Science.gov

Sample records for hazardous material spills

  1. Organizing to cope with hazardous-material spills

    SciTech Connect

    Rychman, D.W.; Ryckman, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    A method is given for handling hazardous-material spills that threaten drinking-water supplies. The method is applied to three case histories involving a phenol/alcohol/solvents spill, a gasoline spill, and a weekend oil spill.

  2. Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) Spill Center strategic plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This strategic Plan was developed in keeping with the Department of Energy`s mission for partnership with its customers to contribute to our Nation`s welfare by providing the technical information and the scientific and educational foundation for the technology, policy and institutional leadership necessary to achieve efficiency in energy use, diversity in energy sources, a more productive and competitive economy, improved environmental quality, and a secure national defense. The Plan provides the concepts for realigning the Departments`s Hazardous Materials Spill Center (HSC) in achieving its vision of becoming the global leader in meeting the diverse HAZMAT needs in the areas of testing, training, and technology. Each of these areas encompass many facets and a multitude of functional and operational requirements at the Federal, state, tribal, and local government levels, as well as those of foreign governments and the private sector. The evolution of the limited dimensional Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility into a multifaceted HAZMAT Spill Center will require us to totally redefine our way of thinking as related to our business approach, both within and outside of the Department. We need to establish and maintain a viable and vibrant outreach program through all aspects of the public (via government agencies) and private sectors, to include foreign partnerships. The HAZMAT Spill Center goals and objectives provide the direction for meeting our vision. This direction takes into consideration the trends and happenings identified in the {open_quotes}Strategic Outlook{close_quotes}, which includes valuable input from our stakeholders and our present and future customers. It is our worldwide customers that provide the essence of the strategic outlook for the HAZMAT Spill Center.

  3. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills... § 170.906 Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? The carrier is typically responsible for cleanup of a radioactive or hazardous material spill with assistance from the shipper using...

  4. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills... § 170.906 Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? The carrier is typically responsible for cleanup of a radioactive or hazardous material spill with assistance from the shipper using...

  5. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? 170.906 Section 170.906 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER... § 170.906 Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? The carrier is typically...

  6. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? 170.906 Section 170.906 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER... § 170.906 Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? The carrier is typically...

  7. Characteristics of hazardous material spills from reporting systems in California.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, G M; Windham, G C; Leonard, A; Neutra, R R

    1986-01-01

    Data on hazardous material releases that occurred between January 1, 1982 and September 30, 1983 in California were obtained from the California Highway Patrol (CHP) and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). The majority of incidents involved highway transport of hazardous materials, although some information was available on air, rail, and stationary facility releases. Vehicle accidents and failure of or damage to the container were the most frequent causes of releases. Proportionately more hazardous materials incidents occurred in early summer than at other times of the year, during weekdays, and daytime hours. The largest proportions of incidents involved the chemical categories of corrosives and fuels. Reported exposures and injuries to response personnel and other people at the scene were relatively few; no fatalities were reported. Few incidents were reported in both data sources, suggesting that the examination of only one data source would yield a gross underestimate of the total number of hazardous materials incidents in California. The lack of available denominator data limits the interpretation of the findings. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:3963282

  8. Characteristics of hazardous material spills from reporting systems in California.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G M; Windham, G C; Leonard, A; Neutra, R R

    1986-05-01

    Data on hazardous material releases that occurred between January 1, 1982 and September 30, 1983 in California were obtained from the California Highway Patrol (CHP) and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). The majority of incidents involved highway transport of hazardous materials, although some information was available on air, rail, and stationary facility releases. Vehicle accidents and failure of or damage to the container were the most frequent causes of releases. Proportionately more hazardous materials incidents occurred in early summer than at other times of the year, during weekdays, and daytime hours. The largest proportions of incidents involved the chemical categories of corrosives and fuels. Reported exposures and injuries to response personnel and other people at the scene were relatively few; no fatalities were reported. Few incidents were reported in both data sources, suggesting that the examination of only one data source would yield a gross underestimate of the total number of hazardous materials incidents in California. The lack of available denominator data limits the interpretation of the findings.

  9. 25 CFR 170.906 - Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Who cleans up radioactive and hazardous material spills? 170.906 Section 170.906 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER... Federal agencies to address all cleanup issues, such as arranging or repackaging of the cargo,...

  10. Hazardous materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... should be in a room with good airflow Work Safely If you find a spill, treat it like ... Hazard communication; Material Safety Data Sheet; MSDS References Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Healthcare. Available at: www.osha. ...

  11. Nowcast model for hazardous material spill prevention and response, San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Wilmot, Wayne L.; Galt, Jerry A.

    1997-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) installed the Physical Oceanographic Real-time System (PORTS) in San Francisco Bay, California, to provide real-time observations of tides, tidal currents, and meteorological conditions to, among other purposes, guide hazardous material spill prevention and response. Integrated with nowcast modeling techniques and dissemination of real-time data and the nowcasting results through the Internet on the World Wide Web, emerging technologies used in PORTS for real-time data collection forms a nowcast modeling system. Users can download tides and tidal current distribution in San Francisco Bay for their specific applications and/or for further analysis.

  12. Oil Spills and Spills of Hazardous Substances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    The stated purpose of this publication is to describe some of the more significant spill incidents and the mechanisms, both managerial and technological, to deal with them. This publication is targeted for school, general public, and other such audiences. Sections include effects of spills, prevention of spills, responding to spills, spill…

  13. Hazardous-Materials Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Henry W.; Edmonds, Gary O.

    1995-01-01

    Remotely controlled mobile robot used to locate, characterize, identify, and eventually mitigate incidents involving hazardous-materials spills/releases. Possesses number of innovative features, allowing it to perform mission-critical functions such as opening and unlocking doors and sensing for hazardous materials. Provides safe means for locating and identifying spills and eliminates risks of injury associated with use of manned entry teams. Current version of vehicle, called HAZBOT III, also features unique mechanical and electrical design enabling vehicle to operate safely within combustible atmosphere.

  14. How well do we understand oil spill hazard mapping?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepp Neves, Antonio Augusto; Pinardi, Nadia

    2017-04-01

    In simple terms, we could describe the marine oil spill hazard as related to three main factors: the spill event itself, the spill trajectory and the arrival and adsorption of oil to the shore or beaching. Regarding the first factor, spill occurrence rates and magnitude distribution and their respective uncertainties have been estimated mainly relying on maritime casualty reports. Abascal et al. (2010) and Sepp Neves et al. (2015) demonstrated for the Prestige (Spain, 2002) and Jiyeh (Lebanon, 2006) spills that ensemble numerical oil spill simulations can generate reliable estimaes of the most likely oil trajectories and impacted coasts. Although paramount to estimate the spill impacts on coastal resources, the third component of the oil spill hazard (i.e. oil beaching) is still subject of discussion. Analysts have employed different methodologies to estimate the coastal component of the hazard relying, for instance, on the beaching frequency solely, the time which a given coastal segment is subject to oil concentrations above a certain preset threshold, percentages of oil beached compared to the original spilled volume and many others. Obviously, results are not comparable and sometimes not consistent with the present knowledge about the environmental impacts of oil spills. The observed inconsistency in the hazard mapping methodologies suggests that there is still a lack of understanding of the beaching component of the oil spill hazard itself. The careful statistical description of the beaching process could finally set a common ground in oil spill hazard mapping studies as observed for other hazards such as earthquakes and landslides. This paper is the last of a series of efforts to standardize oil spill hazard and risk assessments through an ISO-compliant framework (IT - OSRA, see Sepp Neves et al., (2015)). We performed two large ensemble oil spill experiments addressing uncertainties in the spill characteristics and location, and meteocean conditions for two

  15. Training Marine Oil Spill Response Workers Under OSHA’s Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    This booklet, written for marine oil spill response employers, describes the training your employees need under HAZWOPER, the Hazardous Waste...stopping, containing, or recovering the spilled material from the release. For example, if you have workers who control an oil spill early in an

  16. Petroleum and hazardous chemical spills in Newark Bay, New Jersey, USA from 1982 to 1991.

    PubMed

    Gunster, D G; Gillis, C A; Bonnevie, N L; Abel, T B; Wenning, R J

    1993-01-01

    Newark Bay, New Jersey, is particularly vulnerable to ecological damage from petroleum and chemical spills, as a result of the enclosed nature and shallow depth of the bay, the high frequency of shipping traffic, and the numerous chemical and petroleum transfer terminals located alongs its shores. To evaluate the potential impacts to the natural resources of this coastal estuarine ecosystem, chemical and petroleum accidents reported to the US Coast Guard (USCG) between 1982 and 1991 were compiled to determine the frequency and volume of these incidents in Newark Bay and in each of its major tributaries. Records obtained from the USCG National Response Center's computerized database indicated that more than 1453 accidental incidents, resulting in the release of more than 18 million US gallons of hazardous materials and petroleum products, occurred throughout Newark Bay during this period of time. The bulk of the materials released to the aquatic environment consisted of petroleum products, specifically No. 6 Fuel Oil (103 spills, 12 829 272 US gal) and gasoline (207 spills, 48 816 US gal). The majority of the reported incidents occurred in the Arthur Kill and its tributaries, as well as in the Kill Van Kull and the Passaic River. The results of this study indicated that the accidental discharge of petroleum and hazardous chemicals represents a significant source of chemical pollution in Newark Bay. Based on the frequency of spills and the volume of materials released to the aquatic environment, it is likely that these events are having a deleterious effect on the Newark Bay ecosystem.

  17. 30 CFR 250.219 - What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the EP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What oil and hazardous substance spills..., REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE... spills of oil (see definition under 30 CFR 254.6) and hazardous substances (see definition under 40...

  18. Hazardous materials dictionary

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Parallel growth of the chemical industry of emergency response capabilities in the public and private sectors has created a new need for improved communications. A new vocabulary of important terms is emerging in each of the industries that transport, store and handle hazardous materials. This dictionary, representing a compilation of words and phrases from many relevant sources, will help document and standardize the nomenclature of hazardous materials. The authors have screened the technical discourse of the chemical, transportation, petroleum and medical fields, both governmental and private, to determine the most current expressions and their uses. The lexicographic goal has been to identify key terms, ambiguous and multiple meaning words, acronyms, symbols and even slang referring to hazardous materials reactions, storing and handling procedures.

  19. Transportation of hazardous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Max

    1994-03-01

    The transportation of hazardous materials has steadily increased through out the past thirty years and will continue to grow through the end of the century. The development of advanced technology to track extremely dangerous shipments and provide immediate electronic load information is essential to both transportation and public safety agencies. Federal, state and local transportation and public safety agencies must have hazardous material transportation information in order to plan, train and equip responders to meet the identified threat. Tracking and identification technology must be consistent within and across state and international borders. The development and implementation of a strategy and technology will require federal, state and private industry coordination and financing.

  20. 30 CFR 250.219 - What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the EP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...), (d), and (e)). (b) Modeling report. If you model a potential oil or hazardous substance spill in developing your EP, a modeling report or the modeling results, or a reference to such report or results if...

  1. Hazardous Materials Hazard Analysis, Portland, Oregon.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    regional equipment, crossings , and other aspects of overall system safety. For further information: Henry Jacobs, Hazardous Materials Inspector U.S... cross -tralning and an Increased in- spection effort. In the last year, twelve Oregon State Police Officers who patrol highways around the Portland area...Response System:, The International Fire Chlef (date unknown). Lee, Myra T. and Roe, Penelope G. Hazardous Materials Management System: A Guide for Local

  2. Report: EPA Provided Quality and Timely Information on Hurricane Katrina Hazardous Material Releases and Debris Management

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2006-P-00023, May 2, 2006. After Hurricane Katrina, EPA was the agency with lead responsibility to prevent, minimize, or mitigate threats to public health and the environment caused by hazardous materials and oil spills in inland zones.

  3. Mechanisms of and facility types involved in hazardous materials incidents.

    PubMed Central

    Kales, S N; Polyhronopoulos, G N; Castro, M J; Goldman, R H; Christiani, D C

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically investigate hazardous materials (hazmat) releases and determine the mechanisms of these accidents, and the industries/activities and chemicals involved. We analyzed responses by Massachusetts' six district hazmat teams from their inception through May 1996. Information from incident reports was extracted onto standard coding sheets. The majority of hazardous materials incidents were caused by spills, leaks, or escapes of hazardous materials (76%) and occurred at fixed facilities (80%). Transportation-related accidents accounted for 20% of incidents. Eleven percent of hazardous materials incidents were at schools or health care facilities. Petroleum-derived fuels were involved in over half of transportation-related accidents, and these accounted for the majority of petroleum fuel releases. Chlorine derivatives were involved in 18% of all accidents and were associated with a wide variety of facility types and activities. In conclusion, systematic study of hazardous materials incidents allows the identification of preventable causes of these incidents. PMID:9300926

  4. 30 CFR 250.250 - What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What oil and hazardous substance spills... MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR... spills of oil (see definition under 30 CFR 254.6) and hazardous substances (see definition under 40...

  5. Review on hazardous and noxious substances (HNS) involved in marine spill incidents—an online database.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Isabel; Moreira, Susana; Santos, Miguel M

    2015-03-21

    In this review, we have collected information on the behavior, fate, weathering, and impact of hazardous and noxious substances (HNS) accidentally spilled at sea on the marine biota. The information was compiled on a datasheet and converted into a database that can be accessed by the general public (www.ciimar.up.pt/hns). Systematization of data is important to assist stakeholders involved in HNS spill preparedness and response, facilitating the incorporation of lessons from past incidents in the decision process. The database contains 184 entries of HNS spilled in 119 incidents in marine waters around the world. Data were analyzed in terms of HNS physical behavior in water according to SEBC (Standard European Behavior Classification) codes. The most common products involved in accidental spills in the marine environment were identified and major lessons highlighted. From the analysis, it was determined that most HNS spills were poorly documented and information was mistreated. In most cases, no monitoring programs were implemented following the incident. This conduct has occurred in 24 out of 119 incidents analyzed and has consequently limited the information on fate, behavior, and weathering of HNS spilled that could have been recovered. Major gaps were identified, and priorities and recommendations were drawn as a step toward improving preparedness and response to HNS spills.

  6. Pharmacist participation in the management of incidents involving hazardous materials.

    PubMed

    Levy, D B; Barone, J A; Raia, J J; York, J M; Vogel, D P

    1987-03-01

    The role of the pharmacist as a hazardous materials consultant is described. Pharmacists in a university-affiliated teaching hospital are contacted by either emergency medical services or the emergency department to assist in the management of incidents involving toxic hazardous materials. These incidents can range from major chemical spills or leaks to long-term exposures involving generalized, nonspecific symptoms. An advanced pharmacy resident in emergency medicine is the primary pharmacy contact for hazardous materials consults. The services provided by the clinical pharmacist include identification of the hazardous materials involved, initiation of special precautions for rescue-squad and hospital-based personnel, clinical assessment of the toxicologic problem, and formulation of therapeutic recommendations. Teaching programs have been developed for pharmacy, nursing, and medical students, hospital employees, and emergency-response agencies. Pharmacy participation in the management of hazardous materials incidents has been well received by emergency department physicians and nurses, as well as by rescue personnel. During the period between January 1 and July 1, 1986, the pharmacy was consulted on 66 hazardous materials incidents. Since pharmacists have traditionally been used as information resources for clinical toxicology questions, it follows that their participation can extend into the field of environmental toxicology, specifically involving hazardous materials. The pharmacist's input as a hazardous materials consultant in our institution has been well received, and we believe that pharmacy departments can play an important role in the management of incidents involving hazardous materials.

  7. Managing Academe's Hazardous Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Fay

    1991-01-01

    Those responsible for planning and management of colleges and universities must plan comprehensively for hazardous waste disposal. Federal and state regulations are increasing, landfill area is becoming scarce, and incineration costs are rising fast. High-level institutional commitment to a sound campus environment policy is essential. (MSE)

  8. Managing Academe's Hazardous Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Fay

    1991-01-01

    Those responsible for planning and management of colleges and universities must plan comprehensively for hazardous waste disposal. Federal and state regulations are increasing, landfill area is becoming scarce, and incineration costs are rising fast. High-level institutional commitment to a sound campus environment policy is essential. (MSE)

  9. 30 CFR 550.219 - What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the EP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the EP? 550.219 Section 550.219 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT... your worst case discharge scenario (see 30 CFR 254.26(a)), and a comparison of the appropriate worst...

  10. 30 CFR 550.219 - What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the EP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the EP? 550.219 Section 550.219 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT... your worst case discharge scenario (see 30 CFR 254.26(a)), and a comparison of the appropriate worst...

