Science.gov

Sample records for hazard classification system

  1. A complete electrical hazard classification system and its application

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Lloyd B; Cartelli, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, NFPA 70E, and relevant OSHA electrical safety standards evolved to address the hazards of 60-Hz power that are faced primarily by electricians, linemen, and others performing facility and utility work. This leaves a substantial gap in the management of electrical hazards in Research and Development (R&D) and specialized high voltage and high power equipment. Examples include lasers, accelerators, capacitor banks, electroplating systems, induction and dielectric heating systems, etc. Although all such systems are fed by 50/60 Hz alternating current (ac) power, we find substantial use of direct current (dc) electrical energy, and the use of capacitors, inductors, batteries, and radiofrequency (RF) power. The electrical hazards of these forms of electricity and their systems are different than for 50160 Hz power. Over the past 10 years there has been an effort to develop a method of classifying all of the electrical hazards found in all types of R&D and utilization equipment. Examples of the variation of these hazards from NFPA 70E include (a) high voltage can be harmless, if the available current is sufficiently low, (b) low voltage can be harmful if the available current/power is high, (c) high voltage capacitor hazards are unique and include severe reflex action, affects on the heart, and tissue damage, and (d) arc flash hazard analysis for dc and capacitor systems are not provided in existing standards. This work has led to a comprehensive electrical hazard classification system that is based on various research conducted over the past 100 years, on analysis of such systems in R&D, and on decades of experience. Initially, national electrical safety codes required the qualified worker only to know the source voltage to determine the shock hazard. Later, as arc flash hazards were understood, the fault current and clearing time were needed. These items are still insufficient to fully characterize all types of

  2. The development of the globally harmonized system (GHS) of classification and labelling of hazardous chemicals.

    PubMed

    Winder, Chris; Azzi, Rola; Wagner, Drew

    2005-10-17

    The hazards of chemicals can be classified using classification criteria that are based on physical, chemical and ecotoxicological endpoints. These criteria may be developed be iteratively, based on scientific or regulatory processes. A number of national and international schemes have been developed over the past 50 years, and some, such as the UN Dangerous Goods system or the EC system for hazardous substances, are in widespread use. However, the unnecessarily complicated multiplicity of existing hazard classifications created much unnecessary confusion at the user level, and a recommendation was made at the 1992 Rio Earth summit to develop a globally harmonized chemical hazard classification and compatible labelling system, including material safety data sheets and easily understandable symbols, that could be used for manufacture, transport, use and disposal of chemical substances. This became the globally harmonized system for the Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). The developmental phase of the GHS is largely complete. Consistent criteria for categorising chemicals according to their toxic, physical, chemical and ecological hazards are now available. Consistent hazard communication tools such as labelling and material safety data sheets are also close to finalisation. The next phase is implementation of the GHS. The Intergovernmental Forum for Chemical Safety recommends that all countries implement the GHS as soon as possible with a view to have the system fully operational by 2008. When the GHS is in place, the world will finally have one system for classification of chemical hazards.

  3. Hazard Classification of Household Chemical Products in Korea according to the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and labeling of Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to review the validity of the need for the application of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) to household chemical products in Korea. The study also aimed to assess the severity of health and environmental hazards of household chemical products using the GHS. Methods 135 products were classified as ‘cleaning agents and polishing agents’ and 98 products were classified as ‘bleaches, disinfectants, and germicides.’ The current status of carcinogenic classification of GHS and carcinogenicity was examined for 272 chemical substances contained in household chemical products by selecting the top 11 products for each of the product categories. In addition, the degree of toxicity was assessed through analysis of whether the standard of the Republic of Korea’s regulations on household chemical products had been exceeded or not. Results According to GHS health and environmental hazards, “acute toxicity (oral)” was found to be the highest for two product groups, ‘cleaning agents and polishing agents’, and ‘bleaches, disinfectants, and germicides’ (result of classification of 233 household chemical products) at 37.8% and 52.0% respectively. In an analysis of carcinogenicity assuming a threshold of IARC 2B for the substances in household chemical products, we found ‘cleaning agents and polishing agents’ to contain 12 chemical substances and ‘bleaches, disinfectants, and germicides’ 11 chemical substances. Conclusion Some of the household chemical products were found to have a high hazard level including acute toxicity and germ cell mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and reproductive toxicity. Establishing a hazard information delivery system including the application of GHS to household chemical products in Korea is urgent as well. PMID:24472347

  4. Early warning, warning or alarm systems for natural hazards? A generic classification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sättele, Martina; Bründl, Michael; Straub, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Early warning, warning and alarm systems have gained popularity in recent years as cost-efficient measures for dangerous natural hazard processes such as floods, storms, rock and snow avalanches, debris flows, rock and ice falls, landslides, flash floods, glacier lake outburst floods, forest fires and even earthquakes. These systems can generate information before an event causes loss of property and life. In this way, they mainly mitigate the overall risk by reducing the presence probability of endangered objects. These systems are typically prototypes tailored to specific project needs. Despite their importance there is no recognised system classification. This contribution classifies warning and alarm systems into three classes: i) threshold systems, ii) expert systems and iii) model-based expert systems. The result is a generic classification, which takes the characteristics of the natural hazard process itself and the related monitoring possibilities into account. The choice of the monitoring parameters directly determines the system's lead time. The classification of 52 active systems moreover revealed typical system characteristics for each system class. i) Threshold systems monitor dynamic process parameters of ongoing events (e.g. water level of a debris flow) and incorporate minor lead times. They have a local geographical coverage and a predefined threshold determines if an alarm is automatically activated to warn endangered objects, authorities and system operators. ii) Expert systems monitor direct changes in the variable disposition (e.g crack opening before a rock avalanche) or trigger events (e.g. heavy rain) at a local scale before the main event starts and thus offer extended lead times. The final alarm decision incorporates human, model and organisational related factors. iii) Model-based expert systems monitor indirect changes in the variable disposition (e.g. snow temperature, height or solar radiation that influence the occurrence probability

  5. A hazard and risk classification system for catastrophic rock slope failures in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, R.; Oppikofer, T.; Anda, E.; Blikra, L. H.; Böhme, M.; Bunkholt, H.; Dahle, H.; Devoli, G.; Eikenæs, O.; Fischer, L.; Harbitz, C. B.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Loew, S.; Yugsi Molina, F. X.

    2012-04-01

    The Geological Survey of Norway carries out systematic geologic mapping of potentially unstable rock slopes in Norway that can cause a catastrophic failure. As catastrophic failure we describe failures that involve substantial fragmentation of the rock mass during run-out and that impact an area larger than that of a rock fall (shadow angle of ca. 28-32° for rock falls). This includes therefore rock slope failures that lead to secondary effects, such as a displacement wave when impacting a water body or damming of a narrow valley. Our systematic mapping revealed more than 280 rock slopes with significant postglacial deformation, which might represent localities of large future rock slope failures. This large number necessitates prioritization of follow-up activities, such as more detailed investigations, periodic monitoring and permanent monitoring and early-warning. In the past hazard and risk were assessed qualitatively for some sites, however, in order to compare sites so that political and financial decisions can be taken, it was necessary to develop a quantitative hazard and risk classification system. A preliminary classification system was presented and discussed with an expert group of Norwegian and international experts and afterwards adapted following their recommendations. This contribution presents the concept of this final hazard and risk classification that should be used in Norway in the upcoming years. Historical experience and possible future rockslide scenarios in Norway indicate that hazard assessment of large rock slope failures must be scenario-based, because intensity of deformation and present displacement rates, as well as the geological structures activated by the sliding rock mass can vary significantly on a given slope. In addition, for each scenario the run-out of the rock mass has to be evaluated. This includes the secondary effects such as generation of displacement waves or landslide damming of valleys with the potential of later

  6. Children's misunderstandings of hazard warning signs in the new globally harmonized system for classification and labeling.

    PubMed

    Latham, Garry; Long, Tony; Devitt, Patric

    2013-12-01

    Accidental chemical poisoning causes more than 35 000 child deaths every year across the world, and it leads to disease, disability, and suffering for many more children. Children's ignorance of dangers and their failure to interpret hazard warning signs as intended contribute significantly to this problem. A new Globally Harmonized System for Classification and Labeling is being implemented internationally with a view to unifying the current multiple and disparate national systems. This study was designed to establish a productive, effective means of teaching the new GHS warning signs to primary school children (aged 7-11 years). A pre-test, post-test, follow-up test design was employed, with a teaching intervention informed by a Delphi survey of expert opinion. Children from one school formed the experimental group (n = 49) and a second school provided a control group (n = 23). Both groups showed a gain in knowledge from pre-test to post-test, the experimental group with a larger gain but which was not statistically significant. However, longer-term retention of knowledge, as shown by the follow-up test, was statistically significantly greater in the experimental group (p = 0.001). The employment of teaching to match children's preferred learning styles, and the use of active learning were found to be related to improved retention of knowledge. Part of the study involved eliciting children's interpretation of standard hazard warning symbols, and this provoked considerable concern over the potential for dangerous misinterpretation with disastrous consequences. This article focuses on the reasons for such misconception and the action required to address this successfully in testing the intervention.

  7. NEC Hazardous classification and compliance regarding the surface moisture monitor measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Bussell, J.H., WHC

    1996-06-12

    The National Electrical Code, NFPA 70, and National Fire Protection Association requirements for use of Surface Moisture Monitor Systems in classified locations are discussed. The design and configuration of the surface moisture monitor are analyzed with respect to how they comply with requirements of the National Electrical Code requirements, articles 500-504.

  8. Evaluation of frameworks for ecotoxicological hazard classification of waste.

    PubMed

    Stiernström, S; Wik, O; Bendz, D

    2016-12-01

    A new harmonized EU regulation for the classification of waste came into effect on 1st June 2015, in which the criteria and assessment methods for the classification of hazardous waste are harmonized with other internationally agreed-upon systems for hazard classification of chemicals (CLP). However, criteria and guidance for the assessment of ecotoxicological hazard (Hazard Property 14, HP14) are still lacking for waste classification. This paper have evaluated and compared two HP14 classification frameworks: (i) a calculation method (summation) for mixtures, and (ii) leaching tests. The two frameworks were evaluated by surveying and evaluating ecotoxicological data for Cu, Zn, K and Ca species in bottom ash from incinerated waste, together with geochemical speciation modelling. Classification based on the summation method proved to be highly sensitive to the choice of speciation and ecotoxicological classification. This results in a wide range of critical concentrations triggering hazardous classification (in particular for Cu and Zn). Important parameters governing the availability of toxic elements, such as transformation from one species to another and complexation on organic or inorganic sorbents, are not accounted for. Geochemical modelling revealed that a testing strategy built on CLP based leaching tests (liquid/solid ratio (L/S)⩾10,000, pH range 5.5-8.5) avoids bias and is superior to the summation method with respect to both precision and accuracy. A testing strategy built on leaching tests, designed for risk assessment purposes, (L/S ratio of 10, natural pH of the ash) severely underestimate the hazard associated with the presence of toxic compounds (Cu and Zn), while simultaneously falsely indicate a hazardousness due to the presence of non-toxic compounds (Ca and K). However, the testing methods adopted by CLP are problematic from a practical and functional point of view. To conclude, the L/S ratio and pH were found to be critical for hazard

  9. Hazard interaction analysis for multi-hazard risk assessment: a systematic classification based on hazard-forming environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Siu, Y. L.; Mitchell, G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper develops a systematic hazard interaction classification based on the geophysical environment that natural hazards arise from - the hazard-forming environment. According to their contribution to natural hazards, geophysical environmental factors in the hazard-forming environment were categorized into two types. The first are relatively stable factors which construct the precondition for the occurrence of natural hazards, whilst the second are trigger factors, which determine the frequency and magnitude of hazards. Different combinations of geophysical environmental factors induce different hazards. Based on these geophysical environmental factors for some major hazards, the stable factors are used to identify which kinds of natural hazards influence a given area, and trigger factors are used to classify the relationships between these hazards into four types: independent, mutex, parallel and series relationships. This classification helps to ensure all possible hazard interactions among different hazards are considered in multi-hazard risk assessment. This can effectively fill the gap in current multi-hazard risk assessment methods which to date only consider domino effects. In addition, based on this classification, the probability and magnitude of multiple interacting natural hazards occurring together can be calculated. Hence, the developed hazard interaction classification provides a useful tool to facilitate improved multi-hazard risk assessment.

  10. Hazard interaction analysis for multi-hazard risk assessment: a systematic classification based on hazard-forming environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baoyin; Siu, Yim Ling; Mitchell, Gordon

    2016-03-01

    This paper develops a systematic hazard interaction classification based on the geophysical environment that natural hazards arise from - the hazard-forming environment. According to their contribution to natural hazards, geophysical environmental factors in the hazard-forming environment were categorized into two types. The first are relatively stable factors which construct the precondition for the occurrence of natural hazards, whilst the second are trigger factors, which determine the frequency and magnitude of hazards. Different combinations of geophysical environmental factors induce different hazards. Based on these geophysical environmental factors for some major hazards, the stable factors are used to identify which kinds of natural hazards influence a given area, and trigger factors are used to classify the relationships between these hazards into four types: independent, mutex, parallel and series relationships. This classification helps to ensure all possible hazard interactions among different hazards are considered in multi-hazard risk assessment. This can effectively fill the gap in current multi-hazard risk assessment methods which to date only consider domino effects. In addition, based on this classification, the probability and magnitude of multiple interacting natural hazards occurring together can be calculated. Hence, the developed hazard interaction classification provides a useful tool to facilitate improved multi-hazard risk assessment.

  11. Hazardous Waste Manifest System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA’s hazardous waste manifest system is designed to track hazardous waste from the time it leaves the generator facility where it was produced, until it reaches the off-site waste management facility that will store, treat, or dispose of the waste.

  12. 42 CFR 84.52 - Respiratory hazards; classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Respiratory hazards; classification. 84.52 Section... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Classification of Approved Respirators; Scope of Approval; Atmospheric Hazards; Service Time § 84.52...

  13. 42 CFR 84.52 - Respiratory hazards; classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Respiratory hazards; classification. 84.52 Section... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Classification of Approved Respirators; Scope of Approval; Atmospheric Hazards; Service Time § 84.52...

  14. 42 CFR 84.52 - Respiratory hazards; classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Respiratory hazards; classification. 84.52 Section... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Classification of Approved Respirators; Scope of Approval; Atmospheric Hazards; Service Time § 84.52...

  15. 42 CFR 84.52 - Respiratory hazards; classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Respiratory hazards; classification. 84.52 Section... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Classification of Approved Respirators; Scope of Approval; Atmospheric Hazards; Service Time § 84.52...

  16. Assessment of the MC3608 detonator shipping package hazard classification

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.B.

    1981-08-07

    An investigation was made to determine whether the MC 3608 Detonator should be assigned a DOT hazard classification of Detonating Fuze, Class C Explosive, per 49 CFR 173.113. This study covers the propagation test as approved by DOE-Albuquerque Operations Office. Analysis of the test data led to the recommended hazard classification of Detonating Fuze, Class C Explosive.

  17. 42 CFR 84.52 - Respiratory hazards; classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respiratory hazards; classification. 84.52 Section... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Classification of Approved Respirators; Scope of Approval; Atmospheric Hazards; Service Time § 84.52...

  18. Hazard categorization and classification for the sodium storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Van Keuren, J.C.

    1994-08-30

    The Sodium Storage Facility is planned to be constructed in the 400 area for long term storage of sodium from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). It will contain four large sodium storage tanks. Three of the tanks have a capacity of 80,000 gallons of sodium each, and the fourth will hold 52,500 gallons. The tanks will be connected by piping with each other and to the FFTF. Sodium from the FFTF primary and secondary Heat Transport Systems (HTS), Interim Decay Storage (IDS), and the Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) will be transferred to the facility, and stored there in a frozen state pending final disposition. A Hazard Classification has been performed in order to evaluate the potential toxic consequences of a sodium fire according to the provisions of DOE Order 5481.1B. The conclusion of these evaluations is that the Sodium Storage Facility meets the requirements of the lowest Hazard Category, i.e., radiological facility, and the Hazard Classification is recommended to be moderate.

  19. Hazard classification assessment for the MC3423 detonator shipping package

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.B.

    1981-11-05

    An investigation was made to determine whether the MC3423 detonator should be assigned a DOT hazard classification of Detonating Fuze, Class C Explosive, per Federal Register 49 CFR 173.113, when packaged as specified. This study covers two propagation tests which evaluated the effects of two orientations of the MC3423 in its shipping tray. The method of testing was approved by DOE, Albuquerque Operations Office. Test data led to the recommended hazard classification of Detonating Fuze, Class C Explosive for both orientations of the detonator.

  20. The impact of REACH on classification for human health hazards.

    PubMed

    Oltmanns, J; Bunke, D; Jenseit, W; Heidorn, C

    2014-11-01

    The REACH Regulation represents a major piece of chemical legislation in the EU and requires manufacturers and importers of chemicals to assess the safety of their substances. The classification of substances for their hazards is one of the crucial elements in this process. We analysed the effect of REACH on classification for human health endpoints by comparing information from REACH registration dossiers with legally binding, harmonised classifications. The analysis included 142 chemicals produced at very high tonnages in the EU, the majority of which have already been assessed in the past. Of 20 substances lacking a harmonised classification, 12 chemicals were classified in REACH registration dossiers. More importantly, 37 substances with harmonised classifications for human health endpoints had stricter classifications in registration dossiers and 29 of these were classified for at least one additional endpoint not covered by the harmonised classification. Substance-specific analyses suggest that one third of these additional endpoints emerged from experimental studies performed to fulfil information requirements under REACH, while two thirds resulted from a new assessment of pre-REACH studies. We conclude that REACH leads to an improved hazard characterisation even for substances with a potentially good data basis.

  1. Risk-Based Prioritization Method for the Classification of Groundwater Pollution from Hazardous Waste Landfills.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Jiang, Yong-Hai; Lian, Xin-Ying; Xi, Bei-Dou; Ma, Zhi-Fei; Xu, Xiang-Jian; An, Da

    2016-12-01

    Hazardous waste landfill sites are a significant source of groundwater pollution. To ensure that these landfills with a significantly high risk of groundwater contamination are properly managed, a risk-based ranking method related to groundwater contamination is needed. In this research, a risk-based prioritization method for the classification of groundwater pollution from hazardous waste landfills was established. The method encompasses five phases, including risk pre-screening, indicator selection, characterization, classification and, lastly, validation. In the risk ranking index system employed here, 14 indicators involving hazardous waste landfills and migration in the vadose zone as well as aquifer were selected. The boundary of each indicator was determined by K-means cluster analysis and the weight of each indicator was calculated by principal component analysis. These methods were applied to 37 hazardous waste landfills in China. The result showed that the risk for groundwater contamination from hazardous waste landfills could be ranked into three classes from low to high risk. In all, 62.2 % of the hazardous waste landfill sites were classified in the low and medium risk classes. The process simulation method and standardized anomalies were used to validate the result of risk ranking; the results were consistent with the simulated results related to the characteristics of contamination. The risk ranking method was feasible, valid and can provide reference data related to risk management for groundwater contamination at hazardous waste landfill sites.

  2. Risk-Based Prioritization Method for the Classification of Groundwater Pollution from Hazardous Waste Landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu; Jiang, Yong-Hai; lian, Xin-Ying; Xi, Bei-Dou; Ma, Zhi-fei; Xu, Xiang-Jian; An, Da

    2016-12-01

    Hazardous waste landfill sites are a significant source of groundwater pollution. To ensure that these landfills with a significantly high risk of groundwater contamination are properly managed, a risk-based ranking method related to groundwater contamination is needed. In this research, a risk-based prioritization method for the classification of groundwater pollution from hazardous waste landfills was established. The method encompasses five phases, including risk pre-screening, indicator selection, characterization, classification and, lastly, validation. In the risk ranking index system employed here, 14 indicators involving hazardous waste landfills and migration in the vadose zone as well as aquifer were selected. The boundary of each indicator was determined by K-means cluster analysis and the weight of each indicator was calculated by principal component analysis. These methods were applied to 37 hazardous waste landfills in China. The result showed that the risk for groundwater contamination from hazardous waste landfills could be ranked into three classes from low to high risk. In all, 62.2 % of the hazardous waste landfill sites were classified in the low and medium risk classes. The process simulation method and standardized anomalies were used to validate the result of risk ranking; the results were consistent with the simulated results related to the characteristics of contamination. The risk ranking method was feasible, valid and can provide reference data related to risk management for groundwater contamination at hazardous waste landfill sites.

  3. Classifications of fluid systems

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Descriptions of fluid-system classifications, product functions and source companies are listed on these pages. System descriptions and product definitions have been kept as simple as possible and, wherever practical, reflect general industry practice and terminology consistent with descriptions adopted by the American Petroleum Institute (API) and the International Association of Drilling Contractors (IADC). Nine distinct fluid systems are defined, with the first six being water-based. Next are oil- and synthetic-based systems, along with the last, which consists of air, mist, foam or gas as the circulating medium. All chemicals and fluid systems listed in these tables are designed for use in drilling, completion and workover operations.

  4. 49 CFR 173.2a - Classification of a material having more than one hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Classification of a material having more than one... having more than one hazard. (a) Classification of a material having more than one hazard. Except as... meets the definition of more than one hazard class or division as defined in this part, shall be...

  5. 49 CFR 173.2a - Classification of a material having more than one hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Classification of a material having more than one... having more than one hazard. (a) Classification of a material having more than one hazard. Except as... meets the definition of more than one hazard class or division as defined in this part, shall be...

  6. Using fewer animals to identify chemical eye hazards: revised criteria necessary to maintain equivalent hazard classification.

    PubMed

    Haseman, Joseph K; Allen, David G; Lipscomb, Elizabeth A; Truax, James F; Stokes, William S

    2011-10-01

    U.S. Federal Hazardous Substances Act (FHSA) regulations specify eye safety testing procedures and hazard classification criteria for substances regulated by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). Current regulations require up to three sequential 6-animal tests. Testing consistent with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline for eye irritation/corrosion, which specifies 3 animals, can also be submitted to US agencies. However, current FHSA regulations do not provide criteria to classify results from 3-animal tests. An analysis was conducted to determine criteria using results from 3-animal tests that would provide equivalent labeling to FHSA regulations. The frequency that FHSA requirements identify substances as ocular irritants was compared with the frequency that a criterion of either ≥ 1/3 or ≥ 2/3 positive animals would identify these substances. A database of rabbit eye tests was also used to estimate over- and underprediction rates for each criterion. In each instance, a criterion of ≥ 1/3 positive animals more closely matched the expected outcome based on FHSA requirements, while a criterion of ≥ 2/3 positive animals identified far fewer irritants. Using a classification criterion of ≥ 1/3 positive animals provided equivalent or greater eye hazard labeling as current FHSA requirements, while using 50-83% fewer animals.

  7. Pyrotechnic hazards classification and evaluation program. Phase 3, segments 1-4: Investigation of sensitivity test methods and procedures for pyrotechnic hazards evaluation and classification, part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The findings, conclusions, and recommendations relative to the investigations conducted to evaluate tests for classifying pyrotechnic materials and end items as to their hazard potential are presented. Information required to establish an applicable means of determining the potential hazards of pyrotechnics is described. Hazard evaluations are based on the peak overpressure or impulse resulting from the explosion as a function of distance from the source. Other hazard classification tests include dust ignition sensitivity, impact ignition sensitivity, spark ignition sensitivity, and differential thermal analysis.

  8. Neuromuscular disease classification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, Aurora; Acha, Begoña; Montero-Sánchez, Adoración; Rivas, Eloy; Escudero, Luis M.; Serrano, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    Diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases is based on subjective visual assessment of biopsies from patients by the pathologist specialist. A system for objective analysis and classification of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies through muscle biopsy images of fluorescence microscopy is presented. The procedure starts with an accurate segmentation of the muscle fibers using mathematical morphology and a watershed transform. A feature extraction step is carried out in two parts: 24 features that pathologists take into account to diagnose the diseases and 58 structural features that the human eye cannot see, based on the assumption that the biopsy is considered as a graph, where the nodes are represented by each fiber, and two nodes are connected if two fibers are adjacent. A feature selection using sequential forward selection and sequential backward selection methods, a classification using a Fuzzy ARTMAP neural network, and a study of grading the severity are performed on these two sets of features. A database consisting of 91 images was used: 71 images for the training step and 20 as the test. A classification error of 0% was obtained. It is concluded that the addition of features undetectable by the human visual inspection improves the categorization of atrophic patterns.

  9. A new approach to the hazard classification of alloys based on transformation/dissolution.

    PubMed

    Skeaff, James M; Hardy, David J; King, Pierrette

    2008-01-01

    Most of the metals produced for commercial application enter into service as alloys which, together with metals and all other chemicals in commerce, are subject to a hazard identification and classification initiative now being implemented in a number of jurisdictions worldwide, including the European Union Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) initiative, effective 1 June 2007. This initiative has considerable implications for environmental protection and market access. While a method for the hazard identification and classification of metals is available in the recently developed United Nations (UN) guidance document on the Globally Harmonized System of Hazard Classification and Labelling (GHS), an approach for alloys has yet to be formulated. Within the GHS, a transformation/dissolution protocol (T/ DP) for metals and sparingly soluble metal compounds is provided as a standard laboratory method for measuring the rate and extent of the release of metals into aqueous media from metal-bearing substances. By comparison with ecotoxicity reference data, T/D data can be used to derive UN GHS classification proposals. In this study we applied the T/DP for the 1st time to several economically important metals and alloys: iron powder, nickel powder, copper powder, and the alloys Fe-2Cu-0.6C (copper = 2%, carbon = 0.6%), Fe-2Ni-0.6C, Stainless Steel 304, Monel, brass, Inconel, and nickel-silver. The iron and copper powders and the iron and nickel powders had been sintered to produce the Fe-2Me-0.6C (Me = copper or nickel) alloys which made them essentially resistant to reaction with the aqueous media, so they would not classify under the GHS, although their component copper and nickel metal powders would. Forming a protective passivating film, chromium in the Stainless Steel 304 and Inconel alloys protected them from reaction with the aqueous media, so that their metal releases were minimal and would not result in GHS classification

  10. Rock slope instabilities in Norway: First systematic hazard and risk classification of 22 unstable rock slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Martina; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Oppikofer, Thierry; Penna, Ivanna

    2016-04-01

    Unstable rock slopes that can cause large failures of the rock-avalanche type have been mapped in Norway for almost two decades. Four sites have earlier been characterized as high-risk objects based on expertise of few researchers. This resulted in installing continuous monitoring systems and set-up of an early-warning system for those four sites. Other unstable rock slopes have not been ranked related to their hazard or risk. There are ca. 300 other sites known of which 70 sites were installed for periodic deformation measurements using multiple techniques (Global Navigation Satellite Systems, extensometers, measurement bolts, and others). In 2012 a systematic hazard and risk classification system for unstable rock slopes was established in Norway and the mapping approach adapted to that in 2013. Now, the first 22 sites were classified for hazard, consequences and risk using this classification system. The selection of the first group of sites to be classified was based on an assumed high hazard or risk and importance given to the sites by Norwegian media and the public. Nine of the classified 22 unstable rock slopes are large sites that deform inhomogeneously or are strongly broken up in individual blocks. This suggests that different failure scenarios are possible that need to be analyzed individually. A total of 35 failure scenarios for those nine unstable rock slopes were considered. The hazard analyses were based on 9 geological parameters defined in the classification system. The classification system will be presented based on the Gamanjunni unstable rock slope. This slope has a well developed back scarp that exposes 150 m preceding displacement. The lateral limits of the unstable slope are clearly visible in the morphology and InSAR displacement data. There have been no single structures observed that allow sliding kinematically. The lower extend of the displacing rock mass is clearly defined in InSAR data and by a zone of higher rock fall activity. Yearly

  11. 7 CFR Appendix A to Subpart E of... - Hazard Potential Classification for Civil Works Projects

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazard Potential Classification for Civil Works... (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES... Subpart E of Part 1724—Hazard Potential Classification for Civil Works Projects The source for...

  12. Aircraft Operations Classification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlow, Charles; Zhu, Weihong

    2001-01-01

    Accurate data is important in the aviation planning process. In this project we consider systems for measuring aircraft activity at airports. This would include determining the type of aircraft such as jet, helicopter, single engine, and multiengine propeller. Some of the issues involved in deploying technologies for monitoring aircraft operations are cost, reliability, and accuracy. In addition, the system must be field portable and acceptable at airports. A comparison of technologies was conducted and it was decided that an aircraft monitoring system should be based upon acoustic technology. A multimedia relational database was established for the study. The information contained in the database consists of airport information, runway information, acoustic records, photographic records, a description of the event (takeoff, landing), aircraft type, and environmental information. We extracted features from the time signal and the frequency content of the signal. A multi-layer feed-forward neural network was chosen as the classifier. Training and testing results were obtained. We were able to obtain classification results of over 90 percent for training and testing for takeoff events.

  13. Chapter 3: Simulating fire hazard across landscapes through time: integrating state-and-transition models with the Fuel Characteristic Classification System

    Treesearch

    Jessica E. Halofsky; Stephanie K. Hart; Miles A. Hemstrom; Joshua S. Halofsky; Morris C. Johnson

    2014-01-01

    Information on the effects of management activities such as fuel reduction treatments and of processes such as vegetation growth and disturbance on fire hazard can help land managers prioritize treatments across a landscape to best meet management goals. State-and-transition models (STMs) allow landscape-scale simulations that incorporate effects of succession,...

  14. Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Brenda; Lamb, Rynn M.

    2015-07-09

    When emergencies occur, first responders and disaster response teams often need rapid access to aerial photography and satellite imagery that is acquired before and after the event. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS) provides quick and easy access to pre- and post-event imagery and geospatial datasets that support emergency response and recovery operations. The HDDS provides a single, consolidated point-of-entry and distribution system for USGS-hosted remotely sensed imagery and other geospatial datasets related to an event response. The data delivery services are provided through an interactive map-based interface that allows emergency response personnel to rapidly select and download pre-event ("baseline") and post-event emergency response imagery.

  15. The hazard and risk classification for large unstable rock slopes in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, R. L.; Oppikofer, T.; Anda, E.; Berg, H.; Blikra, L. H.; Böhme, M.; Bunkholt, H.; Crosta, G. B.; Dahle, H.; Fischer, L.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Loew, S.; Yugsi Molina, F. X.

    2012-12-01

    Catastrophic failure of large rock slopes led several times per century in Norway to rock avalanches or large rock falls, which impacted into settlements directly but also caused either a displacement wave when impacting a water body or damming of narrow valleys that impacred settlements in distance with often deadly consequences. Such events will also occur in future. In order to make mitigation of the negative consequences of such events possible, the Geological Survey of Norway (NGU) following its obligation towards society and the Norwegian Water and Energy Directorate (NVE) carries out systematic geologic mapping of potentially unstable rock slopes that might fail catastrophically. Within the last years systematic mapping in only three of the 17 counties of Norway has revealed more than 300 sites of potential future rock slope failures. This number necessitates prioritization of follow-up activities, such as periodic and permanent monitoring and early-warning. This quantitative hazard and risk classification system was build to compare sites so that political and financial decisions can be taken. The classification system is scenario-based as intensity and rate of displacement, as well as the geological structures activated by the sliding rock mass vary significantly on slopes. In addition, for each scenario the secondary effects, such as generation of displacement waves or landslide damming of valleys with the potential of later outburst floods, have to be evaluated. The hazard classification is based on two sets of criteria: 1) Structural site investigations including analysis of the development of the back-scarp, lateral limits and basal sliding surface. This includes a kinematic analysis that tests if rock sliding or toppling is kinematically feasible with respect to the slope orientation, the persistence of main structures and the morphologic expression of the sliding surface. 2) The analysis of the activity of the slope is primarily based on the slide

  16. Rocket propulsion hazard summary: Safety classification, handling experience and application to space shuttle payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennington, D. F.; Man, T.; Persons, B.

    1977-01-01

    The DOT classification for transportation, the military classification for quantity distance, and hazard compatibility grouping used to regulate the transportation and storage of explosives are presented along with a discussion of tests used in determining sensitivity of propellants to an impact/shock environment in the absence of a large explosive donor. The safety procedures and requirements of a Scout launch vehicle, Western and Eastern Test Range, and the Minuteman, Delta, and Poseidon programs are reviewed and summarized. Requirements of the space transportation system safety program include safety reviews from the subsystem level to the completed payload. The Scout safety procedures will satisfy a portion of these requirements but additional procedures need to be implemented to comply with the safety requirements for Shuttle operation from the Eastern Test Range.

  17. Hazard ranking systems for chemical wastes and chemical waste sites. Hazardous waste ranking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, R.D.; Parker, F.L.; Crutcher, M.R.

    1991-12-31

    Hazardous materials and substances have always existed in the environment. Mankind has evolved to live with some degree of exposure to toxic materials. Until recently the risk has been from natural toxins or natural background radiation. While rapid technological advances over the past few decades have improved the lifestyle of our society, they have also dramatically increased the availability, volume and types of synthetic and natural hazardous materials. Many of their effects are as yet uncertain. Products and manufacturing by-products that no longer serve a useful purpose are deemed wastes. For some waste products land disposal will always be their ultimate fate. Hazardous substances are often included in the waste products. One needs to classify wastes by degree of hazard (risk). Risk (degree of probability of loss) is usually defined for risk assessment as probability of an occurrence times the consequences of the occurrence. Perhaps even more important than the definition of risk is the choice of a risk management strategy. The choice of strategy will be strongly influenced by the decision criteria used. Those decision criteria could be utility (the greatest happiness of the greatest number), rights or technology based or some combination of the three. It is necessary to make such choices about the definition of risks and criteria for management. It is clear that these are social (i.e., political) and value choices and science has little to say on this matter. This is another example of what Alvin Weinberg has named Transcience where the subject matter is scientific and technical but the choices are social, political and moral. This paper shall deal only with the scientific and technical aspects of the hazardous waste problem to create a hazardous substances classification system.

  18. CLASSIFICATION FRAMEWORK FOR COASTAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Classification Framework for Coastal Systems. EPA/600/R-04/061. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Atlantic Ecology Division, Narragansett, RI, Gulf Ecology Division, Gulf Bree...

  19. CLASSIFICATION FRAMEWORK FOR COASTAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Classification Framework for Coastal Systems. EPA/600/R-04/061. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Atlantic Ecology Division, Narragansett, RI, Gulf Ecology Division, Gulf Bree...

  20. Radiological hazard classification of DOE facilities by DOE STD-1027-92: LANL nuclear facility list

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Los Alamos facilities containing significant radiological hazards have been reclassified according to DOE-SID 1027-92, a recently issued guide for hazard classification. DOE-STD 1027-92 was provided in support of DOE Order 5480.23 to identify which facilities would be governed under DOE 5480.23 requirements; these would presumably be called nuclear facilities. This new classification has affected the original list of 18 LANL nuclear facilities by increasing it to 39. It has also lowered the classification of TA-55-4, the plutonium processing facility containing highest intrinsic hazard at LANL, from the highest classification to an intermediate classification. This presentation addresses the impact of these changes in the nuclear facility list in the areas of radiological health, safety analysis documentation, and risk management.

  1. Radiological hazard classification of DOE facilities by DOE STD-1027-92: LANL nuclear facility list

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    Los Alamos facilities containing significant radiological hazards have been reclassified according to DOE-SID 1027-92, a recently issued guide for hazard classification. DOE-STD 1027-92 was provided in support of DOE Order 5480.23 to identify which facilities would be governed under DOE 5480.23 requirements; these would presumably be called nuclear facilities. This new classification has affected the original list of 18 LANL nuclear facilities by increasing it to 39. It has also lowered the classification of TA-55-4, the plutonium processing facility containing highest intrinsic hazard at LANL, from the highest classification to an intermediate classification. This presentation addresses the impact of these changes in the nuclear facility list in the areas of radiological health, safety analysis documentation, and risk management.

  2. Seismic event classification system

    DOEpatents

    Dowla, F.U.; Jarpe, S.P.; Maurer, W.

    1994-12-13

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities. 21 figures.

  3. Seismic event classification system

    DOEpatents

    Dowla, Farid U.; Jarpe, Stephen P.; Maurer, William

    1994-01-01

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

  4. Transformation/dissolution characteristics of a nickel matte and nickel concentrates for acute and chronic hazard classification.

    PubMed

    Skeaff, James M; Beaudoin, Robert

    2015-01-01

    For the purposes of aquatic hazard classification under the United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification (UNGHS), we have examined the transformation/dissolution (T/D) characteristics of a Ni matte and 4 Ni concentrates at pH 6 using the United Nations (UN) Transformation/Dissolution Protocol (T/DP) for metals and sparingly soluble metal compounds. Among the analytes Ni, Co, and Cu, Ni was released into the T/D solutions in the highest concentrations and was thus the main driver in establishing the hazard classification. We applied an extrapolation-scaling approach to obtain concentrations of total dissolved Ni at low loadings of 0.1 and 0.01 mg/L for derivation of chronic classification outcomes in the European Union (EU) classification, labeling, and packaging (CLP) scheme. The T/D data would classify the Ni matte as Acute 2-Chronic 2 under the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) scheme, and Chronic 1 under the EU CLP. Three of the 4 Ni concentrates would classify as GHS Acute 2-Chronic 2 and EU CLP Chronic 2, whereas the 4th would classify as GHS Acute 3-Chronic 3 and EU CLP Chronic 3. In applying the critical surface area (CSA) approach to the Ni concentrates, acute and chronic hazard classification outcomes were the same as those derived from direct application of the T/D data to the GHS and EU schemes. Such agreement provided confidence that the CSA approach could yield scientifically defensible acute and chronic hazard classification outcomes.

  5. The Hazard Notification System (HANS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedigar, S. F.; Venezky, D. Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Volcano Hazards Program (VHP) has developed a Hazard Notification System (HANS) for distributing volcanic activity information collected by scientists to airlines, emergency services, and the general public. In the past year, data from HANS have been used by airlines to make decisions about diverting or canceling flights during the eruption of Mount Redoubt. HANS was developed to provide a single system that each of the five U.S. volcano observatories could use for communicating and storing volcanic information about the 160+ potentially active U.S. volcanoes. The data that cover ten tables and nearly 100 fields are now stored in similar formats, and the information can be released in styles requested by our agency partners, such as the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Currently, HANS has about 4500 reports stored; on average, two - three reports are added daily. HANS (at its most basic form) consists of a user interface for entering data into one of many release types (Daily Status Reports, Weekly Updates, Volcano Activity Notifications, etc.); a database holding previous releases as well as observatory information such as email address lists and volcano boilerplates; and a transmission system for formatting releases and sending them out by email or other web related system. The user interface to HANS is completely web based, providing access to our observatory scientists from any online PC. The underlying database stores the observatory information and drives the observatory and program websites' dynamic updates and archived information releases. HANS also runs scripts for generating several different feeds including the program home page Volcano Status Map. Each observatory has the capability of running an instance of HANS. There are currently three instances of HANS and each instance is synchronized to all other instances using a master-slave environment. Information can be entered on any node; slave nodes transmit data to the master node

  6. Classification of close binary systems by Svechnikov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryomova, G. N.

    The paper presents the historical overview of classification schemes of eclipsing variable stars with the foreground of advantages of the classification scheme by Svechnikov being widely appreciated for Close Binary Systems due to simplicity of classification criteria and brevity.

  7. Screening tests for hazard classification of complex waste materials - Selection of methods

    SciTech Connect

    Weltens, R.; Vanermen, G.; Tirez, K.; Robbens, J.; Deprez, K.; Michiels, L.

    2012-12-15

    In this study we describe the development of an alternative methodology for hazard characterization of waste materials. Such an alternative methodology for hazard assessment of complex waste materials is urgently needed, because the lack of a validated instrument leads to arbitrary hazard classification of such complex waste materials. False classification can lead to human and environmental health risks and also has important financial consequences for the waste owner. The Hazardous Waste Directive (HWD) describes the methodology for hazard classification of waste materials. For mirror entries the HWD classification is based upon the hazardous properties (H1-15) of the waste which can be assessed from the hazardous properties of individual identified waste compounds or - if not all compounds are identified - from test results of hazard assessment tests performed on the waste material itself. For the latter the HWD recommends toxicity tests that were initially designed for risk assessment of chemicals in consumer products (pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, biocides, food, etc.). These tests (often using mammals) are not designed nor suitable for the hazard characterization of waste materials. With the present study we want to contribute to the development of an alternative and transparent test strategy for hazard assessment of complex wastes that is in line with the HWD principles for waste classification. It is necessary to cope with this important shortcoming in hazardous waste classification and to demonstrate that alternative methods are available that can be used for hazard assessment of waste materials. Next, by describing the pros and cons of the available methods, and by identifying the needs for additional or further development of test methods, we hope to stimulate research efforts and development in this direction. In this paper we describe promising techniques and argument on the test selection for the pilot study that we have performed on different types of

  8. Screening tests for hazard classification of complex waste materials--selection of methods.

    PubMed

    Weltens, R; Vanermen, G; Tirez, K; Robbens, J; Deprez, K; Michiels, L

    2012-12-01

    In this study we describe the development of an alternative methodology for hazard characterization of waste materials. Such an alternative methodology for hazard assessment of complex waste materials is urgently needed, because the lack of a validated instrument leads to arbitrary hazard classification of such complex waste materials. False classification can lead to human and environmental health risks and also has important financial consequences for the waste owner. The Hazardous Waste Directive (HWD) describes the methodology for hazard classification of waste materials. For mirror entries the HWD classification is based upon the hazardous properties (H1-15) of the waste which can be assessed from the hazardous properties of individual identified waste compounds or--if not all compounds are identified--from test results of hazard assessment tests performed on the waste material itself. For the latter the HWD recommends toxicity tests that were initially designed for risk assessment of chemicals in consumer products (pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, biocides, food, etc.). These tests (often using mammals) are not designed nor suitable for the hazard characterization of waste materials. With the present study we want to contribute to the development of an alternative and transparent test strategy for hazard assessment of complex wastes that is in line with the HWD principles for waste classification. It is necessary to cope with this important shortcoming in hazardous waste classification and to demonstrate that alternative methods are available that can be used for hazard assessment of waste materials. Next, by describing the pros and cons of the available methods, and by identifying the needs for additional or further development of test methods, we hope to stimulate research efforts and development in this direction. In this paper we describe promising techniques and argument on the test selection for the pilot study that we have performed on different types of

  9. Fuel Characteristic Classification System version 3.0: technical documentation

    Treesearch

    Susan J. Prichard; David V. Sandberg; Roger D. Ottmar; Ellen Eberhardt; Anne Andreu; Paige Eagle; Kjell. Swedin

    2013-01-01

    The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) is a software module that records wildland fuel characteristics and calculates potential fire behavior and hazard potentials based on input environmental variables. The FCCS 3.0 is housed within the Integrated Fuels Treatment Decision Support System (Joint Fire Science Program 2012). It can also be run from command...

  10. Classification systems for stalking behavior.

    PubMed

    Racine, Christopher; Billick, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Stalking is a complex behavioral phenomenon that is unique in that it necessarily involves a prolonged dyadic relationship between both a perpetrator and a victim. Since criminalization of stalking behavior in the 1990s, different conceptual typologies have attempted to classify this behavior to assess risk and aid in management decisions. The authors reviewed the current literature regarding the most recent and accepted stalking classification systems. The three predominant stalker typologies currently in use include Zona's stalker-victim types, Mullen's stalker typology, and the RECON stalker typology. Of these, the RECON classification system alone was developed in an attempt to separate stalkers into groups based on previously known risk factors for behaviorally based phenomenon such as propensity for violence. Understanding and simplifying these classification systems may enhance the potential that new research will lead to evidence-based management and treatment strategies in the stalking situation.

  11. Preliminary Considerations for Classifying Hazards of Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Maddalon, Jeffrey M.; Miner, Paul S.; Szatkowski, George N.; Ulrey, Michael L.; DeWalt, Michael P.; Spitzer, Cary R.

    2007-01-01

    The use of unmanned aircraft in national airspace has been characterized as the next great step forward in the evolution of civil aviation. To make routine and safe operation of these aircraft a reality, a number of technological and regulatory challenges must be overcome. This report discusses some of the regulatory challenges with respect to deriving safety and reliability requirements for unmanned aircraft. In particular, definitions of hazards and their classification are discussed and applied to a preliminary functional hazard assessment of a generic unmanned system.

  12. A GHS-consistent approach to health hazard classification of petroleum substances, a class of UVCB substances.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles R; McKee, Richard H; Freeman, James J; Swick, Derek; Mahagaokar, Suneeta; Pigram, Glenda; Roberts, Linda G; Smulders, Chantal J; Beatty, Patrick W

    2013-12-01

    The process streams refined from petroleum crude oil for use in petroleum products are among those designated by USEPA as UVCB substances (unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products and biological materials). They are identified on global chemical inventories with unique Chemical Abstract Services (CAS) numbers and names. The chemical complexity of most petroleum substances presents challenges when evaluating their hazards and can result in differing evaluations due to the varying level of hazardous constituents and differences in national chemical control regulations. Global efforts to harmonize the identification of chemical hazards are aimed at promoting the use of consistent hazard evaluation criteria. This paper discusses a systematic approach for the health hazard evaluation of petroleum substances using chemical categories and the United Nations (UN) Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of classification and labeling. Also described are historical efforts to characterize the hazard of these substances and how they led to the development of categories, the identification of potentially hazardous constituents which should be considered, and a summary of the toxicology of the major petroleum product groups. The use of these categories can increase the utility of existing data, provide better informed hazard evaluations, and reduce the amount of animal testing required.

  13. Sustainable System for Residual Hazards Management

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

    2004-06-01

    Hazardous, radioactive and other toxic substances have routinely been generated and subsequently disposed of in the shallow subsurface throughout the world. Many of today’s waste management techniques do not eliminate the problem, but rather only concentrate or contain the hazardous contaminants. Residual hazards result from the presence of hazardous and/or contaminated material that remains on-site following active operations or the completion of remedial actions. Residual hazards pose continued risk to humans and the environment and represent a significant and chronic problem that require continuous longterm management (i.e. >1000 years). To protect human health and safeguard the natural environment, a sustainable system is required for the proper management of residual hazards. A sustainable system for the management of residual hazards will require the integration of engineered, institutional and land-use controls to isolate residual contaminants and thus minimize the associated hazards. Engineered controls are physical modifications to the natural setting and ecosystem, including the site, facility, and/or the residual materials themselves, in order to reduce or eliminate the potential for exposure to contaminants of concern (COCs). Institutional controls are processes, instruments, and mechanisms designed to influence human behavior and activity. System failure can involve hazardous material escaping from the confinement because of system degradation (i.e., chronic or acute degradation) or by externalintrusion of the biosphere into the contaminated material because of the loss of institutional control. An ongoing analysis of contemporary and historic sites suggests that the significance of the loss of institutional controls is a critical pathway because decisions made during the operations/remedial action phase, as well as decisions made throughout the residual hazards management period, are key to the longterm success of the prescribed system. In fact

  14. Space vehicle propulsion systems: Environmental space hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, P. J.; Bahr, G. K.

    1990-01-01

    The hazards that exist in geolunar space which may degrade, disrupt, or terminate the performance of space-based LOX/LH2 rocket engines are evaluated. Accordingly, a summary of the open literature pertaining to the geolunar space hazards is provided. Approximately 350 citations and about 200 documents and abstracts were reviewed; the documents selected give current and quantitative detail. The methodology was to categorize the various space hazards in relation to their importance in specified regions of geolunar space. Additionally, the effect of the various space hazards in relation to spacecraft and their systems were investigated. It was found that further investigation of the literature would be required to assess the effects of these hazards on propulsion systems per se; in particular, possible degrading effects on exterior nozzle structure, directional gimbals, and internal combustion chamber integrity and geometry.

  15. Assessing the potential hazard of chemical substances for the terrestrial environment. Development of hazard classification criteria and quantitative environmental indicators.

    PubMed

    Tarazona, J V; Fresno, A; Aycard, S; Ramos, C; Vega, M M; Carbonell, G

    2000-03-20

    Hazard assessment constitutes an essential tool in order to evaluate the potential effects of chemical substances on organisms and ecosystems. It includes as a first step, hazard identification, which must detect the potential dangers of the substance (i.e. the kind of effects that the substance may produce), and a second step to quantify each danger and to set the expected dose/response relationships. Hazard assessment plays a key role in the regulation of chemical substances, including pollution control and sustainable development. However, the aquatic environment has largely received more attention than terrestrial ecosystems. This paper presents the extrapolation of several basic concepts from the aquatic to the terrestrial compartment, and suggests possibilities for their regulatory use. Two specific proposals are discussed. The first focuses on the scientific basis of the hazard identification-classification criteria included in the EU regulations and their extrapolation to the terrestrial environment. The second focuses on the OECD programme for environmental indicators and the development of a soil pollution pressure indicator to quantify the potential hazards for the soil compartment and its associated terrestrial ecosystem related to the toxic chemicals applied deliberately (i.e. pesticides) or not (i.e. heavy metals in sludge-based fertilisers; industrial spills) to the soil.

  16. Prototype Expert System for Climate Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Clay

    Many students find climate classification laborious and time-consuming, and through their lack of repetition fail to grasp the details of classification. This paper describes an expert system for climate classification that is being developed at Middle Tennessee State University. Topics include: (1) an introduction to the nature of classification,…

  17. [Petroleum substances--human health hazards. I. Classification of petroleum substances on the list of dangerous substances and assessment of existing hazards].

    PubMed

    Konieczko, Katarzyna

    2006-01-01

    Complex products derived from petroleum are widely used as fuels, greases, solvents, and intermediates in many branches of industry. Petroleum exposure-related human health hazards, observed in occupationally exposed people and in the general population, are a serious sanitary problem. Complex and variable composition of individual petroleum products makes the actual assessment of human health hazards difficult. Potential hazards, and resulting classification of individual petroleum substance groups, are discussed in the presented work. This should prove to be helpful to work safety and hygiene services as well as to supervising institutions, mainly the sanitary inspection, in a proper assessment of the hazards, and consequently in taking appropriate preventive actions. In Part I., general issues concerning the hazard assessment and legal aspects of petroleum substances classification are presented. In Part. II., individual groups of petroleum substances are discussed with respect to health hazards, resulting from both physicochemical properties and toxicity, and their classification based on this analysis is suggested.

  18. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

    1996-12-31

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

  19. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOEpatents

    Schiffbauer, William H.; Ganoe, Carl W.

    1999-01-01

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

  20. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOEpatents

    Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

    1999-08-17

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

  1. Superfund Hazard Ranking System Training Course

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Hazard Ranking System (HRS) training course is a four and ½ day, intermediate-level course designed for personnel who are required to compile, draft, and review preliminary assessments (PAs), site inspections (SIs), and HRS documentation records/packag

  2. Cosmic ray hazards in the solar system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milford, S. N.

    1965-01-01

    Cosmic ray hazards in solar system considered from measurements of cosmic ray energy and charge spectra near Earth and in interplanetary space near Earth, together with interaction of cosmic rays with Moon surface

  3. Early identification systems for emerging foodborne hazards.

    PubMed

    Marvin, H J P; Kleter, G A; Prandini, A; Dekkers, S; Bolton, D J

    2009-05-01

    This paper provides a non-exhausting overview of early warning systems for emerging foodborne hazards that are operating in the various places in the world. Special attention is given to endpoint-focussed early warning systems (i.e. ECDC, ISIS and GPHIN) and hazard-focussed early warning systems (i.e. FVO, RASFF and OIE) and their merit to successfully identify a food safety problem in an early stage is discussed. Besides these early warning systems which are based on monitoring of either disease symptoms or hazards, also early warning systems and/or activities that intend to predict the occurrence of a food safety hazard in its very beginning of development or before that are described. Examples are trend analysis, horizon scanning, early warning systems for mycotoxins in maize and/or wheat and information exchange networks (e.g. OIE and GIEWS). Furthermore, recent initiatives that aim to develop predictive early warning systems based on the holistic principle are discussed. The assumption of the researchers applying this principle is that developments outside the food production chain that are either directly or indirectly related to the development of a particular food safety hazard may also provide valuable information to predict the development of this hazard.

  4. 75 FR 16037 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). See section 3001(f) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6921(f), and 40..., Arkansas. The waste falls under the classification of listed waste pursuant to Sec. 261.31....

