Science.gov

Sample records for hazardous material spills

  1. Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) Spill Center strategic plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This strategic Plan was developed in keeping with the Department of Energy`s mission for partnership with its customers to contribute to our Nation`s welfare by providing the technical information and the scientific and educational foundation for the technology, policy and institutional leadership necessary to achieve efficiency in energy use, diversity in energy sources, a more productive and competitive economy, improved environmental quality, and a secure national defense. The Plan provides the concepts for realigning the Departments`s Hazardous Materials Spill Center (HSC) in achieving its vision of becoming the global leader in meeting the diverse HAZMAT needs in the areas of testing, training, and technology. Each of these areas encompass many facets and a multitude of functional and operational requirements at the Federal, state, tribal, and local government levels, as well as those of foreign governments and the private sector. The evolution of the limited dimensional Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility into a multifaceted HAZMAT Spill Center will require us to totally redefine our way of thinking as related to our business approach, both within and outside of the Department. We need to establish and maintain a viable and vibrant outreach program through all aspects of the public (via government agencies) and private sectors, to include foreign partnerships. The HAZMAT Spill Center goals and objectives provide the direction for meeting our vision. This direction takes into consideration the trends and happenings identified in the {open_quotes}Strategic Outlook{close_quotes}, which includes valuable input from our stakeholders and our present and future customers. It is our worldwide customers that provide the essence of the strategic outlook for the HAZMAT Spill Center.

  2. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? 170.906 Section 170.906 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste...

  3. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? 170.906 Section 170.906 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste...

  4. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? 170.906 Section 170.906 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste...

  5. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? 170.906 Section 170.906 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste...

  6. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? 170.906 Section 170.906 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste...

  7. Oil Spills and Spills of Hazardous Substances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    The stated purpose of this publication is to describe some of the more significant spill incidents and the mechanisms, both managerial and technological, to deal with them. This publication is targeted for school, general public, and other such audiences. Sections include effects of spills, prevention of spills, responding to spills, spill…

  8. Hazardous-Materials Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Henry W.; Edmonds, Gary O.

    1995-01-01

    Remotely controlled mobile robot used to locate, characterize, identify, and eventually mitigate incidents involving hazardous-materials spills/releases. Possesses number of innovative features, allowing it to perform mission-critical functions such as opening and unlocking doors and sensing for hazardous materials. Provides safe means for locating and identifying spills and eliminates risks of injury associated with use of manned entry teams. Current version of vehicle, called HAZBOT III, also features unique mechanical and electrical design enabling vehicle to operate safely within combustible atmosphere.

  9. Hazardous materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... people how to work with hazardous materials and waste. There are many different kinds of hazardous materials, including: Chemicals, like some that are used for cleaning Drugs, like chemotherapy to treat cancer Radioactive material that is used for x-rays or ...

  10. 30 CFR 250.219 - What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the EP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...), (d), and (e)). (b) Modeling report. If you model a potential oil or hazardous substance spill in... under 30 CFR 254.6) and hazardous substances (see definition under 40 CFR part 116) as applicable, must accompany your EP: (a) Oil spill response planning. The material required under paragraph (a)(1) or...

  11. 30 CFR 550.250 - What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 CFR 254.6) and hazardous substances (see definition under 40 CFR part 116), as applicable, must accompany your DPP or DOCD: (a) Oil spill response planning. The material required under paragraph (a)(1) or (a)(2) of this section: (1) An Oil Spill Response Plan (OSRP) for the facilities you will use...

  12. Petroleum and hazardous chemical spills in Newark Bay, New Jersey, USA from 1982 to 1991.

    PubMed

    Gunster, D G; Gillis, C A; Bonnevie, N L; Abel, T B; Wenning, R J

    1993-01-01

    Newark Bay, New Jersey, is particularly vulnerable to ecological damage from petroleum and chemical spills, as a result of the enclosed nature and shallow depth of the bay, the high frequency of shipping traffic, and the numerous chemical and petroleum transfer terminals located alongs its shores. To evaluate the potential impacts to the natural resources of this coastal estuarine ecosystem, chemical and petroleum accidents reported to the US Coast Guard (USCG) between 1982 and 1991 were compiled to determine the frequency and volume of these incidents in Newark Bay and in each of its major tributaries. Records obtained from the USCG National Response Center's computerized database indicated that more than 1453 accidental incidents, resulting in the release of more than 18 million US gallons of hazardous materials and petroleum products, occurred throughout Newark Bay during this period of time. The bulk of the materials released to the aquatic environment consisted of petroleum products, specifically No. 6 Fuel Oil (103 spills, 12 829 272 US gal) and gasoline (207 spills, 48 816 US gal). The majority of the reported incidents occurred in the Arthur Kill and its tributaries, as well as in the Kill Van Kull and the Passaic River. The results of this study indicated that the accidental discharge of petroleum and hazardous chemicals represents a significant source of chemical pollution in Newark Bay. Based on the frequency of spills and the volume of materials released to the aquatic environment, it is likely that these events are having a deleterious effect on the Newark Bay ecosystem.

  13. Proceedings of the 6th national conference on hazardous wastes and hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This book contained the proceedings of the 6th national Conference on Hazardous wastes and Hazardous materials. Topics covered include: federal and state policy papers, risk assessment, health and endangerment, contaminated groundwater control, treatment, spill control management and tank leakage control.

  14. Hazardous materials dictionary

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Parallel growth of the chemical industry of emergency response capabilities in the public and private sectors has created a new need for improved communications. A new vocabulary of important terms is emerging in each of the industries that transport, store and handle hazardous materials. This dictionary, representing a compilation of words and phrases from many relevant sources, will help document and standardize the nomenclature of hazardous materials. The authors have screened the technical discourse of the chemical, transportation, petroleum and medical fields, both governmental and private, to determine the most current expressions and their uses. The lexicographic goal has been to identify key terms, ambiguous and multiple meaning words, acronyms, symbols and even slang referring to hazardous materials reactions, storing and handling procedures.

  15. DOT (US Department of Transportation) issues new hazardous materials rules

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-02

    The DOT has introduced a four-digit numbering system for hazardous chemical cargoes and is also requiring: the appropriate display of the numbers; the distribution of a guidebook keyed to the numbers, which will detail the hazards posed by each chemical and suggest procedures for dealing with spills of releases; the presence of a manifest with each shipment of hazardous wastes, with the manifest bearing the signatures of responsible officials of the shipper, each carrier, and the treatment or storage firm receiving the wastes; the reporting of spills; and the banning of 253 dangerous materials from commercial transportation.

  16. Hazardous material control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book covers the following topics. Waste exchange and recycling, the New York State experience. Department of defense hazardous waste minimazation, Recovery of heavy metals from electric arc furnace steelmaking dusts, Small generator cooperative effects economical recycling.

  17. Recognizing the importance of hazardous material storage and handling

    SciTech Connect

    Strycula, J.

    1994-12-31

    Hazardous material storage and handling, of both waste and raw material, is fast becoming the greatest concern of industry, government and the general public. These concerns are compounded in fixed manufacturing facilities due to the already tremendous pressure and scrutiny of government agencies and public watchdogs. Meeting hazardous material management regulations and guidelines head-on minimizes risk and practically eliminates penalties and fines. The Safety or Environmental Director at the facility must not only be concerned with the safe methods of storage and handling of these materials, but also aware of the methods that must be implemented to most effectively minimize and control accidents involving fluid spills, fires, explosions, or air contamination.

  18. Managing Academe's Hazardous Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Fay

    1991-01-01

    Those responsible for planning and management of colleges and universities must plan comprehensively for hazardous waste disposal. Federal and state regulations are increasing, landfill area is becoming scarce, and incineration costs are rising fast. High-level institutional commitment to a sound campus environment policy is essential. (MSE)

  19. 30 CFR 250.219 - What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the EP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... information must accompany the EP? 250.219 Section 250.219 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT... OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.219 What oil and... spills of oil (see definition under 30 CFR 254.6) and hazardous substances (see definition under 40...

  20. 78 FR 42998 - Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials, Safety Administration (PHMSA... participate in a public meeting addressing the transportation of hazardous materials by rail. FRA and......

  1. Transportation of Hazardous Evidentiary Material.

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, Douglas.

    2005-06-01

    This document describes the specimen and transportation containers currently available for use with hazardous and infectious materials. A detailed comparison of advantages, disadvantages, and costs of the different technologies is included. Short- and long-term recommendations are also provided.3 DraftDraftDraftExecutive SummaryThe Federal Bureau of Investigation's Hazardous Materials Response Unit currently has hazardous material transport containers for shipping 1-quart paint cans and small amounts of contaminated forensic evidence, but the containers may not be able to maintain their integrity under accident conditions or for some types of hazardous materials. This report provides guidance and recommendations on the availability of packages for the safe and secure transport of evidence consisting of or contaminated with hazardous chemicals or infectious materials. Only non-bulk containers were considered because these are appropriate for transport on small aircraft. This report will addresses packaging and transportation concerns for Hazardous Classes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 materials. If the evidence is known or suspected of belonging to one of these Hazardous Classes, it must be packaged in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR Part 173. The anthrax scare of several years ago, and less well publicized incidents involving unknown and uncharacterized substances, has required that suspicious substances be sent to appropriate analytical laboratories for analysis and characterization. Transportation of potentially hazardous or infectious material to an appropriate analytical laboratory requires transport containers that maintain both the biological and chemical integrity of the substance in question. As a rule, only relatively small quantities will be available for analysis. Appropriate transportation packaging is needed that will maintain the integrity of the substance, will not allow biological alteration, will not react chemically with the substance being

  2. An Introduction to Hazardous Material Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhardt, Peter A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Colleges must have a system to safely control the ordering, delivery, transport, storage, and use of hazardous material. Information on hazardous material management is excerpted from "Managing Hazardous Waste at Educational Institutions. (MLW)

  3. Hazardous materials package performance regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, N. A.; Glass, R. E.; McClure, J. D.; Finley, N. C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a hazardous materials Hazmat Packaging Performance Evaluation (HPPE) project being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Department of Transportation Research Special Programs Administration (DOT-RSPA) to look at the subset of bulk packagings that are larger than 2000 gallons. The objectives of this project are to evaluate current hazmat specification packagings and develop supporting documentation for determining performance requirements for packagings in excess of 2000 gallons that transport hazardous materials that have been classified as extremely toxic by inhalation (METBI).

  4. Detection, identification, and quantification techniques for spills of hazardous chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, J. F.; Sandness, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    The first 400 chemicals listed in the Coast Guard's Chemical Hazards Response Information System were evaluated with respect to their detectability, identifiability, and quantifiability by 12 generalized remote and in situ sensing techniques. Identification was also attempted for some key areas in water pollution sensing technology.

  5. Transportation of Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    2000-02-28

    This report documents the Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment (EPHA) for the Transportation of Hazardous Materials (THM) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). This hazards assessment is intended to identify and analyze those transportation hazards significant enough to warrant consideration in the SRS Emergency Management Program.

  6. LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF RESIDUAL LIQUID ORGANICS FROM SPILLS, LEAKS, AND THE DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTES IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic liquids that are essentially immiscible with water migrate through the subsurface under the influence of capillary, viscous, and buoyancy forces. These liquids originate from the improper disposal of hazardous wastes, and the spills and leaks of petroleum hydrocarbons a...

  7. Spill Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2005-01-01

    This article describes OSHA procedures for handling Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories. The Laboratory Standard requires a Chemical Hygiene Plan to address all aspects of working with hazardous chemicals. This includes dealing with chemical spills. Chemical spill kits or "spill crash carts" need to be available in case…

  8. Robots Working with Hazardous Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Amai, W.; Fahrenholtz, J.

    1999-01-06

    While many research and development activities take place at Sandia National Laboratories' Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center (ISRC), where the "rubber meets the road" is in the ISRC'S delivered systems. The ISRC has delivered several systems over the last few years that handle hazardous materials on a daily basis, and allow human workers to move to a safer, supervisory role than the "hands-on" operations that they used to perform. The ISRC at Sandia performs a large range of research and development activities, including development and delivery of one-of-a-kind robotic systems for use with hazardous materials. Our mission is to create systems for operations where people can't or don't want to perform the operations by hand, and the systems described in this article are several of our first-of-a-kind deliveries to achieve that mission.

  9. Epidemiology of hazardous materials responses by Massachusetts district HAZMAT teams.

    PubMed

    Kales, S N; Castro, M J; Christiani, D C

    1996-04-01

    Hazardous materials releases can cause substantial morbidity and mortality, but very few studies have systemically investigated them. We analyzed responses by Massachusetts' six district hazardous materials (HAZMAT) teams from the time of their inception through February 1994. Spills, leaks, and other escapes of materials caused or contributed to 67 of 85 (79%) incidents. Transportation-related accidents accounted for 13 of 83 (16%), whereas the remainder of the releases occurred at fixed facilities. The chemicals most frequently involved were various hydrocarbons and corrosive materials. Most incidents (60 of 85 [70%]) had no reported injuries. Civilians were injured in 18 of 85 (21%) incidents; regular fire fighter and/or police were injured in eight of 85 (9%) incidents; and HAZMAT team members in one of 85 incidents (1%). Systematic study is needed to identify preventable causes of HAZMAT responses as well as ideas for better control of secondary health effects.

  10. Aquatic toxicity of forty industrial chemicals: Testing in support of hazardous substance spill prevention regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, M. W.; Ward, C. H.

    1981-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is presently developing hazardous substance spill regulations to help prevent water pollution. Aquatic animal toxicity data are used as criteria for the designation and categorization of substances as hazardous, even though this type of data is not available for many industrial chemicals. Static 96-hr. toxicity tests were conducted with 40 such chemicals to provide basic toxicity data for regulatory decision making. Thirty-two of the 40 chemicals tested were hazardous to aquatic life as determined by 96-hr. LC 50's less than or equal to 500 mg/l. All 40 chemicals were tested with the fresh-water fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, and ten chemicals were also tested with the salt-water grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio.

  11. IT - OSRA: applying ensemble simulations to estimate the oil spill hazard associated to operational and accidental oil spills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepp Neves, Antonio Augusto; Pinardi, Nadia; martins, Flavio

    2016-04-01

    Every year, 270,000 tonnes of oil are estimated to be spilled in the ocean by vessel operations (e.g. tank washing, leakage of lubricants) and the so called operational spills are typically associated with small volumes and high occurrence rate. Vessel-related accidental spills (e.g. collisions, explosions) seldom occur and usually involve high volumes of oil, accounting for about 100,000 tonnes/year. The occurrence of accidental spills and their impacts have been well documented in the available literature. On the other hand, occurrence rates of operational spills and the effects they have on the marine and coastal environments remain very uncertain due to insufficient sampling effort and methodological limitations. Trying to foresee when and where an oil spill will occur in a certain area, its characteristics and impacts is, at present, impossible. Oil spill risk assessments (OSRAs) have been employed in several parts of the globe in order to deal with such uncertainties and protect the marine environment. In the present work, we computed the oil spill risk applying ensemble oil spill simulations following an ISO-31000 compliant OSRA methodology (Sepp Neves et al. , 2015). The ensemble experiment was carried out for the Algarve coast (southern Portugal) generating a unique data set of 51,200 numerical oil spill simulations covering the main sources of uncertainties (i.e. where and when the spill will happen and oil spill model configuration). From the generated data set, the risk due to accidental and operational spills was mapped for the Algarve municipalities based on the frequency and magnitude (i.e. concentrations) of beaching events and the main sources of risk were identified. The socioeconomic and environmental dimensions of the risk were treated separately. Seasonal changes in the risk index proposed due to the variability of meteo-oceanographic variables (i.e. currents and waves) were also quantified.

  12. NASA LaRC Hazardous Material Pharmacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esquenet, Remy

    1995-01-01

    In 1993-1994 the Office of Environmental Engineering contracted SAIC to develop NASA Langley's Pollution Prevention (P2) Program. One of the priority projects identified in this contract was the development of a hazardous waste minimization (HAZMIN)/hazardous materials reutilization (HAZMART) program in the form of a Hazardous Materials Pharmacy. A hazardous materials pharmacy is designed to reduce hazardous material procurement costs and hazardous waste disposal costs. This is accomplished through the collection and reissue of excess hazardous material. Currently, a rarely used hazardous material may be stored in a shop area, unused, until it passes its expiration date. The material is then usually disposed of as a hazardous waste, often at a greater expense than the original cost of the material. While this material was on the shelf expiring, other shop areas may have ordered new supplies of the same material. The hazardous material pharmacy would act as a clearinghouse for such materials. Material that is not going to be used would be turned in to the pharmacy. Other users could then be issued this material free of charge, thereby reducing procurement costs. The use of this material by another shop prevents it from expiring, thereby reducing hazardous waste disposal costs.

  13. Hazardous material replacement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Guttridge, A.H.

    1993-09-01

    Methyl dianiline (MDA) is one of the components used in potting of electronic assemblies at Allied Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD). MDA is a liver toxin and a suspected carcinogen. The KCD has made a commitment to eliminate the use of hazardous materials as much as technically feasible. This project was initiated to find alternatives to the MDA foam system. The project plan was to verify that the new materials developed by expert groups within the DOE nuclear weapons complex, such as the Organic Materials Group, would meet the unique requirements of the assemblies fabricated in the Electronic Products Manufacturing Building (EPMB) at KCD. The work was discontinued when associates assigned to the project were transferred to higher priority projects.

  14. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 392: Spill Sites and Construction Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    R. B. Jackson

    2002-02-01

    This Closure Report documents the closure activities that were conducted to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 392--Spill Sites and Construction Materials located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). CAU 392 is listed on in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996) and consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 5 and 6 of the NTS: CAS 05-17-02 Construction Materials/Lead Bricks; CAS 06-17-03 Cement Mud Pit; CAS 06-1 9-01 Cable Pile; Powder Piles (3); CAS 06-44-02 Paint Spill; CAS 06-44-03 Plaster Spill; CAS 06-44-04 Cutting Fluid Discharge Ditch. Closure activities were performed in two phases. Phase 1 activities consisted of collecting waste characterization samples of soil and material present on-site, and where appropriate, performing radiological screening of debris at the six CASs. Results were used to determine how waste generated during closure activities would be handled and disposed of, i.e., as nonhazardous sanitary or hazardous waste, etc. Phase 2 activities consisted of closing each CAS by removing debris and/or soil, disposing of the generated waste, and verifying that each CAS was clean closed by visual inspection and/or by the collecting soil verification samples for laboratory analysis. Copies of the analytical results for the site verification samples are included in Appendix A. Copies of the Sectored Housekeeping Site Closure Verification Form for each of the six CASs are included in Appendix 8. Appendix C contains a copy of the Bechtel Nevada (BN) On-site Waste Transport Manifest for the hazardous waste generated during closure of CAS 06-44-02.

  15. 78 FR 69310 - Hazardous Materials Table, Special Provisions, Hazardous Materials Communications, Emergency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 172 Hazardous Materials Table, Special Provisions, Hazardous Materials Communications, Emergency Response Information, Training Requirements, and... of October 1, 2012, on page 242, in Sec. 172.101, in the Hazardous Materials Table, in the entry...

  16. Designing a HAZMAT (hazardous materials) incident management system for facilities with widely varying emergency organization structures

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, R.J.; Easterly, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently conducting a research program for the United States Air Force, the purpose of which is to assist them in their emergency planning for HAZMAT spills. This paper describes the first two tasks in the program. These tasks are oriented towards: determining the extent of the hazardous materials (HAZMAT) problem and establishing plans directed toward HAZMAT incident management.

  17. 78 FR 24309 - Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration List of Special Permit Applications Delayed AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: List of Applications Delayed... of Hazardous Materials Special Permits and Approvals, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

  18. 76 FR 75950 - Hazardous Materials: Emergency Restriction/Prohibition Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Hazardous Materials: Emergency Restriction/Prohibition Order AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION..., including Rainbow of Hope. This Emergency Order was issued by the Office of Hazardous Materials...

  19. 76 FR 45332 - Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is...

  20. 78 FR 34156 - Hazardous Materials: Emergency Recall Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Hazardous Materials: Emergency Recall Order AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Emergency Recall Order... on May 24, 2013 to The Lite Cylinder Company, Inc. The Office of Hazardous Materials Safety...

  1. 78 FR 18419 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Delayed Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Delayed Applications AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: List of... Paquet, Director, Office of Hazardous Materials Special Permits and Approvals, Pipeline and...

  2. Public health consequences of mercury spills: Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance system, 1993-1998.

    PubMed Central

    Zeitz, Perri; Orr, Maureen F; Kaye, Wendy E

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed data from states that participated in the Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) system maintained by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry to describe the public health consequences of mercury releases. From 1993 through 1998, HSEES captured 406 events in which mercury was the only substance released. Schools and universities, private residences, and health care facilities were the most frequent locations involved in mercury events, and human error was the contributing factor for most of the releases. Fourteen persons experienced adverse health effects as a result of the releases. An additional 31 persons had documented elevated levels of mercury in the blood. No fatalities resulted. Evacuations were ordered in 90 (22%) of the events, and the length of evacuation ranged from 1 hr to 46 days. Mercury spills have a significant public health impact and economic burden. Some actions that could potentially lessen the consequences of mercury spills are to switch to mercury-free alternatives, train people in the safe handling and disposal of mercury, and keep mercury securely stored when it is necessary to have it on hand. PMID:11836139

  3. 30 CFR 550.250 - What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the DPP or DOCD? 550.250 Section 550.250 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Contents...

  4. 30 CFR 550.250 - What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the DPP or DOCD? 550.250 Section 550.250 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and Information Contents...

  5. Hazardous materials in Fresh Kills landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, J.S.

    1997-12-31

    No environmental monitoring and corrective action programs can pinpoint multiple locations of hazardous materials the total amount of them in a large landfill. Yet the consequences of hazardous materials in MSW landfills are considerable, in terms of public health concerns, environmental damage, and cleanup costs. In this paper a rough estimation is made of how much hazardous material may have been disposed in Fresh Kills landfill in Staten Island, New York. The logic and methods could be used for other MSW landfills. Fresh Kills has frequently been described as the world`s largest MSW landfill. While records of hazardous waste disposal at Fresh Kills over nearly 50 years of operation certainly do not exist, no reasonable person would argue with the conclusion that large quantities of hazardous waste surely have been disposed at Fresh Kills, both legally and illegally. This study found that at least 2 million tons of hazardous wastes and substances have been disposed at Fresh Kills since 1948. Major sources are: household hazardous waste, commercial RCRA hazardous waste, incinerator ash, and commercial non-RCRA hazardous waste, governmental RCRA hazardous waste. Illegal disposal of hazardous waste surely has contributed even more. This is a sufficient amount to cause serious environmental contamination and releases, especially from such a landfill without an engineered liner system, for example. This figure is roughly 1% of the total amount of waste disposed in Fresh Kills since 1948, probably at least 200 million tons.

  6. 77 FR 37961 - Hazardous Materials: Incorporating Rail Special Permits Into the Hazardous Materials Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ...The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration is amending the Hazardous Materials Regulations to incorporate provisions contained in certain widely used or longstanding rail special permits that have general applicability and established safety records. Special permits allow a company or an individual to package or ship a hazardous material in a manner that varies from the......

  7. Environmental risk analysis of hazardous material rail transportation.

    PubMed

    Saat, Mohd Rapik; Werth, Charles J; Schaeffer, David; Yoon, Hongkyu; Barkan, Christopher P L

    2014-01-15

    An important aspect of railroad environmental risk management involves tank car transportation of hazardous materials. This paper describes a quantitative, environmental risk analysis of rail transportation of a group of light, non-aqueous-phase liquid (LNAPL) chemicals commonly transported by rail in North America. The Hazardous Materials Transportation Environmental Consequence Model (HMTECM) was used in conjunction with a geographic information system (GIS) analysis of environmental characteristics to develop probabilistic estimates of exposure to different spill scenarios along the North American rail network. The risk analysis incorporated the estimated clean-up cost developed using the HMTECM, route-specific probability distributions of soil type and depth to groundwater, annual traffic volume, railcar accident rate, and tank car safety features, to estimate the nationwide annual risk of transporting each product. The annual risk per car-mile (car-km) and per ton-mile (ton-km) was also calculated to enable comparison between chemicals and to provide information on the risk cost associated with shipments of these products. The analysis and the methodology provide a quantitative approach that will enable more effective management of the environmental risk of transporting hazardous materials.

  8. Pumping through porous hydrophobic/oleophilic materials: an alternative technology for oil spill remediation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jin; Ye, Yin-Dong; Yao, Hong-Bin; Zhu, Xi; Wang, Xu; Wu, Liang; Wang, Jin-Long; Ding, Hang; Yong, Ni; He, Ling-Hui; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-04-01

    Recently, porous hydrophobic/oleophilic materials (PHOMs) have been shown to be the most promising candidates for cleaning up oil spills; however, due to their limited absorption capacity, a large quantity of PHOMs would be consumed in oil spill remediation, causing serious economic problems. In addition, the complicated and time-consuming process of oil recovery from these sorbents is also an obstacle to their practical application. To solve the above problems, we apply external pumping on PHOMs to realize the continuous collection of oil spills in situ from the water surface with high speed and efficiency. Based on this novel design, oil/water separation and oil collection can be simultaneously achieved in the remediation of oil spills, and the oil sorption capacity is no longer limited to the volume and weight of the sorption material. This novel external pumping technique may bring PHOMs a step closer to practical application in oil spill remediation.

  9. Hazard index for underground toxic material

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.F.; Cohen, J.J.; McKone, T.E.

    1980-06-01

    To adequately define the problem of waste management, quantitative measures of hazard must be used. This study reviews past work in the area of hazard indices and proposes a geotoxicity hazard index for use in characterizing the hazard of toxic material buried underground. Factors included in this index are: an intrinsic toxicity factor, formulated as the volume of water required for dilution to public drinking-water levels; a persistence factor to characterize the longevity of the material, ranging from unity for stable materials to smaller values for shorter-lived materials; an availability factor that relates the transport potential for the particular material to a reference value for its naturally occurring analog; and a correction factor to accommodate the buildup of decay progeny, resulting in increased toxicity.

  10. Development of short, acute exposure hazard estimates: a tool for assessing the effects of chemical spills in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Bejarano, Adriana C; Farr, James K

    2013-08-01

    Management decisions aimed at protecting aquatic resources following accidental chemical spills into rivers and coastal estuaries require estimates of toxic thresholds derived from realistic spill conditions: acute pulse exposures of short duration (h), information which often is unavailable. Most existing toxicity data (median lethal concentration or median effective concentration) come from tests performed under constant exposure concentrations and exposure durations in the 24-h to 96-h range, conditions not typical of most chemical spills. Short-exposure hazard concentration estimates were derived for selected chemicals using empirical toxicity data. Chemical-specific 5th percentile hazard concentrations (HC5) of species sensitivity distributions (SSD) from individual exposure durations (6-96 h) were derived via bootstrap resampling and were plotted against their original exposure durations to estimate HC5s and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) at shorter exposures (1, 2, and 4 h). This approach allowed the development of short-exposure HC5s for 12 chemicals. Model verification showed agreement between observed and estimated short-exposure HC5s (r(2) adjusted = 0.95, p < 0.0001), and comparison of estimated short-exposure HC5s with empirical toxicity data indicated generally conservative hazard estimates. This approach, applied to 2 real spill incidents, indicated hazard estimates above expected environmental concentrations (acrylonitrile), and suggested that environmental concentrations likely exceeded short-exposure hazard estimates (furfural). Although estimates generated through this approach were likely overprotective, these were derived from environmentally realistic exposure durations, providing risk-assessors with a tool to manage field decisions. Environ Toxicol Chem 2013;32:1918-1927. © 2013 SETAC. PMID:23625642

  11. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Partin, Judy K.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-04-05

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  12. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Partin, Judy K.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-01-01

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  13. Hazardous materials transportation and emergency response programs

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.S.; Fore, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    This presentation consists of the following visual aids; (1) detailed routing capabilities of truck, rail, barge; (2) legislative data base for hazardous materials; and (3) emergency response of accident site Eddyville, Kentucky (airports in vicinity of Eddyville, KY).

  14. Hazardous Materials Management Program Report- 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2005-06-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Hazardous Materials Management Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2005 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  15. Oil spill hazard from dispersal of oil along shipping lanes in the Southern Adriatic and Northern Ionian Seas.

    PubMed

    Liubartseva, S; De Dominicis, M; Oddo, P; Coppini, G; Pinardi, N; Greggio, N

    2015-01-15

    An assessment of hazard stemming from operational oil ship discharges in the Southern Adriatic and Northern Ionian (SANI) Seas is presented. The methodology integrates ship traffic data, the fate and transport oil spill model MEDSLIK-II, coupled with the Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) ocean currents, sea surface temperature analyses and ECMWF surface winds. Monthly and climatological hazard maps were calculated for February 2009 through April 2013. Monthly hazard distributions of oil show that the zones of highest sea surface hazard are located in the southwestern Adriatic Sea and eastern Ionian Sea. Distinctive "hot spots" appear in front of the Taranto Port and the sea area between Corfu Island and the Greek coastlines. Beached oil hazard maps indicate the highest values in the Taranto Port area, on the eastern Greek coastline, as well as in the Bari Port area and near Brindisi Port area.