  11. 30 CFR 550.219 - What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the EP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the EP? 550.219 Section 550.219 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT... your worst case discharge scenario (see 30 CFR 254.26(a)), and a comparison of the appropriate worst...

  12. 78 FR 42998 - Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials, Safety Administration (PHMSA... participate in a public meeting addressing the transportation of hazardous materials by rail. FRA and......

  13. Transportation of Hazardous Evidentiary Material.

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, Douglas.

    2005-06-01

    This document describes the specimen and transportation containers currently available for use with hazardous and infectious materials. A detailed comparison of advantages, disadvantages, and costs of the different technologies is included. Short- and long-term recommendations are also provided.3 DraftDraftDraftExecutive SummaryThe Federal Bureau of Investigation's Hazardous Materials Response Unit currently has hazardous material transport containers for shipping 1-quart paint cans and small amounts of contaminated forensic evidence, but the containers may not be able to maintain their integrity under accident conditions or for some types of hazardous materials. This report provides guidance and recommendations on the availability of packages for the safe and secure transport of evidence consisting of or contaminated with hazardous chemicals or infectious materials. Only non-bulk containers were considered because these are appropriate for transport on small aircraft. This report will addresses packaging and transportation concerns for Hazardous Classes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 materials. If the evidence is known or suspected of belonging to one of these Hazardous Classes, it must be packaged in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR Part 173. The anthrax scare of several years ago, and less well publicized incidents involving unknown and uncharacterized substances, has required that suspicious substances be sent to appropriate analytical laboratories for analysis and characterization. Transportation of potentially hazardous or infectious material to an appropriate analytical laboratory requires transport containers that maintain both the biological and chemical integrity of the substance in question. As a rule, only relatively small quantities will be available for analysis. Appropriate transportation packaging is needed that will maintain the integrity of the substance, will not allow biological alteration, will not react chemically with the substance being

  14. Hazardous materials incidents in military aircraft.

    PubMed

    Voge, V M; Tolan, G

    1993-07-01

    We evaluated 10 years of reported hazardous cargo incident information from the U.S. Air Force and Naval Safety Centers. In this first of two papers describing the hazardous cargo problems reported by the two services, we describe types of aircraft and types of hazardous cargo involved in incidents not causing aircraft mishaps. Normally, hazardous cargo must be manifested as such and no passengers are allowed on such flights. Unauthorized hazardous cargo was found on military aircraft carrying passengers. The most common problem was fuel spills or fumes. The most frequent cause of a hazardous cargo incident was improper manifest of same. Improvements are recommended for the incompatible or inconsistent hazardous cargo incident reporting systems, in order to improve prevention of hazardous cargo incidents.

  15. Risk assessment of oil spills along the Mediterranean coast: A sensitivity analysis of the choice of hazard quantification.

    PubMed

    Al Shami, A; Harik, G; Alameddine, I; Bruschi, D; Garcia, D Astiaso; El-Fadel, M

    2017-01-01

    Oil pollution in the Mediterranean represents a serious threat to the coastal environment. Quantifying the risks associated with a potential spill is often based on results generated from oil spill models. In this study, MEDSLIK-II, an EU funded and endorsed oil spill model, is used to assess potential oil spill scenarios at four pilot areas located along the northern, eastern, and southern Mediterranean shoreline, providing a wide range of spill conditions and coastal geomorphological characteristics. Oil spill risk assessment at the four pilot areas was quantified as a function of three oil pollution metrics that include the susceptibility of oiling per beach segment, the average volume of oiling expected in the event of beaching, and the average oil beaching time. The results show that while the three pollution metrics tend to agree in their hazard characterization when the shoreline morphology is simple, considerable differences in the quantification of the associated hazard is possible under complex coastal morphologies. These differences proved to greatly alter the evaluation of environmental risks. An integrative hazard index is proposed that encompasses the three simulated pollution metrics. The index promises to shed light on oil spill hazards that can be universally applied across the Mediterranean basin by integrating it with the unified oil spill risk assessment tool developed by the Regional Marine Pollution Emergency Response Centre for the Mediterranean (REMPEC).

  16. Detection, identification, and quantification techniques for spills of hazardous chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, J. F.; Sandness, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    The first 400 chemicals listed in the Coast Guard's Chemical Hazards Response Information System were evaluated with respect to their detectability, identifiability, and quantifiability by 12 generalized remote and in situ sensing techniques. Identification was also attempted for some key areas in water pollution sensing technology.

  17. Hazardous materials package performance regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, N. A.; Glass, R. E.; McClure, J. D.; Finley, N. C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a hazardous materials Hazmat Packaging Performance Evaluation (HPPE) project being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Department of Transportation Research Special Programs Administration (DOT-RSPA) to look at the subset of bulk packagings that are larger than 2000 gallons. The objectives of this project are to evaluate current hazmat specification packagings and develop supporting documentation for determining performance requirements for packagings in excess of 2000 gallons that transport hazardous materials that have been classified as extremely toxic by inhalation (METBI).

  18. LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF RESIDUAL LIQUID ORGANICS FROM SPILLS, LEAKS, AND THE DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTES IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic liquids that are essentially immiscible with water migrate through the subsurface under the influence of capillary, viscous, and buoyancy forces. These liquids originate from the improper disposal of hazardous wastes, and the spills and leaks of petroleum hydrocarbons a...

  19. LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF RESIDUAL LIQUID ORGANICS FROM SPILLS, LEAKS, AND THE DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTES IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic liquids that are essentially immiscible with water migrate through the subsurface under the influence of capillary, viscous, and buoyancy forces. These liquids originate from the improper disposal of hazardous wastes, and the spills and leaks of petroleum hydrocarbons a...

  20. Treatment of oil spill fire hazards with chemical dispersants: a case history

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, S.

    1982-10-01

    Federal contingency plans include the use of chemical dispersants to ameliorate hazardous situations caused by spills of flammable or explosive petroleum products. The closing of the Williamsburg Bridge in New York City, when a gasoline tanker exploded and sank under it, was nearly overshadowed by the leakage of 7 750 000 L (2 000 000 gal) of gasoline from a storage facility in Boston. The threat to a densely populated neighborhood of six-family tenement houses and a large racetrack that stabled hundreds of Thoroughbred horses led to the use of a chemical dispersant to neutralize the fire hazard. Favorable results by fire departments in recent years, as a result of training, have established dispersants as the method of choice to handle nonburning spill incidents. Even though the teams that responded to several such emergencies of course held the protection of life and property as paramount, no toxicological environmental effects were noted during subsequent observations.

  1. Hazardous Material Packaging and Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Hypes, Philip A.

    2016-02-04

    This is a student training course. Some course objectives are to: recognize and use standard international and US customary units to describe activities and exposure rates associated with radioactive material; determine whether a quantity of a single radionuclide meets the definition of a class 7 (radioactive) material; determine, for a given single radionuclide, the shipping quantity activity limits per 49 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 173.435; determine the appropriate radioactive material hazard class proper shipping name for a given material; determine when a single radionuclide meets the DOT definition of a hazardous substance; determine the appropriate packaging required for a given radioactive material; identify the markings to be placed on a package of radioactive material; determine the label(s) to apply to a given radioactive material package; identify the entry requirements for radioactive material labels; determine the proper placement for radioactive material label(s); identify the shipping paper entry requirements for radioactive material; select the appropriate placards for a given radioactive material shipment or vehicle load; and identify allowable transport limits and unacceptable transport conditions for radioactive material.

  2. Spill Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2005-01-01

    This article describes OSHA procedures for handling Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories. The Laboratory Standard requires a Chemical Hygiene Plan to address all aspects of working with hazardous chemicals. This includes dealing with chemical spills. Chemical spill kits or "spill crash carts" need to be available in case…

  3. Spill Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2005-01-01

    This article describes OSHA procedures for handling Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories. The Laboratory Standard requires a Chemical Hygiene Plan to address all aspects of working with hazardous chemicals. This includes dealing with chemical spills. Chemical spill kits or "spill crash carts" need to be available in case…

  4. Transportation of Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    2000-02-28

    This report documents the Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment (EPHA) for the Transportation of Hazardous Materials (THM) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). This hazards assessment is intended to identify and analyze those transportation hazards significant enough to warrant consideration in the SRS Emergency Management Program.

  5. Robots Working with Hazardous Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Amai, W.; Fahrenholtz, J.

    1999-01-06

    While many research and development activities take place at Sandia National Laboratories' Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center (ISRC), where the "rubber meets the road" is in the ISRC'S delivered systems. The ISRC has delivered several systems over the last few years that handle hazardous materials on a daily basis, and allow human workers to move to a safer, supervisory role than the "hands-on" operations that they used to perform. The ISRC at Sandia performs a large range of research and development activities, including development and delivery of one-of-a-kind robotic systems for use with hazardous materials. Our mission is to create systems for operations where people can't or don't want to perform the operations by hand, and the systems described in this article are several of our first-of-a-kind deliveries to achieve that mission.

  6. IT - OSRA: applying ensemble simulations to estimate the oil spill hazard associated to operational and accidental oil spills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepp Neves, Antonio Augusto; Pinardi, Nadia; martins, Flavio

    2016-04-01

    Every year, 270,000 tonnes of oil are estimated to be spilled in the ocean by vessel operations (e.g. tank washing, leakage of lubricants) and the so called operational spills are typically associated with small volumes and high occurrence rate. Vessel-related accidental spills (e.g. collisions, explosions) seldom occur and usually involve high volumes of oil, accounting for about 100,000 tonnes/year. The occurrence of accidental spills and their impacts have been well documented in the available literature. On the other hand, occurrence rates of operational spills and the effects they have on the marine and coastal environments remain very uncertain due to insufficient sampling effort and methodological limitations. Trying to foresee when and where an oil spill will occur in a certain area, its characteristics and impacts is, at present, impossible. Oil spill risk assessments (OSRAs) have been employed in several parts of the globe in order to deal with such uncertainties and protect the marine environment. In the present work, we computed the oil spill risk applying ensemble oil spill simulations following an ISO-31000 compliant OSRA methodology (Sepp Neves et al. , 2015). The ensemble experiment was carried out for the Algarve coast (southern Portugal) generating a unique data set of 51,200 numerical oil spill simulations covering the main sources of uncertainties (i.e. where and when the spill will happen and oil spill model configuration). From the generated data set, the risk due to accidental and operational spills was mapped for the Algarve municipalities based on the frequency and magnitude (i.e. concentrations) of beaching events and the main sources of risk were identified. The socioeconomic and environmental dimensions of the risk were treated separately. Seasonal changes in the risk index proposed due to the variability of meteo-oceanographic variables (i.e. currents and waves) were also quantified.

  7. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 392: Spill Sites and Construction Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    R. B. Jackson

    2002-02-01

    This Closure Report documents the closure activities that were conducted to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 392--Spill Sites and Construction Materials located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). CAU 392 is listed on in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996) and consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 5 and 6 of the NTS: CAS 05-17-02 Construction Materials/Lead Bricks; CAS 06-17-03 Cement Mud Pit; CAS 06-1 9-01 Cable Pile; Powder Piles (3); CAS 06-44-02 Paint Spill; CAS 06-44-03 Plaster Spill; CAS 06-44-04 Cutting Fluid Discharge Ditch. Closure activities were performed in two phases. Phase 1 activities consisted of collecting waste characterization samples of soil and material present on-site, and where appropriate, performing radiological screening of debris at the six CASs. Results were used to determine how waste generated during closure activities would be handled and disposed of, i.e., as nonhazardous sanitary or hazardous waste, etc. Phase 2 activities consisted of closing each CAS by removing debris and/or soil, disposing of the generated waste, and verifying that each CAS was clean closed by visual inspection and/or by the collecting soil verification samples for laboratory analysis. Copies of the analytical results for the site verification samples are included in Appendix A. Copies of the Sectored Housekeeping Site Closure Verification Form for each of the six CASs are included in Appendix 8. Appendix C contains a copy of the Bechtel Nevada (BN) On-site Waste Transport Manifest for the hazardous waste generated during closure of CAS 06-44-02.

  8. NASA LaRC Hazardous Material Pharmacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esquenet, Remy

    1995-01-01

    In 1993-1994 the Office of Environmental Engineering contracted SAIC to develop NASA Langley's Pollution Prevention (P2) Program. One of the priority projects identified in this contract was the development of a hazardous waste minimization (HAZMIN)/hazardous materials reutilization (HAZMART) program in the form of a Hazardous Materials Pharmacy. A hazardous materials pharmacy is designed to reduce hazardous material procurement costs and hazardous waste disposal costs. This is accomplished through the collection and reissue of excess hazardous material. Currently, a rarely used hazardous material may be stored in a shop area, unused, until it passes its expiration date. The material is then usually disposed of as a hazardous waste, often at a greater expense than the original cost of the material. While this material was on the shelf expiring, other shop areas may have ordered new supplies of the same material. The hazardous material pharmacy would act as a clearinghouse for such materials. Material that is not going to be used would be turned in to the pharmacy. Other users could then be issued this material free of charge, thereby reducing procurement costs. The use of this material by another shop prevents it from expiring, thereby reducing hazardous waste disposal costs.

  9. Hazardous material replacement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Guttridge, A.H.

    1993-09-01

    Methyl dianiline (MDA) is one of the components used in potting of electronic assemblies at Allied Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD). MDA is a liver toxin and a suspected carcinogen. The KCD has made a commitment to eliminate the use of hazardous materials as much as technically feasible. This project was initiated to find alternatives to the MDA foam system. The project plan was to verify that the new materials developed by expert groups within the DOE nuclear weapons complex, such as the Organic Materials Group, would meet the unique requirements of the assemblies fabricated in the Electronic Products Manufacturing Building (EPMB) at KCD. The work was discontinued when associates assigned to the project were transferred to higher priority projects.

  10. Selection of Priority Hazardous Chemicals for Permeation Testing and Hazardous Chemical Spill Detection and Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Form DOT F 1700.7 (8/72) Reproduction of form and completed page is authorized i-ik a) . . E 9L E ~~ S0 = u. a) 0C C 0 0 U 0 0n 0 V...to the increase in the number of PCB incidents reported to the NRC. Of the top 25 NRC spills- excluding asphalt , creosote, jet fuel, kerosene, and...keytones 12. Glycols and epoxides 13. Carboxylic acid and derivatives 14. Nitriles and isocyanates 15. Amines and imines 16. Organic sulfur compounds

  11. 78 FR 69310 - Hazardous Materials Table, Special Provisions, Hazardous Materials Communications, Emergency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 172 Hazardous Materials Table, Special Provisions, Hazardous Materials Communications, Emergency Response Information, Training Requirements, and... of October 1, 2012, on page 242, in Sec. 172.101, in the Hazardous Materials Table, in the entry...

  12. 76 FR 51324 - Hazardous Materials: Incorporating Rail Special Permits Into the Hazardous Materials Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 171, 172, 173, 174, 179, and 180 RIN 2137-AE55 Hazardous Materials: Incorporating Rail Special Permits Into the Hazardous Materials Regulations AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of...

  13. Use of health hazard criteria for estimating the hazard potential of chemicals to water in case of a spill.

    PubMed

    Höfer, T; Steinhäuser, K G

    2000-02-01

    Accidental spills resulting in severe pollution can occur during transportation or handling of large volumes of chemicals. To address this problem, chemicals are classified according to the level of hazard to man and the environment in order to then define graduated technical standards. Three regulatory examples (enforced or drafted for transport and industrial installations in Europe) covering aspects of limnic as well as sea water are discussed in regard to health aspects of pollution. Whereas for the safety of seagoing tankships an exposure orientated combination of health and environmental aspects is used, for industrial plants in Germany a scoring system based on the European Union's Risk Phrase system is applied. The health-related parameters primarily used for hazard classification are repeated-dose toxicity and acute oral and dermal toxicity. Acute oral toxicity is most widely used because of the ready availability of data. Carcinogenicity is treated as the most important hazard. The report discusses the importance of dermal exposure, aspiration, and endocrine disruption as parameters as well as the importance of health criteria for the protection of aquatic organisms. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. Personal Protective Equipment Use and Hazardous Drug Spills among Ambulatory Oncology Nurses: Results from a Mailed Survey

    PubMed Central

    He, Bei Y.; Mendelsohn-Victor, Kari; McCullagh, Marjorie C.; Friese, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To examine patterns and organizational correlates of personal protective equipment (PPE) use and hazardous drug spills. Design Cross-sectional mailed survey. Setting Ambulatory practices in California, Georgia, and Michigan. Sample 252 Oncology Nursing Society members who administer hazardous drugs. Methods Bivariate and multivariable regression analyses. Main Research Variables Outcomes were PPE use and hazardous drug spills. Covariates included nursing workloads, nurses’ practice environments, and barriers to PPE use. Findings 26% reported a recent drug spill. 90% wore only one pair of chemotherapy-tested gloves. Increased PPE use was significantly associated with nurse participation in practice affairs (β = 0.25, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.41), non-private ownership (β= 0.37, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.64), increased nursing workloads (β = 0.03, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.04), and fewer barriers to PPE use (β = 0.65, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.93). Spills were significantly associated with less favorable manager leadership and support (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.98), and higher workloads (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.06). Conclusions Drug spills occur often in ambulatory settings. PPE use remains low and barriers to use persist. Higher workloads are associated with both lower PPE use and more spills. Implications Managers should monitor and correct aberrant workloads and assure PPE is available and staff are trained. Knowledge Translation 1) Workloads are an important factor to consider in reducing hazardous drug exposures. 2) Nurses report substantial barriers to exposure prevention, including absence of equipment and lack of training. 3) Educational interventions are needed to improve use of PPE and reduction in hazardous drug exposures PMID:28067030

  15. 78 FR 24309 - Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration List of Special Permit Applications Delayed AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: List of Applications Delayed... of Hazardous Materials Special Permits and Approvals, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

  16. 76 FR 45332 - Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is...