  5. Strata-based forest fuel classification for wild fire hazard assessment using terrestrial LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Zhu, Xuan; Yebra, Marta; Harris, Sarah; Tapper, Nigel

    2016-10-01

    Fuel structural characteristics affect fire behavior including fire intensity, spread rate, flame structure, and duration, therefore, quantifying forest fuel structure has significance in understanding fire behavior as well as providing information for fire management activities (e.g., planned burns, suppression, fuel hazard assessment, and fuel treatment). This paper presents a method of forest fuel strata classification with an integration between terrestrial light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and geographic information system for automatically assessing forest fuel structural characteristics (e.g., fuel horizontal continuity and vertical arrangement). The accuracy of fuel description derived from terrestrial LiDAR scanning (TLS) data was assessed by field measured surface fuel depth and fuel percentage covers at distinct vertical layers. The comparison of TLS-derived depth and percentage cover at surface fuel layer with the field measurements produced root mean square error values of 1.1 cm and 5.4%, respectively. TLS-derived percentage cover explained 92% of the variation in percentage cover at all fuel layers of the entire dataset. The outcome indicated TLS-derived fuel characteristics are strongly consistent with field measured values. TLS can be used to efficiently and consistently classify forest vertical layers to provide more precise information for forest fuel hazard assessment and surface fuel load estimation in order to assist forest fuels management and fire-related operational activities. It can also be beneficial for mapping forest habitat, wildlife conservation, and ecosystem management.

  6. 21 CFR 7.41 - Health hazard evaluation and recall classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Health hazard evaluation and recall classification. 7.41 Section 7.41 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conducted by an ad hoc committee of Food and Drug Administration scientists and will take into account, but...

  7. A rating system for determination of hazardous wastes.

    PubMed

    Talinli, Ilhan; Yamantürk, Rana; Aydin, Egemen; Başakçilardan-Kabakçi, Sibel

    2005-11-11

    Although hazardous waste lists and their classification methodologies are nearly the same in most of the countries, there are some gaps and subjectiveness in determining the waste as hazardous waste. A rating system for the determination of waste as a hazardous waste is presented in this study which aims to overcome the problems resulted from the existing methodologies. Overall rating value (ORV) calculates and quantifies the waste as regular, non-regular or hazardous waste in an "hourglass" scale. "ORV" as a cumulative-linear formulation in proposed model consists of components such as ecological effects of the waste (Ee) in terms of four main hazard criteria: ignitability, reactivity, corrosivity and toxicity; combined potential risk (CPR) including carcinogenic effect, toxic, infectious and persistence characteristics; existing lists and their methodology (L) and decision factor (D) to separate regular and non-regular waste. Physical form (f) and quantity (Q) of the waste are considered as factors of these components. Seventeen waste samples from different sources are evaluated to demonstrate the simulation of the proposed model by using "hourglass" scale. The major benefit of the presented rating system is to ease the works of decision makers in managing the wastes.

  8. JANNAF 17th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocchiaro, James E. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor); Rognan, Melanie (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    Volume 1, the first of two volumes is a compilation of 16 unclassified/unlimited technical papers presented at the 17th meeting of the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS) held jointly with the 35th Combustion Subcommittee (CS) and Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS). The meeting was held on 7 - 11 December 1998 at Raytheon Systems Company and the Marriott Hotel, Tucson, AZ. Topics covered include projectile and shaped charge jet impact vulnerability of munitions; thermal decomposition and cookoff behavior of energetic materials; damage and hot spot initiation mechanisms with energetic materials; detonation phenomena of solid energetic materials; and hazard classification, insensitive munitions, and propulsion systems safety.

  9. JANNAF 17th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocchiaro, James E. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor); Rognan, Melanie (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    Volume 1, the first of two volumes is a compilation of 16 unclassified/unlimited technical papers presented at the 17th meeting of the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS) held jointly with the 35th Combustion Subcommittee (CS) and Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS). The meeting was held on 7 - 11 December 1998 at Raytheon Systems Company and the Marriott Hotel, Tucson, AZ. Topics covered include projectile and shaped charge jet impact vulnerability of munitions; thermal decomposition and cookoff behavior of energetic materials; damage and hot spot initiation mechanisms with energetic materials; detonation phenomena of solid energetic materials; and hazard classification, insensitive munitions, and propulsion systems safety.

  10. Geological hazard monitoring system in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaprindashvili, George

    2017-04-01

    Georgia belongs to one of world's most complex mountainous regions according to the scale and frequency of Geological processes and damage caused to population, farmlands, and Infrastructure facilities. Geological hazards (landslide, debrisflow/mudflow, rockfall, erosion and etc.) are affecting many populated areas, agricultural fields, roads, oil and gas pipes, high-voltage electric power transmission towers, hydraulic structures, and tourist complexes. Landslides occur almost in all geomorphological zones, resulting in wide differentiation in the failure types and mechanisms and in the size-frequency distribution. In Georgia, geological hazards triggered by: 1. Activation of highly intense earthquakes; 2. Meteorological events provoking the disaster processes on the background of global climatic change; 3. Large-scale Human impact on the environment. The prediction and monitoring of Geological Hazards is a very wide theme, which involves different researchers from different spheres. Geological hazard monitoring is essential to prevent and mitigate these hazards. In past years in Georgia several monitoring system, such as Ground-based geodetic techniques, Debrisflow Early Warning System (EWS) were installed on high sensitive landslide and debrisflow areas. This work presents description of Geological hazard monitoring system in Georgia.

  11. Volcanic hazard warning system: Persistence and transferability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, John H.; Gersmehl, Philip J.

    1980-03-01

    This study examines the normative functioning of the volcano warning system on the Island of Hawaii. The research seeks to identify the combination of factors, both environmental and social, which allows the system to operate with success. On the basis of the findings, several recommendations are offered for improving environmental hazard warning systems.

  12. A hazard control system for robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Ruth Chiang; Rad, Adrian

    1991-01-01

    A robot for space applications will be required to complete a variety of tasks in an uncertain, harsh environment. This fact presents unusual and highly difficult challenges to ensuring the safety of astronauts and keeping the equipment they depend on from becoming damaged. The systematic approach being taken to control hazards that could result from introducing robotics technology in the space environment is described. First, system safety management and engineering principles, techniques, and requirements are discussed as they relate to Shuttle payload design and operation in general. The concepts of hazard, hazard category, and hazard control, as defined by the Shuttle payload safety requirements, is explained. Next, it is shown how these general safety management and engineering principles are being implemented on an actual project. An example is presented of a hazard control system for controlling one of the hazards identified for the Development Test Flight (DTF-1) of NASA's Flight Telerobotic Servicer, a teleoperated space robot. How these schemes can be applied to terrestrial robots is discussed as well. The same software monitoring and control approach will insure the safe operation of a slave manipulator under teleoperated or autonomous control in undersea, nuclear, or manufacturing applications where the manipulator is working in the vicinity of humans or critical hardware.

  13. JANNAF 19th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocchiaro, James E. (Editor); Kuckels, Melanie C. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This volume, the first of two volumes is a compilation of 25 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 19th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS) meeting held jointly with the 37th Combustion Subcommittee (CS) and 25th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS), and 1st Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee (MSS) meetings. The meeting was held 13-17 November 2000 at the Naval Postgraduate School and Hyatt Regency Hotel, Monterey, California. Topics covered at the PSHS meeting include: impact and thermal vulnerability of gun propellants; thermal decomposition and cookoff behavior of energetic materials; violent reaction and detonation phenomena of solid energetic materials subjected to shock and impact loading; and hazard classification, and insensitive munitions testing of propellants and propulsion systems.

  14. JANNAF 18th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocchiaro, James E. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This volume, the first of two volumes is a compilation of 18 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 18th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS) meeting held jointly with the 36th Combustion Subcommittee (CS) and 24th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS) meetings. The meeting was held 18-21 October 1999 at NASA Kennedy Space Center and The DoubleTree Oceanfront Hotel, Cocoa Beach, Florida. Topics covered at the PSHS meeting include: shaped charge jet and kinetic energy penetrator impact vulnerability of gun propellants; thermal decomposition and cookoff behavior of energetic materials; violent reaction; detonation phenomena of solid energetic materials subjected to shock and impact stimuli; and hazard classification, insensitive munitions, and propulsion systems safety.

  15. JANNAF 18th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocchiaro, James E. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This volume, the first of two volumes is a compilation of 18 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 18th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS) meeting held jointly with the 36th Combustion Subcommittee (CS) and 24th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS) meetings. The meeting was held 18-21 October 1999 at NASA Kennedy Space Center and The DoubleTree Oceanfront Hotel, Cocoa Beach, Florida. Topics covered at the PSHS meeting include: shaped charge jet and kinetic energy penetrator impact vulnerability of gun propellants; thermal decomposition and cookoff behavior of energetic materials; violent reaction; detonation phenomena of solid energetic materials subjected to shock and impact stimuli; and hazard classification, insensitive munitions, and propulsion systems safety.

  16. Preliminary hazards analysis of thermal scrap stabilization system. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, W.S.

    1994-08-23

    This preliminary analysis examined the HA-21I glovebox and its supporting systems for potential process hazards. Upon further analysis, the thermal stabilization system has been installed in gloveboxes HC-21A and HC-21C. The use of HC-21C and HC-21A simplified the initial safety analysis. In addition, these gloveboxes were cleaner and required less modification for operation than glovebox HA-21I. While this document refers to glovebox HA-21I for the hazards analysis performed, glovebox HC-21C is sufficiently similar that the following analysis is also valid for HC-21C. This hazards analysis document is being re-released as revision 1 to include the updated flowsheet document (Appendix C) and the updated design basis (Appendix D). The revised Process Flow Schematic has also been included (Appendix E). This Current revision incorporates the recommendations provided from the original hazards analysis as well. The System Design Description (SDD) has also been appended (Appendix H) to document the bases for Safety Classification of thermal stabilization equipment.

  17. 76 FR 16534 - Hazardous Waste Management System Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 261 Hazardous Waste Management System Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste...,'' to exclude (or delist) on a one-time basis from the lists of hazardous waste, a certain solid waste... the petitioned waste is ] not hazardous waste. This exclusion applies to 148 cubic yards of...

  18. Preliminary Hazards Assessment: Iron disulfide purification system

    SciTech Connect

    1991-07-30

    A process for the purification (washing) of iron disulfide (FeS{sub 2}) powder is conducted in the Northeast corner (Area 353) of the main plant building (Building 100). This location is about 130 feet from the fenced boundary of the Partnership School/Child Development Center. In the first steps of the process, raw iron disulfide powder is ground and separated by particle size. The ground and sized powder is then purified in a three-step acid washing process using both hydrochloric acid (HCI) and hydrofluoric (HF) acid. The iron disulfide process is an intermittent batch process conducted four to eight times a year. This study is a Preliminary Hazards Assessment (PHA) to assess the hazards associated with the iron disulfide process. This is a preliminary study and will be used to determine if additional safety analysis is necessary. The scope of the PHA includes assessment of the process steps of grinding, size classification, and purification. The purpose is to identify major hazards and determine if the current and newly added safeguards are adequate for operation. The PHA also lists recommendations for additional safety features that should be added to reduce the risks of operation.

  19. Classification schemes for carcinogenicity based on hazard-identification have become outmoded and serve neither science nor society.

    PubMed

    Boobis, Alan R; Cohen, Samuel M; Dellarco, Vicki L; Doe, John E; Fenner-Crisp, Penelope A; Moretto, Angelo; Pastoor, Timothy P; Schoeny, Rita S; Seed, Jennifer G; Wolf, Douglas C

    2016-12-01

    Classification schemes for carcinogenicity based solely on hazard-identification such as the IARC monograph process and the UN system adopted in the EU have become outmoded. They are based on a concept developed in the 1970s that chemicals could be divided into two classes: carcinogens and non-carcinogens. Categorization in this way places into the same category chemicals and agents with widely differing potencies and modes of action. This is how eating processed meat can fall into the same category as sulfur mustard gas. Approaches based on hazard and risk characterization present an integrated and balanced picture of hazard, dose response and exposure and allow informed risk management decisions to be taken. Because a risk-based decision framework fully considers hazard in the context of dose, potency, and exposure the unintended downsides of a hazard only approach are avoided, e.g., health scares, unnecessary economic costs, loss of beneficial products, adoption of strategies with greater health costs, and the diversion of public funds into unnecessary research. An initiative to agree upon a standardized, internationally acceptable methodology for carcinogen assessment is needed now. The approach should incorporate principles and concepts of existing international consensus-based frameworks including the WHO IPCS mode of action framework. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Road Ahead for Library Classification Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Joan S.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses knowledge organization tools in the context of seven challenges facing library classification systems. Highlights include revisions to the Dewey Decimal Classification, the Windows-based CD-ROM version of Dewey, support for machine-assisted classification, multilingual use of Dewey, use of Dewey as a general knowledge organization and…

  1. Hazardous materials information hotline using System 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, J.E.; Fuchel, K.

    1984-04-30

    The Center for Assessment of Chemical and Physical Hazards (CACPH) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a computer hotline service for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors. This service provides access to health and safety information for over 800 chemicals and hazardous materials. The data base uses System 2000 on a CDC 6600 and provides information on the chemical name and its synonyms, 17 categories of health and safety information, composition of chemical mixtures, categories of chemicals, use and hazards, and physical, chemical and toxicity attributes. In order to make this information available to people unfamiliar with System 2000, a user-friendly interface was developed using a Fortran PLEX Program. 1 reference, 1 figure.

  2. 20th JANNAF Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocchiaro, James E. (Editor); Eggleston, Debra S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor); Inzar, Jeanette M. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This volume, the first of two volumes, is a collection of 24 unclassified/unlimited-distribution papers which were presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 20th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS), 38th Combustion Subcommittee (CS), 26th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS), and 21 Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee meeting. The meeting was held 8-12 April 2002 at the Bayside Inn at The Sandestin Golf & Beach Resort and Eglin Air Force Base, Destin, Florida. Topics covered include: insensitive munitions and hazard classification testing of solid rocket motors and other munitions; vulnerability of gun propellants to impact stimuli; thermal decomposition and cookoff properties of energetic materials; burn-to-violent reaction phenomena in energetic materials; and shock-to-detonation properties of solid propellants and energetic materials.

  3. Soil classifications systems review. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Systems used to classify soils are discussed and compared. Major types of classification systems that are reviewed include natural systems, technical systems, the FAO/UNESCO world soil map, soil survey map units, and numerical taxonomy. Natural Classification systems discussed in detail are the United States system, Soil Taxonomy, and the Russian and Canadian systems. Included in the section on technical classification systems are reviews on the AASHO and Unified (ASTM) classification systems. The review of soil classification systems was conducted to establish improved availability of accurate ground thermal conductivity and other heat transfer related properties information. These data are intended to help in the design of closed-loop ground heat exchange systems.

  4. Pyrotechnic hazards classification and evaluation program. Phase 2, segment 3: Test plan for determining hazards associated with pyrotechnic manufacturing processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A comprehensive test plan for determining the hazards associated with pyrotechnic manufacturing processes is presented. The rationale for each test is based on a systematic analysis of historical accounts of accidents and a detailed study of the characteristics of each manufacturing process. The most hazardous manufacturing operations have been determined to be pressing, mixing, reaming, and filling. The hazard potential of a given situation is evaluated in terms of the probabilities of initiation, communication, and transition to detonation (ICT). The characteristics which affect the ICT probabilities include the ignition mechanisms which are present either in normal or abnormal operation, the condition and properties of the pyrotechnic material, and the configuration of the processing equipment. Analytic expressions are derived which describe the physical conditions of the system, thus permitting a variety of processes to be evaluated in terms of a small number of experiments.

  5. [Application of risk grading and classification for occupational hazards in risk management for a shipbuilding project].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wenfeng; Tan, Qiang; Wu, Shihua; Deng, Yingcong; Liu, Lifen; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Yimin

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the application of risk grading and classification for occupational hazards in risk management for a shipbuilding project. The risk management for this shipbuilding project was performed by a comprehensive application of MES evaluation, quality assessment of occupational health management, and risk grading and classification for occupational hazards, through the methods of occupational health survey, occupational health testing, and occupational health examinations. The results of MES evaluation showed that the risk of occupational hazards in this project was grade 3, which was considered as significant risk; Q value calculated by quality assessment of occupational health management was 0.52, which was considered to be unqualified; the comprehensive evaluation with these two methods showed that the integrated risk rating for this shipbuilding project was class D, and follow- up and rectification were needed with a focus on the improvement in health management. The application of MES evaluation and quality assessment of occupational health management in risk management for occupational hazards can achieve objective and reasonable conclusions and has good applicability.

  6. Integrative Chemical-Biological Read-Across Approach for Chemical Hazard Classification

    PubMed Central

    Low, Yen; Sedykh, Alexander; Fourches, Denis; Golbraikh, Alexander; Whelan, Maurice; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Traditional read-across approaches typically rely on the chemical similarity principle to predict chemical toxicity; however, the accuracy of such predictions is often inadequate due to the underlying complex mechanisms of toxicity. Here we report on the development of a hazard classification and visualization method that draws upon both chemical structural similarity and comparisons of biological responses to chemicals measured in multiple short-term assays (”biological” similarity). The Chemical-Biological Read-Across (CBRA) approach infers each compound's toxicity from those of both chemical and biological analogs whose similarities are determined by the Tanimoto coefficient. Classification accuracy of CBRA was compared to that of classical RA and other methods using chemical descriptors alone, or in combination with biological data. Different types of adverse effects (hepatotoxicity, hepatocarcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and acute lethality) were classified using several biological data types (gene expression profiling and cytotoxicity screening). CBRA-based hazard classification exhibited consistently high external classification accuracy and applicability to diverse chemicals. Transparency of the CBRA approach is aided by the use of radial plots that show the relative contribution of analogous chemical and biological neighbors. Identification of both chemical and biological features that give rise to the high accuracy of CBRA-based toxicity prediction facilitates mechanistic interpretation of the models. PMID:23848138

  7. Integrative chemical-biological read-across approach for chemical hazard classification.

    PubMed

    Low, Yen; Sedykh, Alexander; Fourches, Denis; Golbraikh, Alexander; Whelan, Maurice; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2013-08-19

    Traditional read-across approaches typically rely on the chemical similarity principle to predict chemical toxicity; however, the accuracy of such predictions is often inadequate due to the underlying complex mechanisms of toxicity. Here, we report on the development of a hazard classification and visualization method that draws upon both chemical structural similarity and comparisons of biological responses to chemicals measured in multiple short-term assays ("biological" similarity). The Chemical-Biological Read-Across (CBRA) approach infers each compound's toxicity from both chemical and biological analogues whose similarities are determined by the Tanimoto coefficient. Classification accuracy of CBRA was compared to that of classical RA and other methods using chemical descriptors alone or in combination with biological data. Different types of adverse effects (hepatotoxicity, hepatocarcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and acute lethality) were classified using several biological data types (gene expression profiling and cytotoxicity screening). CBRA-based hazard classification exhibited consistently high external classification accuracy and applicability to diverse chemicals. Transparency of the CBRA approach is aided by the use of radial plots that show the relative contribution of analogous chemical and biological neighbors. Identification of both chemical and biological features that give rise to the high accuracy of CBRA-based toxicity prediction facilitates mechanistic interpretation of the models.

  8. Autoclass: An automatic classification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutz, John; Cheeseman, Peter; Hanson, Robin

    1991-01-01

    The task of inferring a set of classes and class descriptions most likely to explain a given data set can be placed on a firm theoretical foundation using Bayesian statistics. Within this framework, and using various mathematical and algorithmic approximations, the AutoClass System searches for the most probable classifications, automatically choosing the number of classes and complexity of class descriptions. A simpler version of AutoClass has been applied to many large real data sets, has discovered new independently-verified phenomena, and has been released as a robust software package. Recent extensions allow attributes to be selectively correlated within particular classes, and allow classes to inherit, or share, model parameters through a class hierarchy. The mathematical foundations of AutoClass are summarized.

  9. Hazard ranking systems for chemical wastes and chemical waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, R.D.; Parker, F.L. ); Crutcher, M.R. and Associates, Inc., Columbia, IL )

    1991-01-01

    Hazardous materials and substances have always existed in the environment. Mankind has evolved to live with some degree of exposure to toxic materials. Until recently the risk has been from natural toxins or natural background radiation. While rapid technological advances over the past few decades have improved the lifestyle of our society, they have also dramatically increased the availability, volume and types of synthetic and natural hazardous materials. Many of their effects are as yet uncertain. Products and manufacturing by-products that no longer serve a useful purpose are deemed wastes. For some waste products land disposal will always be their ultimate fate. Hazardous substances are often included in the waste products. One needs to classify wastes by degree of hazard (risk). Risk (degree of probability of loss) is usually defined for risk assessment as probability of an occurrence times the consequences of the occurrence. Perhaps even more important than the definition of risk is the choice of a risk management strategy. The choice of strategy will be strongly influenced by the decision criteria used. Those decision criteria could be utility (the greatest happiness of the greatest number), rights or technology based or some combination of the three. It is necessary to make such choices about the definition of risks and criteria for management. It is clear that these are social (i.e., political) and value choices and science has little to say on this matter. This is another example of what Alvin Weinberg has named Transcience where the subject matter is scientific and technical but the choices are social, political and moral. This paper shall deal only with the scientific and technical aspects of the hazardous waste problem to create a hazardous substances classification system.

  10. Hazard property classification of waste according to the recent propositions of the EC using different methods.

    PubMed

    Hennebert, Pierre; van der Sloot, Hans A; Rebischung, Flore; Weltens, Reinhilde; Geerts, Lieve; Hjelmar, Ole

    2014-10-01

    Hazard classification of waste is a necessity, but the hazard properties (named "H" and soon "HP") are still not all defined in a practical and operational manner at EU level. Following discussion of subsequent draft proposals from the Commission there is still no final decision. Methods to implement the proposals have recently been proposed: tests methods for physical risks, test batteries for aquatic and terrestrial ecotoxicity, an analytical package for exhaustive determination of organic substances and mineral elements, surrogate methods for the speciation of mineral elements in mineral substances in waste, and calculation methods for human toxicity and ecotoxicity with M factors. In this paper the different proposed methods have been applied to a large assortment of solid and liquid wastes (>100). Data for 45 wastes - documented with extensive chemical analysis and flammability test - were assessed in terms of the different HP criteria and results were compared to LoW for lack of an independent classification. For most waste streams the classification matches with the designation provided in the LoW. This indicates that the criteria used by LoW are similar to the HP limit values. This data set showed HP 14 'Ecotoxic chronic' is the most discriminating HP. All wastes classified as acute ecotoxic are also chronic ecotoxic and the assessment of acute ecotoxicity separately is therefore not needed. The high number of HP 14 classified wastes is due to the very low limit values when stringent M factors are applied to total concentrations (worst case method). With M factor set to 1 the classification method is not sufficiently discriminating between hazardous and non-hazardous materials. The second most frequent hazard is HP 7 'Carcinogenic'. The third most frequent hazard is HP 10 'Toxic for reproduction' and the fourth most frequent hazard is HP 4 "Irritant - skin irritation and eye damage". In a stepwise approach, it seems relevant to assess HP 14 first, then, if

  11. Rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V; Tibrea, Steven L; Shull, Davis J; Coleman, Jerry T; Shuler, James M

    2015-04-28

    A rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system and associated methods of operation are provided. An exemplary system includes a central command, a wireless backhaul network, and a remote monitoring unit. The remote monitoring unit can include a positioning system configured to determine a position of the remote monitoring unit based on one or more signals received from one or more satellites located in Low Earth Orbit. The wireless backhaul network can provide bidirectional communication capability independent of cellular telecommunication networks and the Internet. An exemplary method includes instructing at least one of a plurality of remote monitoring units to provide an alert based at least in part on a location of a hazard and a plurality of positions respectively associated with the plurality of remote monitoring units.

  12. Advancing Towards a Universal Soil Classification System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Phillip R.; Hempel, Jon; Micheli, Erika; McBratney, Alex

    2014-05-01

    Within the variability of soils across the globe, there are common soil attributes that pedologists have used to group soil within taxonomic classifications. Classification systems are necessary for the communication of information about soils. There are many national classification systems used within designated countries and two classification systems used globally, the US Soil Taxonomy and the World Reference Base. There is a great need for soil scientists to develop one common language or taxonomic system to communicate information within soil science as well as to other scientists in other disciplines. The International Union of Soil Sciences Working Group for Universal Soil Classification was officially established by an IUSS Council decision in August of 2010 at the World Congress of Soil Science in Brisbane, Australia. The charge for the Working Group includes development of common standards for methods and terminology in soil observations and investigations and the development of a universal soil classification system. The Universal Soil Classification Working Group was established and the initial meeting was held at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana USA. The Working Group has evaluated the current national systems and the two international systems to identify gaps in knowledge. Currently, it was determined that gaps in knowledge exists in cold soil, hydromorphic, salt affected, anthropengic, and tropical soil groups. Additionally, several members of the Working Group have utilized taxonomic distance calculations from large databases to determine the clusters of similar taxonomic groupings utilizing the classification. Additionally, the databases are being used to make allocations into logical groups to recognize "Great Soil Groups". The great soil groups will be equivalent to great groups level from Soil Taxonomy along with similar levels in the World Reference Base, Australian Soil Classification and other defined soil classification systems

  13. Environmentally Adaptive UXO Detection and Classification Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    data used in this study. 3 Environmentally Adaptive UXO Detection and Classification Systems 1 Abstract This final report addresses the problem of...FINAL REPORT Environmentally Adaptive UXO Detection and Classification Systems SERDP Project MR-2417 APRIL 2016 Dr. Nick Klausner Information...Defense Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The publication of this report does not indicate endorsement by the

  14. Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Twitchell, K.E.; Skinner, N.L.

    1993-07-01

    This manual is the tutorial for the Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System (HSSDS), an online, comprehensive system of information on alternatives to hazardous solvents and related subjects. The HSSDS data base contains product information, material safety data sheets, toxicity reports, usage reports, biodegradable data, product chemical element lists, and background information on solvents. HSSDS use TOPIC{reg_sign} to search for information based on a query defined by the user. TOPIC provides a full text retrieval of unstructured source documents. In this tutorial, a series of lessons is provided that guides the user through basic steps common to most queries performed with HSSDS. Instructions are provided for both window-based and character-based applications.

  15. Robotics and remote systems for hazardous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jamshidi, M.; Eicker, P.

    1993-01-01

    This is the first volume in a series of books to be published by Prentice Hall on Environmental and Intelligent Manufacturing Systems. The editors have assembled an interdisciplinary collection of authors from industry, government, and academia, that provide a broad range of expertise on robotics and remote systems. Readily accessible to practicing engineers, the book provides case studies and introduces new technology applicable to remote operations in unstructured and/or hazardous environments. Chapter 1 gives an overview of the US Environmental Protection Agency's efforts to apply robotic technology to assist in the operations at hazardous waste sites. The next chapter focuses on the theory and implementation of robust impedance control for robotic manipulators. Chapter 3 presents a discussion on the integration of failure tolerance into robotic systems. The next two chapters address the issue of sensory feedback and its indispensable role in remote and/or hazardous environments. Chapter 6 presents numerous examples of robots and telemanipulators that have been applied for various tasks at the DOE's Savannah River Site. The following chapter picks up on this theme and discusses the fundamental paradigm shifts that are required in artificial intelligence for robots to deal with hazardous, unstructured, and dynamic environments. Chapter 8 returns to the issue of impedance control first raised in Chapter 2. While the majority of the applications discussed in this book are related to the nuclear industry, chapter 9 considers applying telerobotics for the control of traditional heavy machinery that is widely used in forestry, mining, and construction. The final chapter of the book returns to the topic of artificial intelligence's role in producing increased autonomy for robotic systems and provides an interesting counterpoint to the philosophy of reactive control discussed earlier.

  16. 75 FR 11002 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 261 Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste... released from the waste, plausible and specific types of management of the petitioned waste, the quantities..., Tennessee from the lists of hazardous wastes. This final rule responds to a petition submitted by Valero...

  17. 75 FR 57686 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 261 Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste... specific waste from a particular generating facility should not be regulated as a hazardous waste. Based on waste-specific information provided by the petitioner, EPA granted an exclusion for up to 3,000...

  18. 75 FR 58346 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 261 Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste...) certain solid wastes generated by its Longview, Texas, facility from the lists of hazardous wastes. EPA... petitioned waste on human health and the environment. DATES: Comments must be received on or before October...

  19. 75 FR 60689 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 261 Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste... Refinery (Beaumont Refinery) to exclude (or delist) a certain solid waste generated by its Beaumont, Texas, facility from the lists of hazardous wastes. EPA used the Delisting Risk Assessment Software (DRAS) Version...

  20. 75 FR 51678 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...-0456; SW-FRL-9191-7] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste... lists of hazardous wastes. This final rule responds to the petition submitted by OxyChem to delist K019, K020, F025, F001, F003, and F005 waste resulting from the treatment of wastewaters from the...

  1. 76 FR 4823 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identifying and Listing Hazardous Waste Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 261 Hazardous Waste Management System; Identifying and Listing Hazardous Waste... per year from the list of hazardous wastes. The Agency has decided to grant the petition based on an evaluation of waste-specific information provided by OGAI and a consideration of public comments received...

  2. The Hazardous Materials Information System. Users Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    only on hazardous materials used by the Government. Keep in mind that the HMIS is a growing system. Just because an item is not listed in the system does...NoO-0729 W. R. GRACE & CO POLYCEL I (CIC) A-A-1543 8520-00-270-0065 CONTINENTAL CHEM CORP BORAX A-A-S 7930-00-281-4731 PAUL CO PRODUCTS INC...As was written earlier, the HMIS is a growing database. Some items in the supply system have not yet been entered into HMIS. Therefore, to be sure

  3. In the shadow of the Cosmetic Directive--inconsistencies in EU environmental hazard classification requirements for UV-filters.

    PubMed

    Sobek, A; Bejgarn, S; Rudén, C; Molander, L; Breitholtz, M

    2013-09-01

    UV-filters are chemicals with potentially environmental hazardous properties. In the European Union (EU), UV-filters contained in sunscreen products are currently regulated by the Cosmetic Directive (from July 2013 by the Cosmetic Products Regulation). Environmental hazard classifications according to the regulation on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures (CLP) must be determined for UV-filters contained in industrial chemical products, whereas UV-filters contained in sunscreens are exempted from CLP. In this study we determined the potential environmental hazard classifications of UV-filters and sunscreen products if the CLP regulation was to be required for cosmetic products. Two sunscreen products were evaluated in accordance with the aquatic environmental hazard criteria for mixtures. The results highlight that the inconsistencies in the current EU regulation of UV filters hamper the risk management of environmental hazards of UV filters used in cosmetic products. Almost 50% of the investigated UV-filters approved for use in cosmetic products on the European market according to the current Cosmetic Directive were identified to meet the CLP classification as being hazardous to the aquatic environment. Assuming a worst-case scenario, the two examined sunscreens could both be classified as hazardous to the aquatic environment with long-lasting effects according to CLP classification criteria. Hence, if the CLP regulation was applicable to sunscreen products, both brands could potentially be labelled with the environmental hazard pictogram and associated hazard and precautionary statements. Including cosmetic products, and thereby sunscreens, in the CLP regulation would contribute to a more harmonized and transparent regulation of potentially hazardous substances on the EU market.

  4. Toxic chemical hazard classification and risk acceptance guidelines for use in DOE facilities. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, D.K.; Davis, J.S.; Prowse, J.; Hoffman, P.W.

    1995-03-24

    The concentration-limit guidelines presented in this document apply to airborne releases of chemicals evaluated with respect to human health effects for the purposes of hazard classification and categorization, risk assessment and safety analysis. They apply to all DOE facilities and operations involving the use of potentially hazardous chemicals. The guidelines do not address other nonradiological hazards such as fire, pressure releases (including explosions), and chemical reactivity, but the guidelines are applicable to hazardous chemical releases resulting from these events. This report presents the subcommittee`s evaluation and recommendations regarding analyses of accidentally released toxic chemicals. The premise upon which these recommendations are based is that the mechanism of action of toxic chemicals is fundamentally different from that associated with radionuclides, with the exception of carcinogens. The recommendations reported herein are restricted to the airborne pathway because in an accident scenario this typically represents the most immediately significant route of public exposure. However, the subcommittee recognizes that exposure to chemicals through other pathways, in particular waterborne, can have significant impacts on human health and the environment. Although there are a number of chemicals for which absorption through the skin can contribute measurably to the total dose in chronic (e.g., occupational) exposure situations, this pathway has not been considered for the acute exposure scenarios considered in this report. Later studies. will address these issues if it appears desirable.

  5. A summary of recent developments in transportation hazard classification activities for ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koller, A. M., Jr.; Hannum, J. A. E.

    1983-01-01

    The transportation hazard classification of Ammonium Perchlorate is discussed. A test program was completed and data were forwarded to retain a Class 5.1 designation (oxidizer) for AP which is shipped internationally. As a follow-on to the initial team effort to conduct AP tests existing data were examined and a matrix which catalogs test parameters and findings was compiled. A collection of test protocols is developed to standardize test methods for energetic materials of all types. The actions to date are summarized; the participating organizations and their roles as presently understood; specific findings on AP (matrix); and issues, lessons learned, and potential actions of particular interest to the propulsion community which may evolve as a result of future U.N. propellant transportation classification activities.

  6. Space debris hazard to defense systems

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-05-01

    Natural and man-made debris are argued to present hazards to space systems, but recent data indicate that at low altitudes, the impact rates from small particles may have been overestimated by an order of magnitude. At high altitudes, small particles only present an impact hazard to large satellites; they would not support a cascade. Large particles would apparently produce a cascade only on time scales of centuries or millennia. Radar and optical data should be capable of resolving these uncertainties, but their observations are, as yet, inconsistent. While independent analytic and numerical estimates of collision and cascade rates agree, given consistent inputs, different groups produced significantly different estimates of debris growth rates. This note examines the basis for these discrepancies.

  7. Modified Hazard Ranking System/Hazard Ranking System for sites with mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes: Software documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Stenner, R.D.; Peloquin, R.A.; Hawley, K.A.

    1986-11-01

    The mHRS/HRS software package was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a uniform method for DOE facilities to use in performing their Conservation Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Phase I Modified Hazard Ranking System or Hazard Ranking System evaluations. The program is designed to remove the tedium and potential for error associated with the performing of hand calculations and the interpreting of information on tables and in reference books when performing an evaluation. The software package is designed to operate on a microcomputer (IBM PC, PC/XT, or PC/AT, or a compatible system) using either a dual floppy disk drive or a hard disk storage system. It is written in the dBASE III language and operates using the dBASE III system. Although the mHRS/HRS software package was developed for use at DOE facilities, it has direct applicability to the performing of CERCLA Phase I evaluations for any facility contaminated by hazardous waste. The software can perform evaluations using either the modified hazard ranking system methodology developed by DOE/PNL, the hazard ranking system methodology developed by EPA/MITRE Corp., or a combination of the two. This document is a companion manual to the mHRS/HRS user manual. It is intended for the programmer who must maintain the software package and for those interested in the computer implementation. This manual documents the system logic, computer programs, and data files that comprise the package. Hardware and software implementation requirements are discussed. In addition, hand calculations of three sample situations (problems) with associated computer runs used for the verification of program calculations are included.

  8. Discriminant forest classification method and system

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Barry Y.; Hanley, William G.; Lemmond, Tracy D.; Hiller, Lawrence J.; Knapp, David A.; Mugge, Marshall J.

    2012-11-06

    A hybrid machine learning methodology and system for classification that combines classical random forest (RF) methodology with discriminant analysis (DA) techniques to provide enhanced classification capability. A DA technique which uses feature measurements of an object to predict its class membership, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) or Andersen-Bahadur linear discriminant technique (AB), is used to split the data at each node in each of its classification trees to train and grow the trees and the forest. When training is finished, a set of n DA-based decision trees of a discriminant forest is produced for use in predicting the classification of new samples of unknown class.

  9. ORDNANCE CORPS VIEWS ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION HAZARDS TO WEAPONS SYSTEMS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EXPLOSIVES INITIATORS, * ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION ), HAZARDS, ELECTROMAGNETIC SHIELDING, RADIOFREQUENCY POWER, ANTENNAS, ATTENUATORS, IMPEDANCE MATCHING, SENSITIVITY, WEAPON SYSTEMS, MODULATION, CIRCUITS, BROADBAND

  10. The evaluation of an analytical protocol for the determination of substances in waste for hazard classification

    SciTech Connect

    Hennebert, Pierre; Papin, Arnaud; Padox, Jean-Marie; Hasebrouck, Benoît

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Knowledge of wastes in substances will be necessary to assess HP1–HP15 hazard properties. • A new analytical protocol is proposed for this and tested by two service laboratories on 32 samples. • Sixty-three percentage of the samples have a satisfactory analytical balance between 90% and 110%. • Eighty-four percentage of the samples were classified identically (Seveso Directive) for their hazardousness by the two laboratories. • The method, in progress, is being normalized in France and is be proposed to CEN. - Abstract: The classification of waste as hazardous could soon be assessed in Europe using largely the hazard properties of its constituents, according to the the Classification, Labelling and Packaging (CLP) regulation. Comprehensive knowledge of the component constituents of a given waste will therefore be necessary. An analytical protocol for determining waste composition is proposed, which includes using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) screening methods to identify major elements and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC–MS) screening techniques to measure organic compounds. The method includes a gross or indicator measure of ‘pools’ of higher molecular weight organic substances that are taken to be less bioactive and less hazardous, and of unresolved ‘mass’ during the chromatography of volatile and semi-volatile compounds. The concentration of some elements and specific compounds that are linked to specific hazard properties and are subject to specific regulation (examples include: heavy metals, chromium(VI), cyanides, organo-halogens, and PCBs) are determined by classical quantitative analysis. To check the consistency of the analysis, the sum of the concentrations (including unresolved ‘pools’) should give a mass balance between 90% and 110%. Thirty-two laboratory samples comprising different industrial wastes (liquids and solids) were tested by two routine service laboratories, to give circa 7000 parameter

  11. Hazard Classification of the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2012-05-01

    The Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is constructing a new facility to replace remote-handled low-level radioactive waste disposal capability for INL and Naval Reactors Facility operations. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) will continue until the facility is full or closed for remediation (estimated at approximately fiscal year 2015). Development of a new onsite disposal facility is the highest ranked alternative and will provide RH-LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate RH-LLW for the foreseeable future. As a part of establishing a safety basis for facility operations, the facility will be categorized according to DOE-STD-1027-92. This classification is important in determining the scope of analyses performed in the safety basis and will also dictate operational requirements of the completed facility. This paper discusses the issues affecting hazard classification in this nuclear facility and impacts of the final hazard categorization.

  12. Classification systems for natural resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kleckner, Richard L.

    1981-01-01

    Resource managers employ various types of resource classification systems in their management activities such as inventory, mapping, and data analysis. Classification is the ordering or arranging of objects into groups or sets on the basis of their relationships, and as such, provide the resource managers with a structure for organizing their needed information. In addition of conforming to certain logical principles, resource classifications should be flexible, widely applicable to a variety of environmental conditions, and useable with minimal training. The process of classification may be approached from the bottom up (aggregation) or the top down (subdivision) or a combination of both, depending on the purpose of the classification. Most resource classification systems in use today focus on a single resource and are used for a single, limited purpose. However, resource managers now must employ the concept of multiple use in their management activities. What they need is an integrated, ecologically based approach to resource classification which would fulfill multiple-use mandates. In an effort to achieve resource-data compatibility and data sharing among Federal agencies, and interagency agreement has been signed by five Federal agencies to coordinate and cooperate in the area of resource classification and inventory.

  13. Advances in metals classification under the United Nations globally harmonized system of classification and labeling.

    PubMed

    Skeaff, James; Adams, William J; Rodriguez, Patricio; Brouwers, Tony; Waeterschoot, Hugo

    2011-10-01

    This article shows how regulatory obligations mandated for metal substances can be met with a laboratory-based transformation/dissolution (T/D) method for deriving relevant hazard classification outcomes, which can then be linked to attendant environmental protection management decisions. We report the results of a ring-test at 3 laboratories conducted to determine the interlaboratory precision of the United Nations T/D Protocol (T/DP) in generating data for classifying 4 metal-bearing substances for acute and chronic toxicity under the United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling (GHS) criteria with respect to the aquatic environment. The test substances were Ni metal powder, cuprous oxide (Cu(2) O) powder, tricobalt tetroxide (Co(3) O(4) ) powder, and cuttings of a NILO K Ni-Co-Fe alloy. Following GHS Annex 10 guidelines, we tested 3 loadings (1, 10, and 100 mg/L) of each substance at pH 6 and 8 for 7 or 28 d to yield T/D data for acute and chronic classification, respectively. We compared the T/DP results (dissolved metal in aqueous media) against acute and chronic ecotoxicity reference values (ERVs) for each substance to assess GHS classification outcomes. For dissolved metal ions, the respective acute and chronic ERVs established at the time of the T/D testing were: 29 and 8 µg/L for Cu; 185 and 1.5 µg/L for Co; and 13.3 and 1.0 mg/L for Fe. The acute ERVs for Ni were pH-dependent: 120 and 68 µg/L at pH 6 and 8, respectively, whereas the chronic ERV for Ni was 2.4 µg/L. The acute classification outcomes were consistent among 3 laboratories: cuprous oxide, Acute 1; Ni metal powder, Acute 3; Co(3) O(4) and the NILO K alloy, no classification. We obtained similar consistent results in chronic classifications: Cu(2) O, Ni metal powder, and Co(3) O(4) , Chronic 4; and the NILO K alloy, no classification. However, we observed equivocal results only in 2 of a possible 48 cases where the coefficient of variation of final T

  14. QA CLASSIFICATION ANALYSIS OF GROUND SUPPORT SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Gwyn

    1996-10-29

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to determine if the permanent function Ground Support Systems (CI: BABEEOOOO) are quality-affecting items and if so, to establish the appropriate Quality Assurance (QA) classification.

  15. Radar System Classification Using Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    This study investigated methods of improving the accuracy of neural networks in the classification of large numbers of classes. A literature search...revealed that neural networks have been successful in the radar classification problem, and that many complex problems have been solved using systems...of multiple neural networks . The experiments conducted were based on 32 classes of radar system data. The neural networks were modelled using a program

  16. Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System (E-Manifest)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This webpage provides information on EPA's work toward developing a hazardous waste electronic manifest system. Information on the Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest Establishment Act, progress on the project and frequent questions are available.

  17. Chemical Safety Alert: Fire Hazard from Carbon Adsorption Deodorizing Systems

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Activated carbon systems used to adsorb vapors for odor control may pose a fire hazard when used for certain types of substances, such as crude sulfate turpentine. Facilities should take precautions and proper procedures to avoid or mitigate these hazards.

  18. Quantifying the effectiveness of early warning systems for natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sättele, M.; Bründl, M.; Straub, D.

    2016-01-01

    Early warning systems (EWSs) are increasingly applied as preventive measures within an integrated risk management approach for natural hazards. At present, common standards and detailed guidelines for the evaluation of their effectiveness are lacking. To support decision-makers in the identification of optimal risk mitigation measures, a three-step framework approach for the evaluation of EWSs is presented. The effectiveness is calculated in function of the technical and the inherent reliability of the EWS. The framework is applicable to automated and non-automated EWSs and combinations thereof. To address the specifics and needs of a wide variety of EWS designs, a classification of EWSs is provided, which focuses on the degree of automations encountered in varying EWSs. The framework and its implementation are illustrated through a series of example applications of EWS in an alpine environment.

  19. Quantifying the effectiveness of early warning systems for natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sättele, M.; Bründl, M.; Straub, D.

    2015-07-01

    Early warning systems (EWS) are increasingly applied as preventive measures within an integrated risk management approach for natural hazards. At present, common standards and detailed guidelines for the evaluation of their effectiveness are lacking. To support decision-makers in the identification of optimal risk mitigation measures, a three-step framework approach for the evaluation of EWS is presented. The effectiveness is calculated in function of the technical and the inherent reliability of the EWS. The framework is applicable to automated and non-automated EWS and combinations thereof. To address the specifics and needs of a wide variety of EWS designs, a classification of EWS is provided, which focuses on the degree of automations encountered in varying EWS. The framework and its implementation are illustrated through a series of example applications of EWS in an alpine environment.

  20. Revised Hazard Ranking System (HRS): Final rule

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-09

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has revised the Hazard Ranking System (HRS) in response to the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). The HRS is the scoring system EPA uses to assess the relative threat associated with the release or potential release of hazardous substances from a waste site. The HRS score is the primary criterion EPA uses to determine whether a site should be placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). The NPL identifies sites that warrant further investigation to determine if they pose risks to public health or the environment. Sites on the NPL are eligible for long-term remedial action financed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by SARA. The revised HRS retains the same cutoff score and basic approach as the original HRS, while incorporating SARA requirements as well as improvements identified as necessary by EPA and the public. The revised HRS retains the ground water, surface water, and air pathways drops the direct contact and fire/explosion pathways, and adds a forth pathway, soil exposure.

  1. 49 CFR 173.2a - Classification of a material having more than one hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS... combination. 4 For pesticides only, where a material has the hazards of Class 3, Packing Group III,...

  2. Robots, systems, and methods for hazard evaluation and visualization

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, Curtis W.; Bruemmer, David J.; Walton, Miles C.; Hartley, Robert S.; Gertman, David I.; Kinoshita, Robert A.; Whetten, Jonathan

    2013-01-15

    A robot includes a hazard sensor, a locomotor, and a system controller. The robot senses a hazard intensity at a location of the robot, moves to a new location in response to the hazard intensity, and autonomously repeats the sensing and moving to determine multiple hazard levels at multiple locations. The robot may also include a communicator to communicate the multiple hazard levels to a remote controller. The remote controller includes a communicator for sending user commands to the robot and receiving the hazard levels from the robot. A graphical user interface displays an environment map of the environment proximate the robot and a scale for indicating a hazard intensity. A hazard indicator corresponds to a robot position in the environment map and graphically indicates the hazard intensity at the robot position relative to the scale.

  3. AOSpine subaxial cervical spine injury classification system.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Alexander R; Koerner, John D; Radcliff, Kris E; Oner, F Cumhur; Reinhold, Maximilian; Schnake, Klaus J; Kandziora, Frank; Fehlings, Michael G; Dvorak, Marcel F; Aarabi, Bizhan; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Schroeder, Gregory D; Kepler, Christopher K; Vialle, Luiz R

    2016-07-01

    This project describes a morphology-based subaxial cervical spine traumatic injury classification system. Using the same approach as the thoracolumbar system, the goal was to develop a comprehensive yet simple classification system with high intra- and interobserver reliability to be used for clinical and research purposes. A subaxial cervical spine injury classification system was developed using a consensus process among clinical experts. All investigators were required to successfully grade 10 cases to demonstrate comprehension of the system before grading 30 additional cases on two occasions, 1 month apart. Kappa coefficients (κ) were calculated for intraobserver and interobserver reliability. The classification system is based on three injury morphology types similar to the TL system: compression injuries (A), tension band injuries (B), and translational injuries (C), with additional descriptions for facet injuries, as well as patient-specific modifiers and neurologic status. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability was substantial for all injury subtypes (κ = 0.75 and 0.64, respectively). The AOSpine subaxial cervical spine injury classification system demonstrated substantial reliability in this initial assessment, and could be a valuable tool for communication, patient care and for research purposes.

  4. Classification Systems Used in Medical Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Scheerer, George; Hines, Lois E.

    1974-01-01

    The present study identifies the classification systems used in 941 libraries. It explores the reasons behind the choice of the National Library of Medicine Classification by 589 libraries. Reclassification procedures were investigated through a questionnaire sent to twenty-five libraries that have changed to NLM since 1959. Statistics and replies are given on: the classification systems employed prior to reclassification; the use of broad or specific Library of Congress class numbers in the LC schedules outside the scope of the NLM schedules; the number of catalogers in each library doing the reclassification; the use of cut-off dates for retrospective materials; the adoption of MeSH headings; user preference; and cost differences. Chief reasons for the change to NLM proved to be local circumstances, currency, arrangement of subclasses by NLM, its dovetailing with the LC Classification, and reliance upon nationally centralized cataloging services. PMID:4466505

  5. Vegetation classification system for California: user's guide

    Treesearch

    Serena C. Hunter; Timothy E. Paysen

    1986-01-01

    The Vegetation Classification System for California is an unbiased system of defining and naming units of vegetation. The concept was devised by an interagency, interdisciplinary team (Paysen and others 1980, 1982). The system derives its uniqueness from its impartiality to any particular agency or resource discipline, thus providing a long-needed link between diverse...

  6. Proximal humeral fracture classification systems revisited.

    PubMed

    Majed, Addie; Macleod, Iain; Bull, Anthony M J; Zyto, Karol; Resch, Herbert; Hertel, Ralph; Reilly, Peter; Emery, Roger J H

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluated several classification systems and expert surgeons' anatomic understanding of these complex injuries based on a consecutive series of patients. We hypothesized that current proximal humeral fracture classification systems, regardless of imaging methods, are not sufficiently reliable to aid clinical management of these injuries. Complex fractures in 96 consecutive patients were investigated by generation of rapid sequence prototyping models from computed tomography Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) imaging data. Four independent senior observers were asked to classify each model using 4 classification systems: Neer, AO, Codman-Hertel, and a prototype classification system by Resch. Interobserver and intraobserver κ coefficient values were calculated for the overall classification system and for selected classification items. The κ coefficient values for the interobserver reliability were 0.33 for Neer, 0.11 for AO, 0.44 for Codman-Hertel, and 0.15 for Resch. Interobserver reliability κ coefficient values were 0.32 for the number of fragments and 0.30 for the anatomic segment involved using the Neer system, 0.30 for the AO type (A, B, C), and 0.53, 0.48, and 0.08 for the Resch impaction/distraction, varus/valgus and flexion/extension subgroups, respectively. Three-part fractures showed low reliability for the Neer and AO systems. Currently available evidence suggests fracture classifications in use have poor intra- and inter-observer reliability despite the modality of imaging used thus making treating these injuries difficult as weak as affecting scientific research as well. This study was undertaken to evaluate the reliability of several systems using rapid sequence prototype models. Overall interobserver κ values represented slight to moderate agreement. The most reliable interobserver scores were found with the Codman-Hertel classification, followed by elements of Resch's trial system. The AO system had the lowest

  7. Hazardous chemical tracking system (HAZ-TRAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Bramlette, J D; Ewart, S M; Jones, C E

    1990-07-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO) developed and implemented a computerized hazardous chemical tracking system, referred to as Haz-Trac, for use at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Haz-Trac is designed to provide a means to improve the accuracy and reliability of chemical information, which enhances the overall quality and safety of ICPP operations. The system tracks all chemicals and chemical components from the time they enter the ICPP until the chemical changes form, is used, or becomes a waste. The system runs on a Hewlett-Packard (HP) 3000 Series 70 computer. The system is written in COBOL and uses VIEW/3000, TurboIMAGE/DBMS 3000, OMNIDEX, and SPEEDWARE. The HP 3000 may be accessed throughout the ICPP, and from remote locations, using data communication lines. Haz-Trac went into production in October, 1989. Currently, over 1910 chemicals and chemical components are tracked on the system. More than 2500 personnel hours were saved during the first six months of operation. Cost savings have been realized by reducing the time needed to collect and compile reporting information, identifying and disposing of unneeded chemicals, and eliminating duplicate inventories. Haz-Trac maintains information required by the Superfund Amendment Reauthorization Act (SARA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

  8. The Hazards Data Distribution System update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Brenda K.; Lamb, Rynn M.