  16. Oil spill hazard from dispersal of oil along shipping lanes in the Southern Adriatic and Northern Ionian Seas.

    PubMed

    Liubartseva, S; De Dominicis, M; Oddo, P; Coppini, G; Pinardi, N; Greggio, N

    2015-01-15

    An assessment of hazard stemming from operational oil ship discharges in the Southern Adriatic and Northern Ionian (SANI) Seas is presented. The methodology integrates ship traffic data, the fate and transport oil spill model MEDSLIK-II, coupled with the Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) ocean currents, sea surface temperature analyses and ECMWF surface winds. Monthly and climatological hazard maps were calculated for February 2009 through April 2013. Monthly hazard distributions of oil show that the zones of highest sea surface hazard are located in the southwestern Adriatic Sea and eastern Ionian Sea. Distinctive "hot spots" appear in front of the Taranto Port and the sea area between Corfu Island and the Greek coastlines. Beached oil hazard maps indicate the highest values in the Taranto Port area, on the eastern Greek coastline, as well as in the Bari Port area and near Brindisi Port area. PMID:25455790

  17. Time-correlations in the dynamics of hazardous material pipelines incidents.

    PubMed

    Sosa, E; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2009-06-15

    This paper addresses the following question: Are the hazardous materials pipeline incidents non-randomly time distributed? Our analysis suggests that they are correlated, which means that a hazardous materials pipeline incident is not independent from the time elapsed since the previous event. That is, our statistical tests suggest that previous accident counts correlate with future counts. But, if we consider incidents with a large severity index (spills and property damage), the phenomenon is unpredictable, since it approaches a Poissonian process (random, independent and uncorrelated).

  18. Control of Materials Flammability Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Dennis E.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on selecting, using, and configuring spacecraft materials in such a way as to minimize the ability of fire to spread onboard a spacecraft. The presentation gives an overview of the flammability requirements of NASA-STD-6001, listing specific tests and evaluation criteria it requires. The presentation then gives flammability reduction methods for specific spacecraft items and materials.

  19. 49 CFR 173.2 - Hazardous materials classes and index to hazard class definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Division No. (if any) Name of class or division 49 CFR reference for definitions None Forbidden materials... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hazardous materials classes and index to hazard... classes and index to hazard class definitions. The hazard class of a hazardous material is...

  20. Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Osterman, Robert A.; Cox, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive or other hazardous samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis. An adjustable top door is located on the top side of the storage member, and the top door includes a channel capable of being selectively placed in registration with the respective storage chambers thereby permitting the samples to selectively enter the respective storage chambers. The top door, when closed, isolates the respective samples within the storage chambers. A plurality of spring-biased bottom doors are located on the bottom sides of the respective storage chambers. The bottom doors isolate the samples in the respective storage chambers when the bottom doors are in the closed position. The bottom doors permit the samples to leave the respective storage chambers from the bottom side when the respective bottom doors are in respective open positions. The bottom doors permit the samples to be loaded into the respective storage chambers after the analysis for storage and transport to a permanent storage location.

  1. Hazardous materials incidents on major highways -- A case study

    SciTech Connect

    McElhaney, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    Personnel from both the public and private sectors have been involved for many years in pre-planning for hazardous materials releases at fixed installations all over the world. As a result of several major petroleum releases during marine transportation, oil companies, private contractors and government agencies have been preparing contingency plans for oil spills and other petroleum product releases in marine settings. Various industry groups have also developed plans for railway and pipeline disasters. These response plans are of varying quality, complexity and usefulness. Organizations such as plant emergency response teams, government agencies, contract response and clean-up crews and fire departments use these plans as a basis for training and resource allocation, hopefully becoming familiar enough with them that the plans are truly useful when product releases occur. Planners and emergency responders to hazardous materials releases must overcome some of the deficiencies which have long stood in the way of efficient and effective response and mitigation efforts. Specifically they must recognize and involve all resources with which they may respond or interact during an incident. This involvement should begin with the planning stages and carry through to training and emergency response and recovery efforts. They must ensure that they adopt and utilize a common command and control system and that all potential resources know this system thoroughly and train together before the incident occurs. It is only through incorporating these two factors that may successfully combat the ever growing number of unwanted product releases occurring in the more difficult realm of transportation.

  2. 76 FR 37283 - Hazardous Materials: Revision to the List of Hazardous Substances and Reportable Quantities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 172 RIN 2137-AE74 Hazardous... materials under the Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5101-5128). PHMSA carries out... Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5101 et seq.), which authorizes the......

  3. Navy Shipboard Hazardous Material Minimization Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bieberich, M.J.; Robinson, P.; Chastain, B.

    1994-12-31

    The use of hazardous (and potentially hazardous) materials in shipboard cleaning applications has proliferated as new systems and equipments have entered the fleet to reside alongside existing equipments. With the growing environmental awareness (and additional, more restrictive regulations) at all levels/echelon commands of the DoD, the Navy has initiated a proactive program to undertake the minimization/elimination of these hazardous materials in order to eliminate HMs at the source. This paper will focus on the current Shipboard Hazardous Materials Minimization Program initiatives including the identification of authorized HM currently used onboard, identification of potential substitute materials for HM replacement, identification of new cleaning technologies and processes/procedures, and identification of technical documents which will require revision to eliminate the procurement of HMs into the federal supply system. Also discussed will be the anticipated path required to implement the changes into the fleet and automated decision processes (substitution algorithm) currently employed. The paper will also present the most recent technologies identified for approval or additional testing and analysis including: supercritical CO{sub 2} cleaning, high pressure blasting (H{sub 2}O + baking soda), aqueous and semi-aqueous cleaning materials and processes, solvent replacements and dedicated parts washing systems with internal filtering capabilities, automated software for solvent/cleaning process substitute selection. Along with these technological advances, data availability (from on-line databases and CDROM Database libraries) will be identified and discussed.

  4. Nuclear and hazardous material perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Sandquist, Gary M.; Kunze, Jay F.; Rogers, Vern C.

    2007-07-01

    The reemerging nuclear enterprise in the 21. century empowering the power industry and nuclear technology is still viewed with fear and concern by many of the public and many political leaders. Nuclear phobia is also exhibited by many nuclear professionals. The fears and concerns of these groups are complex and varied, but focus primarily on (1) management and disposal of radioactive waste [especially spent nuclear fuel and low level radioactive waste], (2) radiation exposures at any level, and (3) the threat nuclear terrorism. The root cause of all these concerns is the exaggerated risk perceived to human health from radiation exposure. These risks from radiation exposure are compounded by the universal threat of nuclear weapons and the disastrous consequences if these weapons or materials become available to terrorists or rogue nations. This paper addresses the bases and rationality for these fears and considers methods and options for mitigating these fears. Scientific evidence and actual data are provided. Radiation risks are compared to similar risks from common chemicals and familiar human activities that are routinely accepted. (authors)

  5. Hazardous-materials regulations miscellaneous amendments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-18

    The US Materials Transportation Bureau incorporates changes into its hazardous-materials regulations, including the addition of the word ''flammable'' as part of the shipping name for the proposed entry ''Poisonous liquid or gas''. This final rule is effective as of 9/18/80. The description requirements for the transportation of dangerous substances by air, which would change the words ''Cargo-only aircraft'' to ''Cargo aircraft only'', will become effective on 7/1/83.

  6. Environmental protection for hazardous materials incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Barkenbus, B.D.; Carter, R.J.; Dobson, J.E.; Easterly, C.E.; Ogle, P.S.; VanCleave, A.K.

    1990-02-01

    This document was prepared to provide the US Air Force fire protection community with an integrated program for handling hazardous materials (HAZMAT)s and hazardous material incidents. The goal of the project was to define and identify a computer system for the base fire departments that would facilitate hazard assessment and response during HAZMAT emergencies, provide HAZMAT incident management guidelines, and provide a training tool to simulate emergency response during normal times. Site visits to Air Force bases were made to observe existing HAZMAT related organizations, their methods and procedures used in HAZMAT management, and to collect personnel input for the development of the computerized Hazardous Materials Incident Management System (HMIMS). The study concentrated on defining strategic areas of concern to emergency response personnel. Particular emphasis was given to such areas as responsibilities and roles for response agencies; personnel requirements to handle HAZMAT incidents; procedures to follow during HAZMAT incidents and decontamination; personnel evacuation; postincident evaluation and feedback; emergency response personnel participation in installation restoration program; personal protective clothing; mutual air requirements; and training. Future recommendations were made for purchase, use, storage, disposal, and management of HAZMATs during their life cycle on bases and during incidents. This detailed technical report and the HMIMS are expected to meet the integrated HAZMAT program needs primarily of Air Force fire departments and secondarily in other response agencies. 21 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Hazardous materials information hotline using System 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, J.E.; Fuchel, K.

    1984-04-30

    The Center for Assessment of Chemical and Physical Hazards (CACPH) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a computer hotline service for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors. This service provides access to health and safety information for over 800 chemicals and hazardous materials. The data base uses System 2000 on a CDC 6600 and provides information on the chemical name and its synonyms, 17 categories of health and safety information, composition of chemical mixtures, categories of chemicals, use and hazards, and physical, chemical and toxicity attributes. In order to make this information available to people unfamiliar with System 2000, a user-friendly interface was developed using a Fortran PLEX Program. 1 reference, 1 figure.

  8. Hazardous materials sensing: An electrical metamaterial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Vaishali; Kitture, Rohini; Kumari, Dimple; Rajesh, Harsh; Banerjee, Shaibal; Kale, S. N.

    2016-10-01

    Metamaterials are recently emerging materials exhibiting amazing properties such as extremely miniaturized antennas, waveguides, optical couplers, multiplexers and filters. Such structures also respond to the variation in their ambient conditions when exposed to toxic and hazardous materials, which are especially hazardous to human health. Through this manuscript, we document our studies on three different high energy materials; namely 2- bromo-2nitropropane-1,3-diol (BNP), bis (1,3-diazido prop-2-yl) malonate (AM) and bis (1,3-diazido prop-2-yl) glutarate (AG). A Complementary Split Ring Resonator has been fabricated at resonant frequency of 4.48 GHz using copper on FR4 substrate. The energetic materials were exposed to the sensor and results were monitored using Vector Network Analyzer. The volume of liquids was varied from 0.5 μL to 3 μL. Prominent and explicit shifts in the transmission resonant frequency and amplitude was seen as a signature of each energetic material. The signatures were not only sensitive to the specific toxic group in the material but also to the volume of the liquid subjected to this sensor. The results are correlated with the simulation results, basic chemistry of the materials and permittivity measurements. The ultra-fast reversibility and repeatability, with good sensitivity and specificity of these devices project their applications in sensitive locations, particularly to combat for human security and health issues.

  9. Hazardous materials events: an industrial comparison.

    PubMed

    Burgess, J L; Kovalchick, D F; Harter, L; Kyes, K B; Thompson, J N

    2000-05-01

    Identifying industries at high risk for hazardous materials releases can facilitate prevention and preparation for such events. A retrospective review by Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes was conducted on non-petroleum hazardous materials emergency events from 1993 to 1995 and collected by the Washington State Department of Health in a program supported by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Annual US Census data were used to determine the number of facilities and employees by SIC code in the state of Washington. SIC codes with the most total events and events per 10,000 employees were ranked and characterized by type of releases. In 3 years, 1269 events were recorded, with 294 involving human victims. Industries with the highest average annual number of events per 10,000 employees were agricultural chemical manufacturing (142); petroleum refining (122); industrial and miscellaneous chemical manufacturing (56); electric light and power (54); and pulp, paper, and paperboard mills (39). Industries with high rates of hazardous materials emergency events should continue to develop methods of preventing these releases.

  10. 49 CFR 212.227 - Hazardous materials inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the Federal hazardous materials regulations (49 CFR parts 171 through 174, and 179), to make reports... procedures employed in the railroad, shipping, or manufacturing industries associated with the transportation... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Materials Regulations, including Federal requirements and...

  11. 49 CFR 212.227 - Hazardous materials inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Federal hazardous materials regulations (49 CFR parts 171 through 174, and 179), to make reports... procedures employed in the railroad, shipping, or manufacturing industries associated with the transportation... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Materials Regulations, including Federal requirements and...

  12. 30 CFR 57.16003 - Storage of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Storage of hazardous materials. 57.16003 Section 57.16003 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 57.16003 Storage of hazardous materials. Materials that can create hazards...

  13. 30 CFR 56.16003 - Storage of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Storage of hazardous materials. 56.16003 Section 56.16003 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 56.16003 Storage of hazardous materials. Materials that can create hazards...

  14. 30 CFR 57.16003 - Storage of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Storage of hazardous materials. 57.16003 Section 57.16003 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 57.16003 Storage of hazardous materials. Materials that can create hazards...

  15. 30 CFR 56.16003 - Storage of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Storage of hazardous materials. 56.16003 Section 56.16003 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 56.16003 Storage of hazardous materials. Materials that can create hazards...

  16. 78 FR 17874 - Hazardous Materials: Miscellaneous Petitions for Rulemaking (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 172, 173, 176, 178 RIN 2137-AE79 Hazardous Materials: Miscellaneous Petitions for Rulemaking (RRR) Correction In rule document 2013-04197.... 172.101 0 On page 14713, the Table titled ``Sec. 172.101 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE'' is corrected...

  17. Determining risks for hazardous material operations

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, M. E.; Dare, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    Integrated Safety Management (ISM) is structured to manage and control work at the activity level. Fundamental to ISM is that all work will be performed safely while meeting the applicable institutional-, facility-, and activity-level expectations. High and medium initial risk activities require certain levels of independent peer and/or Environmental, Health & Safety subject matter expert reviews prior to authorization. A key responsibility of line management and chemical workers is to assign initial risk adequately, so that the proper reviews are obtained. Thus, the effectiveness of an ISM system is largely dependent upon the adequacy and accuracy of this initial risk determination. In the following presentation, a Risk Determination Model (RDM) is presented for physical, health and ecological hazards associated with materials. Magnitude of exposure (Le., dose or concentration), frequency, duration, and quantity are the four factors most difficult to capture in a research and development setting. They are factored into the determination, as a function of the quantity of material. Quantity and magnitude of exposure components are simplified by using boundary criteria. This RDM will promote conformity and consistency in the assignment of risk to hazardous material activities. In conclusion, the risk assessors (line manager and chemical worker) should be capable of more accurately assessing the risk of exposure to a specific chemical with regard to the employee, public, and the environment.

  18. 49 CFR 177.801 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HIGHWAY General Information and Regulations § 177.801 Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments. No person may accept for transportation or transport by motor vehicle a forbidden material...

  19. 49 CFR 177.801 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HIGHWAY General Information and Regulations § 177.801 Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments. No person may accept for transportation or transport by motor vehicle a forbidden material...

  20. 30 CFR 57.16004 - Containers for hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Containers for hazardous materials. 57.16004 Section 57.16004 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 57.16004 Containers for hazardous materials. Containers holding hazardous...

  1. 30 CFR 56.16004 - Containers for hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Containers for hazardous materials. 56.16004 Section 56.16004 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 56.16004 Containers for hazardous materials. Containers holding hazardous...

  2. 46 CFR 151.03-30 - Hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-30 Hazardous material. In this part... Agency designates hazardous substances in 40 CFR Table 116.4A. The Coast Guard designates...

  3. 46 CFR 151.03-30 - Hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-30 Hazardous material. In this part... Agency designates hazardous substances in 40 CFR Table 116.4A. The Coast Guard designates...

  4. 46 CFR 151.03-30 - Hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-30 Hazardous material. In this part... Agency designates hazardous substances in 40 CFR Table 116.4A. The Coast Guard designates...

  5. 46 CFR 151.03-30 - Hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-30 Hazardous material. In this part... Agency designates hazardous substances in 40 CFR Table 116.4A. The Coast Guard designates...

  6. 46 CFR 151.03-30 - Hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-30 Hazardous material. In this part... Agency designates hazardous substances in 40 CFR Table 116.4A. The Coast Guard designates...

  7. A Mobile Robot for Remote Response to Incidents Involving Hazardous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will describe a teleoperated mobile robot system being developed at JPL for use by the JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team. The project, which began in October 1990, is focused on prototyping a robotic vehicle which can be quickly deployed and easily operated by HAZMAT Team personnel allowing remote entry and exploration of a hazardous material incident site. The close involvement of JPL Fire Department personnel has been critical in establishing system requirements as well as evaluating the system. The current robot, called HAZBOT III, has been especially designed for operation in environments that may contain combustible gases. Testing of the system with the Fire Department has shown that teleoperated robots can successfully gain access to incident sites allowing hazardous material spills to be remotely located and identified. Work is continuing to enable more complex missions through enhancement of the operator interface and by allowing tetherless operation.

  8. 49 CFR 212.227 - Hazardous materials inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... railroad; (3) Knowledge of the physical and chemical properties and chemical hazards associated with... the Federal hazardous materials regulations (49 CFR parts 171 through 174, and 179), to make...

  9. 49 CFR 212.227 - Hazardous materials inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... railroad; (3) Knowledge of the physical and chemical properties and chemical hazards associated with... the Federal hazardous materials regulations (49 CFR parts 171 through 174, and 179), to make...

  10. 49 CFR 212.227 - Hazardous materials inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... railroad; (3) Knowledge of the physical and chemical properties and chemical hazards associated with... the Federal hazardous materials regulations (49 CFR parts 171 through 174, and 179), to make...

  11. Hazardous material training for transporters and receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    A brief overview is presented of the DOT`s Research and Special Programs Administration`s (RSPA) and OSHA hazardous material training program. Training requirements are compared for redundancy and differences. Specific programs include HAZMAT-DOT, Hazard Communication, HAZWOPER and PPE training. A training management program is proposed that is modular in nature. Goals of the program are to satisfy regulatory requirements in a cog effective manner. Specific areas will be covered using the training requirements in Docket HM-126 as they relate to other OSHA HAZMAT training programs. Training management programs which are not administratively complete or are not functionally relevant can be a source of liability. A non-regulated area is training for personnel conducting testing and maintenance of HAZMAT packaging meeting the requirements of Docket HM-181. The packaging standards meet performance versus construction standards. Without training of maintenance and testing personnel a liability may exist for manufacturers and transporters. A value added training module appended to HM- 126 training can significantly reduce this liability. Modular based safety training management programs reduce training costs and non-compliance liabilities. They allow management to quickly adjust their training program to satisfy changing regulations with a minimal expenditure, of resources, reduced redundancy and a reduction in unnecessary training.

  12. Hazardous materials. Disaster medical planning and response.

    PubMed

    Levitin, H W; Siegelson, H J

    1996-05-01

    Hazardous materials offer a variety of unique challenges to emergency personnel. These agents have immense economic impact, but when mishandled, they become notorious for turning contained accidents into disasters involving the entire community. During a hazmat accident, the victims often ignore the rules of the disaster plan by seeking out the nearest hospital for medical care, regardless of that institution's capabilities. Health care workers rushing to the aid of contaminated individuals, without taking appropriate precautions (i.e., donning PPE), potentially make themselves victims. Disaster preparedness requires planning, policy, and procedure development, hazard analysis, training, and the availability of personal protective equipment for all responding personnel. Presently, the level of hazmat preparedness varies greatly among different hospitals, EMS and fire services, and disaster response teams. These differences in hazmat preparedness can be linked to a variety of factors (lack of awareness, funding, and support) and controversies (types of PPE and level of training required) which have prevented the establishment of a national hazmat policy for most of these organizations. Despite these difficulties, emergency departments continue to be the primary provider of care to contaminated individuals. As a result, emergency physicians must work with their hospital to implement a hazmat decontamination program in order to appropriately care for these individuals. The appendix to this article presents a list of recommendations for hospital hazmat preparedness. It is modeled after existing CDC and OSHA guidelines.

  13. Hazardous materials. Disaster medical planning and response.

    PubMed

    Levitin, H W; Siegelson, H J

    1996-05-01

    Hazardous materials offer a variety of unique challenges to emergency personnel. These agents have immense economic impact, but when mishandled, they become notorious for turning contained accidents into disasters involving the entire community. During a hazmat accident, the victims often ignore the rules of the disaster plan by seeking out the nearest hospital for medical care, regardless of that institution's capabilities. Health care workers rushing to the aid of contaminated individuals, without taking appropriate precautions (i.e., donning PPE), potentially make themselves victims. Disaster preparedness requires planning, policy, and procedure development, hazard analysis, training, and the availability of personal protective equipment for all responding personnel. Presently, the level of hazmat preparedness varies greatly among different hospitals, EMS and fire services, and disaster response teams. These differences in hazmat preparedness can be linked to a variety of factors (lack of awareness, funding, and support) and controversies (types of PPE and level of training required) which have prevented the establishment of a national hazmat policy for most of these organizations. Despite these difficulties, emergency departments continue to be the primary provider of care to contaminated individuals. As a result, emergency physicians must work with their hospital to implement a hazmat decontamination program in order to appropriately care for these individuals. The appendix to this article presents a list of recommendations for hospital hazmat preparedness. It is modeled after existing CDC and OSHA guidelines. PMID:8635411

  14. Waste explosives and other hazardous materials--hazard potential and remedial measures: an overview.

    PubMed

    Pandey, R K; Asthana, S N; Bhattacharya, B; Tiwari, Ila; Ghole, V S

    2007-07-01

    A large amount of energetic materials including propellants, high explosives, pyrotechnics are subjected to disposal either due to expiry of their useful life or rejection in the manufacturing process. The environmental regulations do not allow the hazardous materials for open burning / detonation in view of the health hazard involved in these operations. The present paper describes the hazard potential of energetic materials and associated hazardous chemicals. It also deals with global technological status for remedial measures of hazardous chemicals along with their merits and demerits.

  15. 75 FR 80893 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT..., 2011. Address Comments to: Record Center, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration,...

  16. 49 CFR 172.313 - Poisonous hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TABLE, SPECIAL PROVISIONS, HAZARDOUS MATERIALS COMMUNICATIONS, EMERGENCY RESPONSE INFORMATION, TRAINING... 1,000 kg (2,205 pounds) or more aggregate gross weight of the material in non-bulk packages marked... aggregate gross weight; and (ii) For different materials in both Hazard Zones A and B, with...

  17. Hazardous material training for transporters and receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, D.J.

    1996-08-01

    A number of years ago I attended a seminar where the Chief of Naval Air Training was a speaker. During his presentation he said, {open_quotes}It is not important how much we train, but how well we train.{close_quotes} He went on to enjoin the attendees to develop maintenance, safety and operational training plans that were goal oriented and with a high degree of flexibility to respond to the needs of carrier based aviation. The emphasis of his presentation was on establishing need based goals and dynamic flexibility. That same philosophy has relevance in private sector safety training programs. Why have a relevant and comprehensive hazardous material (HAZMAT) training program? For openers, there can be substantial liabilities incurred by non-compliance with federal, state and local regulations. Although not an indemnification policy, a well managed training program can be an element of defense against tort claims which may include actual and costly punitive damages. A viable training program can also help to accomplish the altruistic objective of protecting the health and safety of employees and thereby decrease the costs of employee turnover. During 1992, over $70 billion worth of mutual funds were traded on the NYSE whose managers included as a primary qualification corporations that were proactive in their environmental health and safety programs. The bottom line is, {open_quotes}It saves you money!{close_quotes}

  18. 49 CFR 172.320 - Explosive hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... required by regulations for commercial explosives specified in 27 CFR part 555, if the national stock... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Explosive hazardous materials. 172.320 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.320 Explosive hazardous materials. (a) Except as...

  19. 49 CFR 172.320 - Explosive hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... required by regulations for commercial explosives specified in 27 CFR part 555, if the national stock... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Explosive hazardous materials. 172.320 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.320 Explosive hazardous materials. (a) Except as...

  20. 49 CFR 172.320 - Explosive hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... required by regulations for commercial explosives specified in 27 CFR part 555, if the national stock... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Explosive hazardous materials. 172.320 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.320 Explosive hazardous materials. (a) Except as...

  1. 49 CFR 173.35 - Hazardous materials in IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... paragraph (h)(1)(iv) of this section. (i) The gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric... hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 50 °C (122 °F). This absolute pressure must not... pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 55 °C (131......

  2. 49 CFR 176.142 - Hazardous materials of extreme flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hazardous materials of extreme flammability. 176... of extreme flammability. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, certain hazardous materials of extreme flammability may not be transported in a vessel carrying Class 1 (explosive)...

  3. 78 FR 8431 - Hazardous Materials: Harmonization with International Standards (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 172 RIN 2137-AE87 Hazardous Materials: Harmonization with International Standards (RRR) Correction In rule document 2012-31243 appearing on pages...

  4. 14 CFR 91.1085 - Hazardous materials recognition training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1085 Hazardous materials recognition training. No program manager may use any person to perform, and no person may perform, any assigned duties and responsibilities for the handling or carriage of hazardous materials (as defined in 49 CFR 171.8), unless that...

  5. 41 CFR 109-43.307-2 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials. 109-43.307-2 Section 109-43.307-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... 43-UTILIZATION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 43.3-Utilization of Excess § 109-43.307-2 Hazardous materials....

  6. 41 CFR 109-43.307-2 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials. 109-43.307-2 Section 109-43.307-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... 43-UTILIZATION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 43.3-Utilization of Excess § 109-43.307-2 Hazardous materials....

  7. 41 CFR 109-43.307-2 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hazardous materials. 109-43.307-2 Section 109-43.307-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... 43-UTILIZATION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 43.3-Utilization of Excess § 109-43.307-2 Hazardous materials....

  8. Oligopyrrole Macrocycles: Receptors and Chemosensors for Potentially Hazardous Materials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Oligopyrroles represent a diverse class of molecular receptors that have been utilized in a growing number of applications. Recently, these systems have attracted interest as receptors and chemosensors for hazardous materials, including harmful anionic species, high-valent actinide cations, and nitroaromatic explosives. These versatile molecular receptors have been used to develop rudimentary colorimetric and fluorimetric assays for hazardous materials. PMID:21465591

  9. 49 CFR 173.35 - Hazardous materials in IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric pressure) measured in the IBC at 55 °C... capacity. (ii) The absolute pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure... hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 55 °C (131 °F). This absolute pressure must......

  10. 49 CFR 173.35 - Hazardous materials in IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... paragraph (h)(1)(iv) of this section. (i) The gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric... hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 50 °C (122 °F). This absolute pressure must not... pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 55 °C (131......

  11. 49 CFR 173.35 - Hazardous materials in IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... paragraph (h)(1)(iv) of this section. (i) The gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric... hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 50 °C (122 °F). This absolute pressure must not... pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 55 °C (131......

  12. 49 CFR 173.35 - Hazardous materials in IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric pressure) measured in the IBC at 55 °C... capacity. (ii) The absolute pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure... hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 55 °C (131 °F). This absolute pressure must......

  13. Hazardous Materials Management Technology. National Voluntary Skills Standard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    Developed by workers, trainers, and professionals in the field, this guide contains a proposed national standard for hazardous materials management technology. The guide first discusses the need for and the development of skills standards, then introduces the hazardous materials management technology standard and the four subgroups of occupations…

  14. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-200 and 89-273-2111, Exxon/Valdez Alaska oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, R.W.; Berardinelli, S.P.; Bender, T.R.

    1991-05-01

    In response to requests from the Laborer's International Union of North America, the Alaska State Health Department, and the United States Coast Guard an evaluation was undertaken of health hazards present during the cleanup of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound. Three field trips were made to the area. The cleanup involved thousands of workers dispersed over hundreds of square miles. After the first two visits, the following issues were targeted for additional evaluation: worker training; adequacy, availability, use and decontamination of personal protective equipment; exposure assessment including a review of prior exposure assessment data, analysis of bulk samples, inhalation exposures, skin exposures, and noise exposures; decontamination procedures; reports of illnesses; and reports of injuries. The authors conclude that at the time of the evaluation, inhalation exposure to volatile components of weathered crude oil was insignificant. Decontamination procedures and the wearing of personal protective equipment were not always effectively and consistently implemented at all sites. The authors recommend measures for future operations of this type, including testing of chemical protective clothing, emergency response plans with provisions for assessment of exposures to volatile organics at the very early stages of cleanup, minimizing exposures to diesel fumes, and that additional general safety recommendations and a proposed surveillance system for tracking injuries be enforced.

  15. Environmental Assessment for the LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, S.E.; Novo, M.G.; Shinn, J.H.

