assuming no topography and found that the path of the 2014 dike could not be hindcasted. The results suggest that lateral dike propagation is governed not only by deviatoric stresses but also by pressure gradients and gravitational potential energy. Furthermore, the model predicts the formation of curved dikes around cone-shaped structures without the assumption of a local deviatoric stress field. We suggest that a likely eruption site for a laterally propagating dike is in topographic lows. The method presented here is simple and computationally feasible. Our results indicate that this kind of a model can be applied to mitigate volcanic hazards in regions where the tectonic setting promotes formation of laterally propagating vertical intrusive sheets.

  1. The OPEX project and standard processing of propagation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brussaard, G.

    1989-05-01

    The Olympus Propagation Package, (OPEX), its mission, and main characteristics, are described. The voluntary participation of experimenters on the OPEX project, and their preparation of detailed handbooks for the design of hardware, data preprocessing and analysis are described. The main characteristics of the standard software developed for propagation data treatment are described.

  2. In-plane propagation of electromagnetic waves in planar metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Changhyun; Rhee, Joo Yull; Kim, Ki Won; Lee, YoungPak

    2016-08-01

    Some planar metamaterials (MMs) or subwavelength antenna/hole arrays have a considerable amount of in-plane propagation when certain conditions are met. In this paper, the in-plane propagation caused by a wave incident on a MM absorber was studied by using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. By using a FDTD simulation, we were able to observe a nonnegligible amount of in-plane propagation after the incident wave had arrived at the surface of the planar structure and gradually decreased propagation of the electromagnetic wave in the planar direction gradually decreased. We performed the FDTD simulation carefully to reproduce valid results and to verify the existence of in-plane propagation. For verification of the in-plane propagation explicitly, Poynting vectors were calculated and visualized inside the dielectric substrate between the metallic back-plate and an array of square patches. We also investigated several different structures with resonators of various shapes and found that the amount of facing edges of adjacent metallic patches critically determined the strength of the in-plane propagation. Through this study, we could establish the basis for the existence of in-plane propagation in MMs.

  3. Error Propagation Made Easy--Or at Least Easier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardenier, George H.; Gui, Feng; Demas, James N.

    2011-01-01

    Complex error propagation is reduced to formula and data entry into a Mathcad worksheet or an Excel spreadsheet. The Mathcad routine uses both symbolic calculus analysis and Monte Carlo methods to propagate errors in a formula of up to four variables. Graphical output is used to clarify the contributions to the final error of each of the…

  4. Graviton propagator from background-independent quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2006-10-13

    We study the graviton propagator in Euclidean loop quantum gravity. We use spin foam, boundary-amplitude, and group-field-theory techniques. We compute a component of the propagator to first order, under some approximations, obtaining the correct large-distance behavior. This indicates a way for deriving conventional spacetime quantities from a background-independent theory.

  5. Teaching Wave Propagation and the Emergence of Viete's Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullerne, J. P.; Goekjian, M. C. Dunn

    2012-01-01

    The well-known result for the frequency of a simple spring-mass system may be combined with elementary concepts like speed = wavelength x frequency to obtain wave propagation speeds for an infinite chain of springs and masses (masses "m" held apart at equilibrium distance "a" by springs of stiffness "gamma"). These propagation speeds are dependent…