    2010-01-01

    After a major disaster, a satellite image or a collection of aerial photographs of the event is frequently the fastest, most effective way to determine its scope and severity. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Emergency Operations Portal provides emergency first responders and support personnel with easy access to imagery and geospatial data, geospatial Web services, and a digital library focused on emergency operations. Imagery and geospatial data are accessed through the Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS). HDDS historically provided data access and delivery services through nongraphical interfaces that allow emergency response personnel to select and obtain pre-event baseline data and (or) event/disaster response data. First responders are able to access full-resolution GeoTIFF images or JPEG images at medium- and low-quality compressions through ftp downloads. USGS HDDS home page: http://hdds.usgs.gov/hdds2/

  9. Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Renee Clary and James Wandersee describe the beginnings of "Classification," which lies at the very heart of science and depends upon pattern recognition. Clary and Wandersee approach patterns by first telling the story of the "Linnaean classification system," introduced by Carl Linnacus (1707-1778), who is…

  10. Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Renee Clary and James Wandersee describe the beginnings of "Classification," which lies at the very heart of science and depends upon pattern recognition. Clary and Wandersee approach patterns by first telling the story of the "Linnaean classification system," introduced by Carl Linnacus (1707-1778), who is…

  11. Desicion Support System For Natural Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyazilov, E.

    2009-04-01

    recommendations should be reasonable. To resolve the above problems or to make them less significant it is necessary to develop decision support systems (DSS). DMs need not tables with initial data, analytical, forecasting and climatic information, but messages containing warnings on critical value accidence, information on probability of hazards, information on potential losses, and information on hazardous impacts and recommendations on decision making. DSS can do the following: take into account impacts on specific points and on the total area under consideration; allow for the effects of the environment on economic entities (objects) in any geographical region to be analyzed; distinguish impacts and changes caused both by different phenomena and by their combination; signal when objects are or can be in adverse environmental conditions, e.g. in the area affected by fog, storm, tropical cyclone or in the area where the probability of hazardous ice events is very high, etc. The main component of DSS is a knowledge base based on the following concept: if we know environmental conditions it is possible to predict potential impacts on the economy; if we know impacts it is possible to give a set of recommendations on how to prevent (reduce) losses or how to use natural resources most efficiently. Decision making criteria are safety of people and property, reduction of losses, increase of profit, materials saving, etc. Knowledge base is a set of rules formulated in a formalized way using if, that, else. If "Water level in S.-Petersburg >150 cm" that "To give out warning information "Hazards for building on coastal river Neva is possible" and recommendations "The valuable goods carry out in second floor" else "To switch another rule". To have a knowledge base in place it is necessary to: develop tools of identifying and getting knowledge from experts; arrange the information flow from available information systems (operational data, analyses, forecasts, climatic information) through

  12. Application of classification principles to improve the reliability of incident classification systems: A test case using HFACS-ADF.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Nikki; Williamson, Ann

    2017-09-01

    Accident classification systems are important tools for safety management. Unfortunately, many of the tools available have demonstrated poor reliability of coding, making their validity and usefulness questionable. This paper demonstrates the application of four strategies to improve the reliability of accident and incident classification systems. The strategies include creating a domain-specific system with limitations on system size and careful selection of codes, specifically the reduction of abstract concepts and bias-causing terminology. Using HFACS-ADF as a test case, the system was adapted using the strategies and validated using comprehension and comprehensiveness testing. The new system was then assessed for reliability. The reliability of the system increased by at least 20% at all levels of the classification system following the changes made. The results provide evidence that the application of theoretically and empirically-derived classification principles are effective for improving the reliability of accident and incident classification systems in high hazard industries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 75 FR 71559 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Withdrawal of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 261 Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste... final exclusion for ExxonMobil Refining and Supply Company-- Beaumont Refinery, published on October 1...Mobil Refining and Supply Company--Beaumont Refinery, published on October 1, 2010, 75 FR 60632....

  14. 75 FR 73972 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Removal of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 261 Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste... exclusion for Eastman Chemical Company--Texas Operations, published on September 24, 2010. DATES: Effective... Company--Texas Operations, published on September 24, 2010, 75 FR 58315. We stated in that direct...

  15. Environmental Protection for Hazardous Materials Incidents. Volume 1. Hazardous Materials Incident Management System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    227 9. Cloves ............................................ 2’h 10. Footwear .......................................... 231...Occupational Safety and Health Xvi NOAA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NSN National Stock Number OHM-TADS Oil and Hazardous Materials...8217rechnical Assistance Data Systems OHSPC Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency "ORM Other Regulated Material ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  16. 76 FR 59960 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Withdrawal of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 261 Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste... Planning and Permitting Division, Corrective Action and Waste Minimization Section (6PD-C), 1445 Ross... will be taken on this petition. A new petition will be required for this waste stream. List of Subjects...

  17. A statistical approach to root system classification

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Gernot; Leitner, Daniel; Nakhforoosh, Alireza; Sobotik, Monika; Moder, Karl; Kaul, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Plant root systems have a key role in ecology and agronomy. In spite of fast increase in root studies, still there is no classification that allows distinguishing among distinctive characteristics within the diversity of rooting strategies. Our hypothesis is that a multivariate approach for “plant functional type” identification in ecology can be applied to the classification of root systems. The classification method presented is based on a data-defined statistical procedure without a priori decision on the classifiers. The study demonstrates that principal component based rooting types provide efficient and meaningful multi-trait classifiers. The classification method is exemplified with simulated root architectures and morphological field data. Simulated root architectures showed that morphological attributes with spatial distribution parameters capture most distinctive features within root system diversity. While developmental type (tap vs. shoot-borne systems) is a strong, but coarse classifier, topological traits provide the most detailed differentiation among distinctive groups. Adequacy of commonly available morphologic traits for classification is supported by field data. Rooting types emerging from measured data, mainly distinguished by diameter/weight and density dominated types. Similarity of root systems within distinctive groups was the joint result of phylogenetic relation and environmental as well as human selection pressure. We concluded that the data-define classification is appropriate for integration of knowledge obtained with different root measurement methods and at various scales. Currently root morphology is the most promising basis for classification due to widely used common measurement protocols. To capture details of root diversity efforts in architectural measurement techniques are essential. PMID:23914200

  18. Active polarimeter optical system laser hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-07-01

    A laser hazard analysis was performed for the SNL Active Polarimeter Optical System based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The Active Polarimeter Optical System (APOS) uses a pulsed, near-infrared, chromium doped lithium strontium aluminum fluoride (Cr:LiSAF) crystal laser in conjunction with a holographic diffuser and lens to illuminate a scene of interest. The APOS is intended for outdoor operations. The system is mounted on a height adjustable platform (6 feet to 40 feet) and sits atop a tripod that points the beam downward. The beam can be pointed from nadir to as much as 60 degrees off of nadir producing an illuminating spot geometry that can vary from circular (at nadir) to elliptical in shape (off of nadir). The JP Innovations crystal Cr:LiSAF laser parameters are presented in section II. The illuminating laser spot size is variable and can be adjusted by adjusting the separation distance between the lens and the holographic diffuser. The system is adjusted while platform is at the lowest level. The laser spot is adjusted for a particular spot size at a particular distance (elevation) from the laser by adjusting the separation distance (d{sub diffuser}) to predetermined values. The downward pointing angle is also adjusted before the platform is raised to the selected operation elevation.

  19. Hazard classification for the supercritical water oxidation test bed. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    A hazard classification of ``routinely accepted by the public`` has been determined for the operation of the supercritical water oxidation test bed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This determination is based on the fact that the design and proposed operation meet or exceed appropriate national standards so that the risks are equivalent to those present in similar activities conducted in private industry. Each of the 17 criteria for hazards ``routinely accepted by the public,`` identified in the EG and G Idaho, Inc., Safety Manual, were analyzed. The supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) test bed will treat simulated mixed waste without the radioactive component. It will be designed to operate with eight test wastes. These test wastes have been chosen to represent a broad cross-section of candidate mixed wastes anticipated for storage or generation by DOE. In particular, the test bed will generate data to evaluate the ability of the technology to treat chlorinated waste and other wastes that have in the past caused severe corrosion and deposition in SCWO reactors.

  20. An evaluation of classification systems for stillbirth

    PubMed Central

    Flenady, Vicki; Frøen, J Frederik; Pinar, Halit; Torabi, Rozbeh; Saastad, Eli; Guyon, Grace; Russell, Laurie; Charles, Adrian; Harrison, Catherine; Chauke, Lawrence; Pattinson, Robert; Koshy, Rachel; Bahrin, Safiah; Gardener, Glenn; Day, Katie; Petersson, Karin; Gordon, Adrienne; Gilshenan, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    Background Audit and classification of stillbirths is an essential part of clinical practice and a crucial step towards stillbirth prevention. Due to the limitations of the ICD system and lack of an international approach to an acceptable solution, numerous disparate classification systems have emerged. We assessed the performance of six contemporary systems to inform the development of an internationally accepted approach. Methods We evaluated the following systems: Amended Aberdeen, Extended Wigglesworth; PSANZ-PDC, ReCoDe, Tulip and CODAC. Nine teams from 7 countries applied the classification systems to cohorts of stillbirths from their regions using 857 stillbirth cases. The main outcome measures were: the ability to retain the important information about the death using the InfoKeep rating; the ease of use according to the Ease rating (both measures used a five-point scale with a score <2 considered unsatisfactory); inter-observer agreement and the proportion of unexplained stillbirths. A randomly selected subset of 100 stillbirths was used to assess inter-observer agreement. Results InfoKeep scores were significantly different across the classifications (p ≤ 0.01) due to low scores for Wigglesworth and Aberdeen. CODAC received the highest mean (SD) score of 3.40 (0.73) followed by PSANZ-PDC, ReCoDe and Tulip [2.77 (1.00), 2.36 (1.21), 1.92 (1.24) respectively]. Wigglesworth and Aberdeen resulted in a high proportion of unexplained stillbirths and CODAC and Tulip the lowest. While Ease scores were different (p ≤ 0.01), all systems received satisfactory scores; CODAC received the highest score. Aberdeen and Wigglesworth showed poor agreement with kappas of 0.35 and 0.25 respectively. Tulip performed best with a kappa of 0.74. The remainder had good to fair agreement. Conclusion The Extended Wigglesworth and Amended Aberdeen systems cannot be recommended for classification of stillbirths. Overall, CODAC performed best with PSANZ-PDC and ReCoDe performing

  1. Error Detection in Mechanized Classification Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyle, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    When documentary material is indexed by a mechanized classification system, and the results judged by trained professionals, the number of documents in disagreement, after suitable adjustment, defines the error rate of the system. In a test case disagreement was 22 percent and, of this 22 percent, the computer correctly identified two-thirds of…

  2. 42 CFR 412.513 - Patient classification system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Patient classification system. 412.513 Section 412... Long-Term Care Hospitals § 412.513 Patient classification system. (a) Classification methodology. CMS... LTC-DRG classification system provides a LTC-DRG, and an appropriate weighting factor, for those cases...

  3. 42 CFR 412.513 - Patient classification system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Patient classification system. 412.513 Section 412... Long-Term Care Hospitals § 412.513 Patient classification system. (a) Classification methodology. CMS... LTC-DRG classification system provides a LTC-DRG, and an appropriate weighting factor, for those cases...

  4. 42 CFR 412.513 - Patient classification system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Patient classification system. 412.513 Section 412... Long-Term Care Hospitals § 412.513 Patient classification system. (a) Classification methodology. CMS... LTC-DRG classification system provides a LTC-DRG, and an appropriate weighting factor, for those cases...

  5. Fish detection and classification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidd, Richard A.; Wilder, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Marine biologists traditionally determine the presence and quantities of different types of fish by dragging nets across the bottom, and examining their contents. This method, although accurate, kills the collected fish, damages their habitat, and consumes large quantities of resources. This paper presents an alternative, a machine vision system capable of determining the presence of fish species. Illumination presents a unique problem in this environment, and the design of an effective illumination system is discussed. The related issues of object orientation and measurement are also discussed and resolved. Capturing images of fish in murky water also presents challenges. An adaptive thresholding technique is required to appropriately segment the fish from the background in these images. Mode detection, and histogram analysis are useful tools in determining these localized thresholds. It is anticipated that this system, created in conjunction with the Rutgers Institute for Marine and Coastal Science, will effectively classify fish in the estuarine environment.

  6. The Kindness of Strangers: Kinds and Politics in Classification Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowker, Geoffrey C.

    1998-01-01

    Examines some medical classification systems with a long history--notably the "International Classification of Diseases (ICD)." States that this classification scheme retains many traces of its own administrative and organizational past in its current form. Suggests that ICD, like other large-scale classification systems, performs so…

  7. Common occupational classification system - revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Stahlman, E.J.; Lewis, R.E.

    1996-05-01

    Workforce planning has become an increasing concern within the DOE community as the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER/WM or EM) seeks to consolidate and refocus its activities and the Office of Defense Programs (DP) closes production sites. Attempts to manage the growth and skills mix of the EM workforce while retaining the critical skills of the DP workforce have been difficult due to the lack of a consistent set of occupational titles and definitions across the complex. Two reasons for this difficulty may be cited. First, classification systems commonly used in industry often fail to cover in sufficient depth the unique demands of DOE`s nuclear energy and research community. Second, the government practice of contracting the operation of government facilities to the private sector has introduced numerous contractor-specific classification schemes to the DOE complex. As a result, sites/contractors report their workforce needs using unique classification systems. It becomes difficult, therefore, to roll these data up to the national level necessary to support strategic planning and analysis. The Common Occupational Classification System (COCS) is designed to overcome these workforce planning barriers. The COCS is based on earlier workforce planning activities and the input of technical, workforce planning, and human resource managers from across the DOE complex. It provides a set of mutually-exclusive occupation titles and definitions that cover the broad range of activities present in the DOE complex. The COCS is not a required record-keeping or data management guide. Neither is it intended to replace contractor/DOE-specific classification systems. Instead, the system provides a consistent, high- level, functional structure of occupations to which contractors can crosswalk (map) their job titles.

  8. 21 CFR 7.41 - Health hazard evaluation and recall classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... who may be at greatest risk. (4) Assessment of the degree of seriousness of the health hazard to which the populations at risk would be exposed. (5) Assessment of the likelihood of occurrence of the hazard... the individual(s) making the health hazard determination. (3) Assessment of hazard to various segments...

  9. Hazard banding in compliance with the new Globally Harmonised System (GHS) for use in control banding tools.

    PubMed

    Arnone, Mario; Koppisch, Dorothea; Smola, Thomas; Gabriel, Stefan; Verbist, Koen; Visser, Remco

    2015-10-01

    Many control banding tools use hazard banding in risk assessments for the occupational handling of hazardous substances. The outcome of these assessments can be combined with advice for the required risk management measures (RMMs). The Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) has resulted in a change in the hazard communication elements, i.e. Hazard (H) statements instead of Risk-phrases. Hazard banding schemes that depend on the old form of safety information have to be adapted to the new rules. The purpose of this publication is to outline the rationales for the assignment of hazard bands to H statements under the GHS. Based on this, this publication proposes a hazard banding scheme that uses the information from the safety data sheets as the basis for assignment. The assignment of hazard bands tiered according to the severity of the underlying hazards supports the important principle of substitution. Additionally, the set of assignment rules permits an exposure-route-specific assignment of hazard bands, which is necessary for the proposed route-specific RMMs. Ideally, all control banding tools should apply the same assignment rules. This GHS-compliant hazard banding scheme can hopefully help to establish a unified hazard banding strategy in the various control banding tools.

  10. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR BACKFILL EMPLACEMENT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    R. Garrett

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) backfill emplacement system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  11. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR EMERGENCY RESPONSE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Zeigler

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) emergency response system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P7 ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  12. Building a classification system that works.

    PubMed

    Unger, J

    1985-01-01

    The process one nursing department used to develop, test, implement, and monitor a definitive patient classification system that accurately predicts needed nursing staff and correlates with department budget is described. The author demonstrates that staff nurses with ordinary skills and experience, using limited resources of time and money, can build a valid, reliable, workable system amenable to computerization and future use in costing out nursing care on an individual patient or diagnosis related group (DRG) basis.

  13. Modified hazard ranking system for sites with mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes. User manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, K.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Stenner, R.D.

    1986-04-01

    This document describes both the original Hazard Ranking System and the modified Hazard Ranking System as they are to be used in evaluating the relative potential for uncontrolled hazardous substance facilities to cause human health or safety problems or ecological or environmental damage. Detailed instructions for using the mHRS/HRS computer code are provided, along with instructions for performing the calculations by hand. Uniform application of the ranking system will permit the DOE to identify those releases of hazardous substances that pose the greatest hazard to humans or the environment. However, the mHRS/HRS by itself cannot establish priorities for the allocation of funds for remedial action. The mHRS/HRS is a means for applying uniform technical judgment regarding the potential hazards presented by a facility relative to other facilities. It does not address the feasibility, desirability, or degree of cleanup required. Neither does it deal with the readiness or ability of a state to carry out such remedial action, as may be indicated, or to meet other conditions prescribed in CERCLA. 13 refs., 13 figs., 27 tabs.

  14. Hazardous Materials Management System. A Guide for Local Emergency Managers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    Office of Emergency Management 12240 N.E. Glisan, Portland, Oregon 97230 81 9 21 043 whom- son MCOEM 0779 July, 1981 Final Report HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...Emergency Management 12210 N. E. Glisan, Portland, Oregon 97230 FEMA REVIEW NOTICE "This report has been reviewed in the Federal Emergency Management Agency...Management Agency." SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF ’.IS PAGE (When. Dot* f’Aor i . lb M INSTRUCTIONS REPORT DOCUENTATION PAGE BEOR COMPLETIORM I. REPORT NUMBER

  15. Automotive System for Remote Surface Classification

    PubMed Central

    Bystrov, Aleksandr; Hoare, Edward; Tran, Thuy-Yung; Clarke, Nigel; Gashinova, Marina; Cherniakov, Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we shall discuss a novel approach to road surface recognition, based on the analysis of backscattered microwave and ultrasonic signals. The novelty of our method is sonar and polarimetric radar data fusion, extraction of features for separate swathes of illuminated surface (segmentation), and using of multi-stage artificial neural network for surface classification. The developed system consists of 24 GHz radar and 40 kHz ultrasonic sensor. The features are extracted from backscattered signals and then the procedures of principal component analysis and supervised classification are applied to feature data. The special attention is paid to multi-stage artificial neural network which allows an overall increase in classification accuracy. The proposed technique was tested for recognition of a large number of real surfaces in different weather conditions with the average accuracy of correct classification of 95%. The obtained results thereby demonstrate that the use of proposed system architecture and statistical methods allow for reliable discrimination of various road surfaces in real conditions. PMID:28368297

  16. Synthetic vitreous fibers: a review of toxicology research and its impact on hazard classification.

    PubMed

    Hesterberg, T W; Hart, G A

    2001-01-01

    Because the inhalation of asbestos, a naturally occurring, inorganic fibrous material, is associated with lung fibrosis and thoracic cancers, concerns have been raised about the possible health effects of synthetic vitreous fibers (SVFs). SVFs include a very broad variety of inorganic fibrous materials with an amorphous molecular structure. Traditionally, SVFs have been divided into three subcategories based on composition: fiberglass, mineral wool (rock, stone, and slag wools), and refractory ceramic fiber. For more than 50 years, the toxicologic potential of SVFs has been researched extensively using human epidemiology and a variety of laboratory studies. Here we review the research and its impact on hazard classification and regulation of SVFs. Large, ongoing epidemiology studies of SVF manufacturing workers have provided very little evidence of harmful effects in humans. Several decades of research using rodents exposed by inhalation have confirmed that SVF pulmonary effects are determined by the "Three D's", fiber dose (lung), dimension, and durability. Lung dose over time is determined by fiber deposition and biopersistence in the lung. Deposition is inversely related to fiber diameter. Biopersistence is directly related to fiber length and inversely related to fiber dissolution and fragmentation rates. Inhaled short fibers are cleared from the lung relatively quickly by mobile phagocytic cells, but long fibers persist until they dissolve or fragment. In contrast to asbestos, most of the SVFs tested in rodent inhalation studies cleared rapidly from the lung (were nonbiopersistent) and were innocuous. However, several relativley biopersistent SVFs induced chronic inflammation, lung scarring (fibrosis), and thoracic neoplasms. Thus, biopersistence of fibers is now generally recognized as a key determinant of the toxicologic potential of SVFs. In vitro dissolution of fibers in simulated extracellular fluid correlates fairly well with fiber biopersistence in the

  17. Self-contained clothing system provides protection against hazardous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Self-contained clothing system protects personnel against hazardous environments. The clothing has an environmental control system and a complete protection envelope consisting of an outer garment, inner garment, underwear, boots, gloves, and helmet.

  18. Exploring the effects of driving experience on hazard awareness and risk perception via real-time hazard identification, hazard classification, and rating tasks.

    PubMed

    Borowsky, Avinoam; Oron-Gilad, Tal

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of driving experience on hazard awareness and risk perception skills. These topics have previously been investigated separately, yet a novel approach is suggested where hazard awareness and risk perception are examined concurrently. Young, newly qualified drivers, experienced drivers, and a group of commercial drivers, namely, taxi drivers performed three consecutive tasks: (1) observed 10 short movies of real-world driving situations and were asked to press a button each time they identified a hazardous situation; (2) observed one of three possible sub-sets of 8 movies (out of the 10 they have seen earlier) for the second time, and were asked to categorize them into an arbitrary number of clusters according to the similarity in their hazardous situation; and (3) observed the same sub-set for a third time and following each movie were asked to rate its level of hazardousness. The first task is considered a real-time identification task while the other two are performed using hindsight. During it participants' eye movements were recorded. Results showed that taxi drivers were more sensitive to hidden hazards than the other driver groups and that young-novices were the least sensitive. Young-novice drivers also relied heavily on materialized hazards in their categorization structure. In addition, it emerged that risk perception was derived from two major components: the likelihood of a crash and the severity of its outcome. Yet, the outcome was rarely considered under time pressure (i.e., in real-time hazard identification tasks). Using hindsight, when drivers were provided with the opportunity to rate the movies' hazardousness more freely (rating task) they considered both components. Otherwise, in the categorization task, they usually chose the severity of the crash outcome as their dominant criterion. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. System Safety Hazards Assessment in Conceptual Program Trade Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eben, Dennis M.; Saemisch, Michael K.

    2003-01-01

    Providing a program in the concept development phase with a method of determining system safety benefits of potential concepts has always been a challenge. Lockheed Martin Space and Strategic Missiles has developed a methodology for developing a relative system safety ranking using the potential hazards of each concept. The resulting output supports program decisions with system safety as an evaluation criterion with supporting data for evaluation. This approach begins with a generic hazards list that has been tailored for the program being studied and augmented with an initial hazard analysis. Each proposed concept is assessed against the list of program hazards and ranked in three derived areas. The hazards can be weighted to show those that are of more concern to the program. Sensitivities can be also be determined to test the robustness of the conclusions

  20. Intelligent Computer Vision System for Automated Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanov, Ivan; Georgieva, Antoniya

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we investigate an Intelligent Computer Vision System applied for recognition and classification of commercially available cork tiles. The system is capable of acquiring and processing gray images using several feature generation and analysis techniques. Its functionality includes image acquisition, feature extraction and preprocessing, and feature classification with neural networks (NN). We also discuss system test and validation results from the recognition and classification tasks. The system investigation also includes statistical feature processing (features number and dimensionality reduction techniques) and classifier design (NN architecture, target coding, learning complexity and performance, and training with our own metaheuristic optimization method). The NNs trained with our genetic low-discrepancy search method (GLPτS) for global optimisation demonstrated very good generalisation abilities. In our view, the reported testing success rate of up to 95% is due to several factors: combination of feature generation techniques; application of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA), which appeared to be very efficient for preprocessing the data; and use of suitable NN design and learning method.

  1. Intelligent Computer Vision System for Automated Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanov, Ivan; Georgieva, Antoniya

    2010-05-21

    In this paper we investigate an Intelligent Computer Vision System applied for recognition and classification of commercially available cork tiles. The system is capable of acquiring and processing gray images using several feature generation and analysis techniques. Its functionality includes image acquisition, feature extraction and preprocessing, and feature classification with neural networks (NN). We also discuss system test and validation results from the recognition and classification tasks. The system investigation also includes statistical feature processing (features number and dimensionality reduction techniques) and classifier design (NN architecture, target coding, learning complexity and performance, and training with our own metaheuristic optimization method). The NNs trained with our genetic low-discrepancy search method (GLPtauS) for global optimisation demonstrated very good generalisation abilities. In our view, the reported testing success rate of up to 95% is due to several factors: combination of feature generation techniques; application of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA), which appeared to be very efficient for preprocessing the data; and use of suitable NN design and learning method.

  2. Classification framework for partially observed dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuan; Tino, Peter; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira

    2017-04-01

    We present a general framework for classifying partially observed dynamical systems based on the idea of learning in the model space. In contrast to the existing approaches using point estimates of model parameters to represent individual data items, we employ posterior distributions over model parameters, thus taking into account in a principled manner the uncertainty due to both the generative (observational and/or dynamic noise) and observation (sampling in time) processes. We evaluate the framework on two test beds: a biological pathway model and a stochastic double-well system. Crucially, we show that the classification performance is not impaired when the model structure used for inferring posterior distributions is much more simple than the observation-generating model structure, provided the reduced-complexity inferential model structure captures the essential characteristics needed for the given classification task.

  3. Proposed clinical internal carotid artery classification system

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrauf, Saleem I; Ashour, Ahmed M; Marvin, Eric; Coppens, Jeroen; Kang, Brian; Hsieh, Tze Yu Yeh; Nery, Breno; Penanes, Juan R; Alsahlawi, Aysha K; Moore, Shawn; Al-Shaar, Hussam Abou; Kemp, Joanna; Chawla, Kanika; Sujijantarat, Nanthiya; Najeeb, Alaa; Parkar, Nadeem; Shetty, Vilaas; Vafaie, Tina; Antisdel, Jastin; Mikulec, Tony A; Edgell, Randall; Lebovitz, Jonathan; Pierson, Matt; Pires de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Buchanan, Paula; Di Cosola, Angela; Stevens, George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Numerical classification systems for the internal carotid artery (ICA) are available, but modifications have added confusion to the numerical systems. Furthermore, previous classifications may not be applicable uniformly to microsurgical and endoscopic procedures. The purpose of this study was to develop a clinically useful classification system. Materials and Methods: We performed cadaver dissections of the ICA in 5 heads (10 sides) and evaluated 648 internal carotid arteries with computed tomography angiography. We identified specific anatomic landmarks to define the beginning and end of each ICA segment. Results: The ICA was classified into eight segments based on the cadaver and imaging findings: (1) Cervical segment; (2) cochlear segment (ascending segment of the ICA in the temporal bone) (relation of the start of this segment to the base of the styloid process: Above, 425 sides [80%]; below, 2 sides [0.4%]; at same level, 107 sides [20%]; P < 0.0001) (relation of cochlea to ICA: Posterior, 501 sides [85%]; posteromedial, 84 sides [14%]; P < 0.0001); (3) petrous segment (horizontal segment of ICA in the temporal bone) starting at the crossing of the eustachian tube superolateral to the ICA turn in all 10 samples; (4) Gasserian-Clival segment (ascending segment of ICA in the cavernous sinus) starting at the petrolingual ligament (PLL) (relation to vidian canal on imaging: At same level, 360 sides [63%]; below, 154 sides [27%]; above, 53 sides [9%]; P < 0.0001); in this segment, the ICA projected medially toward the clivus in 275 sides (52%) or parallel to the clivus with no deviation in 256 sides (48%; P < 0.0001); (5) sellar segment (medial loop of ICA in the cavernous sinus) starting at the takeoff of the meningeal hypophyseal trunk (ICA was medial into the sella in 271 cases [46%], lateral without touching the sella in 127 cases [23%], and abutting the sella in 182 cases [31%]; P < 0.0001); (6) sphenoid segment (lateral loop of ICA within the

  4. Guide for Hydrogen Hazards Analysis on Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, Harold; Woods, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    The physical and combustion properties of hydrogen give rise to hazards that must be considered when designing and operating a hydrogen system. One of the major concerns in the use of hydrogen is that of fire or detonation because of hydrogen's wide flammability range, low ignition energy, and flame speed. Other concerns include the contact and interaction of hydrogen with materials, such as the hydrogen embrittlement of materials and the formation of hydrogen hydrides. The low temperature of liquid and slush hydrogen bring other concerns related to material compatibility and pressure control; this is especially important when dissimilar, adjoining materials are involved. The potential hazards arising from these properties and design features necessitate a proper hydrogen hazards analysis before introducing a material, component, or system into hydrogen service. The objective of this guide is to describe the NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility hydrogen hazards analysis method that should be performed before hydrogen is used in components and/or systems. The method is consistent with standard practices for analyzing hazards. It is recommended that this analysis be made before implementing a hydrogen component qualification procedure. A hydrogen hazards analysis is a useful tool for hydrogen-system designers, system and safety engineers, and facility managers. A hydrogen hazards analysis can identify problem areas before hydrogen is introduced into a system-preventing damage to hardware, delay or loss of mission or objective, and possible injury or loss of life.

  5. Department of Defense Hazardous Chemical Warning Labeling System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    LAPELING SYSTEM TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Foreword j Table of Contents ii Introduction 1 Data Elements of the DoD Label 4 Hazardous Material Label Sections 5...Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) Polyester Phenolic Resin !-I DoD Hazardous Materials Information System Dart - Benz,’nc AR 1-8 Ma terala Safnty Data...129.u 1ion)2ryLabelli ng (A,•,3I Z129.1I - 19837) 2-1 / DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL WARNING LABELING SYSTEM On August 29, l987, the

  6. Integrated Geo Hazard Management System in Cloud Computing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanifah, M. I. M.; Omar, R. C.; Khalid, N. H. N.; Ismail, A.; Mustapha, I. S.; Baharuddin, I. N. Z.; Roslan, R.; Zalam, W. M. Z.

    2016-11-01

    Geo hazard can result in reducing of environmental health and huge economic losses especially in mountainous area. In order to mitigate geo-hazard effectively, cloud computer technology are introduce for managing geo hazard database. Cloud computing technology and it services capable to provide stakeholder's with geo hazards information in near to real time for an effective environmental management and decision-making. UNITEN Integrated Geo Hazard Management System consist of the network management and operation to monitor geo-hazard disaster especially landslide in our study area at Kelantan River Basin and boundary between Hulu Kelantan and Hulu Terengganu. The system will provide easily manage flexible measuring system with data management operates autonomously and can be controlled by commands to collects and controls remotely by using “cloud” system computing. This paper aims to document the above relationship by identifying the special features and needs associated with effective geohazard database management using “cloud system”. This system later will use as part of the development activities and result in minimizing the frequency of the geo-hazard and risk at that research area.

  7. Superfund Hazard Ranking System Training Course: Table of Contents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Hazard Ranking System (HRS) training course is a four and ½ day, intermediate-level course designed for personnel who are required to compile, draft, and review preliminary assessments (PAs), site inspections (SIs), and HRS documentation records/packag

  8. Dust Hazard Management in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Most robotic missions to the outer solar system must grapple with the hazards posed by the dusty rings of the gas giants. Early assessments of these hazards led simply to ring avoidance due to insufficient data and high uncertainties on the dust population present in such rings. Recent approaches, principal among them the Cassini dust hazard management strategy, provide useful results from detailed modeling of spacecraft vulnerabilities and dust hazard regions, which along with the range of mission trajectories are used to to assess the risks posed by each passage through a zone of potential hazard. This paper shows the general approach used to implement the analysis for Cassini, with recommendations for future outer planet missions.

  9. Dust Hazard Management in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Most robotic missions to the outer solar system must grapple with the hazards posed by the dusty rings of the gas giants. Early assessments of these hazards led simply to ring avoidance due to insufficient data and high uncertainties on the dust population present in such rings. Recent approaches, principal among them the Cassini dust hazard management strategy, provide useful results from detailed modeling of spacecraft vulnerabilities and dust hazard regions, which along with the range of mission trajectories are used to to assess the risks posed by each passage through a zone of potential hazard. This paper shows the general approach used to implement the analysis for Cassini, with recommendations for future outer planet missions.

  10. A program system for efficient multispectral classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åkersten, S. I.

    Pixelwise multispectral classification is an important tool for analyzing remotely sensed imagery data. The computing time for performing this analysis becomes significantly large when large, multilayer images are analyzed. In the classical implementation of the supervised multispectral classification assuming gaussian-shaped multidimensional class-clusters, the computing time is furthermore approximately proportional to the square of the number of image layers. This leads to very appreciable CPU-times when large numbers of multispectral channels are used and/or temporal classification is performed. In order to decrease computer time, a classification program system has been implemented which has the following characteristics: (1) a simple one-dimensional box classifier, (2) a multidimensional box classifier, (3) a class-pivotal "canonical" classifier utilizing full maximum likelihood and making full use of within-class and between-class statistical characteristics, (4) a hybrid classifier (2 and 3 combined), and (5) a local neighbourhood filtering algorithm producing generalized classification results. The heart of the classifier is the class-pivotal canonical classifier. This algorithm is based upon an idea of Dye suggesting the use of linear transformations making possible a simultaneous evaluation of a measure of the pixel being likely not to belong to the candidate class as well as computing its full maximum likelihood ratio. In case it is more likely to be misclassified the full maximum likelihood evaluation can be truncated almost immediately, i.e. the candidate class can often be rejected using only one or two of the available transformed spectral features. The result of this is a classifier with CPU-time which is empirically shown to be linearly dependent upon the number of image layers. The use of the hybrid classifier lowers the CPU-time with another factor of 3-4. Furthermore, for certain problems like classifying water-non water a single spectral band

  11. Review of groundwater contamination hazard rating systems for old landfills.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raj Kumar; Datta, Manoj; Nema, Arvind Kumar

    2010-02-01

    A large number of old uncontrolled landfills exist in developing countries. These are potentially harmful to the environment, especially with respect to groundwater contamination, and therefore, are in need of appropriate control and remedial measures. However, due to resource constraints, such measures are to be undertaken in a phased manner. An appropriate landfill hazard rating system that can evaluate relative groundwater contamination hazard of different sites is a useful tool for site ranking in order to set priorities. This paper reviews 18 existing hazard rating systems that follow the index function approach. Nine systems that are best representative of the existing systems, have been applied to six hazardous waste landfills as well as six municipal solid waste landfills. When used for ranking hazardous waste landfills, some systems such as HRS-1990, ERPHRS, WARM and RSS respond well whereas others like DRASTIC, NCS, NPC system and JENV system show a clustering effect. However, these rating systems do not perform well when applied to old municipal solid waste landfills. Even the HRS-1990, which is observed to be the most sensitive among all rating systems, exhibits some shortcomings. Improvements have been suggested in the waste quantity factor values of HRS-1990 to make it suitable for old municipal solid waste landfills. The improved system is observed to provide superior results in comparison with the existing systems, making it appropriate for use as a tool for ranking of old landfills in need of remediation and control measures.

  12. Extensions to the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Fourakis, Marios; Hall, Sheryl D.; Karlsson, Heather B.; Lohmeier, Heather L.; McSweeny, Jane L.; Potter, Nancy L.; Scheer-Cohen, Alison R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Tilkens, Christie M.; Wilson, David L.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes three extensions to a classification system for paediatric speech sound disorders termed the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS). Part I describes a classification extension to the SDCS to differentiate motor speech disorders from speech delay and to differentiate among three sub-types of motor speech disorders.…

  13. Extensions to the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Fourakis, Marios; Hall, Sheryl D.; Karlsson, Heather B.; Lohmeier, Heather L.; McSweeny, Jane L.; Potter, Nancy L.; Scheer-Cohen, Alison R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Tilkens, Christie M.; Wilson, David L.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes three extensions to a classification system for paediatric speech sound disorders termed the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS). Part I describes a classification extension to the SDCS to differentiate motor speech disorders from speech delay and to differentiate among three sub-types of motor speech disorders.…

  14. 42 CFR 412.513 - Patient classification system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Patient classification system. 412.513 Section 412.513 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Long-Term Care Hospitals § 412.513 Patient classification system. (a) Classification methodology. CMS...

  15. A new classification system for shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E

    2010-04-01

    Glenohumeral joint instability is extremely common yet the definition and classification of instability remains unclear. In order to find the best ways to treat instability, the condition must be clearly defined and classified. This is particularly important so that treatment studies can be compared or combined, which can only be done if the patient population under study is the same. The purpose of this paper was to review the problems with historical methods of defining and classifying instability and to introduce the FEDS system of classifying instability, which was developed to have content validity and found to have high interobserver and intraobserver agreement.

  16. Classification system adopted for fixed cutter bits

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.J.; Doiron, H.H.

    1988-01-01

    The drilling industry has begun adopting the 1987 International Association of Drilling Contractors' (IADC) method for classifying fixed cutter drill bits. By studying the classification codes on bit records and properly applying the new IADC fixed cutter dull grading system to recently run bits, the end-user should be able to improve the selection and usage of fixed cutter bits. Several users are developing databases for fixed cutter bits in an effort to relate field performance to some of the more prominent bit design characteristics.

  17. Eolian Modeling System: Predicting Windblown Dust Hazards in Battlefield Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-03

    environments and to understand the implications of eolian transport for environmental processes such as soil and desert pavement formation. The...REPORT Final Report for Eolian Modeling System (EMS): Predicting Windblown Sand and Dust Hazards in Battlefield Environments 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...Predicting Windblown Sand and Dust Hazards in Battlefield Environments ." The objectives of the research were to 1) develop numerical models for the

  18. "Chromosome": a knowledge-based system for the chromosome classification.

    PubMed

    Ramstein, G; Bernadet, M

    1993-01-01

    Chromosome, a knowledge-based analysis system has been designed for the classification of human chromosomes. Its aim is to perform an optimal classification by driving a tool box containing the procedures of image processing, pattern recognition and classification. This paper presents the general architecture of Chromosome, based on a multiagent system generator. The image processing tool box is described from the met aphasic enhancement to the fine classification. Emphasis is then put on the knowledge base intended for the chromosome recognition. The global classification process is also presented, showing how Chromosome proceeds to classify a given chromosome. Finally, we discuss further extensions of the system for the karyotype building.

  19. 14 CFR 417.409 - System hazard controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to causing pressure ruptures and material releases during launch processing; and (4) Provide pressure... processing: (1) A launch operator must ensure electrical and mechanical systems, including systems that... electrical power and signal circuits that interface with hazardous subsystems. (e) Propulsion systems....

  20. [Globally harmonized system of classification and labelling of chemicals (GHS) and its implementation in Japan].

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Muneyuki

    2010-01-01

    The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) is a set of recommendations by the United Nations, first issued in 2003 as a communication tool for the sound management of chemicals, comprising harmonized classification criteria for physical, health and environmental hazards, a unified format for material safety data sheets (MSDS), and labeling elements including pictograms and hazard statements preassigned to each classification category. The GHS has been introduced into Japan and implemented in the regulatory framework for chemical safety. The Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS) adopted the GHS, and the GHS-based JIS rules have become the Japanese standards for labels and MSDS. The use of the JIS format for labels and MSDS is recommended by several competent authorities in Japan although mostly on a voluntary basis. In the workplace, however, GHS-based JIS labels and MSDS have become legal requirements by the Industrial Safety and Health Law since 2006; namely, issuing MSDS in such a format is mandatory for the 640 specified chemicals and also labeling for the 99 targeted chemicals*. Although the GHS provides definitions and classification criteria for 10 classes of health hazards (acute toxicity, skin and eye corrosion/irritation, sensitization, germ cell mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity, specific target organ toxicity single/repeated exposures, and aspiration hazard), it does not provide actual classification of chemicals, so that competent authorities and industries need to classify a number of chemicals and/or mixtures. Weight-of-evidence judgment and/or expert judgment would be necessary in many cases. In this paper, the outline of the GHS classification is described and problems of the GHS and its implementation are discussed.

  1. Gynecomastia Classification for Surgical Management: A Systematic Review and Novel Classification System.

    PubMed

    Waltho, Daniel; Hatchell, Alexandra; Thoma, Achilleas

    2017-03-01

    Gynecomastia is a common deformity of the male breast, where certain cases warrant surgical management. There are several surgical options, which vary depending on the breast characteristics. To guide surgical management, several classification systems for gynecomastia have been proposed. A systematic review was performed to (1) identify all classification systems for the surgical management of gynecomastia, and (2) determine the adequacy of these classification systems to appropriately categorize the condition for surgical decision-making. The search yielded 1012 articles, and 11 articles were included in the review. Eleven classification systems in total were ascertained, and a total of 10 unique features were identified: (1) breast size, (2) skin redundancy, (3) breast ptosis, (4) tissue predominance, (5) upper abdominal laxity, (6) breast tuberosity, (7) nipple malposition, (8) chest shape, (9) absence of sternal notch, and (10) breast skin elasticity. On average, classification systems included two or three of these features. Breast size and ptosis were the most commonly included features. Based on their review of the current classification systems, the authors believe the ideal classification system should be universal and cater to all causes of gynecomastia; be surgically useful and easy to use; and should include a comprehensive set of clinically appropriate patient-related features, such as breast size, breast ptosis, tissue predominance, and skin redundancy. None of the current classification systems appears to fulfill these criteria.

  2. Landslide hazards and systems analysis: A Central European perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Martin; Damm, Bodo; Kreuzer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Part of the problem with assessing landslide hazards is to understand the variable settings in which they occur. There is growing consensus that hazard assessments require integrated approaches that take account of the coupled human-environment system. Here we provide a synthesis of societal exposure and vulnerability to landslide hazards, review innovative approaches to hazard identification, and lay a focus on hazard assessment, while presenting the results of historical case studies and a landslide time series for Germany. The findings add to a growing body of literature that recognizes societal exposure and vulnerability as a complex system of hazard interactions that evolves over time as a function of social change and development. We therefore propose to expand hazard assessments by the framework and concepts of systems analysis (e.g., Liu et al., 2007) Results so far have been promising in ways that illustrate the importance of feedbacks, thresholds, surprises, and time lags in the evolution of landslide hazard and risk. In densely populated areas of Central Europe, landslides often occur in urbanized landscapes or on engineered slopes that had been transformed or created intentionally by human activity, sometimes even centuries ago. The example of Germany enables to correlate the causes and effects of recent landslides with the historical transition of urbanization to urban sprawl, ongoing demographic change, and some chronic problems of industrialized countries today, including ageing infrastructures or rising government debts. In large parts of rural Germany, the combination of ageing infrastructures, population loss, and increasing budget deficits starts to erode historical resilience gains, which brings especially small communities to a tipping point in their efforts to risk reduction. While struggling with budget deficits and demographic change, these communities are required to maintain ageing infrastructures that are particularly vulnerable to

  3. K basin sludge & water system preliminary hazard analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MARTIN, J.B.

    2001-09-06

    This report provides the initial Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA) for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project, Sludge and Water System (SWS) subproject. The purpose of the K East (KE) basins SWS is to provide a system that will transfer the KE basins sludge from in-basin storage or source locations to containment and loadout for subsequent transport to T Plant for storage. The SWS will provide a system (Phase I) to retrieve and contain the identified as-settled sludge volume in the KE basin, while maintaining basin water clarity and associated radioactive control limits in accordance with basin operation requirements, and to support the Fuel Transfer System (FTS) and Debris Removal System (DRS). The SWS will also provide a system (Phase II) to retrieve and contain the remaining as-settled sludge volume in the K East basin, while maintaining basin water clarity and associated radioactive control limits in accordance with basin operation requirements. The SWS is in the conceptual design phase. A primary purpose of this PHA is to support the Conceptual Design Document (draft). As details of the SWS process and design are developed, this initial PHA will require revision. The K Basin Hazard Analysis (HNF-3960) documents the hazard analysis previously performed on the K basins including the multi-canister overpack (MCO) and support buildings. HNF-3960 will be updated later to reflect future SWS activities for sludge and water transfer to ensure that all hazards are included. All operational activities and energy sources associated with the SWS are evaluated in this hazard analysis. Using a systematic approach, this document identifies hazards created by abnormal operating conditions, external events (e.g., range fire), and natural phenomena hazards (e.g., earthquake) with the potential for causing undesirable consequences to facility workers, on-site individuals, the public, or the environment.

  4. Development of a Wave Resource Classification System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, S.; Haas, K. A.; Neary, V. S.; Bredin, S.

    2016-12-01

    As the wave energy industry develops, detailed classification systems for wave resource assessments are beneficial for characterizing the wave resource statistics of particular sites and codifying opportunities and risks at these sites. Despite the wide spread availability of wave buoy data for the United States, this is currently insufficient to develop a classification scheme. Therefore, data from the 3rd generation wave model (WWIII) is utilized. Key wave resource statistics for the entire US territorial waters are computed and retained as time-series using a 30-year hindcast (1980-2009) wave spectra including: Annual available energy (AAE), omni-directional wave power, significant wave height, energy period, spectral width, direction of maximum directionally resolved wave power and directionality coefficient. The hindcast data are extensively validated with the available buoy wave measurements using the validation methodology recommended by the IEC standard for wave energy resource assessments (IEC TS 62600-101). As a high level wave classification, the AAE density is the primary indicator of wave energy resources. The AAE is analogous to annual energy production (AEP) without considering the energy conversion process. It can be thought as the theoretical available wave energy resource for any particular location. The AAE is separated into four different classes of ascending energy levels, 0, I, II, and III. Because of the dependence of wave energy devices on wave frequencies, the AAE for the US territorial waters are computed for the full spectrum along with different frequency bands corresponding to wind sea, swell and transitional sea states. The geographic distribution for the different wave classes within each frequency band have been determined. Finally, subclasses based on the extreme wave conditions will also be presented.

  5. Functional classifications for cerebral palsy: correlations between the gross motor function classification system (GMFCS), the manual ability classification system (MACS) and the communication function classification system (CFCS).

    PubMed

    Compagnone, Eliana; Maniglio, Jlenia; Camposeo, Serena; Vespino, Teresa; Losito, Luciana; De Rinaldis, Marta; Gennaro, Leonarda; Trabacca, Antonio

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate a possible correlation between the gross motor function classification system-expanded and revised (GMFCS-E&R), the manual abilities classification system (MACS) and the communication function classification system (CFCS) functional levels in children with cerebral palsy (CP) by CP subtype. It was also geared to verify whether there is a correlation between these classification systems and intellectual functioning (IF) and parental socio-economic status (SES). A total of 87 children (47 males and 40 females, age range 4-18 years, mean age 8.9±4.2) were included in the study. A strong correlation was found between the three classifications: Level V of the GMFCS-E&R corresponds to Level V of the MACS (rs=0.67, p=0.001); the same relationship was found for the CFCS and the MACS (rs=0.73, p<0.001) and for the GMFCS-E&R and the CFCS (rs=0.61, p=0.001). The correlations between the IQ and the global functional disability profile were strong or moderate (GMFCS and IQ: rs=0.66, p=0.001; MACS and IQ: rs=0.58, p=0.001; CFCS and MACS: rs=0.65, p=0.001). The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine if there were differences between the GMFCS-E&R, the CFCS and the MACS by CP type. CP types showed different scores for the IQ level (Chi-square=8.59, df=2, p=0.014), the GMFCS-E&R (Chi-square=36.46, df=2, p<0.001), the CFCS (Chi-square=12.87, df=2, p=0.002), and the MACS Level (Chi-square=13.96, df=2, p<0.001) but no significant differences emerged for the SES (Chi-square=1.19, df=2, p=0.554). This study shows how the three functional classifications (GMFCS-E&R, CFCS and MACS) complement each other to provide a better description of the functional profile of CP. The systematic evaluation of the IQ can provide useful information about a possible future outcome for every functional level. The SES does not appear to affect functional profiles.

  6. Immune System Toxicity and Immunotoxicity Hazard Identification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to chemicals may alter immune system health, increasing the risk of infections, allergy and autoimmune diseases. The chapter provides a concise overview of the immune system, host factors that affect immune system heal, and the effects that xenobiotic exposure may have ...

  7. Immune System Toxicity and Immunotoxicity Hazard Identification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to chemicals may alter immune system health, increasing the risk of infections, allergy and autoimmune diseases. The chapter provides a concise overview of the immune system, host factors that affect immune system heal, and the effects that xenobiotic exposure may have ...

  8. The role of BCS (biopharmaceutics classification system) and BDDCS (biopharmaceutics drug disposition classification system) in drug development.

    PubMed

    Benet, Leslie Z

    2013-01-01

    Biopharmaceutics Classification System and Biopharmaceutics Drug Distribution Classification System are complimentary, not competing, classification systems that aim to improve, simplify, and speed drug development. Although both systems are based on classifying drugs and new molecular entities into four categories using the same solubility criteria, they differ in the criterion for permeability and have different purposes. Here, the details and applications of both systems are reviewed with particular emphasis of their role in drug development. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Remote inspection system for hazardous sites

    SciTech Connect

    Redd, J.; Borst, C.; Volz, R.A.; Everett, L.J.

    1999-04-01

    Long term storage of special nuclear materials poses a number of problems. One of these is a need to inspect the items being stored from time to time. Yet the environment is hostile to man, with significant radiation exposure resulting from prolonged presence in the storage facility. This paper describes research to provide a remote inspection capability, which could lead to eliminating the need for humans to enter a nuclear storage facility. While there are many ways in which an RI system might be created, this paper describes the development of a prototype remote inspection system, which utilizes virtual reality technology along with robotics. The purpose of this system is to allow the operator to establish a safe and realistic telepresence in a remote environment. In addition, it was desired that the user interface for the system be as intuitive to use as possible, thus eliminating the need for extensive training. The goal of this system is to provide a robotic platform with two cameras, which are capable of providing accurate and reliable stereographic images of the remote environment. One application for the system is that it might be driven down the corridors of a nuclear storage facility and utilized to inspect the drums inside, all without the need for physical human presence. Thus, it is not a true virtual reality system providing simulated graphics, but rather an augmented reality system, which performs remote inspection of an existing, real environment.

  10. Compute Element and Interface Box for the Hazard Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villalpando, Carlos Y.; Khanoyan, Garen; Stern, Ryan A.; Some, Raphael R.; Bailey, Erik S.; Carson, John M.; Vaughan, Geoffrey M.; Werner, Robert A.; Salomon, Phil M.; Martin, Keith E.; Spaulding, Matthew D.; Luna, Michael E.; Motaghedi, Shui H.; Trawny, Nikolas; Johnson, Andrew E.; Ivanov, Tonislav I.; Huertas, Andres; Whitaker, William D.; Goldberg, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    The Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) program is building a sensor that enables a spacecraft to evaluate autonomously a potential landing area to generate a list of hazardous and safe landing sites. It will also provide navigation inputs relative to those safe sites. The Hazard Detection System Compute Element (HDS-CE) box combines a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) board for sensor integration and timing, with a multicore computer board for processing. The FPGA does system-level timing and data aggregation, and acts as a go-between, removing the real-time requirements from the processor and labeling events with a high resolution time. The processor manages the behavior of the system, controls the instruments connected to the HDS-CE, and services the "heavy lifting" computational requirements for analyzing the potential landing spots.

  11. A mobile mapping system for hazardous facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, R.E.; Jones, J.P.; Little, C.Q.; Wilson, C.W.

    1997-03-01

    The Mobile Mapping System (MMS) is a completely self-contained vehicle with omnidirectional capability and extremely good odometry, capable of operation up to 12 hours between battery charges. The platform itself is based on a dual differential drive system with a compliant linkage between the two drive systems. This compliant linkage allows for low-level controller errors to be absorbed by the system and their navigational effects to be compensated for, yielding an extremely accurate navigational capability. Vehicle design also allows for a considerable payload (250 lb) and a large surface area for auxiliary equipment mounting (2 by 6 ft). The vehicle supports remote operation by reading commands and writing replies through its serial communications port. Use of a radio-ethernet and a radio-video channel allow for remote video and communications links to be maintained with the vehicle in many remote operation environments. The MMS uses a structured light system to quickly acquire coarse range images of the environment and a coherent laser radar (CLR) to acquire finer resolution range images. The coherent laser radar can also be used to determine platform position and orientation to millimeter accuracies if targets of known. Sensor range image data as well as video are off loaded to a remote computer for postprocessing, display, and archiving. Diagrams and images below include an image of the MMS vehicle before addition of sensors, diagram of vehicle with sensors, and computer system connections.