  17. 78 FR 34156 - Hazardous Materials: Emergency Recall Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Hazardous Materials: Emergency Recall Order AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Emergency Recall Order... on May 24, 2013 to The Lite Cylinder Company, Inc. The Office of Hazardous Materials Safety...

  18. 78 FR 18419 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Delayed Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Delayed Applications AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: List of... Paquet, Director, Office of Hazardous Materials Special Permits and Approvals, Pipeline and...

  19. 77 FR 21714 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 172, 173, and 175 RIN 2137-AE44 Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... A. Leary, Standards and Rulemaking Division, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety...

  20. 78 FR 1119 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 172, 173, and 175 RIN 2137-AE44 Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) on the transportation of lithium cells and batteries,...

  1. 76 FR 75950 - Hazardous Materials: Emergency Restriction/Prohibition Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Hazardous Materials: Emergency Restriction/Prohibition Order AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION..., including Rainbow of Hope. This Emergency Order was issued by the Office of Hazardous Materials Safety...

  2. 30 CFR 550.250 - What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the DPP or DOCD? 550.250 Section 550.250 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... comparison of the appropriate worst case discharge scenario in your approved regional OSRP with the worst...

  3. 30 CFR 550.250 - What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the DPP or DOCD? 550.250 Section 550.250 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... comparison of the appropriate worst case discharge scenario in your approved regional OSRP with the worst...

  4. 30 CFR 550.250 - What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the DPP or DOCD? 550.250 Section 550.250 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... comparison of the appropriate worst case discharge scenario in your approved regional OSRP with the worst...

  5. 30 CFR 250.250 - What oil and hazardous substance spills information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... development and production activities (see 30 CFR 254.26(b), (c), (d), and (e)). (b) Modeling report. If you model a potential oil or hazardous substance spill in developing your DPP or DOCD, a modeling report or the modeling results, or a reference to such report or results if you have already submitted it to the...

  6. The California Unified Contingency Plan: A format for integrating state and federal oil spill and hazardous substance requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Wines, H.H. III

    1998-12-31

    The California Unified Contingency Plan is a format, modeled after the federal Integrated Contingency Plan guidance, that allows facilities subject to two or more oil spill and hazardous substance requirements, under either federal regulation or California law, to meet all of those requirements in a single comprehensive emergency response and planning document. Oil spill response plans which can be consolidated under this format include the California Marine Facility Contingency Plan, the federal Spill Prevention. Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plan and associated Facility Response Plan required by the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA-90), as well as any other federal or state planning requirements concerning petroleum, hazardous substances and hazardous wastes. Use of the california Unified Contingency Plan will minimize duplication in the preparation and implementation of emergency response plans and will improve economic efficiency for both the regulated and regulating communities. California`s regulatory agencies have been statutorily mandated to accept contingency plans prepared under this format. Regulations concerning oil spill prevention overlap wit h regulations concerning hazardous substances, and both overlap with still more regulations. Implementation of the California Unified Contingency Plan will now make it possible to eliminate this redundancy and provide the state with both internal consistency and regulatory harmony with the rest of the nation.

  7. Technology for Managing Spills on Land and Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahm, Douglas B.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Spill control methods have been developed to control, treat and monitor spills of hazardous materials during their manufacture, transport, and storage. Spills on both land and water, and methods of treatment and control in these environments were studied. A discussion of detection and monitoring equipment and protective clothing concludes this…

  8. Hazard index for underground toxic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. F.; Cohen, J. J.; McKone, T. E.

    1980-06-01

    Work in the area of hazard indices was reviewed. A geotoxicity hazard index for use in characterizing the hazard of toxic material buried underground is presented. Factors included in this index are: an intrinsic toxicity factor, formulated as the volume of water required for dilution to public drinking water levels; a persistence factor to chracterize the longevity of the material, ranging from unity for stable materials to smaller values for shorter lived materials; an availability factor that relates the transport potential for the particular material to a reference value for its naturally occurring analog; and a correction factor to accommodate the buildup of decay progeny, resulting in increased toxicity.

  9. Hazardous materials in Fresh Kills landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, J.S.

    1997-12-31

    No environmental monitoring and corrective action programs can pinpoint multiple locations of hazardous materials the total amount of them in a large landfill. Yet the consequences of hazardous materials in MSW landfills are considerable, in terms of public health concerns, environmental damage, and cleanup costs. In this paper a rough estimation is made of how much hazardous material may have been disposed in Fresh Kills landfill in Staten Island, New York. The logic and methods could be used for other MSW landfills. Fresh Kills has frequently been described as the world`s largest MSW landfill. While records of hazardous waste disposal at Fresh Kills over nearly 50 years of operation certainly do not exist, no reasonable person would argue with the conclusion that large quantities of hazardous waste surely have been disposed at Fresh Kills, both legally and illegally. This study found that at least 2 million tons of hazardous wastes and substances have been disposed at Fresh Kills since 1948. Major sources are: household hazardous waste, commercial RCRA hazardous waste, incinerator ash, and commercial non-RCRA hazardous waste, governmental RCRA hazardous waste. Illegal disposal of hazardous waste surely has contributed even more. This is a sufficient amount to cause serious environmental contamination and releases, especially from such a landfill without an engineered liner system, for example. This figure is roughly 1% of the total amount of waste disposed in Fresh Kills since 1948, probably at least 200 million tons.

  10. 76 FR 4276 - Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 174 Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of Transportation... in this aspect of FRA's hazardous materials program. DATES: The public meeting will be held...

  11. 77 FR 37961 - Hazardous Materials: Incorporating Rail Special Permits Into the Hazardous Materials Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ... June 25, 2012 Part II Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 171, 172, 173, et al. Hazardous Materials: Incorporating Rail Special Permits Into the Hazardous Materials Regulations; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 122 / Monday...

  12. Pumping through porous hydrophobic/oleophilic materials: an alternative technology for oil spill remediation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jin; Ye, Yin-Dong; Yao, Hong-Bin; Zhu, Xi; Wang, Xu; Wu, Liang; Wang, Jin-Long; Ding, Hang; Yong, Ni; He, Ling-Hui; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-04-01

    Recently, porous hydrophobic/oleophilic materials (PHOMs) have been shown to be the most promising candidates for cleaning up oil spills; however, due to their limited absorption capacity, a large quantity of PHOMs would be consumed in oil spill remediation, causing serious economic problems. In addition, the complicated and time-consuming process of oil recovery from these sorbents is also an obstacle to their practical application. To solve the above problems, we apply external pumping on PHOMs to realize the continuous collection of oil spills in situ from the water surface with high speed and efficiency. Based on this novel design, oil/water separation and oil collection can be simultaneously achieved in the remediation of oil spills, and the oil sorption capacity is no longer limited to the volume and weight of the sorption material. This novel external pumping technique may bring PHOMs a step closer to practical application in oil spill remediation.

  13. Environmental risk analysis of hazardous material rail transportation.

    PubMed

    Saat, Mohd Rapik; Werth, Charles J; Schaeffer, David; Yoon, Hongkyu; Barkan, Christopher P L

    2014-01-15

    An important aspect of railroad environmental risk management involves tank car transportation of hazardous materials. This paper describes a quantitative, environmental risk analysis of rail transportation of a group of light, non-aqueous-phase liquid (LNAPL) chemicals commonly transported by rail in North America. The Hazardous Materials Transportation Environmental Consequence Model (HMTECM) was used in conjunction with a geographic information system (GIS) analysis of environmental characteristics to develop probabilistic estimates of exposure to different spill scenarios along the North American rail network. The risk analysis incorporated the estimated clean-up cost developed using the HMTECM, route-specific probability distributions of soil type and depth to groundwater, annual traffic volume, railcar accident rate, and tank car safety features, to estimate the nationwide annual risk of transporting each product. The annual risk per car-mile (car-km) and per ton-mile (ton-km) was also calculated to enable comparison between chemicals and to provide information on the risk cost associated with shipments of these products. The analysis and the methodology provide a quantitative approach that will enable more effective management of the environmental risk of transporting hazardous materials. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. 49 CFR 383.121 - Requirements for hazardous materials endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hazardous materials accidents; and (10) Tunnels and railroad crossings. (b) Hazardous materials handling... materials; (3) Emergency procedures; and (4) Existence of special requirements for transporting Class...

  15. 75 FR 60333 - Hazardous Material; Miscellaneous Packaging Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... Hazardous Material; Miscellaneous Packaging Amendments AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... materials packages may be considered a bulk packaging. The September 1, 2006 NPRM definition for ``bulk... erroneously stated Large Packagings would contain hazardous materials without an intermediate packaging,...

  16. Hazard index for underground toxic material

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.F.; Cohen, J.J.; McKone, T.E.

    1980-06-01

    To adequately define the problem of waste management, quantitative measures of hazard must be used. This study reviews past work in the area of hazard indices and proposes a geotoxicity hazard index for use in characterizing the hazard of toxic material buried underground. Factors included in this index are: an intrinsic toxicity factor, formulated as the volume of water required for dilution to public drinking-water levels; a persistence factor to characterize the longevity of the material, ranging from unity for stable materials to smaller values for shorter-lived materials; an availability factor that relates the transport potential for the particular material to a reference value for its naturally occurring analog; and a correction factor to accommodate the buildup of decay progeny, resulting in increased toxicity.

  17. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Partin, Judy K.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-01-01

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  18. Detection device for hazardous material

    SciTech Connect

    Partin, J.K.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chemical with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  19. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Partin, Judy K.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-04-05

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  20. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation of hazardous materials. The transportation of hazardous materials is governed by the hazardous materials... below, an agency official, prior to the transportation of hazardous materials, shall certify on the...

  1. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation of hazardous materials. The transportation of hazardous materials is governed by the hazardous materials... below, an agency official, prior to the transportation of hazardous materials, shall certify on the...

  2. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation of hazardous materials. The transportation of hazardous materials is governed by the hazardous materials... below, an agency official, prior to the transportation of hazardous materials, shall certify on the...

  3. Oil spill hazard from dispersal of oil along shipping lanes in the Southern Adriatic and Northern Ionian Seas.

    PubMed

    Liubartseva, S; De Dominicis, M; Oddo, P; Coppini, G; Pinardi, N; Greggio, N

    2015-01-15

    An assessment of hazard stemming from operational oil ship discharges in the Southern Adriatic and Northern Ionian (SANI) Seas is presented. The methodology integrates ship traffic data, the fate and transport oil spill model MEDSLIK-II, coupled with the Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) ocean currents, sea surface temperature analyses and ECMWF surface winds. Monthly and climatological hazard maps were calculated for February 2009 through April 2013. Monthly hazard distributions of oil show that the zones of highest sea surface hazard are located in the southwestern Adriatic Sea and eastern Ionian Sea. Distinctive "hot spots" appear in front of the Taranto Port and the sea area between Corfu Island and the Greek coastlines. Beached oil hazard maps indicate the highest values in the Taranto Port area, on the eastern Greek coastline, as well as in the Bari Port area and near Brindisi Port area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. NRT-1: Hazardous Materials Planning Guide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The NRT issued Hazardous Materials Emergency Planning Guide (NRT1) in 1987, as required by EPCRA, to provide planning guidance for state and local governments in the development of local emergency response plans.

  5. Hazardous materials transportation and emergency response programs

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.S.; Fore, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    This presentation consists of the following visual aids; (1) detailed routing capabilities of truck, rail, barge; (2) legislative data base for hazardous materials; and (3) emergency response of accident site Eddyville, Kentucky (airports in vicinity of Eddyville, KY).

  6. Hazardous Materials Management Program Report- 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2005-06-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Hazardous Materials Management Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2005 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  7. Unconventional oil and gas spills: Materials, volumes, and risks to surface waters in four states of the U.S.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Kelly O; Baruch-Mordo, Sharon; Patterson, Lauren A; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Entrekin, Sally A; Fargione, Joseph E; Kiesecker, Joseph M; Konschnik, Kate E; Ryan, Joseph N; Trainor, Anne M; Saiers, James E; Wiseman, Hannah J

    2017-03-01

    Extraction of oil and gas from unconventional sources, such as shale, has dramatically increased over the past ten years, raising the potential for spills or releases of chemicals, waste materials, and oil and gas. We analyzed spill data associated with unconventional wells from Colorado, New Mexico, North Dakota and Pennsylvania from 2005 to 2014, where we defined unconventional wells as horizontally drilled into an unconventional formation. We identified materials spilled by state and for each material we summarized frequency, volumes and spill rates. We evaluated the environmental risk of spills by calculating distance to the nearest stream and compared these distances to existing setback regulations. Finally, we summarized relative importance to drinking water in watersheds where spills occurred. Across all four states, we identified 21,300 unconventional wells and 6622 reported spills. The number of horizontal well bores increased sharply beginning in the late 2000s; spill rates also increased for all states except PA where the rate initially increased, reached a maximum in 2009 and then decreased. Wastewater, crude oil, drilling waste, and hydraulic fracturing fluid were the materials most often spilled; spilled volumes of these materials largely ranged from 100 to 10,000L. Across all states, the average distance of spills to a stream was highest in New Mexico (1379m), followed by Colorado (747m), North Dakota (598m) and then Pennsylvania (268m), and 7.0, 13.3, and 20.4% of spills occurred within existing surface water setback regulations of 30.5, 61.0, and 91.4m, respectively. Pennsylvania spills occurred in watersheds with a higher relative importance to drinking water than the other three states. Results from this study can inform risk assessments by providing improved input parameters on volume and rates of materials spilled, and guide regulations and the management policy of spills.

  8. Unconventional oil and gas spills: Materials, volumes, and risks to surface waters in four states of the U.S.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maloney, Kelly O.; Baruch-Mordo, Sharon; Patterson, Lauren A.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Entrekin, Sally; Fargione, Joe E.; Kiesecker, Joseph M.; Konschnik, Kate E.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Trainor, Anne M.; Saiers, James E.; Wiseman, Hannah J.

    2017-01-01

    Extraction of oil and gas from unconventional sources, such as shale, has dramatically increased over the past ten years, raising the potential for spills or releases of chemicals, waste materials, and oil and gas. We analyzed spill data associated with unconventional wells from Colorado, New Mexico, North Dakota and Pennsylvania from 2005 to 2014, where we defined unconventional wells as horizontally drilled into an unconventional formation. We identified materials spilled by state and for each material we summarized frequency, volumes and spill rates. We evaluated the environmental risk of spills by calculating distance to the nearest stream and compared these distances to existing setback regulations. Finally, we summarized relative importance to drinking water in watersheds where spills occurred. Across all four states, we identified 21,300 unconventional wells and 6622 reported spills. The number of horizontal well bores increased sharply beginning in the late 2000s; spill rates also increased for all states except PA where the rate initially increased, reached a maximum in 2009 and then decreased. Wastewater, crude oil, drilling waste, and hydraulic fracturing fluid were the materials most often spilled; spilled volumes of these materials largely ranged from 100 to 10,000 L. Across all states, the average distance of spills to a stream was highest in New Mexico (1379 m), followed by Colorado (747 m), North Dakota (598 m) and then Pennsylvania (268 m), and 7.0, 13.3, and 20.4% of spills occurred within existing surface water setback regulations of 30.5, 61.0, and 91.4 m, respectively. Pennsylvania spills occurred in watersheds with a higher relative importance to drinking water than the other three states. Results from this study can inform risk assessments by providing improved input parameters on volume and rates of materials spilled, and guide regulations and the management policy of spills.