    1986-04-01

    The LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, is being constructed by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). In this Environmental Assessment, environmental consequences of spilling hazardous materials in the Frenchman Flat basin are evaluated and mitigations and recommendations are stated in order to protect natural resources and reduce land-use impacts. Guidelines and restrictions concerning spill-test procedures will be determined by the LGF Test Facility Operations Manager and DOE based on toxicity documentation for the test material, provided by the user, and mitigations imposed by the Environmental Assessment. In addition to Spill Test Facility operational procedures, certain assumptions have been made in preparation of this document: no materials will be considered for testing that have cumulative, long-term persistence in the environment; spill tests will consist of releases of 15 min or less; and sufficient time will be allowed between tests for recovery of natural resources. Geographic limits to downwind concentrations of spill materials were primarily determined from meteorological data, human occupational exposure standards to hazardous materials and previous spill tests. These limits were established using maximum spill scenarios and environmental impacts are discussed as worst case scenarios; however, spill-test series will begin with smaller spills, gradually increasing in size after the impacts of the initial tests have been evaluated.

  16. Hazardous Materials on Board. Second Edition. Marine Advisory Bulletin No. 43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hild, Carl

    Intended for boat captains, this illustrated book describes hazards, activities at risk, precautions to take, and procedures for spills. The inside front and back covers provide general rules for treatment of poisonings and emergency phone numbers. Chapter 1 focuses on recognizing the risk and causes of shipboard hazards and describes hazardous…

  17. Subtask 1.11 -- Spectroscopic field screening of hazardous waste and toxic spills. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grisanti, A.A.

    1997-10-01

    Techniques for the field characterization of soil contamination due to spillage of hazardous waste or toxic chemicals are time-consuming and expensive. Thus more economical, less time-intensive methods are needed to facilitate rapid field screening of contaminated sites. The overall objective of this project is to study the feasibility of using an evanescent field absorbance sensor Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic sensor coupled with cone penetrometry as a field screening method. The specific objectives of this project are as follows: design an accessory for use with FT-IR that interfaces the spectrometer to a cone penetrometer; characterize the response of the FT-IR accessory to selected hydrocarbons in a laboratory-simulated field environment; and determine the ability of the FT-IR-CPT instrument to measure hydrocarbon contamination in soil by direct comparison with a reference method (e.g., Soxhlet extraction followed by gas chromatography) to quantify hydrocarbons from the same soil.

  18. Process of cleaning oil spills and the like

    SciTech Connect

    Breisford, J.A.

    1993-06-01

    A process of cleaning spills of toxic or hazardous materials such as oil, antifreeze, gasoline, and the like from bodies of water, garage floors, roadways and the like, comprising spraying unbonded shredded fiberglass blowing wool composition particles onto the spill, absorbing the spill into the shredded fiberglass blowing wool composition particles, and removing the soaked shredded fiberglass blowing wool composition particles and the spill absorbed therein. An absorbent composition for absorbing spills of toxic or hazardous materials such as oil, antifreeze, gasoline, and like, comprising shredded fiberglass blowing wool particles, and means for absorbing the spill and for stiffening the co-position so that the composition fights against being compressed so that less of the absorbed spill escapes from the composition when it is being removed from the spill, said means including cork particles dispersed in with the fiberglass blowing wool particles. An absorbent sock for absorbing or containing a spill of toxic or hazardous materials such as oil, antifreeze, gasoline, and the like, comprising a hollow tube, said tube being permeable to the toxic or hazardous materials and being made of nylon or polypropylene, and unbonded, shredded fiberglass blowing wool composition particles enclosed in the tube. Apparatus for controlling an oil slick on the surface of water, comprising a craft for traversing the slick, a supply of fiberglass blowing wool composition particles stored on the craft in position for being dispersed, shredding means on the craft for shredding the fiberglass blowing wool particles to form unbonded, shredded fiberglass blowing wool particles, and dispensing means on the craft for dispensing the unbonded, shredded fiberglass blowing wool particles onto the slick.

  19. Advanced Materials Laboratory hazards assessment document

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, B.; Banda, Z.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy Order 55OO.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the AML. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 23 meters. The highest emergency classification is a General Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is a nominal area that conforms to DOE boundaries and physical/jurisdictional boundaries such as fence lines and streets.

  20. Activities for Teaching about Hazardous Materials in the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Robert W.; And Others

    Materials containing hazardous substances present serious problems to human health and to the health of the environment. There are many potential problems related to the site of a house or apartment, the construction materials used in the house or the apartment, products and materials used in and around the home, and disposal of materials.…

  1. Microstructures of superhydrophobic plant leaves - inspiration for efficient oil spill cleanup materials.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, Claudia; Rodrigues da Silva, Isabelle C; Mail, Matthias; Kavalenka, Maryna N; Barthlott, Wilhelm; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2016-08-16

    The cleanup of accidental oil spills in water is an enormous challenge; conventional oil sorbents absorb large amounts of water in addition to oil and other cleanup methods can cause secondary pollution. In contrast, fresh leaves of the aquatic ferns Salvinia are superhydrophobic and superoleophilic, and can selectively absorb oil while repelling water. These selective wetting properties are optimal for natural oil absorbent applications and bioinspired oil sorbent materials. In this paper we quantify the oil absorption capacity of four Salvinia species with different surface structures, water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) and Lotus leaves (Nelumbo nucifera), and compare their absorption capacity to artificial oil sorbents. Interestingly, the oil absorption capacities of Salvinia molesta and Pistia stratiotes leaves are comparable to artificial oil sorbents. Therefore, these pantropical invasive plants, often considered pests, qualify as environmentally friendly materials for oil spill cleanup. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of oil density and viscosity on the oil absorption, and examine how the presence and morphology of trichomes affect the amount of oil absorbed by their surfaces. Specifically, the influence of hair length and shape is analyzed by comparing different hair types ranging from single trichomes of Salvinia cucullata to complex eggbeater-shaped trichomes of Salvinia molesta to establish a basis for improving artificial bioinspired oil absorbents.

  2. A Preliminary Study of Biodegradable Waste as Sorbent Material for Oil-Spill Cleanup

    PubMed Central

    Idris, J.; Eyu, G. D.; Mansor, A. M.; Ahmad, Z.; Chukwuekezie, C. S.

    2014-01-01

    Oil spill constitutes a major source of fresh and seawater pollution as a result of accidental discharge from tankers, marine engines, and underwater pipes. Therefore, the need for cost-effective and environmental friendly sorbent materials for oil spill cleanup cannot be overemphasized. The present work focuses on the preliminary study of empty palm fruit bunch fibre as a promising sorbent material. The morphology of the unmodified empty palm fruit bunch, EPFB fibre, was examined using an optical microcopy, scanning electron microcopy coupled with EDX and X-ray diffraction. The effects of oil volume, fibre weight, and time on oil absorption of EPFB fibre were evaluated with new engine oil from the model oil. The results show that EPFB fibre consists of numerous micro pores, hydrophobic, and partially crystalline and amorphous with approximately 13.5% carbon. The oil absorbency of the fibre increased with the increase in oil volume, immersion time, and fibre weight. However, sorption capacity decreased beyond 3 g in 100 mL. Additionally unmodified EPFB fibre showed optimum oil sorption efficiency of approximately 2.8 g/g within three days of immersion time. PMID:24693241

  3. A preliminary study of biodegradable waste as sorbent material for oil-spill cleanup.

    PubMed

    Idris, J; Eyu, G D; Mansor, A M; Ahmad, Z; Chukwuekezie, C S

    2014-01-01

    Oil spill constitutes a major source of fresh and seawater pollution as a result of accidental discharge from tankers, marine engines, and underwater pipes. Therefore, the need for cost-effective and environmental friendly sorbent materials for oil spill cleanup cannot be overemphasized. The present work focuses on the preliminary study of empty palm fruit bunch fibre as a promising sorbent material. The morphology of the unmodified empty palm fruit bunch, EPFB fibre, was examined using an optical microcopy, scanning electron microcopy coupled with EDX and X-ray diffraction. The effects of oil volume, fibre weight, and time on oil absorption of EPFB fibre were evaluated with new engine oil from the model oil. The results show that EPFB fibre consists of numerous micro pores, hydrophobic, and partially crystalline and amorphous with approximately 13.5% carbon. The oil absorbency of the fibre increased with the increase in oil volume, immersion time, and fibre weight. However, sorption capacity decreased beyond 3 g in 100 mL. Additionally unmodified EPFB fibre showed optimum oil sorption efficiency of approximately 2.8 g/g within three days of immersion time.

  4. Microstructures of superhydrophobic plant leaves - inspiration for efficient oil spill cleanup materials.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, Claudia; Rodrigues da Silva, Isabelle C; Mail, Matthias; Kavalenka, Maryna N; Barthlott, Wilhelm; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    The cleanup of accidental oil spills in water is an enormous challenge; conventional oil sorbents absorb large amounts of water in addition to oil and other cleanup methods can cause secondary pollution. In contrast, fresh leaves of the aquatic ferns Salvinia are superhydrophobic and superoleophilic, and can selectively absorb oil while repelling water. These selective wetting properties are optimal for natural oil absorbent applications and bioinspired oil sorbent materials. In this paper we quantify the oil absorption capacity of four Salvinia species with different surface structures, water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) and Lotus leaves (Nelumbo nucifera), and compare their absorption capacity to artificial oil sorbents. Interestingly, the oil absorption capacities of Salvinia molesta and Pistia stratiotes leaves are comparable to artificial oil sorbents. Therefore, these pantropical invasive plants, often considered pests, qualify as environmentally friendly materials for oil spill cleanup. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of oil density and viscosity on the oil absorption, and examine how the presence and morphology of trichomes affect the amount of oil absorbed by their surfaces. Specifically, the influence of hair length and shape is analyzed by comparing different hair types ranging from single trichomes of Salvinia cucullata to complex eggbeater-shaped trichomes of Salvinia molesta to establish a basis for improving artificial bioinspired oil absorbents. PMID:27529805

  5. A preliminary study of biodegradable waste as sorbent material for oil-spill cleanup.

    PubMed

    Idris, J; Eyu, G D; Mansor, A M; Ahmad, Z; Chukwuekezie, C S

    2014-01-01

    Oil spill constitutes a major source of fresh and seawater pollution as a result of accidental discharge from tankers, marine engines, and underwater pipes. Therefore, the need for cost-effective and environmental friendly sorbent materials for oil spill cleanup cannot be overemphasized. The present work focuses on the preliminary study of empty palm fruit bunch fibre as a promising sorbent material. The morphology of the unmodified empty palm fruit bunch, EPFB fibre, was examined using an optical microcopy, scanning electron microcopy coupled with EDX and X-ray diffraction. The effects of oil volume, fibre weight, and time on oil absorption of EPFB fibre were evaluated with new engine oil from the model oil. The results show that EPFB fibre consists of numerous micro pores, hydrophobic, and partially crystalline and amorphous with approximately 13.5% carbon. The oil absorbency of the fibre increased with the increase in oil volume, immersion time, and fibre weight. However, sorption capacity decreased beyond 3 g in 100 mL. Additionally unmodified EPFB fibre showed optimum oil sorption efficiency of approximately 2.8 g/g within three days of immersion time. PMID:24693241

  6. 49 CFR 173.2 - Hazardous materials classes and index to hazard class definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Division No. (if any) Name of class or division 49 CFR reference for definitions None Forbidden materials... Explosives (with no significant blast hazard) 173.50 1 1.5 Very insensitive explosives; blasting agents...

  7. Household Hazardous Materials and Their Labels: A Reference for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Lillian F.

    Household hazardous materials are products or wastes which are toxic, corrosive, reactive, and/or ignitable. Although common products such as pesticides, oils, gasoline, solvents, cleaners, and polishes are hazardous, students and adults are not always aware of potential dangers. This sourcebook contains definitions and examples of household…

  8. 41 CFR 101-42.202 - Identification of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous... Health Administration (OSHA) regulations found in 29 CFR part 1910 and paragraph 1-602(c) of...

  9. 41 CFR 101-42.202 - Identification of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous... Health Administration (OSHA) regulations found in 29 CFR part 1910 and paragraph 1-602(c) of...

  10. 41 CFR 101-42.202 - Identification of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous... Health Administration (OSHA) regulations found in 29 CFR part 1910 and paragraph 1-602(c) of...

  11. 41 CFR 101-42.202 - Identification of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous... Health Administration (OSHA) regulations found in 29 CFR part 1910 and paragraph 1-602(c) of...

  12. 41 CFR 101-42.202 - Identification of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous... Health Administration (OSHA) regulations found in 29 CFR part 1910 and paragraph 1-602(c) of...

  13. 75 FR 9147 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... associated with the air transport of lithium cells and batteries. PHMSA and FAA will hold a public meeting on... air transportation, eliminate regulatory exceptions for lithium cells and batteries, other than...-AE44 Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous...

  14. Hazardous Materials Chemistry for the Non-Chemist. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Thomas K.; Enholm, Eric J.

    This book provides a basic introduction for the student to hazardous materials chemistry. Coverage of chemistry, rather than non-chemical hazards, is particularly stressed on a level which the layman can understand. Basic terminology is emphasized at all levels, as are simple chemistry symbols, in order to provide the student with an introductory…

  15. 49 CFR 171.16 - Detailed hazardous materials incident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... quantity of hazardous waste; (3) A specification cargo tank with a capacity of 1,000 gallons or greater..., explosion or dangerous evolution of heat (i.e., an amount of heat sufficient to be dangerous to packaging or... material is not— (A) Offered for transportation or transported by aircraft, (B) A hazardous waste, or...

  16. Functional design criteria for the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, P.K.

    1995-03-10

    Within the United States, there are few hands-on training centers capable of providing integrated technical training within a practical application environment. Currently, there are no training facilities that offer both radioactive and chemical hazardous response training. There are no hands-on training centers that provide training for both hazardous material operations and emergency response that also operate as a partnership between organized labor, state agencies, tribes, and local emergency responders within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Available facilities appear grossly inadequate for training the thousands of people at Hanford, and throughout the Pacific Northwest, who are required to qualify under nationally-mandated requirements. It is estimated that 4,000 workers at the Hanford Site alone need hands-on training. Throughout the Pacific Northwest, the potential target audience would be over 30,000 public sector emergency response personnel, as well as another 10,000 clean-up workers represented by organized labor. The HAMMER Training Center will be an interagency-sponsored training center. It will be designed, built, and operated to ensure that clean-up workers, fire fighters, and public sector management and emergency response personnel are trained to handle accidental spills of hazardous materials. Training will cover wastes at clean-up sites, and in jurisdictions along the transportation corridors, to effectively protect human life, property, and the environment.

  17. 49 CFR 173.243 - Bulk packaging for certain high hazard liquids and dual hazard materials which pose a moderate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.243 Bulk packaging for certain high... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain high hazard liquids and dual hazard materials which pose a moderate hazard. 173.243 Section 173.243 Transportation...

  18. 49 CFR 173.243 - Bulk packaging for certain high hazard liquids and dual hazard materials which pose a moderate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Packaging for Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.243 Bulk packaging for certain high... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain high hazard liquids and dual hazard materials which pose a moderate hazard. 173.243 Section 173.243 Transportation...

  19. 14 CFR 145.165 - Hazardous materials training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... training. (a) Each repair station that meets the definition of a hazmat employer under 49 CFR 171.8 must have a hazardous materials training program that meets the training requirements of 49 CFR part...

  20. 14 CFR 145.165 - Hazardous materials training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... training. (a) Each repair station that meets the definition of a hazmat employer under 49 CFR 171.8 must have a hazardous materials training program that meets the training requirements of 49 CFR part...

  1. 14 CFR 145.165 - Hazardous materials training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... training. (a) Each repair station that meets the definition of a hazmat employer under 49 CFR 171.8 must have a hazardous materials training program that meets the training requirements of 49 CFR part...

  2. 14 CFR 145.165 - Hazardous materials training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... training. (a) Each repair station that meets the definition of a hazmat employer under 49 CFR 171.8 must have a hazardous materials training program that meets the training requirements of 49 CFR part...

  3. 14 CFR 145.165 - Hazardous materials training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... training. (a) Each repair station that meets the definition of a hazmat employer under 49 CFR 171.8 must have a hazardous materials training program that meets the training requirements of 49 CFR part...

  4. 49 CFR 174.81 - Segregation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... transportation, commingling of hazardous materials would not occur. Notwithstanding the methods of separation... no explosive substances are carried in the same rail car. (h) Except as provided in paragraph (i)...

  5. SOUTH ELEVATION. THE DWELLING, FLAG TOWER, AND HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH ELEVATION. THE DWELLING, FLAG TOWER, AND HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE SHED ARE VISIBLE IN THE BACKGROUND. - U.S. Coast Guard Lake Worth Inlet Station, Boathouse, Peanut Island, Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, FL

  6. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  7. FUEL CONSERVATION BY THE APPLICATION OF SPILL PREVENTION AND FAILSAFE ENGINEERING (A GUIDELINE MANUAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Goodier, J. L.; Siclari, R. J.; Garrity, P. A.

    1980-10-30

    From a series of nationwide plant surveys dedicated to spill prevention, containment and countermeasure evaluation, coupled with spill response action activities, a need was determined for a spill prevention guideline manual. From Federally accumulated statistics for oil and hazardous substance spills, the authors culled information on spills of hydrocarbon products. In 1978, a total of 1456 oil spills were reported compared to 1451 in 1979. The 1978 spills were more severe, however, since 7;289,163 gallons of oil were accident~y discharged. In 1979, the gallons spilled was reduced to 3,663,473. These figures are derived from reported spills; it is highly possible that an equal amount was spilled and not reported. Spills effectively contained within a plant property that do not enter a n~vigational waterway need not be reported. Needless to say, there is a tremendous annual loss of oil products due to accidental spillage during transportation, cargo transfer, bulk storage and processing. As an aid to plant engineers and managers, Fe~eral workers, fire marshalls and fire and casualty insurance inspectors, the documen~ is offered as a spill prevention guide. The'manual defines state-of-the-art spill prevention practices and automation techniques that can reduce spills caused by human error. Whenever practical, the cost of implementation is provided to aid equipment acquisition and installation budgeting. To emphasize the need for spill prevention activities, historic spills are briefly described after which remedial action is defined in an appropriate section of the manual. The section on plant security goes into considerable depth since to date no Federal agency or traqe association has provided industry with guidelines on this important phase of plant operation. The intent of the document is to provide finger-tip reference material that can be used by interested parties in a nationwide effort to reduce loss of oil from preventable spills.

  8. Hazardous Materials Technician. Technical Committee on Occupational Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Montana Coll., Havre. Montana Center for Vocational Education, Research, Curriculum and Personnel Development.

    This document describes Montana's postsecondary curriculum to prepare hazardous materials technicians. Basic general education requirements are described. The technical skills and the knowledge associated with each are listed in the following categories: (1) site assessment; (2) sampling materials; (3) handling materials; (4) recording data; (5)…

  9. 76 FR 65779 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is hereby... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in... Center, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of...

  10. 76 FR 2950 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is hereby... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, ] additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in... Center, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of...

  11. Conversion of hazardous materials using supercritical water oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Rofer, Cheryl K.; Buelow, Steven J.; Dyer, Richard B.; Wander, Joseph D.

    1992-01-01

    A process for destruction of hazardous materials in a medium of supercritical water without the addition of an oxidant material. The harzardous material is converted to simple compounds which are relatively benign or easily treatable to yield materials which can be discharged into the environment. Treatment agents may be added to the reactants in order to bind certain materials, such as chlorine, in the form of salts or to otherwise facilitate the destruction reactions.

  12. Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

    1991-02-01

    The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  13. The Fate of Hazardous Materials in the Biosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Sandquist, Gary M.

    2006-07-01

    Although nuclear power appears to be expanding as a major global energy source, the disposal of radioactive waste from the nuclear fuel cycle still poses formidable challenges to the full expansion of the nuclear enterprise. The perception that nuclear wastes represent unique and insoluble threats to humans is ill founded. The risk from these radioactive materials is comparable and many ways less severe than other more familiar hazardous materials that are ubiquitous in the biosphere. Radioactive materials decay and reduce in time unlike stable elements. Besides the reduction of radioactive materials through decay, the dilution and dispersion of all hazardous materials by natural forces and events provides the reduction required to make adequate and safe disposal of nuclear waste possible. The ultimate sink for essentially all of these hazardous wastes will prove to be the oceans with their great capacity of dilution and containment. (author)

  14. Design for containment of hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.C. ); McDonald, J.R. )

    1991-03-01

    Department of Energy, (DOE), facilities across the United States, use wind and tornado design and evaluation criteria based on probabilistic performance goals. In addition, other programs such as Advanced Light Water Reactors, New Production Reactors, and Individual Plant Examinations for External Events for commercial nuclear power plants utilize design and evaluation criteria based on probabilistic performance goals. The use of probabilistic performance goals is a departure from design practice for commercial nuclear power plants which have traditionally been designed utilizing a conservative specification of wind and tornado loading combined with deterministic response evaluation methods and permissible behavior limits. Approaches which utilize probabilistic wind and tornado hazard curves for specification of loading and deterministic response evaluation methods and permissible behavior limits are discussed in this paper. Through the use of such design/evaluation approaches, it may be demonstrated that there is high likelihood that probabilistic performance goals can be achieved. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  15. 76 FR 43509 - Hazardous Materials; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... September 29, 2010, PHMSA published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) under this docket HM-218F. (74 FR... Aluminum Association; the American Society for Testing and Materials; and the Institute of Makers of... reviewed the updated American Society for Testing and Materials Standard pertaining to the use of...

  16. Environmental Projects. Volume 9: Construction of hazardous materials storage facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Activities at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC) are carried out in support of seven parabolic dish antennas. These activities may give rise to environmental hazards. This report is one in a series of reports describing environmental projects at GDSCC. The construction of two hazardous materials and wastes storage facilities and an acid-wash facility is described. An overview of the Goldstone complex is also presented along with a description of the environmental aspects of the GDSCC site.

  17. 77 FR 24885 - Hazardous Materials; Miscellaneous Amendments (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... DOT's complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477...-2008-0005 (HM-215J) [74 FR 220] entitled ``Hazardous Materials: Revision to Requirements for the... peroxide) material in lab packs. PHMSA recently received a request for a formal letter of...

  18. 41 CFR 109-44.702-3 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... materials. The Director, Office of Administrative Services and heads of field organizations shall be responsible for the safeguards, notifications, and certifications required by 41 CFR part 101-42 and part 109... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hazardous materials....

  19. 41 CFR 109-44.702-3 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... materials. The Director, Office of Administrative Services and heads of field organizations shall be responsible for the safeguards, notifications, and certifications required by 41 CFR part 101-42 and part 109... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials....

  20. 41 CFR 109-44.702-3 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... materials. The Director, Office of Administrative Services and heads of field organizations shall be responsible for the safeguards, notifications, and certifications required by 41 CFR part 101-42 and part 109... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials....

  1. 75 FR 42364 - Hazardous Materials: Incorporation of Certain Cargo Tank Special Permits Into Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... its degree of hazard, from a high hazard Packing Group I material to a low hazard Packing Group III...\\ Thermoplastic material non-hazardous at room temperature. (2) Cargo tank requirements. Each non-DOT... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 171 and 173 RIN 2137-AE56...

  2. Simplified training for hazardous materials management in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Braithwaite, J.

    1994-12-31

    There are thousands of dangerous situations happening daily in developing countries around the world involving untrained workers and hazardous materials. There are very few if any agencies in developing countries that are charged with ensuring safe and healthful working conditions. In addition to the problem of regulation and enforcement, there are potential training problems due to the level of literacy and degree of scientific background of these workers. Many of these workers are refugees from poorly developed countries who are willing to work no matter what the conditions. Training methods (standards) accepted as state of the art in the United States and other developed countries may not work well under the conditions found in developing countries. Because these methods may not be appropriate, new and novel ways to train workers quickly, precisely and economically in hazardous materials management should be developed. One approach is to develop training programs that use easily recognizable graphics with minimal verbal instruction, programs similar to the type used to teach universal international driving regulations and safety. The program as outlined in this paper could be tailored to any sized plant and any hazardous material handling or exposure situation. The situation in many developing countries is critical, development of simplified training methods for workers exposed to hazardous materials hold valuable market potential and are an opportunity for many underdeveloped countries to develop indigenous expertise in hazardous materials management.

  3. Technology assessment of solar-energy systems. Materials resource and hazardous materials impacts of solar deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffman, Y. M.; Tahami, J. E.

    1982-04-01

    The materials-resource and hazardous-materials impacts were determined by examining the type and quantity of materials used in the manufacture, construction, installation, operation and maintenance of solar systems. The materials requirements were compared with US materials supply and demand data to determine if potential problems exist in terms of future availability of domestic supply and increased dependence on foreign sources of supply. Hazardous materials were evaluated in terms of public and occupational health hazards and explosive and fire hazards. It is concluded that: although large amounts of materials would be required, the US had sufficient industrial capacity to produce those materials; (2) postulated growth in solar technology deployment during the period 1995-2000 could cause some production shortfalls in the steel and copper industry; the U.S. could increase its import reliance for certain materials such as silver, iron ore, and copper; however, shifts to other materials such as aluminum and polyvinylchloride could alleviate some of these problems.

  4. Material and methods for oil spill control and cleanup and extinguishing petroleum fires

    SciTech Connect

    States, J. B.

    1981-02-03

    A dispersal medium is described for cleaning of oil spills and the like and extinguishing petroleum fires. Its major quantitative part consists of a household liquid detergent and also contains eucalyptus oil, bovine urine, alfalfa and vitamin b-6. Methods of oil spill clean-up and fire extinguishing are also described.

  5. Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste

    DOEpatents

    Tranter, Troy J.; Knecht, Dieter A.; Todd, Terry A.; Burchfield, Larry A.; Anshits, Alexander G.; Vereshchagina, Tatiana; Tretyakov, Alexander A.; Aloy, Albert S.; Sapozhnikova, Natalia V.

    2006-10-03

    Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

  6. Hazard assessment of a simulated oil spill on intertidal areas of the St. Lawrence River with SPMD-TOX

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B.T.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Lee, Kenneth; Gauthier, J.

    2004-01-01

    Phytoremediation in a simulated crude oil spill was studied with a "minimalistic" approach. The SPMD-TOX paradigm - a miniature passive sorptive device to collect and concentrate chemicals and microscale tests to detect toxicity - was used to monitor over time the bioavailability and potential toxicity of an oil spill. A simulated crude oil spill was initiated on an intertidal freshwater grass-wetland along the St. Lawrence River southwest of Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. Several phytoremediation treatments were investigated; to dissipate and ameliorate the spill, treatments included nutrient amendments with inorganic nitrogen sources (ammonium nitrate and sodium nitrate) and phosphate (super triple phosphate) with and without cut plants, with natural attenuation (no phytoremedial treatment) as a control. Sequestered oil residues were bioavailable in all oil-treated plots in Weeks 1 and 2. Interestingly, the samples were colored and fluoresced under ultraviolet light. In addition, microscale tests showed that sequestered residues were acutely toxic and genotoxic, as well as that they induced hepatic P450 enzymes. Analysis of these data suggested that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were among the bioavailable residues sequestered. In addition, these findings suggested that the toxic bioavailable fractions of the oil spill and degradation products dissipated rapidly over time because after the second week the water column contained no oil or detectable degradation products in this riverine intertidal wetland. SPMD-TOX revealed no evidence of bioavailable oil products in Weeks 4, 6, 8, and 12. All phytoremediation efforts appeared to be ineffective in changing either the dissipation rate or the ability to ameliorate the oil toxicity. SPMD-TOX analysis of the water columns from these riverine experimental plots profiled the occurrence, dissipation, and influence of phytoremediation on the bioavailability and toxicity of oil products (parent or degradation products

  7. 76 FR 2951 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Hazardous Materials Safety has received the application described herein. Each mode of transportation for... published in accordance with part 107 of the Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5117... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice...

  8. Smoldering combustion hazards of thermal insulation materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlemiller, T.J.; Rogers, F.E.

    1980-07-01

    Work on the smolder ignitability in cellulosic insulation and on thermal analytical characterization of the oxidation of this material is presented. Thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) shows that both retarded and unretarded cellulosic insulation oxidizes in two overall stages, both of which are exothermic. The second stage (oxidation of the char left as a residue of the first stage) is much more energetic on a unit mass basis than the first. However, kinetics and a sufficient exothermicity make the first stage responsible for ignition in most realistic circumstances. Existing smolder retardants such as boric acid have their major effect on the kinetics of the second oxidation stage and thus produce only a rather small (20/sup 0/C) increase in smolder ignition temperature. Several simplified analogs of attic insulations have been tested to determine the variability of minimum smolder ignition temperature. These employed planar or tubular constant temperature heat sources in a thermal environment quite similar to a realistic attic application. Go/no-go tests provided the borderline (minimum) ignition temperature for each configuration. The wide range (150/sup 0/C) of minimum ignition temperatures confirmed the predominant dependence of smolder ignition on heat flow geometry. Other factors (bulk density, retardants) produced much less effect on ignitability.