  12. [Rationality of N3 classification and its sub-classification in TNM classification system for advanced gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yanlong; Huang, Jinyu; Zhu, Zhi; Xu, Huimian

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the rationality of N3 classification and its sub-classification in the 7th UICC/AJCC TNM classification system. Clinicopathological data of 610 patients with stage N3 advanced gastric cancer who underwent standard D2 and D2+ radical surgery at the Department of Surgical Oncology, The First Hospital of China Medical University, from January 1980 to March 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into N3a and N3b groups, and clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis were compared between N3a and N3b patients. Overall survival rate was determined using the Kaplan-Meier estimator. The log-rank test was used to identify differences between the survival curves of different groups. In multivariate analysis, Cox proportional hazard model was used to identify independent factors associated with prognosis. Among 610 patients, 426 were men and 184 were women, 394 were N3a and 216 were N3b, with a mean age of(57±11) years old (range 23 to 83). A total of 19 842 lymph nodes were examined, in which 9 575 nodes were positive, with the metastatic ratio of 48.3%. The 5-year overall survival rate was 20.0%. Univariate analysis of prognostic factors suggested that tumor location (P=0.000), tumor size (P=0.003), Borrmann type (P=0.000), pathologic type (P=0.043), lymphatic vessel invasion (P=0.000), growth pattern (P=0.019), invasion depth (P=0.000), resection extent (P=0.000) and N3 sub-classification (P=0.000) were significantly associated with the prognosis of N3 patients. Further analysis showed that tumor size (P=0.028), invasion depth (P=0.000) and gastric resection extent (P=0.002) were significantly associated with the prognosis of N3a patients, while Borrmann type (P=0.034), lymphatic vessel invasion (P=0.002), invasion depth (P=0.008) and resection extent (P=0.003) were significantly associated with the prognosis of N3b patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that lymphatic vessel invasion (P=0.009), resection extent (P=0

  13. Hazard classification of chemicals inducing haemolytic anaemia: An EU regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Muller, Andre; Jacobsen, Helene; Healy, Edel; McMickan, Sinead; Istace, Fréderique; Blaude, Marie-Noëlle; Howden, Peter; Fleig, Helmut; Schulte, Agnes

    2006-08-01

    Haemolytic anaemia is often induced following prolonged exposure to chemical substances. Currently, under EU Council Directive 67/548/EEC, substances which induce such effects are classified as dangerous and assigned the risk phrase R48 'Danger of serious damage to health by prolonged exposure.' Whilst the general classification criteria for this endpoint are outlined in Annex VI of this Directive, they do not provide specific information to assess haemolytic anaemia. This review produced by the EU Working Group on Haemolytic Anaemia provides a toxicological assessment of haemolytic anaemia and proposes criteria that can be used in the assessment for classification of substances which induce such effects. An overview of the primary and secondary effects of haemolytic anaemia which can occur in rodent repeated dose toxicity studies is given. A detailed analysis of the toxicological significance of such effects is then performed and correlated with the general classification criteria used for this endpoint. This review intends to give guidance when carrying out an assessment for classification for this endpoint and to allow for better transparency in the decision-making process on when to classify based on the presence of haemolytic anaemia in repeated dose toxicity studies. The extended classification criteria for haemolytic anaemia outlined in this review were accepted by the EU Commission Working Group on the Classification and Labelling of Dangerous Substances in September 2004.

  14. Using an information system to meet Hazardous Waste Management needs

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.J. Jr.; Howe, R.E.; Townsend, S.L.; Maloy, D.T.; Kochhar, R.K.

    1995-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a large quantity RCRA hazardous waste generator. LLNL also generates low level and transuranic radioactive waste that is managed in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) orders. The mixed low level and mixed transuranic waste generated must be managed to comply with both RCRA regulations and DOE orders. LLNL`s hazardous and radioactive waste generation is comprised of 900 generators who contribute to nearly two hundred waste streams. LLNL has a permitted EPA treatment and storage (TSD) facility for handling RCRA hazardous waste that is operated by LLNL`s Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) division. In HWM we have developed an information system, the Total Waste Management System (TWMS), to replace an inadequate ``cradle to grave`` tracking of all the waste types described above. The goals of this system are to facilitate the safe handling and storage of these hazardous wastes, provide compliance with the regulations and serve as an informational tool to help HWM manage and dispose of these wastes in a cost effective manner.

  15. MITRE system for clinical assertion status classification

    PubMed Central

    Aberdeen, John; Coarr, Matt; Tresner-Kirsch, David; Wellner, Ben; Yeh, Alexander; Hirschman, Lynette

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe a system for determining the assertion status of medical problems mentioned in clinical reports, which was entered in the 2010 i2b2/VA community evaluation ‘Challenges in natural language processing for clinical data’ for the task of classifying assertions associated with problem concepts extracted from patient records. Materials and methods A combination of machine learning (conditional random field and maximum entropy) and rule-based (pattern matching) techniques was used to detect negation, speculation, and hypothetical and conditional information, as well as information associated with persons other than the patient. Results The best submission obtained an overall micro-averaged F-score of 0.9343. Conclusions Using semantic attributes of concepts and information about document structure as features for statistical classification of assertions is a good way to leverage rule-based and statistical techniques. In this task, the choice of features may be more important than the choice of classifier algorithm. PMID:21515542

  16. Destructive Interactions Between Mitigation Strategies and the Causes of Unexpected Failures in Natural Hazard Mitigation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, S. J.; Fearnley, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Large investments in the mitigation of natural hazards, using a variety of technology-based mitigation strategies, have proven to be surprisingly ineffective in some recent natural disasters. These failures reveal a need for a systematic classification of mitigation strategies; an understanding of the scientific uncertainties that affect the effectiveness of such strategies; and an understanding of how the different types of strategy within an overall mitigation system interact destructively to reduce the effectiveness of the overall mitigation system. We classify mitigation strategies into permanent, responsive and anticipatory. Permanent mitigation strategies such as flood and tsunami defenses or land use restrictions, are both costly and 'brittle': when they malfunction they can increase mortality. Such strategies critically depend on the accuracy of the estimates of expected hazard intensity in the hazard assessments that underpin their design. Responsive mitigation strategies such as tsunami and lahar warning systems rely on capacities to detect and quantify the hazard source events and to transmit warnings fast enough to enable at risk populations to decide and act effectively. Self-warning and voluntary evacuation is also usually a responsive mitigation strategy. Uncertainty in the nature and magnitude of the detected hazard source event is often the key scientific obstacle to responsive mitigation; public understanding of both the hazard and the warnings, to enable decision making, can also be a critical obstacle. Anticipatory mitigation strategies use interpretation of precursors to hazard source events and are used widely in mitigation of volcanic hazards. Their critical limitations are due to uncertainties in time, space and magnitude relationships between precursors and hazard events. Examples of destructive interaction between different mitigation strategies are provided by the Tohoku 2011 earthquake and tsunami; recent earthquakes that have impacted

  17. A UAV System for Observing Volcanoes and Natural Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggiani, G.; Persiani, F.; Ceruti, A.; Tortora, P.; Troiani, E.; Giuletti, F.; Amici, S.; Buongiorno, M.; Distefano, G.; Bentini, G.; Bianconi, M.; Cerutti, A.; Nubile, A.; Sugliani, S.; Chiarini, M.; Pennestri, G.; Petrini, S.; Pieri, D.

    2007-12-01

    Fixed or rotary wing manned aircraft are currently the most commonly used platforms for airborne reconnaissance in response to natural hazards, such as volcanic eruptions, oil spills, wild fires, earthquakes. Such flights are very often undertaken in hazardous flying conditions (e.g., turbulence, downdrafts, reduced visibility, close proximity to dangerous terrain) and can be expensive. To mitigate these two fundamental issues-- safety and cost--we are exploring the use of small (less than 100kg), relatively inexpensive, but effective, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for this purpose. As an operational test, in 2004 we flew a small autonomous UAV in the airspace above and around Stromboli Volcano. Based in part on this experience, we are adapting the RAVEN UAV system for such natural hazard surveillance missions. RAVEN has a 50km range, with a 3.5m wingspan, main fuselage length of 4.60m, and maximum weight of 56kg. It has autonomous flight capability and a ground control Station for the mission planning and control. It will carry a variety of imaging devices, including a visible camera, and an IR camera. It will also carry an experimental Fourier micro-interferometer based on MOEMS technology, (developed by IMM Institute of CNR), to detect atmospheric trace gases. Such flexible, capable, and easy-to-deploy UAV systems may significantly shorten the time necessary to characterize the nature and scale of the natural hazard threats if used from the outset of, and systematically during, natural hazard events. When appropriately utilized, such UAVs can provide a powerful new hazard mitigation and documentation tool for civil protection hazard responders. This research was carried out under the auspices of the Italian government, and, in part, under contract to NASA at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  18. Hazard analysis of Clostridium perfringens in the Skylab Food System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourland, C. T.; Huber, C. S.; Kiser, P. R.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Rowley, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Food System presented unique microbiological problems because food was warmed in null-gravity and because the heat source was limited to 69.4 C (to prevent boiling in null-gravity). For these reasons, the foods were manufactured using critical control point techniques of quality control coupled with appropriate hazard analyses. One of these hazard analyses evaluated the threat from Clostridium perfringens. Samples of food were inoculated with C. perfringens and incubated for 2 h at temperatures ranging from 25 to 55 C. Generation times were determined for the foods at various temperatures. Results of these tests were evaluated taking into consideration: food-borne disease epidemiology, the Skylab food manufacturing procedures, and the performance requirements of the Skylab Food System. Based on this hazard analysis, a limit for C. perfringens of 100/g was established for Skylab foods.

  19. Hazard analysis of Clostridium perfringens in the Skylab Food System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourland, C. T.; Huber, C. S.; Kiser, P. R.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Rowley, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Food System presented unique microbiological problems because food was warmed in null-gravity and because the heat source was limited to 69.4 C (to prevent boiling in null-gravity). For these reasons, the foods were manufactured using critical control point techniques of quality control coupled with appropriate hazard analyses. One of these hazard analyses evaluated the threat from Clostridium perfringens. Samples of food were inoculated with C. perfringens and incubated for 2 h at temperatures ranging from 25 to 55 C. Generation times were determined for the foods at various temperatures. Results of these tests were evaluated taking into consideration: food-borne disease epidemiology, the Skylab food manufacturing procedures, and the performance requirements of the Skylab Food System. Based on this hazard analysis, a limit for C. perfringens of 100/g was established for Skylab foods.

  20. A new tree classification system for southern hardwoods

    Treesearch

    James S. Meadows; Daniel A. Jr. Skojac

    2008-01-01

    A new tree classification system for southern hardwoods is described. The new system is based on the Putnam tree classification system, originally developed by Putnam et al., 1960, Management ond inventory of southern hardwoods, Agriculture Handbook 181, US For. Sew., Washington, DC, which consists of four tree classes: (1) preferred growing stock, (2) reserve growing...

  1. The Geohazard Safety Classification: how resilience could play a role in the geo-hydrological hazards assessment of school buildings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazzi, Veronica; Morelli, Stefano; Casagli, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The impacts of adverse events related to geological hazards are unevenly distributed among communities and groups of individuals concentrated in restricted workplaces. Their consequent safety level is the result of differential exposures to these events and of diversified levels of preparation to them. Nowadays, the exposure and coping ability as co-determinants of people's safety are of particular interest for institutions managing the schools systems. According to the disaster risk reduction experts, the geo-hydrological processes can be mitigated with knowledge and planning, physical and environmental protection measures, and response preparedness. UNISDR is promoting a global culture of safety and resilience through the integration of disaster risk reduction in school curricula. The Comprehensive School Safety (CSS) framework is intended to advance the goals of the Worldwide Initiative for Safe Schools and the Global Alliance for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience in the Education Sector, and to promote school safety as a priority area of post-2015 frameworks for sustainable development, risk reduction and resilience. In Italy, according the latest ministerial survey (June 2010), there are 41,902 school buildings. Their alarming condition in terms of safety for their daily occupants is reflected by 39 fatalities ascribable to structural failures in the last 21 years. In 95% of these cases victims are a sad tribute due to natural phenomena. A rigorous evaluation of the total risk of a school building, as defined by the well known risk equation (R=HxVxE), would require a complete probability density function describing the exposure to specific types of events of all the pupils and personnel in the school. In addition, the probability that the inhabitants are present in the school during an event should be estimated depending on the time of day, day of week, or month of the year, as well as on local holiday schedules. The inclusion of resilience as a component

  2. Thunderstorm classification for airport lightning avoidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Yoshikawa, E.; Stock, M.; Shimamura, S.; Ushio, T.

    2016-12-01

    Aircraft initiated or intercepted lightning is a significant issue for civilian flight operation in Japan. Lightning strikes seldom cause fatal aircraft accidents thanks to both certifications of aircraft designs for lightning resilience and extensive weather support during aircraft operation. However, hundreds of lightning strikes to aircrafts are still reported each year in Japan, which can cause flights to be delayed or cancelled, and causes several hundred millions of yen each year in damagesTherefore, our research group, consisting of MRI, JAXA, and Osaka University, has started developing a new tactical weather support for airport operation aiming at lightning avoidance. Although lightning location systems are already utilized in airports, it is slow to detect thunderstorms because these systems only identify lightning hazards after the associated thunderstorm is mature. Our group is combining the data from a lightning mapping system called the Broadband Observation network for Lightning and Thunderstorms (BOLT) with a high time resolution phased array weather radar (PAWR). The PAWR can complete a full volume scan in as little as 10 or 30 seconds. In order to estimate the potential for lightning, we will operate a campaign to collect high resolution data from BOLT and the PAWR until 2018. At the same time, we are developing algorithms which can identify storm cells, and tabulating measurements such as reflectivity, wind, and temperature. In this presentation, details of the observation campaign and the progress of the analyses will be presented.

  3. Pyrotechnic hazards classification and evaluation program test report. Heat flux study of deflagrating pyrotechnic munitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fassnacht, P. O.

    1971-01-01

    A heat flux study of deflagrating pyrotechnic munitions is presented. Three tests were authorized to investigate whether heat flux measurements may be used as effective hazards evaluation criteria to determine safe quantity distances for pyrotechnics. A passive sensor study was conducted simultaneously to investigate their usefulness in recording events and conditions. It was concluded that heat flux measurements can effectively be used to evaluate hazards criteria and that passive sensors are an inexpensive tool to record certain events in the vicinity of deflagrating pyrotechnic stacks.

  4. Classification and certification requirements for floating production systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bowie, R.D.; Richardson, K.L.

    1995-12-31

    Floating Production Systems (FPSs) can be either, custom built or a converted semi-submersible, tanker or barge. The paper describes the necessary steps to be taken for the Classification and Certification of FPSs and FPSOS. The paper outlines the latest Classification and certification requirements for both semi-submersible and ship type FPSS. Classification and regulatory requirements for the Hull Structure, Stability, Station Keeping, Shipboard and Production Systems are discussed.

  5. Participatory Classification in a System for Assessing Multimodal Transportation Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-17

    potential problem on new users. The aggregated classifiers can be used to bootstrap at the initial stage of the classification . However, ongoing collection...Participatory Classification in a System for Assessing Multimodal Transportation Patterns Kalyanaraman Shankari Mogeng Yin Randy H. Katz David E...Participatory Classification in a System for Assessing Multimodal Transportation Patterns 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  6. New classification system for long-bone fractures supplementing the AO/OTA classification.

    PubMed

    Garnavos, Christos; Kanakaris, Nikolaos K; Lasanianos, Nikolaos G; Tzortzi, Paraskevi; West, Robert M

    2012-05-01

    This article describes a novel, clinically oriented classification system for long-bone fractures that is simple, reliable, and useful to predict treatment method, complications, and outcome. The reliability and memorability of the new classification were statistically tested and compared with the AO-Müller/Orthopaedic Trauma Association (AO/OTA) long-bone fracture classification. The proposed classification system was also clinically validated with a targeted pilot study designed for content and clinical outcome retrospectively reviewing 122 closed tibial shaft fractures, which were used as a representative paradigm of long-bone fractures. Statistical evaluation showed that the proposed classification system had improved inter- and intraobserver variation agreement and easier memorability compared with the AO/OTA classification system. The clinical validation study showed its predictive value regarding selection of treatment method, complication rate, and injury outcome.The proposed classification system proved simple, reliable, and memorable. Its clinical value appeared strong enough to justify the organization of larger studies for a complete assessment of its clinical usefulness for all long-bone fractures.

  7. Environmental Hazards and Systems Schools. Technical Report No. 81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dexter, Arthur

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the feasibility of incorporating certain protective concepts into selected systems-constructed schools. These concepts were to be incorporated at a minimal cost increase, with minimal sacrifice of amenities, and with no detrimental effect on facility configuration. The environmental hazards taken into…

  8. FIELD TEST OF THE PROPOSED REVISED HAZARD RANKING SYSTEM (HRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) requires the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to revise the Hazard Ranking System (HRS) so that, to the maximum extent feasible, it accurately assesses the relative risks associated with actual or potent...

  9. 21 CFR 7.41 - Health hazard evaluation and recall classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... situation that could expose humans or animals to a health hazard. Any conclusion shall be supported as.... 7.41 Section 7.41 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... need not be limited to, the following factors: (1) Whether any disease or injuries have...

  10. 21 CFR 7.41 - Health hazard evaluation and recall classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... situation that could expose humans or animals to a health hazard. Any conclusion shall be supported as.... 7.41 Section 7.41 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... need not be limited to, the following factors: (1) Whether any disease or injuries have...

  11. 21 CFR 7.41 - Health hazard evaluation and recall classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... situation that could expose humans or animals to a health hazard. Any conclusion shall be supported as.... 7.41 Section 7.41 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... need not be limited to, the following factors: (1) Whether any disease or injuries have...

  12. Classification of coal seam outburst hazards and evaluation of the importance of influencing factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xianzhi; Song, Dazhao; Qian, Ziwei

    2017-07-01

    Coal and gas outbursts are the result of several geological factors related to coal seam gas (coal seam gas pressure P, coal seam sturdiness coefficient f and coal seam gas content W), and these parameters can be used to classify the outburst hazard level of a coal seam. To classify the outburst hazard level of a coal seam by means of statistical methods, this study considered the geological parameters of coal seam gas and statistical data on the amount of material involved in coal outbursts. Through multivariate regression analysis, a multivariate regression equation between the outburst coal quantity and P, f and W was established. Using a significance evaluation of the aforementioned factors, the relative contributions of the gas-related geological parameters to the outburst hazard level of a coal seam were found to follow the order P>f>W. This work provides a scientific basis for evaluating the outburst hazard level of a coal seam and adopting feasible and economical outburst-prevention measures.

  13. 49 CFR 173.2a - Classification of a material having more than one hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... meets the definition of more than one hazard class or division as defined in this part, shall be classed... the definition of a pyrophoric material in § 173.124(b)(1) of this subchapter (Division 4.2). (7) A material that meets the definition of a self-reactive material in § 173.124(a)(2) of this subchapter...

  14. 49 CFR 173.2a - Classification of a material having more than one hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... meets the definition of more than one hazard class or division as defined in this part, shall be classed... the definition of a pyrophoric material in § 173.124(b)(1) of this subchapter (Division 4.2). (7) A material that meets the definition of a self-reactive material in § 173.124(a)(2) of this subchapter...

  15. Automatic systems and the low-level wind hazard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffer, Dwight R.

    1987-01-01

    Automatic flight control systems provide means for significantly enhancing survivability in severe wind hazards. The technology required to produce the necessary control algorithms is available and has been made technically feasible by the advent of digital flight control systems and accurate, low-noise sensors, especially strap-down inertial sensors. The application of this technology and these means has not generally been enabled except for automatic landing systems, and even then the potential has not been fully exploited. To fully exploit the potential of automatic systems for enhancing safety in wind hazards requires providing incentives, creating demand, inspiring competition, education, and eliminating prejudicial disincentitives to overcome the economic penalties associated with the extensive and riskly development and certification of these systems. If these changes will come about at all, it will likely be through changes in the regulations provided by the certifying agencies.

  16. Potential environmental impacts of light-emitting diodes (LEDs): metallic resources, toxicity, and hazardous waste classification.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Kang, Daniel; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Schoenung, Julie M

    2011-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are advertised as environmentally friendly because they are energy efficient and mercury-free. This study aimed to determine if LEDs engender other forms of environmental and human health impacts, and to characterize variation across different LEDs based on color and intensity. The objectives are as follows: (i) to use standardized leachability tests to examine whether LEDs are to be categorized as hazardous waste under existing United States federal and California state regulations; and (ii) to use material life cycle impact and hazard assessment methods to evaluate resource depletion and toxicity potentials of LEDs based on their metallic constituents. According to federal standards, LEDs are not hazardous except for low-intensity red LEDs, which leached Pb at levels exceeding regulatory limits (186 mg/L; regulatory limit: 5). However, according to California regulations, excessive levels of copper (up to 3892 mg/kg; limit: 2500), Pb (up to 8103 mg/kg; limit: 1000), nickel (up to 4797 mg/kg; limit: 2000), or silver (up to 721 mg/kg; limit: 500) render all except low-intensity yellow LEDs hazardous. The environmental burden associated with resource depletion potentials derives primarily from gold and silver, whereas the burden from toxicity potentials is associated primarily with arsenic, copper, nickel, lead, iron, and silver. Establishing benchmark levels of these substances can help manufacturers implement design for environment through informed materials substitution, can motivate recyclers and waste management teams to recognize resource value and occupational hazards, and can inform policymakers who establish waste management policies for LEDs.

  17. Warning system for hydrogeological hazards in Campania (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biafore, Mauro; Cristiano, Luigi; Gentile, Salvatore; Gentilella, Matteo; Giannattasio, Maurizio; Napoli, Francesca

    2010-05-01

    Campania is the Italian region with the highest population density (419 inhabitants/km2). Almost 20% of its territory (13669 km2) is affected by significant hydrogeological hazards, with related loss scenarios in almost 12% of it. The most critical hydrogeological hazard scenarios are those triggered by extreme rainfall events with duration ranging from a few tens of minutes up 72 hours: flood loss scenarios are expected in catchments with spatial extent from a few Km2 up to 5000 km2; shallow landslides and mudflows are also triggered by rainfall events within a broad range of time scales. This study presents a warning system for hydrogeological hazards, which has been operating in Campania since 2005, designed for mitigating losses due to extreme rainfall events. The warning system is structured into two stages: the meteorological forecasting stage and the hydrological monitoring stage. In the first stage, after evaluating rainfall forecasts provided by numerical weather prediction models (with a forecasting time up to 48 hours), warning messages are issued to the local municipalities grouped in 8 warning zones. Critical rainfall events are identified by three different alert levels, according to their forecasted spatial and temporal extents, each corresponding to a category of expected hazard scenarios at regional level. During the second stage, the dynamic evolution of the hydrological events is monitored by a real-time network of river stage and rain gauges, which are employed to compute one or more precursors for each loss scenario. Loss scenarios have been classified according to the temporal and spatial scales of the corresponding precursors, in order to deal with the difficulties related to the occurrence of significantly different hazard scenarios during the same rainfall event. Three threshold values have been identified for each precursor, corresponding to given hazard and alert levels. As a precursor exceeds a threshold value, warning messages are

  18. The classification of osteonecrosis in patients with cancer: validation of a new radiological classification system.

    PubMed

    Niinimäki, T; Niinimäki, J; Halonen, J; Hänninen, P; Harila-Saari, A; Niinimäki, R

    2015-12-01

    To validate a new, non-joint-specific radiological classification system that is suitable regardless of the site of the osteonecrosis (ON) in patients with cancer. Critical deficiencies in the existing ON classification systems were identified and a new, non-joint-specific radiological classification system was developed. Seventy-two magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of patients with cancer and ON lesions were graded, and the validation of the new system was performed by assessing inter- and intra-observer reliability. Intra-observer reliability of ON grading was good or very good, with kappa values of 0.79-0.86. Interobserver agreement was lower but still good, with kappa values of 0.62-0.77. Ninety-eight percent of all intra- or interobserver differences were within one grade. Interobserver reliability of assessing the location of ON was very good, with kappa values of 0.93-0.98. All the available radiological ON classification systems are joint specific. This limitation has spurred the development of multiple systems, which has led to the insufficient use of classifications in ON studies among patients with cancer. The introduced radiological classification system overcomes the problem of joint-specificity, was found to be reliable, and can be used to classify all ON lesions regardless of the affected site. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Classification of parotidectomy: a proposed modification to the European Salivary Gland Society classification system.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wai Keat; Shetty, Subhaschandra

    2017-08-01

    Parotidectomy remains the mainstay of treatment for both benign and malignant lesions of the parotid gland. There exists a wide range of possible surgical options in parotidectomy in terms of extent of parotid tissue removed. There is increasing need for uniformity of terminology resulting from growing interest in modifications of the conventional parotidectomy. It is, therefore, of paramount importance for a standardized classification system in describing extent of parotidectomy. Recently, the European Salivary Gland Society (ESGS) proposed a novel classification system for parotidectomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate this system. A classification system proposed by the ESGS was critically re-evaluated and modified to increase its accuracy and its acceptability. Modifications mainly focused on subdividing Levels I and II into IA, IB, IIA, and IIB. From June 2006 to June 2016, 126 patients underwent 130 parotidectomies at our hospital. The classification system was tested in that cohort of patient. While the ESGS classification system is comprehensive, it does not cover all possibilities. The addition of Sublevels IA, IB, IIA, and IIB may help to address some of the clinical situations seen and is clinically relevant. We aim to test the modified classification system for partial parotidectomy to address some of the challenges mentioned.

  20. Designing a Classification System for Internet Offenders: Doing Cognitive Distortions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hundersmarck, Steven F.; Durkin, Keith F.; Delong, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    Televised features such as NBC's "To Catch a Predator" have highlighted the growing problem posed by Internet sexual predators. This paper reports on the authors' attempts in designing a classification system for Internet offenders. The classification system was designed based on existing theory, understanding the nature of Internet offenders and…

  1. Designing a Classification System for Internet Offenders: Doing Cognitive Distortions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hundersmarck, Steven F.; Durkin, Keith F.; Delong, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    Televised features such as NBC's "To Catch a Predator" have highlighted the growing problem posed by Internet sexual predators. This paper reports on the authors' attempts in designing a classification system for Internet offenders. The classification system was designed based on existing theory, understanding the nature of Internet offenders and…

  2. A Curriculum-Based Classification System for Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuyler, Gwyer

    2003-01-01

    Proposes and tests a community college classification system based on curricular characteristics and their association with institutional characteristics. Seeks readily available data correlates to represent percentage of a college's course offerings that are in the liberal arts. A simple two-category classification system using total enrollment…

  3. The Comprehensive AOCMF Classification System: Orbital Fractures - Level 3 Tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Christoph; Audigé, Laurent; Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Buitrago-Téllez, Carlos H.; Rudderman, Randal; Prein, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The AOCMF Classification Group developed a hierarchical three-level craniomaxillofacial classification system with increasing level of complexity and details. Within the midface (level 1 code 92), the level 2 system describes the location of the fractures within defined regions in the central and lateral midface including the internal orbit. This tutorial outlines the level 3 detailed classification system for fractures of the orbit. It depicts the orbital fractures according to the subregions defined as orbital rims, anterior orbital walls, midorbit, and apex. The system allows documentation of the involvement of specific orbital structures such as inferior orbital fissure, internal orbital buttress, the greater wing of sphenoid, lacrimal bone, superior orbital fissure, and optic canal. The classification system is presented along with rules for fracture location and coding, a series of case examples with clinical imaging and a general discussion on the design of this classification. PMID:25489393

  4. Heat wave hazard classification and risk assessment using artificial intelligence fuzzy logic.

    PubMed

    Keramitsoglou, Iphigenia; Kiranoudis, Chris T; Maiheu, Bino; De Ridder, Koen; Daglis, Ioannis A; Manunta, Paolo; Paganini, Marc

    2013-10-01

    The average summer temperatures as well as the frequency and intensity of hot days and heat waves are expected to increase due to climate change. Motivated by this consequence, we propose a methodology to evaluate the monthly heat wave hazard and risk and its spatial distribution within large cities. A simple urban climate model with assimilated satellite-derived land surface temperature images was used to generate a historic database of urban air temperature fields. Heat wave hazard was then estimated from the analysis of these hourly air temperatures distributed at a 1-km grid over Athens, Greece, by identifying the areas that are more likely to suffer higher temperatures in the case of a heat wave event. Innovation lies in the artificial intelligence fuzzy logic model that was used to classify the heat waves from mild to extreme by taking into consideration their duration, intensity and time of occurrence. The monthly hazard was subsequently estimated as the cumulative effect from the individual heat waves that occurred at each grid cell during a month. Finally, monthly heat wave risk maps were produced integrating geospatial information on the population vulnerability to heat waves calculated from socio-economic variables.

  5. The Bellevue Classification System: nursing's voice upon the library shelves.

    PubMed

    Mages, Keith C

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the inspiration, construction, and meaning of the Bellevue Classification System (BCS), created during the 1930s for use in the Bellevue School of Nursing Library. Nursing instructor Ann Doyle, with assistance from librarian Mary Casamajor, designed the BCS after consulting with library leaders and examining leading contemporary classification systems, including the Dewey Decimal Classification and Library of Congress, Ballard, and National Health Library classification systems. A close textual reading of the classes, subclasses, and subdivisions of these classification systems against those of the resulting BCS, reveals Doyle's belief that the BCS was created not only to organize the literature, but also to promote the burgeoning intellectualism and professionalism of early twentieth-century American nursing.

  6. Classification systems in Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia - Sentiment or evidenced based?

    PubMed

    Parker, V L; Pacey, A A; Palmer, J E; Tidy, J A; Winter, M C; Hancock, B W

    2017-05-01

    The classification system for Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) has proved a controversial topic for over 100years. Numerous systems simultaneously existed in different countries, with three main rival classifications gaining popularity, namely histological, anatomical and clinical prognostic systems. Until 2000, prior to the combination of the FIGO and WHO classifications, there was no worldwide consensus on the optimal classification system, largely due to a lack of high quality data proving the merit of one system over another. Remarkably, a validated, prospectively tested classification system is yet to be conducted. Over time, increasing criticisms have emerged regarding the currently adopted combined FIGO/WHO classification system, and its ability to identify patients most likely to develop primary chemotherapy resistance or disease relapse. This is particularly pertinent for patients with low-risk disease, whereby one in three patients are resistant to first line therapy, rising to four out of five women who score 5 or 6. This review aims to examine the historical basis of the GTN classification systems and critically appraise the evidence on which they were based. This culminates in a critique of the current FIGO/WHO prognostic system and discussion surrounding clinical preference versus evidence based practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 76 FR 55846 - Hazardous Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste: Carbon Dioxide...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... Listing of Hazardous Waste: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Streams in Geologic Sequestration Activities AGENCY...) to conditionally exclude carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) streams that are hazardous from the definition of... Recovery Act (RCRA) to conditionally exclude carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) streams that are hazardous from the...

  8. The Comprehensive AOCMF Classification System: Classification and Documentation within AOCOIAC Software

    PubMed Central

    Audigé, Laurent; Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Kunz, Christoph; Buitrago-Téllez, Carlos H.; Prein, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The AOCMF Classification Group developed a hierarchical three-level craniomaxillofacial (CMF) fracture classification system. The fundamental level 1 distinguishes four major anatomical units including the mandible (code 91), midface (code 92), skull base (code 93) and cranial vault (code 94); level 2 relates to the location of the fractures within defined topographical regions within each units; level 3 relates to fracture morphology in these regions regarding fragmentation, displacement, and bone defects, as well as the involvement of specific anatomical structures. The resulting CMF classification system has been implemented into AO comprehensive injury automatic classifier (AOCOIAC) software allowing for fracture classification as well as clinical documentation of individual cases including a selected sample of diagnostic images. This tutorial highlights the main features of the software. In addition, a series of illustrative case examples is made available electronically for viewing and editing. PMID:25489395

  9. A Medical Classification System for Ambulatory-care Manpower Planning

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Donald P.; Kilpatrick, Kerry E.

    1974-01-01

    The Trilevel Classification System described adapts the useful features of existing classification systems for convenient use in health manpower analysis. A computer program links the Kaiser Clinical-Behavioral Classification system, oriented to the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of patient populations using ambulatory-care services, with the Geomet Specifications of Care, which in turn utilizes ICDA-coded records and Current Procedural Terminology—coded elements of care. An extensive case study is discussed in which the system is used in an HMO to predict the differential effects of various delegation policies for physician assistants. PMID:4154928

  10. The Rotterdam Foot Classification: A Classification System for Medial Polydactyly of the Foot.

    PubMed

    Burger, Elise B; Hovius, Steven E R; Burger, Bart J; van Nieuwenhoven, Christianne A

    2016-08-03

    Polydactyly at the medial side of the foot ("medial polydactyly" of the foot) is a rare and diverse congenital anomaly. In order to plan and evaluate surgical treatment, the classification of medial polydactyly is useful. The aim of our study was to develop a reliable and valid classification system for medial polydactyly of the foot that is more useful than previous systems for preoperative evaluation and surgical planning. A review of the literature and the clinical experience of a single experienced surgeon were used to determine classification categories. We identified all patients with medial polydactyly who had preoperative radiographs and clinical photographs and were treated at our hospital between 1993 and 2014. All affected feet were assessed according to our proposed classification system, the Rotterdam foot classification. The intrarater and interrater reliability among 5 observers who evaluated 30 feet were assessed with use of the Cohen kappa (κ) statistic. We developed a classification system that describes duplication type, syndactyly, the presence of a hypoplastic ray, and deviation of the hallux. Seventy-three feet were classified according to the system. Seven duplication types were distinguished. Complete metatarsal duplication was most frequently seen (in 29%). Twelve feet showed a broad hallux without external expression of duplication. Syndactyly between medial and lateral (duplicate) halluces was present in 30 feet; between the lateral hallux and second toe, in 13 feet; and between both duplicated halluces and the lateral hallux and second toe, in 21 feet. A hypoplastic ray was seen in 75% of the feet. Intrarater agreement for duplication, hypoplastic rays, syndactyly, and deviation were, respectively, κ = 0.79, 0.75, 0.59, and 0.78. Interrater agreement for duplication, hypoplastic rays, syndactyly, and deviation were, respectively, κ = 0.72, 0.54, 0.48, and 0.64. The proposed classification system contains 4 categories of anatomic

  11. Towards a Collaborative Intelligent Tutoring System Classification Scheme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harsley, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel classification scheme for Collaborative Intelligent Tutoring Systems (CITS), an emergent research field. The three emergent classifications of CITS are unstructured, semi-structured, and fully structured. While all three types of CITS offer opportunities to improve student learning gains, the full extent to which these…

  12. Development of an Interest-Oriented Occupational Classification System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Droege, Robert C.; Padgett, Adaline

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes research to develop a comprehensive and coordinated occupational testing and classification system. An extension of this research led to identification of measurable interest factors which are incorporated in a trait-oriented occupational classification structure contained in USES Guide for Occupational Exploration, a supplement to the…

  13. A concept of a space hazard counteraction system: Astronomical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shustov, B. M.; Rykhlova, L. V.; Kuleshov, Yu. P.; Dubov, Yu. N.; Elkin, K. S.; Veniaminov, S. S.; Borovin, G. K.; Molotov, I. E.; Naroenkov, S. A.; Barabanov, S. I.; Emel'yanenko, V. V.; Devyatkin, A. V.; Medvedev, Yu. D.; Shor, V. A.; Kholshevnikov, K. V.

    2013-07-01

    The basic science of astronomy and, primarily, its branch responsible for studying the Solar System, face the most important practical task posed by nature and the development of human civilization—to study space hazards and to seek methods of counteracting them. In pursuance of the joint Resolution of the Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and the RAS (Russian Academy of Sciences) Space Council of June 23, 2010, the RAS Institute of Astronomy in collaboration with other scientific and industrial organizations prepared a draft concept of the federal-level program targeted at creating a system of space hazard detection and counteraction. The main ideas and astronomical content of the concept are considered in this article.

  14. Development of a classification system for periodontal diseases and conditions.

    PubMed

    Armitage, G C

    1999-12-01

    Classification systems are necessary in order to provide a framework in which to scientifically study the etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of diseases in an orderly fashion. In addition, such systems give clinicians a way to organize the health care needs of their patients. The last time scientists and clinicians in the field of periodontology and related areas agreed upon a classification system for periodontal diseases was in 1989 at the World Workshop in Clinical Periodontics. Subsequently, a simpler classification was agreed upon at the 1st European Workshop in Periodontology. These classification systems have been widely used by clinicians and research scientists throughout the world. Unfortunately, the 1989 classification had many shortcomings including: 1) considerable overlap in disease categories, 2) absence of a gingival disease component, 3) inappropriate emphasis on age of onset of disease and rates of progression, and 4) inadequate or unclear classification criteria. The 1993 European classification lacked the detail necessary for adequate characterization of the broad spectrum of periodontal diseases encountered in clinical practice. The need for a revised classification system for periodontal diseases was emphasized during the 1996 World Workshop in Periodontics. In 1997 the American Academy of Periodontology responded to this need and formed a committee to plan and organize an international workshop to revise the classification system for periodontal diseases. The proceedings in this volume are the result of this reclassification effort. The process involved development by the Organizing Committee of an outline for a new classification and identification of individuals to write state-of-the-science reviews for each of the items on the outline. The reviewers were encouraged to depart from the preliminary outline if there were data to support any modifications. On October 30-November 2, 1999, the International Workshop for a Classification of

  15. Development of a classification system for periodontal diseases and conditions.

    PubMed

    Armitage, G C

    2000-01-01

    Classification systems are necessary in order to provide a framework in which to scientifically study the etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of diseases in an orderly fashion. In addition, such systems give clinicians a way to organize the health care needs of their patients. The last time scientists and clinicians in the field of periodontology and related areas agreed upon a classification system for periodontal diseases was in 1989 at the World Workshop in Clinical Periodontics. Subsequently, a simpler classification was agreed upon at the 1st European Workshop in Periodontology. These classification systems have been widely used by clinicians and research scientists throughout the world. Unfortunately, the 1989 classification had many shortcomings, including: (1) considerable overlap in disease categories, (2) absence of a gingival disease component, (3) inappropriate emphasis on age of onset of disease and rates of progression, and (4) inadequate or unclear classification criteria. The 1993 European classification lacked the detail necessary for adequate characterization of the broad spectrum of periodontal diseases encountered in clinical practice. The need for a revised classification system for periodontal diseases was emphasized during the 1996 World Workshop in Periodontics. In 1997 the American Academy of Periodontology responded to this need and formed a committee to plan and organize an international workshop to revise the classification system for periodontal diseases. The proceedings in this volume are the result of this reclassification effort. The process involved development by the Organizing Committee of an outline for a new classification and identification of individuals to write state-of-the-science reviews for each of the items on the outline. The reviewers were encouraged to depart from the preliminary outline if there were data to support any modifications. On October 30-November 2, 1999, the International Workshop for a Classification

  16. Current Efforts to Develop Alternate "TB 700-2" Test Protocols for the Hazard Classification of Large Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Daniel F.; Bennett, Robert R.; Graham, Kenneth J.; Boggs, Thomas L.; Atwood, Alice I.; Butcher, A. Garn

    2002-04-01

    When the Department of Defense (DoD) revised Technical Bulletin (TB) 700-2, NAVSEAINST 8020.8B, TO 11A-1-47, DLAR 8220.12 hazard classification guidelines in January 1998, it significantly changed the procedures used to determine the explosive classification of rocket motors, to be shipped or placed in DoD storage facilities. The revised test protocols outlined in this document, (hereafter referred to as TB 700-2) are far more conservative and costly to implement than the previous ones. These changes could have a profound impact on the solid rocket community and in particular those involved with the research and development and manufacture of large (less than or = 304.8-millimeter (less than or = 12-inch)) diameter solid rocket motors (SRMs). The ramifications may include higher development costs and limitations on performance improvements. This paper outlines current efforts of the solid rocket community to develop acceptable alternate test protocols for large rocket motors that could fulfill the intent of TB 700-2 and be considered by the Department of Defense Explosive Safety Board (DDESB) for incorporation into a future revision to TB 700-2.

  17. Current Efforts to Develop Alternate "TB 700-2" Test Protocols for the Hazard Classification of Large Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Daniel F.; Bennett, Robert R.; Graham, Kenneth J.; Boggs, Thomas L.; Atwood, Alice I.

    1998-01-01

    When the Department of Defense (DoD) revised Technical Bulletin (TB) 700-2, NAVSEAINST 8020.8B, TO 11A-1-47, DLAR 8220.12 hazard classification guidelines in January 1998 1, it significantly changed the procedures used to determine the explosive classification of rocket motors, to be shipped or placed in DoD storage facilities. The revised test protocols outlined in this document, (hereafter referred to as TB 700-2) are far more conservative and costly to implement than the previous ones. These changes could have a profound impact on the solid rocket community and in particular those involved with the research and development and manufacture of large (greater than or equal 304.8-millimeter (greater than or equal l2-inch)) diameter solid rocket motors (SRMs). The ramifications may include higher development costs and limitations on performance improvements. This paper outlines current efforts of the solid rocket community to develop acceptable alternate test protocols for large rocket motors that could fulfill the intent of TB 700-2 and be considered by the Department of Defense Explosive Safety Board (DDESB) for incorporation into a future revision to TB 700-2.

  18. Current Efforts to Develop Alternate "TB700-2" Test Protocols for the Hazard Classification of Large Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Daniel F.; Bennett, Robert R.; Graham, Kenneth J.; Boggs, Thomas L.; Atwood, Alice I.

    2001-09-01

    When the Department of Defense (DoD) revised Technical Bulletin (TB) 700-2, NAVSEAINST 8020.8B, TO 11A-1-47, DLAR 8220.12 hazard classification guidelines in January 1998 1, it significantly changed the procedures used to determine the explosive classification of rocket motors, to be shipped or placed in DoD storage facilities. The revised test protocols outlined in this document, (hereafter referred to as TB 700-2) are far more conservative and costly to implement than the previous ones. These changes could have a profound impact on the solid rocket community and in particular those involved with the research and development and manufacture of large (equal to or greater than) 304.8-millimeter (equal to or greater than 12-inch diameter solid rocket motors (SRMs). The ramifications may include higher development costs and limitations on performance improvements. This paper outlines current efforts of the solid rocket community to develop acceptable alternate test protocols for large rocket motors that could fulfill the intent of TB 700-2 and be considered by the Department of Defense Explosive Safety Board (DDESB) for incorporation into a future revision to TB 700-2.

  19. Control Decisions for Flammable Gas Hazards in Waste Transfer Systems

    SciTech Connect

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2000-06-28

    This report describes the control decisions for flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems (i.e., waste transfer piping and waste transfer-associated structures) made at control decision meetings on November 30, 1999a and April 19, 2000, and their basis. These control decisions, and the analyses that support them, will be documented in an amendment to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (CHG 2000a) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) (CHG 2000b) to close the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) (Bacon 1996 and Wagoner 1996). Following the Contractor Tier I review of the FSAR and TSR amendment, it will be submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) for review and approval. The control decision meeting on November 30, 1999 to address flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems followed the control decision process and the criteria for control decisions described in Section 3.3.1.5 of the FSAR. The control decision meeting agenda, attendance list, and introductory and background presentations are included in Attachments 1 through 4. The control decision discussions on existing and other possible controls for flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems and the basis for selecting or not selecting specific controls are summarized in this report.

  20. Integrating Community Volcanic Hazard Mapping, Geographic Information Systems, and Modeling to Reduce Volcanic Hazard Vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajo Sanchez, Jorge V.

    This dissertation is composed of an introductory chapter and three papers about vulnerability and volcanic hazard maps with emphasis on lahars. The introductory chapter reviews definitions of the term vulnerability by the social and natural hazard community and it provides a new definition of hazard vulnerability that includes social and natural hazard factors. The first paper explains how the Community Volcanic Hazard Map (CVHM) is used for vulnerability analysis and explains in detail a new methodology to obtain valuable information about ethnophysiographic differences, hazards, and landscape knowledge of communities in the area of interest: the Canton Buenos Aires situated on the northern flank of the Santa Ana (Ilamatepec) Volcano, El Salvador. The second paper is about creating a lahar hazard map in data poor environments by generating a landslide inventory and obtaining potential volumes of dry material that can potentially be carried by lahars. The third paper introduces an innovative lahar hazard map integrating information generated by the previous two papers. It shows the differences in hazard maps created by the communities and experts both visually as well as quantitatively. This new, integrated hazard map was presented to the community with positive feedback and acceptance. The dissertation concludes with a summary chapter on the results and recommendations.

  1. Defining Talar Head and Neck Pathology: The Malvern Classification System.

    PubMed

    Hood, Christopher Robin; Miller, Jason Roy; Hollinger, Josuha Kevin

    2017-08-23

    Talar fractures account for <1% of all fractures in the body and 3% to 6% of pedal fractures. Of these fractures, avulsion and neck fractures represent the most and second most common type, respectively. Several classification systems exist for talar fractures of the talar dome (Berndt-Hardy), talar neck dislocation (Hawkins), and talar body (Sneppen) anatomic locations. Although diverse, they are not all encompassing for fracture patterns of the talus. Another set of pathologic issues occur about the talar head and neck region that can be seen in the clinical setting. Thus, a new classification system (Malvern classification system for talar head/neck fractures) was devised and defined for this location. The system represents a comprehensive review of the available published data and synthesis into an organized classification system. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Classification procedure in limited angle tomography system

    SciTech Connect

    Chlewicki, W.; Baniukiewicz, P.; Chady, T.; Brykalski, A.

    2011-06-23

    In this work we propose the use of limited angle reconstruction algorithms combined with a procedure for defect detection and feature evaluation in three dimensions. The procedure consists of the following steps: acquisition of the X-ray projections, approximated limited angle 3D image reconstruction, and image preprocessing and classification.

  3. Maximizing the Validity of Holland's Classification System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haase, Richard F.; And Others

    Discriminant analysis of Holland's Self Directed Search and Vocational Preference Inventory significantly improved the predictive validity of his classification scheme, over the traditional method of assigning high point codes. These results were obtained with both an initial and a replication sample of undergraduates pursuing various degrees. The…

  4. A global classification of coastal flood hazard climates associated with large-scale oceanographic forcing.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Ana; Vitousek, Sean; Camus, Paula; Tomás, Antonio; Espejo, Antonio; Losada, Inigo J; Barnard, Patrick L; Erikson, Li H; Ruggiero, Peter; Reguero, Borja G; Mendez, Fernando J

    2017-07-11

    Coastal communities throughout the world are exposed to numerous and increasing threats, such as coastal flooding and erosion, saltwater intrusion and wetland degradation. Here, we present the first global-scale analysis of the main drivers of coastal flooding due to large-scale oceanographic factors. Given the large dimensionality of the problem (e.g. spatiotemporal variability in flood magnitude and the relative influence of waves, tides and surge levels), we have performed a computer-based classification to identify geographical areas with homogeneous climates. Results show that 75% of coastal regions around the globe have the potential for very large flooding events with low probabilities (unbounded tails), 82% are tide-dominated, and almost 49% are highly susceptible to increases in flooding frequency due to sea-level rise.

  5. Water-washable ink system reduces printers' hazardous emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Kratch, K.

    1994-08-01

    Printing industry solvents contain large quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a major contributor to air pollution in that industry. Because most printing inks contain non-water-soluble petroleum, organic solvents have been necessary to clean presses using those inks. However, under proposed control technique guidelines for lithographic printers issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), printing-press wash solutions could contain no more than 30% VOCs. Deluxe Corp., a St. Paul, Minn.-based lithographic printer, recognized that stiffer emissions rules could mean harsh penalties for non-compliance and, in 1990, began developing a water-based press wash that would meet the guidelines. Deluxe last year introduced a 100% vegetable oil-based ink that becomes water-washable when exposed to the company's water-based press-wash solution. The solvent-free system eliminates VOCs and hazardous wastes associated with printing, contains no chemicals considered hazardous by EPA, uses no non-renewable resources, and works with existing printing equipment and processes. The system also eliminates water and soil contamination risks associated with laundering or landfilling solvent-saturated shop towels, saves money by eliminating the need to pay for hazardous waste disposal and provides relief to employees who complain about the strong odors of traditional press-wash solvents.

  6. Revised Hazard Ranking System: Background information. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    The Fact Sheet discusses the Hazard Ranking System (HRS) in response to the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). The HRS is the scoring system EPA uses to assess the relative threat associated with the release or potential release of hazardous substances from a waste site. The HRS score is the primary criterion EPA uses to determine whether a site should be placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). The NPL identifies sites that warrant further investigation to determine if they pose risks to public health or the environment. Sites on the NPL are eligible for long-term 'remedial action' financed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by SARA. SARA authorizes a 'Hazardous Substances Superfund' totalling $8.5 billion over 5 years to pay costs not assumed by those responsible for problems at a site. The HRS uses data that can be collected relatively quickly and inexpensively, thus allowing most Superfund resources to be directed to remedial actions at sites on the NPL.

  7. Lithium-thionyl chloride cell system safety hazard analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dampier, F. W.

    1985-03-01

    This system safety analysis for the lithium thionyl chloride cell is a critical review of the technical literature pertaining to cell safety and draws conclusions and makes recommendations based on this data. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the electrochemical reactions occurring during discharge are discussed with particular attention given to unstable SOCl2 reduction intermediates. Potentially hazardous reactions between the various cell components and discharge products or impurities that could occur during electrical or thermal abuse are described and the most hazardous conditions and reactions identified. Design factors influencing the safety of Li/SOCl2 cells, shipping and disposal methods and the toxicity of Li/SOCl2 battery components are additional safety issues that are also addressed.

  8. Radiological Hazard of Spallation Products in Accelerator-Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M.; Stankovskii, A.; Artisyuk, V.; Korovin, Yu.; Shmelev, A.; Titarenko, Yu.

    2002-09-15

    The central issue underlying this paper is related to elucidating the hazard of radioactive spallation products that might be an important factor affecting the design option of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs). Hazard analysis based on the concept of Annual Limit on Intake identifies alpha-emitting isotopes of rare earths (REs) (dysprosium, gadolinium, and samarium) as the dominant contributors to the overall toxicity of traditional (W, Pb, Pb-Bi) targets. The matter is addressed from several points of view: code validation to simulate their yields, choice of material for the neutron producing targets, and challenging the beam type. The paper quantitatively determines the domain in which the toxicity of REs exceeds that of polonium activation products broadly discussed now in connection with advertising lead-bismuth technology for the needs of ADSs.

  9. Reliability of the Lisfranc injury radiological classification (Myerson-modified Hardcastle classification system).

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Shady; Hamad, Faisal; Riaz, Muhammad; Ahmed, Ghalib; Al Ateeq, Mohammad; Ibrahim, Talal

    2015-11-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the reliability of the radiological classification system (Myerson-modified Hardcastle Classification System) for Lisfranc injury. The classification system is a three-grade ordinal scale based on fracture displacement. Thirty-nine Lisfranc injury radiographs were evaluated by 38 independent observers consisting of consultant orthopaedic surgeons (18), orthopaedic surgery residents (17) and consultant musculoskeletal radiologists (3) on two separate occasions after receiving training in the use of the classification. The intra- and inter-observer reliability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and found to be excellent. The mean weighted intra- and inter-observer ICCs were 0.94 (95 % CI 0.89-0.97, p < 0.01) and 0.81 (95 % CI 0.68-0.89, p < 0.01), respectively. The Myerson-modified Hardcastle classification system in our study was shown to be reliable and can be used in outcome studies and provide standard terminology among clinicians for Lisfranc injuries.

  10. Classification and Coding, An Introduction and Review of Classification and Coding Systems. Management Guide No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacConnell, W.

    Nearly all organizations are faced with problems of classifying and coding financial data, management and technical information, components, stores, etc. and need to apply some logical and meaningful system of identification. This report examines the objectives and applications of classification and coding systems and reviews eight systems…

  11. WEB-based System for Aftershock Hazard Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Sergey; Shebalin, Peter

    2017-04-01

    The first version of web-based system for automatic aftershock hazard assessment is available at http://afcast.org/afcast. The system software downloads earthquake data every 2 hours from ANSS Comprehensive Earthquake Catalog (ComCat, http://earthquake.usgs.gov/data/comcat/) provided on-line by USGS. Currently the system is aimed to assess hazard of aftershocks of M5.5+ after earthquakes of M6.5+. The access to the system is unlimited to the registered users only. First, the system estimates in quasi real time mode an area where strong aftershocks are expected. This area is modeled by an ellipse and stadium (the locus of distances from a line segment not exceeding a given value), both centered and oriented according to the main shock rupture, estimated using epicenters of the first 12 hours aftershocks. The sizes of the areas are controlled by q part of earthquakes for 12 hours after the mainshock from the enclosed circle with radius of 0.03x10^M/2. The chosen q-values are based on retrospective (1980-2015) analysis of the error diagram and imply three forecasting strategies: "soft", "neutral" and "hard". The "soft" strategy minimizes false alarms at a reasonable rate of failures to predict. The "hard" strategy, in contrary, minimizes the rate of failures to predict at a reasonable area of alarms. The "neutral" strategy equalizes errors of two types. Three concentric ellipses or stadiums may serve as benchmarks for the choice corresponding to specific hazard reduction measures between the three strategies. Next, the system will estimate the period and magnitude of the strongest aftershock expected inside the alarm area. This research was carried out at the expense of the Russian Science Foundation (Project No. 16-17-00093).