  6. Fluid-Mud Gravity Current Propagation through Aquatic Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testik, F. Y.; Yilmaz, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to elucidate the effects of aquatic vegetation on the propagation of constant-flux non-Newtonian gravity currents. The motivation of this study is related to the formation of fluid-mud gravity currents, which exhibit non-Newtonian rheology, in the vegetated coastal zones during shallow-water dredge disposal operations. Although the propagation dynamics and phase transitions of non-Newtonian gravity currents over horizontal bottoms have been previously studied both experimentally and theoretically, the effects of stiff aquatic vegetation on the propagation characteristics have not been studied yet. During its propagation, a gravity current is under the influence of three main forces: inertia, buoyancy and viscous forces. Based upon the balance among these forces, the gravity currents may propagate in three distinct phases: slumping (for constant-volume gravity currents) or jet (for constant-flux gravity currents), inertia-buoyancy and viscous-buoyancy phase. Propagation characteristics of gravity currents differ for each of these phases. Presence of aquatic vegetation, which is typical in shallow coastal waters, disturbs the form and propagation characteristics of the gravity currents. In this present study, the effects of emerged stiff aquatic vegetation (such as the Spartina Alterniflora, also known as smooth cordgrass that exist in salt marshes) on the propagation characteristics of fluid-mud gravity currents are studied experimentally. A laboratory tank (4.3m x 0.25m x 0.5m) is used to generate constant-flux gravity currents that propagate over a 2.0m long perforated plate with stiff plastic rods that simulate emerged stiff aquatic vegetation. Experiments have been conducted with different concentrations of fluid-mud mixtures that are prepared by mixing Kaolinite clay and tap water. In the experiments, different vegetation densities have been considered. For each of the experimental runs with the vegetation, an experimental run without vegetation

  7. Blue-green pulsed propagation through fog.

    PubMed

    Mooradian, G C; Geller, M; Stotts, L B; Stephens, D H; Krautwald, R A

    1979-02-15

    Measurements and analysis of a blue-green pulsed propagation through fog have identified three distinct regions for energy transport. Region I small number of attenuation lengths tau in the path (0 32): the direct beam and the forwardscattered beam have decayed to the point where the diffusion type multiple-scattered radiation is the dominant energy received. This component does not decay exponentially but results in large spatial, angular, and temporal spreading. This paper presents quantitative data on Region II. PMID:20208740

  8. The propagation of uncertainty for humidity calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell-Smith, J.

    2009-12-01

    This paper addresses the international humidity community's need for standardization of methods for propagation of uncertainty associated with humidity generators and for handling uncertainty associated with the reference water vapour-pressure and enhancement-factor equations. The paper outlines uncertainty calculations for the mixing ratio, dew-point temperature and relative humidity output from humidity generators, and in particular considers controlling equations for a theoretical hybrid humidity generator combining single-pressure (1-P), two-pressure (2-P) and two-flow (2-F) principles. Also considered is the case where the humidity generator is used as a stable source with traceability derived from a reference hygrometer, i.e. a dew-point meter, a relative humidity meter or a wet-bulb psychrometer. Most humidity generators in use at national metrology institutes can be considered to be special cases of those considered here and sensitivity coefficients for particular types may be extracted. The ability to account for correlations between input variables and between different instances of the evaluation of the reference equations is discussed. The uncertainty calculation examples presented here are representative of most humidity calculations.

  9. Propagation of a constant velocity fission wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deinert, Mark

    2011-10-01

    The ideal nuclear fuel cycle would require no enrichment, minimize the need fresh uranium, and produce few, if any, transuranic elements. Importantly, the latter goal would be met without the reprocessing. For purely physical reasons, no reactor system or fuel cycle can meet all of these objectives. However, a traveling-wave reactor, if feasible, could come remarkably close. The concept is simple: a large cylinder of natural (or depleted) uranium is subjected to a fast neutron source at one end, the neutrons would transmute the uranium downstream and produce plutonium. If the conditions were right, a self-sustaining fission wave would form, producing yet more neutrons which would breed more plutonium and leave behind little more than short-lived fission products. Numerical studies have shown that fission waves of this type are also possible. We have derived an exact solution for the propagation velocity of a fission wave through fertile material. The results show that these waves fall into a class of traveling wave phenomena that have been encountered in other systems. The solution places a strict conditions on the shapes of the flux, diffusive, and reactive profiles that would be required for such a phenomenon to persist. The results are confirmed numerically.