  9. (abstract) A Mobile Robot for Remote Response to Incidents Involving Hazardous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will report the status of the Emergency Response Robotics project, a teleoperated mobile robot system being developed at JPL for use by the JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team. The project, which began in 1991, has been focused on developing a robotic vehicle which can be quickly deployed by HAZMAT Team personnel for first entry into an incident site. The primary goals of the system are to gain access to the site, locate and identify the hazard, and aid in its mitigation. The involvement of JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team personnel has been critical in guiding the design and evaluation of the system. A unique feature of the current robot, called HAZBOT III, is its special design for operation in combustible environments. This includes the use of all solid state electronics, brushless motors, and internal pressurization. Demonstration and testing of the system with HAZMAT Team personnel has shown that teleoperated robots, such as HAZBOT III, can successfully gain access to incident sites locating and identifying hazardous material spills. Work is continuing to enable more complex missions through the addition of appropriate sensor technology and enhancement of the operator interface.

  10. Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Robert; Wills, Brandon; Kang, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Chlorine gas represents a hazardous material threat from industrial accidents and as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent events involving chlorine disasters and its use by terrorists, discuss pre-hospital considerations and suggest strategies for the initial management for acute chlorine exposure events. PMID:20823965

  11. 49 CFR 172.320 - Explosive hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... product code required by regulations for commercial explosives specified in 27 CFR part 555, if the... accordance with 49 CFR part 107 subpart E and certified in accordance with § 173.65, with the FC number... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Explosive hazardous materials. 172.320 Section...

  12. 49 CFR 172.320 - Explosive hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... product code required by regulations for commercial explosives specified in 27 CFR part 555, if the... accordance with 49 CFR part 107 subpart E and certified in accordance with § 173.65, with the FC number... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Explosive hazardous materials. 172.320 Section...

  13. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... regulations (49 CFR parts 170-180) issued by the Department of Transportation. Except as otherwise provided... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transportation of hazardous materials. 101-42.405 Section 101-42.405 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...

  14. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... regulations (49 CFR parts 170-180) issued by the Department of Transportation. Except as otherwise provided... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Transportation of... Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation...

  15. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... regulations (49 CFR parts 170-180) issued by the Department of Transportation. Except as otherwise provided... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Transportation of... Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation...

  16. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regulations (49 CFR parts 170-180) issued by the Department of Transportation. Except as otherwise provided... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Transportation of... Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation...

  17. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... regulations (49 CFR parts 170-180) issued by the Department of Transportation. Except as otherwise provided... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Transportation of... Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation...

  18. NORTH ELEVATION. HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE SHED IS VISIBLE AT THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH ELEVATION. HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE SHED IS VISIBLE AT THE FAR RIGHT. DOCKSIDE STORAGE SHED IS VISIBLE IN THE DISTANCE. LAKE WORTH INLET AND THE TOWN OF PALM BEACH ARE IN THE BACKGROUND. - U.S. Coast Guard Lake Worth Inlet Station, Boathouse, Peanut Island, Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, FL

  19. 78 FR 42457 - Hazardous Materials: Revision to Fireworks Regulations (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ...PHMSA is revising the Hazardous Materials Regulations applicable to the approval of Division 1.4G consumer fireworks (UN0336 Fireworks) and establishing DOT-approved fireworks certification agencies that provide an alternative to the approval process for Division 1.4G consumer fireworks. PHMSA is also reformatting the procedural regulations pertaining to certification agencies. These actions......

  20. Hazardous Materials in Marine Transportation: A Practical Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Thomas J.; Kichner, Jerzy J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a course offered at the United States Coast Guard Academy that deals with the marine transportation of hazardous materials. Outlines the major topics covered in the course, including marine transportation regulations. Discusses the use of lectures, laboratory demonstrations, and "hands-on" activities in the instructional sequences. (TW)

  1. 76 FR 56304 - Hazardous Materials: Minor Editorial Corrections and Clarifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... 26, 2011 under Docket Number PHMSA-2009-0410 (HM-233B) (76 FR 44496) entitled ``Revisions of Special...-215F) [72 FR 25162], entitled ``Hazardous Materials: Revision and Reformatting of Requirements for the... were added for ``Pyrethroid pesticide, liquid toxic, 6.1, UN3352.'' These entries for...

  2. 49 CFR 383.121 - Requirements for hazardous materials endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Endorsement each applicant must have such knowledge as is required of a driver of a hazardous materials laden vehicle, from information contained in 49 CFR parts 171, 172, 173, 177, 178, and 397 on the following: (a... REGULATIONS COMMERCIAL DRIVER'S LICENSE STANDARDS; REQUIREMENTS AND PENALTIES Required Knowledge and...

  3. Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Training: The Colorado Training Institute. Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Leslie

    The Colorado Training Institute (CTI), established in 1980, is a non-profit, instructional program devoted to promoting hazardous materials safety through education. It has trained over 3,000 emergency response personnel and industry officials and is a unique example of the private and public sectors working together to protect the public from…

  4. 77 FR 39662 - Hazardous Materials; Reverse Logistics (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... enterprise's gross sales are return costs. The third-party logistics providers themselves earn 12% to 15% in... concerns involving ``reverse logistics'' for the transport of hazardous materials as well as identifying... impacts that may result from a reverse logistics rulemaking. G. Privacy Act Anyone is able to search...

  5. 49 CFR 171.16 - Detailed hazardous materials incident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... quantity of hazardous waste; (3) A specification cargo tank with a capacity of 1,000 gallons or greater..., explosion or dangerous evolution of heat (i.e., an amount of heat sufficient to be dangerous to packaging or... solids; and (iv) The material is not— (A) Offered for transportation or transported by aircraft; (B)...

  6. 49 CFR 171.16 - Detailed hazardous materials incident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... quantity of hazardous waste; (3) A specification cargo tank with a capacity of 1,000 gallons or greater..., explosion or dangerous evolution of heat (i.e., an amount of heat sufficient to be dangerous to packaging or...) for solids; and (iv) The material is not— (A) Offered for transportation or transported by...

  7. 49 CFR 171.16 - Detailed hazardous materials incident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... quantity of hazardous waste; (3) A specification cargo tank with a capacity of 1,000 gallons or greater..., explosion or dangerous evolution of heat (i.e., an amount of heat sufficient to be dangerous to packaging or... solids; and (iv) The material is not— (A) Offered for transportation or transported by aircraft; (B)...

  8. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, K.A.; Bolton, P.A.; Robinson, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center.

  9. SB 1082 -- Unified hazardous materials/waste program: Local implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.

    1995-12-31

    California Senate Bill 1082 was signed into law in the fall of 1993 because business and industry believed there were too many hazardous materials inspectors asking the same questions, looking at the same items and requiring similar information on several variations of the same form. Industry was not happy with the large diversity of programs, each with its own inspectors, permits and fees, essentially doing what industry believed was the same inspection. SB 1082 will allow local city and county agencies to apply to the California Environmental Protection Agency to become a Certified Unified Program Agency (CUPA) or work with a CUPA as a Participating Agency (PA) to manage specific program elements. The CUPA will unify six regulatory programs including hazardous waste/tiered permitting, aboveground storage tanks, underground storage tanks, business and area plans/inventory or disclosure, acutely hazardous materials/risk management prevention and Uniform Fire Code programs related to hazardous materials inventory/plan requirements. The bill requires the CUPA to (1) implement a permit consolidation program; (2) implement a single fee system with a state surcharge; (3) consolidate, coordinate and make consistent any local or regional requirements or guidance documents; and (4) implement a single unified inspection and enforcement program.

  10. Analysis of hazardous material releases due to natural hazards in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Hatice; Santella, Nicholas; Steinberg, Laura J; Cruz, Ana Maria

    2012-10-01

    Natural hazards were the cause of approximately 16,600 hazardous material (hazmat) releases reported to the National Response Center (NRC) between 1990 and 2008-three per cent of all reported hazmat releases. Rain-induced releases were most numerous (26 per cent of the total), followed by those associated with hurricanes (20 per cent), many of which resulted from major episodes in 2005 and 2008. Winds, storms or other weather-related phenomena were responsible for another 25 per cent of hazmat releases. Large releases were most frequently due to major natural disasters. For instance, hurricane-induced releases of petroleum from storage tanks account for a large fraction of the total volume of petroleum released during 'natechs' (understood here as a natural hazard and the hazardous materials release that results). Among the most commonly released chemicals were nitrogen oxides, benzene, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Three deaths, 52 injuries, and the evacuation of at least 5,000 persons were recorded as a consequence of natech events. Overall, results suggest that the number of natechs increased over the study period (1990-2008) with potential for serious human and environmental impacts.

  11. Analysis of hazardous material releases due to natural hazards in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Hatice; Santella, Nicholas; Steinberg, Laura J; Cruz, Ana Maria

    2012-10-01

    Natural hazards were the cause of approximately 16,600 hazardous material (hazmat) releases reported to the National Response Center (NRC) between 1990 and 2008-three per cent of all reported hazmat releases. Rain-induced releases were most numerous (26 per cent of the total), followed by those associated with hurricanes (20 per cent), many of which resulted from major episodes in 2005 and 2008. Winds, storms or other weather-related phenomena were responsible for another 25 per cent of hazmat releases. Large releases were most frequently due to major natural disasters. For instance, hurricane-induced releases of petroleum from storage tanks account for a large fraction of the total volume of petroleum released during 'natechs' (understood here as a natural hazard and the hazardous materials release that results). Among the most commonly released chemicals were nitrogen oxides, benzene, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Three deaths, 52 injuries, and the evacuation of at least 5,000 persons were recorded as a consequence of natech events. Overall, results suggest that the number of natechs increased over the study period (1990-2008) with potential for serious human and environmental impacts. PMID:22329456

  12. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  13. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  14. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  15. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  16. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also §...

  17. Method and apparatus for the management of hazardous waste material

    DOEpatents

    Murray, Jr., Holt

    1995-01-01

    A container for storing hazardous waste material, particularly radioactive waste material, consists of a cylindrical body and lid of precipitation hardened C17510 beryllium-copper alloy, and a channel formed between the mated lid and body for receiving weld filler material of C17200 copper-beryllium alloy. The weld filler material has a precipitation hardening temperature lower than the aging kinetic temperature of the material of the body and lid, whereby the weld filler material is post weld heat treated for obtaining a weld having substantially the same physical, thermal, and electrical characteristics as the material of the body and lid. A mechanical seal assembly is located between an interior shoulder of the body and the bottom of the lid for providing a vacuum seal.

  18. Method and apparatus for the management of hazardous waste material

    DOEpatents

    Murray, H. Jr.

    1995-02-21

    A container for storing hazardous waste material, particularly radioactive waste material, consists of a cylindrical body and lid of precipitation hardened C17510 beryllium-copper alloy, and a channel formed between the mated lid and body for receiving weld filler material of C17200 copper-beryllium alloy. The weld filler material has a precipitation hardening temperature lower than the aging kinetic temperature of the material of the body and lid, whereby the weld filler material is post weld heat treated for obtaining a weld having substantially the same physical, thermal, and electrical characteristics as the material of the body and lid. A mechanical seal assembly is located between an interior shoulder of the body and the bottom of the lid for providing a vacuum seal. 40 figs.

  19. Oil Spill!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansberry, Karen Rohrich; Morgan, Emily

    2005-01-01

    An oil spill occurs somewhere in the world almost every day of the year, and the consequences can be devastating. In this month's column, students explore the effects of oil spills on plants, animals, and the environment and investigate oil spill clean-up methods through a simulated oil spill. The activities described in this article give students…

  20. Federal program for regulating highly hazardous materials finally takes off

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, P.C.

    1996-11-01

    The Risk Management Program (RMP) rule, Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act (CAA), was signed on May 24 and finalized on June 20. RMP is one of the most comprehensive, technically based regulatory programs for preventing, detecting and responding to accidental hazardous materials releases to have been issued in recent times. Although facilities have three years to comply, EPA estimates that the rule will affect an estimated 66,000 facilities that store highly hazardous or acutely toxic materials. The 1990 CAA Amendments are designed to prevent accidental releases of highly hazardous chemicals from stationary sources. Two significant regulatory programs that have emerged from the revised CAA are the Process Safety Management (PSM) standard and RMP. PSM is designed to protect employees and regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. RMP`s purpose is to protect the public and the environment from highly hazardous chemicals. It authorizes EPA to create a list of substances (distinct from the list generated under PSM) known to cause serious adverse effects and to implement a program for accidental chemical release prevention.

  1. Routing Hazardous Materials around the District of Columbia Area

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Shih-Miao; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Peterson, B E; Han, Lee; Chin, Charles

    2009-12-01

    ABSTRACT The recent hazardous material (hazmat) shipment ban in Washington, DC has led to debates, legal challenges, and considerations by other major cities to pursue similar actions. This paper presents a methodology for evaluating hazmat shipment routing options on railroad networks under situations such as the shipment ban. A case study involves three alternatives is presented. Population and other vulnerable people within a 0.8 km (or 0.5 mile) radius buffer zone along the rail line are used to evaluate the potential risk associated with ultra hazardous material shipments. Based on this study, it is concluded that moderate increases in ton-km, subsequently time in-transit, will be resulted from the rerouting. On the other hand, the overall population-at-risk will see a reduction. The population-atrisk burden, however, is simply shifted from one location to other locations. This paper also identifies areas for potential follow-up efforts.

  2. HAZBOT - A hazardous materials emergency response mobile robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. W.; Edmonds, G.

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe the progress that has been made towards the development of a mobile robot that can be used by hazardous materials emergency response teams to perform a variety of tasks including incident localization and characterization, hazardous material identification/classification, site surveillance and monitoring, and ultimately incident mitigation. In September of 1991, the HAZBOT II vehicle performed its first end-to-end demonstration involving a scenario in which the vehicle: navigated to the incident location from a distant (150-200 ft.) deployment site; entered a building through a door with thumb latch style handle and door closer; located and navigated to the suspected incident location (a chemical storeroom); unlocked and opened the storeroom's door; climbed over the storeroom's 12 in. high threshold to enter the storeroom; and located and identified a broken container of benzene.

  3. Performance-oriented packagings for hazardous materials: Resource guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This document provides recommendations to US Department of Energy (DOE) shippers regarding packaging that meet performance-oriented packaging requirements implemented by US Department of Transportation (DOT) in rulemaking HM-181 (December 21, 1990) and subsequent actions. The packaging described in this document are certified by their vendor to comply with requirements for Packing Group I, II, or III hazardous materials packaging. The intent of this document is to share information between DOE and contractors and at all DOE facilities.

  4. New approach to inventorying army hazardous materials. A study done for the Eighth U. S. Army, Korea. Volume 2. Hazardous-material data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.J.; Gee, C.S.; Lee, Y.H.; Mikulich, L.R.; Grafmyer, D.E.

    1991-09-01

    The goal of the Army hazardous waste minimization program is to achieve a 50 percent reduction of the hazardous waste generated by calendar year 1992 (CY92), as compared to baseline CY85. A first step in achieving effective hazardous waste management is to conduct a thorough hazardous material inventory. Volume I describes a method created to inventory hazardous material by collecting supply data from Logistics Control Activity (LCA) at the Presidio, San Francisco, CA, an comparing this data with the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) in the Hazardous Material Information System (HMIS). Volume H lists hazardous material data collected for the Eighth U.S. Army (EUSA), Korea. Common elements between the two data bases were compiled, analyzed, and validated. It was found that the intersection of the two data bases created a composite list that substantially reduced the number of nonhazardous wastes included in the individual lists. This method may also be applied to supply data from other Army installations.

  5. Hydrothermal oxidation of Navy shipboard excess hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    LaJeunesse, C.A.; Haroldsen, B.L.; Rice, S.F.; Brown, B.G.

    1997-03-01

    This study demonstrated effective destruction, using a novel supercritical water oxidation reactor, of oil, jet fuel, and hydraulic fluid, common excess hazardous materials found on-board Navy vessels. This reactor uses an advanced injector design to mix the hazardous compounds with water, oxidizer, and a supplementary fuel and it uses a transpiring wall to protect the surface of the reactor from corrosion and salt deposition. Our program was divided into four parts. First, basic chemical kinetic data were generated in a simple, tubular-configured reactor for short reaction times (<1 second) and long reaction times (>5 seconds) as a function of temperature. Second, using the data, an engineering model was developed for the more complicated industrial reactor mentioned above. Third, the three hazardous materials were destroyed in a quarter-scale version of the industrial reactor. Finally, the test data were compared with the model. The model and the experimental results for the quarter-scale reactor are described and compared in this report. A companion report discusses the first part of the program to generate basic chemical kinetic data. The injector and reactor worked as expected. The oxidation reaction with the supplementary fuel was initiated between 400 {degrees}C and 450 {degrees}C. The released energy raised the reactor temperature to greater than 600 {degrees}C. At that temperature, the hazardous materials were efficiently destroyed in less than five seconds. The model shows good agreement with the test data and has proven to be a useful tool in designing the system and understanding the test results. 16 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Oil spill hazard assessment using a reverse trajectory method for the Egadi marine protected area (Central Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Ciappa, Achille; Costabile, Salvatore

    2014-07-15

    The Egadi Marine Protected Area (MPA) on the western side of the Sicily Channel (Central Mediterranean) is exposed to a high risk of oil pollution from the tanker routes connecting the eastern and western basins of the Mediterranean Sea. Areas where an oil spill would do most damage, and thus where surveillance should be concentrated, are identified in this study by Lagrangian tracers tracked backwards in time from points along the MPA perimeter using data spanning six years from 2006 to 2011. Results indicate that the areas where oil surveillance would be most beneficial are segments of the tanker routes south of Sicily (highly frequented) and north of Sicily (scarcely frequented), both extending about 150 miles from November to March and 100 miles in the other months. The third route, close to the Tunisian shore, is the most frequented by oil tankers but the threat period is limited to November and December. PMID:24934441

  7. Ecology and Oil Spills, 17-1. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Quartermaster School, Ft. Lee, VA.

    This single-lesson course in ecology and oil spills for the secondary/postsecondary level comprises one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. The purpose stated for the 2-hour course is to provide students with an understanding of…

  8. Feasibility study--computerized application of the hazardous material regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, J.J.; Green, V.M.; Rawl, R.R.

    1992-09-01

    The feasibility of developing a full expert system for transportation and packaging of hazardous and radioactive materials was initiated within the framework of three subtasks: (1) analysis of commercial packages related to regulation scanning, (2) analysis of computer languages to develop the expert system, and (3) development of expert system prototypes. The strategy to develop the latter subtask was to first,develop modules to capture the knowledge of different areas of transportation and packaging and second, to analyze the feasibility of appending these different modules in one final full package. The individual modules development contemplated one prototype for transporting and packaging of radioactive material and another for transporting hazardous chemical materials. In the event that it is not feasible to link these two packages, the modules can always be used as stand-alone tools, or linked as a single package with some restrictions in their applicability. The work done during this fiscal year has focused on developing a prototype for transporting radioactive materials.

  9. Oil Spills

    MedlinePlus

    ... is to provide scientific support to the U.S. Coast Guard officers in charge of response operations. In addition ... NOAA Responds to Oil Spills While the U.S. Coast Guard oversees all responses to oil spills and chemical ...

  10. 75 FR 52391 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is hereby... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in... special Duenweg, MO. permit to add an additional Division 5.1 hazardous material. 10656-M The...

  11. 49 CFR 176.74 - On deck stowage of break-bulk hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false On deck stowage of break-bulk hazardous materials. 176.74 Section 176.74 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL General Handling and Stowage...

  12. 49 CFR 171.1 - Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to persons and functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... transportation of hazardous materials that the Secretary considers appropriate. In 49 CFR 1.53, the Secretary... Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR; 49 CFR Parts 171 through 180) under that delegated authority. This... commerce. Transportation of a hazardous material in commerce begins when a carrier takes...

  13. 49 CFR 171.1 - Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to persons and functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... transportation of hazardous materials that the Secretary considers appropriate. In 49 CFR 1.53, the Secretary... Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR; 49 CFR parts 171 through 180) under that delegated authority. This... commerce. Transportation of a hazardous material in commerce begins when a carrier takes...

  14. 48 CFR 252.223-7006 - Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. 252.223-7006 Section 252.223-7006 Federal Acquisition... and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. As prescribed in 223.7103(a), use the following clause: Prohibition on Storage and Disposal of Toxic and Hazardous Materials (APR 1993) (a) Definitions. As used...

  15. 48 CFR 252.223-7006 - Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. 252.223-7006 Section 252.223-7006 Federal Acquisition... and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. As prescribed in 223.7103(a), use the following clause: Prohibition on Storage and Disposal of Toxic and Hazardous Materials (APR 2012) (a) Definitions. As used...

  16. 76 FR 77588 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is hereby... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in...: Record Center, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of...

  17. 49 CFR 172.312 - Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings... INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.312 Liquid hazardous materials in non... packagings containing liquid hazardous materials, single packaging fitted with vents, or open...

  18. 49 CFR 172.312 - Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings... INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.312 Liquid hazardous materials in non... packagings containing liquid hazardous materials, single packaging fitted with vents, or open...

  19. 49 CFR 172.312 - Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings... INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.312 Liquid hazardous materials in non... packagings containing liquid hazardous materials, single packaging fitted with vents, or open...

  20. 49 CFR 172.312 - Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings... INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.312 Liquid hazardous materials in non... packagings containing liquid hazardous materials, single packaging fitted with vents, or open...

  1. 49 CFR 172.312 - Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings... INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.312 Liquid hazardous materials in non... packagings containing liquid hazardous materials, single packaging fitted with vents, or open...

  2. 76 FR 4276 - Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... actions and repairs. See 60 FR 65,492 and 65,495 (December 19, 1995); 61 FR 28,666 and 28,669 (June 5, 1996); and 65 FR 50,450 and 50,455 (August 18, 2000). The number of movement approvals issued by FRA... materials regulations (HMR; 49 CFR parts 171-180). The genesis of 49 CFR 174.50 was the 1996...

  3. Spill prevention control and countermeasure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This report includes facility descriptions for both oil and hazardous chemicals storage. It gives oil spill history; regulatory guideline conformance; local emergency arrangements; evacuation procedures and the contingency plan for oil and hazardous substances. (PSB)

  4. Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Gotovchikov, Vitaly T.; Ivanov, Alexander V.; Filippov, Eugene A.

    1998-05-12

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

  5. Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

    1998-05-12

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

  6. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested

  7. The Exxon Valdez oil spill; The environmental health response to man-made disasters

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, R.

    1990-01-01

    The environmental health professions faced many challenges in 1989, among them the protection of public health in the wake of both natural and man-made disasters. Following hurricanes in the Caribbean and southeast United States, the earthquake in northern California and the Exxon oil spill in Alaska, environmental health officials and consultants were confronted with extraordinary problems concerning housing, drinking water, hazardous materials spills, solid waste management, waste water management and sanitation. This article discusses the environmental health response to one of these events - the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

  8. 49 CFR 1.97 - Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous... ORGANIZATION AND DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.97 Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator. The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

  9. 49 CFR 1.97 - Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous... ORGANIZATION AND DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.97 Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator. The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

  10. 49 CFR 1.97 - Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous... ORGANIZATION AND DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.97 Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator. The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

  11. 49 CFR 176.69 - General stowage requirements for hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL General Handling and Stowage § 176.69 General stowage requirements for hazardous... in the position indicated during transportation. (c) If a vessel designed for and carrying hazardous materials in freight containers or a vessel designed for and carrying hazardous materials in barges...

  12. 49 CFR 176.69 - General stowage requirements for hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL General Handling and Stowage § 176.69 General stowage requirements for hazardous... in the position indicated during transportation. (c) If a vessel designed for and carrying hazardous materials in freight containers or a vessel designed for and carrying hazardous materials in barges...

  13. 49 CFR 176.69 - General stowage requirements for hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL General Handling and Stowage § 176.69 General stowage requirements for hazardous... in the position indicated during transportation. (c) If a vessel designed for and carrying hazardous materials in freight containers or a vessel designed for and carrying hazardous materials in barges...

  14. 49 CFR 176.69 - General stowage requirements for hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL General Handling and Stowage § 176.69 General stowage requirements for hazardous... in the position indicated during transportation. (c) If a vessel designed for and carrying hazardous materials in freight containers or a vessel designed for and carrying hazardous materials in barges...

  15. 76 FR 77589 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... Hazardous Materials Safety has received the application described herein. Each mode of transportation for... special permit is published in accordance with Part 107 of the Federal hazardous materials transportation... authorize the Auroroa, NY. Subpart C. transportation in commerce of certain waste hazardous...

  16. 49 CFR 176.72 - Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials. 176.72 Section 176.72 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... VESSEL General Handling and Stowage § 176.72 Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials. (a) A metal...

  17. 49 CFR 176.72 - Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials. 176.72 Section 176.72 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... VESSEL General Handling and Stowage § 176.72 Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials. (a) A metal...

  18. 40 CFR 262.215 - Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... subpart or to the RCRA hazardous waste regulations. (b) If an unwanted material does not meet the definition of hazardous waste in § 261.3, it is no longer subject to this subpart or to the RCRA...

  19. 40 CFR 262.215 - Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subpart or to the RCRA hazardous waste regulations. (b) If an unwanted material does not meet the definition of hazardous waste in § 261.3, it is no longer subject to this subpart or to the RCRA...

  20. 40 CFR 262.215 - Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... subpart or to the RCRA hazardous waste regulations. (b) If an unwanted material does not meet the definition of hazardous waste in § 261.3, it is no longer subject to this subpart or to the RCRA...

  1. 40 CFR 262.215 - Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... subpart or to the RCRA hazardous waste regulations. (b) If an unwanted material does not meet the definition of hazardous waste in § 261.3, it is no longer subject to this subpart or to the RCRA...

  2. A multimodal location and routing model for hazardous materials transportation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuanchang; Lu, Wei; Wang, Wen; Quadrifoglio, Luca

    2012-08-15

    The recent US Commodity Flow Survey data suggest that transporting hazardous materials (HAZMAT) often involves multiple modes, especially for long-distance transportation. However, not much research has been conducted on HAZMAT location and routing on a multimodal transportation network. Most existing HAZMAT location and routing studies focus exclusively on single mode (either highways or railways). Motivated by the lack of research on multimodal HAZMAT location and routing and the fact that there is an increasing demand for it, this research proposes a multimodal HAZMAT model that simultaneously optimizes the locations of transfer yards and transportation routes. The developed model is applied to two case studies of different network sizes to demonstrate its applicability. The results are analyzed and suggestions for future research are provided.

  3. Managing hazardous material conditions in wastewater collections systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, C.

    1994-12-31

    As modern industrial processes make greater and greater use of an ever increasing array of chemical substances the risk of these materials entering public sewer systems increases commensurately. Compounding this problem is the additional issue of a large population of single walled underground storage tanks now reaching the end of their safe-use lifespan while continuing in service. Tanks first put into underground service twenty to thirty years ago are now beginning to fail in ever increasing numbers releasing hazardous substances into the Vadose zone and ultimately into waste-water collection infrastructures. This paper, through the examination of a case study involving diesel fuel in a large, municipal waste-water collection system, offers a prototypical methodology for the management of such incidents.

  4. A multimodal location and routing model for hazardous materials transportation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuanchang; Lu, Wei; Wang, Wen; Quadrifoglio, Luca

    2012-08-15

    The recent US Commodity Flow Survey data suggest that transporting hazardous materials (HAZMAT) often involves multiple modes, especially for long-distance transportation. However, not much research has been conducted on HAZMAT location and routing on a multimodal transportation network. Most existing HAZMAT location and routing studies focus exclusively on single mode (either highways or railways). Motivated by the lack of research on multimodal HAZMAT location and routing and the fact that there is an increasing demand for it, this research proposes a multimodal HAZMAT model that simultaneously optimizes the locations of transfer yards and transportation routes. The developed model is applied to two case studies of different network sizes to demonstrate its applicability. The results are analyzed and suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:22633882

  5. [Preparation and performance investigation of Trichoderma viride-modified corn stalk as sorbent materials for oil spills].

    PubMed

    Lan, Zhou-Lin; Peng, Dan; Guo, Chu-Ling; Zhu, Chao-Fei; Xue, Xiu-Ling; Dang, Zhi

    2013-04-01

    This work aims at preparing oil spill sorbent (TCS, Trichoderma viride-modified corn stalk) through solid-state fermentation of corn stalk by Trichoderma viride. Single-factor experiments, including the effect of modification time, solid-liquid ratio of modification and modification temperature, and adsorption experiments simulating oil spill condition, were carried out. The results indicated that the maximum oil adsorption of TCS, 13.84 g x g(-1), could be obtained under the conditions of 6 days of modification, with a solid-liquid ratio of 1:4 and a modification temperature of 25 degrees C. This oil absorption was 110.33% of that of the raw material (RCS, Raw Corn Stalk). Comparing RCS and TCS by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD), the results separately showed that TCS had rougher surface, lower cellulose content and higher instability, which explains the increase of oil absorption. Also, the component analysis indicated that bio-modification could reduce the contents of celluloses and hemicelluloses from corn stalk. Besides, sorption kinetics and oil retention performance test showed that, TCS, which could reach adsorption equilibrium after 1 h of 80 r x min(-1) oscillating, had fast oil adsorption rate, and it also had good oil retention performance, which could keep 74. 87% of the initial adsorption rate when trickling 10 min after reaching adsorption equilibrium.