  9. Control of Materials Flammability Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Dennis E.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on selecting, using, and configuring spacecraft materials in such a way as to minimize the ability of fire to spread onboard a spacecraft. The presentation gives an overview of the flammability requirements of NASA-STD-6001, listing specific tests and evaluation criteria it requires. The presentation then gives flammability reduction methods for specific spacecraft items and materials.

  10. Time-correlations in the dynamics of hazardous material pipelines incidents.

    PubMed

    Sosa, E; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2009-06-15

    This paper addresses the following question: Are the hazardous materials pipeline incidents non-randomly time distributed? Our analysis suggests that they are correlated, which means that a hazardous materials pipeline incident is not independent from the time elapsed since the previous event. That is, our statistical tests suggest that previous accident counts correlate with future counts. But, if we consider incidents with a large severity index (spills and property damage), the phenomenon is unpredictable, since it approaches a Poissonian process (random, independent and uncorrelated).

  11. Oil and Hazardous Materials Spill Response Technology Development, Strategic Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    treatment , and disposal or incineration.  The above apply to submerged as well as floating oils.  For HAZMAT, the fundamental issues are...chemical treatments for marsh and wetlands , Flushing techniques, Countering Recovery methods X X Skimmer effectiveness in cold weather Countering...are required in each of these steps for both floating and non- floating oils and in all environments, including ice. For HAZMAT the analysis was

  12. 78 FR 60726 - Hazardous Materials Regulations: Penalty Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ...; Offeror Requirements for specific hazardous materials: Cigarette lighters, Explosives, Radioactive... groups, explosive classifications, or hazardous materials. Applying specific baselines instead of...

  13. 49 CFR 174.3 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... transportation or transport by rail any shipment of hazardous material that is not in conformance with the... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY...

  14. Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Osterman, Robert A.; Cox, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive or other hazardous samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis. An adjustable top door is located on the top side of the storage member, and the top door includes a channel capable of being selectively placed in registration with the respective storage chambers thereby permitting the samples to selectively enter the respective storage chambers. The top door, when closed, isolates the respective samples within the storage chambers. A plurality of spring-biased bottom doors are located on the bottom sides of the respective storage chambers. The bottom doors isolate the samples in the respective storage chambers when the bottom doors are in the closed position. The bottom doors permit the samples to leave the respective storage chambers from the bottom side when the respective bottom doors are in respective open positions. The bottom doors permit the samples to be loaded into the respective storage chambers after the analysis for storage and transport to a permanent storage location.

  15. Checklists for hazardous materials emergency preparedness.

    PubMed

    Borron, Stephen W

    2015-02-01

    Preparation for, and response to, hazardous materials emergencies requires both preplanning and just-in-time information management. The development of an emergency operations plan and a hazardous materials incident response plan involves many steps and implicates numerous resources: institutional, governmental, and private. This article provides checklists for development of plans and guidelines, with numerous references to information and material resources. An important component of readiness is revision. The availability of resources, human and informatics, as well as the means for accessing them, inevitably changes over time. The reader is advised to update all links and telephone numbers on a regularly scheduled basis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 46 CFR 151.03-30 - Hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hazardous material. 151.03-30 Section 151.03-30 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-30 Hazardous material. In this part hazardous material means a liquid material or substance that is— (a) Flammable or combustible;...

  17. 46 CFR 151.03-30 - Hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hazardous material. 151.03-30 Section 151.03-30 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-30 Hazardous material. In this part hazardous material means a liquid material or substance that is— (a) Flammable or combustible;...

  18. 46 CFR 151.03-30 - Hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hazardous material. 151.03-30 Section 151.03-30 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-30 Hazardous material. In this part hazardous material means a liquid material or substance that is— (a) Flammable or combustible;...

  19. Environmental Protection for Hazardous Materials Incidents. Volume 1. Hazardous Materials Incident Management System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    227 9. Cloves ............................................ 2’h 10. Footwear .......................................... 231...Occupational Safety and Health Xvi NOAA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NSN National Stock Number OHM-TADS Oil and Hazardous Materials...8217rechnical Assistance Data Systems OHSPC Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency "ORM Other Regulated Material ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  20. 76 FR 37283 - Hazardous Materials: Revision to the List of Hazardous Substances and Reportable Quantities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 172 RIN 2137-AE74 Hazardous... materials under the Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5101-5128). PHMSA carries out... Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5101 et seq.), which authorizes the......

  1. Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, T.L.

    1995-12-01

    The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

  2. Nuclear and hazardous material perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Sandquist, Gary M.; Kunze, Jay F.; Rogers, Vern C.

    2007-07-01

    The reemerging nuclear enterprise in the 21. century empowering the power industry and nuclear technology is still viewed with fear and concern by many of the public and many political leaders. Nuclear phobia is also exhibited by many nuclear professionals. The fears and concerns of these groups are complex and varied, but focus primarily on (1) management and disposal of radioactive waste [especially spent nuclear fuel and low level radioactive waste], (2) radiation exposures at any level, and (3) the threat nuclear terrorism. The root cause of all these concerns is the exaggerated risk perceived to human health from radiation exposure. These risks from radiation exposure are compounded by the universal threat of nuclear weapons and the disastrous consequences if these weapons or materials become available to terrorists or rogue nations. This paper addresses the bases and rationality for these fears and considers methods and options for mitigating these fears. Scientific evidence and actual data are provided. Radiation risks are compared to similar risks from common chemicals and familiar human activities that are routinely accepted. (authors)

  3. Navy Shipboard Hazardous Material Minimization Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bieberich, M.J.; Robinson, P.; Chastain, B.

    1994-12-31

    The use of hazardous (and potentially hazardous) materials in shipboard cleaning applications has proliferated as new systems and equipments have entered the fleet to reside alongside existing equipments. With the growing environmental awareness (and additional, more restrictive regulations) at all levels/echelon commands of the DoD, the Navy has initiated a proactive program to undertake the minimization/elimination of these hazardous materials in order to eliminate HMs at the source. This paper will focus on the current Shipboard Hazardous Materials Minimization Program initiatives including the identification of authorized HM currently used onboard, identification of potential substitute materials for HM replacement, identification of new cleaning technologies and processes/procedures, and identification of technical documents which will require revision to eliminate the procurement of HMs into the federal supply system. Also discussed will be the anticipated path required to implement the changes into the fleet and automated decision processes (substitution algorithm) currently employed. The paper will also present the most recent technologies identified for approval or additional testing and analysis including: supercritical CO{sub 2} cleaning, high pressure blasting (H{sub 2}O + baking soda), aqueous and semi-aqueous cleaning materials and processes, solvent replacements and dedicated parts washing systems with internal filtering capabilities, automated software for solvent/cleaning process substitute selection. Along with these technological advances, data availability (from on-line databases and CDROM Database libraries) will be identified and discussed.

  4. 75 FR 9147 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT 49 CFR Parts 172, 173, 175 RIN 2137-AE44 Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) in coordination with the Federal...

  5. 78 FR 58501 - Hazardous Materials: Failure To Pay Civil Penalties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 107 and 109 RIN 2137-AE97 Hazardous Materials: Failure To Pay Civil Penalties AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration... hazardous materials procedural found under our regulations. Specifically, this proposed action would...

  6. 75 FR 1302 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 172, 173, 175 RIN 2137-AE44 Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), is proposing to amend requirements in the Hazardous Materials...

  7. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Transportation of... Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation of hazardous materials. The transportation of hazardous materials is governed by the hazardous materials...

  8. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Transportation of... Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation of hazardous materials. The transportation of hazardous materials is governed by the hazardous materials...

  9. Hospital preparedness for hazardous materials incidents and treatment of contaminated patients.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, J L; Blackmon, G M; Brodkin, C A; Robertson, W O

    1997-01-01

    Hospital-based facilities providing emergency care in the state of Washington were surveyed to determine their level of preparedness for hazardous materials incidents including the treatment of contaminated patients. Responses to a faxed questionnaire were received from 95 (94%) of the 101 emergency care facilities in Washington State. Only 42 (44%) of the facilities reported the ability to receive any chemically exposed patient. Of the 95 responding emergency care facilities, 39 (41%) had no designated decontamination facilities; 67 (70%) had protocols for handling chemical contamination and possible evacuation from hazardous materials spills, and 52 (55%) had protocols for handling medical facility contamination and possible evacuation from treating chemically contaminated patients. Twelve (13%) facilities had evacuated their emergency department or other part of the hospital for contamination incidents in the past 5 years. Despite the frequent occurrence of hazardous materials incidents, most emergency care facilities in Washington State are not fully prepared to handle contaminated patients and chemical spills. This may have important implications for the care of persons with exposure to hazardous materials and for implementing Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations standards and federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations. PMID:9426476

  10. 76 FR 43509 - Hazardous Materials; Miscellaneous Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ...PHMSA is amending the Hazardous Materials Regulations to make miscellaneous amendments to update and clarify certain regulatory requirements. These amendments are intended to: promote safer transportation practices; eliminate unnecessary regulatory requirements; finalize outstanding petitions for rulemaking; facilitate international commerce; and simplify the regulations. PHMSA anticipates......

  11. 49 CFR 172.313 - Poisonous hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Poisonous hazardous materials. 172.313 Section 172.313 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS...

  12. 49 CFR 172.313 - Poisonous hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Poisonous hazardous materials. 172.313 Section 172.313 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS...

  13. 49 CFR 172.313 - Poisonous hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Poisonous hazardous materials. 172.313 Section 172.313 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS...

  14. 49 CFR 172.313 - Poisonous hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Poisonous hazardous materials. 172.313 Section 172.313 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS...

  15. 78 FR 42457 - Hazardous Materials: Revision to Fireworks Regulations (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 107, 171, 172, and 173 RIN 2137-AE70 Hazardous Materials: Revision to Fireworks Regulations (RRR) AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: PHMSA is revising the Hazardous...

  16. 75 FR 5375 - Hazardous Material; Miscellaneous Packaging Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 171, 172, 173, et al. Hazardous Material; Miscellaneous Packaging Amendments; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75 , No. 21... Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 171, 172, 173, 174, and 178 RIN 2137-AD89 Hazardous...

  17. Hazardous materials information hotline using System 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, J.E.; Fuchel, K.

    1984-04-30

    The Center for Assessment of Chemical and Physical Hazards (CACPH) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a computer hotline service for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors. This service provides access to health and safety information for over 800 chemicals and hazardous materials. The data base uses System 2000 on a CDC 6600 and provides information on the chemical name and its synonyms, 17 categories of health and safety information, composition of chemical mixtures, categories of chemicals, use and hazards, and physical, chemical and toxicity attributes. In order to make this information available to people unfamiliar with System 2000, a user-friendly interface was developed using a Fortran PLEX Program. 1 reference, 1 figure.

  18. 49 CFR 171.16 - Detailed hazardous materials incident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Materials Incident Report to the Information Systems Manager, PHH-63, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials... Hazardous Material Incident Report to the Information System Manager, DHM-63, Research and Special Programs... INFORMATION, REGULATIONS, AND DEFINITIONS Incident Reporting, Notification, BOE Approvals and Authorization...

  19. Hazardous materials sensing: An electrical metamaterial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Vaishali; Kitture, Rohini; Kumari, Dimple; Rajesh, Harsh; Banerjee, Shaibal; Kale, S. N.

    2016-10-01

    Metamaterials are recently emerging materials exhibiting amazing properties such as extremely miniaturized antennas, waveguides, optical couplers, multiplexers and filters. Such structures also respond to the variation in their ambient conditions when exposed to toxic and hazardous materials, which are especially hazardous to human health. Through this manuscript, we document our studies on three different high energy materials; namely 2- bromo-2nitropropane-1,3-diol (BNP), bis (1,3-diazido prop-2-yl) malonate (AM) and bis (1,3-diazido prop-2-yl) glutarate (AG). A Complementary Split Ring Resonator has been fabricated at resonant frequency of 4.48 GHz using copper on FR4 substrate. The energetic materials were exposed to the sensor and results were monitored using Vector Network Analyzer. The volume of liquids was varied from 0.5 μL to 3 μL. Prominent and explicit shifts in the transmission resonant frequency and amplitude was seen as a signature of each energetic material. The signatures were not only sensitive to the specific toxic group in the material but also to the volume of the liquid subjected to this sensor. The results are correlated with the simulation results, basic chemistry of the materials and permittivity measurements. The ultra-fast reversibility and repeatability, with good sensitivity and specificity of these devices project their applications in sensitive locations, particularly to combat for human security and health issues.

  20. Analysis on tank truck accidents involved in road hazardous materials transportation in china.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaoyan; Yan, Ying; Li, Xiaonan; Xie, Chenjiang; Wang, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    Due to the sheer size and capacity of the tanker and the properties of cargo transported in the tank, hazmat tanker accidents are more disastrous than other types of vehicle accidents. The aim of this study was to provide a current survey on the situation of accidents involving tankers transporting hazardous materials in China. Detailed descriptions of 708 tanker accidents associated with hazmat transportation in China from 2004 to 2011 were analyzed to identify causes, location, types, time of occurrence, hazard class for materials involved, consequences, and the corresponding probability. Hazmat tanker accidents mainly occurred in eastern (38.1%) and southwest China (12.3%). The most frequent hazmat tanker accidents involved classes 2, 3, and 8. The predominant accident types were rollover (29.10%), run-off-the-road (16.67%), and rear-end collisions (13.28%), with a high likelihood of a large spill occurring. About 55.93% of the accidents occurred on freeways and class 1 roads, with the spill percentage reaching 75.00% and the proportion of spills that occurred in the total accidents amounting to 77.82%, of which 61.72% are considered large spills. The month with the highest accident probability was July (12.29%), and most crashes occurred during the early morning (4:00-6:00 a.m.) and midday (10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.) hours, 19.63% versus 16.10%. Human-related errors (73.8%) and vehicle-related defects (19.6%) were the primary reasons for hazmat tanker crashes. The most common outcomes of a hazmat tanker accident was a spill without further events (55.51%), followed by a release with fire (7.77%), and release with an explosion (2.54%). The safety situation of China's hazmat tanker transportation is grim. Such accidents not only have high spill percentages and consistently large spills but they can also cause serious consequences, such as fires and explosions. Improving the training of drivers and the quality of vehicles, deploying roll stability aids, enhancing

  1. Coordinated Navy Hazardous Material Substitution Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    the Commerce Business Daily ( CBD ) and unofficial. channels such as the media should be used to the maximum extent possible to get the message to current...01lice ot Mandgement and Budget. Paperwork Aeduction Project (0 104-0188), Washington, DC 2o . . . uianK) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES...COVERED lAugust 1993 Interim Draft 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS C: F33615-89-D-4003 Coordinated Navy Hazardous Material Substitution Order Nr

  2. 41 CFR 101-42.203 - Reassignment of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... materials. 101-42.203 Section 101-42.203 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.203 Reassignment of hazardous materials....

  3. 41 CFR 101-42.208 - Custody of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... materials. 101-42.208 Section 101-42.208 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.208 Custody of hazardous materials. Custody...

  4. 41 CFR 101-42.203 - Reassignment of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... materials. 101-42.203 Section 101-42.203 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.203 Reassignment of hazardous materials....

  5. 41 CFR 101-42.208 - Custody of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... materials. 101-42.208 Section 101-42.208 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.208 Custody of hazardous materials. Custody...

  6. 49 CFR 383.121 - Requirements for hazardous materials endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... 383.121 Section 383.121 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... REGULATIONS COMMERCIAL DRIVER'S LICENSE STANDARDS; REQUIREMENTS AND PENALTIES Required Knowledge and Skills...) Hazardous materials regulations including: (1) Hazardous materials table; (2) Shipping paper...

  7. 14 CFR 135.507 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 135.507 Section 135.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.507 Hazardous materials training records. (a) General...

  8. 14 CFR 135.507 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 135.507 Section 135.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.507 Hazardous materials training records. (a) General...

  9. 14 CFR 135.505 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 135.505 Section 135.505 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.505 Hazardous materials training required. (a)...

  10. 14 CFR 135.503 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 135.503 Section 135.503 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.503 Hazardous materials training: General. (a) Each...

  11. 14 CFR 135.503 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 135.503 Section 135.503 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.503 Hazardous materials training: General. (a) Each...

  12. 14 CFR 135.503 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 135.503 Section 135.503 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.503 Hazardous materials training: General. (a) Each...

  13. 14 CFR 135.507 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 135.507 Section 135.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.507 Hazardous materials training records. (a) General...

  14. 14 CFR 135.507 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 135.507 Section 135.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.507 Hazardous materials training records. (a) General...

  15. 14 CFR 135.503 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 135.503 Section 135.503 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.503 Hazardous materials training: General. (a) Each...