  10. Production Density Diffusion Equation Propagation and Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Kenji; Amano, Yoshinori

    When we call the production flow to transition elements in the next step in the process of product manufactured one, the production flow is considered to be displaced in the direction of the unit production density. Density and production, as captured from different perspectives, also said production costs per unit of production. However, it is assumed that contributed to the production cost of manufacturing 100 percent. They may not correspond to the physical propagation conditions after each step of the production density, the equations governing the manufacturing process, which is intended to be represented by a single diffusion equation. We can also apply the concept of energy levels in statistical mechanics, production density function, in other words, in statistical mechanics “place” that if you use the world of manufacturing and production term. If the free energy in this production (potential) that are consuming the substance is nothing but the entropy production. That is, productivity is defined as the entropy production has to be. Normally, when we increase the number of production units, the product nears completion at year-end number of units completed and will aim to be delivered to the contractor from the turnover order. However, if you stop at any number of units, that will increase production density over time. Thus, the diffusion does not proceed from that would be irreversible. In other words, the congestion will occur in production. This fact and to report the results of analysis based on real data.

  11. Surface waves propagating on a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Pablo; Aumaître, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    We study the propagation of monochromatic surface waves on a turbulent flow of liquid metal, when the waves are much less energetic than the background flow. Electromagnetic forcing drives quasi-two-dimensional turbulence with strong vertical vorticity. To isolate the surface-wave field, we remove the surface deformation induced by the background turbulent flow using coherent-phase averaging at the wave frequency. We observe a significant increase in wavelength, when the latter is smaller than the forcing length scale. This phenomenon has not been reported before and can be explained by multiple random wave deflections induced by the turbulent velocity gradients. The shift in wavelength thus provides an estimate of the fluctuations in deflection angle. Local measurements of the wave frequency far from the wavemaker do not reveal such systematic behavior, although a small shift is visible. Finally, we quantify the damping enhancement induced by the turbulent flow and compare it to the existing theoretical predictions. Most of them suggest that the damping increases as the square of the Froude number, whereas our experimental data show a linear increase with the Froude number. We interpret this linear relationship as a balance between the time for a wave to cross a turbulent structure and the turbulent mixing time. The larger the ratio of these two times, the more energy is extracted from the wave. We conclude with possible mechanisms for energy exchange.

  12. Propagation of Axially Symmetric Detonation Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Druce, R L; Roeske, F; Souers, P C; Tarver, C M; Chow, C T S; Lee, R S; McGuire, E M; Overturf, G E; Vitello, P A

    2002-06-26

    We have studied the non-ideal propagation of detonation waves in LX-10 and in the insensitive explosive TATB. Explosively-driven, 5.8-mm-diameter, 0.125-mm-thick aluminum flyer plates were used to initiate 38-mm-diameter, hemispherical samples of LX-10 pressed to a density of 1.86 g/cm{sup 3} and of TATB at a density of 1.80 g/cm{sup 3}. The TATB powder was a grade called ultrafine (UFTATB), having an arithmetic mean particle diameter of about 8-10 {micro}m and a specific surface area of about 4.5 m{sup 2}/g. Using PMMA as a transducer, output pressure was measured at 5 discrete points on the booster using a Fabry-Perot velocimeter. Breakout time was measured on a line across the booster with a streak camera. Each of the experimental geometries was calculated using the Ignition and Growth Reactive Flow Model, the JWL++ Model and the Programmed Burn Model. Boosters at both ambient and cold (-20 C and -54 C) temperatures have been experimentally and computationally studied. A comparison of experimental and modeling results is presented.

  13. Synchronization with propagation - The functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rǎsvan, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    The structure represented by one or several oscillators couple to a one-dimensional transmission environment (e.g. a vibrating string in the mechanical case or a lossless transmission line in the electrical case) turned to be attractive for the research in the field of complex structures and/or complex behavior. This is due to the fact that such a structure represents some generalization of various interconnection modes with lumped parameters for the oscillators. On the other hand the lossless and distortionless propagation along transmission lines has generated several research in electrical, thermal, hydro and control engineering leading to the association of some functional differential equations to the basic initial boundary value problems. The present research is performed at the crossroad of the aforementioned directions. We shall associate to the starting models some functional differential equations - in most cases of neutral type - and make use of the general theorems for existence and stability of forced oscillations for functional differential equations. The challenges introduced by the analyzed problems for the general theory are emphasized, together with the implication of the results for various applications.