  6. [Preparation and performance investigation of Trichoderma viride-modified corn stalk as sorbent materials for oil spills].

    PubMed

    Lan, Zhou-Lin; Peng, Dan; Guo, Chu-Ling; Zhu, Chao-Fei; Xue, Xiu-Ling; Dang, Zhi

    2013-04-01

    This work aims at preparing oil spill sorbent (TCS, Trichoderma viride-modified corn stalk) through solid-state fermentation of corn stalk by Trichoderma viride. Single-factor experiments, including the effect of modification time, solid-liquid ratio of modification and modification temperature, and adsorption experiments simulating oil spill condition, were carried out. The results indicated that the maximum oil adsorption of TCS, 13.84 g x g(-1), could be obtained under the conditions of 6 days of modification, with a solid-liquid ratio of 1:4 and a modification temperature of 25 degrees C. This oil absorption was 110.33% of that of the raw material (RCS, Raw Corn Stalk). Comparing RCS and TCS by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD), the results separately showed that TCS had rougher surface, lower cellulose content and higher instability, which explains the increase of oil absorption. Also, the component analysis indicated that bio-modification could reduce the contents of celluloses and hemicelluloses from corn stalk. Besides, sorption kinetics and oil retention performance test showed that, TCS, which could reach adsorption equilibrium after 1 h of 80 r x min(-1) oscillating, had fast oil adsorption rate, and it also had good oil retention performance, which could keep 74. 87% of the initial adsorption rate when trickling 10 min after reaching adsorption equilibrium. PMID:23798149

  7. Using transportation accident databases to investigate ignition and explosion probabilities of flammable spills.

    PubMed

    Ronza, A; Vílchez, J A; Casal, J

    2007-07-19

    Risk assessment of hazardous material spill scenarios, and quantitative risk assessment in particular, make use of event trees to account for the possible outcomes of hazardous releases. Using event trees entails the definition of probabilities of occurrence for events such as spill ignition and blast formation. This study comprises an extensive analysis of ignition and explosion probability data proposed in previous work. Subsequently, the results of the survey of two vast US federal spill databases (HMIRS, by the Department of Transportation, and MINMOD, by the US Coast Guard) are reported and commented on. Some tens of thousands of records of hydrocarbon spills were analysed. The general pattern of statistical ignition and explosion probabilities as a function of the amount and the substance spilled is discussed. Equations are proposed based on statistical data that predict the ignition probability of hydrocarbon spills as a function of the amount and the substance spilled. Explosion probabilities are put forth as well. Two sets of probability data are proposed: it is suggested that figures deduced from HMIRS be used in land transportation risk assessment, and MINMOD results with maritime scenarios assessment. Results are discussed and compared with previous technical literature.

  8. Regulation of the transportation of hazardous materials: a critique and a proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    This article is a description and analysis of the system of regulation of hazardous-materials transportation and a proposal for reform. It has four parts. Part I surveys the present scheme of federal, state, and local safety regulation of hazardous-materials transportation. Part II describes the failures of the present regulatory system and presents a framework for analyzing alternative approaches to preventing hazardous-materials-transportation accidents. Part III compares the present system with one such alternative, a system of strict liability. Part IV is a proposal for reforming hazardous-materials-transportation regulation by deregulating materials that are not extremely hazardous, and imposing strict liability on all transporters of hazardous materials.

  9. The leaking tank car on TC-4. [Industry and government response to hazardous material emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    Most hazardous waste spills are taken care of by the industries directly involved. U.S. EPA's Emergency Response Program encourages industry and the States to take all possible countermeasures without federal intervention.An example is given of an incident involving a leak of approximately one ton of sulfur dioxide from a tank car in Kansas. What might have been a serious problem was controlled successfully by a railroad environmental emergency response team with no injuries to the team personnel or to the community. (JMT)

  10. Smoldering combustion hazards of thermal-insulation materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlemiller, J.

    1981-08-01

    The smoldering combustion hazards of cellulosic loose fill insulation materials fall into three categories: smolder initiation, smolder propagation, and transition from smoldering into flaming. Previous findings on the initiation problem are summarized briefly. They serve as the basis for recommendations on an improved smolder ignition test method which is designed to give ignition temperatures comparable to those in practice. The proposed test method requires checking against full-scale mock-up results before it can be considered for implementation. Smolder propagation, driven by buoyant convection, through a thick (18 cm) layer of cellulosic insulation has been extensively examined. A heavy (25% add-on) loading of boric acid (a widely used smolder retardant) cuts the propagation rate in half (from approx. 0.3 to 0.15 cm/min) but does not come close to stopping this process. Analysis of experimental profiles for temperature, oxygen level, and remaining organic fraction strongly indicates that the smolder wave is oxygen-supply controlled and that it involves both first and second stages of oxidative heat release from the insulation material. The balance of involvement of the two stages varies with depth in the layer. It appears that efforts to develop improved means of suppressing smolder propagation must be directed at the entire oxidation process. However, since boric acid is fairly effective at slowing the second stage of oxidation, most new efforts should be aimed at the first stage of oxidation (which also is responsible for smolder initiation).

  11. Rapid test for the detection of hazardous microbiological material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordmueller, Mario; Bohling, Christian; John, Andreas; Schade, Wolfgang

    2009-09-01

    After attacks with anthrax pathogens have been committed since 2001 all over the world the fast detection and determination of biological samples has attracted interest. A very promising method for a rapid test is Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS is an optical method which uses time-resolved or time-integrated spectral analysis of optical plasma emission after pulsed laser excitation. Even though LIBS is well established for the determination of metals and other inorganic materials the analysis of microbiological organisms is difficult due to their very similar stoichiometric composition. To analyze similar LIBS-spectra computer assisted chemometrics is a very useful approach. In this paper we report on first results of developing a compact and fully automated rapid test for the detection of hazardous microbiological material. Experiments have been carried out with two setups: A bulky one which is composed of standard laboratory components and a compact one consisting of miniaturized industrial components. Both setups work at an excitation wavelength of λ=1064nm (Nd:YAG). Data analysis is done by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) with an adjacent neural network for fully automated sample identification.

  12. Evaluation of electrospun polyvinyl chloride/polystyrene fibers as sorbent materials for oil spill cleanup.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haitao; Qiu, Shanshan; Jiang, Wei; Wu, Daxiong; Zhang, Canying

    2011-05-15

    A novel, high-capacity oil sorbent consisting of polyvinyl chloride (PVC)/polystyrene (PS) fiber was prepared by an electrospinning process. The sorption capacity, oil/water selectivity, and sorption mechanism of the PVC/PS sorbent were studied. The results showed that the sorption capacities of the PVC/PS sorbent for motor oil, peanut oil, diesel, and ethylene glycol were 146, 119, 38, and 81 g/g, respectively. It was about 5-9 times that of a commercial polypropylene (PP) sorbent. The PVC/PS sorbent also had excellent oil/water selectivity (about 1000 times) and high buoyancy in the cleanup of oil over water. The SEM analysis indicated that voids among fibers were the key for the high capacity. The electrospun PVC/PS sorbent is a better alternative to the widely used PP sorbent for oil spill cleanup.

  13. 49 CFR 171.1 - Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to persons and functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... materials in commerce, as the Secretary considers appropriate. The Secretary is authorized to apply these regulations to persons who transport hazardous materials in commerce. In addition, the law authorizes the Secretary to apply these regulations to persons who cause hazardous materials to be transported in...

  14. 49 CFR 171.1 - Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to persons and functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... materials in commerce, as the Secretary considers appropriate. The Secretary is authorized to apply these regulations to persons who transport hazardous materials in commerce. In addition, the law authorizes the Secretary to apply these regulations to persons who cause hazardous materials to be transported in...

  15. 48 CFR 252.223-7006 - Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 102 of CERCLA (42 U.S.C. 9602) (40 CFR part 302); (ii) Materials that are of an explosive, flammable... disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. 252.223-7006 Section 252.223-7006 Federal Acquisition... and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. As prescribed in 223.7103(a), use the following...

  16. 48 CFR 252.223-7006 - Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 102 of CERCLA (42 U.S.C. 9602) (40 CFR part 302); (ii) Materials that are of an explosive, flammable... disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. 252.223-7006 Section 252.223-7006 Federal Acquisition... and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. As prescribed in 223.7103(a), use the following...

  17. The Element of Surprise: Preparing for the Possibility of Hazardous Materials within Archival Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Judith A.

    2007-01-01

    Unprocessed archival collections can contain unknown and potentially hazardous materials that can be harmful to other collections and staff. Archival literature largely focuses on collection and personnel dangers posed by environmental hazards such as mold and insect infestation but not on pharmaceutical and chemical hazards. In this article, the…

  18. 77 FR 60334 - New Marking Standards for Parcels Containing Hazardous Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) published final rule HM-215K (76 FR 3308- 3389), which... class 5.1 (oxidizing substances), hazard class 5.2 (organic peroxides) and hazard class 8 (corrosives...'' column (only) as follows:] 5 Oxidizing Substances, Only Mailable Limited Organic Peroxides....

  19. 49 CFR 175.25 - Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... For further information contact your airline representative. (b) Ticket purchase. An aircraft operator... airline representative), passenger notification of permitted and forbidden hazardous materials may...

  20. Assessment of synfuel spill cleanup options

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, S.E.; Wakamiya, W.; English, C.J.; Strand, J.A.; Mahlum, D.D.

    1982-04-01

    Existing petroleum-spill cleanup technologies are reviewed and their limitations, should they be used to mitigate the effects of synfuels spills, are discussed. The six subsections of this report address the following program goals: synfuels production estimates to the year 2000; possible sources of synfuel spills and volumes of spilled fuel to the year 2000; hazards of synfuels spills; assessment of existing spill cleanup technologies for oil spills; assessment of cleanup technologies for synfuel spills; and disposal of residue from synfuel spill cleanup operations. The first goal of the program was to obtain the most current estimates on synfuel production. These estimates were then used to determine the amount of synfuels and synfuel products likely to be spilled, by location and by method of transportation. A review of existing toxicological studies and existing spill mitigation technologies was then completed to determine the potential impacts of synthetic fuel spills on the environment. Data are presented in the four appendixes on the following subjects: synfuel production estimates; acute toxicity of synfuel; acute toxicity of alcohols.

  1. Hazardous materials readiness of United States level 1 trauma centers.

    PubMed

    Ghilarducci, D P; Pirrallo, R G; Hegmann, K T

    2000-07-01

    Injuries caused by hazardous materials (hazmat) accidents are common in the United States, and emergency departments should be capable of decontaminating these patients. There are, however, no national studies that assess emergency department preparedness. The purpose of this survey was to assess the hazmat readiness of US Level 1 trauma centers (TCs). All 1996 Hospital Blue Book TCs (256) were queried by anonymous survey; 61% (156) responded to the survey. The TCs treated 43,046 +/- 28,455 patients (median, 40,500; range, 600 to 220,000); 15 +/- 29 (median, 6; range, 0 to 200) were hazmat-contaminated. Only 6% acknowledged having all necessary equipment required for safe decontamination. Many (83%) had hazmat response plans, but few (30%) of these plans were complete. Approximately 36% of the staff had received training. Thirteen staff required medical attention themselves after rendering care to a contaminated patient. Only 58% of the TCs performed a single drill. The preparedness of US Level 1 TCs to safely decontaminate hazmat patients seems to be inadequate.

  2. International Symposia on Integrated Exposure Assessment for Hazardous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ho-Jang; Ha, Mina

    2012-01-01

    Objectives On September 2, 2010 and November 25, 2011, the Korean Research Project on Integrated Exposure Assessment to Hazardous Materials for Food Safety (KRIEFS) organized two international symposia in Seoul, Korea. KRIEFS, established by the Korean Food and Drug Administration in March 2010, envisioned these international symposia as means to obtain advanced experiences from other countries and to reflect on and refine the KRIEFS's survey design and methods. Methods For the first symposium KRIEFS invited human biomonitoring (HBM) experts from Germany, the US, and Canada. The visiting HBM experts shared the details of their national studies while the KRIEFS discussed study design, as well as the methods, results and policymaking processes of the KRIEFS project. The second symposium was organized to share the survey design and results on endocrine disruptors from Taiwan. Results The Speaker from Germany introduced the German Environmental Survey and shared their experiences in HBM design, such as the process of developing reference values, and discussed the new HBM plan in Germany and the European Union. The Representative from Canada shared insights from national HBM approach. In the case of the US, the speaker focused on risk communication with subjects in epidemiological studies. In the second international symposium, the speaker shared the experience of endocrine disruptors'studies from Taiwan. Conclusions KRIEFS was able to better understand previous nationwide HBM research designs, policy making process, and risk communication with research subjects.

  3. Hazard control indices for radiological and non-radiological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boothe, G.F.

    1994-12-21

    This document devises a method of comparing radiological and non-radiological hazard control levels. Such a comparison will be useful in determining the design control features for facilities that handle radioactive mixed waste. The design control features of interest are those that assure the protection of workers and the environment from unsafe airborne levels of radiological or non-radiological hazards.

  4. 33 CFR 127.1313 - Storage of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Operations § 127.1313 Storage of... the marine transfer area for LHG: (1) The LHG being transferred. (2) Fuel required by the vessel,...

  5. 33 CFR 127.1313 - Storage of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Operations § 127.1313 Storage of... the marine transfer area for LHG: (1) The LHG being transferred. (2) Fuel required by the vessel,...

  6. 33 CFR 127.1313 - Storage of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Operations § 127.1313 Storage of... the marine transfer area for LHG: (1) The LHG being transferred. (2) Fuel required by the vessel,...

  7. 33 CFR 127.1313 - Storage of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Operations § 127.1313 Storage of... the marine transfer area for LHG: (1) The LHG being transferred. (2) Fuel required by the vessel,...

  8. 33 CFR 127.1313 - Storage of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Operations § 127.1313 Storage of... the marine transfer area for LHG: (1) The LHG being transferred. (2) Fuel required by the vessel,...

  9. Bioremediation for marine oil spills

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The study examines the potential of bioremediation technologies to clean up marine oil spills and to minimize the damage they cause. Thus, the study evaluates a small, but highly visible, subset of the many possible applications of bioremediation technologies to environmental problems. Among the other applications for which bioremediation is being considered or is currently in use are: (1) treatment of nontoxic liquid and solid wastes; (2) treatment of toxic or hazardous wastes; (3) treatment of contaminated groundwater, and (4) grease decomposition. Although recent marine oil spills and bioremediation efforts have called attention to the potential of bioremediation as an oil spill response technology, some of the other applications, in particular the treatment of hazardous waste, appear to have greater potential. Officials at approximately 135 hazardous waste sites, for example, are now either considering, planning, or operating full-scale bioremediation systems.

  10. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    John A. McLachlan

    2003-12-01

    In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how

  11. 49 CFR 1.96 - The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.96 The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. Is responsible for: (a) Pipelines. (1) Administering a national program of safety in natural...

  12. 49 CFR 1.96 - The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.96 The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. Is responsible for: (a) Pipelines. (1) Administering a national program of safety in natural...

  13. 49 CFR 1.96 - The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.96 The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. Is responsible for: (a) Pipelines. (1) Administering a national program of safety in natural...

  14. 78 FR 69745 - Safety and Security Plans for Class 3 Hazardous Materials Transported by Rail

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... rail transportation of Class 3 hazardous materials, including FRA's Emergency Order No. 28 (78 FR 48218 (EO 28)); the agencies' Joint Safety Advisory published on August 7, 2013 (78 FR 48224) (First Joint... of hazardous materials by rail (78 FR 42998); the referral of safety issues related to EO 28 and...

  15. 41 CFR 101-42.404 - Special requirements for the sale of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the sale of hazardous materials. 101-42.404 Section 101-42.404 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY...

  16. 41 CFR 101-42.401 - Sales responsibilities for hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for hazardous materials. 101-42.401 Section 101-42.401 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY...

  17. 40 CFR 262.215 - Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unwanted material that is not solid or... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Alternative... Eligible Academic Entities § 262.215 Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste. (a) If...

  18. 76 FR 37887 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of... the International, 173.60-173.62. transportation in LLC, Lone Jack, MO. commerce of Fireworks...

  19. 77 FR 76604 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR Part 107, Subpart B), notice is hereby... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in....173(b)(2). permit to authorize an Services, Inc., additional packaging. Norwell, MA. 14848-M...

  20. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  1. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  2. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  3. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  4. 41 CFR 101-42.302 - Responsibilities for donation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of 29 CFR 1910.1200. The State agency and/or donee shall sign the certification in § 101-42.301(b... donation of hazardous materials. 101-42.302 Section 101-42.302 Public Contracts and Property Management...-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.302 Responsibilities...

  5. 41 CFR 101-42.302 - Responsibilities for donation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of 29 CFR 1910.1200. The State agency and/or donee shall sign the certification in § 101-42.301(b... donation of hazardous materials. 101-42.302 Section 101-42.302 Public Contracts and Property Management...-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.302 Responsibilities...

  6. Regulations for the transportation of hazardous materials, including liquefied gases, by vessels: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    An overview covers the US domestic regulations enforced by the US Coast Guard and the international standards established by the Intergovernmental Maritime Consultative Organization regarding the safe maritime transport of hazardous materials; the organizations involved; the types of regulatory requirements imposed; and the interplay between domestic and international standards for the transport of hazardous materials.

  7. 49 CFR 171.1 - Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to persons and functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... transportation of hazardous materials that the Secretary considers appropriate. In 49 CFR 1.53, the Secretary... Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR; 49 CFR Parts 171 through 180) under that delegated authority. This... the movement is on or crosses a public road or is on track that is part of the general railroad...

  8. Hazardous Materials Technology: A Community College's Response to a Critical Employment Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedel, Janice N.; And Others

    Studies conducted by the Eastern Iowa Community College District in 1986 revealed a lack of credit programs and curricula for training individuals in the technical aspects of hazardous materials management and need for hazardous materials technicians by local industry. In response, an associate of applied science (AAS) degree program in Hazardous…

  9. 49 CFR 176.72 - Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hook may not be used for handling any package of hazardous materials. (b) The use of equipment designed to lift or move cargo by means of pressure exerted on the packages may not be used for handling any package of hazardous materials if the device can damage the package or the package is not designed to...

  10. 49 CFR 176.72 - Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hook may not be used for handling any package of hazardous materials. (b) The use of equipment designed to lift or move cargo by means of pressure exerted on the packages may not be used for handling any package of hazardous materials if the device can damage the package or the package is not designed to...

  11. 46 CFR 54.20-2 - Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)). 54.20-2 Section 54.20-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-2 Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces...

  12. 46 CFR 54.20-2 - Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)). 54.20-2 Section 54.20-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-2 Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces...

  13. 46 CFR 54.20-2 - Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)). 54.20-2 Section 54.20-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-2 Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces...

  14. 46 CFR 54.20-2 - Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)). 54.20-2 Section 54.20-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-2 Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces...

  15. 46 CFR 54.20-2 - Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)). 54.20-2 Section 54.20-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-2 Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces...

  16. 49 CFR 173.205 - Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. 173.205 Section 173.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.205 Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. When §...

  17. 49 CFR 173.205 - Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. 173.205 Section 173.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.205 Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. When §...

  18. 49 CFR 173.205 - Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. 173.205 Section 173.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.205 Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. When §...

  19. 49 CFR 173.205 - Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. 173.205 Section 173.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.205 Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. When §...

  20. 49 CFR 173.205 - Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. 173.205 Section 173.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.205 Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. When §...

  1. 75 FR 52057 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Delays in Processing of Special Permits Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ..., PA. 14945-N Vulcan 4 03-31-2011 Construction Materials LP SE, db/a Vulcan Materials Company, Atlanta... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Delays in Processing of Special Permits Applications AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

  2. Chemical comparison of weathered spilled oil and Exxon/Valdez hold oil from an occupational health standpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, W.H.; Ho, Chen-h.; Guerin, M.R.; Tyndall, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    On March 24, 1989, the oil tanker Exxon/Valdez ran aground on Bligh Reef located off the coast of Alaska, and 11 million gallons of Northslope Alaska crude oil were spilled into Prince William Sound. More than 11,000 workers and uncounted volunteers participated in the clean up operation. The exposure of cleanup workers to spilled oil over several months of cleanup operations suggests the need for an assessment of any unusual occupational health hazards. To address this issue, weathered spilled oil and hold oil were subjected to biodirected chemical fractionation and target chemical analyses. Potential inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact hazards were investigated. The characterization methods of the DOE/Office of Health and Environmental Research Synthetic Fuels Program were applied to samples related to the spill to permit inter-comparability with that data base. Two oil spills were obtained for characterization. Exxon/Valdez hold oil collected directly from the hold of the tanker was provided by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Also provided was a 75-days old weathered spilled oil sampled on June 6, 1989, from a skimmer collecting oil washed off of Knight Island. Because 40 wt % of the weathered oil consisted of non-oil materials such as sand, entrapped water, and leaves, an oil fraction was prepared by suspending the oil benzene/chloroform drying with anhydrous magnesium sulfate, filtering, and removing the solvent by rotary evaporation. The tests conducted here suggest that there is no unusual human health hazard associated with the weathered Exxon/Valdez spilled oil in the context of other petroleum crude oils. Clearly, the volatile organics in the freshly spilled oil present a potential inhalation hazard, but such a threat is considerably mitigated by weathering. The polar neutral chemical class fraction increases notably during weathering, but does not appear to represent an increased genotoxic hazard. 20 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  3. Monohydrocalcite: a promising remediation material for hazardous anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Munemoto, Takashi; Sakai, Minoru; Yagi, Shintaro

    2011-12-01

    The formation conditions, solubility and stability of monohydrocalcite (MHC, CaCO3·H2O), as well as sorption behaviors of toxic anions on MHC, are reviewed to evaluate MHC as a remediation material for hazardous oxyanions. MHC is a rare mineral in geological settings that occurs in recent sediments in saline lakes. Water temperature does not seem to be an important factor for MHC formation. The pH of lake water is usually higher than 8 and the Mg/Ca ratio exceeds 4. MHC synthesis experiments as a function of time indicate that MHC is formed from amorphous calcium carbonate and transforms to calcite and/or aragonite. Most studies show that MHC forms from solutions containing Mg, which inhibits the formation of stable calcium carbonates. The solubility of MHC is higher than those of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, but lower than those of ikaite and amorphous calcium carbonate at ambient temperature. The solubility of MHC decreases with temperature. MHC is unstable and readily transforms to calcite or aragonite. The transformation consists of the dissolution of MHC and the subsequent formation of stable phases from the solution. The rate-limiting steps of the transformation of MHC are the nucleation and growth of stable crystalline phases. Natural occurrences indicate that certain additives, particularly PO4 and Mg, stabilize MHC. Laboratory studies confirm that a small amount of PO4 in solution (>30 μM) can significantly inhibit the transformation of MHC. MHC has a higher sorption capacity for PO4 than calcite and aragonite. The modes of PO4 uptake are adsorption on the MHC surface at moderate phosphate concentrations and precipitation of secondary calcium phosphate minerals at higher concentrations. Arsenate is most likely removed from the solution during the transformation of MHC. The proposed sorption mechanism of arsenate is coprecipitation during crystallization of aragonite. The arsenic sorption capacity by MHC is significantly higher than simple adsorption

  4. Hazardous Material Data File (HMDF), quarterly update. Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The Hazardous Materiel Data File (HMDF) purpose is to provide storage and transportation information on chemical, radioactive and ammunition items in the Army inventory. Data is taken from the Army Central Logistics Data Bank (ACLDB).

  5. Determination of the fire hazards of mine materials using a radiant panel

    PubMed Central

    Harteis, S.P.; Litton, C.D.; Thomas, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a laboratory-scale method to rank the ignition and fire hazards of commonly used underground mine materials and to eliminate the need for the expensive large-scale tests that are currently being used. A radiant-panel apparatus was used to determine the materials’ relevant thermal characteristics: time to ignition, critical heat flux for ignition, heat of gasification, and mass-loss rate. Three thermal parameters, TRP, TP1 and TP4, were derived from the data, then developed and subsequently used to rank the combined ignition and fire hazards of the combustible materials from low hazard to high hazard. The results compared favorably with the thermal and ignition hazards of similar materials reported in the literature and support this approach as a simpler one for quantifying these combustible hazards. PMID:26877552

  6. Preparedness of hazardous materials emergencies in railyards: Guidance for railroads and adjacent communities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Railroads are a key part of the distribution system for hazardous materials and, thus, much hazardous material passes through railyards en route to intermediate or final consumers. While the vast majority of these materials are shipped without incident, both the number of shipments and the nature of the materials themselves dictate that railyards and surrounding communities be prepared to respond quickly and effectively to emergencies. This report contains information on 11 emergency preparedness functions and 150 guidance recommendations.

  7. Natural and technologic hazardous material releases during and after natural disasters: a review.

    PubMed

    Young, Stacy; Balluz, Lina; Malilay, Josephine

    2004-04-25

    Natural disasters may be powerful and prominent mechanisms of direct and indirect hazardous material (hazmat) releases. Hazardous materials that are released as the result of a technologic malfunction precipitated by a natural event are referred to as natural-technologic or na-tech events. Na-tech events pose unique environmental and human hazards. Disaster-associated hazardous material releases are of concern, given increases in population density and accelerating industrial development in areas subject to natural disasters. These trends increase the probability of catastrophic future disasters and the potential for mass human exposure to hazardous materials released during disasters. This systematic review summarizes direct and indirect disaster-associated releases, as well as environmental contamination and adverse human health effects that have resulted from natural disaster-related hazmat incidents. Thorough examination of historic disaster-related hazmat releases can be used to identify future threats and improve mitigation and prevention efforts.

  8. Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100

    SciTech Connect

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-11-09

    The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations.

  9. Natural and technologic hazardous material releases during and after natural disasters: a review.

    PubMed

    Young, Stacy; Balluz, Lina; Malilay, Josephine

    2004-04-25

    Natural disasters may be powerful and prominent mechanisms of direct and indirect hazardous material (hazmat) releases. Hazardous materials that are released as the result of a technologic malfunction precipitated by a natural event are referred to as natural-technologic or na-tech events. Na-tech events pose unique environmental and human hazards. Disaster-associated hazardous material releases are of concern, given increases in population density and accelerating industrial development in areas subject to natural disasters. These trends increase the probability of catastrophic future disasters and the potential for mass human exposure to hazardous materials released during disasters. This systematic review summarizes direct and indirect disaster-associated releases, as well as environmental contamination and adverse human health effects that have resulted from natural disaster-related hazmat incidents. Thorough examination of historic disaster-related hazmat releases can be used to identify future threats and improve mitigation and prevention efforts. PMID:15081734

  10. Use of magnetic carbon composites from renewable resource materials for oil spill clean up and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2015-10-27

    A method of separating a liquid hydrocarbon material from a body of water, includes: (a) mixing magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites with a liquid hydrocarbon material dispersed in a body of water to allow the magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each to be adhered by the liquid hydrocarbon material to form a mixture; (b) applying a magnetic force to the mixture to attract the magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by the liquid hydrocarbon material; and (c) removing the body of water from the magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by the liquid hydrocarbon material while maintaining the applied magnetic force. The magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites is formed by subjecting one or more metal lignosulfonates or metal salts to microwave radiation, in presence of lignin/derivatives either in presence of alkali or a microwave absorbing material, for a period of time effective to allow the carbon-metal nanocomposites to be formed.

  11. Prospective study of hepatic, renal, and haematological surveillance in hazardous materials firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Kales, S; Polyhronopoulos, G; Aldrich, J; Mendoza, P; Suh, J; Christiani, D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate possible health effects related to work with hazardous materials as measured by end organ effect markers in a large cohort over about 2 years, and in a subcohort over 5 years.
METHODS—Hepatic, renal, and haematological variables were analysed from 1996-98 in hazardous materials firefighters including 288 hazardous materials technicians (81%) and 68 support workers (19%). The same end organ effect markers in a subcohort of the technicians were also analysed (n=35) from 1993-98. Support workers were considered as controls because they are also firefighters, but had a low potential exposure to hazardous materials.
RESULTS—During the study period, no serious injuries or exposures were reported. For the end organ effect markers studied, no significant differences were found between technicians and support workers at either year 1 or year 3. After adjustment for a change in laboratory, no significant longitudinal changes were found within groups for any of the markers except for creatinine which decreased for both technicians (p<0.001) and controls (p<0.01).
CONCLUSIONS—Health effects related to work are infrequent among hazardous materials technicians. Haematological, hepatic, and renal testing is not required on an annual basis and has limited use in detecting health effects in hazardous materials technicians.