  16. 14 CFR 135.505 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 135.505 Section 135.505 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.505 Hazardous materials training required. (a)...

  17. 14 CFR 135.505 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 135.505 Section 135.505 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.505 Hazardous materials training required. (a)...

  18. 14 CFR 135.507 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 135.507 Section 135.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.507 Hazardous materials training records. (a) General...

  19. 14 CFR 135.505 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 135.505 Section 135.505 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.505 Hazardous materials training required. (a)...

  20. 14 CFR 135.503 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 135.503 Section 135.503 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.503 Hazardous materials training: General. (a) Each...

  1. 78 FR 17874 - Hazardous Materials: Miscellaneous Petitions for Rulemaking (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 172, 173, 176, 178 RIN 2137-AE79 Hazardous Materials: Miscellaneous Petitions for Rulemaking (RRR) Correction In rule document 2013-04197.... 172.101 0 On page 14713, the Table titled ``Sec. 172.101 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE'' is corrected...

  2. 49 CFR 175.3 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments. 175.3 Section 175.3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT General Information and Regulations...

  3. 49 CFR 176.3 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments. 176.3 Section 176.3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL General § 176.3 Unacceptable...

  4. 49 CFR 174.3 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments. 174.3 Section 174.3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY RAIL General Requirements § 174.3...

  5. 76 FR 56304 - Hazardous Materials: Minor Editorial Corrections and Clarifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 105, 106, 107, 130, 171, 172, 173, 174, 176, and 177 RIN 2137-AE77 Hazardous Materials: Minor Editorial Corrections and Clarifications AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This...

  6. 49 CFR 212.227 - Hazardous materials inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hazardous materials inspector. 212.227 Section 212... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Materials Regulations, including Federal requirements and industry standards for the manufacturing of bulk packaging used in the transportation of hazardous materials by...

  7. 49 CFR 212.227 - Hazardous materials inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hazardous materials inspector. 212.227 Section 212... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Materials Regulations, including Federal requirements and industry standards for the manufacturing of bulk packaging used in the transportation of hazardous materials by...

  8. 49 CFR 212.227 - Hazardous materials inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hazardous materials inspector. 212.227 Section 212... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Materials Regulations, including Federal requirements and industry standards for the manufacturing of bulk packaging used in the transportation of hazardous materials by...

  9. Risk methodologies for offsite hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kot, C.A.; Eichler, T.V.; Wiedermann, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    A number of suggestions have been advanced in recent years concerning the risks posed to nuclear power plants by offsite hazardous materials relative to (1) the regulatory approach including considerations of minimum and safe standoff distances, exclusion distances, site acceptance ceilings and floors, screening distances and screening probabilities, plant design, etc., and (2) the analysis and evaluation procedures such as material screening criteria, plant vulnerability, standarized physical models, etc. An evaluation of current analyses and approaches indicates that this complex problem, variety of approaches, and safety concerns may be better accommodated by developing criteria and treatments along the lines of a so-called conditional risk approach. Specifically, the probability (P) of some ultimate consequence (C) occurring from an accident (A) involving hazardous materials is given as P(C) = P(C/A) x P(A). Assuming that the plant to accident site standoff distance is the fundamental independent variable of the risk methodology, certain conditional risk designations and conditions can be made and are presented.

  10. The Hazardous Materials Information System. Users Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    only on hazardous materials used by the Government. Keep in mind that the HMIS is a growing system. Just because an item is not listed in the system does...NoO-0729 W. R. GRACE & CO POLYCEL I (CIC) A-A-1543 8520-00-270-0065 CONTINENTAL CHEM CORP BORAX A-A-S 7930-00-281-4731 PAUL CO PRODUCTS INC...As was written earlier, the HMIS is a growing database. Some items in the supply system have not yet been entered into HMIS. Therefore, to be sure

  11. 49 CFR 177.801 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HIGHWAY General Information and Regulations § 177.801 Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments. No person may accept for transportation or transport by motor vehicle a forbidden material...

  12. 49 CFR 177.801 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HIGHWAY General Information and Regulations § 177.801 Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments. No person may accept for transportation or transport by motor vehicle a forbidden material...

  13. 49 CFR 177.801 - Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PUBLIC HIGHWAY General Information and Regulations § 177.801 Unacceptable hazardous materials shipments. No person may accept for transportation or transport by motor vehicle a forbidden material...

  14. Exposure to human waste from spills while servicing aircraft lavatories: hazards and methods of prevention.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Steven E; Abelmann, Anders; Dorevitch, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Workers service the lavatories of commercial aircraft approximately 11 million times per year in the United States and may have exposure to the spectrum of pathogenic viruses, bacteria and parasites potentially found in human waste. An industrial hygiene walk-through of the workplace was conducted by an interdisciplinary occupational health and safety team, and lavatory waste operators and supervisors and the process was observed. Exposure to untreated waste can occur through dermal, ingestion, and inhalation in quantities ranging from droplets to large spills. Several engineering and administrative measures were advised to minimize worker exposure, including the effective locking of a critical valve, and a mechanism for communicating valve locking problems.

  15. 30 CFR 56.16004 - Containers for hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Containers for hazardous materials. 56.16004 Section 56.16004 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 56.16004 Containers for hazardous materials. Containers holding hazardous...

  16. 30 CFR 57.16004 - Containers for hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Containers for hazardous materials. 57.16004 Section 57.16004 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Storage and Handling § 57.16004 Containers for hazardous materials. Containers holding hazardous...

  17. 49 CFR 173.2a - Classification of a material having more than one hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS... combination. 4 For pesticides only, where a material has the hazards of Class 3, Packing Group III,...

  18. 77 FR 39662 - Hazardous Materials; Reverse Logistics (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ...-39666] [FR Doc No: 2012-16177] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... Materials; Reverse Logistics (RRR) AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA... materials in the ``reverse logistics'' supply chain. Reverse logistics is the process that is initiated when...

  19. Waste explosives and other hazardous materials--hazard potential and remedial measures: an overview.

    PubMed

    Pandey, R K; Asthana, S N; Bhattacharya, B; Tiwari, Ila; Ghole, V S

    2007-07-01

    A large amount of energetic materials including propellants, high explosives, pyrotechnics are subjected to disposal either due to expiry of their useful life or rejection in the manufacturing process. The environmental regulations do not allow the hazardous materials for open burning / detonation in view of the health hazard involved in these operations. The present paper describes the hazard potential of energetic materials and associated hazardous chemicals. It also deals with global technological status for remedial measures of hazardous chemicals along with their merits and demerits.

  20. Reduce accidental releases of hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, D.

    1996-09-01

    With final publication of the Risk Management Program (RMP), operating companies must take action to lessen the likelihood of accidental hazardous chemical releases. Now, companies must extensively investigate how raw materials and products are managed within the process and storage facilities. Protection at high costs is not profitable. At the same time, not enough protection is also costly should a release invoke substantial property damage or loss of life. Modern ways to confine regulated compounds include inherently safer technologies (ISTs) and active mitigation technologies. These new designs and added options can improve protection against more likely release scenarios. Using the guidelines, HPI operators manage both compliance and cost of compliance when developing safety programs for RMP.

  1. Experimental investigation of various vegetable fibers as sorbent materials for oil spills.

    PubMed

    Annunciado, T R; Sydenstricker, T H D; Amico, S C

    2005-11-01

    Oil spills are a global concern due to their environmental and economical impact. Various commercial systems have been developed to control these spills, including the use of fibers as sorbents. This research investigates the use of various vegetable fibers, namely mixed leaves residues, mixed sawdust, sisal (Agave sisalana), coir fiber (Cocos nucifera), sponge-gourd (Luffa cylindrica) and silk-floss as sorbent materials of crude oil. Sorption tests with crude oil were conducted in deionized and marine water media, with and without agitation. Water uptake by the fibers was investigated by tests in dry conditions and distillation of the impregnated sorbent. The silk-floss fiber showed a very high degree of hydrophobicity and oil sorption capacity of approximately 85goil/g sorbent (in 24hours). Specific gravity measurements and buoyancy tests were also used to evaluate the suitability of these fibers for the intended application.

  2. 75 FR 70069 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications For Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications For Modification of Special Permit AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is...

  3. Explosion Hazards Associated with Spills of Large Quantities of Hazardous Materials. Phase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    that which has boiled uff. SpV (7r,/4) ) tp + fo 0 (7r/4) D2 RdO (I) Combining Eq. (I) with the experimentally determined relations given in the Esso...oil-off rate cf: v= r/4 D2 R - 0.25 02, (4) and the max value *flax = 0.25max (5) Step 3 - Calculate Vapor Accumulation and Vapor Flow Rate A...calculated as follows: C --CSLCLe 0 (22) where CSL is the s•:a level concentration. 21 Step 7 - Calculate the time Variation of Plume Shape During the pool

  4. Emergency material allocation and scheduling for the application to chemical contingency spills under multiple scenarios.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Guo, Liang; Jiang, Jiping; Jiang, Dexun; Wang, Peng

    2017-01-01

    In the emergency management relevant to chemical contingency spills, efficiency emergency rescue can be deeply influenced by a reasonable assignment of the available emergency materials to the related risk sources. In this study, an emergency material scheduling model (EMSM) with time-effective and cost-effective objectives is developed to coordinate both allocation and scheduling of the emergency materials. Meanwhile, an improved genetic algorithm (IGA) which includes a revision operation for EMSM is proposed to identify the emergency material scheduling schemes. Then, scenario analysis is used to evaluate optimal emergency rescue scheme under different emergency pollution conditions associated with different threat degrees based on analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method. The whole framework is then applied to a computational experiment based on south-to-north water transfer project in China. The results demonstrate that the developed method not only could guarantee the implementation of the emergency rescue to satisfy the requirements of chemical contingency spills but also help decision makers identify appropriate emergency material scheduling schemes in a balance between time-effective and cost-effective objectives.

  5. Environmental Assessment for the LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, S.E.; Novo, M.G.; Shinn, J.H.

    1986-04-01

    The LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, is being constructed by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). In this Environmental Assessment, environmental consequences of spilling hazardous materials in the Frenchman Flat basin are evaluated and mitigations and recommendations are stated in order to protect natural resources and reduce land-use impacts. Guidelines and restrictions concerning spill-test procedures will be determined by the LGF Test Facility Operations Manager and DOE based on toxicity documentation for the test material, provided by the user, and mitigations imposed by the Environmental Assessment. In addition to Spill Test Facility operational procedures, certain assumptions have been made in preparation of this document: no materials will be considered for testing that have cumulative, long-term persistence in the environment; spill tests will consist of releases of 15 min or less; and sufficient time will be allowed between tests for recovery of natural resources. Geographic limits to downwind concentrations of spill materials were primarily determined from meteorological data, human occupational exposure standards to hazardous materials and previous spill tests. These limits were established using maximum spill scenarios and environmental impacts are discussed as worst case scenarios; however, spill-test series will begin with smaller spills, gradually increasing in size after the impacts of the initial tests have been evaluated.

  6. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-200 and 89-273-2111, Exxon/Valdez Alaska oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, R.W.; Berardinelli, S.P.; Bender, T.R.

    1991-05-01

    In response to requests from the Laborer's International Union of North America, the Alaska State Health Department, and the United States Coast Guard an evaluation was undertaken of health hazards present during the cleanup of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound. Three field trips were made to the area. The cleanup involved thousands of workers dispersed over hundreds of square miles. After the first two visits, the following issues were targeted for additional evaluation: worker training; adequacy, availability, use and decontamination of personal protective equipment; exposure assessment including a review of prior exposure assessment data, analysis of bulk samples, inhalation exposures, skin exposures, and noise exposures; decontamination procedures; reports of illnesses; and reports of injuries. The authors conclude that at the time of the evaluation, inhalation exposure to volatile components of weathered crude oil was insignificant. Decontamination procedures and the wearing of personal protective equipment were not always effectively and consistently implemented at all sites. The authors recommend measures for future operations of this type, including testing of chemical protective clothing, emergency response plans with provisions for assessment of exposures to volatile organics at the very early stages of cleanup, minimizing exposures to diesel fumes, and that additional general safety recommendations and a proposed surveillance system for tracking injuries be enforced.

  7. 49 CFR 173.155 - Exceptions for Class 9 (miscellaneous hazardous materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing Group... the material meets the definition of a hazardous substance, hazardous waste, marine pollutant, or...

  8. 14 CFR 121.1005 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 121.1005 Section 121.1005 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  9. 14 CFR 91.1085 - Hazardous materials recognition training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials recognition training. 91.1085 Section 91.1085 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1085 Hazardous materials recognition training. No...

  10. 14 CFR 121.1005 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 121.1005 Section 121.1005 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  11. 14 CFR 91.1085 - Hazardous materials recognition training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous materials recognition training. 91.1085 Section 91.1085 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1085 Hazardous materials recognition training. No...

  12. 14 CFR 121.1007 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 121.1007 Section 121.1007 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  13. 14 CFR 121.1007 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 121.1007 Section 121.1007 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  14. 14 CFR 121.1003 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 121.1003 Section 121.1003 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  15. 14 CFR 121.1005 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 121.1005 Section 121.1005 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  16. 14 CFR 121.1007 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 121.1007 Section 121.1007 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  17. 14 CFR 121.1007 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 121.1007 Section 121.1007 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  18. 14 CFR 91.1085 - Hazardous materials recognition training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials recognition training. 91.1085 Section 91.1085 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1085 Hazardous materials recognition training. No...

  19. 14 CFR 121.1007 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 121.1007 Section 121.1007 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  20. 14 CFR 121.1003 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 121.1003 Section 121.1003 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  1. 14 CFR 91.1085 - Hazardous materials recognition training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials recognition training. 91.1085 Section 91.1085 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1085 Hazardous materials recognition training. No...

  2. 14 CFR 121.1003 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 121.1003 Section 121.1003 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  3. 14 CFR 121.1003 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 121.1003 Section 121.1003 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  4. 14 CFR 121.1003 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 121.1003 Section 121.1003 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  5. 14 CFR 121.1005 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 121.1005 Section 121.1005 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  6. 41 CFR 109-43.307-2 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials. 109-43.307-2 Section 109-43.307-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... 43-UTILIZATION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 43.3-Utilization of Excess § 109-43.307-2 Hazardous materials....

  7. 41 CFR 109-43.307-2 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials. 109-43.307-2 Section 109-43.307-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... 43-UTILIZATION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 43.3-Utilization of Excess § 109-43.307-2 Hazardous materials....

  8. 41 CFR 109-43.307-2 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hazardous materials. 109-43.307-2 Section 109-43.307-2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... 43-UTILIZATION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 43.3-Utilization of Excess § 109-43.307-2 Hazardous materials....

  9. Hazardous Materials Management Skill Standard. Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, Tex.

    This document begins with a brief report describing how the Center for Occupational Research and Development (CORD) organized a coalition of organizations related to the hazardous materials industry to identify required skills and training for Hazardous Materials Management Technician (HMMT). CORD staff established a committee of employers,…

  10. Oligopyrrole Macrocycles: Receptors and Chemosensors for Potentially Hazardous Materials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Oligopyrroles represent a diverse class of molecular receptors that have been utilized in a growing number of applications. Recently, these systems have attracted interest as receptors and chemosensors for hazardous materials, including harmful anionic species, high-valent actinide cations, and nitroaromatic explosives. These versatile molecular receptors have been used to develop rudimentary colorimetric and fluorimetric assays for hazardous materials. PMID:21465591

  11. 49 CFR 173.35 - Hazardous materials in IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric pressure) measured in the IBC at 55 °C... capacity. (ii) The absolute pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure... hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 55 °C (131 °F). This absolute pressure must......

  12. 49 CFR 173.35 - Hazardous materials in IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... paragraph (h)(1)(iv) of this section. (i) The gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric... hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 50 °C (122 °F). This absolute pressure must not... pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 55 °C (131......

  13. 49 CFR 173.35 - Hazardous materials in IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... paragraph (h)(1)(iv) of this section. (i) The gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric... hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 50 °C (122 °F). This absolute pressure must not... pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 55 °C (131......

  14. 49 CFR 173.35 - Hazardous materials in IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric pressure) measured in the IBC at 55 °C... capacity. (ii) The absolute pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure... hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 55 °C (131 °F). This absolute pressure must......

  15. 49 CFR 173.35 - Hazardous materials in IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... paragraph (h)(1)(iv) of this section. (i) The gauge pressure (pressure in the IBC above ambient atmospheric... hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 50 °C (122 °F). This absolute pressure must not... pressure (vapor pressure of the hazardous material plus atmospheric pressure) in the IBC at 55 °C (131......