  12. Autism and classification systems: a study of 84 children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A number of studies have shown that current classification systems (ICD 10, DSM IV TR) have limitation when applied to autistic children and the category PDD NOS (DSM IV TR) has in particular been criticized. To check the possible usefulness of other classification systems to better describe patient's functioning, we retrospectively studied 84 patients, seen consecutively in our Child Neurology and Psychiatry Department (excluding only those presenting for another disease even if with clinical signs of a PDD). Methods We tried to classify them according to ICD 10, DSM IV TR, CFTMEA-R, "operational classification" (Manzano and Palacio) and de Ajuriaguerra's classification. Results We found a good correspondence between DSM IV TR and ICD 10 and the use of psychodynamic classification systems (in particular CFTMEA-R) was useful to differentiate clinical subtypes collected under the PDD NOS etiquette according to DSM IV TR. Conclusions To rationalize research efforts and find better tailored therapies, we need to improve PDD classification systems, using contributions coming from every field of child psychiatry and neurology: it's possible that 0-3 Classification could help this. PMID:20205822

  13. Laser beacon system for aircraft collision hazard determination.

    PubMed

    Miles, R B

    1980-07-01

    A laser beacon collision hazard determination system is capable of simultaneously determining range, bearing, and heading of threat aircraft. Calculations demonstrate that threat aircraft may be observed at > 10 km under good visibility conditions. When the visibility is limited to 5.6 km (3 nautical miles), the shortest possible warning time for aircraft below 3000 m (10,000 ft) can be > 15 sec. A wide variety of detection systems may be chosen based on cost, detection range, and sophistication. Traffic saturation is not a problem since closer aircraft produce easily distinguishable signals so traffic may be prioritized. Preliminary tests demonstrate that accurate range measurements are possible under daylight conditions.

  14. Digital warning system for geologic hazards in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, M. J.; Stefansson, R.; Hvannberg, E. Th.; Jonsson, B. G.; Halldorsson, P.; Magnusson, H. S.; Gudmundsson, G. B.; Thorbjarnardottir, B. S.; Gunnarsdottir, S.; Sveinbjornsson, H.

    2003-04-01

    The Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) monitors and maintains an automated network of 42 digital seismic stations, which provides near real-time seismicity measurements for an area encompassing terrestrial and near-shore regions of Iceland (see http://www.vedur.is/ja). Additionally, digital data are received continuously from six borehole strain meters and 17 differential GPS stations. Collectively, these geophysical data allow unique insight into tectonic processes responsible for earthquake and volcanic activity in Iceland. To enable more precise, verifiable short- and long-term forecasts of geologic hazard potential in Iceland, the IMO is currently developing an Internet-based warning system. In this presentation, we describe the conceptual and technical design of the warning system and supporting geo-database. Specifically, we (i) explain how IMO data are stored to allow fast information retrieval via the Internet; (ii) summarise the design of the user interface, data options and display formats, and the software responsible for handling data requests; and (iii) illustrate how the warning system is providing unique overview capabilities that permit advanced recognition of anomalous geologic processes. The main advantage of the warning system is the ease and speed at which multi-parameter historic and real-time geophysical data can be evaluated on-screen. Besides the ability to visualise processed field data, a resource database is accessible from the system interface. This database comprises digital information in the form of scientific publications, customised hazard summaries, pre-processed information for civil defence purposes, and annotated map and image resources. Although the warning system will be used primarily by the IMO, it is anticipated that allied research institutions, civil defence personnel, and the public will benefit from Internet access to geophysical data and related hazard information. However, to ensure clear and effective information

  15. A Ternary Phase Diagram for a Less Hazardous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udale, Barbara A.; Wells, John D.

    1995-12-01

    The ternary phase diagram for the partially miscible liquid system n-propanol-n-heptane-water can be determined readily in an undergraduate laboratory experiment. The coexistence curve is obtained from titration results. Tie lines are then estimated from the compositions of pairs of phases in equilibrium, the propanol concentrations being determined by gas chromatography. The reagents are less hazardous than those of the classic acetic acid-chloroform-water system, and the gas chromatographic analysis has more interest for students than the acid-base titrations of the older experiment.

  16. 40 CFR 141.710 - Bin classification for filtered systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Treatment Technique Requirements § 141.710 Bin classification for filtered systems. (a) Following...) of this section is a violation of the treatment technique requirement....

  17. A proposed ecosystem services classification system to support green accounting

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are a multitude of actual or envisioned, complete or incomplete, ecosystem service classification systems being proposed to support Green Accounting. Green Accounting is generally thought to be the formal accounting attempt to factor environmental production into National ...

  18. A proposed ecosystem services classification system to support green accounting

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are a multitude of actual or envisioned, complete or incomplete, ecosystem service classification systems being proposed to support Green Accounting. Green Accounting is generally thought to be the formal accounting attempt to factor environmental production into National ...

  19. Improvement of the classification system for wheelchair rugby: athlete priorities.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Viola C; Hart, Anne L; van Limbeek, Jacques; Vanlandewijck, Yves C

    2014-10-01

    A representative sample (N=302) of the wheelchair rugby population responded to a survey about the classification system based on prioritized items by International Wheelchair Rugby Federation members. Respondents stated, "The classification system is accurate but needs adjustments" (56%), "Any athlete with tetraequivalent impairment should be allowed to compete" (72%), "Athletes with cerebral palsy and other coordination impairments should be classified with a system different than the current one" (75%), and "The maximal value for trunk should be increased from 1.0 to 1.5" (67%). A minority stated, "Wheelchair rugby should only be open to spinal cord injury and other neurological conditions" (36%) and "There should be a 4.0 class" (33%). Results strongly indicated that athletes and stakeholders want adjustments to the classification system in two areas: a focus on evaluation of athletes with impairments other than loss of muscle power caused by spinal cord injury and changes in classification of trunk impairment.

  20. A system for analysis and classification of voice communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Older, H. J.; Jenney, L. L.; Garland, L.

    1973-01-01

    A method for analysis and classification of verbal communications typically associated with manned space missions or simulations was developed. The study was carried out in two phases. Phase 1 was devoted to identification of crew tasks and activities which require voice communication for accomplishment or reporting. Phase 2 entailed development of a message classification system and a preliminary test of its feasibility. The classification system permits voice communications to be analyzed to three progressively more specific levels of detail and to be described in terms of message content, purpose, and the participants in the information exchange. A coding technique was devised to allow messages to be recorded by an eight-digit number.

  1. ABCD classification system: a novel classification for subaxial cervical spine injuries.

    PubMed

    Shousha, Mootaz

    2014-04-20

    The classification system was derived through a retrospective analysis of 73 consecutive cases of subaxial cervical spine injury as well as thorough literature review. To define a new classification system for subaxial cervical spine injuries. There exist several methods to classify subaxial cervical spine injuries but no single system has emerged as clearly superior to the others. On the basis of a 2-column anatomical model, the first part of the proposed classification is an anatomical description of the injury. It delivers the information whether the injury is bony, ligamentous, or a combined one. The first 4 alphabetical letters have been used for simplicity. Each column is represented by an alphabetical letter from A to D. Each letter has a radiological meaning (A = Absent injury, B = Bony lesion, C = Combined bony and ligamentous, D = Disc or ligamentous injury).The second part of the classification is represented by 3 modifiers. These are the neurological status of the patient (N), the degree of spinal canal stenosis (S), and the degree of instability (I). For simplicity, each modifier was graded in an ascending pattern of severity from zero to 2. The last part is optional and denotes which radiological examination has been used to define the injury type. The new ABCD classification was applicable for all patients. The most common type was anterior ligamentous and posterior combined injury "DC" (37.9%), followed by "DD" injury in 12% of the cases. Through this work a new classification for cervical spine injuries is proposed. The aim is to establish criteria for a common language in description of cervical injuries aiming for simplification, especially for junior residents. Each letter and each sign has a meaning to deliver the largest amount of information. Both the radiological as well as the clinical data are represented in this scheme. However, further evaluation of this classification is needed. 3.

  2. Acuity systems dialogue and patient classification system essentials.

    PubMed

    Harper, Kelle; McCully, Crystal

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining resources for quality patient care is a major responsibility of nurse leaders and requires accurate information in the political world of budgeting. Patient classification systems (PCS) assist nurse managers in controlling cost and improving patient care while appropriately using financial resources. This paper communicates acuity systems development, background, flaws, and components while discussing a few tools currently available. It also disseminates the development of a new acuity tool, the Patient Classification System. The PCS tool, developed in a small rural hospital, uses 5 broad concepts: (1) medications, (2) complicated procedures, (3) education, (4) psychosocial issues, and (5) complicated intravenous medications. These concepts embrace a 4-tiered scale that differentiates significant patient characteristics and assists in staffing measures for equality in patient staffing and improving quality of care and performance. Data obtained through use of the PCS can be used by nurse leaders to effectively and objectively lobby for appropriate patient care resources. Two questionnaires distributed to registered nurses on a medical-surgical unit evaluated the nurses' opinion of the 5 concepts and the importance for establishing patient acuity for in-patient care. Interrater reliability among nurses was 87% with the author's acuity tool.

  3. Balancing reservoir creation and seismic hazard in enhanced geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gischig, V.; Wiemer, S.; Alcolea, A.

    2014-09-01

    Fracture shear-dilatancy is an essential process for enhancing the permeability of deep geothermal reservoirs, and is usually accompanied by the radiation of seismic waves. However, the hazard and risk perspective of induced seismicity research typically focuses only on the question of how to reduce the occurrence of induced earthquakes. Here we present a quantitative analysis of seismic hazard as a function of the two key factors defining an enhanced geothermal system: The permeability enhancement, and the size of the stimulated reservoir. Our model has two coupled components: (1) a pressure diffusion model and (2) a stochastic seismicity model. Permeability is increased in the source area of each induced earthquake depending on the amount of slip, which is determined by the magnitude. We show that the few largest earthquakes (i.e. 5-10 events with M ≥ 1.5) contribute more than half of the total reservoir stimulation. The results further indicate that planning and controlling of reservoir engineering operations may be compromised by the considerable variability of maximum observed magnitude, reservoir size, the Gutenberg-Richter b-value and Shapiro's seismogenic index (i.e. a measure of seismic reactivity of a reservoir) that arises from the intrinsic stochastic nature of induced seismicity. We also find that injection volume has a large impact on both reservoir size and seismic hazard. Injection rate and injection scheme have a negligible effect. The impact of site-specific parameters on seismicity and reservoir properties is greater than that of the injected volume. In particular, conditions that lead to high b-values-possibly a low differential stress level-have a high impact on seismic hazard, but also reduce the efficiency of the stimulation in terms of permeability enhancement. Under such conditions, target reservoir permeability can still be achieved without reaching an unacceptable level of seismic hazard, if either the initial reservoir permeability is

  4. USAF pilot selection and classification systems.

    PubMed

    Carretta, T R

    1989-01-01

    A total of 478 pilot candidates were given a computerized test battery, the Basic Attributes Test (BAT) currently being validated for pilot selection and classification. The battery included tests of psychomotor and cognitive/perceptual abilities and personality/attitudinal characteristics. Results indicated that several of the BAT tests were able to improve the prediction of graduation/elimination from flight training and follow-on training recommendation (fighter or non-fighter aircraft) above that provided by currently used paper-and-pencil tests. It was concluded that several of the BAT performance measures were capturing skills and abilities related to flight training performance that are not being assessed by currently used selection instruments. Implications for pilot selection and classification procedures are discussed.

  5. Indigenous vs. International soil classification system in Ohangwena Region, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudat, Brice; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Bloemertz, Lena

    2014-05-01

    This poster will present soil diversity in North-Central Namibia, with a focus on soil fertility. It aims to show the correspondence and differences between an international and an indigenous soil classification system. International classifications, like World Reference Base for Soil Resources (WRB), are very helpful tools to share information in soil science and agriculture. However, these classification are meaningful for large scale soil processes understanding but local specificities cannot be understood and differentiated. On the other hand, knowledge that farmers have on cultivated soils is very accurate and adapted to local agricultural use. However, their knowledge should be properly defined and translated to be used by scientists. Once their knowledge can be read by scientists, it provides very powerful tools for soil mapping and characterization. Analysis so far has focused on the area of Ondobe (30 km West from Eenhana, Ohangwena region). This area is located between two major systems, the Cuvelai floodplain to the West and the Kalahari Woodlands to the East. While all the cultivated soils from this region would be classified as Arenosols (WRB), the local classification differentiates five major soil types (Omutunda, Ehenge, Omufitu, Elondo, Ehenene). In WRB classification, these soils correspond, roughly, to specific Arenosols, respectively Hypereutric, Albic, Haplic, Rubic and Salic Arenosols. Further work will evaluate, the local variation inside each indigenous soil types. Hierarchical classification using soil field descriptors will be used to create statistic soil groups. These new groups will then be compared to each classification system.

  6. A practical prenatal ultrasound classification system for common oral clefts.

    PubMed

    Maarse, Wiesje; Boonacker, Chantal W B; Breugem, Corstiaan C; Kon, Moshe; Manten, Gwendolyn T R; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B

    2015-09-01

    Our aim is to introduce and validate a new oral cleft classification system based on prenatal ultrasound for use by professionals in daily practice. During a 3-year period (2011-2014), all cases of prenatal oral cleft diagnosed by ultrasound were retrospectively reviewed. A new prenatal ultrasound classification system was introduced. For the purpose of validation, prenatal ultrasound images of oral cleft types were described according to the new classification system and were compared with postnatal findings by reviewing medical records. A total of 103 fetuses with oral cleft were identified by ultrasound. The mean gestation time at detection was 20.4 weeks (95% confidence intervals: 20.0-20.7). The association between oral cleft and other anomalies varied by cleft type; types 2b/3b and 4 were most frequently associated with other anomalies. The measure of agreement between the prenatal and postnatal findings showed a Kappa value of 0.63 (95% confidence intervals: 0.52-0.75), demonstrating the accuracy of this new classification system. A new prenatal oral cleft classification system is presented. This system appears to be accurate, and it shows the variation in the risk of associated anomalies for each cleft type. We expect that ultrasonographers will be able to use the new classification in daily practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. 76 FR 74709 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ..., including any sludge, spill residue, ash, emission control dust, or leachate, remains a hazardous waste... Lower Park Tank Farm is listed as F037 and F038 because it contains petroleum refinery oil/water/solids separation sludges that are listed as hazardous wastes due to benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, chrysene, lead...

  8. 75 FR 20942 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Removal of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... Listing of Hazardous Waste; Removal of Saccharin and Its Salts From the Lists of Hazardous Constituents... regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) to remove saccharin and its salts from the... Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) to remove saccharin and its salts...

  9. The development of a recreational land classification system

    Treesearch

    Robert W. Reinhardt; Diana Gould

    1995-01-01

    The New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation has had a land classification system in place since 1972. This system was developed during the creation of the first Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan. This system has become the backbone of the Park Master Planning Process. During the past few years the New York State Park System...

  10. An early warning system for marine storm hazard mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vousdoukas, M. I.; Almeida, L. P.; Pacheco, A.; Ferreira, O.

    2012-04-01

    The present contribution presents efforts towards the development of an operational Early Warning System for storm hazard prediction and mitigation. The system consists of a calibrated nested-model train which consists of specially calibrated Wave Watch III, SWAN and XBeach models. The numerical simulations provide daily forecasts of the hydrodynamic conditions, morphological change and overtopping risk at the area of interest. The model predictions are processed by a 'translation' module which is based on site-specific Storm Impact Indicators (SIIs) (Ciavola et al., 2011, Storm impacts along European coastlines. Part 2: lessons learned from the MICORE project, Environmental Science & Policy, Vol 14), and warnings are issued when pre-defined threshold values are exceeded. For the present site the selected SIIs were (i) the maximum wave run-up height during the simulations; and (ii) the dune-foot horizontal retreat at the end of the simulations. Both SIIs and pre-defined thresholds were carefully selected on the grounds of existing experience and field data. Four risk levels were considered, each associated with an intervention approach, recommended to the responsible coastal protection authority. Regular updating of the topography/bathymetry is critical for the performance of the storm impact forecasting, especially when there are significant morphological changes. The system can be extended to other critical problems, like implications of global warming and adaptive management strategies, while the approach presently followed, from model calibration to the early warning system for storm hazard mitigation, can be applied to other sites worldwide, with minor adaptations.

  11. Topographical mapping system for radiological and hazardous environments acceptance testing

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Dochat, G.R.

    1997-12-01

    During the summer of 1996, the Topographical Mapping System (TMS) for hazardous and radiological environments and its accompanying three-dimensional (3-D) visualization tool, the Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote-Viewing System (ICERVS), were delivered to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL and Mechanical Technology, Inc., performed final acceptance testing of the TMS during the next eight months. The TMS was calibrated and characterized during this period. This paper covers the calibration, characterization, and acceptance testing of the TMS. Development of the TMS and ICERVS was initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the purpose of characterization and remediation of underground storage tanks (USTs) at DOE sites across the country. DOE required a 3-D, topographical mapping system suitable for use in hazardous and radiological environments. The intended application is the mapping of the interior of USTs as part of DOE`s waste characterization and remediation efforts and to obtain baseline data on the content of the storage tank interiors as well as data on changes in the tank contents and levels brought about by waste remediation steps. Initially targeted for deployment at the Hanford Washington site, the TMS is designed to be a self-contained, compact, and reconfigurable system that is capable of providing rapid, variable-resolution mapping information in poorly characterized workspaces with a minimum of operator intervention.

  12. Topographical mapping system for radiological and hazardous environments acceptance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Gary A.; Dochat, G. R.

    1997-09-01

    During the summer of 1996, the topographical mapping system (TMS) for hazardous and radiological environments and its accompanying three-dimensional (3-D) visualization tool, the interactive computer-enhanced remote-viewing system (ICERVS), were delivered to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL and Mechanical Technology, Inc., performed final acceptance testing of the TMS during the next eight months. The TMS was calibrated and characterized during this period. This paper covers the calibration, characterization, and acceptance testing of the TMS. Development of the TMS and the ICERVS was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the purpose of characterization and remediation of underground storage tanks (USTs) at DOE sites across the country. DOE required a 3-D, topographical mapping system suitable for use in hazardous and radiological environments. The intended application is the mapping of the interior of USTs as part of DOE's waste characterization and remediation efforts and to obtain baseline data on the content of the storage tank interiors as well as data on changes in the tank contents and levels brought about by waste remediation steps. Initially targeted for deployment at the Hanford Washington site, the TMS is designed to be a self-contained, compact, reconfigurable system that is capable of providing rapid, variable-resolution mapping information in poorly characterized workspaces with a minimum of operator intervention.

  13. Expert systems for the transportation of hazardous and radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, C.E.; Clover, J.C.; Ferrada, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    Under the supervision of the Transportation Technologies Group which is in the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, an expert system prototype for the transportation and packaging of hazardous and radioactive materials has been designed and developed. The development of the expert system prototype focused on using the combination of hypermedia elements and the Visual Basic{trademark} programming language. Hypermedia technology uses software that allows the user to interact with the computing environment through many formats: text, graphics, audio, and full-motion video. With the use of hypermedia, a user-friendly prototype has been developed to sort through numerous transportation regulations, thereby leading to the proper packaging for the materials. The expert system performs the analysis of regulations that an expert in shipping information would do; only the expert system performs the work more quickly. Currently, enhancements in a variety of categories are being made to the prototype. These include further expansion of non-radioactive materials, which includes any material that is hazardous but not radioactive; and the addition of full-motion video, which will depict regulations in terms that are easy to understand and which will show examples of how to handle the materials when packaging them.

  14. A new classification system for dental treatment under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Loyola-Rodriguez, Juan Pablo; Zavala-Alonso, Veronica; Patiño-Marin, Nuria; Friedman, Clive

    2006-01-01

    The provision of comprehensive care for patients with special needs using dental general anesthesia (DGA) has changed over time, and now includes more complex procedures and the participation of many services. As a result, it is necessary to integrate, organize and describe all of the procedures that are carried out in different DGA settings. The aim of this study was to propose a systematic classification for dental treatment procedures be delivered under DGA, and to compare this classification system with an existing system. This new classification system has three distinct components: type, frequency and length of time needed to complete dental procedures for both primary and permanent teeth. A wide range of oral surgery procedures and endodontic treatment was also included. A retrospective cohort study utilizing 84 subjects was used to develop and compare the two classification systems. When comparing the different categories of procedures by both classifications, there were significant statistical differences between them (p < 0.05). Oral health care for patients with special needs has evolved, with more complex and extensive interventions that require teamwork by personnel from different dental or medical specialties. The classification system in this study includes detailed information regarding the procedures involved in the DGA. This helps to provide a clear understanding and specific information that enables the comparison of clinical experiences across populations where a DGA has been used for patients with special needs.

  15. Pesticides in urban multiunit dwellings: hazard identification using classification and regression tree (CART) analysis.

    PubMed

    Julien, Rhona; Levy, Jonathan I; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Hauser, Russ; Spengler, John D; Canales, Robert A; Hynes, H Patricia

    2008-10-01

    Many units in public housing or other low-income urban dwellings may have elevated pesticide residues, given recurring infestation, but it would be logistically and economically infeasible to sample a large number of units to identify highly exposed households to design interventions. Within this study, our aim was to devise a low-cost approach to identify homes in public housing with high levels of pesticide residues, using information that would allow the housing authority and residents to determine optimal strategies to reduce household exposures. As part of the Healthy Public Housing Initiative, we collected environmental samples from 42 public housing apartments in Boston, MA, in 2002 and 2003 and gathered housing characteristics; for example, household demographics and self-reported pesticide use information, considering information available with and without a home visit. Focusing on five organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides, we used classification and regression tree analysis (CART) to disaggregate the pesticide concentration data into homogenous subsamples according to housing characteristics, which allowed us to identify households and associated networks impacted by the mismanagement of pesticides. The CART analysis demonstrated reasonable sensitivity and specificity given more extensive household information but generally poor performance using only information available without a home visit. Apartments with high concentrations of cyfluthrin, a pyrethroid of interest given that it is a restricted use pesticide, were more likely to be associated with Hispanic residents who resided in their current apartment for more than 5 yr, consistent with documented pesticide usage patterns. We conclude that using CART as an exploratory technique to better understand the home characteristics associated with elevated pesticide levels may be a viable approach for risk management in large multiunit housing developments.

  16. Limitation of previous Allen classification and subaxial cervical spine injury classification (SLIC) system in distractive-extension injury of cervical spine: proposal of modified classification system.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Su-Kyung; Ham, Dong-Hun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Choi, Byung-Wan

    2016-01-01

    To verify the clinical applicability of a modified classification system in distractive-extension cervical spine injury that reflects the degrees of soft tissue damage and spinal cord injury while complementing previous Allen classification and subaxial cervical spine injury classification (SLIC) system. A total of 195 patients with cervical spine distraction-extension (DE) injury were retrospectively classified. We added stages IIIA (with concomitant spinal cord injury without bony abnormalities) and IIIB (with concomitant additional soft tissue swelling) to the existing stages I and II of the Allen classification. We also supplemented the SLIC system by refining and assigning scores to bony morphology and soft tissue damage. The previous and proposed classification systems were compared by analyzing their scoring performances in terms of clinical features and prognosis. The Allen classification yielded 153 and 42 patients with stage 1 and 42 stage 2 injuries, respectively. Patients classified according to the proposed system were stratified as follows: stage I, 58; stage II, 27; stage IIIA, 33; and stage IIIB, 77. Regarding neurological symptoms and prognosis, stages IIIA and IIIB were poorer than stage I but significantly better than stage II (P < 0.05). On the SLIC system, 146 patients scored ≥5; and 37 and 12 patients scored 4 and ≤3 points, respectively, whereas the numbers of patients who scored ≥5, 4, and ≤3 points on the modified SLIC system were 170, 21, and 4, respectively. The proposed classification and scoring system to complement the Allen classification and SLIC system with respect to the degrees of soft tissue damage and spinal cord injury is considered effective for diagnosing and determining therapeutic directions and prognosis in cases of cervical spine extension injury.

  17. Fire hazard and other safety concerns of photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Shiradkar, Narendra S.

    2012-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) modules are usually considered safe and reliable. But in case of grid-connected PV systems that are becoming popular, the issue of fire safety of PV modules is becoming increasingly important due to the employed high voltages of 600 to 1000 V. The two main factors, i.e., open circuiting of the dc circuit and of the bypass diodes and ground faults that are responsible for the fire in the PV systems, have been discussed in detail along with numerous real life examples. Recommendations are provided for preventing the fire hazards such as designing the PV array mounting system to minimize the chimney effect, having proper bypass and blocking diodes, and interestingly, having an ungrounded PV system.

  18. Protection of Electrical Systems from EM Hazards - Design Guide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    ft-A112 707 BOEING MILITARY AIRPLANE CO SEATTLE WA F/6 1/3 PROTECTION OF ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS FROM ER HAZARDS - DESIGN GUIDE--ETC (Ul SEP al 0 L...34AMMUTALLWMCID AMFO MW W 4 AM1 IMA- l Gn-*ATrBRN AMl FORC BMIO, O 4W Fm _-- # 82 u q)J. o0 : . ,. 0 0 - NOTICE When Government drawings, specifications, or other...Avoeessio For STIS QuaM Me!I TAB Unannounoea 0 @"-----.. .Julttiloatio opyI Distrbut ion/ \\UUPECED/ Avalability Code, I Avai and/or* - 1o_ / TABLE OF

  19. Comparison of the clinical applicability of Miller's classification system to Kumar and Masamatti's classification system of gingival recession

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Gupta, Geeti; Puri, Komal; Bansal, Mansi; Jain, Deept; Khatri, Manish; Masamatti, Sujata Surendra

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aims of the present study were to (i) Find the percentage of recession cases that could be classified by application of Miller's and/or Kumar and Masamatti's classification of gingival recession, and (ii) compare the percentage of clinical applicability of Miller's criteria and Kumar and Masamatti's criteria to the total recessions present. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 patients (1089 recession cases) were included in the study wherein they were classified using both Miller's and Kumar and Masamatti's classification systems of gingival recession. Percentage comparison of the application of both classification systems was done. Results: Data analysis showed that though all the cases of the recession were classified by Kumar and Masamatti's classification, only 34.61% cases were classified by Miller's classification. 19.10% cases were completely (having only labial/buccal recession) classified. In 15.51% (out of 34.61%) cases, only buccal recession was classified according to Miller's criteria and included in this category, although these cases had both buccal and lingual/palatal recessions. Furthermore, 29.75% cases of recession with interdental loss and marginal tissue loss coronal to mucogingival junction (MGJ) remained uncategorized by Miller's classification; categorization of palatal/lingual recession was possible with Kumar and Masamatti's classification. Conclusion: The elaborative evaluation of both buccal and palatal/lingual recession by the Kumar and Masamatti's classification system can be used to overcome the limitations of Miller's classification system, especially the cases with interdental loss and having marginal tissue loss coronal to MGJ. PMID:26644724

  20. The 2010 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC): A Classification System Gets an Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmel, Alissa; Cosca, Theresa

    2010-01-01

    Making sense of occupational data isn't always easy. But the task is less daunting when the data are well organized. For Federal occupational statistics, the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system establishes that organization. And a recent revision to the SOC means that the data will be current, in addition to being well organized. The…

  1. Multidisciplinary consensus on the classification of prenatal and postnatal urinary tract dilation (UTD classification system).

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hiep T; Benson, Carol B; Bromley, Bryann; Campbell, Jeffrey B; Chow, Jeanne; Coleman, Beverly; Cooper, Christopher; Crino, Jude; Darge, Kassa; Herndon, C D Anthony; Odibo, Anthony O; Somers, Michael J G; Stein, Deborah R

    2014-12-01

    Urinary tract (UT) dilation is sonographically identified in 1-2% of fetuses and reflects a spectrum of possible uropathies. There is significant variability in the clinical management of individuals with prenatal UT dilation that stems from a paucity of evidence-based information correlating the severity of prenatal UT dilation to postnatal urological pathologies. The lack of correlation between prenatal and postnatal US findings and final urologic diagnosis has been problematic, in large measure because of a lack of consensus and uniformity in defining and classifying UT dilation. Consequently, there is a need for a unified classification system with an accepted standard terminology for the diagnosis and management of prenatal and postnatal UT dilation. A consensus meeting was convened on March 14-15, 2014, in Linthicum, Maryland, USA to propose: 1) a unified description of UT dilation that could be applied both prenatally and postnatally; and 2) a standardized scheme for the perinatal evaluation of these patients based on sonographic criteria (i.e. the classification system). The participating societies included American College of Radiology, the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine, the American Society of Pediatric Nephrology, the Society for Fetal Urology, the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, the Society for Pediatric Urology, the Society for Pediatric Radiology and the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasounds. The recommendations proposed in this consensus statement are based on a detailed analysis of the current literature and expert opinion representing common clinical practice. The proposed UTD Classification System (and hence the severity of the UT dilation) is based on six categories in US findings: 1) anterior-posterior renal pelvic diameter (APRPD); 2) calyceal dilation; 3) renal parenchymal thickness; 4) renal parenchymal appearance; 5) bladder abnormalities; and 6) ureteral abnormalities. The classification system is stratified based on

  2. GEHS Neurophysiological Classification System for Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Greathouse, David G; Ernst, Greg; Halle, John S; Shaffer, Scott W

    2016-01-01

    Median neuropathy at or distal to the wrist or carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is one of a number of muscle, tendon, and nerve-related disorders that affect people performing intensive work with their hands. Following a thorough history and physical examination, electrophysiological examination including both nerve conduction studies (NCS) and electromyography (EMG) testing may be performed and currently serve as the reference standard for the diagnosis of CTS. The EMG and NCS exams should identify the peripheral nerve, specific location in the nerve pathway, involvement of sensory and/or motor axons, and the presence of myelinopathy and/or axonopathy neuropathic process. Clinical electrophysiologists now have 2 neurophysiological classification systems for patients with CTS from which to choose when preparing their electrophysiological testing reports. The Bland (2000) and GEHS (2012) neurophysiological classification systems for patients with CTS are discussed. Two case studies of patients with electrophysiological evidence of CTS are presented. Application and comparison of categorizations by the Bland and GEHS neurophysiological classification systems are incorporated into the presentation and discussion of these case studies. This article describes 2 neurophysiological classification systems for patients with CTS. The Bland system documents the distribution of patients with CTS on a scale based upon nerve conduction study findings, but it does not include any EMG findings in its grading scale. The GEHS neurophysiological classification system includes findings for both the NCS and EMG components of the electrophysiological examination. The GEHS classification system provides electrophysiological evidence of myelinopathy and/or axonopathy for patients with CTS. Additional research comparing the psychometric properties and prognostic utility of the Bland and GEHS neurophysiologic classifications is warranted.

  3. 76 FR 48073 - Hazardous Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste: Carbon Dioxide...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ..., refuse, sludge from a waste treatment plant, water supply treatment plant, or air pollution control... subtitle C for petroleum-contaminated media based on the fact that the potential hazards of such...

  4. Hazardous Waste Management Systems: Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste - Federal Register Notice, May 1, 1991

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is announcing an administrative stay of a portion of the hazardous waste listing K069 so that the listing does not apply to slurries generated from air pollution control devices that are intended to capture acid gases.

  5. Fire hazard and other safety concerns of PV systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.

    2011-09-01

    Photovoltaic modules are usually considered safe and reliable. But in case of grid-connected PV systems that are becoming very popular, the issue of fire safety of PV modules is becoming increasingly important due to the employed high voltages of 600 V to 1000 V. The two main factors i.e. open circuiting of the bypass diode and ground fault that are responsible for the fire in the PV systems have been discussed in detail along with numerous real life examples. Recommendations are provided for preventing the fire hazards such as having at least class C fire rated PV modules, proper bypass and blocking diodes and interestingly, having an ungrounded PV system.

  6. A CLASSIFICATION AND RETRIEVAL SYSTEM FOR RECORDED FOREIGN LANGUAGE TAPES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KAY, J.B.; JAMESON, A.

    A CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGE RECORDINGS, DEVISED FOR USE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ESSEX, IS DESCRIBED IN THIS ARTICLE. CODING AND CROSS-REFERENCE SYSTEMS FOR THE VARIOUS CATEGORIES OF TAPES ARE OUTLINED, AND SPECIFIC EXAMPLES ARE INCLUDED. APPENDED IS A LIST OF TAPE REFERENCE CODES. THE SYSTEM OUTLINED IS NOT CONSIDERED IDEAL, BUT IT…

  7. Development of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (1997)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    To address the need for a standardized system to classify the gross motor function of children with cerebral palsy, the authors developed a five-level classification system analogous to the staging and grading systems used in medicine. Nominal group process and Delphi survey consensus methods were used to examine content validity and revise the…

  8. A system of vegetation classification applied to Hawaii

    Treesearch

    Michael G. Buck; Timothy E. Paysen

    1984-01-01

    A classification system for use in describing vegetation has been developed for Hawaii. Physiognomic and taxonomic criteria are used for a hierarchical stratification of vegetation in which the system categories are Formation, Subformation, Series, Association, and Phase. The System applies to local resource management activities and serves as a framework for resource...

  9. Development of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (1997)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    To address the need for a standardized system to classify the gross motor function of children with cerebral palsy, the authors developed a five-level classification system analogous to the staging and grading systems used in medicine. Nominal group process and Delphi survey consensus methods were used to examine content validity and revise the…

  10. Portable medical status system. [potential hazards in the use of the telecare system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, O. C.

    1976-01-01

    The hazards inherent in the Portable Medical Status System are identified, and the measures taken to reduce them to an acceptable level are described. Identification of these hazards is a prerequisite to use of the system on humans in the earth environment. One hazard which is insufficiently controlled and which is considered a constraint to use on humans is the level of current possible in the electrodes for the EEG (electroencephalograph) circuitry. It exceeds the maximum specified. A number of procedural and design recommendations for enhancement of safety are made.

  11. Multiphase Systems for Medical Image Region Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garamendi, J. F.; Malpica, N.; Schiavi, E.

    2009-05-01

    Variational methods for region classification have shown very promising results in medical image analysis. The Chan-Vese model is one of the most popular methods, but its numerical resolution is slow and it has serious drawbacks for most multiphase applications. In this work, we extend the link, stablished by Chambolle, between the two classes binary Chan-Vese model and the Rudin-Osher-Fatemi (ROF) model to a multiphase four classes minimal partition problem. We solve the ROF image restoration model and then we threshold the image by means of a genetic algorithm. This strategy allows for a more efficient algorithm due to the fact that only one well posed elliptic problem is solved instead of solving the coupled parabolic equations arising in the original multiphase Chan-Vese model.

  12. The Comprehensive AOCMF Classification System: Midface Fractures - Level 2 Tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Christoph; Audigé, Laurent; Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Buitrago-Téllez, Carlos H.; Frodel, John; Rudderman, Randal; Prein, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The AOCMF Classification Group developed a hierarchical three-level craniomaxillofacial classification system with increasing level of complexity and details. The highest level 1 system distinguish four major anatomical units including the mandible (code 91), midface (code 92), skull base (code 93), and cranial vault (code 94). This tutorial presents the level 2 system for the midface unit that concentrates on the location of the fractures within defined regions in the central (upper, intermediate, and lower) and lateral (zygoma, pterygoid) midface, as well as the internal orbit and palate. The level 2 midface fracture location outlines the topographic boundaries of the anatomical regions. The common nasoorbitoethmoidal and zygoma en bloc fracture patterns, as well as the time-honored Le Fort classification are taken into account. This tutorial is organized in a sequence of sections dealing with the description of the classification system with illustrations of the topographical cranial midface regions along with rules for fracture location and coding, a series of case examples with clinical imaging and a general discussion on the design of this classification. Individual fracture mapping in these regions regarding severity, fragmentation, displacement of the fragment or bone defect is addressed in a more detailed level 3 system in the subsequent articles. PMID:25489391

  13. Wavelets and power system transients: feature detection and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, David C.; Camps, Octavia I.; Mayer, Jeff

    1994-03-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the development of software for classifying power system disturbances by type from the transient waveform signature. The implementation of classification capability in future transient recorders will enable such features as selective storage of transient data (to better utilize limited storage media) and automated reporting of disturbances to central control facilities. The wavelet transform provides an effective and efficient means of decomposing voltage and current signals of power system transients to detectable and discriminant features. Similarities of power system transients to wide-band signals in other domains, the simultaneous presence of a resonant frequency, its harmonics, and impulse (high-frequency, time-localized) components, make this technique extendible to other classification systems. The classification algorithm uses statistical pattern recognition on features derived from the extreme representation of the transient waveform after processing the transient waveform by a non-orthogonal, quadratic spline wavelet. Training and classification testing use simulated waveforms of a 200 mile, three-phase transmission line produced by the Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP). A simple Bayesian classifier identifies an unknown transient waveform as a capacitor switching or fault transient, and locates the point of disturbance from one of two possible locations on the transmission line. Due to the effectiveness of the wavelet transform preprocessing, the classification system currently performs at 100 percent accuracy on four transient classes.

  14. Pyrotechnic hazards classification and evaluation program. Electrostatic vulnerability of the E8 and XM15/XM165 clusters, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    A survey of the electrostatic vulnerability of explosive manufacturing plants and recommendations for reducing the vulnerability are discussed. During the course of the investigations, the XM15/XM165 and the E8 launcher were shown to be susceptible to electrostatic ignition. The pyrotechnic hazard of prime concern associated with electrostatics is that of the spark which can be generated. The heat, shock, and ionization produced by the spark can cause ignition of pyrotechnics. However, as a result of the initial ignition tests (XM15 fuse train), changes have been incorporated to make the fusing system relatively safe from premature electrostatic activation.

  15. U.S. Geological Survey Library classification system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sasscer, R. Scott

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Library classification system has been designed for earth science libraries. It is a tool for assigning call numbers to earth science and allied pure science materials in order to collect these materials into related subject groups on the library shelves and arrange them alphabetically by author and title. The classification can be used as a retrieval system to access materials through the subject and geographic numbers.The classification scheme has been developed over the years since 1904 to meet the ever-changing needs of increased specialization and the development of new areas of research in the earth sciences. The system contains seven schedules: Subject scheduleGeological survey schedule Earth science periodical scheduleGovernment document periodical scheduleGeneral science periodical schedule Earth science map schedule Geographic schedule Introduction provides detailed instructions on the construction of call numbers for works falling into the framework of the classification schedules.The tables following the introduction can be quickly accessed through the use of the newly expanded subject index.The purpose of this publication is to provide the earth science community with a classification and retrieval system for earth science materials, to offer sufficient explanation of its structure and use, and to enable library staff and clientele to classify or access research materials in a library collection.

  16. Amendments to the hazardous-waste management system identification and listing of hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-16

    Identification and listing of hazardous waste are announced by the US Environmental Protection Agency. These changes add certain wastes and their toxic constituents to the hazardous-waste list and will make them subject to the management standards issued under the amended Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976. The new wastes include brine purification muds and chlorinated hydrocarbon wastes from certain process stages in chlorine production, and distillation bottoms from aniline and chlorobenzene production. This interim final rule will become effective on 1/16/81. In a separate notice, EPA proposes to add seven wastes to this list, including process residues from aniline extraction in the production of aniline and wastewater from nitrobenzene/aniline production, separated aqueous stream from reactor product washing step in the batch production of chlorobenzenes, and wastewater treatment sludge from the mercury cell process in chlorine production. Comments on the interim final rule and proposed hazardous wastes must be received by 9/15/80.

  17. A vegetation classification system applied to southern California

    Treesearch

    Timothy E. Paysen; Jeanine A. Derby; Hugh Black; Vernon C. Bleich; John W. Mincks

    1980-01-01

    A classification system for use in describing vegetation has been developed and is being applied to southern California. It is based upon a hierarchical stratification of vegetation, using physiognomic and taxonomic criteria. The system categories are Formation, Subformation. Series, Association, and Phase. Formations, Subformations, and Series have been specified for...

  18. What's behind the Biological Classification System in Use Today?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, William C.

    2010-01-01

    Whether students should memorize classification schemes (taxonomies) is a column in itself, but the author can address the role that this system plays in the study of biology. To that end, it will help to address how the system developed over time. And toward "that" end, you will do a simple activity to start. (Contains 3 figures.)

  19. 40 CFR 141.710 - Bin classification for filtered systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... completion of the initial round of source water monitoring required under § 141.701(a), filtered systems must... water monitoring required under § 141.701(b), filtered systems must recalculate their Cryptosporidium... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bin classification for filtered...

  20. 40 CFR 141.710 - Bin classification for filtered systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... completion of the initial round of source water monitoring required under § 141.701(a), filtered systems must... water monitoring required under § 141.701(b), filtered systems must recalculate their Cryptosporidium... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bin classification for filtered...

  1. 40 CFR 141.710 - Bin classification for filtered systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... completion of the initial round of source water monitoring required under § 141.701(a), filtered systems must... water monitoring required under § 141.701(b), filtered systems must recalculate their Cryptosporidium... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bin classification for filtered...

  2. 40 CFR 141.710 - Bin classification for filtered systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... completion of the initial round of source water monitoring required under § 141.701(a), filtered systems must... water monitoring required under § 141.701(b), filtered systems must recalculate their Cryptosporidium... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bin classification for filtered...

  3. Implementing the North American Industry Classification System at BLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, James A.; Murphy, John B.

    2001-01-01

    The United States, Canada, and Mexico developed the North American Industry Classification System, which captures new and emerging industries, uses a unified concept to define industries, and is a consistent and comparable tool for measuring the nations' economies. Despite initial conversion difficulties, the new system will be a more accurate way…

  4. Transmission tower classification based on landslide risk map generated by Geographical Information System (GIS) at Cameron Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, Hazwani N.; O, Rohayu C.; U, Fathoni; Baharuddin, Inz

    2013-06-01

    Transmission tower is usually locates at remote area which is covered by hilly topography. Landslide is mainly occurring at hilly area and causing failure to the tower structure. This phenomenon subsequently will affect the national electricity supply. A landslide risk hazard map is generated using Geographical Information System (GIS). Risk classification is introduced to initiate the monitoring process along Jor-Bintang transmission line, Cameron Highland, Pahang. The classification has been divided into three categories, which are low, medium and high. This method can be applied in slope monitoring activities since all towers have been classified based on their risk level. Therefore, maintenance schedule can be planned smoothly and efficiently.

  5. Transmission tower classification based on landslide risk Map generated by Geographical Information System (GIS) at Cameron Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, Hazwani N.; O, Rohayu C.; U, Fathoni; Baharuddin, I. N. Z.; A, Azwin Z.

    2013-06-01

    Transmission tower is usually locates at remote area which is covered by hilly topography. Landslide is mainly occurring at hilly area and causing failure to the tower structure. This phenomenon subsequently will affect the national electricity supply. A landslide risk hazard map is generated using Geographical Information System (GIS). Risk classification is introduced to initiate the monitoring process along Jor-Bintang transmission line, Cameron Highland, Pahang. The classification has been divided into three categories, which are low, medium and high. This method can be applied in slope monitoring activities since all towers have been classified based on their risk level. Therefore, maintenance schedule can be planned smoothly and efficiently.

  6. Overview of Classification Systems in Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Rulon L.; Jazaeri, Omid; Yi, J.; Smith, M.; Gupta, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD), secondary to atherosclerotic disease, is currently the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. While PAD is common, it is estimated that the majority of patients with PAD are undiagnosed and undertreated. The challenge to the treatment of PAD is to accurately diagnose the symptoms and determine treatment for each patient. The varied presentations of peripheral vascular disease have led to numerous classification schemes throughout the literature. Consistent grading of patients leads to both objective criteria for treating patients and a baseline for clinical follow-up. Reproducible classification systems are also important in clinical trials and when comparing medical, surgical, and endovascular treatment paradigms. This article reviews the various classification systems for PAD and advantages to each system. PMID:25435665

  7. The Comprehensive AOCMF Classification System: Radiological Issues and Systematic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago-Téllez, Carlos H.; Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Prein, Joachim; Kunz, Christoph; Ieva, Antonio di; Audigé, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The AOCMF Classification Group developed a hierarchical three-level craniomaxillofacial (CMF) classification system with increasing level of complexity and details. The basic level 1 system differentiates fracture location in the mandible (code 91), midface (code 92), skull base (code 93), and cranial vault (code 94); the levels 2 and 3 focus on defining fracture location and morphology within more detailed regions and subregions. Correct imaging acquisition, systematic analysis, and interpretation according to the anatomic and surgical relevant structures in the CMF regions are essential for an accurate, reproducible, and comprehensive diagnosis of CMF fractures using that system. Basic principles for radiographic diagnosis are based on conventional plain films, multidetector computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. In this tutorial, the radiological issues according to each level of the classification are described. PMID:25489396

  8. Operational Forecasting and Warning systems for Coastal hazards in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwang-Soon; Kwon, Jae-Il; Kim, Jin-Ah; Heo, Ki-Young; Jun, Kicheon

    2017-04-01

    Coastal hazards caused by both Mother Nature and humans cost tremendous social, economic and environmental damages. To mitigate these damages many countries have been running the operational forecasting or warning systems. Since 2009 Korea Operational Oceanographic System (KOOS) has been developed by the leading of Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (KIOST) in Korea and KOOS has been operated in 2012. KOOS is consists of several operational modules of numerical models and real-time observations and produces the basic forecasting variables such as winds, tides, waves, currents, temperature and salinity and so on. In practical application systems include storm surges, oil spills, and search and rescue prediction models. In particular, abnormal high waves (swell-like high-height waves) have occurred in the East coast of Korea peninsula during winter season owing to the local meteorological condition over the East Sea, causing property damages and the loss of human lives. In order to improve wave forecast accuracy even very local wave characteristics, numerical wave modeling system using SWAN is established with data assimilation module using 4D-EnKF and sensitivity test has been conducted. During the typhoon period for the prediction of sever waves and the decision making support system for evacuation of the ships, a high-resolution wave forecasting system has been established and calibrated.

  9. Dual-EMI system for object classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marble, Jay; McMichael, Ian

    2010-04-01

    Two vehicle mounted metal detector arrays are used in conjunction to perform object classification. The first array (Vallon VMV-16) contains small coils for detecting shallow targets. The second array (Minelab STMR II) contains receive coils of roughly the same size, but a single large transmitter for detecting deep targets. These two sensors are used together to classify objects as: "SHALLOW and LARGE","DEEP and LARGE", or "SHALLOW and SMALL". SHALLOW/DEEP implies the depth of the object; SMALL/LARGE implies the metal content. These object classes are further specified within the paper. An experiment is performed using unexploded ordnance (UXO) and shallow buried calibration objects. The UXO ranges in depth from flush buried to 48". The calibration targets consist of metallic cylinders ranging in depth from flush buried to 12". The strength of each sensor is described and a fusion algorithm is developed. A detection performance curve is shown illustrating the benefit of multi-sensor fusion for UXO detection.

  10. Teaching Hazards Geography and Geographic Information Systems: A Middle School Level Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jerry T.; Borden, Kevin A.; Schmidtlein, Mathew C.

    2008-01-01

    Hazards are taught with the belief that knowing something about their occurrence might help us avoid their consequences. The integrative nature of hazards--physical and social systems bound together--is attractive to the student and the instructor alike. Answering why we teach hazards is fairly straightforward. A more pressing question at present…

  11. Teaching Hazards Geography and Geographic Information Systems: A Middle School Level Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jerry T.; Borden, Kevin A.; Schmidtlein, Mathew C.

    2008-01-01

    Hazards are taught with the belief that knowing something about their occurrence might help us avoid their consequences. The integrative nature of hazards--physical and social systems bound together--is attractive to the student and the instructor alike. Answering why we teach hazards is fairly straightforward. A more pressing question at present…

  12. Low-cost real-time automatic wheel classification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabestari, Behrouz N.; Miller, John W. V.; Wedding, Victoria

    1992-11-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a low-cost machine vision system for identifying various types of automotive wheels which are manufactured in several styles and sizes. In this application, a variety of wheels travel on a conveyor in random order through a number of processing steps. One of these processes requires the identification of the wheel type which was performed manually by an operator. A vision system was designed to provide the required identification. The system consisted of an annular illumination source, a CCD TV camera, frame grabber, and 386-compatible computer. Statistical pattern recognition techniques were used to provide robust classification as well as a simple means for adding new wheel designs to the system. Maintenance of the system can be performed by plant personnel with minimal training. The basic steps for identification include image acquisition, segmentation of the regions of interest, extraction of selected features, and classification. The vision system has been installed in a plant and has proven to be extremely effective. The system properly identifies the wheels correctly up to 30 wheels per minute regardless of rotational orientation in the camera's field of view. Correct classification can even be achieved if a portion of the wheel is blocked off from the camera. Significant cost savings have been achieved by a reduction in scrap associated with incorrect manual classification as well as a reduction of labor in a tedious task.

  13. Irreparable rotator cuff tears: a novel classification system.

    PubMed

    Castricini, R; De Benedetto, M; Orlando, N; Gervasi, E; Castagna, A

    2014-04-01

    Irreparable rotator cuff tears can be managed by several approaches. However, current tear classifications fail to reflect the wide variety of their presentation, which has important clinical and prognostic implications. We describe a novel classification system based on preoperative imaging findings and intraoperative observation where each cuff tendon (numbered sequentially: 1-supraspinatus, 2-infraspinatus, 3-teres minor, and 4-subscapularis) is assessed intraoperatively for reducibility to the footprint; tendons with reparable lesions are assessed for fatty degeneration (which predicts healing potential) and given a plus if degeneration is <50 % (Fuchs stage I-II/Goutallier stage 0-II) or a minus if it is ≥50 % (Fuchs stage III/Goutallier stage III-IV). The proposed system (1) allows more consistent and reproducible classification of cuff tears where at least one tendon is irreparable; (2) results in more accurate diagnosis; (3) guides in treatment selection; and (4) ensures better outcomes and realistic patient expectations. The novel classification system can contribute to develop increasingly exhaustive and reproducible classification models.

  14. Assessment of hazardous air pollutants for advanced power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brekke, D.W.; Erickson, T.A.

    1995-12-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) identified 189 substances as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). Under the CAAA, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must regulate emissions of these HAPs at their sources, including advanced power systems used for the production of electricity. This project focused on evaluating and manipulating the advanced power systems HAP data currently available for presentation to the US Department of Energy (DOE). The data were analyzed for trends associated with emission control systems and operating conditions. This project was an addition to an existing DOE program entitled Trace Element Emissions (TEE), which is being conducted by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). The purpose of this addition is to evaluate the current results of HAP emissions sampling from full-scale and demonstration units employing advanced power or hot-gas cleanup systems. The specific objectives of this program are to (1) perform a technical review and assessment of the data accumulated on the fate of trace metals in advanced coal power systems and compare them to emissions from conventional coal-fired power plants, and (2) assess the effectiveness of conventional and innovative control technologies relative to potential regulation requirements.

  15. Geological hazards: from early warning systems to public health toolkits.

    PubMed

    Samarasundera, Edgar; Hansell, Anna; Leibovici, Didier; Horwell, Claire J; Anand, Suchith; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2014-11-01

    Extreme geological events, such as earthquakes, are a significant global concern and sometimes their consequences can be devastating. Geographic information plays a critical role in health protection regarding hazards, and there are a range of initiatives using geographic information to communicate risk as well as to support early warning systems operated by geologists. Nevertheless we consider there to remain shortfalls in translating information on extreme geological events into health protection tools, and suggest that social scientists have an important role to play in aiding the development of a new generation of toolkits aimed at public health practitioners. This viewpoint piece reviews the state of the art in this domain and proposes potential contributions different stakeholder groups, including social scientists, could bring to the development of new toolkits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 75 FR 60632 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Direct Final Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... scenario for possible ground water contamination resulting from disposal of the petitioned waste in a...., ground water, surface water, soil, air) for hazardous constituents present in the Centrifuge solids. EPA... the environment. In assessing potential risks to ground water, EPA used the maximum estimated...

  17. 75 FR 51671 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... exclude (or delist) a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) sludge filter cake (called sludge hereinafter... to the petition submitted by Tokusen, to delist the WWTP sludge. After careful analysis and use of... waste. This exclusion applies to 2,000 cubic yards per year of the WWTP sludge with Hazardous Waste...

  18. The Orchard Sports Injury Classification System (OSICS) version 10.

    PubMed

    Rae, Katherine; Orchard, John

    2007-05-01

    Injury classification systems are generally used in sports medicine (1) to accurately classify diagnoses for summary studies, permitting easy grouping into parent categories for tabulation and (2) to create a database from which cases can be extracted for research on specific injuries. Clarity is most important for the first purpose, whereas diagnostic detail is particularly important for the second. An ideal classification system is versatile and appropriate for all sports and all data collection scenarios. The Orchard Sports Injury Classification System (OSICS) was developed in 1992 primarily for the first purpose, a specific study examining the incidence of injury at the elite level of football in Australia. As usage of the OSICS expanded into different sports, limitations were noted and therefore many revisions have been made. A recent study found the OSICS-8, whilst superior to the International Classification of Diseases Australian Modification (ICD-10-AM) in both speed of use and 3-coder agreement, still achieved a lower level of agreement than expected. The study also revealed weaknesses in the OSICS-8 that needed to be addressed. A recent major revision resulted in the development of the new 4-character OSICS-10. This revision attempts to improve interuser agreement, partly by including more diagnoses encountered in a sports medicine setting. The OSICS-10 should provide far greater depth in classifications for the benefit of those looking to maintain diagnostic information. It is also structured to easily collapse down into parent classifications for those wanting to preserve basic information only. For those researchers wanting information collected under broader injury headings, particularly those not using fully computerized systems, the simplicity of the OSICS-8 system may still suffice.