Keywords: hazardous materials; firefighters; medical surveillance PMID:11160986

  12. 75 FR 17111 - Hazardous Materials Regulations: Combustible Liquids

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... FR 3382) proposing to re-define the term ``flammable liquid,'' in order to harmonize the definition... February 21, 1970, the Board published an NPRM under Docket No. HM-42 (35 FR 3298) proposing to create and...) include kerosene, fuel oil, turpentine and certain alcohols, all of which present fire hazards...

  13. 78 FR 14702 - Hazardous Materials: Miscellaneous Petitions for Rulemaking (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ...-218D (73 FR 4699) intended to help emergency responders identify and respond to the hazards unique to...-224D (74 FR 2199), PHMSA added a new description to the HMT for Powder, smokeless, Division 1.4C... FR 11034). In this final rule, we amend miscellaneous provisions in the HMR to clarify the...

  14. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials....

  15. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials....

  16. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials....

  17. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials....

  18. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials....

  19. 40 CFR 260.42 - Notification requirement for hazardous secondary materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Notification requirement for hazardous secondary materials. 260.42 Section 260.42 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions §...

  20. 40 CFR 260.42 - Notification requirement for hazardous secondary materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Notification requirement for hazardous secondary materials. 260.42 Section 260.42 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions §...

  1. 40 CFR 260.42 - Notification requirement for hazardous secondary materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Notification requirement for hazardous secondary materials. 260.42 Section 260.42 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions §...

  2. 25 CFR 170.905 - How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material? 170.905 Section 170.905 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear...

  3. 75 FR 34682 - Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 46 CFR Parts 97 and 148 RIN 1625-AB47 Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code; Correction AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... proposed rule published in the Federal Register on June 17, 2010, entitled ``Bulk Solid Hazardous...

  4. 49 CFR 173.240 - Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... portable tanks; UN portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64; and sift-proof non... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.240 Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials. When §...

  5. 41 CFR 101-42.304 - Special requirements for donation of certain hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agency and/or donee to comply with DOT regulations (49 CFR part 171 et seq.) when transporting hazardous... CFR part 261 et seq.) including its application to transporters, storers, users, and permitting of... donation of certain hazardous materials. 101-42.304 Section 101-42.304 Public Contracts and...

  6. 41 CFR 101-42.304 - Special requirements for donation of certain hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... agency and/or donee to comply with DOT regulations (49 CFR part 171 et seq.) when transporting hazardous... CFR part 261 et seq.) including its application to transporters, storers, users, and permitting of... donation of certain hazardous materials. 101-42.304 Section 101-42.304 Public Contracts and...

  7. 25 CFR 170.905 - How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material? 170.905 Section 170.905 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear...

  8. 25 CFR 170.905 - How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material? 170.905 Section 170.905 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear...

  9. 25 CFR 170.905 - How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material? 170.905 Section 170.905 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear...

  10. 25 CFR 170.905 - How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material? 170.905 Section 170.905 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear...

  11. 49 CFR 173.240 - Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... portable tanks; UN portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64; and sift-proof non... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.240 Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials. When §...

  12. 49 CFR 173.240 - Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... portable tanks; UN portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64; and sift-proof non... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.240 Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials. When §...

  13. 49 CFR 173.240 - Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... portable tanks; UN portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64; and sift-proof non... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.240 Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials. When §...

  14. Teaching about Hazardous Materials. ERIC/SMEAC Environmental Education Digest No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Disinger, John F.

    Problems related to the handling of hazardous substances and toxic wastes have escalated making this environmental dilemma a national concern. This digest provides an update of key legislative and management efforts associated with hazardous wastes and reviews current instructional materials in the area. Major topics addressed include: (1) waste…

  15. 49 CFR 173.240 - Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... portable tanks; UN portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64; and sift-proof non... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.240 Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials. When §...

  16. 49 CFR 175.26 - Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous materials requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... following information: (1) Cargo containing hazardous materials (dangerous goods) for transportation by... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations § 175.26 Notification at cargo...

  17. 49 CFR 175.26 - Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous materials requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... following information: (1) Cargo containing hazardous materials (dangerous goods) for transportation by... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations § 175.26 Notification at cargo...

  18. 49 CFR 175.26 - Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous materials requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... following information: (1) Cargo containing hazardous materials (dangerous goods) for transportation by... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations § 175.26 Notification at cargo...

  19. 49 CFR 175.26 - Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous materials requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... following information: (1) Cargo containing hazardous materials (dangerous goods) for transportation by... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations § 175.26 Notification at cargo...

  20. 14 CFR Appendix O to Part 121 - Hazardous Materials Training Requirements For Certificate Holders

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... any shipper, including a will-not-carry certificate holder offering dangerous goods for transport... authorized in their operations specifications to transport hazardous materials (will-carry) are prescribed in.... Table 1—Operators That Transport Hazardous Material—Will-Carry Certificate Holders Aspects of...

  1. 49 CFR 175.26 - Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous materials requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... following information: (1) Cargo containing hazardous materials (dangerous goods) for transportation by... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notification at cargo facilities of hazardous... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations § 175.26 Notification at cargo...

  2. 14 CFR Appendix O to Part 121 - Hazardous Materials Training Requirements For Certificate Holders

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... any shipper, including a will-not-carry certificate holder offering dangerous goods for transport... authorized in their operations specifications to transport hazardous materials (will-carry) are prescribed in.... Table 1—Operators That Transport Hazardous Material—Will-Carry Certificate Holders Aspects of...

  3. 14 CFR Appendix O to Part 121 - Hazardous Materials Training Requirements For Certificate Holders

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... any shipper, including a will-not-carry certificate holder offering dangerous goods for transport... authorized in their operations specifications to transport hazardous materials (will-carry) are prescribed in.... Table 1—Operators That Transport Hazardous Material—Will-Carry Certificate Holders Aspects of...

  4. Use of magnetic carbon composites from renewable resource materials for oil spill clean up and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2014-02-11

    A method for separating a liquid hydrocarbon material from a body of water. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of mixing a plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites with a liquid hydrocarbon material dispersed in a body of water to allow the plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each to be adhered by an amount of the liquid hydrocarbon material to form a mixture, applying a magnetic force to the mixture to attract the plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by an amount of the liquid hydrocarbon material, and removing said plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by an amount of the liquid hydrocarbon material from said body of water while maintaining the applied magnetic force, wherein the plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites is formed by subjecting one or more metal lignosulfonates or metal salts to microwave radiation, in presence of lignin/derivatives either in presence of alkali or a microwave absorbing material.

  5. 49 CFR 173.2 - Hazardous materials classes and index to hazard class definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Division No. (if any) Name of class or division 49 CFR reference for definitions None Forbidden materials... material 173.124 5 5.1 Oxidizer 173.127 5 5.2 Organic peroxide 173.128 6 6.1 Poisonous materials 173.132...

  6. 49 CFR 173.2 - Hazardous materials classes and index to hazard class definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Division No. (if any) Name of class or division 49 CFR reference for definitions None Forbidden materials... material 173.124 5 5.1 Oxidizer 173.127 5 5.2 Organic peroxide 173.128 6 6.1 Poisonous materials 173.132...

  7. Screening tests for hazard classification of complex waste materials - Selection of methods

    SciTech Connect

    Weltens, R.; Vanermen, G.; Tirez, K.; Robbens, J.; Deprez, K.; Michiels, L.

    2012-12-15

    In this study we describe the development of an alternative methodology for hazard characterization of waste materials. Such an alternative methodology for hazard assessment of complex waste materials is urgently needed, because the lack of a validated instrument leads to arbitrary hazard classification of such complex waste materials. False classification can lead to human and environmental health risks and also has important financial consequences for the waste owner. The Hazardous Waste Directive (HWD) describes the methodology for hazard classification of waste materials. For mirror entries the HWD classification is based upon the hazardous properties (H1-15) of the waste which can be assessed from the hazardous properties of individual identified waste compounds or - if not all compounds are identified - from test results of hazard assessment tests performed on the waste material itself. For the latter the HWD recommends toxicity tests that were initially designed for risk assessment of chemicals in consumer products (pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, biocides, food, etc.). These tests (often using mammals) are not designed nor suitable for the hazard characterization of waste materials. With the present study we want to contribute to the development of an alternative and transparent test strategy for hazard assessment of complex wastes that is in line with the HWD principles for waste classification. It is necessary to cope with this important shortcoming in hazardous waste classification and to demonstrate that alternative methods are available that can be used for hazard assessment of waste materials. Next, by describing the pros and cons of the available methods, and by identifying the needs for additional or further development of test methods, we hope to stimulate research efforts and development in this direction. In this paper we describe promising techniques and argument on the test selection for the pilot study that we have performed on different types of

  8. Ross Hazardous and Toxic Materials Handling Facility: Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    URS Consultants, Inc.

    1992-06-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) owns a 200-acre facility in Washington State known as the Ross Complex. Activities at the Ross Complex routinely involve handling toxic substances such as oil-filled electrical equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organic and inorganic compounds for preserving wood transmission poles, and paints, solvents, waste oils, and pesticides and herbicides. Hazardous waste management is a common activity on-site, and hazardous and toxic substances are often generated from these and off-site activities. The subject of this environmental assessment (EA) concerns the consolidation of hazardous and toxic substances handling at the Complex. This environmental assessment has been developed to identify the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposal. It has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to determine if the proposed action is likely to have a significant impact on the environment. In addition to the design elements included within the project, mitigation measures have been identified within various sections that are now incorporated within the project. This facility would be designed to improve the current waste handling practices and to assist BPA in meeting Federal and state regulations.

  9. An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yurconic, M.

    1992-08-01

    The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office`s program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

  10. An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yurconic, M.

    1992-08-01

    The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office's program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

  11. 41 CFR 101-42.209 - Cost of care and handling of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of hazardous materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.209 Section 101-42.209 Public... OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.209 Cost of care and handling of hazardous materials and certain categories of property. The...

  12. 41 CFR 101-42.206 - Special requirements for utilization of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... utilization of hazardous materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.206 Section 101-42.206 Public... OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.206 Special requirements for utilization of hazardous materials and certain categories of property....

  13. Hazardous materials management using a Cradle-to-Grave Tracking and Information System (CGTIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kjeldgaard, E.; Fish, J.; Campbell, D.; Freshour, N.; Hammond, B.; Bray, O.; Hollingsworth, M.

    1995-03-01

    Hazardous materials management includes interactions among materials, personnel, facilities, hazards, and processes of various groups within a DOE site`s environmental, safety & health (ES&H) and line organizations. Although each group is charged with addressing a particular aspect of these properties and interactions, the information it requires must be gathered into a coherent set of common data for accurate and consistent hazardous material management and regulatory reporting. It is these common data requirements which the Cradle-to-Grave Tracking and Information System (CGTIS) is designed to satisfy. CGTIS collects information at the point at which a process begins or a material enters a facility, and maintains that information, for hazards management and regulatory reporting, throughout the entire life-cycle by providing direct on-line links to a site`s multitude of data bases to bring information together into one common data model.

  14. 75 FR 9634 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR Part 107, Subpart B), notice is hereby given that the... reinforced composite gas cylinders for the transportation of certain compressed gases. (mode 1) 14965-N...

  15. 76 FR 37403 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in..., DC. Division 2.1 and 2.2 gases in alterative packaging when transported by motor vehicle....

  16. 33 CFR 155.310 - Containment of oil and hazardous material cargo discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) For a tankship, as defined in 46 CFR 30.10-67, the coaming or other barrier required in 46 CFR 32.56... OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION...

  17. 75 FR 9634 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... published in accordance with Part 107 of the Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5 117.... Boyle 49 CFR 173.835(g).. To modify the special Transportation, permit to authorize an Inc....

  18. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report : February 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2009-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental anagement ystem Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  19. 49 CFR 172.313 - Poisonous hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... markings required by this subpart: (a) A material poisonous by inhalation (see § 171.8 of this subchapter... outer packaging used as a single or composite packaging for materials meeting the definition of Division... containing a material poisonous by inhalation in non-bulk packages shall be marked, on each side and each...

  20. 49 CFR 172.313 - Poisonous hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... markings required by this subpart: (a) A material poisonous by inhalation (see § 171.8 of this subchapter... outer packaging used as a single or composite packaging for materials meeting the definition of Division... containing a material poisonous by inhalation in non-bulk packages shall be marked, on each side and each...

  1. 49 CFR 172.313 - Poisonous hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... markings required by this subpart: (a) A material poisonous by inhalation (see § 171.8 of this subchapter... outer packaging used as a single or composite packaging for materials meeting the definition of Division... containing a material poisonous by inhalation in non-bulk packages shall be marked, on each side and each...

  2. Oil Spills

    MedlinePlus

    ... or in the ocean). Other factors include what kind of exposure and how much exposure there was. People who clean up the spill are more at risk. Problems could include skin and eye irritation, neurologic and breathing problems, and stress. Not much is known about the long-term ...

  3. 46 CFR 153.1132 - Reporting spills and non-complying discharges: Category A, B, C, and D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reporting spills and non-complying discharges: Category A, B, C, and D. 153.1132 Section 153.1132 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Approval...

  4. 46 CFR 153.1132 - Reporting spills and non-complying discharges: Category A, B, C, and D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reporting spills and non-complying discharges: Category A, B, C, and D. 153.1132 Section 153.1132 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Approval...

  5. 46 CFR 153.1132 - Reporting spills and non-complying discharges: Category A, B, C, and D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting spills and non-complying discharges: Category A, B, C, and D. 153.1132 Section 153.1132 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Approval...

  6. 46 CFR 153.1132 - Reporting spills and non-complying discharges: Category A, B, C, and D.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reporting spills and non-complying discharges: Category A, B, C, and D. 153.1132 Section 153.1132 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Approval...

  7. 75 FR 36773 - Pipeline Safety: Updating Facility Response Plans in Light of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... discharging oil into or on any navigable waters of the United States or adjoining shorelines must prepare and... substantial harm to the environment by discharging oil into or on any navigable waters of the United States or... Light of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety...

  8. Immobilization of low level hazardous organics using recycled materials

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, J.R.; Smith, F.G.

    1996-12-31

    Rust Remedial Services, Inc. (RRS) recently conducted a major study on the effectiveness of additives, both virgin and recycled, in the immobilization of low-level organics in soils. Using a clean soil spiked with a mixture of hazardous organic chemicals, twelve different stabilization formulations were comparatively tested using leaching (TCLP) and total analysis (TCA) methods. TCLP reduction levels illustrated the effectiveness of the stabilization treatment on a wide variety of low level organics in contaminated soil, with the proper selection of stabilization admixtures. A specially prepared, comminuted, rubber particulate was especially effective in reducing the apparent presence of certain semi-volatile organic compounds in soil, as measured by TCA methods. Most semi-volatile organic compounds were so strongly held by the rubber particles that they were not recovered in the analytical procedure.

  9. 78 FR 15303 - Hazardous Materials; Miscellaneous Amendments (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ... sulfur trioxide (SO 3 ) which are both known eye and respiratory irritants, and hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S... the Federal Register under Docket Number PHMSA-2009-27289 (HM-233A) [74 FR 68004] an NPRM entitled... Division 4.2, Packing Group (PG) I material and Division 5.2 (organic peroxide) material in lab...

  10. 75 FR 5375 - Hazardous Material; Miscellaneous Packaging Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... provisions to require plastic single and composite non-bulk packagings containing Division 6.1 material to be.... 172.313(b). Paragraph (b) of Sec. 172.313 requires plastic single and composite non-bulk packagings... in This Final Rule A. Definitions B. Plastic Packagings Used To Transport Poison Materials...

  11. 48 CFR 252.223-7006 - Prohibition on Storage, Treatment, and Disposal of Toxic or Hazardous Materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., Treatment, and Disposal of Toxic or Hazardous Materials. 252.223-7006 Section 252.223-7006 Federal..., Treatment, and Disposal of Toxic or Hazardous Materials. As prescribed in 223.7106, use the basic clause or..., TREATMENT, AND DISPOSAL OF TOXIC OR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS—BASIC (SEP 2014) (a) Definitions. As used in...

  12. 49 CFR 173.36 - Hazardous materials in Large Packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... an inner packaging is constructed of paper or flexible plastic, the inner packaging must be replaced...) Corrosive materials (except ORM-D) in bottles are further packed in securely closed inner receptacles...

  13. 49 CFR 172.313 - Poisonous hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... outer packaging used as a single or composite packaging for materials meeting the definition of Division... means, with the word “POISON” in letters at least 6.3 mm (0.25 inch) in height. Additional text...

  14. 49 CFR 177.848 - Segregation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... transported with acids if a mixture of the materials would generate hydrogen cyanide; Division 4.2 materials... X O X O Oxidizers 5.1 A X X X X O O X O Organic peroxides 5.2 X X X X O X O Poisonous liquids PG I... affecting § 177.848, see the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of...

  15. 49 CFR 177.848 - Segregation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... transported with acids if a mixture of the materials would generate hydrogen cyanide; Division 4.2 materials... X O X O Oxidizers 5.1 A X X X X O O X O Organic peroxides 5.2 X X X X O X O Poisonous liquids PG I... affecting § 177.848, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of...

  16. 49 CFR 177.848 - Segregation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... transported with acids if a mixture of the materials would generate hydrogen cyanide; Division 4.2 materials... X O X O Oxidizers 5.1 A X X X X O O X O Organic peroxides 5.2 X X X X O X O Poisonous liquids PG I... affecting § 177.848, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of...

  17. Hydrolysis of aluminum dross material to achieve zero hazardous waste.

    PubMed

    David, E; Kopac, J

    2012-03-30

    A simple method with high efficiency for generating high pure hydrogen by hydrolysis in tap water of highly activated aluminum dross is established. Aluminum dross is activated by mechanically milling to particles of about 45 μm. This leads to removal of surface layer of the aluminum particles and creation of a fresh chemically active metal surface. In contact with water the hydrolysis reaction takes place and hydrogen is released. In this process a Zero Waste concept is achieved because the other product of reaction is aluminum oxide hydroxide (AlOOH), which is nature-friendly and can be used to make high quality refractory or calcium aluminate cement. For comparison we also used pure aluminum powder and alkaline tap water solution (NaOH, KOH) at a ratio similar to that of aluminum dross content. The rates of hydrogen generated in hydrolysis reaction of pure aluminum and aluminum dross have been found to be similar. As a result of the experimental setup, a hydrogen generator was designed and assembled. Hydrogen volume generated by hydrolysis reaction was measured. The experimental results obtained reveal that aluminum dross could be economically recycled by hydrolysis process with achieving zero hazardous aluminum dross waste and hydrogen generation. PMID:22326245

  18. Analysis of hazardous biological material by MALDI mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    KL Wahl; KH Jarman; NB Valentine; MT Kingsley; CE Petersen; ST Cebula; AJ Saenz

    2000-03-21

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has become a valuable tool for analyzing microorganisms. The speed with which data can be obtained from MALDI-MS makes this a potentially important tool for biological health hazard monitoring and forensic applications. The excitement in the mass spectrometry community in this potential field of application is evident by the expanding list of research laboratories pursuing development of MALDI-MS for bacterial identification. Numerous research groups have demonstrated the ability to obtain unique MALDI-MS spectra from intact bacterial cells and bacterial cell extracts. The ability to differentiate strains of the same species has been investigated. Reproducibility of MALDI-MS spectra from bacterial species under carefully controlled experimental conditions has also been demonstrated. Wang et al. have reported on interlaboratory reproducibility of the MALDI-MS analysis of several bacterial species. However, there are still issues that need to be addressed, including the careful control of experimental parameters for reproducible spectra and selection of optimal experimental parameters such as solvent and matrix.

  19. ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS AT A RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Stephen; Welling, Steven; Bell, Simon

    2003-02-27

    The use of hazardous waste disposal facilities permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (''RCRA'') to dispose of low concentration and exempt radioactive materials is a cost-effective option for government and industry waste generators. The hazardous and PCB waste disposal facility operated by US Ecology Idaho, Inc. near Grand View, Idaho provides environmentally sound disposal services to both government and private industry waste generators. The Idaho facility is a major recipient of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers FUSRAP program waste and received permit approval to receive an expanded range of radioactive materials in 2001. The site has disposed of more than 300,000 tons of radioactive materials from the federal government during the past five years. This paper presents the capabilities of the Grand View, Idaho hazardous waste facility to accept radioactive materials, site-specific acceptance criteria and performance assessment, radiological safety and environmental monitoring program information.

  20. Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

    2010-12-01

    This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

  1. Hazardous materials transportation. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the transportation of hazardous chemicals, gases, explosives, and spent nuclear fuel. Liquefied natural gas transportation is emphasized. Tanker ships, containers, and pipelines for these materials are discussed along with truck, rail, air, and submarine transportation. Safety programs and routing information are presented. Hazards specific to arctic shipping are included. (Contains a minimum of 132 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Hazardous materials transportation. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the transportation of hazardous chemicals, gases, explosives, and spent nuclear fuel. Liquefied natural gas transportation is emphasized. Tanker ships, containers, and pipelines for these materials are discussed along with truck, rail, air, and submarine transportation. Safety programs and routing information are presented. Hazards specific to arctic shipping are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  3. Hazardous materials transportation. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the transportation of hazardous chemicals, gases, explosives, and spent nuclear fuel. Liquefied natural gas transportation is emphasized. Tanker ships, containers, and pipelines for these materials are discussed along with truck, rail, air, and submarine transportation. Safety programs and routing information are presented. Hazards specific to arctic shipping are included. (Contains a minimum of 137 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. The spill prevention, control, and countermeasures (SPCC) plan for the Y-12 Plant. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This spill prevention, control and countermeasures (SPCC) Plan is divided into two volumes. Volume I addresses Y-12`s compliance with regulations pertinent to the content of SPCC Plans. Volume II is the SPCC Hazardous Material Storage Data Base, a detailed tabulation of facility-specific information and data on potential spill sources at the Y-12 Plant. Volume I follows the basic format and subject sequence specified in 40 CFR 112.7. This sequence is prefaced by three additional chapters, including this introduction and brief discussions of the Y-12 Plant`s background/environmental setting and potential spill source categories. Two additional chapters on containers and container storage areas and PCB and PCB storage for disposal facilities are inserted into the required sequence. The following required subjects are covered in this volume: Spill history, site drainage; secondary containment/diversion structures and equipment; contingency plans; notification and spill response procedures; facility drainage; bulk storage tanks; facility transfer operations, pumping, and in-plant processes; transfer stations (facility tank cars/tank tracks); inspections and records; security, and personnel, training, and spill prevention procedures.

  5. 33 CFR 155.310 - Containment of oil and hazardous material cargo discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS... material into the water; and (3) A mechanical means of closing each drain and scupper in the container or... water. (c) All oil tankers and offshore oil barges with a cargo capacity of 250 or more barrels...

  6. 33 CFR 155.310 - Containment of oil and hazardous material cargo discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS... material into the water; and (3) A mechanical means of closing each drain and scupper in the container or... water. (c) All oil tankers and offshore oil barges with a cargo capacity of 250 or more barrels...

  7. 33 CFR 155.310 - Containment of oil and hazardous material cargo discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS... material into the water; and (3) A mechanical means of closing each drain and scupper in the container or... water. (c) All oil tankers and offshore oil barges with a cargo capacity of 250 or more barrels...

  8. 33 CFR 155.310 - Containment of oil and hazardous material cargo discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS... material into the water; and (3) A mechanical means of closing each drain and scupper in the container or... water. (c) All oil tankers and offshore oil barges with a cargo capacity of 250 or more barrels...

  9. 49 CFR 175.25 - Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notification at air passenger facilities of... MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations § 175.25 Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions. (a) Each person who engages in for-hire...

  10. 49 CFR 175.25 - Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notification at air passenger facilities of... MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations § 175.25 Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions. (a) Each person who engages in for-hire...

  11. 76 FR 454 - Hazardous Materials Transportation: Revisions of Special Permits Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... Chief, Hazardous Materials Standards Division, Office of Operating and Environmental Standards, U.S... notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM; 75 FR 43898) proposing to revise its procedures for applying for a... Materials: Incorporation of Special Permits Into Regulations,'' published on May 14, 2010 (75 FR...

  12. 77 FR 17394 - Hazardous Materials: Approval and Communication Requirements for the Safe Transportation of Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ...: Approval and Communication Requirements for the Safe Transportation of Air Bag Inflators, Air Bag Modules... the Hazardous Materials Regulations applicable to air bag inflators, air bag modules, and seat-belt... material appropriately classified as a ] UN3268 air bag inflator, air bag module, or seat-belt...

  13. 49 CFR 173.33 - Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... material lading would have a dangerous reaction with the hazardous material. (2) A cargo tank may not be... pressure in accordance with 49 CFR 180.405(k). (3) Any Specification MC 310 or MC 311 cargo tank motor... transport argon, carbon dioxide, helium, krypton, neon, nitrogen, and xenon. However, if the cargo...

  14. Hazardous and toxic materials: Safe handling and disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses safety and accident prevention in chemical operations. It presents a chapter on dioxin, and material on personal and respiratory protective equipment, PBCs and PBBs, disposal of lab chemicals, acid rain, chemical wastes, RCRA, and the Superfund. Some of the topics considered include toxicity, fires and explosions, personal protective equipment, and respiratory protective equipment.

  15. 49 CFR 177.848 - Segregation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....848, see the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed... materials 4.3 X X X X O X O Oxidizers 5.1 A X X X X O O X O Organic peroxides 5.2 X X X X O X O...

  16. Intra-aortic filtration is effective in collecting hazardous materials.

    PubMed

    Mestres, Carlos-A; Bernabeu, Eduardo; Fernández, Claudio; Colli, Andrea; Josa, Miguel

    2007-04-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac operations are mostly due to particle embolization. This case illustrates the embolic potential of any material. A 77-year-old lady underwent re-operation for homograft aortic regurgitation and mitral valve replacement. Intra-aortic filtration was used. After cardiopulmonary bypass the filter was found to have captured a pledget from a suture used to secure the mitral replacement device.

  17. Hazardous material minimization for radar assembly. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Biggs, P.M.

    1997-03-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendment, enacted in November 1990, empowered the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to completely eliminate the production and usage of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) by January 2000. A reduction schedule for methyl chloroform beginning in 1993 with complete elimination by January 2002 was also mandated. In order to meet the mandates, the processes, equipment, and materials used to solder and clean electronic assemblies were investigated. A vapor-containing cleaning system was developed. The system can be used with trichloroethylene or d-Limonene. The solvent can be collected for recycling if desired. Fluxless and no-clean soldering were investigated, and the variables for a laser soldering process were identified.

  18. Who's protecting you from hazardous substances

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    Employee accidents, life endangering spills of harmful chemicals, toxic materials leaching into drinking water, polluted air, crippling side effects of wonder metals and products, and human and animal deaths made it apparent that in order to protect and preserve the community and the environment, the community needed to be aware/knowledgeable of chemical uses and related possible dangers, i.e., it was time to establish rules and regulations for the use and disposal of hazardous substances and chemicals. This report details several organizations, acts, rules, and regulations created in the interest of hazardous materials safety.

  19. Understanding oil spills and oil spill response

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The volume contains individual sections that outline what oil spills are, their potential effects on the environment, how they are cleaned up, and how various agencies prepare for spills before they happen.

  20. Materials for Shielding Astronauts from the Hazards of Space Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Miller, J.; Shinn, J. L.; Thibeault, S. A.; Singleterry, R. C.; Simonsen, L. C.; Kim, M. H.

    1997-01-01

    One major obstacle to human space exploration is the possible limitations imposed by the adverse effects of long-term exposure to the space environment. Even before human spaceflight began, the potentially brief exposure of astronauts to the very intense random solar energetic particle (SEP) events was of great concern. A new challenge appears in deep space exploration from exposure to the low-intensity heavy-ion flux of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since the missions are of long duration and the accumulated exposures can be high. Because cancer induction rates increase behind low to rather large thickness of aluminum shielding according to available biological data on mammalian exposures to GCR like ions, the shield requirements for a Mars mission are prohibitively expensive in terms of mission launch costs. Preliminary studies indicate that materials with high hydrogen content and low atomic number constituents are most efficient in protecting the astronauts. This occurs for two reasons: the hydrogen is efficient in breaking up the heavy GCR ions into smaller less damaging fragments and the light constituents produce few secondary radiations (especially few biologically damaging neutrons). An overview of the materials related issues and their impact on human space exploration will be given.

  1. Applying radiological emergency planning experience to hazardous materials emergency planning within the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Foltman, A.; Newsom, D.; Lerner, K.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear industry has extensive radiological emergency planning (REP) experience that is directly applicable to hazardous materials emergency planning. Recently, the Feed Materials Production Center near Cincinnati, Ohio, successfully demonstrated such application. The REP experience includes conceptual bases and standards for developing plans that have been tested in hundreds of full-scale exercises. The exercise program itself is also well developed. Systematic consideration of the differences between chemical and radiological hazards shows that relatively minor changes to the REP bases and standards are necessary. Conduct of full-scale, REP-type exercises serves to test the plans, provide training, and engender confidence and credibility.