  16. 78 FR 8431 - Hazardous Materials: Harmonization with International Standards (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 172 RIN 2137-AE87 Hazardous Materials: Harmonization with International Standards (RRR) Correction In rule document 2012-31243 appearing on pages 988...

  17. 49 CFR 172.320 - Explosive hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Explosive hazardous materials. 172.320 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.320 Explosive hazardous materials. (a) Except as otherwise... required by regulations for commercial explosives specified in 27 CFR part 555, if the national...

  18. 49 CFR 172.320 - Explosive hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Explosive hazardous materials. 172.320 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.320 Explosive hazardous materials. (a) Except as otherwise... product code required by regulations for commercial explosives specified in 27 CFR part 555, if...

  19. 49 CFR 172.320 - Explosive hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Explosive hazardous materials. 172.320 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.320 Explosive hazardous materials. (a) Except as otherwise... required by regulations for commercial explosives specified in 27 CFR part 555, if the national...

  20. 49 CFR 172.320 - Explosive hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Explosive hazardous materials. 172.320 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.320 Explosive hazardous materials. (a) Except as otherwise... product code required by regulations for commercial explosives specified in 27 CFR part 555, if...

  1. 49 CFR 172.320 - Explosive hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Explosive hazardous materials. 172.320 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.320 Explosive hazardous materials. (a) Except as otherwise... required by regulations for commercial explosives specified in 27 CFR part 555, if the national...

  2. Hazardous materials response project: program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The overall purpose of this Program described is to provide timely and effective deployment of scientific resources during an emergency oil or hazardous substance release to minimize environmental and socioeconomic impact.

  3. Process of cleaning oil spills and the like

    SciTech Connect

    Breisford, J.A.

    1993-06-01

    A process of cleaning spills of toxic or hazardous materials such as oil, antifreeze, gasoline, and the like from bodies of water, garage floors, roadways and the like, comprising spraying unbonded shredded fiberglass blowing wool composition particles onto the spill, absorbing the spill into the shredded fiberglass blowing wool composition particles, and removing the soaked shredded fiberglass blowing wool composition particles and the spill absorbed therein. An absorbent composition for absorbing spills of toxic or hazardous materials such as oil, antifreeze, gasoline, and like, comprising shredded fiberglass blowing wool particles, and means for absorbing the spill and for stiffening the co-position so that the composition fights against being compressed so that less of the absorbed spill escapes from the composition when it is being removed from the spill, said means including cork particles dispersed in with the fiberglass blowing wool particles. An absorbent sock for absorbing or containing a spill of toxic or hazardous materials such as oil, antifreeze, gasoline, and the like, comprising a hollow tube, said tube being permeable to the toxic or hazardous materials and being made of nylon or polypropylene, and unbonded, shredded fiberglass blowing wool composition particles enclosed in the tube. Apparatus for controlling an oil slick on the surface of water, comprising a craft for traversing the slick, a supply of fiberglass blowing wool composition particles stored on the craft in position for being dispersed, shredding means on the craft for shredding the fiberglass blowing wool particles to form unbonded, shredded fiberglass blowing wool particles, and dispensing means on the craft for dispensing the unbonded, shredded fiberglass blowing wool particles onto the slick.

  4. Subtask 1.11 -- Spectroscopic field screening of hazardous waste and toxic spills. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grisanti, A.A.

    1997-10-01

    Techniques for the field characterization of soil contamination due to spillage of hazardous waste or toxic chemicals are time-consuming and expensive. Thus more economical, less time-intensive methods are needed to facilitate rapid field screening of contaminated sites. The overall objective of this project is to study the feasibility of using an evanescent field absorbance sensor Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic sensor coupled with cone penetrometry as a field screening method. The specific objectives of this project are as follows: design an accessory for use with FT-IR that interfaces the spectrometer to a cone penetrometer; characterize the response of the FT-IR accessory to selected hydrocarbons in a laboratory-simulated field environment; and determine the ability of the FT-IR-CPT instrument to measure hydrocarbon contamination in soil by direct comparison with a reference method (e.g., Soxhlet extraction followed by gas chromatography) to quantify hydrocarbons from the same soil.

  5. Hazardous Materials on Board. Second Edition. Marine Advisory Bulletin No. 43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hild, Carl

    Intended for boat captains, this illustrated book describes hazards, activities at risk, precautions to take, and procedures for spills. The inside front and back covers provide general rules for treatment of poisonings and emergency phone numbers. Chapter 1 focuses on recognizing the risk and causes of shipboard hazards and describes hazardous…

  6. Microstructures of superhydrophobic plant leaves - inspiration for efficient oil spill cleanup materials.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, Claudia; Rodrigues da Silva, Isabelle C; Mail, Matthias; Kavalenka, Maryna N; Barthlott, Wilhelm; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2016-08-16

    The cleanup of accidental oil spills in water is an enormous challenge; conventional oil sorbents absorb large amounts of water in addition to oil and other cleanup methods can cause secondary pollution. In contrast, fresh leaves of the aquatic ferns Salvinia are superhydrophobic and superoleophilic, and can selectively absorb oil while repelling water. These selective wetting properties are optimal for natural oil absorbent applications and bioinspired oil sorbent materials. In this paper we quantify the oil absorption capacity of four Salvinia species with different surface structures, water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) and Lotus leaves (Nelumbo nucifera), and compare their absorption capacity to artificial oil sorbents. Interestingly, the oil absorption capacities of Salvinia molesta and Pistia stratiotes leaves are comparable to artificial oil sorbents. Therefore, these pantropical invasive plants, often considered pests, qualify as environmentally friendly materials for oil spill cleanup. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of oil density and viscosity on the oil absorption, and examine how the presence and morphology of trichomes affect the amount of oil absorbed by their surfaces. Specifically, the influence of hair length and shape is analyzed by comparing different hair types ranging from single trichomes of Salvinia cucullata to complex eggbeater-shaped trichomes of Salvinia molesta to establish a basis for improving artificial bioinspired oil absorbents.

  7. A Preliminary Study of Biodegradable Waste as Sorbent Material for Oil-Spill Cleanup

    PubMed Central

    Idris, J.; Eyu, G. D.; Mansor, A. M.; Ahmad, Z.; Chukwuekezie, C. S.

    2014-01-01

    Oil spill constitutes a major source of fresh and seawater pollution as a result of accidental discharge from tankers, marine engines, and underwater pipes. Therefore, the need for cost-effective and environmental friendly sorbent materials for oil spill cleanup cannot be overemphasized. The present work focuses on the preliminary study of empty palm fruit bunch fibre as a promising sorbent material. The morphology of the unmodified empty palm fruit bunch, EPFB fibre, was examined using an optical microcopy, scanning electron microcopy coupled with EDX and X-ray diffraction. The effects of oil volume, fibre weight, and time on oil absorption of EPFB fibre were evaluated with new engine oil from the model oil. The results show that EPFB fibre consists of numerous micro pores, hydrophobic, and partially crystalline and amorphous with approximately 13.5% carbon. The oil absorbency of the fibre increased with the increase in oil volume, immersion time, and fibre weight. However, sorption capacity decreased beyond 3 g in 100 mL. Additionally unmodified EPFB fibre showed optimum oil sorption efficiency of approximately 2.8 g/g within three days of immersion time. PMID:24693241

  8. A preliminary study of biodegradable waste as sorbent material for oil-spill cleanup.

    PubMed

    Idris, J; Eyu, G D; Mansor, A M; Ahmad, Z; Chukwuekezie, C S

    2014-01-01

    Oil spill constitutes a major source of fresh and seawater pollution as a result of accidental discharge from tankers, marine engines, and underwater pipes. Therefore, the need for cost-effective and environmental friendly sorbent materials for oil spill cleanup cannot be overemphasized. The present work focuses on the preliminary study of empty palm fruit bunch fibre as a promising sorbent material. The morphology of the unmodified empty palm fruit bunch, EPFB fibre, was examined using an optical microcopy, scanning electron microcopy coupled with EDX and X-ray diffraction. The effects of oil volume, fibre weight, and time on oil absorption of EPFB fibre were evaluated with new engine oil from the model oil. The results show that EPFB fibre consists of numerous micro pores, hydrophobic, and partially crystalline and amorphous with approximately 13.5% carbon. The oil absorbency of the fibre increased with the increase in oil volume, immersion time, and fibre weight. However, sorption capacity decreased beyond 3 g in 100 mL. Additionally unmodified EPFB fibre showed optimum oil sorption efficiency of approximately 2.8 g/g within three days of immersion time.

  9. Advanced Materials Laboratory hazards assessment document

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, B.; Banda, Z.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy Order 55OO.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the AML. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 23 meters. The highest emergency classification is a General Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is a nominal area that conforms to DOE boundaries and physical/jurisdictional boundaries such as fence lines and streets.

  10. Composite Material Hazard Assessment at Crash Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    isocyanates, blood-borne pathogens, radioactive material , plastics, polymers composed of organic material , and composite fibers. Aircraft...projectiles and release of materials All Interior and exterior Strontium Radioactive material used in aircraft construction Internal and external...exposure and subsequent risk. The Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office requires that materials be packaged together for disposal, segregating

  11. Activities for Teaching about Hazardous Materials in the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Robert W.; And Others

    Materials containing hazardous substances present serious problems to human health and to the health of the environment. There are many potential problems related to the site of a house or apartment, the construction materials used in the house or the apartment, products and materials used in and around the home, and disposal of materials.…

  12. Hazardous material & waste management at the Air Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.M.; Tucker, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    LINDEN{trademark} Environmental Management System is for the management of hazardous materials and hazardous waste and was created under an Air Force Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with Wright Laboratory. The software development was accomplished in the Materials Directorate which has over 75,000 containers, 18,000 unique chemicals, 160 laboratories, and 200 storage locations. It contains pre-loaded data including: US DOT tables, US EPA List of Lists, SARA storage conditions and container types, and information and chemical synonyms for over 70,000 CAS Registry Numbers. LINDEN is used with bar code technology to capture chemical usage information, essential for regulatory compliance, extensive reporting capabilities and beneficial for reducing waste and material costs. As a result of using the software, the Materials Directorate has decreased the amount of hazardous materials in inventory, the number of containers being handled, and the amount and cost of hazardous waste.

  13. FUEL CONSERVATION BY THE APPLICATION OF SPILL PREVENTION AND FAILSAFE ENGINEERING (A GUIDELINE MANUAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Goodier, J. L.; Siclari, R. J.; Garrity, P. A.

    1980-10-30

    From a series of nationwide plant surveys dedicated to spill prevention, containment and countermeasure evaluation, coupled with spill response action activities, a need was determined for a spill prevention guideline manual. From Federally accumulated statistics for oil and hazardous substance spills, the authors culled information on spills of hydrocarbon products. In 1978, a total of 1456 oil spills were reported compared to 1451 in 1979. The 1978 spills were more severe, however, since 7;289,163 gallons of oil were accident~y discharged. In 1979, the gallons spilled was reduced to 3,663,473. These figures are derived from reported spills; it is highly possible that an equal amount was spilled and not reported. Spills effectively contained within a plant property that do not enter a n~vigational waterway need not be reported. Needless to say, there is a tremendous annual loss of oil products due to accidental spillage during transportation, cargo transfer, bulk storage and processing. As an aid to plant engineers and managers, Fe~eral workers, fire marshalls and fire and casualty insurance inspectors, the documen~ is offered as a spill prevention guide. The'manual defines state-of-the-art spill prevention practices and automation techniques that can reduce spills caused by human error. Whenever practical, the cost of implementation is provided to aid equipment acquisition and installation budgeting. To emphasize the need for spill prevention activities, historic spills are briefly described after which remedial action is defined in an appropriate section of the manual. The section on plant security goes into considerable depth since to date no Federal agency or traqe association has provided industry with guidelines on this important phase of plant operation. The intent of the document is to provide finger-tip reference material that can be used by interested parties in a nationwide effort to reduce loss of oil from preventable spills.

  14. 14 CFR 145.165 - Hazardous materials training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials training. 145.165 Section 145.165 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Personnel § 145.165 Hazardous...

  15. 14 CFR 145.165 - Hazardous materials training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training. 145.165 Section 145.165 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Personnel § 145.165 Hazardous...

  16. Hazardous Materials Chemistry for the Non-Chemist. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Thomas K.; Enholm, Eric J.

    This book provides a basic introduction for the student to hazardous materials chemistry. Coverage of chemistry, rather than non-chemical hazards, is particularly stressed on a level which the layman can understand. Basic terminology is emphasized at all levels, as are simple chemistry symbols, in order to provide the student with an introductory…

  17. Household Hazardous Materials and Their Labels: A Reference for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Lillian F.

    Household hazardous materials are products or wastes which are toxic, corrosive, reactive, and/or ignitable. Although common products such as pesticides, oils, gasoline, solvents, cleaners, and polishes are hazardous, students and adults are not always aware of potential dangers. This sourcebook contains definitions and examples of household…

  18. Functional design criteria for the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, P.K.

    1995-03-10

    Within the United States, there are few hands-on training centers capable of providing integrated technical training within a practical application environment. Currently, there are no training facilities that offer both radioactive and chemical hazardous response training. There are no hands-on training centers that provide training for both hazardous material operations and emergency response that also operate as a partnership between organized labor, state agencies, tribes, and local emergency responders within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Available facilities appear grossly inadequate for training the thousands of people at Hanford, and throughout the Pacific Northwest, who are required to qualify under nationally-mandated requirements. It is estimated that 4,000 workers at the Hanford Site alone need hands-on training. Throughout the Pacific Northwest, the potential target audience would be over 30,000 public sector emergency response personnel, as well as another 10,000 clean-up workers represented by organized labor. The HAMMER Training Center will be an interagency-sponsored training center. It will be designed, built, and operated to ensure that clean-up workers, fire fighters, and public sector management and emergency response personnel are trained to handle accidental spills of hazardous materials. Training will cover wastes at clean-up sites, and in jurisdictions along the transportation corridors, to effectively protect human life, property, and the environment.

  19. An Approach to the Management of Hazardous Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    J.V./Zaccor T.L./Hsus and C./Wilton EW-C /3 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATINNW N ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK 4 1 AREA a WORK UNIT NUMBERS... programs . UNCLASS IFI ED SECU~tTV CLA&trjCA’TjOt Of TmjtS P&GE(Vtl~on Dor’e Enlered (DETACHABLE SUMMARY) SSI 8043-4 Final Report Approved for public...material problem areas, including manufacture, transportation, use, disposal, spills, etc. The major objective of this program was to analyze approaches

  20. SOUTH ELEVATION. THE DWELLING, FLAG TOWER, AND HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH ELEVATION. THE DWELLING, FLAG TOWER, AND HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE SHED ARE VISIBLE IN THE BACKGROUND. - U.S. Coast Guard Lake Worth Inlet Station, Boathouse, Peanut Island, Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, FL

  1. 49 CFR 212.227 - Hazardous materials inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STATE SAFETY PARTICIPATION REGULATIONS State Inspection Personnel... procedures employed in the railroad, shipping, or manufacturing industries associated with the transportation... standards for the manufacturing of bulk packaging used in the transportation of hazardous materials by...

  2. 49 CFR 212.227 - Hazardous materials inspector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STATE SAFETY PARTICIPATION REGULATIONS State Inspection Personnel... procedures employed in the railroad, shipping, or manufacturing industries associated with the transportation... standards for the manufacturing of bulk packaging used in the transportation of hazardous materials by...

  3. Safe Transportation of Hazardous Materials Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Gonzalez, Charles A. [D-TX-20

    2009-12-16

    House - 12/17/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Safe Transportation of Hazardous Materials Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Gonzalez, Charles A. [D-TX-20

    2011-11-04

    House - 11/07/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. 49 CFR 383.121 - Requirements for hazardous materials endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...; (4) Passenger Carrying Buses and Hazardous Materials; (5) Attendance of Motor Vehicles; (6) Parking...: (1) Use of equipment to protect the public; (2) Special precautions for equipment to be used in fires...

  6. 49 CFR 171.16 - Detailed hazardous materials incident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., explosion or dangerous evolution of heat (i.e., an amount of heat sufficient to be dangerous to packaging or... death results from injury caused by a hazardous material; (2) There was a misidentification of the...

  7. 49 CFR 171.16 - Detailed hazardous materials incident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., explosion or dangerous evolution of heat (i.e., an amount of heat sufficient to be dangerous to packaging or... death results from injury caused by a hazardous material; (2) There was a misidentification of the...

  8. 49 CFR 171.16 - Detailed hazardous materials incident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., explosion or dangerous evolution of heat (i.e., an amount of heat sufficient to be dangerous to packaging or... death results from injury caused by a hazardous material; (2) There was a misidentification of the...