  19. Methods of classification for women undergoing induction of labour: a systematic review and novel classification system.

    PubMed

    Nippita, T A; Khambalia, A Z; Seeho, S K; Trevena, J A; Patterson, J A; Ford, J B; Morris, J M; Roberts, C L

    2015-09-01

    A lack of reproducible methods for classifying women having an induction of labour (IOL) has led to controversies regarding IOL and related maternal and perinatal health outcomes. To evaluate articles that classify IOL and to develop a novel IOL classification system. Electronic searches using CINAHL, EMBASE, WEB of KNOWLEDGE, and reference lists. Two reviewers independently assessed studies that classified women having an IOL. For the systematic review, data were extracted on study characteristics, quality, and results. Pre-specified criteria were used for evaluation. A multidisciplinary collaboration developed a new classification system using a clinically logical model and stakeholder feedback, demonstrating applicability in a population cohort of 909 702 maternities in New South Wales, Australia, over the period 2002-2011. All seven studies included in the systematic review categorised women according to the presence or absence of varying medical indications for IOL. Evaluation identified uncertainties or deficiencies across all studies, related to the criteria of total inclusivity, reproducibility, clinical utility, implementability, and data availability. A classification system of ten groups was developed based on parity, previous caesarean, gestational age, number, and presentation of the fetus. Nulliparous and parous women at full term were the largest groups (21.2 and 24.5%, respectively), and accounted for the highest proportion of all IOL (20.7 and 21.5%, respectively). Current methods of classifying women undertaking IOL based on medical indications are inadequate. We propose a classification system that has the attributes of simplicity and clarity, uses information that is readily and reliably collected, and enables the standard characterisation of populations of women having an IOL across and within jurisdictions. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  20. Classifications of central solar domestic hot water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. Y.; Hao, B.; Peng, C.; Wang, S. S.

    2016-08-01

    Currently, there are many means by which to classify solar domestic hot water systems, which are often categorized according to their scope of supply, solar collector positions, and type of heat storage tank. However, the lack of systematic and scientific classification as well as the general disregard of the thermal performance of the auxiliary heat source is important to DHW systems. Thus, the primary focus of this paper is to determine a classification system for solar domestic hot water systems based on the positions of the solar collector and auxiliary heating device, both respectively and in combination. Field-testing data regarding many central solar DHW systems demonstrates that the position of the auxiliary heat source clearly reflects the operational energy consumption. The consumption of collective auxiliary heating hot water system is much higher than individual auxiliary heating hot water system. In addition, costs are significantly reduced by the separation of the heat storage tank and the auxiliary heating device.

  1. A paleoclimate classification system with U. S. Western Interior examples

    SciTech Connect

    Egbert, R.L.

    1990-07-01

    Present climate classification is extensively used in the scientific community but the geologic discipline seldom refers to any classification system when describing paleoclimates. Because insolation, the radiation reaching the earth from the sun, has been and is the major source for the earth's weather energy, climate distributions of past geologic ages were probably similar to those of today. Many lithologic and other features point to geologic climate indicators. It is suggested that geologists adopt the Koeppen climate classification system as a standard to describe paleoclimate environments. A series of illustrations depict generalized climate types that influenced the stratigraphic development of the US Western Interior through several geologic time periods. Most stratigraphic papers infer climate conditions which, with interpretation, can be fitted to the patterns shown on the illustrations.

  2. Fusion within a classification system family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxley, Mark E.; Schubert Kabban, Christine M.

    2017-05-01

    A detection system outputs two distinct labels, thus, there are two errors it can make. The Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) function quantifies both of these errors as parameters vary within the system. Combining two detection systems typically yields better performance when a combining rule is chosen appropriately. When detection systems are combined the assumption of independence is usually made in order to simplify the math- ematics, so that we need only combine the individual ROC curve from each system into one ROC curve. This paper investigates label fusion of two detection systems drawn from a single Detection System Family (DSF). Given that one knows the ROC function for the DSF, we seek a formula with the resultant ROC function of the fused detection systems as a function (specifically, a transformation) of the ROC function. In this paper, we derive this transformation for the disjunction and conjunction label rules. Examples are given that demonstrates this transformation. Furthermore, another transformation is given to account for the dependencies between the two systems within the family. Examples will be given that demonstrates these ideas and the corresponding transformation acting on the ROC curve.

  3. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: moving towards a new classification system.

    PubMed

    Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Hardiman, Orla; Kiernan, Matthew C; Chiò, Adriano; Rix-Brooks, Benjamin; van den Berg, Leonard H

    2016-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive adult-onset neurodegenerative disease that primarily affects upper and lower motor neurons, but also frontotemporal and other regions of the brain. The extent to which each neuronal population is affected varies between individuals. The subsequent patterns of disease progression form the basis of diagnostic criteria and phenotypic classification systems, with considerable overlap in the clinical terms used. This overlap can lead to confusion between diagnosis and phenotype. Formal classification systems such as the El Escorial criteria and the International Classification of Diseases are systematic approaches but they omit features that are important in clinical management, such as rate of progression, genetic basis, or functional effect. Therefore, many neurologists use informal classification approaches that might not be systematic, and could include, for example, anatomical descriptions such as flail-arm syndrome. A new strategy is needed to combine the benefits of a systematic approach to classification with the rich and varied phenotypic descriptions used in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Classification of residential areas according to physical vulnerability to natural hazards: a case study of Çanakkale, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Başaran-Uysal, Arzu; Sezen, Funda; Ozden, Süha; Karaca, Oznur

    2014-01-01

    The selection of new settlement areas and the construction of safe buildings, as well as rendering built-up areas safe, are of great importance in mitigating the damage caused by natural disasters. Most cities in Turkey are unprepared for natural hazards. In this paper, Çanakkale, located in a first-degree seismic zone and sprawled around the Sartçay Delta, is examined in terms of its physical vulnerability to natural hazards. Residential areas are analysed using GIS (geographic information system) and remote-sensing technologies in relation to selected indicators. Residential areas of the city are divided into zones according to an evaluation of geological characteristics, the built-up area's features, and urban infrastructure, and four risk zones are determined. The results of the analysis show that the areas of the city suitable for housing are very limited. In addition, the historical centre and the housing areas near Sartçay stream are shown to be most problematic in terms of natural disasters and sustainability.

  5. Evolution and classification of the CRISPR-Cas systems.

    PubMed

    Makarova, Kira S; Haft, Daniel H; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Brouns, Stan J J; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Horvath, Philippe; Moineau, Sylvain; Mojica, Francisco J M; Wolf, Yuri I; Yakunin, Alexander F; van der Oost, John; Koonin, Eugene V

    2011-06-01

    The CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated proteins) modules are adaptive immunity systems that are present in many archaea and bacteria. These defence systems are encoded by operons that have an extraordinarily diverse architecture and a high rate of evolution for both the cas genes and the unique spacer content. Here, we provide an updated analysis of the evolutionary relationships between CRISPR-Cas systems and Cas proteins. Three major types of CRISPR-Cas system are delineated, with a further division into several subtypes and a few chimeric variants. Given the complexity of the genomic architectures and the extremely dynamic evolution of the CRISPR-Cas systems, a unified classification of these systems should be based on multiple criteria. Accordingly, we propose a 'polythetic' classification that integrates the phylogenies of the most common cas genes, the sequence and organization of the CRISPR repeats and the architecture of the CRISPR-cas loci.

  6. Evolution and classification of the CRISPR-Cas systems

    PubMed Central

    S. Makarova, Kira; H. Haft, Daniel; Barrangou, Rodolphe; J. J. Brouns, Stan; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Horvath, Philippe; Moineau, Sylvain; J. M. Mojica, Francisco; I. Wolf, Yuri; Yakunin, Alexander F.; van der Oost, John; V. Koonin, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    The CRISPR–Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–CRISPR-associated proteins) modules are adaptive immunity systems that are present in many archaea and bacteria. These defence systems are encoded by operons that have an extraordinarily diverse architecture and a high rate of evolution for both the cas genes and the unique spacer content. Here, we provide an updated analysis of the evolutionary relationships between CRISPR–Cas systems and Cas proteins. Three major types of CRISPR–Cas system are delineated, with a further division into several subtypes and a few chimeric variants. Given the complexity of the genomic architectures and the extremely dynamic evolution of the CRISPR–Cas systems, a unified classification of these systems should be based on multiple criteria. Accordingly, we propose a `polythetic' classification that integrates the phylogenies of the most common cas genes, the sequence and organization of the CRISPR repeats and the architecture of the CRISPR–cas loci. PMID:21552286

  7. Quality assurance: The 10-Group Classification System (Robson classification), induction of labor, and cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Robson, Michael; Murphy, Martina; Byrne, Fionnuala

    2015-10-01

    Quality assurance in labor and delivery is needed. The method must be simple and consistent, and be of universal value. It needs to be clinically relevant, robust, and prospective, and must incorporate epidemiological variables. The 10-Group Classification System (TGCS) is a simple method providing a common starting point for further detailed analysis within which all perinatal events and outcomes can be measured and compared. The system is demonstrated in the present paper using data for 2013 from the National Maternity Hospital in Dublin, Ireland. Interpretation of the classification can be easily taught. The standard table can provide much insight into the philosophy of care in the population of women studied and also provide information on data quality. With standardization of audit of events and outcomes, any differences in either sizes of groups, events or outcomes can be explained only by poor data collection, significant epidemiological variables, or differences in practice. In April 2015, WHO proposed that the TGCS (also known as the Robson classification) is used as a global standard for assessing, monitoring, and comparing cesarean delivery rates within and between healthcare facilities.

  8. The Earth System Science Pathfinder VOLCAM Volcanic Hazard Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.

    1999-01-01

    The VOLCAM mission is planned for research on volcanic eruptions and as a demonstration of a satellite system for measuring the location and density of volcanic eruption clouds for use in mitigating hazards to aircraft by the operational air traffic control systems. A requirement for 15 minute time resolution is met by flight as payloads of opportunity on geostationary satellites. Volcanic sulfur dioxide and ash are detected using techniques that have been developed from polar orbiting TOMS (UV) and AVHRR (IR) data. Seven band UV and three band IR filter wheel cameras are designed for continuous observation of the full disk of the earth with moderate (10 - 20 km) ground resolution. This resolution can be achieved with small, low cost instruments but is adequate for discrimination of ash and sulfur dioxide in the volcanic clouds from meteorological clouds and ozone. The false alarm rate is small through use of sulfur dioxide as a unique tracer of volcanic clouds. The UV band wavelengths are optimized to detect very small sulfur dioxide amounts that are present in pre-eruptive outgassing of volcanoes. The system is also capable of tracking dust and smoke clouds, and will be used to infer winds at tropopause level from the correlation of total ozone with potential vorticity.

  9. 77 FR 36447 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... factors could cause the waste to be hazardous. EPA considered whether the waste is acutely toxic, the... Manganese 6.66E-01 3.11E+02 Mercury ND 2.00E-01 Methyl ethyl ketone......... ND 2.00E+00 Molybdenum 1.66E-02... toxic constituents. EPA is proposing to require ExxonMobil to analyze representative samples of...

  10. An integrated knowledge system for the Space Shuttle hazardous gas detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Shi, George Z.; Bangasser, Carl; Fensky, Connie; Cegielski, Eric; Overbey, Glenn

    1993-01-01

    A computer-based integrated Knowledge-Based System, the Intelligent Hypertext Manual (IHM), was developed for the Space Shuttle Hazardous Gas Detection System (HGDS) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The IHM stores HGDS related knowledge and presents it in an interactive and intuitive manner. This manual is a combination of hypertext and an expert system which store experts' knowledge and experience in hazardous gas detection and analysis. The IHM's purpose is to provide HGDS personnel with the capabilities of: locating applicable documentation related to procedures, constraints, and previous fault histories; assisting in the training of personnel; enhancing the interpretation of real time data; and recognizing and identifying possible faults in the Space Shuttle sub-systems related to hazardous gas detection.

  11. An Automated Slide Classification System at Georgia Tech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresti, Maryellen

    1973-01-01

    The Georgia Tech Architecture Library slide collection is being revolutionized by adapting the Santa Cruz Slide Classification System. The slide catalog record is being transferred inexpensively to tapes and updated by the computer. Computer programs print out indexes in any of fifteen different sort fields. (Author)

  12. Exercise-Associated Collapse in Endurance Events: A Classification System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, William O.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a classification system devised for exercise-associated collapse in endurance events based on casualties observed at six Twin Cities Marathons. Major diagnostic criteria are body temperature and mental status. Management protocol includes fluid and fuel replacement, temperature correction, and leg cramp treatment. (Author/SM)

  13. The Nature of the Physical Microenvironment: An Expanded Classification System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachs, Theodore D.

    1989-01-01

    Develops a classification system for the physical environment based on 3 dimensions of stimulation. Intercorrelations of physical and social environmental measures obtained for 88 infants of 12 months supported the validity of the decision rule that nonresponsive animate stimulation is primarily physical rather than social. (RJC)

  14. Nursing Classification System: Foundation for Personnel Planning and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Rosemary L.; Mable, Richard J.

    1983-01-01

    This article demonstrates the usefulness of the Nursing Classification System (NCS) as an operational planning and control tool. Here the authors introduce and illustrate the concept of workload indexing, a means by which the NCS assists in defining staffing needs and monitoring workload and performance. (SSH)

  15. Exercise-Associated Collapse in Endurance Events: A Classification System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, William O.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a classification system devised for exercise-associated collapse in endurance events based on casualties observed at six Twin Cities Marathons. Major diagnostic criteria are body temperature and mental status. Management protocol includes fluid and fuel replacement, temperature correction, and leg cramp treatment. (Author/SM)

  16. Image interpretation for a multilevel land use classification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The potential use is discussed of three remote sensors for developing a four level land use classification system. Three types of imagery for photointerpretation are presented: ERTS-1 satellite imagery, high altitude photography, and medium altitude photography. Suggestions are given as to which remote sensors and imagery scales may be most effectively employed to provide data on specific types of land use.

  17. A proposal for a test method for assessment of hazard property HP 12 ("Release of an acute toxic gas") in hazardous waste classification - Experience from 49 waste.

    PubMed

    Hennebert, Pierre; Samaali, Ismahen; Molina, Pauline

    2016-12-01

    A stepwise method for assessment of the HP 12 is proposed and tested with 49 waste samples. The hazard property HP 12 is defined as "Release of an acute toxic gas": waste which releases acute toxic gases (Acute Tox. 1, 2 or 3) in contact with water or an acid. When a waste contains a substance assigned to one of the following supplemental hazards EUH029, EUH031 and EUH032, it shall be classified as hazardous by HP 12 according to test methods or guidelines (EC, 2014a, 2014b). When the substances with the cited hazard statement codes react with water or an acid, they can release HCl, Cl2, HF, HCN, PH3, H2S, SO2 (and two other gases very unlikely to be emitted, hydrazoic acid HN3 and selenium oxide SeO2 - a solid with low vapor pressure). Hence, a method is proposed:For a set of 49 waste, water addition did not produce gas. Nearly all the solid waste produced a gas in contact with hydrochloric acid in 5 min in an automated calcimeter with a volume >0.1L of gas per kg of waste. Since a plateau of pressure is reached only for half of the samples in 5 min, 6 h trial with calorimetric bombs or glass flasks were done and confirmed the results. Identification of the gases by portable probes showed that most of the tested samples emit mainly CO2. Toxic gases are emitted by four waste: metallic dust from the aluminum industry (CO), two air pollution control residue of industrial waste incinerator (H2S) and a halogenated solvent (organic volatile(s) compound(s)). HF has not been measured in these trials started before the present definition of HP 12. According to the definition of HP 12, only the H2S emission of substances with hazard statement EUH031 is accounted for. In view of the calcium content of the two air pollution control residue, the presence of calcium sulphide (EUH031) can be assumed. These two waste are therefore classified potentially hazardous for HP 12, from a total of 49 waste. They are also classified as hazardous for other properties (HP 7, 10and14 for one

  18. Toward an objective classification of cells in the immune system.

    PubMed Central

    Lefkovits, I; Kuhn, L; Valiron, O; Merle, A; Kettman, J

    1988-01-01

    The relative abundance of individual proteins shared among clones of lymphocytes provides a meaningful basis for cellular classification. Twelve clones of T cells (obtained by limiting dilution) were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis for polypeptide content and then evaluated by the computational technique known as principal component analysis. As a result, relatedness of the clones was established and expressed in terms of taxonomic distances. The data show that a comprehensive and objective classification of the cells involved in the immune system can be approached. Images PMID:3259320

  19. On a production system using default reasoning for pattern classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Lowe, Carlyle M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses an unconventional application of a production system to a problem involving belief specialization. The production system reduces a large quantity of low-level descriptions into just a few higher-level descriptions that encompass the problem space in a more tractable fashion. This classification process utilizes a set of descriptions generated by combining the component hierarchy of a physical system with the semantics of the terminology employed in its operation. The paper describes an application of this process in a program, constructed in C and CLIPS, that classifies signatures of electromechanical system configurations. The program compares two independent classifications, describing the actual and expected system configurations, in order to generate a set of contradictions between the two.

  20. Classification.

    PubMed

    Tuxhorn, Ingrid; Kotagal, Prakash

    2008-07-01

    In this article, we review the practical approach and diagnostic relevance of current seizure and epilepsy classification concepts and principles as a basic framework for good management of patients with epileptic seizures and epilepsy. Inaccurate generalizations about terminology, diagnosis, and treatment may be the single most important factor, next to an inadequately obtained history, that determines the misdiagnosis and mismanagement of patients with epilepsy. A stepwise signs and symptoms approach for diagnosis, evaluation, and management along the guidelines of the International League Against Epilepsy and definitions of epileptic seizures and epilepsy syndromes offers a state-of-the-art clinical approach to managing patients with epilepsy.

  1. Reliability assessment of a novel cervical spine deformity classification system.

    PubMed

    Ames, Christopher P; Smith, Justin S; Eastlack, Robert; Blaskiewicz, Donald J; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank; Bess, Shay; Kim, Han Jo; Mundis, Gregory M; Klineberg, Eric; Gupta, Munish; O'Brien, Michael; Hostin, Richard; Scheer, Justin K; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Fu, Kai-Ming G; Hart, Robert; Albert, Todd J; Riew, K Daniel; Fehlings, Michael G; Deviren, Vedat; Lafage, Virginie

    2015-12-01

    Despite the complexity of cervical spine deformity (CSD) and its significant impact on patient quality of life, there exists no comprehensive classification system. The objective of this study was to develop a novel classification system based on a modified Delphi approach and to characterize the intra- and interobserver reliability of this classification. Based on an extensive literature review and a modified Delphi approach with an expert panel, a CSD classification system was generated. The classification system included a deformity descriptor and 5 modifiers that incorporated sagittal, regional, and global spinopelvic alignment and neurological status. The descriptors included: "C," "CT," and "T" for primary cervical kyphotic deformities with an apex in the cervical spine, cervicothoracic junction, or thoracic spine, respectively; "S" for primary coronal deformity with a coronal Cobb angle ≥ 15°; and "CVJ" for primary craniovertebral junction deformity. The modifiers included C2-7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA), horizontal gaze (chin-brow to vertical angle [CBVA]), T1 slope (TS) minus C2-7 lordosis (TS-CL), myelopathy (modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association [mJOA] scale score), and the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-Schwab classification for thoracolumbar deformity. Application of the classification system requires the following: 1) full-length standing posteroanterior (PA) and lateral spine radiographs that include the cervical spine and femoral heads; 2) standing PA and lateral cervical spine radiographs; 3) completed and scored mJOA questionnaire; and 4) a clinical photograph or radiograph that includes the skull for measurement of the CBVA. A series of 10 CSD cases, broadly representative of the classification system, were selected and sufficient radiographic and clinical history to enable classification were assembled. A panel of spinal deformity surgeons was queried to classify each case twice, with a minimum of 1 intervening week. Inter- and

  2. Genetic variety of sinkholes and their reconaissance and classification for the derivation of hazards and to forecast of collapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucke, D.

    2012-04-01

    Genetic variety of sinkholes and their reconnaissance and classification for the derivation of hazards and to forecast of collapses Dieter Mucke GEOMONTAN Gesellschaft für Geologie und Bergbau mbH&Co.KG, Muldentalstrasse 56, 09603 Rothenfurth, Saxony/Germany The term "sinkhole" covers a lot of depressions on the earth's surface, caused by very different geological processes and anthropogenic activities. The speed of the origin of the depressions is different and leads to different hazards. The forecast look for hazards and the introduction of preventive measures gets safer if type and cause of the depressions are known of. First aim of the lecture is the classification of sinkholes in different types. Geogenic depressions develope in karst landscapes as well as in plain areas of detrital sediments on soluble rocks. The depressions are in karst landscapes localized directly in the soluble rocks like limestone or sulphate rocks (anhydrite, gypsum). It results there for solution dolines and collapse dolines in these rocks themselves.. In other cases the soluble rocks often are in large depth under overlaying claystones, siltstones, sandstones or clays, silts, sands. A cave deeply is formed under the earth's surface and when a roof failure happens, the overburden sinks after. A depression of caldera shape with abrupt slopes suddenly forms in the non-karst rock at the surface. Such erdfall-collapses in Triassic claystones develop flatter walls in the course of the time. In German such depressions are called "Erdfall" to distinguish them of dolines. Because in English the term "earth fall" has an other meaning, I will further call such depressions "erdfall-collaps". The solution of limestones and sulphate rocks results with the formation of caves and following emergence of collapse dolines and erdfall-collapses. The underground dissolution (subrosion) of rock salt is as opposed to without formation of caves. It leads to a slow lowering of the earth's surface in flat

  3. A statistical method to evaluate dental classification systems used by military dental services.

    PubMed

    Simecek, John W; McGinley, John L; Levine, Michael E; Diefenderfer, Kim E; Ahlf, Renee L

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research project was to develop a systematic approach to evaluate the effectiveness of dental classifications used by military dental services to predict dental emergencies. A retrospective cohort study of U.S. Navy recruits were followed for an average of 3.5 years. Dental records of 1,114 recruits who had their initial dental examination during the calendar year 1997 were collected in 2001. Four hundred sixty-two dental emergencies (DE) were recorded, of which 50 were class 3 patients. The incidence density ratio (IDR) of DE was 2.2 (p < 0.001; class 3 compared to class 1 or 2 patients). The mean times to DE in patients who experienced DE were 92 days (class 3 patients) and 418 days (class 1 and 2 patients; p < 0.001), while the median times to DE were 59 days and 295 days (p < 0.001) for class 3 and class 1 or 2, respectively. The adjusted hazard ratio for DE in class 3 versus class 1 and 2 patients was 1.519 (p = 0.0149). We have concluded that examination of the following statistics is necessary to assess the effectiveness of military dental classification systems: (1) the percentage of DE that occur in class 3 patients, (2) the IDR of DE, (3) the mean time to DE, (4) the median time to DE, and (5) the hazard ratio of DE.

  4. SRS: Site ranking system for hazardous chemical and radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Rechard, R.P.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Brown, S.L.

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the rationale and presents instructions for a site ranking system (SRS). SRS ranks hazardous chemical and radioactive waste sites by scoring important and readily available factors that influence risk to human health. Using SRS, sites can be ranked for purposes of detailed site investigations. SRS evaluates the relative risk as a combination of potentially exposed population, chemical toxicity, and potential exposure of release from a waste site; hence, SRS uses the same concepts found in a detailed assessment of health risk. Basing SRS on the concepts of risk assessment tends to reduce the distortion of results found in other ranking schemes. More importantly, a clear logic helps ensure the successful application of the ranking procedure and increases its versatility when modifications are necessary for unique situations. Although one can rank sites using a detailed risk assessment, it is potentially costly because of data and resources required. SRS is an efficient approach to provide an order-of-magnitude ranking, requiring only readily available data (often only descriptive) and hand calculations. Worksheets are included to make the system easier to understand and use. 88 refs., 19 figs., 58 tabs.

  5. Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.

    2011-01-01

    A supervised learning task involves constructing a mapping from input data (normally described by several features) to the appropriate outputs. Within supervised learning, one type of task is a classification learning task, in which each output is one or more classes to which the input belongs. In supervised learning, a set of training examples---examples with known output values---is used by a learning algorithm to generate a model. This model is intended to approximate the mapping between the inputs and outputs. This model can be used to generate predicted outputs for inputs that have not been seen before. For example, we may have data consisting of observations of sunspots. In a classification learning task, our goal may be to learn to classify sunspots into one of several types. Each example may correspond to one candidate sunspot with various measurements or just an image. A learning algorithm would use the supplied examples to generate a model that approximates the mapping between each supplied set of measurements and the type of sunspot. This model can then be used to classify previously unseen sunspots based on the candidate's measurements. This chapter discusses methods to perform machine learning, with examples involving astronomy.

  6. Color image classification systems for poultry viscera inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Kevin; Chen, Yud-Ren; Early, Howard; Park, Bosoon

    1999-01-01

    A neuro-fuzzy based image classification system that utilizes color-imaging features of poultry viscera in the spectral and spatial domains was developed in this study. Poultry viscera of liver and heart were separated into four classes: normal, airsacculitis, cadaver, and septicemia. Color images for the classified poultry viscera were collected in the poultry process plant. These images in RGB color space were segmented and statistical analysis was performed for feature selection. The neuro-fuzzy system utilizes hybrid paradigms of fuzzy interference system and neural networks to enhance the robustness of the classification processes. The results showed that the accuracy for separation of normal from abnormal livers were 87.5 to 92.5% when two classes of validation data were used. For two-class classification of chicken hearts, the accuracies were 92.5 to 97.5%. When neuro-fuzzy models were employed to separate chicken livers into three classes (normal, airsacculitis, and cadaver), the accuracy was 88.3% for the training data and 83.3% for the validation data. Combining features of chicken liver and heart, a generalized neuro-fuzzy model was designed to classify poultry viscera into four classes (normal, airsacculitis, cadaver, and septicemia). The classification accuracy of 86.3% was achieved for the training data and 82.5% accuracy for the validation.

  7. Computer-aided pattern classification system for dermoscopy images.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Qaisar; Celebi, M Emre; Fondón, Irene

    2012-08-01

    Computer-aided pattern classification of melanoma and other pigmented skin lesions is one of the most important tasks for clinical diagnosis. To differentiate between benign and malignant lesions, the extraction of color, architectural order, symmetry of pattern and homogeneity (CASH) is a challenging task. In this article, a novel pattern classification system (PCS) based on the clinical CASH rule is presented to classify among six classes of patterns. The PCS system consists of the following five steps: transformation to the CIE L*a*b* color space, pre-processing to enhance the tumor region and removal of hairs, tumor-area segmentation, color and texture feature extraction, and finally, classification based on a multiclass support vector machine. The PCS system is tested on a total of 180 dermoscopic images. To test the performance of the PCS diagnostic classifier, the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) is utilized. The proposed classifier achieved a sensitivity of 91.64%, specificity of 94.14%, and AUC of 0.948. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed pattern classifier is highly accurate and classify between benign and malignant lesions into some extend. The PCS method is fully automatic and can accurately detect different patterns from dermoscopy images using color and texture properties. Additional pattern features can be included to investigate the impact of pattern classification based on the CASH rule. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. An Expert System for the Management of Hazardous Materials at a Naval Supply Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    This thesis analyzes, designs and implements an expert system for the management of hazardous material at a Naval Supply Center (NSC). This system is...warehouse worker. The Hazardous Material Expert System (HAZMAT ES) will facilitate making the storage decision and will allow a warehouse worker to

  9. Outpatient costing and classification: are we any closer toa national standard for ambulatory classification systems?

    PubMed

    Cleary, M I; Murray, J M; Michael, R; Piper, K

    1998-10-19

    The Outpatient Costing and Classification Study was commissioned by the Department of Health and Family Services to evaluate the suitability of the Developmental Ambulatory Classification System (DACS). Data on the full range of ambulatory services (outpatient clinics, emergency departments and allied health services) were collected prospectively from a stratified sample of 28 public hospitals. Patient encounters captured in the study represent 1% of the total ambulatory encounters in Australia in one year. Costing per encounter included time spent with the patient, cost of procedures, indirect costs (salaries and consumables), overhead costs and diagnostic costs. The most significant variable explaining cost variation was hospital type, followed by outpatient clinic type. Visit type and presence or absence of a procedure--major splits for the proposed DACS--did not produce splits that were consistent across all hospital strata. The study found that DACS is not an appropriate classification for hospital ambulatory services. A clinic-based structure for outpatients and allied health departments is recommended for classifying and funding ambulatory services in Australia.

  10. Tutorial on Actual Space Environmental Hazards For Space Systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; Fennell, J. F.; Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, T. P.

    2013-12-01

    It has become common in the space science community to conduct research on diverse physical phenomena because they are thought to contribute to space weather. However, satellites contend with only three primary environmental hazards: single event effects, vehicle charging, and total dose, and not every physical phenomenon that occurs in space contributes in substantial ways to create these hazards. One consequence of the mismatch between actual threats and all-encompassing research is the often-described gap between research and operations; another is the creation of forecasts that provide no actionable information for design engineers or spacecraft operators. An example of the latter is the physics of magnetic field emergence on the Sun; the phenomenon is relevant to the formation and launch of coronal mass ejections and is also causally related to the solar energetic particles that may get accelerated in the interplanetary shock. Unfortunately for the research community, the engineering community mitigates the space weather threat (single-event effects from heavy ions above ~50 MeV/nucleon) with a worst-case specification of the environment and not with a prediction. Worst-case definition requires data mining of past events, while predictions involve large-scale systems science from the Sun to the Earth that is compelling for scientists and their funding agencies but not actionable for design or for most operations. Differing priorities among different space-faring organizations only compounds the confusion over what science research is relevant. Solar particle impacts to human crew arise mainly from the total ionizing dose from the solar protons, so the priority for prediction in the human spaceflight community is therefore much different than in the unmanned satellite community, while both communities refer to the fundamental phenomenon as space weather. Our goal in this paper is the presentation of a brief tutorial on the primary space environmental phenomena

  11. ISE-based sensor array system for classification of foodstuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciosek, Patrycja; Sobanski, Tomasz; Augustyniak, Ewa; Wróblewski, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    A system composed of an array of polymeric membrane ion-selective electrodes and a pattern recognition block—a so-called 'electronic tongue'—was used for the classification of liquid samples: milk, fruit juice and tonic. The task of this system was to automatically recognize a brand of the product. To analyze the measurement set-up responses various non-parametric classifiers such as k-nearest neighbours, a feedforward neural network and a probabilistic neural network were used. In order to enhance the classification ability of the system, standard model solutions of salts were measured (in order to take into account any variation in time of the working parameters of the sensors). This system was capable of recognizing the brand of the products with accuracy ranging from 68% to 100% (in the case of the best classifier).

  12. A new classification system for lesbians: the Dyke Diagnostic Manual.

    PubMed

    Eliason, Michele J

    2010-01-01

    There has been a long-standing need for a diagnostic manual that documents the unique pathological behaviors of lesbians. The Dyke Diagnostic Manual (DDM) is meant to supplement mainstream classification systems used to identify problematic behaviors in heterosexuals. This article presents thirteen uniquely lesbian conditions that are nowhere to be found in heterosexist diagnostic systems. The DDM may help to reduce the pain and suffering found in many lesbian relationships where one or both partners are afflicted.

  13. Annotation and Classification of CRISPR-Cas Systems.

    PubMed

    Makarova, Kira S; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas (CRISPR-associated proteins) is a prokaryotic adaptive immune system that is represented in most archaea and many bacteria. Among the currently known prokaryotic defense systems, the CRISPR-Cas genomic loci show unprecedented complexity and diversity. Classification of CRISPR-Cas variants that would capture their evolutionary relationships to the maximum possible extent is essential for comparative genomic and functional characterization of this theoretically and practically important system of adaptive immunity. To this end, a multipronged approach has been developed that combines phylogenetic analysis of the conserved Cas proteins with comparison of gene repertoires and arrangements in CRISPR-Cas loci. This approach led to the current classification of CRISPR-Cas systems into three distinct types and ten subtypes for each of which signature genes have been identified. Comparative genomic analysis of the CRISPR-Cas systems in new archaeal and bacterial genomes performed over the 3 years elapsed since the development of this classification makes it clear that new types and subtypes of CRISPR-Cas need to be introduced. Moreover, this classification system captures only part of the complexity of CRISPR-Cas organization and evolution, due to the intrinsic modularity and evolutionary mobility of these immunity systems, resulting in numerous recombinant variants. Moreover, most of the cas genes evolve rapidly, complicating the family assignment for many Cas proteins and the use of family profiles for the recognition of CRISPR-Cas subtype signatures. Further progress in the comparative analysis of CRISPR-Cas systems requires integration of the most sensitive sequence comparison tools, protein structure comparison, and refined approaches for comparison of gene neighborhoods.

  14. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR DISPOSAL CONTAINER HANDLING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Salzman

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) disposal container handling system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-O333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  15. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR SITE COMPRESSED AIR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Ziegler

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) site compressed air system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  16. Creating a Canonical Scientific and Technical Information Classification System for NCSTRL+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiffany, Melissa E.; Nelson, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the new subject classification system for the NCSTRL+ project. NCSTRL+ is a canonical digital library (DL) based on the Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL). The current NCSTRL+ classification system uses the NASA Scientific and Technical (STI) subject classifications, which has a bias towards the aerospace, aeronautics, and engineering disciplines. Examination of other scientific and technical information classification systems showed similar discipline-centric weaknesses. Traditional, library-oriented classification systems represented all disciplines, but were too generalized to serve the needs of a scientific and technically oriented digital library. Lack of a suitable existing classification system led to the creation of a lightweight, balanced, general classification system that allows the mapping of more specialized classification schemes into the new framework. We have developed the following classification system to give equal weight to all STI disciplines, while being compact and lightweight.

  17. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELIMINARY DESIGN HAZARD ANALYSIS SUPPLEMENT 1

    SciTech Connect

    FRANZ GR; MEICHLE RH

    2011-07-18

    This 'What/If' Hazards Analysis addresses hazards affecting the Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) NPH and external events at the preliminary design stage. In addition, the hazards of the operation sequence steps for the mechanical handling operations in preparation of Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC), disconnect STSC and prepare STSC and Sludge Transport System (STS) for shipping are addressed.

  18. Network structure classification and features of water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustolisi, Orazio; Simone, Antonietta; Ridolfi, Luca

    2017-04-01

    The network connectivity structure of water distribution systems (WDSs) represents the domain where hydraulic processes occur, driving the emerging behavior of such systems, for example with respect to robustness and vulnerability. In complex network theory (CNT), a common way of classifying the network structure and connectivity is the association of the nodal degree distribution to specific probability distribution models, and during the last decades, researchers classified many real networks using the Poisson or Pareto distributions. In spite of the fact that degree-based network classification could play a crucial role to assess WDS vulnerability, this task is not easy because the network structure of WDSs is strongly constrained by spatial characteristics of the environment where they are constructed. The consequence of these spatial constraints is that the nodal degree spans very small ranges in WDSs hindering a reliable classification by the standard approach based on the nodal degree distribution. This work investigates the classification of the network structure of 22 real WDSs, built in different environments, demonstrating that the Poisson distribution generally models the degree distributions very well. In order to overcome the problem of the reliable classification based on the standard nodal degree, we define the "neighborhood" degree, equal to the sum of the nodal degrees of the nearest topological neighbors (i.e., the adjacent nodes). This definition of "neighborhood" degree is consistent with the fact that the degree of a single node is not significant for analysis of WDSs.

  19. Proposed Classification of Auriculotemporal Nerve, Based on the Root System

    PubMed Central

    Komarnitki, Iulian; Tomczyk, Jacek; Ciszek, Bogdan; Zalewska, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The topography of the auriculotemporal nerve (ATN) root system is the main criterion of this nerve classification. Previous publications indicate that ATN may have between one and five roots. Most common is a one- or two-root variant of the nerve structure. The problem of many publications is the inconsistency of nomenclature which concerns the terms “roots”, “connecting branches”, or “branches” that are used to identify the same structures. This study was performed on 80 specimens (40 adults and 40 fetuses) to propose a classification based on: (i) the number of roots, (ii) way of root division, and (iii) configuration of interradicular fibers that form the ATN trunk. This new classification is a remedy for inconsistency of nomenclature of ATN in the infratemporal fossa. This classification system has proven beneficial when organizing all ATN variants described in previous studies and could become a helpful tool for surgeons and dentists. Examination of ATN from the infratemporal fossa of fetuses (the youngest was at 18 weeks gestational age) showed that, at that stage, the nerve is fully developed. PMID:25856464

  20. Automatic counterfeit protection system code classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Beusekom, Joost; Schreyer, Marco; Breuel, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Wide availability of cheap high-quality printing techniques make document forgery an easy task that can easily be done by most people using standard computer and printing hardware. To prevent the use of color laser printers or color copiers for counterfeiting e.g. money or other valuable documents, many of these machines print Counterfeit Protection System (CPS) codes on the page. These small yellow dots encode information about the specific printer and allow the questioned document examiner in cooperation with the manufacturers to track down the printer that was used to generate the document. However, the access to the methods to decode the tracking dots pattern is restricted. The exact decoding of a tracking pattern is often not necessary, as tracking the pattern down to the printer class may be enough. In this paper we present a method that detects what CPS pattern class was used in a given document. This can be used to specify the printer class that the document was printed on. Evaluation proved an accuracy of up to 91%.

  1. International photographic classification and grading system for myopic maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Kawasaki, Ryo; Jonas, Jost B; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Saw, Seang-Mei; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Klaver, Caroline C W; Moriyama, Muka; Shinohara, Kosei; Kawasaki, Yumiko; Yamazaki, Mai; Meuer, Stacy; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Yasuda, Miho; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Sugano, Akira; Wang, Jie Jin; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Yin

    2015-05-01

    To develop a classification and grading system for myopic maculopathy. Development and evaluation of a classification system for myopic maculopathy based on observational case series. A comprehensive set of myopic macular lesions was defined via literature review and through consensus meetings among retinal specialists and clinician scientists. A classification of myopic maculopathy was formulated based on fundus photographs and a modified Delphi process and consensus. Inter- and intraobserver reproducibility, assessed as agreement (%) and weighted kappa values, were evaluated. One hundred retinal photographs with myopia and myopic macular lesions were selected from case series at the High Myopia Clinic of the Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan. We defined 5 categories of myopic maculopathy including "no myopic retinal degenerative lesion" (Category 0), "tessellated fundus" (Category 1), "diffuse chorioretinal atrophy" (Category 2), "patchy chorioretinal atrophy" (Category 3), and "macular atrophy" (Category 4). Three additional features to supplement these categories were defined as "plus" lesions, namely, lacquer cracks, myopic choroidal neovascularization, and Fuchs spot. Posterior staphyloma was considered as a further, important sign of myopic retinopathy. The intraobserver agreement was ≥85% and the corresponding weighted kappa statistic was ≥0.6 between observations. After a brief training session, interobserver kappa statistics reached the predefined satisfactory level (≥0.4), considered as above moderate agreement. We propose a classification system for myopic maculopathy that was found to be reproducible. Applying a uniform classification in different studies will facilitate communication and comparison of findings from clinical trials and epidemiologic studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multispectral data acquisition and classification - Statistical models for system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Park, S. K.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper we relate the statistical processes that are involved in multispectral data acquisition and classification to a simple radiometric model of the earth surface and atmosphere. If generalized, these formulations could provide an analytical link between the steadily improving models of our environment and the performance characteristics of rapidly advancing device technology. This link is needed to bring system analysis tools to the task of optimizing remote sensing and (real-time) signal processing systems as a function of target and atmospheric properties, remote sensor spectral bands and system topology (e.g., image-plane processing), radiometric sensitivity and calibration accuracy, compensation for imaging conditions (e.g., atmospheric effects), and classification rates and errors.

  3. [Construction of biopharmaceutics classification system of Chinese materia medica].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wei, Li; Dong, Ling; Zhu, Mei-Ling; Tang, Ming-Min; Zhang, Lei

    2014-12-01

    Based on the characteristics of multicomponent of traditional Chinese medicine and drawing lessons from the concepts, methods and techniques of biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) in chemical field, this study comes up with the science framework of biopharmaceutics classification system of Chinese materia medica (CMMBCS). Using the different comparison method of multicomponent level and the CMMBCS method of overall traditional Chinese medicine, the study constructs the method process while setting forth academic thoughts and analyzing theory. The basic role of this system is clear to reveal the interaction and the related absorption mechanism of multicomponent in traditional Chinese medicine. It also provides new ideas and methods for improving the quality of Chinese materia medica and the development of new drug research.

  4. General classification handbook for floodplain vegetation in large river systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieck, Jennifer J.; Ruhser, Janis; Hoy, Erin E.; Robinson, Larry R.

    2015-01-01

    This handbook describes the General Wetland Vegetation Classification System developed as part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) Program, Long Term Resource Monitoring (LTRM) element. The UMRR is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the states of Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, and Wisconsin. The classification system consists of 31 general map classes and has been used to create systemic vegetation data layers throughout the diverse Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS), which includes the commercially navigable reaches of the Mississippi River from Minneapolis, Minnesota, in the north to Cairo, Illinois, in the south, the Illinois River, and navigable portions of the Kaskaskia, Black, St. Croix, and Minnesota Rivers. In addition, this handbook describes the evolution of the General Wetland Vegetation Classification System, discusses the process of creating a vegetation data layer, and describes each of the 31 map classes in detail. The handbook also acts as a pictorial guide to each of the map classes as they may appear in the field, as well as on color-infrared imagery. This version is an update to the original handbook published in 2004.

  5. Nomenclature and systems of classification for cardiomyopathy in children.

    PubMed

    Konta, Laura; Franklin, Rodney C G; Kaski, Juan P

    2015-08-01

    There has been a progressive evolution in systems of classification for cardiomyopathy, driven by advances in imaging modalities, disease recognition, and genetics, following initial clinical descriptions in the 1960s. A pathophysiological classification emerged and was endorsed by World Health Organisation Task Forces in 1980 and 1995: dilated, hypertrophic, restrictive, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathies; subdivided into idiopathic and disease-specific cardiomyopathies. Genetic advances have increasingly linked "idiopathic" phenotypes to specific mutations, although most linkages exhibit highly variable or little genotype-phenotype correlation, confounded by age-dependent changes and varying penetrance. The following two dominant classification systems are currently in use, with advocates in both continents. First, American Heart Association (2006): "A heterogeneous group of diseases of the myocardium associated with mechanical and/or electrical dysfunction that usually exhibit inappropriate ventricular hypertrophy or dilatation due to a variety of causes that frequently are genetic". These are subdivided to those predominantly involving the heart - primary - due to genetic mutation, including ion channelopathies, acquired disease, or mixed; and those with systemic involvement in other organ systems - secondary. Second, European Society of Cardiology (2008): "A myocardial disorder in which heart muscle is structurally and functionally abnormal… sufficient to cause the observed myocardial abnormality", with subdivision to familial and non-familial, excluding ion channelopathies, and split to specific disease subtypes and idiopathic. Further differences exist in the definitions for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; however, whichever high-level classification is used, the clinical reality remains phenotype driven. Clinical evaluation and diagnostic imaging dominate initial patient contact, revealing diagnostic red flags that determine further

  6. New Site Coefficients and Site Classification System Used in Recent Building Seismic Code Provisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dobry, R.; Borcherdt, R.D.; Crouse, C.B.; Idriss, I.M.; Joyner, W.B.; Martin, G.R.; Power, M.S.; Rinne, E.E.; Seed, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Recent code provisions for buildings and other structures (1994 and 1997 NEHRP Provisions, 1997 UBC) have adopted new site amplification factors and a new procedure for site classification. Two amplitude-dependent site amplification factors are specified: Fa for short periods and Fv for longer periods. Previous codes included only a long period factor S and did not provide for a short period amplification factor. The new site classification system is based on definitions of five site classes in terms of a representative average shear wave velocity to a depth of 30 m (V?? s). This definition permits sites to be classified unambiguously. When the shear wave velocity is not available, other soil properties such as standard penetration resistance or undrained shear strength can be used. The new site classes denoted by letters A - E, replace site classes in previous codes denoted by S1 - S4. Site classes A and B correspond to hard rock and rock, Site Class C corresponds to soft rock and very stiff / very dense soil, and Site Classes D and E correspond to stiff soil and soft soil. A sixth site class, F, is defined for soils requiring site-specific evaluations. Both Fa and Fv are functions of the site class, and also of the level of seismic hazard on rock, defined by parameters such as Aa and Av (1994 NEHRP Provisions), Ss and S1 (1997 NEHRP Provisions) or Z (1997 UBC). The values of Fa and Fv decrease as the seismic hazard on rock increases due to soil nonlinearity. The greatest impact of the new factors Fa and Fv as compared with the old S factors occurs in areas of low-to-medium seismic hazard. This paper summarizes the new site provisions, explains the basis for them, and discusses ongoing studies of site amplification in recent earthquakes that may influence future code developments.

  7. Preparing for the Use of Classification in Online Cataloging Systems and in Online Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Pauline A.; Markey, Karen

    1985-01-01

    Presents overview of library classification and automation (1940-84), including use of Dewey Decimal and Library of Congress classification in online cataloging systems. Highlights include classification number access in existing online catalogs, functions of classification records, specifications for authority file records, and the nature of…

  8. Post-treatment glenoid classification system for total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Churchill, R Sean

    2012-04-01

    Over the past 10 years, numerous advancements in glenoid preparation and resurfacing have occurred. Current glenoid classification systems are either focused solely on the patient's preoperative glenoid bone configuration or on the available glenoid bone stock in revision arthroplasty cases. While these systems provide value in preoperative planning, they fail to properly classify the surgical reconstruction completed. A literature review of common bone preparation methods and sources of glenoid prosthetic failure was performed. Based upon this review, a classification system for grading the status of the glenoid after prosthetic implantation was developed. A 6 category, post-treatment, glenoid classification system is proposed: type 0: no reaming; type I: glenoid reaming into but not through the subchondral bone; type II: glenoid reaming which perforates through <50% of the subchondral bone surface area; type III: glenoid reaming which perforates through >50% of the subchondral bone surface area; type IV: use of structural bone graft; and type V: use of a posterior augmented glenoid prosthesis. Types I-III are further subdivided into subtype A which have 100% bone support of the prosthesis, and subtype B which have a region of unsupported prosthesis. The classification system proposed addresses the surgical management of the glenoid during prosthetic replacement. This unique approach to classifying the glenoid following surgical intervention will allow direct follow-up comparison of similarly treated glenoid replacements. Future multicenter studies, possibly through joint registry databases, could then determine the long-term efficacy of the various glenoid preparation methods. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Classification of Microarray Data Using Kernel Fuzzy Inference System.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Kumar Rath, Santanu

    2014-01-01

    The DNA microarray classification technique has gained more popularity in both research and practice. In real data analysis, such as microarray data, the dataset contains a huge number of insignificant and irrelevant features that tend to lose useful information. Classes with high relevance and feature sets with high significance are generally referred for the selected features, which determine the samples classification into their respective classes. In this paper, kernel fuzzy inference system (K-FIS) algorithm is applied to classify the microarray data (leukemia) using t-test as a feature selection method. Kernel functions are used to map original data points into a higher-dimensional (possibly infinite-dimensional) feature space defined by a (usually nonlinear) function ϕ through a mathematical process called the kernel trick. This paper also presents a comparative study for classification using K-FIS along with support vector machine (SVM) for different set of features (genes). Performance parameters available in the literature such as precision, recall, specificity, F-measure, ROC curve, and accuracy are considered to analyze the efficiency of the classification model. From the proposed approach, it is apparent that K-FIS model obtains similar results when compared with SVM model. This is an indication that the proposed approach relies on kernel function.

  10. Validation of a new classification system for skin tears.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Kimberly; Baranoski, Sharon; Holloway, Samantha; Langemo, Diane

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to validate and establish reliability of the International Skin Tear classification system. A consensus panel of 12 internationally recognized key opinion leaders convened in 2011 to establish consensus statements on the prevention, prediction, assessment, and treatment of skin tears. Subsequently, a new skin tear classification system was proposed. The system was then tested for interrater and intrarater reliability between the experts before being tested more widely on a sample of 327 individuals from the United States, Canada, and Europe. The results of the study indicated a substantial level of agreement for the expert panel (Fleiss κ = 0.619; 2-month follow-up = 0.653). Intrarater reliability was high (Cohen κ = 0.877). Interrater reliability was moderate (Fleiss κ = 0.555) for healthcare professionals (n = 303) and fair for non-health professionals (Fleiss κ = 0.338; n = 24). This international study established the reliability and validity of a new classification system for skin tears.

  11. Nasal Septal Deviations: A Systematic Review of Classification Systems.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Jeffrey; Certal, Victor; Chang, Edward T; Camacho, Macario

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To systematically review the international literature for internal nasal septal deviation classification systems and summarize them for clinical and research purposes. Data Sources. Four databases (including PubMed/MEDLINE) were systematically searched through December 16, 2015. Methods. Systematic review, adhering to PRISMA. Results. After removal of duplicates, this study screened 952 articles for relevance. A final comprehensive review of 50 articles identified that 15 of these articles met the eligibility criteria. The classification systems defined in these articles included C-shaped, S-shaped, reverse C-shaped, and reverse S-shaped descriptions of the septal deviation in both the cephalocaudal and anteroposterior dimensions. Additional studies reported use of computed tomography and categorized deviation based on predefined locations. Three studies graded the severity of septal deviations based on the amount of deflection. The systems defined in the literature also included an evaluation of nasal septal spurs and perforations. Conclusion. This systematic review ascertained that the majority of the currently published classification systems for internal nasal septal deviations can be summarized by C-shaped or reverse C-shaped, as well as S-shaped or reverse S-shaped deviations in the anteroposterior and cephalocaudal dimensions. For imaging studies, predefined points have been defined along the septum. Common terminology can facilitate future research.

  12. Platelet-rich plasma: the PAW classification system.

    PubMed

    DeLong, Jeffrey M; Russell, Ryan P; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2012-07-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been the subject of hundreds of publications in recent years. Reports of its effects in tissue, both positive and negative, have generated great interest in the orthopaedic community. Protocols for PRP preparation vary widely between authors and are often not well documented in the literature, making results difficult to compare or replicate. A classification system is needed to more accurately compare protocols and results and effectively group studies together for meta-analysis. Although some classification systems have been proposed, no single system takes into account the multitude of variables that determine the efficacy of PRP. In this article we propose a simple method for organizing and comparing results in the literature. The PAW classification system is based on 3 components: (1) the absolute number of Platelets, (2) the manner in which platelet Activation occurs, and (3) the presence or absence of White cells. By analyzing these 3 variables, we are able to accurately compare publications. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reliability of intracerebral hemorrhage classification systems: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rannikmäe, Kristiina; Woodfield, Rebecca; Anderson, Craig S; Charidimou, Andreas; Chiewvit, Pipat; Greenberg, Steven M; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Meretoja, Atte; Palm, Frederic; Putaala, Jukka; Rinkel, Gabriel Je; Rosand, Jonathan; Rost, Natalia S; Strbian, Daniel; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Tsai, Chung-Fen; Wermer, Marieke Jh; Werring, David; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Sudlow, Cathie Lm

    2016-08-01

    Accurately distinguishing non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) subtypes is important since they may have different risk factors, causal pathways, management, and prognosis. We systematically assessed the inter- and intra-rater reliability of ICH classification systems. We sought all available reliability assessments of anatomical and mechanistic ICH classification systems from electronic databases and personal contacts until October 2014. We assessed included studies' characteristics, reporting quality and potential for bias; summarized reliability with kappa value forest plots; and performed meta-analyses of the proportion of cases classified into each subtype. We included 8 of 2152 studies identified. Inter- and intra-rater reliabilities were substantial to perfect for anatomical and mechanistic systems (inter-rater kappa values: anatomical 0.78-0.97 [six studies, 518 cases], mechanistic 0.89-0.93 [three studies, 510 cases]; intra-rater kappas: anatomical 0.80-1 [three studies, 137 cases], mechanistic 0.92-0.93 [two studies, 368 cases]). Reporting quality varied but no study fulfilled all criteria and none was free from potential bias. All reliability studies were performed with experienced raters in specialist centers. Proportions of ICH subtypes were largely consistent with previous reports suggesting that included studies are appropriately representative. Reliability of existing classification systems appears excellent but is unknown outside specialist centers with experienced raters. Future reliability comparisons should be facilitated by studies following recently published reporting guidelines. © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  14. [Introduction and interpretation of abcd classification system for subaxial cervical spine injury].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhida; Lin, Bin; Yu, Zhiyi; Li, Bingwen

    2014-11-01

    To introduce and interpret ABCD classification system for subaxial cervical spine injury. The literature related to subaxial cervical spine injury classification system was extensively reviewed, analyzed, and summarized so as to introduce the ABCD classification system. The ABCD classification system for subaxial cervical spine injury consists of 3 parts. The first part of the proposed classification is an anatomical description of the injury; it delivers the information whether injury is bony, ligamentous, or a combined one. The second part is the classification of nerve function, spinal stenosis, and spinal instability. The last part is optional and denotes radiological examination which is used to define injury type. Several letters have been used for simplicity to deliver the largest amount of information. And a treatment algorithm based on the proposed classification is suggested. The ABCD classification system is proposed for simplification. However further evaluation of this classification is needed.