  2. Terrorism and hazardous material trucking: promoting perceived collective efficacy for terrorism prevention.

    PubMed

    James, Keith

    2008-01-01

    Hazardous-material trucking has recently been identified as an area of high potential risk for terrorism. Some recent theory and case study papers have argued for the importance of collective efficacy to disaster-response, terrorism prevention, and other rare-but-risky events. Therefore, a study based on the collective efficacy literature was done to test an intervention for increasing perceived collective efficacy for terrorism prevention among Canadian hazardous-material truck drivers. Results supported the impact of the intervention in increasing perceived efficacy for terrorism prevention. Implications for theory, research, and application are discussed.

  3. MR of ballistic materials: imaging artifacts and potential hazards.

    PubMed

    Smith, A S; Hurst, G C; Duerk, J L; Diaz, P J

    1991-01-01

    The most common ballistic materials available in the urban setting were studied for their MR effects on deflection force, rotation, heating, and imaging artifacts at 1.5 T to determine the potential efficacy and safety for imaging patients with ballistic injuries. The 28 missiles tested covered the range of bullet types and materials suggested by the Cleveland Police Department. The deflection force was measured by the New method. Rotation was evaluated 30 min after bullets had been placed in a 10% (weight per weight) ballistic gelatin designed to simulate brain tissue, with the long axis of the bullet placed parallel and perpendicular to the Z axis of the magnet. Heating was measured with alcohol thermometers by imaging for 1 hr alternatively with gradient-echo and spin-echo sequences (RF absorption = 0.033 and 0.326 w/kg respectively). Image artifacts on routine sequences were evaluated. All the steel-containing bullets except for the Winchester armor-piercing 38 caliber exhibited deflection. A nonsteel 7.38-mm Mauser also deflected. Deflection range was 514 to 15,504 dynes. Rotation occurred when the bullets were not parallel to the Z axis. Temperature changes were not significant. Deflecting projectiles resulted in obliteration of the image. The artifacts from other projectiles were small but varied by content. The artifact of the Winchester armor-piercing 38-caliber bullet was similar to those without steel. Bullets that contain steel or ferromagnetic contaminates such as nickel can be rotated within the MR unit.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2058521

  4. Integrating Hazardous Materials Characterization and Assessment Tools to Guide Pollution Prevention in Electronic Products and Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Carl

    Due to technology proliferation, the environmental burden attributed to the production, use, and disposal of hazardous materials in electronics have become a worldwide concern. The major theme of this dissertation is to develop and apply hazardous materials assessment tools to systematically guide pollution prevention opportunities in the context of electronic product design, manufacturing and end-of-life waste management. To this extent, a comprehensive review is first provided on describing hazard traits and current assessment methods to evaluate hazardous materials. As a case study at the manufacturing level, life cycle impact assessment (LCIA)-based and risk-based screening methods are used to quantify chemical and geographic environmental impacts in the U.S. printed wiring board (PWB) industry. Results from this industrial assessment clarify priority waste streams and States to most effectively mitigate impact. With further knowledge of PWB manufacturing processes, select alternative chemical processes (e.g., spent copper etchant recovery) and material options (e.g., lead-free etch resist) are discussed. In addition, an investigation on technology transition effects for computers and televisions in the U.S. market is performed by linking dynamic materials flow and environmental assessment models. The analysis forecasts quantities of waste units generated and maps shifts in environmental impact potentials associated with metal composition changes due to product substitutions. This insight is important to understand the timing and waste quantities expected and the emerging toxic elements needed to be addressed as a consequence of technology transition. At the product level, electronic utility meter devices are evaluated to eliminate hazardous materials within product components. Development and application of a component Toxic Potential Indicator (TPI) assessment methodology highlights priority components requiring material alternatives. Alternative

  5. Disposal of hazardous materials from TxDOT activities. Final report, September 1992-August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, M.; Corapcioglu, M.Y.; Beavers, T.; Beck, B.; Mehevec, A.

    1994-11-01

    The process of purchasing, storing, handling and disposal of hazardous waste is demanding. The Texas Department of Transportation deals with many such compounds every day in performing its duty of maintaining over 70,000 miles of Texas roadway. With the new demands being placed on all users of hazardous materials by the new EPA guidelines, procedures must be enacted to ensure TxDOT`s compliance with these ever-changing regulations. The placement of full-time safety and hazardous materials coordinators in each district office will help to ensure that employees follow reporting procedures and use disposal guidelines. The report will discuss these actions and others that might help TxDOT in this task.

  6. Radioactivity and associated radiation hazards in ceramic raw materials and end products.

    PubMed

    Viruthagiri, G; Rajamannan, B; Suresh Jawahar, K

    2013-12-01

    Studies have been planned to obtain activity and associated radiation hazards in ceramic raw materials (quartz, feldspar, clay, zircon, kaolin, grog, alumina bauxite, baddeleyite, masse, dolomite and red mud) and end products (ceramic brick, glazed ceramic wall and floor tiles) as the activity concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium vary from material to material. The primordial radionuclides in ceramic raw materials and end products are one of the sources of radiation hazard in dwellings made of these materials. By the determination of the activity level in these materials, the indoor radiological hazard to human health can be assessed. This is an important precautionary measure whenever the dose rate is found to be above the recommended limits. The aim of this work was to measure the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in ceramic raw materials and end products. The activity of these materials has been measured using a gamma-ray spectrometry, which contains an NaI(Tl) detector connected to multichannel analyser (MCA). Radium equivalent activity, alpha-gamma indices and radiation hazard indices associated with the natural radionuclides are calculated to assess the radiological aspects of the use of the ceramic end products as decorative or covering materials in construction sector. Results obtained were examined in the light of the relevant international legislation and guidance and compared with the results of similar studies reported in different countries. The results suggest that the use of ceramic end product samples examined in the construction of dwellings, workplace and industrial buildings is unlikely to give rise to any significant radiation exposure to the occupants.

  7. Hazardous materials transportation. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the transfer of hazardous materials primarily by road, rail, and cargo vessels. The citations include risk assessment, accident analyses, response programs, and shipping container designs. Federal legislation, state programs, and test procedures for a variety of containers are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Hazardous materials transportation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the transfer of hazardous materials primarily by road, rail, and cargo vessels. The citations include risk assessment, accident analyses, response programs, and shipping container designs. Federal legislation, state programs, and test procedures for a variety of containers are also discussed.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  9. Hazardous materials transportation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the transfer of hazardous materials primarily by road, rail, and cargo vessels. The citations include risk assessment, accident analyses, response programs, and shipping container designs. Federal legislation, state programs, and test procedures for a variety of containers are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Hazardous materials transportation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the transfer of hazardous materials primarily by road, rail, and cargo vessels. The citations include risk assessment, accident analyses, response programs, and shipping container designs. Federal legislation, state programs, and test procedures for a variety of containers are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. 78 FR 60755 - Hazardous Materials: Enhanced Enforcement Procedures-Resumption of Transportation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ...- 2005-22356 (PHM-7), ``Hazardous Materials: Enhanced Enforcement Procedures.'' 76 FR 11570. The final... it; and the temporary detention and inspection of potentially non-compliant packages. 76 FR 11570... by HMTSSRA. 71 FR 52751, 52753 (Sept. 7, 2006). The United States Coast Guard is authorized...

  12. Hazardous Materials Management Technology Programs. National Voluntary Skills Standard. Implementation Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This implementation guide is intended to help educators use the Skills Standard for Hazardous Materials Management Technology (HMMT). It begins with a description of HMMT and a summary of the 13 job functions of the standard. Within each job function are supporting skills and knowledge that an HMMT worker must possess to be able to accomplish the…

  13. 25 CFR 170.901 - What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste... materials. Legal authority includes, but is not limited to, 23 U.S.C. 141; 23 U.S.C. 127; 49 CFR parts 107, 171-180; 10 CFR part 71....

  14. 49 CFR 173.241 - Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64; and non-DOT Specification portable... solid materials. 173.241 Section 173.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.241 Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and...

  15. 76 FR 8658 - Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ...), 1974, as amended, that carry bulk solid cargoes other than grain. The final rule (75 FR 64586) allows... SECURITY Coast Guard 46 CFR Part 148 RIN 1625-AB47 Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Rule;...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 209 - Federal Railroad Administration Guidelines for Initial Hazardous Materials Assessments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... violation, for example, the guidelines for shipping paper violations at 49 CFR §§ 172.200-.203. All.... 21301; 28 U.S.C. 2461, note. 49 CFR section Description Guideline amount 2 PART 107—HAZARDOUS MATERIALS....800 Total failure to develop security plan. Factors to consider are the size of the entity (is it...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 209 - Federal Railroad Administration Guidelines for Initial Hazardous Materials Assessments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... example, the guidelines for shipping paper violations at 49 CFR §§ 172.200-.203. All penalties in these... CFR section Description Guideline amount 2 PART 107—HAZARDOUS MATERIALS PROGRAM PROCEDURES 107.608....800 Total failure to develop security plan. Factors to consider are the size of the entity (is it...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 209 - Federal Railroad Administration Guidelines for Initial Hazardous Materials Assessments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... example, the guidelines for shipping paper violations at 49 CFR §§ 172.200-.203. All penalties in these... CFR section Description Guideline amount 2 PART 107—HAZARDOUS MATERIALS PROGRAM PROCEDURES 107.608....800 Total failure to develop security plan. Factors to consider are the size of the entity (is it...

  19. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 209 - Federal Railroad Administration Guidelines for Initial Hazardous Materials Assessments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... example, the guidelines for shipping paper violations at 49 CFR §§ 172.200-.203. All penalties in these... CFR section Description Guideline amount 2 PART 107—HAZARDOUS MATERIALS PROGRAM PROCEDURES 107.608....800 Total failure to develop security plan. Factors to consider are the size of the entity (is it...

  20. 76 FR 81396 - Hazardous Materials: Miscellaneous Amendments; Response to Appeals; Corrections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... 13, 2011 (76 FR 56304). III. Corrections and Amendments As indicated above, based on appeals... (NPRM) under this docket HM-218F (74 FR 16135). The NPRM proposed amendments to the Hazardous Materials...: Miscellaneous Amendments'' under Docket Number PHMSA-2009- 0151(HM-218F) (76 FR 43510) amending the...

  1. 78 FR 66326 - Hazardous Materials: Rail Petitions and Recommendations To Improve the Safety of Railroad Tank...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... proposed rulemaking (ANPRM; 78 FR 54849) seeking public comments on whether issues raised in eight... Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477) or you may visit http...-AE91 Hazardous Materials: Rail Petitions and Recommendations To Improve the Safety of Railroad Tank...

  2. Educational Needs and Employment Trends of Environmental Hazardous Materials Technicians and Related Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudis, Paula M.; And Others

    A study was conducted to assess trends in the supply and demand for environmental hazardous materials (EHM) technical and related workers and to identify the skills and knowledge required of personnel in these positions. Information for the study was gathered through interviews, focus groups, and data from a mailed survey of employers of EHM…

  3. 25 CFR 170.901 - What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste... International Atomic Energy Agency, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Environmental... materials. Legal authority includes, but is not limited to, 23 U.S.C. 141; 23 U.S.C. 127; 49 CFR parts...

  4. 25 CFR 170.901 - What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste... International Atomic Energy Agency, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Environmental... materials. Legal authority includes, but is not limited to, 23 U.S.C. 141; 23 U.S.C. 127; 49 CFR parts...

  5. 25 CFR 170.901 - What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste... International Atomic Energy Agency, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Environmental... materials. Legal authority includes, but is not limited to, 23 U.S.C. 141; 23 U.S.C. 127; 49 CFR parts...

  6. 25 CFR 170.901 - What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste... International Atomic Energy Agency, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Environmental... materials. Legal authority includes, but is not limited to, 23 U.S.C. 141; 23 U.S.C. 127; 49 CFR parts...

  7. 49 CFR 173.241 - Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64; and non-DOT Specification portable... solid materials. 173.241 Section 173.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.241 Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and...

  8. 49 CFR 173.241 - Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64; and non-DOT Specification portable... solid materials. 173.241 Section 173.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.241 Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and...

  9. 49 CFR 173.241 - Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64; and non-DOT Specification portable... solid materials. 173.241 Section 173.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.241 Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and...

  10. 75 FR 34573 - Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... FR 3316). D. Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. You may submit a request for... Environmental Protection Agency FR Federal Register HMR Hazardous Materials Regulations, 49 CFR Parts 171-180... transported without special permit from the Coast Guard; the list was last revised in 1984 (49 FR 16794)....

  11. 75 FR 63 - Hazardous Materials: Revision to Requirements for the Transportation of Batteries and Battery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ...; ``Liquefied flammable gas,'' UN3478; and ``Hydrogen in metal hydride,'' UN3479. As indicated by the expanded... PHMSA-2007-0065 (HM-224D) and PHMSA-2008-0005 (HM-215J) [74 FR 2200] revising the Hazardous Materials..., 2008 (73 FR 44820) and are consistent with standards adopted internationally in the revised editions...

  12. 78 FR 30258 - Hazardous Materials: Enhanced Enforcement Procedures-Resumption of Transportation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... proposing to address certain matters identified in the Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Act of 2012... procedural regulations. For the mandates to address certain matters related to the Department's enhanced... matters identified by Congress. These inspection and enforcement procedures will not change the...

  13. Probability analysis of multiple-tank-car release incidents in railway hazardous materials transportation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Saat, Mohd Rapik; Barkan, Christopher P L

    2014-07-15

    Railroads play a key role in the transportation of hazardous materials in North America. Rail transport differs from highway transport in several aspects, an important one being that rail transport involves trains in which many railcars carrying hazardous materials travel together. By contrast to truck accidents, it is possible that a train accident may involve multiple hazardous materials cars derailing and releasing contents with consequently greater potential impact on human health, property and the environment. In this paper, a probabilistic model is developed to estimate the probability distribution of the number of tank cars releasing contents in a train derailment. Principal operational characteristics considered include train length, derailment speed, accident cause, position of the first car derailed, number and placement of tank cars in a train and tank car safety design. The effect of train speed, tank car safety design and tank car positions in a train were evaluated regarding the number of cars that release their contents in a derailment. This research provides insights regarding the circumstances affecting multiple-tank-car release incidents and potential strategies to reduce their occurrences. The model can be incorporated into a larger risk management framework to enable better local, regional and national safety management of hazardous materials transportation by rail.

  14. 77 FR 60935 - Hazardous Materials: Minor Editorial Corrections and Clarifications (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    .... Paragraphs 2.a.(1) and 3.a.(1) are revised by correcting an erroneous mathematical calculation. This... Regulatory Policies and Procedures of the Department of Transportation (44 FR 11034). Additionally, E.O..., Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. 49 CFR Part 172 Education, Hazardous materials...

  15. 49 CFR 173.241 - Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64; and non-DOT Specification portable... solid materials. 173.241 Section 173.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.241 Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and...

  16. 49 CFR 173.37 - Hazardous Materials in Flexible Bulk Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Transportation § 173.37 Hazardous Materials in Flexible Bulk Containers. (a) No person may offer or accept a... an external visual inspection by the person filling the Flexible Bulk Container to ensure: (1) The.... Required markings that are missing, damaged or difficult to read must be restored or returned to...

  17. Foothill-De Anza Community College District Hazardous Materials Program Review and Future Direction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foothill-De Anza Community Coll. District, Los Altos Hills, CA.

    This document provides a historical perspective on the Foothill-De Anza Community College District Hazardous Materials Program. Prior to the 1990's, the State College and Community College system were basically exempted from nearly all local regulatory compliance efforts. State enforcement of environmental regulations at the community college…

  18. 46 CFR 153.40 - Determination of materials that are hazardous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 153.40 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS General § 153.40... in 49 CFR 1.46(t) to carry out the functions under 49 U.S.C. 1803, the Coast Guard has found...

  19. 46 CFR 153.40 - Determination of materials that are hazardous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Section 153.40 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS General § 153.40... in 49 CFR 1.46(t) to carry out the functions under 49 U.S.C. 1803, the Coast Guard has found...

  20. 46 CFR 153.40 - Determination of materials that are hazardous.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Section 153.40 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS General § 153.40... in 49 CFR 1.46(t) to carry out the functions under 49 U.S.C. 1803, the Coast Guard has found...

  1. Oil spill clean up

    SciTech Connect

    Claxton, L.D.; Houk, V.S.; Williams, R.; Kremer, F.

    1991-01-01

    Due to the consideration of bioremediation for oil spills, it is important to understand the ecological and human health implications of bioremediation efforts. During biodegradation, the toxicity of the polluting material may actually increase upon the conversion of non-toxic constituents to toxic species. Also, toxic compounds refractory to biological degradation may compromise the effectiveness of the treatment technique. In the study, the Salmonella mutagenicity assay showed that both the Prudhoe Bay crude oil and its weathered counterpart collected from oil-impacted water were weakly mutagenic. Results also showed that the mutagenic components were depleted at a faster rate than the overall content of organic material.

  2. The human health implications of crude oil spills in the Niger delta, Nigeria: An interpretation of published studies

    PubMed Central

    Ordinioha, Best; Brisibe, Seiyefa

    2013-01-01

    Background: The health hazards created by oil exploration and exploitation are covert and slow in action. They are not given the deserved attention in official documents in Nigeria, even as they can be major contributors to the disease burden in oil-bearing communities. This study is an interpretation of the data reported in several published studies on crude oil spills in the Niger delta region, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A manual and Internet search was conducted to extract quantitative data on the quantity of crude oil spilled; the concentrations of the pollutants in surface water, ground water, ambient air and plant and animal tissue; and the direct impact on human health and household food security. Results: An average of 240,000 barrels of crude oil are spilled in the Niger delta every year, mainly due to unknown causes (31.85%), third party activity (20.74%), and mechanical failure (17.04%). The spills contaminated the surface water, ground water, ambient air, and crops with hydrocarbons, including known carcinogens like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and benxo (a) pyrene, naturally occurring radioactive materials, and trace metals that were further bioaccumulated in some food crops. The oil spills could lead to a 60% reduction in household food security and were capable of reducing the ascorbic acid content of vegetables by as much as 36% and the crude protein content of cassava by 40%. These could result in a 24% increase in the prevalence of childhood malnutrition. Animal studies indicate that contact with Nigerian crude oil could be hemotoxic and hepatotoxic, and could cause infertility and cancer. Conclusions: The oil spills in the Niger delta region have acute and long-term effects on human health. Material relief and immediate and long-term medical care are recommended, irrespective of the cause of the spill, to ensure that the potential health effects of exposures to the spills are properly addressed. PMID:23661893

  3. Packaging performance evaluation and performance oriented packaging standards for large packages for poison inhalation hazard materials

    SciTech Connect

    Griego, N.R.; Mills, G.S.; McClure, J.D.

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Transportation Research & Special Programs Administration (DOT-RSPA) has sponsored a project at Sandia National Laboratories to evaluate the protection provided by current packagings used for truck and rail transport of materials that have been classified as Poison Inhalation Hazards (PIH) and to recommend performance standards for these PIH packagings. Hazardous materials span a wide range of toxicity and there are many parameters used to characterize toxicity; for any given hazardous material, data are not available for all of the possible toxicity parameters. Therefore, it was necessary to select a toxicity criterion to characterize all of the PIH compounds (a value of the criterion was derived from other parameters in many cases) and to calculate their dispersion in the event of a release resulting from a transportation accident. Methodologies which account for material toxicity and dispersal characteristics were developed as a major portion of this project and applied to 72 PIH materials. This report presents details of the PIH material toxicity comparisons, calculation of their dispersion, and their classification into five severity categories. 16 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 395: AREA 19 SPILL SITES, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    2005-10-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 395, Area 19 Spill Sites, consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 19 of the Nevada Test Site. Closure activities performed at each CAS include: (1) CAS 19-19-04, Concrete Spill: A concrete spill could not be located at the site. Therefore, no further action was taken. (2) CAS 19-25-03, Oil Spills: Approximately five cubic yards of hydrocarbon-impacted soil and various used oil filters were removed from the site and transported to the Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill for disposal. (3) CAS 19-44-02, Fuel Spill: Less than 0.5 cubic feet of hydrocarbon-impacted soil was removed from a concrete pad and transported to the Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill for disposal. (4) CAS 19-44-04, U-19bk Drill Site Release: Approximately four cubic yards of hydrocarbon-impacted soil were removed from the site and transported to the Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill for disposal. (5) CAS 19-44-05, U-19bh Drill Site Release: Evidence of an oil spill could not be found at the site. Therefore, no further action was taken. (6) CAS 19-99-05, Pile; Unknown Material: Based on previous sampling activities by International Technology (IT) Corporation the material was determined to be non-hazardous. Due to the remote location of the material and the determination that removal of the material would constitute an unnecessary ground disturbance as defined in the Sectored Housekeeping Work Plan, the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) agreed that the site would be closed by taking no further action. (7) CAS 19-99-07, Cement Spill: Based on previous sampling activities by IT Corporation the material was determined to be non-hazardous. Due to the remote location of the material and the determination that removal of the material would constitute an unnecessary ground disturbance as defined in the Sectored Housekeeping Work Plan, the NNSA/NSO and

  5. Task 1.11 - Spectroscopic field screening of hazardous waste and toxic spills. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Grisanti, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    Techniques for the field characterization of soil contamination due to spillage of hazardous waste or toxic chemicals are time consuming and expensive. Thus more economical, less time intensive methods are needed to facilitate rapid field screening of contaminated sites. In situ detection of toxic chemicals in soil offers both time and cost advantages for field screening, with additional application to real time site monitoring.

  6. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 300 - Oil Spill Response

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oil Spill Response E Appendix E to... PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Pt. 300, App. E Appendix E to Part 300—Oil Spill Response Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction....

  7. Hazards Response of Energetic Materials - Initiation Mechanisms, Experimental Characterization, and Development of Predictive Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J; Nichols III, A; Reaugh, J; McClelland, M; Hsu, P C

    2005-04-15

    We present our approach to develop a predictive capability for hazards -- thermal and non-shock impact -- response of energetic material systems based on: (A) identification of relevant processes; (B) characterization of the relevant properties; (C) application of property data to predictive models; and (D) application of the models into predictive simulation. This paper focuses on the first two elements above, while a companion paper by Nichols et al focuses on the final two elements. We outline the underlying mechanisms of hazards response and their interactions, and present our experimental work to characterize the necessary material parameters, including thermal ignition, thermal and mechanical properties, fracture/fragmentation behavior, deflagration rates, and the effect of material damage. We also describe our validation test, the Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment. Finally, we integrate the entire collection of data into a qualitative understanding that is useful until such time as the predictive models become available.

  8. Hazardous materials regulatory compliance guide for public transit operations. Appendices. Volumes 1 and 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Guide provides California transit operators with a method to determine what requirements may apply to their specific operations. The Guide uses checklists, focused questions, and informational narratives to take the user through the maze of regulations. For the regulation of concern, the Guide describes the basic compliance activities that must be undertaken: reports, plans, permits, training, storage, handling, or disposal. Each transit operator can compare its present activities with those required to achieve compliance and to identify additional steps needed to correct deficiencies. The hazard communication, and worker right-to-know, hazardous wastes, transport of hazardous materials, use of above-ground and below ground tanks, discharges to surface to surface waters, release reporting, and environmental training.

  9. Processing hazardous materials: Risk information at the local level. Final report on Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, W.D.; Owens, W.L.; Rich, R.C.; Manheim, J.B.

    1988-12-01

    The pilot study examines the role of Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs, set up under Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act) in communicating about the risks from hazardous wastes in Superfund or RCRA sites as well as the risks from hazardous substances covered under the Community Right-to-know Law. This phase evaluated the usefulness of certain hazard analysis materials to the LEPCs. Eighty LEPCs in Virginia were surveyed about their activities and their perceptions of their responsibilities for communicating to their communities about Title III risks. The major conclusion for Phase I is that LEPCs were emphasizing the development of their local emergency plans. Communicating with the local citizenry was a secondary concern at that time. Phase II is examining how things have changed across 10 states.

  10. Method for acid oxidation of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed organic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Robert A.; Smith, James R.; Ramsey, William G.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Bickford, Dennis F.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for reducing the volume of low level radioactive and mixed waste to enable the waste to be more economically stored in a suitable repository, and for placing the waste into a form suitable for permanent disposal. The invention involves a process for preparing radioactive, hazardous, or mixed waste for storage by contacting the waste starting material containing at least one organic carbon-containing compound and at least one radioactive or hazardous waste component with nitric acid and phosphoric acid simultaneously at a contacting temperature in the range of about 140.degree. C. to about 210 .degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the organic carbon-containing compound to gaseous products, thereby producing a residual concentrated waste product containing substantially all of said radioactive or inorganic hazardous waste component; and immobilizing the residual concentrated waste product in a solid phosphate-based ceramic or glass form.

  11. Organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization utilizing fossil fuel combustion waste materials

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.; Lane, D.C.; Brown, M.A.; Raska, K.A.; Clark, J.A.; Rovani, J.F.

    1993-09-01

    A laboratory study was conducted at the Western Research Institute to evaluate the ability of innovative clean coal technology (ICCT) waste to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents of hazardous wastes. The four ICCT wastes used in this study were: (1) the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) atmospheric fluidized bed combustor (AFBC) waste, (2) the TVA spray dryer waste, (3) the Laramie River Station spray dryer waste, and (4) the Colorado-Ute AFBC waste. Four types of hazardous waste stream materials were obtained and chemically characterized for use in evaluating the ability of the ICCT wastes to stabilize hazardous organic and inorganic wastes. The wastes included an API separator sludge, mixed metal oxide-hydroxide waste, metal-plating sludge, and creosote-contaminated soil. The API separator sludge and creosote-contaminated soil are US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-listed hazardous wastes and contain organic contaminants. The mixed metal oxide-hydroxide waste and metal-plating sludge (also an EPA-listed waste) contain high concentrations of heavy metals. The mixed metal oxide-hydroxide waste fails the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for cadmium, and the metal-plating sludge fails the TCLP for chromium. To evaluate the ability of the ICCT wastes to stabilize the hazardous wastes, mixtures involving varying amounts of each of the ICCT wastes with each of the hazardous wastes were prepared, allowed to equilibrate, and then leached with deionized, distilled water. The leachates were analyzed for the hazardous constituent(s) of interest using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure.

  12. 49 CFR 1.53 - Delegations to the Administrator of the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Delegations to the Administrator of the Pipeline... to the Administrator of the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. The Administrator of the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration is delegated authority for...

  13. 49 CFR 1.53 - Delegations to the Administrator of the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Delegations to the Administrator of the Pipeline... to the Administrator of the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. The Administrator of the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration is delegated authority for...

  14. 41 CFR 101-42.206 - Special requirements for utilization of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... utilization of hazardous materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.206 Section 101-42.206 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN...

  15. 41 CFR 101-42.209 - Cost of care and handling of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of hazardous materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.209 Section 101-42.209 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN...

  16. 41 CFR 101-42.406 - Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Abandonment or... CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.406 Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials...

  17. 41 CFR 101-42.406 - Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Abandonment or... CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.406 Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials...

  18. 41 CFR 101-42.406 - Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Abandonment or... CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.406 Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials...

  19. 41 CFR 101-42.406 - Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Abandonment or... CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.406 Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials...

  20. 41 CFR 101-42.406 - Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Abandonment or... CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.406 Abandonment or destruction of surplus hazardous materials...

  1. 78 FR 41853 - Safety Advisory Guidance: Heating Rail Tank Cars To Prepare Hazardous Material for Unloading or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... Rail Tank Cars To Prepare Hazardous Material for Unloading or Transloading AGENCY: Pipeline and... transloading \\1\\ hazardous materials from rail tank cars, specifically those persons heating a rail tank car to.... Guidance for Heating of Rail Tank Cars for Unloading or Transloading I. Background PHMSA's mission is...

  2. 40 CFR 241.3 - Standards and procedures for identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid wastes when used as fuels or ingredients in...) SOLID WASTES SOLID WASTES USED AS FUELS OR INGREDIENTS IN COMBUSTION UNITS Identification of Non-Hazardous Secondary Materials That Are Solid Wastes When Used as Fuels or Ingredients in Combustion...

  3. 40 CFR 241.3 - Standards and procedures for identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid wastes when used as fuels or ingredients in...) SOLID WASTES SOLID WASTES USED AS FUELS OR INGREDIENTS IN COMBUSTION UNITS Identification of Non-Hazardous Secondary Materials That Are Solid Wastes When Used as Fuels or Ingredients in Combustion...

  4. 40 CFR 241.3 - Standards and procedures for identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid wastes when used as fuels or ingredients in...) SOLID WASTES SOLID WASTES USED AS FUELS OR INGREDIENTS IN COMBUSTION UNITS Identification of Non-Hazardous Secondary Materials That Are Solid Wastes When Used as Fuels or Ingredients in Combustion...