  9. 49 CFR 171.16 - Detailed hazardous materials incident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., explosion or dangerous evolution of heat (i.e., an amount of heat sufficient to be dangerous to packaging or... death results from injury caused by a hazardous material; (2) There was a misidentification of the...

  10. The cost and risk impacts of rerouting railroad shipments of hazardous materials.

    PubMed

    Glickman, Theodore S; Erkut, Erhan; Zschocke, Mark S

    2007-09-01

    Rail shipments of hazardous materials expose the population near the routes to the possibility of an accident resulting in a spill. Rail routes are determined by economic concerns such as route length and the revenue generated for the originating carrier. In this paper we consider an alternate routing strategy that takes accident risks into account. We employ a model to quantify rail transport risk and then use a weighted combination of cost and risk and generate alternate routes. In some cases the alternate routes achieve significantly lower risk values than the practical routes at a small incremental cost. While there are generally fewer rerouting alternatives for rail than for road transport, considering the possible consequences of a train derailment we argue that risk should be taken into account when selecting rail routes and that the cost-risk tradeoffs should be evaluated.

  11. Deaths, injuries, and evacuations from acute hazardous materials releases.

    PubMed Central

    Binder, S

    1989-01-01

    We examined reports from three surveillance systems of 587 acute releases of hazardous materials in 1986. These releases resulted in at least 115 deaths, 2,254 injuries, and 111 evacuations. Only eight (1 percent) of the 587 events were common to all three systems. Estimates of the public health consequences of hazardous materials releases could be improved by enforcing existing laws, modifying report forms, and validating collected information. PMID:2751024

  12. Removing Hazardous Materials from Buildings: A Training Curriculum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    DAIM-ODF. The work was performed by the Engineering Processes Branch (CFN) and Materials and Structures Branch (CFM) of the Facilities Division (CF...need for guidance on how installations are expected to handle the hazards they encounter when performing repurposing or demolition. In 2014, the...knowledge to be able to perform the following tasks or areas of learning: • Identify hazardous building materials, understand why they are a con

  13. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  14. Hazardous Materials Technician. Technical Committee on Occupational Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Montana Coll., Havre. Montana Center for Vocational Education, Research, Curriculum and Personnel Development.

    This document describes Montana's postsecondary curriculum to prepare hazardous materials technicians. Basic general education requirements are described. The technical skills and the knowledge associated with each are listed in the following categories: (1) site assessment; (2) sampling materials; (3) handling materials; (4) recording data; (5)…

  15. 78 FR 987 - Hazardous Materials: Harmonization with International Standards (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ...PHMSA is amending the Hazardous Materials Regulations to maintain alignment with international standards by incorporating various amendments, including changes to proper shipping names, hazard classes, packing groups, special provisions, packaging authorizations, air transport quantity limitations, and vessel stowage requirements. These revisions are necessary to harmonize the Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) with recent changes made to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code, the International Civil Aviation Organization's Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (ICAO Technical Instructions), and the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods--Model Regulations (UN Model Regulations) and address a petition for rulemaking.

  16. 77 FR 49167 - Hazardous Materials: Harmonization with International Standards (RRR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ...PHMSA proposes to amend the Hazardous Materials Regulations to maintain alignment with international standards by incorporating various amendments, including changes to proper shipping names, hazard classes, packing groups, special provisions, packaging authorizations, air transport quantity limitations, and vessel stowage requirements. These revisions are necessary to harmonize the Hazardous Materials Regulations with recent changes made to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code, the International Civil Aviation Organization's Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air, and the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods--Model Regulations and subsequently address a petition for rulemaking.

  17. Conversion of hazardous materials using supercritical water oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Rofer, Cheryl K.; Buelow, Steven J.; Dyer, Richard B.; Wander, Joseph D.

    1992-01-01

    A process for destruction of hazardous materials in a medium of supercritical water without the addition of an oxidant material. The harzardous material is converted to simple compounds which are relatively benign or easily treatable to yield materials which can be discharged into the environment. Treatment agents may be added to the reactants in order to bind certain materials, such as chlorine, in the form of salts or to otherwise facilitate the destruction reactions.

  18. Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

    1991-02-01

    The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  19. 76 FR 65779 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is hereby... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in... Center, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of...

  20. 76 FR 2950 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is hereby... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, ] additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in... Center, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of...

  1. 78 FR 60755 - Hazardous Materials: Enhanced Enforcement Procedures-Resumption of Transportation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ...: Enhanced Enforcement Procedures--Resumption of Transportation AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials... identified in the Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Improvement Act of 2012 related to the Department... hazardous material transportation matters identified by Congress. This final rule is required to...

  2. 76 FR 32867 - Hazardous Materials: Requirements for Storage of Explosives During Transportation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... Materials: Requirements for Storage of Explosives During Transportation AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous...-8553, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200... Requirements Applicable to Explosives Stored During Transportation A. Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR; 49...

  3. Regulatory Exclusions and Alternative Standards for the Recycling of Materials, Solid Wastes and Hazardous Wastes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Determining the Level of Regulation for Hazardous Waste Recycling, Recycled Materials that are not Subject to RCRA Hazardous Waste Regulation, Materials Subject to Alternative Regulatory Controls, Materials Subject to Full Hazardous Waste Regulations.

  4. 77 FR 43141 - Air Carrier Hazardous Materials Passenger Notification Requirements: Acceptable Means of Compliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Air Carrier Hazardous Materials Passenger Notification Requirements... Aviation Administration (FAA), in coordination with the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... CONTACT: Kenneth Miller, Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Hazard Materials Safety (ADG-1), 800...

  5. Design for containment of hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.C. ); McDonald, J.R. )

    1991-03-01

    Department of Energy, (DOE), facilities across the United States, use wind and tornado design and evaluation criteria based on probabilistic performance goals. In addition, other programs such as Advanced Light Water Reactors, New Production Reactors, and Individual Plant Examinations for External Events for commercial nuclear power plants utilize design and evaluation criteria based on probabilistic performance goals. The use of probabilistic performance goals is a departure from design practice for commercial nuclear power plants which have traditionally been designed utilizing a conservative specification of wind and tornado loading combined with deterministic response evaluation methods and permissible behavior limits. Approaches which utilize probabilistic wind and tornado hazard curves for specification of loading and deterministic response evaluation methods and permissible behavior limits are discussed in this paper. Through the use of such design/evaluation approaches, it may be demonstrated that there is high likelihood that probabilistic performance goals can be achieved. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  6. 49 CFR 176.76 - Transport vehicles, freight containers, and portable tanks containing hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... hazardous materials may be carried only on board a trailership, trainship, ferry vessel or car float. (c...

  7. The environmental and medical geochemistry of potentially hazardous materials produced by disasters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Morman, Suzette A.; Meeker, G.P.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Hageman, Philip L.; Wolf, Ruth E.

    2014-01-01

    Many natural or human-caused disasters release potentially hazardous materials (HM) that may pose threats to the environment and health of exposed humans, wildlife, and livestock. This chapter summarizes the environmentally and toxicologically significant physical, mineralogical, and geochemical characteristics of materials produced by a wide variety of recent disasters, such as volcanic eruptions, hurricanes and extreme storms, spills of mining/mineral-processing wastes or coal extraction by-products, and the 2001 attacks on and collapse of the World Trade Center towers. In describing these characteristics, this chapter also illustrates the important roles that geochemists and other earth scientists can play in environmental disaster response and preparedness. In addition to characterizing in detail the physical, chemical, and microbial makeup of HM generated by the disasters, these roles also include (1) identifying and discriminating potential multiple sources of the materials; (2) monitoring, mapping, and modeling dispersal and evolution of the materials in the environment; (3) understanding how the materials are modified by environmental processes; (4) identifying key characteristics and processes that influence the materials' toxicity to exposed humans and ecosystems; (5) estimating shifts away from predisaster environmental baseline conditions; and (6) using geochemical insights learned from past disasters to help estimate, prepare for, and increase societal resilience to the environmental and related health impacts of future disasters.

  8. Material and methods for oil spill control and cleanup and extinguishing petroleum fires

    SciTech Connect

    States, J. B.

    1981-02-03

    A dispersal medium is described for cleaning of oil spills and the like and extinguishing petroleum fires. Its major quantitative part consists of a household liquid detergent and also contains eucalyptus oil, bovine urine, alfalfa and vitamin b-6. Methods of oil spill clean-up and fire extinguishing are also described.

  9. Hazardous material transportation risks in the Puget Sound Region

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, W.B.; Rhoads, R.E.; Franklin, A.L.; Cole, B.M.; Rau, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper summarizes results of a study performed for the Transportation Systems Center (TSC) of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), to determine public safety risks of transporting hazardous material (HM) in the Central Puget Sound Region (CPSR) of Washington State. Results of this study were used in a regional assessment of hazardous material transportation conducted for the Materials Transportation Bureau (MTB) of DOT by the Puget Sound Council of Governments (PSCOG) and the DOT Transportation Systems Center (TSC). Additional hazardous material studies have also been conducted by the DOT in New Orleans, Louisiana, San Francisco, California, Niagara County, New York, Indianapolis, Indiana, Memphis, Tennessee, and the State of Massachusetts. 15 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. 41 CFR 109-44.702-3 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous materials. 109-44.702-3 Section 109-44.702-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... materials. The Director, Office of Administrative Services and heads of field organizations shall...

  11. 41 CFR 109-44.702-3 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hazardous materials. 109-44.702-3 Section 109-44.702-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... materials. The Director, Office of Administrative Services and heads of field organizations shall...

  12. 41 CFR 109-44.702-3 - Hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous materials. 109-44.702-3 Section 109-44.702-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... materials. The Director, Office of Administrative Services and heads of field organizations shall...

  13. 49 CFR 173.36 - Hazardous materials in Large Packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and thickness of the outer packaging must be such that friction during transportation is not likely to... weakened in the event of leakage. (5) Metallic devices. Nails, staples and other metallic devices must not... materials may not contain other hazardous materials, except dry ice. (i) When a Large Packaging is used...

  14. 49 CFR 173.36 - Hazardous materials in Large Packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and thickness of the outer packaging must be such that friction during transportation is not likely to... weakened in the event of leakage. (5) Metallic devices. Nails, staples and other metallic devices must not... materials may not contain other hazardous materials, except dry ice. (i) When a Large Packaging is used...

  15. Environmental Projects. Volume 9: Construction of hazardous materials storage facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Activities at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC) are carried out in support of seven parabolic dish antennas. These activities may give rise to environmental hazards. This report is one in a series of reports describing environmental projects at GDSCC. The construction of two hazardous materials and wastes storage facilities and an acid-wash facility is described. An overview of the Goldstone complex is also presented along with a description of the environmental aspects of the GDSCC site.

  16. Material instability hazards in mine-processing operations

    SciTech Connect

    Fredland, J.W.; Wu, K.K.; Kirkwood, D.W.

    1993-10-01

    Many accidents occur in the mining industry as a result of the instability of material during handling and processing operation. Accidents due to dump point instability at stockpiles, and at spoil or waste piles, for example, occur with alarming frequency. Miners must be trained to be better aware of these hazards. Information on safe working procedures at stockpiles and surge piles is provided. Mine operators must review their training and operating procedures regularly to ensure that hazardous conditions are avoided.

  17. Simplified training for hazardous materials management in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Braithwaite, J.

    1994-12-31

    There are thousands of dangerous situations happening daily in developing countries around the world involving untrained workers and hazardous materials. There are very few if any agencies in developing countries that are charged with ensuring safe and healthful working conditions. In addition to the problem of regulation and enforcement, there are potential training problems due to the level of literacy and degree of scientific background of these workers. Many of these workers are refugees from poorly developed countries who are willing to work no matter what the conditions. Training methods (standards) accepted as state of the art in the United States and other developed countries may not work well under the conditions found in developing countries. Because these methods may not be appropriate, new and novel ways to train workers quickly, precisely and economically in hazardous materials management should be developed. One approach is to develop training programs that use easily recognizable graphics with minimal verbal instruction, programs similar to the type used to teach universal international driving regulations and safety. The program as outlined in this paper could be tailored to any sized plant and any hazardous material handling or exposure situation. The situation in many developing countries is critical, development of simplified training methods for workers exposed to hazardous materials hold valuable market potential and are an opportunity for many underdeveloped countries to develop indigenous expertise in hazardous materials management.

  18. 75 FR 36773 - Pipeline Safety: Updating Facility Response Plans in Light of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... Light of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration... response plan under 49 CFR part 194. In light of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico... Pipeline Systems. Subject: Updating Facility Response Plans in Light of the Deepwater Horizon Oil...

  19. Oil Spills

    MedlinePlus

    ... of response operations. In addition to spill response software and mapping tools , OR&R provides standard techniques ... communities for oil spills, OR&R develops several software and map tools for spill response and planning. ...

  20. Oil Spills

    MedlinePlus

    Oil spills often happen because of accidents, when people make mistakes or equipment breaks down. Other causes include natural disasters or deliberate acts. Oil spills have major environmental and economic effects. Oil spills ...

  1. Hazardous materials on the public lands. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) of the U.S. Dept. of the Interior (DOI) manages 272 million acres of public lands, located mostly in the western states and Alaska. In the early 1980s, sites on BLM-administered lands were found to be contaminated with solid wastes, principally from mining and the disposal of municipal wastes. That discovery prompted BLM to establish the Hazardous Materials Management Program (HMMP), the goals of which were to protect the public and its resources, to ensure compliance with laws and regulations regarding hazardous materials, to minimize BLM's legal liability, and to control the cost of cleaning up these wastes. Public concern over hazardous materials on BLM lands prompted an examination of BLM activities by Congress, which resulted in Congress passing an appropriations bill directing BLM to make arrangements with the National Academy of Sciences to evaluate the HMMP. The report presents the results of the committee's study, including its findings and recommendations.

  2. Hazard assessment of a simulated oil spill on intertidal areas of the St. Lawrence River with SPMD-TOX

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B.T.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Lee, Kenneth; Gauthier, J.

    2004-01-01

    Phytoremediation in a simulated crude oil spill was studied with a "minimalistic" approach. The SPMD-TOX paradigm - a miniature passive sorptive device to collect and concentrate chemicals and microscale tests to detect toxicity - was used to monitor over time the bioavailability and potential toxicity of an oil spill. A simulated crude oil spill was initiated on an intertidal freshwater grass-wetland along the St. Lawrence River southwest of Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. Several phytoremediation treatments were investigated; to dissipate and ameliorate the spill, treatments included nutrient amendments with inorganic nitrogen sources (ammonium nitrate and sodium nitrate) and phosphate (super triple phosphate) with and without cut plants, with natural attenuation (no phytoremedial treatment) as a control. Sequestered oil residues were bioavailable in all oil-treated plots in Weeks 1 and 2. Interestingly, the samples were colored and fluoresced under ultraviolet light. In addition, microscale tests showed that sequestered residues were acutely toxic and genotoxic, as well as that they induced hepatic P450 enzymes. Analysis of these data suggested that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were among the bioavailable residues sequestered. In addition, these findings suggested that the toxic bioavailable fractions of the oil spill and degradation products dissipated rapidly over time because after the second week the water column contained no oil or detectable degradation products in this riverine intertidal wetland. SPMD-TOX revealed no evidence of bioavailable oil products in Weeks 4, 6, 8, and 12. All phytoremediation efforts appeared to be ineffective in changing either the dissipation rate or the ability to ameliorate the oil toxicity. SPMD-TOX analysis of the water columns from these riverine experimental plots profiled the occurrence, dissipation, and influence of phytoremediation on the bioavailability and toxicity of oil products (parent or degradation products

  3. Gis-based assessment of marine oil spill hazard and environmental vulnerability for the coasts of Crete in South Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Nikiforakis, Ioannis K.; Kampanis, Nikolaos A.