  15. U.S. Geological Survey Library classification system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sasscer, R. Scott

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey library classification system has been designed for an earth science library. It is a tool for assigning classification numbers to earth science and allied pure science library materials in order to collect these materials into related subject groups on the library shelves and arrange them alphabetically by author and title. It can also be used as a retrieval system to access these materials through the subject and visible geographic classification numbers.The classification scheme has been developed over the years since 1904 to meet the ever-changing needs of increased specialization and new areas of study in the earth sciences.This system contains seven schedules:Subject scheduleGeological survey scheduleEarth science periodical scheduleGovernment documents periodical scheduleGeneral science periodical scheduleEarth science maps scheduleGeographic scheduleA geographic number, from the geographic schedule, is distinguished from other numbers in the system in that it is always enclosed in parentheses; for example, (200) is the geographic number for the United States.The geographic number is used in conjunction with the six other previously listed schedules, and it represents slightly different nuances of meanings, in respect to geographic locale, for each schedule.When used with a subject number, the geographic number indicates the country, state, province, or region in which the research was made. The subject number, 203, geology, when combined with the geographic number, (200), for example 203(200), is the classification number for library materials on the geology of the United States.The geographic number, combined with the capital letter G, for example, G(211), is the classification number for an earth science periodical issued by a geological association or university geology department in the State of Maine.When the letter S is combined with a geographic number, for example, S(276), it represents a general science periodical for a

  16. USGS Emergency Response and the Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. K.; Lamb, R.

    2013-12-01

    Remotely sensed datasets such as satellite imagery and aerial photography can be an invaluable resource to support the response and recovery from many types of emergency events such as floods, earthquakes, landslides, wildfires, and other natural or human-induced disasters. When disaster strikes there is often an urgent need and high demand for rapid acquisition and coordinated distribution of pre- and post-event geospatial products and remotely sensed imagery. These products and images are necessary to record change, analyze impacts, and facilitate response to the rapidly changing conditions on the ground. The coordinated and timely provision of relevant imagery and other datasets is one important component of the USGS support for domestic and international emergency response activities. The USGS Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS) serves as a single, consolidated point-of-access for relevant satellite and aerial image datasets during an emergency event response. The HDDS provides data visibility and immediate download services through a complementary pair of graphical map-based and traditional directory-based interfaces. This system allows emergency response personnel to rapidly select and obtain pre-event ('baseline') and post-event emergency response imagery from many different sources. These datasets will typically include images that are acquired directly by USGS, but may also include many other types of images that are collected and contributed by partner agencies and organizations during the course of an emergency event response. Over the past decade, USGS Emergency Response and HDDS have supported hundreds of domestic and international disaster events by providing critically needed pre- and post-event remotely sensed imagery and other related geospatial products as required by the emergency response community. Some of the larger national events supported by HDDS have included Hurricane Sandy (2012), the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (2010), and Hurricane

  17. The ROC Curves of Fused Independent Classification Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    spectral settings arises in many fields of study; in medicine, the detection of a cancer; in marketing , the detection of the best customer base; in the...THE ROC CURVES OF FUSED INDEPENDENT CLASSIFICATION SYSTEMS THESIS Michael B. Walsh AFIT/GAM/ENC/08/06 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR...FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. The views expressed in this

  18. Classification of Transient Phenomena in Distribution System using wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, Alireza

    2014-05-01

    An efficient procedure for classification of transient phenomena in distribution systems is proposed in this paper. The proposed method has been applied to classify some transient phenomena such as inrush current, load switching, capacitor switching and single phase to ground fault. The new scheme is based on wavelet transform algorithm. All of the events for feature extraction and test are simulated using Electro Magnetic Transient Program (EMTP). Results show high accuracy of proposed method.

  19. Review of Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Integrated Hazard Development Process. Appendices; Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smiles, Michael D.; Blythe, Michael P.; Bejmuk, Bohdan; Currie, Nancy J.; Doremus, Robert C.; Franzo, Jennifer C.; Gordon, Mark W.; Johnson, Tracy D.; Kowaleski, Mark M.; Laube, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    The Chief Engineer of the Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Office requested that the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) perform an independent assessment of the ESD's integrated hazard development process. The focus of the assessment was to review the integrated hazard analysis (IHA) process and identify any gaps/improvements in the process (e.g. missed causes, cause tree completeness, missed hazards). This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  20. Review of Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Integrated Hazard Development Process. Volume 1; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smiles, Michael D.; Blythe, Michael P.; Bejmuk, Bohdan; Currie, Nancy J.; Doremus, Robert C.; Franzo, Jennifer C.; Gordon, Mark W.; Johnson, Tracy D.; Kowaleski, Mark M.; Laube, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    The Chief Engineer of the Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Office requested that the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) perform an independent assessment of the ESD's integrated hazard development process. The focus of the assessment was to review the integrated hazard analysis (IHA) process and identify any gaps/improvements in the process (e.g., missed causes, cause tree completeness, missed hazards). This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  1. What should an ideal spinal injury classification system consist of? A methodological review and conceptual proposal for future classifications

    PubMed Central

    Audigé, Laurent; Hanson, Beate; Chapman, Jens R.; Hosman, Allard J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Since Böhler published the first categorization of spinal injuries based on plain radiographic examinations in 1929, numerous classifications have been proposed. Despite all these efforts, however, only a few have been tested for reliability and validity. This methodological, conceptual review summarizes that a spinal injury classification system should be clinically relevant, reliable and accurate. The clinical relevance of a classification is directly related to its content validity. The ideal content of a spinal injury classification should only include injury characteristics of the vertebral column, is primarily based on the increasingly routinely performed CT imaging, and is clearly distinctive from severity scales and treatment algorithms. Clearly defined observation and conversion criteria are crucial determinants of classification systems’ reliability and accuracy. Ideally, two principle spinal injury characteristics should be easy to discern on diagnostic images: the specific location and morphology of the injured spinal structure. Given the current evidence and diagnostic imaging technology, descriptions of the mechanisms of injury and ligamentous injury should not be included in a spinal injury classification. The presence of concomitant neurologic deficits can be integrated in a spinal injury severity scale, which in turn can be considered in a spinal injury treatment algorithm. Ideally, a validation pathway of a spinal injury classification system should be completed prior to its clinical and scientific implementation. This review provides a methodological concept which might be considered prior to the synthesis of new or modified spinal injury classifications. PMID:20464432

  2. A Biochar Classification System and Associated Test Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Camps-Arbestain, Marta; Amonette, James E.; Singh, Balwant; Wang, Tao; Schmidt, Hans-Peter

    2015-02-18

    In this chapter, a biochar classification system related to its use as soil amendment is proposed. This document builds upon previous work and constrains its scope to materials with properties that satisfy the criteria for biochar as defined by either the International Biochar Initiative (IBI) Biochar Standards or the European Biochar Community (EBC) Standards, and it is intended to minimise the need for testing in addition to those required according to the above-mentioned standards. The classification system envisions enabling stakeholders and commercial entities to (i) identify the most suitable biochar to fulfil the requirements for a particular soil and/or land-use, and (ii) distinguish the application of biochar for specific niches (e.g., soilless agriculture). It is based on the best current knowledge and the intention is to periodically review and update the document based on new data and knowledge that become available in the scientific literature. The main thrust of this classification system is based on the direct or indirect beneficial effects that biochar provides from its application to soil. We have classified the potential beneficial effects of biochar application to soils into five categories with their corresponding classes, where applicable: (i) carbon (C) storage value, (ii) fertiliser value, (iii) liming value, (iv) particle-size, and (v) use in soil-less agriculture. A summary of recommended test methods is provided at the end of the chapter.

  3. A science based approach to topical drug classification system (TCS).

    PubMed

    Shah, Vinod P; Yacobi, Avraham; Rădulescu, Flavian Ştefan; Miron, Dalia Simona; Lane, Majella E

    2015-08-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) for oral immediate release solid drug products has been very successful; its implementation in drug industry and regulatory approval has shown significant progress. This has been the case primarily because BCS was developed using sound scientific judgment. Following the success of BCS, we have considered the topical drug products for similar classification system based on sound scientific principles. In USA, most of the generic topical drug products have qualitatively (Q1) and quantitatively (Q2) same excipients as the reference listed drug (RLD). The applications of in vitro release (IVR) and in vitro characterization are considered for a range of dosage forms (suspensions, creams, ointments and gels) of differing strengths. We advance a Topical Drug Classification System (TCS) based on a consideration of Q1, Q2 as well as the arrangement of matter and microstructure of topical formulations (Q3). Four distinct classes are presented for the various scenarios that may arise and depending on whether biowaiver can be granted or not.

  4. Reliability of the revised wheelchair rugby trunk impairment classification system.

    PubMed

    Altmann, V C; Groen, B E; van Limbeek, J; Vanlandewijck, Y C; Keijsers, N L W

    2013-12-01

    Observational, cross-sectional. A new classification system for trunk impairment in wheelchair rugby was introduced in 2010. It consists of 10 tests, arranged in an algorithm, to assign four different trunk scores (0, 0.5, 1.0 or 1.5) to athletes. The purpose of this study was to assess the inter-rater reliability of this classification system. National competition for wheelchair rugby and wheelchair basketball in the Netherlands and Belgium. Three experienced wheelchair rugby classifiers independently assigned trunk scores to wheelchair rugby and wheelchair basketball athletes in two sessions. After each session, test descriptions were adjusted. The inter-rater reliability was evaluated by determining the agreement and Fleiss Kappa. In the first session, all classifiers agreed on the trunk score in 13 out of 16 athletes; the overall Kappa was 0.76 (P<0.001). The Kappa per trunk score ranged from 0.29 to 1. Four test descriptions were adjusted after the first session. In the second session, there was an agreement in trunk score between the classifiers in 15 out of 21 athletes. The overall Kappa was 0.75 (P<0.0001), and the Kappa per trunk scores ranged from 0.58 to 0.92. After the second session, two test descriptions were improved. The revised classification system for trunk impairment in wheelchair rugby showed a adequate inter-rater reliability for the allocation of trunk scores.

  5. Information systems to manage historical data for natural hazards assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, G.; Guidoboni, E.

    2003-04-01

    Over the last few decades, historical data have become increasingly important in the different sectors dealing with the mitigation of greater natural hazards. By historical data we mean both the instrumental ones, above all those of the last 100 years, and the descriptive ones that generally cover very broad chronological ranges. Suffice it to think, for example, that in countries with ancient cultural traditions like Italy, the catalogue of strong earthquakes has been extended to embrace the last 2,500 years. In this sector, important methodological contributions have come from a multidisciplinary approach to research and the processing of historical information concerning: earthquakes, volcanic eruption, floods, landslides, geochemical data, seismographic data, etc.. Sophisticated and in-depth finalised historical research can make huge quantities of information available, while the development of dedicated information systems can allow for the efficient as well as flexible organisation of both descriptive and parametric data. The honing of the appropriate interfaces also allows the original data to be tapped and even processed in line with the kind of end-user. Thus, by means of an efficient and targeted organisation of the data, the demands of scientific documentation and dissemination can be satisfied. The databases presented here have been developed by SGA over the last twenty years within the scope of the research for the National Institute for Geophysics and Volcanology and other Italian research bodies. There is a cognitive synergy between the various databases, as a knowledge of the different geophysical phenomena that share the same spatial-temporal frame encourages a combined understanding of the phenomena themselves. The uniformity of approach in the information technology database structure and in the management procedures has been developed in order to enhance the scientific benefits of this synergy.

  6. Designation of a multi hazard monitoring and management system for urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assilzadeh, H.; Gao, Y.

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes designation of an integrated system for urban disasters monitoring and management. Multi sensor application for urban hazard monitoring, can be conducted with appropriate models in GIS and internet based communication infrastructure to provide a solution for real time urban hazards contingency and emergency response. The system architect includes a module called command and control system, designed for managing and coordinating urban accidents response. Command and control system coordinates all tasks related to accident emergency response through urban hazard administration office. The structure also includes web based accident data dissemination scheme through internet portal which act as a communication system to connect accident managers in administration office with accident relief operators on the ground. All components of the system including database, central repository system, command and control system, communication system, and urban disaster models are described. This new development in geomatics application can be used for other hazards monitoring and management in the environment.

  7. Databases applicable to quantitative hazard/risk assessment-Towards a predictive systems toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Michael Jackson, Marcus

    2008-11-15

    The Workshop on The Power of Aggregated Toxicity Data addressed the requirement for distributed databases to support quantitative hazard and risk assessment. The authors have conceived and constructed with federal support several databases that have been used in hazard identification and risk assessment. The first of these databases, the EPA Gene-Tox Database was developed for the EPA Office of Toxic Substances by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and is currently hosted by the National Library of Medicine. This public resource is based on the collaborative evaluation, by government, academia, and industry, of short-term tests for the detection of mutagens and presumptive carcinogens. The two-phased evaluation process resulted in more than 50 peer-reviewed publications on test system performance and a qualitative database on thousands of chemicals. Subsequently, the graphic and quantitative EPA/IARC Genetic Activity Profile (GAP) Database was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). A chemical database driven by consideration of the lowest effective dose, GAP has served IARC for many years in support of hazard classification of potential human carcinogens. The Toxicological Activity Profile (TAP) prototype database was patterned after GAP and utilized acute, subchronic, and chronic data from the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards. TAP demonstrated the flexibility of the GAP format for air toxics, water pollutants and other environmental agents. The GAP format was also applied to developmental toxicants and was modified to represent quantitative results from the rodent carcinogen bioassay. More recently, the authors have constructed: 1) the NIEHS Genetic Alterations in Cancer (GAC) Database which quantifies specific mutations found in cancers induced by environmental agents, and 2) the NIEHS Chemical Effects in Biological Systems (CEBS) Knowledgebase that integrates genomic and other biological data including

  8. On the Origins of the Quinarian System of Classification.

    PubMed

    Novick, Aaron

    2016-02-01

    William Sharp Macleay developed the quinarian system of classification in his Horæ Entomologicæ, published in two parts in 1819 and 1821. For two decades, the quinarian system was widely discussed in Britain and influenced such naturalists as Charles Darwin, Richard Owen, and Thomas Huxley. This paper offers the first detailed account of Macleay's development of the quinarian system. Macleay developed his system under the shaping influence of two pressures: (1) the insistence by followers of Linnaeus on developing artificial systems at the expense of the natural system and (2) the apparent tension between the continuity of organic nature and the failure of linear classification schemes (which continuity seemed to require). Against what he perceived as dogmatic indolence on the part of the Linnaeans, Macleay developed a philosophy of science in which hypotheses that exceeded the available evidence should be proposed and subjected to severe tests. He also developed a novel comparative anatomical methodology, the method of variation, to aid in his search for the natural system. Using this method, he developed an intricate system that showed how organic nature could be continuous without being linear. A failure to appreciate these facets of Macleay's thought has led to several misunderstandings of him and his work, most notably that he was an idealist. These misunderstandings are here rebutted.

  9. A Novel Classification System for Injuries After Electronic Cigarette Explosions.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Scott B; Beckett, Allison R; Lintner, Alicia; Leahey, Carly; Greer, Ashley; Brevard, Sidney B; Simmons, Jon D; Kahn, Steven A

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) contain lithium batteries that have been known to explode and/or cause fires that have resulted in burn injury. The purpose of this article is to present a case study, review injuries caused by e-cigarettes, and present a novel classification system from the newly emerging patterns of burns. A case study was presented and online media reports for e-cigarette burns were queried with search terms "e-cigarette burns" and "electronic cigarette burns." The reports and injury patterns were tabulated. Analysis was then performed to create a novel classification system based on the distinct injury patterns seen in the study. Two patients were seen at our regional burn center after e-cigarette burns. One had an injury to his thigh and penis that required operative intervention after ignition of this device in his pocket. The second had a facial burn and corneal abrasions when the device exploded while he was inhaling vapor. The Internet search and case studies resulted in 26 cases for evaluation. The burn patterns were divided in direct injury from the device igniting and indirect injury when the device caused a house or car fire. A numerical classification was created: direct injury: type 1 (hand injury) 7 cases, type 2 (face injury) 8 cases, type 3 (waist/groin injury) 11 cases, and type 5a (inhalation injury from using device) 2 cases; indirect injury: type 4 (house fire injury) 7 cases and type 5b (inhalation injury from fire started by the device) 4 cases. Multiple e-cigarette injuries are occurring in the United States and distinct patterns of burns are emerging. The classification system developed in this article will aid in further study and future regulation of these dangerous devices.

  10. 48 CFR 19.303 - Determining North American Industry Classification System codes and size standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Industry Classification System codes and size standards. 19.303 Section 19.303 Federal Acquisition... Classification System codes and size standards. (a)(1) The contracting officer shall determine the appropriate North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and related small business size standard and...

  11. 5 CFR 9701.231 - Conversion of positions and employees to the DHS classification system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the DHS classification system. 9701.231 Section 9701.231 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF... MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification Transitional Provisions § 9701.231 Conversion of positions and employees to the DHS classification system. (a) This...

  12. 5 CFR 9701.231 - Conversion of positions and employees to the DHS classification system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the DHS classification system. 9701.231 Section 9701.231 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF... MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification Transitional Provisions § 9701.231 Conversion of positions and employees to the DHS classification system. (a) This...

  13. 48 CFR 19.303 - Determining North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards. 19.303 Section 19.303 Federal Acquisition... Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards. (a) The contracting officer shall determine the... North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards. (a) * * * For...

  14. 5 CFR 9901.231 - Conversion of positions and employees to NSPS classification system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... NSPS classification system. 9901.231 Section 9901.231 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE... MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NATIONAL SECURITY PERSONNEL SYSTEM (NSPS) Classification Transitional Provisions § 9901.231 Conversion of positions and employees to NSPS classification system. (a) Introduction...

  15. A Classification System for Urodynamic Evaluation of Lower Urinary Tract System Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Anastasios

    2017-04-14

    A classification system for lower urinary tract system (LUTS) dysfunction, based on urodynamics, could support the evaluation and management of this pathological condition. A new alphanumerical classification system is proposed for staging neurogenic and non-neurogenic LUTS dysfunction, according to the urodynamic evaluation. This is a proposal based on experience from everyday clinical practice and represents an opinion open to discussion. The purpose of this alphanumerical classification is the establishment of a simple, unified staging system describing all LUTS dysfunction situations, after a urodynamic evaluation, in a way that can help in diagnosis, treatment, health professionals' communication, education, and research. This alphanumerical classification for LUTS dysfunction could become a unified standard and a prerequisite for ensuring the quality of care in all resource settings. Moreover, it would be useful for the future to include a classification as part of LUTS dysfunction registration. A new alphanumerical classification system is presented. The purpose of this classification is the establishment of a simple, unified staging system describing entire lower urinary tract system dysfunction situations in a way that could help in diagnosis, treatment, health professionals' communication, education, and research. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Classification of Unmanned Aircraft Systems. UAS Classification/Categorization for Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Category, class, and type designations are primary means to identify appropriate aircraft certification basis, operating rules/limitations, and pilot qualifications to operate in the National Airspace System (NAS). The question is whether UAS fit into existing aircraft categories or classes, or are unique enough to justify the creation of a new category/class. In addition, the characteristics or capabilities, which define when an UAS becomes a regulated aircraft, must also be decided. This issue focuses on UAS classification for certification purposes. Several approaches have been considered for classifying UAS. They basically group into either using a weight/mass basis, or a safety risk basis, factoring in the performance of the UAS, including where the UAS would operate. Under existing standards, aircraft must have a Type Certificate and Certificate of Airworthiness, in order to be used for "compensation or hire", a major difference from model aircraft. Newer technologies may make it possible for very small UAS to conduct commercial services, but that is left for a future discussion to extend the regulated aircraft to a lower level. The Access 5 position is that UAS are aircraft and should be regulated above the weight threshold differentiating them from model airplanes. The recommended classification grouping is summarized in a chart.

  17. 77 FR 17573 - Hazard Communication

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ...In this final rule, OSHA is modifying its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) to conform to the United Nations' Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). OSHA has determined that the modifications will significantly reduce costs and burdens while also improving the quality and consistency of information provided to employers and employees regarding chemical......

  18. The Comprehensive AOCMF Classification System: Midface Fractures - Level 3 Tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Audigé, Laurent; Kunz, Christoph; Buitrago-Téllez, Carlos H.; Rudderman, Randal; Prein, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    This tutorial outlines the details of the AOCMF image-based classification system for fractures of the midface at the precision level 3. The topography of the different midface regions (central midface—upper central midface, intermediate central midface, lower central midface—incorporating the naso-orbito-ethmoid region; lateral midface—zygoma and zygomatic arch, palate) is subdivided in much greater detail than in level 2 going beyond the Le Fort fracture types and its analogs. The level 3 midface classification system is presented along with guidelines to precisely delineate the fracture patterns in these specific subregions. It is easy to plot common fracture entities, such as nasal and naso-orbito-ethmoid, and their variants due to the refined structural layout of the subregions. As a key attribute, this focused approach permits to document the occurrence of fragmentation (i.e., single vs. multiple fracture lines), displacement, and bone loss. Moreover, the preinjury dental state and the degree of alveolar atrophy in edentulous maxillary regions can be recorded. On the basis of these individual features, tooth injuries, periodontal trauma, and fracture involvement of the alveolar process can be assessed. Coding rules are given to set up a distinctive formula for typical midface fractures and their combinations. The instructions and illustrations are elucidated by a series of radiographic imaging examples. A critical appraisal of the design of this level 3 midface classification is made. PMID:25489392

  19. Coding hazardous tree failures for a data management system

    Treesearch

    Lee A. Paine

    1978-01-01

    Codes for automatic data processing (ADP) are provided for hazardous tree failure data submitted on Report of Tree Failure forms. Definitions of data items and suggestions for interpreting ambiguously worded reports are also included. The manual is intended to insure the production of accurate and consistent punched ADP cards which are used in transfer of the data to...

  20. Characteristics of hazardous material spills from reporting systems in California.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, G M; Windham, G C; Leonard, A; Neutra, R R

    1986-01-01

    Data on hazardous material releases that occurred between January 1, 1982 and September 30, 1983 in California were obtained from the California Highway Patrol (CHP) and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). The majority of incidents involved highway transport of hazardous materials, although some information was available on air, rail, and stationary facility releases. Vehicle accidents and failure of or damage to the container were the most frequent causes of releases. Proportionately more hazardous materials incidents occurred in early summer than at other times of the year, during weekdays, and daytime hours. The largest proportions of incidents involved the chemical categories of corrosives and fuels. Reported exposures and injuries to response personnel and other people at the scene were relatively few; no fatalities were reported. Few incidents were reported in both data sources, suggesting that the examination of only one data source would yield a gross underestimate of the total number of hazardous materials incidents in California. The lack of available denominator data limits the interpretation of the findings. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:3963282

  1. HAZARD ASSESSMENT OF METALS AND METAL COMPOUNDS IN TERRESTRIAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metal accumulation in soil can result in adverse effects on soil biota, and may concentrate metals in food chains to levels detrimental to humans and wildlife. A SETAC Pellston Workshop entitled " Hazard Identification Approach For Metals And Inorganic Metal Substances" examined...

  2. Test instrumentation evaluates electrostatic hazards in fluid system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, L. H.; Henry, R.; Krebs, D.

    1967-01-01

    RJ-1 fuel surface potential is measured with a probe to determine the degree of hazard originating from static electricity buildup in the hydraulic fluid. The probe is mounted in contact with the fluid surface and connected to an electrostatic voltmeter.

  3. Characteristics of hazardous material spills from reporting systems in California.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G M; Windham, G C; Leonard, A; Neutra, R R

    1986-05-01

    Data on hazardous material releases that occurred between January 1, 1982 and September 30, 1983 in California were obtained from the California Highway Patrol (CHP) and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). The majority of incidents involved highway transport of hazardous materials, although some information was available on air, rail, and stationary facility releases. Vehicle accidents and failure of or damage to the container were the most frequent causes of releases. Proportionately more hazardous materials incidents occurred in early summer than at other times of the year, during weekdays, and daytime hours. The largest proportions of incidents involved the chemical categories of corrosives and fuels. Reported exposures and injuries to response personnel and other people at the scene were relatively few; no fatalities were reported. Few incidents were reported in both data sources, suggesting that the examination of only one data source would yield a gross underestimate of the total number of hazardous materials incidents in California. The lack of available denominator data limits the interpretation of the findings.

  4. HAZARD ASSESSMENT OF METALS AND METAL COMPOUNDS IN TERRESTRIAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metal accumulation in soil can result in adverse effects on soil biota, and may concentrate metals in food chains to levels detrimental to humans and wildlife. A SETAC Pellston Workshop entitled " Hazard Identification Approach For Metals And Inorganic Metal Substances" examined...

  5. Expert system for mine supervising staff, fire hazard monitoring and fire-fighting

    SciTech Connect

    Dziurzynski, W.; Wasilewski, S.

    1999-07-01

    The paper presents the functions of an expert system designed for mine supervising staff responsible for fire hazard monitoring and fire-fighting. The essence of the system is to gather the complete data from hazard monitoring systems and the results of manual measurements made by ventilation staff in a common database. The database can be used for analysis and engineering calculation employed in mine ventilation supervision and also for the prevention against natural hazards, in particular fire and methane. Hardware and software tools developed within the framework of the system will also be used during rescue operation.

  6. A Functional-Phylogenetic Classification System for Transmembrane Solute Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive classification system for transmembrane molecular transporters has been developed and recently approved by the transport panel of the nomenclature committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This system is based on (i) transporter class and subclass (mode of transport and energy coupling mechanism), (ii) protein phylogenetic family and subfamily, and (iii) substrate specificity. Almost all of the more than 250 identified families of transporters include members that function exclusively in transport. Channels (115 families), secondary active transporters (uniporters, symporters, and antiporters) (78 families), primary active transporters (23 families), group translocators (6 families), and transport proteins of ill-defined function or of unknown mechanism (51 families) constitute distinct categories. Transport mode and energy coupling prove to be relatively immutable characteristics and therefore provide primary bases for classification. Phylogenetic grouping reflects structure, function, mechanism, and often substrate specificity and therefore provides a reliable secondary basis for classification. Substrate specificity and polarity of transport prove to be more readily altered during evolutionary history and therefore provide a tertiary basis for classification. With very few exceptions, a phylogenetic family of transporters includes members that function by a single transport mode and energy coupling mechanism, although a variety of substrates may be transported, sometimes with either inwardly or outwardly directed polarity. In this review, I provide cross-referencing of well-characterized constituent transporters according to (i) transport mode, (ii) energy coupling mechanism, (iii) phylogenetic grouping, and (iv) substrates transported. The structural features and distribution of recognized family members throughout the living world are also evaluated. The tabulations should facilitate familial and functional

  7. Classification of healthcare systems: Can we go further?

    PubMed

    Toth, Federico

    2016-05-01

    This article addresses the issue of the classification of healthcare systems, with the intent to take a step further than the previously analysed models of healthcare organisation. As concerns the financing of healthcare services, the standard tripartite classification (according to which healthcare systems are divided into three groups: voluntary insurance, social health insurance and universal coverage) is enriched with two additional types: compulsory national health insurance and residual programs. With respect to the provision of services and the relationship between insurers and providers, it is important to distinguish between vertically integrated and separated systems. What differentiates this analysis from the majority of previous studies is its underlying logic. Assuming that all systems are hybrid, the article proposes to put aside the classic logic for classifying healthcare systems (according to which individual countries are pigeonholed into different classes depending on the prevailing system) in favour of the identikit logic. The concept of segmentation (of healthcare services or population) proves to be remarkably useful to this purpose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An ambulatory care classification system: design, development and evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, D

    1979-01-01

    A medical classification system for coding a patient's reason for visit has been developed for use in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and for ambulatory care settings. The code is developed in a modular structure and includes modules for Symptoms; Diseases; Diagnostic, Screening and Preventive Procedures; Therapeutic Procedures, Process Problems and Counseling; Injuries and Adverse Effects; Follow-ups for Test Results; and Administrative Reasons for Visits. The system was evaluated in coding tests, through review by medical societies representing the major specialties, and by other health care providers. An extensive coding index is available. PMID:468555

  9. Paediatric biopharmaceutics classification system: current status and future decisions.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Hannah

    2014-08-05

    Biopharmaceutical methods are routinely used in the design of medicines to predict in vivo absorption and hence guide the development of new products. Differences in anatomy and physiology of paediatric patients require adaptation of existing biopharmaceutical methods to ensure that in vivo predictions are relevant for this population. The biopharmaceutics classification system is a tool used in drug development to guide formulation selection and manufacture from early clinical studies through to product launch. The applicability of the biopharmaceutics system to paediatric product development has yet to be explored; this note brings together some key issues in direct extrapolation from adults into paediatric populations. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 300 - The Hazard Ranking System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The Hazard Ranking System A Appendix A to Part 300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Pt. 300, App. A Appendix A to...

  11. The modified "Rockfall Hazard Rating System": a new tool for roads risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budetta, P.

    2003-04-01

    This paper contains a modified method for the analysis of rockfall hazard along roads and motorways. The method is derived from that one developed by Pierson et alii at the Oregon State Highway Division. The Rockfall Hazard Rating System (RHRS) provides a rational way to make informed decisions on where and how to spend construction funds. An exponential scoring graph is used to represent the increase in hazard that is reflected in the nine categories forming the classification (slope height, ditch effectiveness, average vehicle risk, percent of decision site distance, roadway width, geological character, quantity of rockfall/event, climate and rock fall history). The resulting total score contains the essential elements regarding the evaluation of the consequences ("cost of failure"). In the modified method, the rating for the categories "ditch effectiveness", "decision sight distance", "rodway width", "geologic characteristic" and "climate and water circulation" have been rendered more easy and objective. The main modifications regard the introduction of the Romana's Slope Mass Rating improving the estimate of the geologic characteristics, of the volume of the potentially unstable blocks and underground water circulation. Other modifications regard the scoring determination for the categories "decision sight distance" and "road geometry". For these categories, the Italian National Council's standards (CNR) have been used. The method must be applied in both the traffic directions because the percentage of reduction in the "decision sight distance" greatly affects the results. An application of the method to a 2-km-long section of the Sorrentine road (n° 145) in Southern Italy was pointed out. A high traffic intensity affects the entire section of the road and rockfalls periodically cause casualties, as well as a large amount of damage and traffic interruptions. The method was applied on seven cross section traces of slopes adjacent to the Sorrentine road and the

  12. Interobserver Agreement in the Classification of Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears Using the Snyder Classification System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S; Davis, Shane M; Doremus, Brittany; Kouk, Shalen; Stetson, William B

    2016-09-01

    At present, there is no widely accepted classification system for partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, and as a result, optimal treatment remains controversial. To examine the interobserver reliability and accuracy of classifying partial rotator cuff tears using the Snyder classification system. We hypothesized that the Snyder classification would be reproducible with high reliability and accuracy. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Twenty-seven orthopaedic surgeons reviewed 10 video-recorded shoulder arthroscopies. Each surgeon was provided with a description of the Snyder classification system for partial-thickness rotator cuff tears and was then instructed to use this system to describe each tear. Interrater kappa statistics and percentage agreement between observers were calculated to measure the level of agreement. Surgeon experience as well as fellowship training was evaluated to determine possible correlations. A kappa coefficient of 0.512 indicated moderate reliability between surgeons using the Snyder classification to describe partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. The mean correct score was 80%, which indicated "very good" agreement. There was no correlation between the number of shoulder arthroscopies performed per year and fellowship training and the number of correct scores. The Snyder classification system is reproducible and can be used in future research studies in analyzing the treatment options of partial rotator cuff tears.

  13. FigSearch: a figure legend indexing and classification system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Jenssen, Tor-Kristian; Nygaard, Vegard; Sack, John; Hovig, Eivind

    2004-11-01

    FigSearch is a prototype text-mining and classification system for figures from any corpus of full-text biological papers. The system allows users to search for figures that contain genes of interest and illustrate protein interactions. The retrieved figures are ranked by a score representing the likelihood to be of a certain type, in this case, schematic illustrations of protein interactions and signaling events. The system contains a Web interface for search, a module for classification of figures based on vector representations of figure legends and a module for indexing gene names. In a preliminary validation, the FigSearch system showed satisfactory performance according to domain experts in providing the most relevant graphical representations. This strategy may be easily extended to other figure types. Moreover, as more full-text data become available, such a system will find increased usefulness in identifying and presenting compressed biological knowledge. A searchable Web interface, FigSearch, is accessible via http://pubgeneserver.uio.no/figsearch/ for all figures from the available corpus.

  14. AMD-stability and the classification of planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, J.; Petit, A. C.

    2017-09-01

    We present here in full detail the evolution of the angular momentum deficit (AMD) during collisions as it was described in Laskar (2000, Phys. Rev. Lett., 84, 3240). Since then, the AMD has been revealed to be a key parameter for the understanding of the outcome of planetary formation models. We define here the AMD-stability criterion that can be easily verified on a newly discovered planetary system. We show how AMD-stability can be used to establish a classification of the multiplanet systems in order to exhibit the planetary systems that are long-term stable because they are AMD-stable, and those that are AMD-unstable which then require some additional dynamical studies to conclude on their stability. The AMD-stability classification is applied to the 131 multiplanet systems from The Extrasolar Planet Encyclopaedia database for which the orbital elements are sufficiently well known. The AMD-stability coefficients of selected planetary systems are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/605/A72

  15. Earthquake Hazard Mitigation Using a Systems Analysis Approach to Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legg, M.; Eguchi, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    The earthquake hazard mitigation goal is to reduce losses due to severe natural events. The first step is to conduct a Seismic Risk Assessment consisting of 1) hazard estimation, 2) vulnerability analysis, 3) exposure compilation. Seismic hazards include ground deformation, shaking, and inundation. The hazard estimation may be probabilistic or deterministic. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA) is generally applied to site-specific Risk assessments, but may involve large areas as in a National Seismic Hazard Mapping program. Deterministic hazard assessments are needed for geographically distributed exposure such as lifelines (infrastructure), but may be important for large communities. Vulnerability evaluation includes quantification of fragility for construction or components including personnel. Exposure represents the existing or planned construction, facilities, infrastructure, and population in the affected area. Risk (expected loss) is the product of the quantified hazard, vulnerability (damage algorithm), and exposure which may be used to prepare emergency response plans, retrofit existing construction, or use community planning to avoid hazards. The risk estimate provides data needed to acquire earthquake insurance to assist with effective recovery following a severe event. Earthquake Scenarios used in Deterministic Risk Assessments provide detailed information on where hazards may be most severe, what system components are most susceptible to failure, and to evaluate the combined effects of a severe earthquake to the whole system or community. Casualties (injuries and death) have been the primary factor in defining building codes for seismic-resistant construction. Economic losses may be equally significant factors that can influence proactive hazard mitigation. Large urban earthquakes may produce catastrophic losses due to a cascading of effects often missed in PSHA. Economic collapse may ensue if damaged workplaces, disruption of utilities, and

  16. 40-Hz ASSR fusion classification system for observing sleep patterns.

    PubMed

    Khuwaja, Gulzar A; Haghighi, Sahar Javaher; Hatzinakos, Dimitrios

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a fusion-based neural network (NN) classification algorithm for 40-Hz auditory steady state response (ASSR) ensemble averaged signals which were recorded from eight human subjects for observing sleep patterns (wakefulness W0 and deep sleep N3 or slow wave sleep SWS). In SWS, sensitivity to pain is the lowest relative to other sleep stages and arousal needs stronger stimuli. 40-Hz ASSR signals were extracted by averaging over 900 sweeps on a 30-s window. Signals generated during N3 deep sleep state show similarities to those produced when general anesthesia is given to patients during clinical surgery. Our experimental results show that the automatic classification system used identifies sleep states with an accuracy rate of 100% when the training and test signals come from the same subjects while its accuracy is reduced to 97.6%, on average, when signals are used from different training and test subjects. Our results may lead to future classification of consciousness and wakefulness of patients with 40-Hz ASSR for observing the depth and effects of general anesthesia (DGA).

  17. Classification of "multipole" superconductivity in multiorbital systems and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomoto, T.; Hattori, K.; Ikeda, H.

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by a growing interest in multiorbital superconductors with spin-orbit interactions, we perform the group-theoretical classification of various unconventional superconductivity emerging in symmorphic O , D4, and D6 space groups. The generalized Cooper pairs, which we here call "multipole" superconductivity, possess spin-orbital coupled (multipole) degrees of freedom, instead of the conventional spin singlet/triplet in single-orbital systems. From the classification, we obtain the following key consequences, which have never been focused in the long history of research in this field: (1) A superconducting gap function with Γ9⊗Γ9 in D6 possesses nontrivial momentum dependence different from the usual spin-1/2 classification. (2) Unconventional gap structure can be realized in the BCS approximation of purely local (onsite) interactions irrespective of attraction/repulsion. It implies the emergence of an electron-phonon (e-ph) driven unconventional superconductivity. (3) Reflecting symmetry of orbital basis functions there appear not symmetry protected but inevitable line nodes/gap minima, and thus, anisotropic s -wave superconductivity can be naturally explained even in the absence of competing fluctuations.

  18. Colorectal Cancer Classification and Cell Heterogeneity: A Systems Oncology Approach.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Calvo, Moisés; Concha, Ángel; Figueroa, Angélica; Garrido, Federico; Valladares-Ayerbes, Manuel

    2015-06-15

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that manifests through diverse clinical scenarios. During many years, our knowledge about the variability of colorectal tumors was limited to the histopathological analysis from which generic classifications associated with different clinical expectations are derived. However, currently we are beginning to understand that under the intense pathological and clinical variability of these tumors there underlies strong genetic and biological heterogeneity. Thus, with the increasing available information of inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity, the classical pathological approach is being displaced in favor of novel molecular classifications. In the present article, we summarize the most relevant proposals of molecular classifications obtained from the analysis of colorectal tumors using powerful high throughput techniques and devices. We also discuss the role that cancer systems biology may play in the integration and interpretation of the high amount of data generated and the challenges to be addressed in the future development of precision oncology. In addition, we review the current state of implementation of these novel tools in the pathological laboratory and in clinical practice.

  19. Colorectal Cancer Classification and Cell Heterogeneity: A Systems Oncology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Calvo, Moisés; Concha, Ángel; Figueroa, Angélica; Garrido, Federico; Valladares-Ayerbes, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that manifests through diverse clinical scenarios. During many years, our knowledge about the variability of colorectal tumors was limited to the histopathological analysis from which generic classifications associated with different clinical expectations are derived. However, currently we are beginning to understand that under the intense pathological and clinical variability of these tumors there underlies strong genetic and biological heterogeneity. Thus, with the increasing available information of inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity, the classical pathological approach is being displaced in favor of novel molecular classifications. In the present article, we summarize the most relevant proposals of molecular classifications obtained from the analysis of colorectal tumors using powerful high throughput techniques and devices. We also discuss the role that cancer systems biology may play in the integration and interpretation of the high amount of data generated and the challenges to be addressed in the future development of precision oncology. In addition, we review the current state of implementation of these novel tools in the pathological laboratory and in clinical practice. PMID:26084042

  20. Stand-off detection and classification of CBRNe using a Lidar system based on a high power femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izawa, Jun; Yokozawa, Takeshi; Kurata, Takao; Yoshida, Akihiro; Mastunaga, Yasushi; Somekawa, Toshihiro; Eto, Shuzo; Manago, Naohiro; Horisawa, Hideyuki; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Fujii, Takashi; Kuze, Hiroaki

    2014-10-01

    We propose a stand-off system that enables detection and classification of CBRNe (Chemical, Biological, Radioactive, Nuclear aerosol and explosive solids). The system is an integrated lidar using a high-power (terawatt) femtosecond laser. The detection and classification of various hazardous targets with stand-off distances from several hundred meters to a few kilometers are achieved by means of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) techniques. In this work, we report on the technical considerations on the system design of the present hybrid lidar system consisting of a nanosecond laser and a femtosecond laser. Also, we describe the current progress in our laboratory experiments that have demonstrated the stand-off detection and classification of various simulants. For the R and N detection scheme, cesium chloride aerosols have successfully been detected by LIBS using a high-power femtosecond laser. For the B detection scheme, TPF signals of organic aerosols such as riboflavin have clearly been recorded. In addition, a compact femtosecond laser has been employed for the LIBS classification of organic plastics employed as e-simulants.

  1. [Application of ecological classification system in China's digital forestry].

    PubMed

    Tang, Li-Na; Dai, Li-Min

    2008-02-01

    In China's conventional forest management system, there are two types of sub-compartment, i.e., the 2nd- and 3rd-level sub-compartments, which are concurrent but inconsistent in size and boundary locations. Even in the same type of sub-compartments, the inconsistency still existed at different time, which is unbeneficial to the long-term forest management planning by using digital technologies. With the mountainous region in eastern Liaoning Province as a case, this paper established an ecological classification system (ECS), which contained 5 ecological land types (ELTs) and 34 ecological land type phases (ELTPs). Based on the basic technical needs of China's digital forestry, the ELTPs could be used as a fixed sub-compartment system. A compatible forest inventory system was designed then. It was concluded that ecosystem management based on ECS and geospatial information technologies combined with computer models and decision-support systems would be the important component of digital forestry.

  2. Simulations of the Hazard Detection System for Approach Trajectories of the Morpheus Lunar Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, Michael E.; Huertas, Andres; Trawny, Nikolas; Villalpando, Carlos Y.; Martin, Keith E.; Wilson, William; Restrepo, Carolina I.

    2015-01-01

    The Hazard Detection System is part of a suite of sensors and algorithms designed to autonomously land a vehicle on unknown terrain while avoiding any hazards. This paper describes the simulations built to predict the performance of the Hazard Detection System to support flight testing onboard the Morpheus Lander testbed at the Kennedy Space Center. The paper describes a hardware-in-the-loop simulation that was used to predict system performance under nominal operating conditions, and also a Monte Carlo simulation to predict command timing performance bounds under a wide range of varying conditions.

  3. Description and Implementation of the Hazardous Materials Tracking System (TRACKER).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    all the LSNs that indicate a fed particular units can also be identified. Some exam- supply class which contains hazardous matel 4 pies from previous...preservative and sealing compounds • 8040 adhesives 65 Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Equipment and Supplies 81 Containers Packaging, and Packing...9330 plastic fabricated materials The information is required for effective manage- 4 9340 glass fabricated materials ment of two environmental

  4. Fire hazards evaluation for light duty utility arm system

    SciTech Connect

    HUCKFELDT, R.A.

    1999-02-24

    In accordance with DOE Order 5480.7A, Fire Protection, a Fire Hazards Analysis must be performed for all new facilities. LMHC Fire Protection has reviewed and approved the significant documentation leading up to the LDUA operation. This includes, but is not limited to, development criteria and drawings, Engineering Task Plan, Quality Assurance Program Plan, and Safety Program Plan. LMHC has provided an appropriate level of fire protection for this activity as documented.

  5. Computer aided decision support system for cervical cancer classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmadwati, Rahmadwati; Naghdy, Golshah; Ros, Montserrat; Todd, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    Conventional analysis of a cervical histology image, such a pap smear or a biopsy sample, is performed by an expert pathologist manually. This involves inspecting the sample for cellular level abnormalities and determining the spread of the abnormalities. Cancer is graded based on the spread of the abnormal cells. This is a tedious, subjective and time-consuming process with considerable variations in diagnosis between the experts. This paper presents a computer aided decision support system (CADSS) tool to help the pathologists in their examination of the cervical cancer biopsies. The main aim of the proposed CADSS system is to identify abnormalities and quantify cancer grading in a systematic and repeatable manner. The paper proposes three different methods which presents and compares the results using 475 images of cervical biopsies which include normal, three stages of pre cancer, and malignant cases. This paper will explore various components of an effective CADSS; image acquisition, pre-processing, segmentation, feature extraction, classification, grading and disease identification. Cervical histological images are captured using a digital microscope. The images are captured in sufficient resolution to retain enough information for effective classification. Histology images of cervical biopsies consist of three major sections; background, stroma and squamous epithelium. Most diagnostic information are contained within the epithelium region. This paper will present two levels of segmentations; global (macro) and local (micro). At the global level the squamous epithelium is separated from the background and stroma. At the local or cellular level, the nuclei and cytoplasm are segmented for further analysis. Image features that influence the pathologists' decision during the analysis and classification of a cervical biopsy are the nuclei's shape and spread; the ratio of the areas of nuclei and cytoplasm as well as the texture and spread of the abnormalities

  6. A neuromorphic system for object detection and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Deepak; Chen, Yang; Kim, Kyungnam; Cheng, Shinko Y.; Honda, Alexander L.; Zhang, Lei

    2013-05-01

    Unattended object detection, recognition and tracking on unmanned reconnaissance platforms in battlefields and urban spaces are topics of emerging importance. In this paper, we present an unattended object recognition system that automatically detects objects of interest in videos and classifies them into various categories (e.g., person, car, truck, etc.). Our system is inspired by recent findings in visual neuroscience on feed-forward object detection and recognition pipeline and mirrors that via two main neuromorphic modules (1) A front-end detection module that combines form and motion based visual attention to search for and detect "integrated" object percepts as is hypothesized to occur in the human visual pathways; (2) A back-end recognition module that processes only the detected object percepts through a neuromorphic object classification algorithm based on multi-scale convolutional neural networks, which can be efficiently implemented in COTS hardware. Our neuromorphic system was evaluated using a variety of urban area video data collected from both stationary and moving platforms. The data are quite challenging as it includes targets at long ranges, occurring under variable conditions of illuminations and occlusion with high clutter. The experimental results of our system showed excellent detection and classification performance. In addition, the proposed bio-inspired approach is good for hardware implementation due to its low complexity and mapping to off-the-shelf conventional hardware.

  7. Is there a relationship between the WHO hazard classification of organophosphate pesticide and outcomes in suicidal human poisoning with commercial organophosphate formulations?

    PubMed

    Peter, John Victor; Jerobin, Jayakumar; Nair, Anupama; Bennett, Anjana

    2010-06-01

    The WHO classification of pesticides by hazard is based primarily on the acute oral and dermal toxicity to rats. In several Asian countries there is no legislation against the sale of Class I insecticides. We evaluated if there was an association between the WHO hazard Class I, II or III organophosphate compound and outcomes in human poisoning. Two-hundred and fifty-one patients with mean (SD) age of 30.4 (11.8) years, admitted with symptomatic poisoning and treated with atropine and supportive care, were followed up until death or hospital discharge. The admission pseudocholinesterase level of 818.8 (1368) IU/L indicated significant suppression of cholinesterase activity. Class I compounds were ingested by 126, Class II by 113 and Class III by 12 patients. The hospital mortality rate was 16.7%, 5.3% and 0% with Class I, II and III organophosphate compounds, respectively (P=0.01). Ventilatory requirements were higher with Class I compared with Class II poisoning (77.0% vs. 54.9%, P<0.001). Patients with Class I poisoning needed mechanical ventilation for a longer period (10.55 (7.4) vs. 7.0 (5.2) days, P=0.002). The linear relationship between the WHO hazard class and mortality in acute organophosphate poisoning mandates the restriction of the sale of organophosphate compounds associated with higher lethality amongst humans.

  8. Application and classification of fuzzy dynamic system and fuzzy linguistic controller with examples illustrated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Paul P.; Tyan, Ching-Yu

    1993-12-01

    This paper presents the classification of fuzzy dynamic systems and fuzzy linguistic controllers (FLC) into standard types (TYPE 1 through TYPE 7). The need, utility value, and the logic behind this classification are given. The proposed classification is the result of studying many known examples of FLC applications. The impact of this classification to new designs and to the improved performance of classical and modern control systems is an important consideration.

  9. Classification of time series patterns from complex dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schryver, J.C.; Rao, N.

    1998-07-01

    An increasing availability of high-performance computing and data storage media at decreasing cost is making possible the proliferation of large-scale numerical databases and data warehouses. Numeric warehousing enterprises on the order of hundreds of gigabytes to terabytes are a reality in many fields such as finance, retail sales, process systems monitoring, biomedical monitoring, surveillance and transportation. Large-scale databases are becoming more accessible to larger user communities through the internet, web-based applications and database connectivity. Consequently, most researchers now have access to a variety of massive datasets. This trend will probably only continue to grow over the next several years. Unfortunately, the availability of integrated tools to explore, analyze and understand the data warehoused in these archives is lagging far behind the ability to gain access to the same data. In particular, locating and identifying patterns of interest in numerical time series data is an increasingly important problem for which there are few available techniques. Temporal pattern recognition poses many interesting problems in classification, segmentation, prediction, diagnosis and anomaly detection. This research focuses on the problem of classification or characterization of numerical time series data. Highway vehicles and their drivers are examples of complex dynamic systems (CDS) which are being used by transportation agencies for field testing to generate large-scale time series datasets. Tools for effective analysis of numerical time series in databases generated by highway vehicle systems are not yet available, or have not been adapted to the target problem domain. However, analysis tools from similar domains may be adapted to the problem of classification of numerical time series data.

  10. Classification of boundary equilibrium bifurcations in planar Filippov systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendinning, Paul

    2016-01-01

    If a family of piecewise smooth systems depending on a real parameter is defined on two different regions of the plane separated by a switching surface, then a boundary equilibrium bifurcation occurs if a stationary point of one of the systems intersects the switching surface at a critical value of the parameter. We derive the leading order terms of a normal form for boundary equilibrium bifurcations of planar systems. This makes it straightforward to derive a complete classification of the bifurcations that can occur. We are thus able to confirm classic results of Filippov [Differential Equations with Discontinuous Right Hand Sides (Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1988)] using different and more transparent methods, and explain why the `missing' cases of Hogan et al. [Piecewise Smooth Dynamical Systems: The Case of the Missing Boundary Equilibrium Bifurcations (University of Bristol, 2015)] are the only cases omitted in more recent work.

  11. 77 FR 56558 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... regulatory docket at no cost for the first 100 pages and at a cost of $0.15 per page for additional copies... processes; (2) Historical sampling data of the IWTP sludge; (3) Analytical results from four samples for.... Methods must meet Performance Based Measurement System Criteria in which the Data Quality Objectives...

  12. National information network and database system of hazardous waste management in China

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Hongchang

    1996-12-31

    Industries in China generate large volumes of hazardous waste, which makes it essential for the nation to pay more attention to hazardous waste management. National laws and regulations, waste surveys, and manifest tracking and permission systems have been initiated. Some centralized hazardous waste disposal facilities are under construction. China`s National Environmental Protection Agency (NEPA) has also obtained valuable information on hazardous waste management from developed countries. To effectively share this information with local environmental protection bureaus, NEPA developed a national information network and database system for hazardous waste management. This information network will have such functions as information collection, inquiry, and connection. The long-term objective is to establish and develop a national and local hazardous waste management information network. This network will significantly help decision makers and researchers because it will be easy to obtain information (e.g., experiences of developed countries in hazardous waste management) to enhance hazardous waste management in China. The information network consists of five parts: technology consulting, import-export management, regulation inquiry, waste survey, and literature inquiry.

  13. 5 CFR 9701.231 - Conversion of positions and employees to the DHS classification system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification Transitional...

  14. 5 CFR 9701.231 - Conversion of positions and employees to the DHS classification system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification...

  15. 5 CFR 9701.231 - Conversion of positions and employees to the DHS classification system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification...

  16. [A system for predicting the toxicity and hazard of chemical substances, based on the joint use of logistic and numerical methods].

    PubMed

    Kharchevnikova, N V

    2005-01-01

    A version of a logical combinatorial intellectual system (DMS system) has been developed to predict the toxicity and hazards of chemical substances. The system is based on the combined description of the substances, which includes both structural and numerical descriptors, particularly those characterizing the reactivity of compounds or their metabolites. The selection of numerical descriptors is based on the classification of processes of the interaction of the substance with the body in accordance with the key stage of the mechanism responsible for its toxic action. The new version of the DSM system takes into account the fact that the toxicity and hazard of chemicals are frequently determined by their bioactivation. Examples of how to apply the system to the prediction of carcinogenicity are given.