  14. Propagation phasor approach for holographic image reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Zhang, Yibo; Göröcs, Zoltán; Feizi, Alborz; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    To achieve high-resolution and wide field-of-view, digital holographic imaging techniques need to tackle two major challenges: phase recovery and spatial undersampling. Previously, these challenges were separately addressed using phase retrieval and pixel super-resolution algorithms, which utilize the diversity of different imaging parameters. Although existing holographic imaging methods can achieve large space-bandwidth-products by performing pixel super-resolution and phase retrieval sequentially, they require large amounts of data, which might be a limitation in high-speed or cost-effective imaging applications. Here we report a propagation phasor approach, which for the first time combines phase retrieval and pixel super-resolution into a unified mathematical framework and enables the synthesis of new holographic image reconstruction methods with significantly improved data efficiency. In this approach, twin image and spatial aliasing signals, along with other digital artifacts, are interpreted as noise terms that are modulated by phasors that analytically depend on the lateral displacement between hologram and sensor planes, sample-to-sensor distance, wavelength, and the illumination angle. Compared to previous holographic reconstruction techniques, this new framework results in five- to seven-fold reduced number of raw measurements, while still achieving a competitive resolution and space-bandwidth-product. We also demonstrated the success of this approach by imaging biological specimens including Papanicolaou and blood smears. PMID:26964671

  15. Propagation phasor approach for holographic image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Zhang, Yibo; Göröcs, Zoltán; Feizi, Alborz; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    To achieve high-resolution and wide field-of-view, digital holographic imaging techniques need to tackle two major challenges: phase recovery and spatial undersampling. Previously, these challenges were separately addressed using phase retrieval and pixel super-resolution algorithms, which utilize the diversity of different imaging parameters. Although existing holographic imaging methods can achieve large space-bandwidth-products by performing pixel super-resolution and phase retrieval sequentially, they require large amounts of data, which might be a limitation in high-speed or cost-effective imaging applications. Here we report a propagation phasor approach, which for the first time combines phase retrieval and pixel super-resolution into a unified mathematical framework and enables the synthesis of new holographic image reconstruction methods with significantly improved data efficiency. In this approach, twin image and spatial aliasing signals, along with other digital artifacts, are interpreted as noise terms that are modulated by phasors that analytically depend on the lateral displacement between hologram and sensor planes, sample-to-sensor distance, wavelength, and the illumination angle. Compared to previous holographic reconstruction techniques, this new framework results in five- to seven-fold reduced number of raw measurements, while still achieving a competitive resolution and space-bandwidth-product. We also demonstrated the success of this approach by imaging biological specimens including Papanicolaou and blood smears.

  16. Premixed turbulent flame propagation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, S.; Jagoda, J.; Sujith, R.

    1995-01-01

    To reduce pollutant formation there is, at present, an increased interest in employing premixed fuel/air mixture in combustion devices. It is well known that greater control over local temperature can be achieved with premixed flames and with lean premixed mixtures, significant reduction of pollutants such as NO(x) can be achieved. However, an issue that is still unresolved is the predictability of the flame propagation speed in turbulent premixed mixtures, especially in lean mixtures. Although substantial progress has been made in recent years, there is still no direct verification that flame speeds in turbulent premixed flows are highly predictable in complex flow fields found in realistic combustors. One of the problems associated with experimental verification is the difficulty in obtaining access to all scales of motion in typical high Reynolds number flows, since, such flows contain scales of motion that range from the size of the device to the smallest Kolmogorov scale. The overall objective of this study is to characterize the behavior of turbulent premixed flames at reasonable high Reynolds number, Re(sub L). Of particular interest here is the thin flame limit where the laminar flame thickness is much smaller than the Kolmogorov scale. Thin flames occur in many practical combustion devices and will be numerically studied using a recently developed new formulation that is briefly described.