  5. 40 CFR 241.3 - Standards and procedures for identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid wastes when used as fuels or ingredients in...) SOLID WASTES SOLID WASTES USED AS FUELS OR INGREDIENTS IN COMBUSTION UNITS Identification of Non-Hazardous Secondary Materials That Are Solid Wastes When Used as Fuels or Ingredients in Combustion...

  6. 29 CFR 1917.153 - Spray painting (See also § 1917.2, definition of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Spray painting (See also § 1917.2, definition of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or atmosphere). 1917.153 Section 1917.153 Labor Regulations Relating to... of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or atmosphere). (a) Scope. This section covers...

  7. 29 CFR 1917.153 - Spray painting (See also § 1917.2, definition of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Spray painting (See also § 1917.2, definition of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or atmosphere). 1917.153 Section 1917.153 Labor Regulations Relating to... of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or atmosphere). (a) Scope. This section covers...

  8. 29 CFR 1917.153 - Spray painting (See also § 1917.2, definition of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Spray painting (See also § 1917.2, definition of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or atmosphere). 1917.153 Section 1917.153 Labor Regulations Relating to... of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or atmosphere). (a) Scope. This section covers...

  9. 29 CFR 1917.153 - Spray painting (See also § 1917.2, definition of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Spray painting (See also § 1917.2, definition of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or atmosphere). 1917.153 Section 1917.153 Labor Regulations Relating to... of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or atmosphere). (a) Scope. This section covers...

  10. 29 CFR 1917.153 - Spray painting (See also § 1917.2, definition of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Spray painting (See also § 1917.2, definition of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or atmosphere). 1917.153 Section 1917.153 Labor Regulations Relating to... of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or atmosphere). (a) Scope. This section covers...

  11. SOFTWARE TOOLS THAT ADDRESS HAZARDOUS MATERIAL ISSUES DURING NUCLEAR FACILITY D and D

    SciTech Connect

    M. COURNOYER; R. GRUNDEMANN

    2001-03-01

    The 49-year-old Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility is where analytical chemistry and metallurgical studies on samples of plutonium and nuclear materials are conduct in support of the Department of Energy's nuclear weapons program. The CMR Facility is expected to be decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) over the next ten to twenty years. Over the decades, several hazardous material issues have developed that need to be address. Unstable chemicals must be properly reassigned or disposed of from the workspace during D and D operation. Materials that have critical effects that are primarily chronic in nature, carcinogens, reproductive toxin, and materials that exhibit high chronic toxicity, have unique decontamination requirements, including the decontrolling of areas where these chemicals were used. Certain types of equipment and materials that contain mercury, asbestos, lead, and polychlorinated biphenyls have special provisions that must be addressed. Utilization of commercially available software programs for addressing hazardous material issues during D and D operations such as legacy chemicals and documentation are presented. These user-friendly programs eliminate part of the tediousness associated with the complex requirements of legacy hazardous materials. A key element of this approach is having a program that inventories and tracks all hazardous materials. Without an inventory of chemicals stored in a particular location, many important questions pertinent to D and D operations can be difficult to answer. On the other hand, a well-managed inventory system can address unstable and highly toxic chemicals and hazardous material records concerns before they become an issue. Tapping into the institutional database provides a way to take advantage of the combined expertise of the institution in managing a cost effective D and D program as well as adding a quality assurance element to the program. Using laboratory requirements as a logic flow

  12. A spill control plan for small and medium lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Venuso, N.

    1993-05-01

    This article reports on a spill control plan for the community in which the author now resides. The lake covers 320 acres, with eight miles of shoreline. It is located 55 miles southwest of Chicago. The plan is supplemented by a procedural manual that incorporates several forms to be completed by the lake managerial staff. The information required is essential for assisting regulatory agencies and to acquire reimbursement for materials used in the containment and cleanup. Briefly required information is: name of person reporting the spill, location of spill, materials spilled, volume spilled, regulatory agencies notified, etc. A copy of the plan is on file at the Illinois EPA Rockford office.

  13. Double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for versatile hazardous materials detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Munson, Chase A.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (ST-LIBS) system capable of detecting a variety of hazardous materials at tens of meters. The use of a double-pulse laser improves the sensitivity and selectivity of ST-LIBS, especially for the detection of energetic materials. In addition to various metallic and plastic materials, the system has been used to detect bulk explosives RDX and Composition-B, explosive residues, biological species such as the anthrax surrogate Bacillus subtilis, and chemical warfare simulants at 20 m. We have also demonstrated the discrimination of explosive residues from various interferents on an aluminum substrate.

  14. Petroleum and hazardous material releases from industrial facilities associated with Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Santella, Nicholas; Steinberg, Laura J; Sengul, Hatice

    2010-04-01

    Hurricane Katrina struck an area dense with industry, causing numerous releases of petroleum and hazardous materials. This study integrates information from a number of sources to describe the frequency, causes, and effects of these releases in order to inform analysis of risk from future hurricanes. Over 200 onshore releases of hazardous chemicals, petroleum, or natural gas were reported. Storm surge was responsible for the majority of petroleum releases and failure of storage tanks was the most common mechanism of release. Of the smaller number of hazardous chemical releases reported, many were associated with flaring from plant startup, shutdown, or process upset. In areas impacted by storm surge, 10% of the facilities within the Risk Management Plan (RMP) and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) databases and 28% of SIC 1311 facilities experienced accidental releases. In areas subject only to hurricane strength winds, a lower fraction (1% of RMP and TRI and 10% of SIC 1311 facilities) experienced a release while 1% of all facility types reported a release in areas that experienced tropical storm strength winds. Of industrial facilities surveyed, more experienced indirect disruptions such as displacement of workers, loss of electricity and communication systems, and difficulty acquiring supplies and contractors for operations or reconstruction (55%), than experienced releases. To reduce the risk of hazardous material releases and speed the return to normal operations under these difficult conditions, greater attention should be devoted to risk-based facility design and improved prevention and response planning.

  15. Safety implications of a large LNG tanker spill over water.

    SciTech Connect

    Hightower, Marion Michael; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

    2005-04-01

    The increasing demand for natural gas in the United States could significantly increase the number and frequency of marine LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports. Although many studies have been conducted to assess the consequences and risks of potential LNG spills, the increasing importance of LNG imports suggests that consistent methods and approaches be identified and implemented to help ensure protection of public safety and property from a potential LNG spill. For that reason the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, requested that Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) develop guidance on a risk-based analysis approach to assess and quantify potential threats to an LNG ship, the potential hazards and consequences of a large spill from an LNG ship, and review prevention and mitigation strategies that could be implemented to reduce both the potential and the risks of an LNG spill over water. Specifically, DOE requested: (1) An in-depth literature search of the experimental and technical studies associated with evaluating the safety and hazards of an LNG spill from an LNG ship; (2) A detailed review of four recent spill modeling studies related to the safety implications of a large-scale LNG spill over water; (3) Evaluation of the potential for breaching an LNG ship cargo tank, both accidentally and intentionally, identification of the potential for such breaches and the potential size of an LNG spill for each breach scenario, and an assessment of the potential range of hazards involved in an LNG spill; (4) Development of guidance on the use of modern, performance-based, risk management approaches to analyze and manage the threats, hazards, and consequences of an LNG spill over water to reduce the overall risks of an LNG spill to levels that are protective of public safety and property.

  16. Screening of pollution control and clean-up materials for river chemical spills using the multiple case-based reasoning method with a difference-driven revision strategy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rentao; Jiang, Jiping; Guo, Liang; Shi, Bin; Liu, Jie; Du, Zhaolin; Wang, Peng

    2016-06-01

    In-depth filtering of emergency disposal technology (EDT) and materials has been required in the process of environmental pollution emergency disposal. However, an urgent problem that must be solved is how to quickly and accurately select the most appropriate materials for treating a pollution event from the existing spill control and clean-up materials (SCCM). To meet this need, the following objectives were addressed in this study. First, the material base and a case base for environment pollution emergency disposal were established to build a foundation and provide material for SCCM screening. Second, the multiple case-based reasoning model method with a difference-driven revision strategy (DDRS-MCBR) was applied to improve the original dual case-based reasoning model method system, and screening and decision-making was performed for SCCM using this model. Third, an actual environmental pollution accident from 2012 was used as a case study to verify the material base, case base, and screening model. The results demonstrated that the DDRS-MCBR method was fast, efficient, and practical. The DDRS-MCBR method changes the passive situation in which the choice of SCCM screening depends only on the subjective experience of the decision maker and offers a new approach to screening SCCM.

  17. Fuel conservation by the application of spill prevention and fail-safe engineering (a guideline manual)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodier, J. L.; Siclari, R. J.; Garrity, P. A.

    1981-06-01

    Spill prevention procedures are provided for maintaining a spill free plant during the transportation, transfer, storage and processing of petroleum products. The manual can be used to prevent spills of materials other than fuel oil. Special emphasis is given to failsafe engineering as an approach to preventing spills from the predominant cause-human failure.

  18. Planning for the Human Dimensions of Oil Spills and Spill Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webler, Thomas; Lord, Fabienne

    2010-04-01

    Oil spill contingency planners need an improved approach to understanding and planning for the human dimensions of oil spills. Drawing on existing literature in social impact assessment, natural hazards, human ecology, adaptive management, global change and sustainability, we develop an integrative approach to understanding and portraying the human dimensions impacts of stressors associated with oil spill events. Our approach is based on three fundamental conclusions that are drawn from this literature review. First, it is productive to acknowledge that, while stressors can produce human impacts directly, they mainly affect intermediary processes and changes to these processes produce human impacts. Second, causal chain modeling taken from hazard management literature provides a means to document how oil spill stressors change processes and produce human impacts. Third, concepts from the global change literature on vulnerability enrich causal models in ways that make more obvious how management interventions lessen hazards and mitigate associated harm. Using examples from recent spill events, we illustrate how these conclusions can be used to diagrammatically portray the human dimensions of oil spills.

  19. Planning for the human dimensions of oil spills and spill response.

    PubMed

    Webler, Thomas; Lord, Fabienne

    2010-04-01

    Oil spill contingency planners need an improved approach to understanding and planning for the human dimensions of oil spills. Drawing on existing literature in social impact assessment, natural hazards, human ecology, adaptive management, global change and sustainability, we develop an integrative approach to understanding and portraying the human dimensions impacts of stressors associated with oil spill events. Our approach is based on three fundamental conclusions that are drawn from this literature review. First, it is productive to acknowledge that, while stressors can produce human impacts directly, they mainly affect intermediary processes and changes to these processes produce human impacts. Second, causal chain modeling taken from hazard management literature provides a means to document how oil spill stressors change processes and produce human impacts. Third, concepts from the global change literature on vulnerability enrich causal models in ways that make more obvious how management interventions lessen hazards and mitigate associated harm. Using examples from recent spill events, we illustrate how these conclusions can be used to diagrammatically portray the human dimensions of oil spills.

  20. Chemical Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures Plan: 100 Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Y.M.

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of this Chemical Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan is to identify the chemical spill control practices, procedures, and containment devices Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) employs to prevent a reportable quantity (RQ) of a hazardous substance (as defined in 40 CFR Part 302) from being released to the environment. The chemical systems and chemical storage facilities in the 100 Areas are described. This document traces the ultimate fate of accidental chemical spills at the 100 Areas. Also included in the document destinations, spill containment devices, and systems surveillance frequencies. 2 tabs.

  1. Conceptual design report, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, K.E.

    1994-11-09

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will involve the management, handling, and cleanup of toxic substances. If the DOE is to meet its high standards of safety, the thousands of workers involved in these activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and the risks associated with these tasks. Furthermore, emergency response for DOE shipments is the primary responsibility of state, tribal, and local governments. A collaborative training initiative with the DOE will strengthen emergency response at the Hanford Site and within the regional communities. Local and international labor has joined the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) partnership, and will share in the HAMMER Training Center core programs and facilities using their own specialized trainers and training programs. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a centralized regional site dedicated to the training of hazardous material, emergency response, and fire fighting personnel.

  2. Project management plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center

    SciTech Connect

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-12-12

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the Hanford Site will involve the handling and cleanup of toxic substances. Thousands of workers involved in these new activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and associated risks. This project is an important part of the Hanford Site mission and will enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to meet high standards for safety. The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center (HAMMER) project will construct a centralized regional training center dedicated to training hazardous materials workers and emergency responders in classrooms and with hands-on, realistic training aids representing actual field conditions. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a cost-effective, high-quality way to meet the Hanford Site training needs. The training center creates a partnership among DOE; government contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and selected institutions of higher education.

  3. Brief report: hazardous materials release resulting from home production of biodiesel--Colorado, May 2006.

    PubMed

    2006-11-17

    On May 7, 2006, a hazardous materials (HazMat) release occurred in a residential area of Colorado when a homeowner who was processing a tank of homemade biodiesel fuel forgot to turn off the tank's heating element and left for the weekend. The heating element overheated and caused a fire that burned the surrounding shed and equipment. The shed had contained >600 gallons of biodiesel and recycled restaurant cooking oil, smaller amounts of glycerin and sodium hydroxide, and 1-gallon containers of sulfuric and phosphoric acid; a mixture of these ingredients seeped into the ground during the fire. A certified HazMat team and the local fire department responded. Investigators found seven 55-gallon barrels of methanol and other hazardous materials outside the shed. No injuries or evacuations occurred. To prevent potential injuries, biodiesel should be purchased from a licensed commercial source. PMID:17108892

  4. An overview of safety assessment, regulation, and control of hazardous material use at NREL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. P.; Crandall, R. S.; Moskowitz, P. D.; Fthenakis, V. M.

    1992-12-01

    This paper summarizes the methodology we use to ensure the safe use of hazardous materials at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). First, we analyze the processes and the materials used in those processes to identify the hazards presented. Then we study federal, state, and local regulations and apply the relevant requirements to our operations. When necessary, we generate internal safety documents to consolidate this information. We design research operations and support systems to conform to these requirements. Before we construct the systems, we perform a semiquantitative risk analysis on likely accident scenarios. All scenarios presenting an unacceptable risk require system or procedural modifications to reduce the risk. Following these modifications, we repeat the risk analysis to ensure that the respective accident scenarios present an acceptable risk. Once all risks are acceptable, we conduct an operational readiness review (ORR). A management-appointed panel performs the ORR ensuring compliance with all relevant requirements. After successful completion of the ORR, operations can begin.

  5. Evaluation of radionuclide concentrations and associated radiological hazard indexes in building materials used in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Nabil M; Mansour, N A; Fayez-Hassan, M

    2013-12-01

    Radionuclide concentrations of ²²⁶Ra, ²³²Th and ⁴⁰K in different types of building materials used in Egypt were measured using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The results showed relatively moderate radionuclide concentrations for all samples except granite, which showed extremely high concentrations of 78.75 ± 2.36, 2.82 ± 0.11 and 2.37 ± 0.07 kBq kg⁻¹ for ²²⁶Ra, ²³²Th and ⁴⁰K, respectively. The radiological hazard indexes of radium equivalent activity (Raeq), external hazard index (Hex) and internal hazard index (Hin), due to the presence of those radionuclides in the investigated building materials, were calculated. The released radon from the selected samples was measured using the AlphaGUARD radon monitor in order to use its value to calculate the radon emanation coefficient and the radon exhalation rate. The alpha equivalent dose (dose from indoor radon generated from building materials) was calculated using the measured values of the radium concentration and the radon emanation coefficient. PMID:23681840

  6. Evaluation of radionuclide concentrations and associated radiological hazard indexes in building materials used in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Nabil M; Mansour, N A; Fayez-Hassan, M

    2013-12-01

    Radionuclide concentrations of ²²⁶Ra, ²³²Th and ⁴⁰K in different types of building materials used in Egypt were measured using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The results showed relatively moderate radionuclide concentrations for all samples except granite, which showed extremely high concentrations of 78.75 ± 2.36, 2.82 ± 0.11 and 2.37 ± 0.07 kBq kg⁻¹ for ²²⁶Ra, ²³²Th and ⁴⁰K, respectively. The radiological hazard indexes of radium equivalent activity (Raeq), external hazard index (Hex) and internal hazard index (Hin), due to the presence of those radionuclides in the investigated building materials, were calculated. The released radon from the selected samples was measured using the AlphaGUARD radon monitor in order to use its value to calculate the radon emanation coefficient and the radon exhalation rate. The alpha equivalent dose (dose from indoor radon generated from building materials) was calculated using the measured values of the radium concentration and the radon emanation coefficient.

  7. H. R. 1935: Oil spill Bill. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, First Session, April 13, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    H.R. 1935 would amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to disallow deductions for costs in connection with oil and hazardous substances cleanup unless the requirements of all applicable Federal laws concerning such cleanup are met. The purposes are to establish that the public should not pay for oil spills or hazardous material spills; that economic losses connected with these spills should be fully compensated; that ecological damages should be mitigated; and that revenues accruing to the Treasury from deductions due to inadequate cleanup be dedicated to the Clean Water Act Fund or to the Superfund. The bill would be effective for all discharges occurring after March 23, 1989, in taxable years ending after that date.

  8. DOE's HAZMAT Spill Center at the Nevada Test Site: Activities and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lelewer, S.A.; Spahn, J.

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns and operates the Hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) Spill Center (HSC) as a research and demonstration facility available on a user-fee basis to private and public sector test and training sponsors concerned with safety aspects of hazardous materials. Though initially designed to accommodate large liquefied natural gas releasers, the HSC has accommodated hazardous materials training and safety-related testing of most chemicals in commercial use. The HSC is located at DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS) near Mercury, Nevada. The HSC provides a unique opportunity for industry and other users to conduct hazardous materials testing and training. This is the only facility of its kind for either large- or small-scale testing of hazardous and toxic fluids under controlled conditions. It is ideally suited for test sponsors to develop verified data on release prevention, mitigation, cleanup, and environmental effects of toxic and hazardous materials. The facility site also supports structured training for hazardous spills, nkigation, and cleanup. Since 1986, the HSC has been utilized for releases to evaluate the patterns of dispersion mitigation techniques, and combustion characteristics of select materials. Use of the facility can also aid users in developing emergency planning under U.S. Public Law 99-499; the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA); and other federal, state, and international laws and regulations. The HSC Program is managed by the DOE, OffIce of Emergency Management, Nonproliferation and National Security, with the support and assistance of other divisions of DOE and the U. S. government.

  9. An examination of the Hazardous Materials Transportation Uniform Safety Act (HMTUSA): A southern perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    On November 16,1990, President Bush signed into law the most comprehensive amendments to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA) in 15 years. The Hazardous Materials Transportation Uniform Safety Act of 1990 (HMTUSA) was created by Congress in an effort to strengthen and clarify the HMTA. This paper will discuss the act`s provisions as they affect shipments of spent fuel and high-level radioactive materials as well as the impact of those provisions on routing and emergency response issues in the southern region. HMTUSA consists of seven key provisions that affect radioactive materials: clarification of regulatory jurisdiction; highway routing standards; broadened industry registration; safety permits for motor carriers of high risk materials; expanded nuclear transportation requirements; new provisions for emergency response training and planning; and a public process for assessing the feasibility of a federally operated central reporting system and data center. In addition to amending various HMTA provisions, the new HMTUSA act provides appropriations to carry out the specific goals of the legislation. The act authorizes appropriations for the 1991, 1992 and 1993 fiscal years.

  10. An examination of the Hazardous Materials Transportation Uniform Safety Act (HMTUSA): A southern perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    On November 16,1990, President Bush signed into law the most comprehensive amendments to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA) in 15 years. The Hazardous Materials Transportation Uniform Safety Act of 1990 (HMTUSA) was created by Congress in an effort to strengthen and clarify the HMTA. This paper will discuss the act's provisions as they affect shipments of spent fuel and high-level radioactive materials as well as the impact of those provisions on routing and emergency response issues in the southern region. HMTUSA consists of seven key provisions that affect radioactive materials: clarification of regulatory jurisdiction; highway routing standards; broadened industry registration; safety permits for motor carriers of high risk materials; expanded nuclear transportation requirements; new provisions for emergency response training and planning; and a public process for assessing the feasibility of a federally operated central reporting system and data center. In addition to amending various HMTA provisions, the new HMTUSA act provides appropriations to carry out the specific goals of the legislation. The act authorizes appropriations for the 1991, 1992 and 1993 fiscal years.

  11. 40 CFR 262.210 - Making the hazardous waste determination in the laboratory before the unwanted material is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... eligible academic entity must: (1) Write the words “hazardous waste” on the container label that is affixed... Determination and Accumulation of Unwanted Material for Laboratories Owned by Eligible Academic Entities § 262... from the laboratory. If an eligible academic entity makes the hazardous waste determination,...

  12. Chemical hazards database and detection system for Microgravity and Materials Processing Facility (MMPF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Jimmy; Smith, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to identify contaminants associated with experiments and facilities is directly related to the safety of the Space Station. A means of identifying these contaminants has been developed through this contracting effort. The delivered system provides a listing of the materials and/or chemicals associated with each facility, information as to the contaminant's physical state, a list of the quantity and/or volume of each suspected contaminant, a database of the toxicological hazards associated with each contaminant, a recommended means of rapid identification of the contaminants under operational conditions, a method of identifying possible failure modes and effects analysis associated with each facility, and a fault tree-type analysis that will provide a means of identifying potential hazardous conditions related to future planned missions.

  13. Assessment of radiation hazards due to natural radioactivity in some building materials used in Egyptian dwellings.

    PubMed

    Medhat, M E

    2009-02-01

    Different types of Egyptian building materials from various locations in Cairo and its suburbs have been analysed for natural radioactivity using gamma ray spectrometry. Concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were in the ranges of (12 +/- 2.8-65 +/- 6.5), (5 +/- 1.8-60 +/- 6.7) and (159 +/- 3.8-920 +/- 12.7 Bq kg(-1)), respectively. The minimum concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K was found in gravel samples, whereas the maximum in granite samples. The results are compared with the published data of other countries and with the world average limits. The radiological hazard parameters: radium equivalent activity, gamma index, alpha index, absorbed dose rate and the annual exposure rate, were determined to assess the radiation hazards associated with Egyptian buildings. All studied samples are lower than world average limits.

  14. Secondary contamination of ED personnel from hazardous materials events, 1995-2001.

    PubMed

    Horton, D Kevin; Berkowitz, Zahava; Kaye, Wendy E

    2003-05-01

    Hazardous materials (hazmat) events pose a health threat not only for those individuals in the immediate vicinity of the release (ie, members of the general public, on-site first responders, employees), but also for ED personnel (ie, physicians and nurses) treating the chemically contaminated victims arriving at the hospital. Secondary contamination injuries to ED personnel result when exposed victims enter the ED without being properly decontaminated. Data from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry's Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance System were used to conduct a retrospective analysis on hazmat events occurring in 16 states from 1995 through 2001 that involved secondary injury to ED personnel. Six events were identified in which 15 ED personnel were secondarily injured while treating contaminated victims. The predominant injuries sustained were respiratory and eye irritation. Proper victim decontamination procedures, good field-to-hospital communication, and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) use can help prevent ED personnel injuries and contamination of the ED. PMID:12811712

  15. Fuel conservation by the application of spill prevention and failsafe engineering: a guideline manual

    SciTech Connect

    Goodier, J.L.; Siclari, R.J.; Garrity, P.A.

    1981-06-01

    This manual was developed to provide guideline information on spill prevention procedures for individuals who have the responsibility of maintaining a spill-free plant during the transportation, transfer, storage and processing of petroleum products. The manual can, however, be used to prevent spills of materials other than fuel oil. An attempt was made to cover every facet of spill prevention. Special emphasis is given to failsafe engineering as an approach to preventing spills from the predominant cause - human failure.

  16. Orientation effect on cone calorimeter test results to assess fire hazard of materials.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kuang-Chung

    2009-12-30

    A cone calorimeter can provide material "reaction to fire" information for use in evaluating the fire hazard of materials. Two orientations can be selected, vertical or horizontal, depending on the geometry of materials in their final use. However, most fire models and material evaluation reports fail to consider the effects of the orientation and applied the horizontal case data. To assess the validity of using data with "horizontal" samples for further applications, a systematic experimental was performed using materials including PMMA, wooden products and polystyrene foams. Besides critical heat flux for ignition, other "reaction to fire" material properties were measured, including ignition time, ignition temperature, heat release rate history and mass loss rate when exposed to three heating irradiances, namely 15, 30 and 50 kW/m(2). For the horizontal orientation in comparison to the vertical orientation, the study data reveal relatively constant temperature distribution before ignition, lower critical heat flux for pilot ignition, shorter time to ignition, lower peak heat release rate, identical total heat release, longer burning time and almost identical combustion completeness for all the tested materials except polystyrene foams. Ignition temperature displaced no clear trend. Vertical orientation tests are consequently recommended for evaluating material fire performance. PMID:19665837

  17. Hazardous Materials Verification and Limited Characterization Report on Sodium and Caustic Residuals in Materials and Fuel Complex Facilities MFC-799/799A

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Mecham

    2010-08-01

    This report is a companion to the Facilities Condition and Hazard Assessment for Materials and Fuel Complex Sodium Processing Facilities MFC-799/799A and Nuclear Calibration Laboratory MFC-770C (referred to as the Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment). This report specifically responds to the requirement of Section 9.2, Item 6, of the Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment to provide an updated assessment and verification of the residual hazardous materials remaining in the Sodium Processing Facilities processing system. The hazardous materials of concern are sodium and sodium hydroxide (caustic). The information supplied in this report supports the end-point objectives identified in the Transition Plan for Multiple Facilities at the Materials and Fuels Complex, Advanced Test Reactor, Central Facilities Area, and Power Burst Facility, as well as the deactivation and decommissioning critical decision milestone 1, as specified in U.S. Department of Energy Guide 413.3-8, “Environmental Management Cleanup Projects.” Using a tailored approach and based on information obtained through a combination of process knowledge, emergency management hazardous assessment documentation, and visual inspection, this report provides sufficient detail regarding the quantity of hazardous materials for the purposes of facility transfer; it also provides that further characterization/verification of these materials is unnecessary.

  18. Who`s protecting you from hazardous substances?

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.S.

    1993-05-01

    Employee accidents, life endangering spills of harmful chemicals, toxic materials leaching into drinking water, polluted air, crippling side effects of wonder metals and products, and human and animal deaths made it apparent that in order to protect and preserve the community and the environment, the community needed to be aware/knowledgeable of chemical uses and related possible dangers, i.e., it was time to establish rules and regulations for the use and disposal of hazardous substances and chemicals. This report details several organizations, acts, rules, and regulations created in the interest of hazardous materials safety.

  19. Oil-material fractionation in Gulf deep water horizontal intrusion layer: Field data analysis with chemodynamic fate model for Macondo 252 oil spill.

    PubMed

    Melvin, A T; Thibodeaux, L J; Parsons, A R; Overton, E; Valsaraj, K T; Nandakumar, K

    2016-04-15

    Among the discoveries of the Deepwater Horizon blowout was the so-called "sub-surface plume"; herein termed the "oil-trapping layer". Hydrocarbons were found positioned at ~1100-1300m with thickness ~100-150m and moving horizontally to the SW in a vertically stratified layer at the junction of the cold abyssal water and the permanent thermocline. This study focuses on its formation process and fate of the hydrocarbons within. The originality of this work to the field is two-fold, first it provides a conceptual framework which places layer origin in the context of a horizontal "intrusion" from the near-field, vertical, blow-out plume and second, it offers a theoretical model for the hydrocarbon chemicals within the horizontal layer as it moves far-afield. The model quantifies the oil-material fractionation process for the soluble and fine particle. The classical Box model, retrofitted with an internal gradient, the "G-Box", allows an approach that includes turbulent eddy diffusion coupled with droplet rise velocity and reactive decay to produce a simple, explicit, transparent, algebraic model with few parameters for the fate of the individual fractions. Computations show the soluble and smallest liquid droplets moving very slowly vertically through the layer appearing within the trapping layer at low concentration with high persistence. The larger droplets move-through this trapping zone quickly, attain high concentrations, and eventually form the sea surface slick. It impacts the field of oil spill engineering science by providing the conceptual idea and the algorithms for projecting the quantities and fractions of oil-material in a deep water, horizontal marine current being dispersed and moving far afield. In the field of oil spill modeling this work extends the current generation near-field plume source models to the far-field. The theory portrays the layer as an efficient oil-material trap. The model-forecasted concentration profiles for alkanes and aromatics

  20. Development of Neutron Probes for Characterization of Hazardous Materials in the Sub-surface Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Keegan, R.P.; McGrath, C.A.; Lopez, J.C.

    2002-05-15

    Neutron probes are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the detection, identification and quantification of hazardous materials in the ground. Such materials include plutonium, uranium, americium, chlorine and fluorine. Both a Neutron Gamma (NG) probe and a Prompt Fission Neutron (PFN) probe are being developed. The NG probe is used primarily for nuclide identification and quantification measurements. The PFN is used mostly for the detection and measurement of fissile material, but also for the determination of thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross sections of the various elements comprising the ground matrix. Calibration of these probes will be carried out at the INEEL using an indoor facility that has been designed for this activity.