  17. The uncertainty in the radon hazard classification of areas as a function of the number of measurements.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, H; Baumgartner, A; Gruber, V; Kaineder, H; Maringer, F J; Ringer, W; Seidel, C

    2017-07-01

    The administration in many countries demands a classification of areas concerning their radon risk taking into account the requirements of the EU Basic Safety Standards. The wide variation of indoor radon concentrations in an area which is caused by different house construction, different living style and different geological situations introduces large uncertainties for any classification scheme. Therefore, it is of importance to estimate the size of the experimental coefficient of variation (relative standard deviation) of the parameter which is used to classify an area. Besides the time period of measurement it is the number of measurements which strongly influences this uncertainty and it is important to find a compromise between the economic possibilities and the needed confidence level. Some countries do not use pure measurement results for the classification of areas but use derived quantities, usually called radon potential, which should reduce the influence of house construction, living style etc. and should rather represent the geological situation of an area. Here, radon indoor measurements in nearly all homes in three municipalities and its conversion into a radon potential were used to determine the uncertainty of the mean radon potential of an area as a function of the number of investigated homes. It could be shown that the coefficient of variation scales like 1/√n with n the number of measured dwellings. The question how to deal with uncertainties when using a classification scheme for the radon risk is discussed and a general procedure is proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of a wetland classification system devised for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The manuscript is part of an FY14 RAP product: "Functional Assessment of Alaska Peatlands in Cook Inlet Basin: A report to Region 10". This report included this technical information product which is a manuscript that has now been fully revised, reviewed and published in a scientific peer-reviewed publication with open access (doi:10.1007/s11273-016-9504-0). The journal article scientific abstract is as follows: "Several wetland classification schemes are now commonly used to describe wetlands in the contiguous United States to meet local, regional, and national regulatory requirements. However, these established systems have proven to be insufficient to meet the needs of land managers in Alaska. The wetlands of this northern region are predominantly peatlands, which are not adequately treated by the nationally-used systems, which have few, if any, peatland classes. A new system was therefore devised to classify wetlands in the rapidly urbanizing Cook Inlet Basin of southcentral Alaska, USA. The Cook Inlet Classification (CIC) is based on seven geomorphic and six hydrologic components that incorporate the environmental gradients responsible for the primary sources of variation in peatland ecosystems. The geomorphic and hydrologic components have the added advantage of being detectable on remote sensing imagery, which facilitates regional mapping across large tracts of inaccessible terrain. Three different quantitative measures were used to evaluate the robu

  19. Cargo Fire Hazards and Hazard Control for the Offshore Bulk Fuel Systems (OBFS).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    operated and all connections manually made. Key person- nel can communicate via a dedicated voice powered communica- tion line. In the event of an emergency...fault tree analysis was used. 3.1 Fault Tree Methodology Fault trees provide a powerful technique for describing overall system reliability and safety...pumps and close power operated v’alves to reduce the leak isolation time. In this case, shutdown time is reduced by two (2) to two and one-half (2 1

  20. 40 CFR 280.42 - Requirements for hazardous substance UST systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... UST systems. Owners and operators of hazardous substance UST systems must provide release detection that meets the following requirements: (a) Release detection at existing UST systems must meet the... systems must meet the release detection requirements for new systems in paragraph (b) of this section. (b...

  1. 40 CFR 280.42 - Requirements for hazardous substance UST systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... UST systems. Owners and operators of hazardous substance UST systems must provide release detection that meets the following requirements: (a) Release detection at existing UST systems must meet the... systems must meet the release detection requirements for new systems in paragraph (b) of this section. (b...

  2. 40 CFR 280.42 - Requirements for hazardous substance UST systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... UST systems. Owners and operators of hazardous substance UST systems must provide release detection that meets the following requirements: (a) Release detection at existing UST systems must meet the... systems must meet the release detection requirements for new systems in paragraph (b) of this section. (b...

  3. 40 CFR 280.42 - Requirements for hazardous substance UST systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... UST systems. Owners and operators of hazardous substance UST systems must provide release detection that meets the following requirements: (a) Release detection at existing UST systems must meet the... systems must meet the release detection requirements for new systems in paragraph (b) of this section. (b...

  4. An updated histological classification system for multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Tanja; Ludwin, Samuel; Prat, Alexandre; Antel, Jack; Brück, Wolfgang; Lassmann, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex and heterogeneous, most likely autoimmune, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Although a number of histological classification systems for CNS lesions have been used by different groups in recent years, no uniform classification exists. In this paper, we propose a simple and unifying classification of MS lesions incorporating many elements of earlier histological systems that aims to provide guidelines for neuropathologists and researchers studying MS lesions to allow for better comparison of different studies performed with MS tissue, and to aid in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease. Based on the presence/absence and distribution of macrophages/microglia (inflammatory activity) and the presence/absence of ongoing demyelination (demyelinating activity), we suggest differentiating between active, mixed active/inactive, and inactive lesions with or without ongoing demyelination. Active lesions are characterized by macrophages/microglia throughout the lesion area, whereas mixed active/inactive lesions have a hypocellular lesion center with macrophages/microglia limited to the lesion border. Inactive lesions are almost completely lacking macrophages/microglia. Active and mixed active/inactive lesions can be further subdivided into lesions with ongoing myelin destruction (demyelinating lesions) and lesions in which the destruction of myelin has ceased, but macrophages are still present (post-demyelinating lesions). This distinction is based on the presence or absence of myelin degradation products within the cytoplasm of macrophages/microglia. For this classification of MS lesions, identification of myelin with histological stains [such as luxol fast blue-PAS] or by immunohistochemistry using antibodies against myelin basic-protein (MBP) or proteolipid-protein (PLP), as well as, detection of macrophages/microglia by, e.g., anti-CD68 is sufficient. Active and demyelinating lesions may be further

  5. Extensions to the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS)

    PubMed Central

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Fourakis, Marios; Hall, Sheryl D.; Karlsson, Heather B.; Lohmeier, Heather L.; McSweeny, Jane L.; Potter, Nancy L.; Scheer-Cohen, Alison R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Tilkens, Christie M.; Wilson, David L.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes three extensions to a classification system for pediatric speech sound disorders termed the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS). Part I describes a classification extension to the SDCS to differentiate motor speech disorders from speech delay and to differentiate among three subtypes of motor speech disorders. Part II describes the Madison Speech Assessment Protocol (MSAP), an approximately two-hour battery of 25 measures that includes 15 speech tests and tasks. Part III describes the Competence, Precision, and Stability Analytics (CPSA) framework, a current set of approximately 90 perceptual- and acoustic-based indices of speech, prosody, and voice used to quantify and classify subtypes of Speech Sound Disorders (SSD). A companion paper, Shriberg, Fourakis, et al. (2010) provides reliability estimates for the perceptual and acoustic data reduction methods used in the SDCS. The agreement estimates in the companion paper support the reliability of SDCS methods and illustrate the complementary roles of perceptual and acoustic methods in diagnostic analyses of SSD of unknown origin. Examples of research using the extensions to the SDCS described in the present report include diagnostic findings for a sample of youth with motor speech disorders associated with galactosemia (Shriberg, Potter, & Strand, 2010) and a test of the hypothesis of apraxia of speech in a group of children with autism spectrum disorders (Shriberg, Paul, Black, & van Santen, 2010). All SDCS methods and reference databases running in the PEPPER (Programs to Examine Phonetic and Phonologic Evaluation Records; [Shriberg, Allen, McSweeny, & Wilson, 2001]) environment will be disseminated without cost when complete. PMID:20831378

  6. The reliability and validity of the Saliba Postural Classification System.

    PubMed

    Collins, Cristiana Kahl; Johnson, Vicky Saliba; Godwin, Ellen M; Pappas, Evangelos

    2016-07-01

    To determine the reliability and validity of the Saliba Postural Classification System (SPCS). Two physical therapists classified pictures of 100 volunteer participants standing in their habitual posture for inter and intra-tester reliability. For validity, 54 participants stood on a force plate in a habitual and a corrected posture, while a vertical force was applied through the shoulders until the clinician felt a postural give. Data were extracted at the time the give was felt and at a time in the corrected posture that matched the peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) in the habitual posture. Inter-tester reliability demonstrated 75% agreement with a Kappa = 0.64 (95% CI = 0.524-0.756, SE = 0.059). Intra-tester reliability demonstrated 87% agreement with a Kappa = 0.8, (95% CI = 0.702-0.898, SE = 0.05) and 80% agreement with a Kappa = 0.706, (95% CI = 0.594-0818, SE = 0.057). The examiner applied a significantly higher (p < 0.001) peak vertical force in the corrected posture prior to a postural give when compared to the habitual posture. Within the corrected posture, the %VGRF was higher when the test was ongoing vs. when a postural give was felt (p < 0.001). The %VGRF was not different between the two postures when comparing the peaks (p = 0.214). The SPCS has substantial agreement for inter- and intra-tester reliability and is largely a valid postural classification system as determined by the larger vertical forces in the corrected postures. Further studies on the correlation between the SPCS and diagnostic classifications are indicated.

  7. Validation of the determinant-based classification and revision of the Atlanta classification systems for acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Piedra, Nelly G; Moya-Hoyo, Neftalí; Rey-Riveiro, Mónica; Gil, Santiago; Sempere, Laura; Martínez, Juan; Lluís, Félix; Sánchez-Payá, José; de-Madaria, Enrique

    2014-02-01

    Two new classification systems for the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) have been proposed, the determinant-based classification (DBC) and a revision of the Atlanta classification (RAC). Our aim was to validate and compare these classification systems. We analyzed data from adult patients with AP (543 episodes of AP in 459 patients) who were admitted to Hospital General Universitario de Alicante from December 2007 to February 2013. Imaging results were reviewed, and the classification systems were validated and compared in terms of outcomes. Pancreatic necrosis was present in 66 of the patients (12%), peripancreatic necrosis in 109 (20%), walled-off necrosis in 61 (11%), acute peripancreatic fluid collections in 98 (18%), and pseudocysts in 19 (4%). Transient and persistent organ failures were present in 31 patients (6%) and 21 patients (4%), respectively. Sixteen patients (3%) died. On the basis of the DBC, 386 (71%), 131 (24%), 23 (4%), and 3 (0.6%) patients were determined to have mild, moderate, severe, or critical AP, respectively. On the basis of the RAC, 363 patients (67%), 160 patients (30%), and 20 patients (4%) were determined to have mild, moderately severe, or severe AP, respectively. The different categories of severity for each classification system were associated with statistically significant and clinically relevant differences in length of hospital stay, need for admission to the intensive care unit, nutritional support, invasive treatment, and in-hospital mortality. In comparing similar categories between the classification systems, no significant differences were found. The DBC and the RAC accurately classify the severity of AP in subgroups of patients. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tank waste remediation system FSAR hazard identification/facility configuration verification report

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, D.P., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-01

    This document provides the results of the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report (TWRS FSAR) hazards identification/facility configuration activities undertaken from the period of March 7, 1996 to May 31, 1996. The purpose of this activity was to provide an independent overview of the TWRS facility specific hazards and configurations that were used in support of the TWRS FSAR hazards and accident analysis development. It was based on a review of existing published documentation and field inspections. The objective of the verification effort was to provide a `snap shot` in time of the existing TWRS facility hazards and configurations and will be used to support hazards and accident analysis activities.

  9. The evolution of a health hazard assessment database management system for military weapons, equipment, and materiel.

    PubMed

    Murnyak, George R; Spencer, Clark O; Chaney, Ann E; Roberts, Welford C

    2002-04-01

    During the 1970s, the Army health hazard assessment (HHA) process developed as a medical program to minimize hazards in military materiel during the development process. The HHA Program characterizes health hazards that soldiers and civilians may encounter as they interact with military weapons and equipment. Thus, it is a resource for medical planners and advisors to use that can identify and estimate potential hazards that soldiers may encounter as they train and conduct missions. The U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine administers the program, which is integrated with the Army's Manpower and Personnel Integration program. As the HHA Program has matured, an electronic database has been developed to record and monitor the health hazards associated with military equipment and systems. The current database tracks the results of HHAs and provides reporting designed to assist the HHA Program manager in daily activities.

  10. Changing tides: increasing evidence to embrace a patient classification system.

    PubMed

    Malloch, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    The effective use of a patient classification system (PCS) in a way that provides value to all health care organizations has yet to be realized given the challenging developmental pathway of these systems. As the science and technology of workforce management emerges along with evidence to support the relationships between nurse work and patient care needs, it is no longer appropriate to rely on systems that provide aggregated and minimal data to address the need for safer patient care and retention of nurses. Specificity about patient care needs in a valid and reliable PCS is essential on our pathway to improved resource utilization, improved decision making, integration of nurse cognitive and knowledge work, and management of variances from planned resource use. Advancements with technology, the ability to create and monitor equitable nurse-patient assignments, conceptual clarity, evidence, regulatory requirements, and professional role development point to a new receptiveness for PCSs.

  11. A Novel System for the Surgical Staging of Primary High-grade Osteosarcoma: The Birmingham Classification.

    PubMed

    Jeys, Lee M; Thorne, Chris J; Parry, Michael; Gaston, Czar Louie L; Sumathi, Vaiyapuri P; Grimer, J Robert

    2017-03-01

    Chemotherapy response and surgical margins have been shown to be associated with the risk of local recurrence in patients with osteosarcoma. However, existing surgical staging systems fail to reflect the response to chemotherapy or define an appropriate safe metric distance from the tumor that will allow complete excision and closely predict the chance of disease recurrence. We therefore sought to review a group of patients with primary high-grade osteosarcoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgical resection and analyzed margins and chemotherapy response in terms of local recurrence. (1) What predictor or combination of predictors available to the clinician can be assessed that more reliably predict the likelihood of local recurrence? (2) Can we determine a better predictor of local recurrence-free survival than the currently applied system of surgical margins? (3) Can we determine a better predictor of overall survival than the currently applied system of surgical margins? This retrospective study included all patients with high-grade conventional osteosarcomas without metastasis at diagnosis treated at one center between 1997 and 2012 with preoperative chemotherapy followed by resection or amputation of the primary tumor who were younger than age 50 years with minimum 24-month followup for those still alive. A total of 389 participants matched the inclusion criteria. Univariate log-rank test and multivariate Cox analyses were undertaken to identify predictors of local recurrence-free survival (LRFS). The Birmingham classification was devised on the basis of two stems: the response to chemotherapy (good response = ≥ 90% necrosis; poor response = < 90% necrosis) and margins (< 2 mm or ≥ 2 mm). The 5-year overall survival rate was 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61%-71%) and 47 patients developed local recurrence (12%). Intralesional margins (hazard ratio [HR], 9.9; 95% CI, 1.2-82; p = 0.03 versus radical margin HR, 1) and a poor response to

  12. Decision-support systems for natural-hazards and land-management issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinitz, Laura; Forney, William; Byrd, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Scientists at the USGS Western Geographic Science Center are developing decision-support systems (DSSs) for natural-hazards and land-management issues. DSSs are interactive computer-based tools that use data and models to help identify and solve problems. These systems can provide crucial support to policymakers, planners, and communities for making better decisions about long-term natural hazards mitigation and land-use planning.

  13. Derivation and Validation of Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Classification Criteria for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Michelle; Orbai, Ana-Maria; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Gordon, Caroline; Merrill, Joan T.; Fortin, Paul R.; Bruce, Ian N.; Isenberg, David; Wallace, Daniel J.; Nived, Ola; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Hanly, John G.; Sanchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Clarke, Ann; Aranow, Cynthia; Manzi, Susan; Urowitz, Murray; Gladman, Dafna; Kalunian, Kenneth; Costner, Melissa; Werth, Victoria P.; Zoma, Asad; Bernatsky, Sasha; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Khamashta, Munther A.; Jacobsen, Soren; Buyon, Jill P.; Maddison, Peter; Dooley, Mary Anne; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F.; Ginzler, Ellen; Stoll, Thomas; Peschken, Christine; Jorizzo, Joseph L.; Callen, Jeffrey P.; Lim, S. Sam; Fessler, Barri J.; Inanc, Murat; Kamen, Diane L.; Rahman, Anisur; Steinsson, Kristjan; Franks, Andrew G.; Sigler, Lisa; Hameed, Suhail; Fang, Hong; Pham, Ngoc; Brey, Robin; Weisman, Michael H.; McGwin, Gerald; Magder, Laurence S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The Systemic Lupus Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) revised and validated the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) SLE classification criteria in order to improve clinical relevance, meet stringent methodology requirements and incorporate new knowledge in SLE immunology. Methods The classification criteria were derived from a set of 702 expert-rated patient scenarios. Recursive partitioning was used to derive an initial rule that was simplified and refined based on SLICC physician consensus. SLICC validated the classification criteria in a new validation sample of 690 SLE patients and controls. Results Seventeen criteria were identified. The SLICC criteria for SLE classification requires: 1) Fulfillment of at least four criteria, with at least one clinical criterion AND one immunologic criterion OR 2) Lupus nephritis as the sole clinical criterion in the presence of ANA or anti-dsDNA antibodies. In the derivation set, the SLICC classification criteria resulted in fewer misclassifications than the current ACR classification criteria (49 versus 70, p=0.0082), had greater sensitivity (94% versus 86%, p<0.0001) and equal specificity (92% versus 93%, p=0.39). In the validation set, the SLICC Classification criteria resulted in fewer misclassifications (62 versus 74, p=0.24), had greater sensitivity (97% versus 83%, p<0.0001) but less specificity (84% versus 96%, p<0.0001). Conclusions The new SLICC classification criteria performed well on a large set of patient scenarios rated by experts. They require that at least one clinical criterion and one immunologic criterion be present for a classification of SLE. Biopsy confirmed nephritis compatible with lupus (in the presence of SLE autoantibodies) is sufficient for classification. PMID:22553077

  14. Gender and cultural issues in psychiatric nosological classification systems.

    PubMed

    van de Water, Tanya; Suliman, Sharain; Seedat, Soraya

    2016-08-01

    Much has changed since the two dominant mental health nosological systems, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), were first published in 1900 and 1952, respectively. Despite numerous modifications to stay up to date with scientific and cultural changes (eg, exclusion of homosexuality as a disorder) and to improve the cultural sensitivity of psychiatric diagnoses, the ICD and DSM have only recently renewed attempts at harmonization. Previous nosological iterations demonstrate the oscillation in the importance placed on the biological focus, highlighting the tension between a gender- and culture-free nosology (solely biological) and a contextually relevant understanding of mental illness. In light of the release of the DSM 5, future nosological systems, such as the ICD 11, scheduled for release in 2017, and the Research Development Criteria (RDoC), can learn from history and apply critiques. This article aims to critically consider gender and culture in previous editions of the ICD and DSM to inform forthcoming classifications.

  15. A data-stream classification system for investigating terrorist threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Alexia; Dettman, Joshua; Gottschalk, Jeffrey; Kotson, Michael; Vuksani, Era; Yu, Tamara

    2016-05-01

    The role of cyber forensics in criminal investigations has greatly increased in recent years due to the wealth of data that is collected and available to investigators. Physical forensics has also experienced a data volume and fidelity revolution due to advances in methods for DNA and trace evidence analysis. Key to extracting insight is the ability to correlate across multi-modal data, which depends critically on identifying a touch-point connecting the separate data streams. Separate data sources may be connected because they refer to the same individual, entity or event. In this paper we present a data source classification system tailored to facilitate the investigation of potential terrorist activity. This taxonomy is structured to illuminate the defining characteristics of a particular terrorist effort and designed to guide reporting to decision makers that is complete, concise, and evidence-based. The classification system has been validated and empirically utilized in the forensic analysis of a simulated terrorist activity. Next-generation analysts can use this schema to label and correlate across existing data streams, assess which critical information may be missing from the data, and identify options for collecting additional data streams to fill information gaps.

  16. Quantifying the effect of early warning systems for mitigating risks from alpine hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Daniel; Sättele, Martina; Bründl, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Early warning systems (EWS) are increasingly applied as flexible and non-intrusive measures for mitigating risks from alpine hazards. They are typically planed and installed in an ad-hoc manner and their effectiveness is not quantified, which is in contrast to structural risk mitigation measures. The effect of an EWS on the risk depends on human decision makers: experts interpret the signals from EWS, authorities decide on intervention measures and the public responds to the warnings. This interaction of the EWS with humans makes the quantification of their effectiveness challenging. Nevertheless, such a quantification is an important step in understanding, improving and justifying the use of EWS. We systematically discuss and demonstrate the factors that influence EWS effectiveness for alpine hazards, and present approaches and tools for analysing them. These include Bayesian network models, which are a powerful tool for an integral probabilistic assessment. The theory is illustrated through applications of warning systems for debris flow and rockfall hazards. References: Sättele M., Bründl M., Straub D. (in print). Quantifying the effectiveness of early warning systems for natural hazards. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. Sättele M., Bründl M., Straub D. (2015). Reliability and Effectiveness of Warning Systems for Natural Hazards: Concepts and Application to Debris Flow Warning. Reliability Engineering & System Safety, 142: 192-202

  17. Controlling Hazardous Releases while Protecting Passengers in Civil Infrastructure Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimer, Sara P.; Katopodes, Nikolaos D.

    2015-11-01

    The threat of accidental or deliberate toxic chemicals released into public spaces is a significant concern to public safety, and the real-time detection and mitigation of such hazardous contaminants has the potential to minimize harm and save lives. Furthermore, the safe evacuation of occupants during such a catastrophe is of utmost importance. This research develops a comprehensive means to address such scenarios, through both the sensing and control of contaminants, and the modeling of and potential communication to occupants as they evacuate. A computational fluid dynamics model is developed of a simplified public space characterized by a long conduit (e.g. airport terminal) with unidirectional ambient flow that is capable of detecting and mitigating the hazardous contaminant (via boundary ports) over several time horizons using model predictive control optimization. Additionally, a physical prototype is built to test the real-time feasibility of this computational flow control model. The prototype is a blower wind-tunnel with an elongated test section with the capability of sensing (via digital camera) an injected `contaminant' (propylene glycol smoke), and then mitigating that contaminant using actuators (compressed air operated vacuum nozzles) which are operated by a set of pressure regulators and a programmable controller. Finally, an agent-based model is developed to simulate ``agents'' (i.e. building occupants) as they evacuate a public space, and is coupled with the computational flow control model such that agents must interact with a dynamic, threatening environment. NSF-CMMI #0856438.

  18. A Model Assessment and Classification System for Men and Women in Correctional Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellervik, Lowell W.; And Others

    The report describes a manpower assessment and classification system for criminal offenders directed towards making practical training and job classification decisions. The model is not concerned with custody classifications except as they affect occupational/training possibilities. The model combines traditional procedures of vocational…

  19. Toward a classification of semidegenerate 3D superintegrable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Ruiz, M. A.; Miller, Willard, Jr.

    2017-03-01

    Superintegrable systems of 2nd order in 3 dimensions with exactly 3-parameter potentials are intriguing objects. Next to the nondegenerate 4-parameter potential systems they admit the maximum number of symmetry operators, but their symmetry algebras do not close under commutation and not enough is known about their structure to give a complete classification. Some examples are known for which the 3-parameter system can be extended to a 4th order superintegrable system with a 4-parameter potential and 6 linearly independent symmetry generators. In this paper we use Bôcher contractions of the conformal Lie algebra so≤ft(5,{C}\\right) to itself to generate a large family of 3-parameter systems with 4th order extensions, on a variety of manifolds, all from Bôcher contractions of a single ‘generic’ system on the 3-sphere. We give a contraction scheme relating these systems. The results have myriad applications for finding explicit solutions for both quantum and classical systems.

  20. 40 CFR 280.42 - Requirements for hazardous substance UST systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... that meets the following requirements: (a) Release detection at existing UST systems must meet the... systems must meet the release detection requirements for new systems in paragraph (b) of this section. (b) Release detection at new hazardous substance UST systems must meet the following requirements:...

  1. Classification of attractors for systems of identical coupled Kuramoto oscillators.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Jan R; Mirollo, Renato

    2014-03-01

    We present a complete classification of attractors for networks of coupled identical Kuramoto oscillators. In such networks, each oscillator is driven by the same first-order trigonometric function, with coefficients given by symmetric functions of the entire oscillator ensemble. For [Formula: see text] oscillators, there are four possible types of attractors: completely synchronized fixed points or limit cycles, and fixed points or limit cycles where all but one of the oscillators are synchronized. The case N = 3 is exceptional; systems of three identical Kuramoto oscillators can also posses attracting fixed points or limit cycles with all three oscillators out of sync, as well as chaotic attractors. Our results rely heavily on the invariance of the flow for such systems under the action of the three-dimensional group of Möbius transformations, which preserve the unit disc, and the analysis of the possible limiting configurations for this group action.

  2. Classification of attractors for systems of identical coupled Kuramoto oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Engelbrecht, Jan R.; Mirollo, Renato

    2014-03-15

    We present a complete classification of attractors for networks of coupled identical Kuramoto oscillators. In such networks, each oscillator is driven by the same first-order trigonometric function, with coefficients given by symmetric functions of the entire oscillator ensemble. For N≠3 oscillators, there are four possible types of attractors: completely synchronized fixed points or limit cycles, and fixed points or limit cycles where all but one of the oscillators are synchronized. The case N = 3 is exceptional; systems of three identical Kuramoto oscillators can also posses attracting fixed points or limit cycles with all three oscillators out of sync, as well as chaotic attractors. Our results rely heavily on the invariance of the flow for such systems under the action of the three-dimensional group of Möbius transformations, which preserve the unit disc, and the analysis of the possible limiting configurations for this group action.

  3. Pathohistological classification systems in gastric cancer: Diagnostic relevance and prognostic value

    PubMed Central

    Berlth, Felix; Bollschweiler, Elfriede; Drebber, Uta; Hoelscher, Arnulf H; Moenig, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Several pathohistological classification systems exist for the diagnosis of gastric cancer. Many studies have investigated the correlation between the pathohistological characteristics in gastric cancer and patient characteristics, disease specific criteria and overall outcome. It is still controversial as to which classification system imparts the most reliable information, and therefore, the choice of system may vary in clinical routine. In addition to the most common classification systems, such as the Laurén and the World Health Organization (WHO) classifications, other authors have tried to characterize and classify gastric cancer based on the microscopic morphology and in reference to the clinical outcome of the patients. In more than 50 years of systematic classification of the pathohistological characteristics of gastric cancer, there is no sole classification system that is consistently used worldwide in diagnostics and research. However, several national guidelines for the treatment of gastric cancer refer to the Laurén or the WHO classifications regarding therapeutic decision-making, which underlines the importance of a reliable classification system for gastric cancer. The latest results from gastric cancer studies indicate that it might be useful to integrate DNA- and RNA-based features of gastric cancer into the classification systems to establish prognostic relevance. This article reviews the diagnostic relevance and the prognostic value of different pathohistological classification systems in gastric cancer. PMID:24914328

  4. Patterns of grease burn injury: development of a classification system.

    PubMed

    Klein, Matthew B; Gibran, Nicole S; Emerson, Dominic; Sullivan, Stephen R; Honari, Shari; Engrav, Loren H; Heimbach, David M

    2005-09-01

    Grease burns occur commonly in the home during food preparation. It has been our observation that grease burns follow a particular pattern of injury. The purpose of this study was to review our institutional experience in the management of these burns to develop a classification scheme. We performed a retrospective review of patients admitted to our burn center with grease burns. Subjects were identified through our database and their charts were reviewed with particular attention to burn distribution, TBSA and need for grafting. We excluded workplace burns and children under the age of six. A total of 249 patients who fit the above criteria were admitted with grease burns to our burn center from 1993 to 2003. The sequence of events leading to burn and its distribution followed a consistent pattern. The majority of patients (86%) had an isolated upper extremity burn or upper extremity burn in combination with a face, trunk or lower extremity burn. Forty percent of patients required at least one excision and grafting procedure. Grease burns associated with cooking at home follow predictable patterns of injury. Based on these patterns we proposed a classification system for domestic grease burns.

  5. Multiple classifier system for remote sensing image classification: a review.

    PubMed

    Du, Peijun; Xia, Junshi; Zhang, Wei; Tan, Kun; Liu, Yi; Liu, Sicong

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, multiple classifier system (MCS) or classifier ensemble has shown great potential to improve the accuracy and reliability of remote sensing image classification. Although there are lots of literatures covering the MCS approaches, there is a lack of a comprehensive literature review which presents an overall architecture of the basic principles and trends behind the design of remote sensing classifier ensemble. Therefore, in order to give a reference point for MCS approaches, this paper attempts to explicitly review the remote sensing implementations of MCS and proposes some modified approaches. The effectiveness of existing and improved algorithms are analyzed and evaluated by multi-source remotely sensed images, including high spatial resolution image (QuickBird), hyperspectral image (OMISII) and multi-spectral image (Landsat ETM+). Experimental results demonstrate that MCS can effectively improve the accuracy and stability of remote sensing image classification, and diversity measures play an active role for the combination of multiple classifiers. Furthermore, this survey provides a roadmap to guide future research, algorithm enhancement and facilitate knowledge accumulation of MCS in remote sensing community.

  6. Spectral classification of stars likely to have planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.; Minniti, D.

    Since all the techniques used for the detection of extrasolar planets are indirect, the characterization of the detected planets is not always quite certain. Up to the present, around 150 planets have been discovered orbiting other stars. The estimation of planetary masses and radii depends on the physical parameters of the mother stars. Therefore, the more those star's parameters are defined, the more accurate the estimates of the masses and radii of their related planets will be. It is essential to count on a reliable spectral classification of these stars in order to estimate the main astrophysical parameters of the stars that have orbiting planets. In this work, we determine the spectral type and luminosity class of 52 bright stars which are likely to have planetary systems. The spectral classification was performed by comparing low resolution spectra obtained at CASLEO (Argentina) with template spectra taken from the Silva & Cornell (1992) library. 73% of the observed stars proved to be of G spectral type, whereas 94% turned out to be main sequence stars or very close to main sequence.

  7. The Comprehensive AOCMF Classification System: Mandible Fractures- Level 2 Tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Audigé, Laurent; Kunz, Christoph; Rudderman, Randal; Buitrago-Téllez, Carlos H.; Frodel, John; Prein, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    This tutorial outlines the details of the AOCMF image-based classification system for fractures of the mandible at the precision level 2 allowing description of their topographical distribution. A short introduction about the anatomy is made. Mandibular fractures are classified by the anatomic regions involved. For this purpose, the mandible is delineated into an array of nine regions identified by letters: the symphysis/parasymphysis region anteriorly, two body regions on each lateral side, combined angle and ascending ramus regions, and finally the condylar and coronoid processes. A precise definition of the demarcation lines between these regions is given for the unambiguous allocation of fractures. Four transition zones allow an accurate topographic assignment if fractures end up in or run across the borders of anatomic regions. These zones are defined between angle/ramus and body, and between body and symphysis/parasymphysis. A fracture is classified as “confined” as long as it is located within a region, in contrast to a fracture being “nonconfined” when it extents to an adjoining region. Illustrations and case examples of mandible fractures are presented to become familiar with the classification procedure in daily routine. PMID:25489388

  8. Multiple Classifier System for Remote Sensing Image Classification: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Du, Peijun; Xia, Junshi; Zhang, Wei; Tan, Kun; Liu, Yi; Liu, Sicong

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, multiple classifier system (MCS) or classifier ensemble has shown great potential to improve the accuracy and reliability of remote sensing image classification. Although there are lots of literatures covering the MCS approaches, there is a lack of a comprehensive literature review which presents an overall architecture of the basic principles and trends behind the design of remote sensing classifier ensemble. Therefore, in order to give a reference point for MCS approaches, this paper attempts to explicitly review the remote sensing implementations of MCS and proposes some modified approaches. The effectiveness of existing and improved algorithms are analyzed and evaluated by multi-source remotely sensed images, including high spatial resolution image (QuickBird), hyperspectral image (OMISII) and multi-spectral image (Landsat ETM+). Experimental results demonstrate that MCS can effectively improve the accuracy and stability of remote sensing image classification, and diversity measures play an active role for the combination of multiple classifiers. Furthermore, this survey provides a roadmap to guide future research, algorithm enhancement and facilitate knowledge accumulation of MCS in remote sensing community. PMID:22666057

  9. A space-based classification system for RF transients

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Call, D.; Johnson, S.; Payne, T.; Ford, W.; Spencer, K.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Baumgart, C.

    1993-12-01

    The FORTE (Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events) small satellite is scheduled for launch in mid 1995. The mission is to measure and classify VHF (30--300 MHz) electromagnetic pulses, primarily due to lightning, within a high noise environment dominated by continuous wave carriers such as TV and FM stations. The FORTE Event Classifier will use specialized hardware to implement signal processing and neural network algorithms that perform onboard classification of RF transients and carriers. Lightning events will also be characterized with optical data telemetered to the ground. A primary mission science goal is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the correlation between the optical flash and the VHF emissions from lightning. By combining FORTE measurements with ground measurements and/or active transmitters, other science issues can be addressed. Examples include the correlation of global precipitation rates with lightning flash rates and location, the effects of large scale structures within the ionosphere (such as traveling ionospheric disturbances and horizontal gradients in the total electron content) on the propagation of broad bandwidth RF signals, and various areas of lightning physics. Event classification is a key feature of the FORTE mission. Neural networks are promising candidates for this application. The authors describe the proposed FORTE Event Classifier flight system, which consists of a commercially available digital signal processing board and a custom board, and discuss work on signal processing and neural network algorithms.

  10. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Asynchronous data-driven classification of weapon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xin; Mukherjee, Kushal; Gupta, Shalabh; Ray, Asok; Phoha, Shashi; Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2009-12-01

    This communication addresses real-time weapon classification by analysis of asynchronous acoustic data, collected from microphones on a sensor network. The weapon classification algorithm consists of two parts: (i) feature extraction from time-series data using symbolic dynamic filtering (SDF), and (ii) pattern classification based on the extracted features using the language measure (LM) and support vector machine (SVM). The proposed algorithm has been tested on field data, generated by firing of two types of rifles. The results of analysis demonstrate high accuracy and fast execution of the pattern classification algorithm with low memory requirements. Potential applications include simultaneous shooter localization and weapon classification with soldier-wearable networked sensors.

  11. An expert system for the on-scene management of hazardous materials incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilakis, G.; Zografos, K.G.

    1995-12-31

    Every year a substantial amount of hazardous materials is transported internationally. The danger associated with accidental release of hazardous materials is substantial and sometimes catastrophic for the humans and the environment. The magnitude of the consequences of accidents involving hazardous materials shipments depends to a great extent on the effectiveness of the emergency response units dispatched at the scene of an incident. The objective of this paper is to develop an expert system for the effective on-scene management of hazardous materials incidents. In particular, the developed KBES (Knowledge Based Expert System) aims to support the central dispatcher, who coordinates all the agencies involved in the incident management response, determine appropriate removal and clearance actions, dispatch and coordinate the required crew.

  12. A structural classification of candidate oscillatory and multistationary biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Blanchini, Franco; Franco, Elisa; Giordano, Giulia

    2014-10-01

    Molecular systems are uncertain: The variability of reaction parameters and the presence of unknown interactions can weaken the predictive capacity of solid mathematical models. However, strong conclusions on the admissible dynamic behaviors of a model can often be achieved without detailed knowledge of its specific parameters. In systems with a sign-definite Jacobian, for instance, cycle-based criteria related to the famous Thomas' conjectures have been largely used to characterize oscillatory and multistationary dynamic outcomes. We build on the rich literature focused on the identification of potential oscillatory and multistationary behaviors using parameter-free criteria. We propose a classification for sign-definite non-autocatalytic biochemical networks, which summarizes several existing results in the literature. We call weak (strong) candidate oscillators systems which can possibly (exclusively) transition to instability due to the presence of a complex pair of eigenvalues, while we call weak (strong) candidate multistationary systems those which can possibly (exclusively) transition to instability due to the presence of a real eigenvalue. For each category, we provide a characterization based on the exclusive or simultaneous presence of positive and negative cycles in the associated sign graph. Most realistic examples of biochemical networks fall in the gray area of systems in which both positive and negative cycles are present: Therefore, both oscillatory and bistable behaviors are in principle possible. However, many canonical example circuits exhibiting oscillations or bistability fall in the categories of strong candidate oscillators/multistationary systems, in agreement with our results.

  13. Inert gas spraying device aids in repair of hazardous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teleha, S.

    1965-01-01

    Inert gas spraying device aids in safely making mechanical repairs to a cryogenic fluid system without prior emptying of the system. This method can be applied to any natural or bottled gas system and with modifications to gasoline transports.

  14. Probabilistic Approaches for Multi-Hazard Risk Assessment of Structures and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwag, Shinyoung

    Performance assessment of structures, systems, and components for multi-hazard scenarios has received significant attention in recent years. However, the concept of multi-hazard analysis is quite broad in nature and the focus of existing literature varies across a wide range of problems. In some cases, such studies focus on hazards that either occur simultaneously or are closely correlated with each other. For example, seismically induced flooding or seismically induced fires. In other cases, multi-hazard studies relate to hazards that are not dependent or correlated but have strong likelihood of occurrence at different times during the lifetime of a structure. The current approaches for risk assessment need enhancement to account for multi-hazard risks. It must be able to account for uncertainty propagation in a systems-level analysis, consider correlation among events or failure modes, and allow integration of newly available information from continually evolving simulation models, experimental observations, and field measurements. This dissertation presents a detailed study that proposes enhancements by incorporating Bayesian networks and Bayesian updating within a performance-based probabilistic framework. The performance-based framework allows propagation of risk as well as uncertainties in the risk estimates within a systems analysis. Unlike conventional risk assessment techniques such as a fault-tree analysis, a Bayesian network can account for statistical dependencies and correlations among events/hazards. The proposed approach is extended to develop a risk-informed framework for quantitative validation and verification of high fidelity system-level simulation tools. Validation of such simulations can be quite formidable within the context of a multi-hazard risk assessment in nuclear power plants. The efficiency of this approach lies in identification of critical events, components, and systems that contribute to the overall risk. Validation of any event or

  15. House mental classification system of denture patients: the contribution of Milus M House.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    Although Dr Milus M. House is credited with devising a method to describe the mental classification of complete denture patients, a review of the literature raises questions regarding the origin of the system. Dr Ewell Neil should have received credit for developing the classification system attributed to Dr House. The contribution of Dr House appears to be a detailed expansion of the classification and the subsequent popularization of the system.

  16. 29 CFR 1915.506 - Hazards of fixed extinguishing systems on board vessels and vessel sections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recognize: (i) Systems' discharge and evacuation alarms and the appropriate escape routes; and (ii) Hazards associated with the extinguishing systems and agents including the dangers of disturbing system components and equipment such as piping, cables, linkages, detection devices, activation devices, and...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.506 - Hazards of fixed extinguishing systems on board vessels and vessel sections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recognize: (i) Systems' discharge and evacuation alarms and the appropriate escape routes; and (ii) Hazards associated with the extinguishing systems and agents including the dangers of disturbing system components and equipment such as piping, cables, linkages, detection devices, activation devices, and...

  18. 29 CFR 1915.506 - Hazards of fixed extinguishing systems on board vessels and vessel sections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... recognize: (i) Systems' discharge and evacuation alarms and the appropriate escape routes; and (ii) Hazards associated with the extinguishing systems and agents including the dangers of disturbing system components and equipment such as piping, cables, linkages, detection devices, activation devices, and...

  19. 29 CFR 1915.506 - Hazards of fixed extinguishing systems on board vessels and vessel sections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... recognize: (i) Systems' discharge and evacuation alarms and the appropriate escape routes; and (ii) Hazards associated with the extinguishing systems and agents including the dangers of disturbing system components and equipment such as piping, cables, linkages, detection devices, activation devices, and...

  20. Developing a Patient Classification System for a Neonatal ICU.

    PubMed

    Daraiseh, Nancy M; Vidonish, William P; Kiessling, Pam; Lin, Li

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable patient classification system (PCS) for a neonatal ICU (NICU). PCSs have been widely used to determine required care hours, budgeting, and staffing. There is a lack of and a vital need for a valid and reliable pediatric PCS because of differences in needs and treatment from adults. Data were collected in a NICU using work sampling, chart reviews, and expert opinion. The resulting PCS was assessed for validity and reliability, ease of use, effectiveness, and satisfaction. The PCS showed significantly high reliability and validity. Survey scores revealed nurses perceived the tool to be easy to use and effective. Using subjective and objective methods, a NICU PCS was shown to be a valid and reliable measure to determine the hours per patient day required to provide care.

  1. Diagnosis of the industrial systems by fuzzy classification.

    PubMed

    Toscano, R; Lyonnet, P

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a classifier based on a fuzzy inference system. For this classifier, we propose a parametrization method which is not necessarily based on an iterative training. This approach can be seen as a pre-parametrization which allows the determination of the rules base and the parameters of the membership functions. We also present a continuous and derivable version of the previous classifier and suggest an iterative learning algorithm based on a gradient method. An example using the learning basis IRIS, which is a benchmark for classification problems, is presented showing the performances of this classifier. Finally this classifier is applied to the diagnosis of a dc motor showing the effectiveness of this method.

  2. Clinical care costing method for the Clinical Care Classification System.

    PubMed

    Saba, Virginia K; Arnold, Jean M

    2004-01-01

    To provide a means for calculating the cost of nursing care using the Clinical Care Classification System (CCCS). Three CCCS indicators of care components, actions, and outcomes in conjunction with Clinical Care Pathways (CCPs). The cost of patient care is based on the type of action time multiplied by care components and nursing costs. The CCCM for the CCCS makes it possible to measure and cost out clinical practice. The CCCM may be used with CCPs in the electronic patient medical record. The CCPs make it easy to track the clinical nursing care across time, settings, population groups, and geographical locations. Collected data may be used many times, allowing for improved documentation, analysis, and costing out of care.

  3. Ethnic Classification in the New Zealand Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Rata, Elizabeth; Zubaran, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The ethnic or “racial” classification of Maori and non-Maori is a pivotal feature of New Zealand’s health system and affects government policy and professional practice within the context of Treaty of Waitangi “partnership” politics. Although intended to empower Maori, ethnic categorization can have unintended and negative consequences by ignoring the causality of material forces in social phenomena. The authors begin by showing how the use of ethnic categories in health policy is justified by the Treaty of Waitangi partnership policies. This provides the context for the argument made in the manuscript that an understanding of the social experience of ethnicity within the complex interaction of sociocultural factors such as socioeconomic location and lifestyle is more useful than using the political construct of ethnic categories in explaining the persistence of low health status for a section of the Maori population. PMID:26892248

  4. The groningen laryngomalacia classification system--based on systematic review and dynamic airway changes.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Martijn; Dikkers, Frederik G; Halmos, Gyorgy B

    2015-12-01

    Laryngomalacia is the most common cause of dyspnea and stridor in newborn infants. Laryngomalacia is a dynamic change of the upper airway based on abnormally pliable supraglottic structures, which causes upper airway obstruction. In the past, different classification systems have been introduced. Until now no classification system is widely accepted and applied. Our goal is to provide a simple and complete classification system based on systematic literature search and our experiences. Retrospective cohort study with literature review. All patients with laryngomalacia under the age of 5 at time of diagnosis were included. Photo and video documentation was used to confirm diagnosis and characteristics of dynamic airway change. Outcome was compared with available classification systems in literature. Eighty-five patients were included. In contrast to other classification systems, only three typical different dynamic changes have been identified in our series. Two existing classification systems covered 100% of our findings, but there was an unnecessary overlap between different types in most of the systems. Based on our finding, we propose a new a classification system for laryngomalacia, which is purely based on dynamic airway changes. The groningen laryngomalacia classification is a new, simplified classification system with three types, based on purely dynamic laryngeal changes, tested in a tertiary referral center: Type 1: inward collapse of arytenoids cartilages, Type 2: medial displacement of aryepiglottic folds, and Type 3: posterocaudal displacement of epiglottis against the posterior pharyngeal wall. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Environmental hazards from natural hydrocarbons seepage: integrated classification of risk from sediment chemistry, bioavailability and biomarkers responses in sentinel species.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Maura; Gorbi, Stefania; Fattorini, Daniele; D'Errico, Giuseppe; Piva, Francesco; Pacitti, Davide; Regoli, Francesco

    2014-02-01

    Potential effects of natural emissions of hydrocarbons in the marine environment have been poorly investigated. In this study, a multidisciplinary weight of evidence (WOE) study was carried out on a shallow seepage, integrating sediment chemistry with bioavailability and onset of subcellular responses (biomarkers) in caged eels and mussels. Results from different lines of evidence (LOEs) were elaborated within a quantitative WOE model which, based on logical flowcharts, provide synthetic indices of hazard for each LOE, before their integration in a quantitative risk assessment. Evaluations of different LOEs were not always in accordance and their overall elaboration summarized as Moderate the risk in the seepage area. This study provided first evidence of biological effects in organisms exposed to natural hydrocarbon emissions, confirming the limit of chemical characterization as stand-alone criteria for environmental quality assessment and the utility of multidisciplinary investigations to determine the good environmental status as required by Environmental Directives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Self-Directed Violence Classification System and the Columbia Classification Algorithm for Suicide Assessment: A Crosswalk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matarazzo, Bridget B.; Clemans, Tracy A.; Silverman, Morton M.; Brenner, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The lack of a standardized nomenclature for suicide-related thoughts and behaviors prompted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, with the Veterans Integrated Service Network 19 Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center, to create the Self-Directed Violence Classification System (SDVCS). SDVCS has been adopted by the…

  7. The Self-Directed Violence Classification System and the Columbia Classification Algorithm for Suicide Assessment: A Crosswalk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matarazzo, Bridget B.; Clemans, Tracy A.; Silverman, Morton M.; Brenner, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The lack of a standardized nomenclature for suicide-related thoughts and behaviors prompted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, with the Veterans Integrated Service Network 19 Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center, to create the Self-Directed Violence Classification System (SDVCS). SDVCS has been adopted by the…

  8. Hazardous materials management using a Cradle-to-Grave Tracking and Information System (CGTIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kjeldgaard, E.; Fish, J.; Campbell, D.; Freshour, N.; Hammond, B.; Bray, O.; Hollingsworth, M.

    1995-03-01

    Hazardous materials management includes interactions among materials, personnel, facilities, hazards, and processes of various groups within a DOE site`s environmental, safety & health (ES&H) and line organizations. Although each group is charged with addressing a particular aspect of these properties and interactions, the information it requires must be gathered into a coherent set of common data for accurate and consistent hazardous material management and regulatory reporting. It is these common data requirements which the Cradle-to-Grave Tracking and Information System (CGTIS) is designed to satisfy. CGTIS collects information at the point at which a process begins or a material enters a facility, and maintains that information, for hazards management and regulatory reporting, throughout the entire life-cycle by providing direct on-line links to a site`s multitude of data bases to bring information together into one common data model.

  9. 48 CFR 219.303 - Determining North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Determining North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards. 219.303 Section 219.303 Federal... Programs 219.303 Determining North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards...

  10. 42 CFR 419.31 - Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and payment weights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and... Hospital Outpatient Services § 419.31 Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and payment weights... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR...

  11. 48 CFR 19.303 - Determining North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Determining North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards. 19.303 Section 19.303 Federal Acquisition... Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards. (a) The contracting officer shall determine the...

  12. 48 CFR 219.303 - Determining North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Determining North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards. 219.303 Section 219.303 Federal... Determining North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards. Contracting...

  13. 42 CFR 419.31 - Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and payment weights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and... Hospital Outpatient Services § 419.31 Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and payment weights... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR...

  14. 48 CFR 219.303 - Determining North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Determining North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards. 219.303 Section 219.303 Federal... Determining North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards. Contracting...

  15. 42 CFR 419.31 - Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and payment weights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and... Hospital Outpatient Services § 419.31 Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and payment weights... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR...

  16. 48 CFR 219.303 - Determining North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Determining North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards. 219.303 Section 219.303 Federal... Programs 219.303 Determining North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes and size standards...

  17. Development of an intelligent hypertext manual for the space shuttle hazardous gas detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Shi, George Z.; Bangasser, Carl; Fensky, Connie

    1992-01-01

    A computer-based Integrated Knowledge System (IKS), the Intelligent Hypertext Manual (IHM), is being developed for the Space Shuttle Hazardous Gas Detection System (HGDS) at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC). The IHM stores all HGDS related knowledge and presents them in an interactive and intuitive manner. The IHM's purpose is to provide HGDS personnel with the capabilities of: enhancing the interpretation of real time data; recognizing and identifying possible faults in the Space Shuttle sub-system related to hazardous gas detections; locating applicable documentation related to procedures, constraints, and previous fault histories; and assisting in the training of personnel.

  18. Hazard Expertise (HAZE) knowledge-based system: description and user guide. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, D.K.; Franczak, G.R.; Pritchard, L.

    1988-11-01

    The Hazard Expertise (HAZE) program is a knowledge-based system for military-installation personnel working with hazardous material/waste management. HAZE is an easy, informal way to share problems, ideas for solutions, and information on the latest technologies and environmental management strategies. The system allows self-contained updating, systematic analysis of alternatives, and selection of optimal technologies. The system provides a list of courses, meeting announcements, a personnel directory, a listing of pertinent literature and other special services. Example sessions demonstrate use of the commands.

  19. A head and neck lymph node classification using an anatomical grid system while maintaining clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Benninger, Brion; Barrett, Richard

    2011-10-01

    The current classification of head and neck lymph nodes lacks a standardized system that integrates basic anatomy and clinical relevance. Currently, anatomy texts, atlases, and journals used to educate future health care professionals use a classification system that differs from the commonly used clinical nomenclature. As a result, student trainees entering the professional world are confused by lymph node terminology. The purpose of this study was to suggest a lymph node classification system that accurately reflected anatomy and clinical applications. A literature search was conducted on anatomic and clinical texts, atlases, journals, and Web sites. Two recurring classification themes were found from anatomic texts and atlases: superficial and deep chains, and local anatomic structures. Since 1988 the clinical specialties have used a Roman numeral "level" system. The differences between anatomic and clinical classification systems have led to academic frustration. After analysis, a functional classification system was developed that integrated anatomic and clinical terminology from the current classification systems. This suggested system revised the clinically accepted level system approved in 1988 and replaced the terminology with an anatomically derived naming system. This system satisfies the need for a classification that unifies anatomic and clinical applications. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Validation of potential classification criteria for systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sindhu R.; Fransen, Jaap; Khanna, Dinesh; Baron, Murray; van den Hoogen, Frank; Medsger, Thomas A.; Peschken, Christine A.; Carreira, Patricia E.; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Tyndall, Alan; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Pope, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Classification criteria for systemic sclerosis (SSc) are being updated jointly by ACR and EULAR. Potential items for classification were reduced to 23 using Delphi and Nominal Group Techniques. We evaluated the face, discriminant and construct validity of the items to be further studied as potential criteria. Methods Face validity was evaluated using the frequency of items in patients sampled from the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group, 1000 Faces of Lupus, the Pittsburgh, Toronto, Madrid and Berlin CTD databases. SSc (n=783) were compared to 1071 patients with diseases similar to SSc (mimickers): SLE (n=499), myositis (n=171), Sjögren’s syndrome (n=95), Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP) (n=228), MCTD (n=29), and idiopathic PAH (n=49). Discriminant validity was evaluated using odds ratios (OR). For construct validity, empiric ranking was compared to expert ranking. Results Compared to mimickers, SSc are more likely to have skin thickening (OR=427), telangiectasias (OR=91), anti-RNA polymerase III antibody (OR=75), puffy fingers (OR=35), finger flexion contractures (OR=29), tendon/bursal friction rubs (OR=27), anti-topoisomerase-I antibody (OR=25), RP (OR=24), finger tip ulcers/pitting scars (OR=19), anti-centromere antibody(OR=14), abnormal nailfold capillaries (OR=10), GERD symptoms (OR=8), and ANA, calcinosis, dysphagia, esophageal dilation (all OR=6), interstitial lung disease/pulmonary fibrosis (OR=5) and anti-PM-Scl antibody (OR=2). Reduced DLCO, PAH, and reduced FVC had OR<2. Renal crisis and digital pulp loss/acro-osteolysis did not occur in SSc mimickers (OR not estimated). Empiric and expert ranking were correlated (Spearman rho 0.53, p=0.01). Conclusion The candidate items have good face, discriminant and construct validity. Further item reduction will be evaluated in prospective SSc and mimicker cases. PMID:22052658