  17. Chiral symmetry breaking with lattice propagators

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A. C.; Papavassiliou, J.

    2011-01-01

    We study chiral symmetry breaking using the standard gap equation, supplemented with the infrared-finite gluon propagator and ghost dressing function obtained from large-volume lattice simulations. One of the most important ingredients of this analysis is the non-Abelian quark-gluon vertex, which controls the way the ghost sector enters into the gap equation. Specifically, this vertex introduces a numerically crucial dependence on the ghost dressing function and the quark-ghost scattering amplitude. This latter quantity satisfies its own, previously unexplored, dynamical equation, which may be decomposed into individual integral equations for its various form factors. In particular, the scalar form factor is obtained from an approximate version of the 'one-loop dressed' integral equation, and its numerical impact turns out to be rather considerable. The detailed numerical analysis of the resulting gap equation reveals that the constituent quark mass obtained is about 300 MeV, while fermions in the adjoint representation acquire a mass in the range of (750-962) MeV.

  18. Mechanistic Analysis of Glovebox Fire Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, M.T.; McClure, P.R.

    1999-06-13

    Propagation of a fire that originates in a single glovebox to other locations in the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is conceivable only if transport of hot combustion gases to other locations causes ignition of combustible materials elsewhere in the system (i.e., flashover). This paper describes a model developed, using the MELCOR computer code, to calculate the generation and transport of combustion gas mass and energy during postulated glovebox fire accident scenarios. The accident scenarios involved a wide spectrum of glovebox operating and potential fire conditions to determine whether flashover conditions could occur at locations outside the burning glovebox: o A variety of combustible material characteristics was considered (e.g., type, quantity, and combustion properties of combustible material). o A spectrum of safety system operating conditions was considered (e.g., glovebox ventilation system operating normally vs an inoperative exhaust fan; drop-box fir e damper closure vs failure to close). o A range of analytical modeling assumptions was considered (e.g., the extent to which heat transfer between hot combustion gases and the glovebox walls is represented in the model). Example results of these calculations are presented to illustrate the benefits obtained and lessons learned by using a computational tool like MELCOR for this analysis.

  19. Effect of Resolution on Propagating Detonation Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-07-10

    Simulations of the cylinder test are used to illustrate the effect of mesh resolution on a propagating detonation wave. For this study we use the xRage code with the SURF burn model for PBX 9501. The adaptive mesh capability of xRage is used to vary the resolution of the reaction zone. We focus on two key properties: the detonation speed and the cylinder wall velocity. The latter is related to the release isentrope behind the detonation wave. As the reaction zone is refined (2 to 15 cells for cell size of 62 to 8μm), both the detonation speed and final wall velocity change by a small amount; less than 1 per cent. The detonation speed decreases with coarser resolution. Even when the reaction zone is grossly under-resolved (cell size twice the reaction-zone width of the burn model) the wall velocity is within a per cent and the detonation speed is low by only 2 per cent.

  20. Laser beam propagation in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The optical effects of atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of low power laser beams are reviewed in this paper. The optical effects are produced by the temperature fluctuations which result in fluctuations of the refractive index of air. The commonly-used models of index-of-refraction fluctuations are presented. Laser beams experience fluctuations of beam size, beam position, and intensity distribution within the beam due to refractive turbulence. Some of the observed effects are qualitatively explained by treating the turbulent atmosphere as a collection of moving gaseous lenses of various sizes. Analytical results and experimental verifications of the variance, covariance and probability distribution of intensity fluctuations in weak turbulence are presented. For stronger turbulence, a saturation of the optical scintillations is observed. The saturation of scintillations involves a progressive break-up of the beam into multiple patches; the beam loses some of its lateral coherence. Heterodyne systems operating in a turbulent atmosphere experience a loss of heterodyne signal due to the destruction of coherence.