    2017-04-01

    Developing effective early warning and coordination systems can save thousands of lives and protect people, property and the environment in the event of natural and man-made disasters. In its document "Towards Better Protection of Citizens against Disaster Risks: Strengthening Early Warning Systems in Europe", the Commission points out that it seeks to follow a multi-hazard approach, to develop near real time alert systems, to ensure a near real time dissemination of alerts to Participating States, and to improve its rapid analytical capacity. In this context, the EU project DECATASTROPHIZE (http://decatastrophize.eu/project/) co-financed by the EU Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection aims to develop a Geospatial Early warning Decision Support System (GE-DSS) to assess, prepare for and respond to multiple and/or simultaneous natural and man-made hazards, disasters, and environmental incidents by using existing models/systems in each partner country (Cyprus, France, Greece, Italy and Spain) in a synergistic way on ONE multi-platform, called DECAT. Specifically, project partners will establish appropriate geo-databases for test areas and use existing hazard models to produce hazard and vulnerability geo-spatial information for earthquakes, landslides, tsunamis, floods, forest fires and marine oil spills. The GE-DSS in will consist of one source code with six geodatabases, i.e., one for each partner and risk data in the respective test area. Each partner organization will be able to manage and monitor its own data/database and their results using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA). The GE-DSS will be demonstrated at the local, regional and national levels through a set of Command Post and Table Top Disaster Exercises. As part of the DECAT GE-DSS, the gis-based geo-database and assessment of marine oil spill hazard and environmental vulnerability for the coasts of Crete in South Aegean Sea are presented here. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps are

  4. Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste

    DOEpatents

    Tranter, Troy J.; Knecht, Dieter A.; Todd, Terry A.; Burchfield, Larry A.; Anshits, Alexander G.; Vereshchagina, Tatiana; Tretyakov, Alexander A.; Aloy, Albert S.; Sapozhnikova, Natalia V.

    2006-10-03

    Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

  5. 30 CFR 19.8 - Protection against bodily hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hazard is chiefly due to the possible burning of the wearer by electrolyte spilled from the battery. MSHA..., when properly filled, the battery will neither leak nor spill electrolyte under actual service..., contingent upon satisfactory performance in service. (b) Corrosion of battery container. The material...

  6. 30 CFR 19.8 - Protection against bodily hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hazard is chiefly due to the possible burning of the wearer by electrolyte spilled from the battery. MSHA..., when properly filled, the battery will neither leak nor spill electrolyte under actual service..., contingent upon satisfactory performance in service. (b) Corrosion of battery container. The material...

  7. 30 CFR 19.8 - Protection against bodily hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hazard is chiefly due to the possible burning of the wearer by electrolyte spilled from the battery. MSHA..., when properly filled, the battery will neither leak nor spill electrolyte under actual service..., contingent upon satisfactory performance in service. (b) Corrosion of battery container. The material...

  8. 30 CFR 19.8 - Protection against bodily hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hazard is chiefly due to the possible burning of the wearer by electrolyte spilled from the battery. MSHA..., when properly filled, the battery will neither leak nor spill electrolyte under actual service..., contingent upon satisfactory performance in service. (b) Corrosion of battery container. The material...

  9. 75 FR 5258 - Hazardous Materials Transportation; Registration and Fee Assessment Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Transportation; Registration and Fee Assessment Program AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... for transportation, certain categories and quantities of hazardous materials. PHMSA's proposal would... of the registration program are to gather information about the transportation of hazardous...

  10. Smoldering combustion hazards of thermal insulation materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlemiller, T.J.; Rogers, F.E.

    1980-07-01

    Work on the smolder ignitability in cellulosic insulation and on thermal analytical characterization of the oxidation of this material is presented. Thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) shows that both retarded and unretarded cellulosic insulation oxidizes in two overall stages, both of which are exothermic. The second stage (oxidation of the char left as a residue of the first stage) is much more energetic on a unit mass basis than the first. However, kinetics and a sufficient exothermicity make the first stage responsible for ignition in most realistic circumstances. Existing smolder retardants such as boric acid have their major effect on the kinetics of the second oxidation stage and thus produce only a rather small (20/sup 0/C) increase in smolder ignition temperature. Several simplified analogs of attic insulations have been tested to determine the variability of minimum smolder ignition temperature. These employed planar or tubular constant temperature heat sources in a thermal environment quite similar to a realistic attic application. Go/no-go tests provided the borderline (minimum) ignition temperature for each configuration. The wide range (150/sup 0/C) of minimum ignition temperatures confirmed the predominant dependence of smolder ignition on heat flow geometry. Other factors (bulk density, retardants) produced much less effect on ignitability.

  11. Sustainable Materials Management: Non-Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Hierarchy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA developed the non-hazardous materials and waste management hierarchy in recognition that no single waste management approach is suitable for managing all materials and waste streams in all circumstances.

  12. Using a composite material containing waste tire powder and polypropylene fiber cut end to recover spilled oil.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chitsan; Hong, Yu-Jue; Hu, Allen H

    2010-02-01

    The superior oil absorption capacity of recycled polypropylene (PP) fiber and waste tire powder were used to recover spilled engine oil. We used ASTM F726-99 method to evaluate oil adsorbing capability of PP fiber and found it to have a large, rapid oil sorption capacity. However, its lack of elasticity dramatically limited that capacity after repeated use. Tire powder, which absorbs less oil more slowly, is more elastic than PP fiber and can be used repeatedly up to a hundred times without losing its oil adsorption capability. We combined PP fiber and tire powder to develop a composite material capable of recovering greater amounts of oil than any of its components. This composite can be use repeatedly for at least 100 times. Thus, the material cost for recovering 1 ton of spilled oil is about USD $0.03, making it very competitive on the market.

  13. 49 CFR 172.101 - Purpose and use of hazardous materials table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose and use of hazardous materials table. 172.101 Section 172.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL...

  14. 49 CFR 172.101 - Purpose and use of hazardous materials table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Purpose and use of hazardous materials table. 172.101 Section 172.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL...

  15. 49 CFR 172.101 - Purpose and use of hazardous materials table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Purpose and use of hazardous materials table. 172.101 Section 172.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL...

  16. 49 CFR 172.101 - Purpose and use of hazardous materials table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Purpose and use of hazardous materials table. 172.101 Section 172.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL...

  17. 76 FR 2951 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Hazardous Materials Safety has received the application described herein. Each mode of transportation for... published in accordance with part 107 of the Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5117... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice...

  18. 76 FR 10771 - Hazardous Materials: Limiting the Use of Electronic Devices by Highway

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ..., Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey... of Hazardous Materials Safety is the Federal safety authority for the transportation of hazardous materials by air, rail, highway, and water. Under the Federal hazardous materials transportation...

  19. 78 FR 12418 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Actions on Special Permit Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Actions on Special Permit Applications AGENCY: Pipeline And Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT...'s Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is hereby given of the actions...

  20. 75 FR 34523 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT... Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is hereby given that the Office...

  1. 46 CFR 148.02-5 - Report of hazardous materials incidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Report of hazardous materials incidents. 148.02-5... CARRIAGE OF SOLID HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN BULK Vessel Requirements § 148.02-5 Report of hazardous materials incidents. In the event of an incident involving hazardous materials, an immediate report must be sent in...

  2. 49 CFR 172.101 - Purpose and use of hazardous materials table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Purpose and use of hazardous materials table. 172.101 Section 172.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL PROVISIONS,...

  3. 76 FR 81396 - Hazardous Materials: Miscellaneous Amendments; Response to Appeals; Corrections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... CFR Part 173 Hazardous materials transportation, Incorporation by reference, Packaging and containers, Radioactive materials, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Uranium. 49 CFR Part 174 Hazardous materials transportation, Radioactive materials, Rail carriers, Railroad safety, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements...

  4. (abstract) A Mobile Robot for Remote Response to Incidents Involving Hazardous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will report the status of the Emergency Response Robotics project, a teleoperated mobile robot system being developed at JPL for use by the JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team. The project, which began in 1991, has been focused on developing a robotic vehicle which can be quickly deployed by HAZMAT Team personnel for first entry into an incident site. The primary goals of the system are to gain access to the site, locate and identify the hazard, and aid in its mitigation. The involvement of JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team personnel has been critical in guiding the design and evaluation of the system. A unique feature of the current robot, called HAZBOT III, is its special design for operation in combustible environments. This includes the use of all solid state electronics, brushless motors, and internal pressurization. Demonstration and testing of the system with HAZMAT Team personnel has shown that teleoperated robots, such as HAZBOT III, can successfully gain access to incident sites locating and identifying hazardous material spills. Work is continuing to enable more complex missions through the addition of appropriate sensor technology and enhancement of the operator interface.

  5. (abstract) A Mobile Robot for Remote Response to Incidents Involving Hazardous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will report the status of the Emergency Response Robotics project, a teleoperated mobile robot system being developed at JPL for use by the JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team. The project, which began in 1991, has been focused on developing a robotic vehicle which can be quickly deployed by HAZMAT Team personnel for first entry into an incident site. The primary goals of the system are to gain access to the site, locate and identify the hazard, and aid in its mitigation. The involvement of JPL Fire Department/HAZMAT Team personnel has been critical in guiding the design and evaluation of the system. A unique feature of the current robot, called HAZBOT III, is its special design for operation in combustible environments. This includes the use of all solid state electronics, brushless motors, and internal pressurization. Demonstration and testing of the system with HAZMAT Team personnel has shown that teleoperated robots, such as HAZBOT III, can successfully gain access to incident sites locating and identifying hazardous material spills. Work is continuing to enable more complex missions through the addition of appropriate sensor technology and enhancement of the operator interface.

  6. 40 CFR 260.42 - Notification requirement for hazardous secondary materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions § 260.42... according to the exclusion (reported as the EPA hazardous waste numbers that would apply if the hazardous secondary materials were managed as hazardous wastes); (8) For each hazardous secondary material,...

  7. Untangling the web of spill and release reporting

    SciTech Connect

    Bost, R.C.; White, L.D.

    1997-10-01

    Regulations pertaining to spills or releases of a hazardous or potentially dangerous substance into the environment are found in seven different federal congressional acts and in state-specific legislation: the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Clean Water Act (CWA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Clean Air Act (CAA). To navigate the tangled web of bureaucracy, this article provides a basic guide for reporting spills and releases to the proper authorities.

  8. 41 CFR 101-42.208 - Custody of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Custody of hazardous materials. 101-42.208 Section 101-42.208 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION...

  9. 41 CFR 101-42.203 - Reassignment of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reassignment of hazardous materials. 101-42.203 Section 101-42.203 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION...

  10. 41 CFR 101-42.202 - Identification of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Identification of hazardous materials. 101-42.202 Section 101-42.202 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION...

  11. 14 CFR 145.206 - Notification of hazardous materials authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notification of hazardous materials authorizations. 145.206 Section 145.206 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Operating Rules §...

  12. 76 FR 11569 - Hazardous Materials: Enhanced Enforcement Authority Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ...PHMSA is implementing enhanced inspection, investigation, and enforcement authority conferred on the Secretary of Transportation by the Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety and Security Reauthorization Act of 2005. This final rule establishes procedures for issuance of emergency orders (restrictions, prohibitions, recalls, and out-of-service orders) to address unsafe conditions or......

  13. Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Training: The Colorado Training Institute. Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Leslie

    The Colorado Training Institute (CTI), established in 1980, is a non-profit, instructional program devoted to promoting hazardous materials safety through education. It has trained over 3,000 emergency response personnel and industry officials and is a unique example of the private and public sectors working together to protect the public from…

  14. Information Resources in Pesticides, Environmental Health and Hazardous Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Winfred F.

    This directory of information centers, selected abstracting and indexing publications, and a discussion of journal capabilities and limitations has been prepared by the Hazardous Materials Advisory Committee of the Environmental Protection Agency. For selected information resources, each of the 20 entries includes name and location of the…

  15. Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Training: The Colorado Training Institute. Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Leslie

    The Colorado Training Institute (CTI), established in 1980, is a non-profit, instructional program devoted to promoting hazardous materials safety through education. It has trained over 3,000 emergency response personnel and industry officials and is a unique example of the private and public sectors working together to protect the public from…

  16. Hazardous Materials in Marine Transportation: A Practical Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Thomas J.; Kichner, Jerzy J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a course offered at the United States Coast Guard Academy that deals with the marine transportation of hazardous materials. Outlines the major topics covered in the course, including marine transportation regulations. Discusses the use of lectures, laboratory demonstrations, and "hands-on" activities in the instructional…

  17. Hazardous Materials in Marine Transportation: A Practical Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Thomas J.; Kichner, Jerzy J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a course offered at the United States Coast Guard Academy that deals with the marine transportation of hazardous materials. Outlines the major topics covered in the course, including marine transportation regulations. Discusses the use of lectures, laboratory demonstrations, and "hands-on" activities in the instructional…

  18. NORTH ELEVATION. HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE SHED IS VISIBLE AT THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH ELEVATION. HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE SHED IS VISIBLE AT THE FAR RIGHT. DOCKSIDE STORAGE SHED IS VISIBLE IN THE DISTANCE. LAKE WORTH INLET AND THE TOWN OF PALM BEACH ARE IN THE BACKGROUND. - U.S. Coast Guard Lake Worth Inlet Station, Boathouse, Peanut Island, Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, FL

  19. 78 FR 23503 - Hazardous Materials; Temporary Reduction of Registration Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... DOT to adjust the amount of the annual registration fee to account for any unexpended balance in the Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness (HMEP) Fund. Due to an unexpended balance that has accumulated in... make the change effective for the 2013-2014 registration year and thus draw down the unexpended balance...

  20. Simulation of a Hazardous and Noxious Substances (HNS) spill in the marine environment: lethal and sublethal effects of acrylonitrile to the European seabass.

    PubMed

    Neuparth, T; Capela, R; Rey-Salgueiro, L; Moreira, S M; Santos, M M; Reis-Henriques, M A

    2013-10-01

    Despite the extensive maritime transportation of Hazardous and Noxious Substances (HNS), there is a current lack of knowledge on the effects posed by HNS spills on the marine biota. Among the HNS identified as priority, acrylonitrile was selected to conduct ecotoxicological assays. We assessed the acute and subletal effects of acrylonitrile in seabass, followed by a recovery phase to simulate the conditions of a spill incident. The work aimed at testing a broad range of biological responses induced by acrylonitrile. Sublethal exposure to the highest two doses increased the fish mortality rate (8.3% and 25% mortality in 0.75 and 2 mg L(-1) acrylonitrile concentrations), whereas no mortality were observed in control and 0.15 mg L(-1) treatments. Additionally, important alterations at sub-individual level were observed. Acrylonitrile significantly induced the activities of Catalase- CAT and Glutathione S-Transferase - GST; and the levels of DNA damage were significantly increased. Conversely, Superoxide Dismutase- SOD - activity was found to be significantly inhibited and no effects were found on Lipid Peroxidation- LPO and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase - EROD - activity. Following a 7d recovery period, the levels of CAT, GST and EROD fell to levels at or below those in the control. In the 2 mg L(-1) group, SOD remained at the levels found during exposure phase. This study has gathered essential information on the acute and subletal toxicity of acrylonitrile to seabass. It also demonstrated that 7d recovery allowed a return of most endpoints to background levels. These data will be useful to assist relevant bodies in preparedness and response to HNS spills. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Oil Spill!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansberry, Karen Rohrich; Morgan, Emily

    2005-01-01

    An oil spill occurs somewhere in the world almost every day of the year, and the consequences can be devastating. In this month's column, students explore the effects of oil spills on plants, animals, and the environment and investigate oil spill clean-up methods through a simulated oil spill. The activities described in this article give students…

  2. Oil Spill!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansberry, Karen Rohrich; Morgan, Emily

    2005-01-01

    An oil spill occurs somewhere in the world almost every day of the year, and the consequences can be devastating. In this month's column, students explore the effects of oil spills on plants, animals, and the environment and investigate oil spill clean-up methods through a simulated oil spill. The activities described in this article give students…

  3. Description and Implementation of the Hazardous Materials Tracking System (TRACKER).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    all the LSNs that indicate a fed particular units can also be identified. Some exam- supply class which contains hazardous matel 4 pies from previous...preservative and sealing compounds • 8040 adhesives 65 Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Equipment and Supplies 81 Containers Packaging, and Packing...9330 plastic fabricated materials The information is required for effective manage- 4 9340 glass fabricated materials ment of two environmental

  4. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, K.A.; Bolton, P.A.; Robinson, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center.

  5. SB 1082 -- Unified hazardous materials/waste program: Local implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.

    1995-12-31

    California Senate Bill 1082 was signed into law in the fall of 1993 because business and industry believed there were too many hazardous materials inspectors asking the same questions, looking at the same items and requiring similar information on several variations of the same form. Industry was not happy with the large diversity of programs, each with its own inspectors, permits and fees, essentially doing what industry believed was the same inspection. SB 1082 will allow local city and county agencies to apply to the California Environmental Protection Agency to become a Certified Unified Program Agency (CUPA) or work with a CUPA as a Participating Agency (PA) to manage specific program elements. The CUPA will unify six regulatory programs including hazardous waste/tiered permitting, aboveground storage tanks, underground storage tanks, business and area plans/inventory or disclosure, acutely hazardous materials/risk management prevention and Uniform Fire Code programs related to hazardous materials inventory/plan requirements. The bill requires the CUPA to (1) implement a permit consolidation program; (2) implement a single fee system with a state surcharge; (3) consolidate, coordinate and make consistent any local or regional requirements or guidance documents; and (4) implement a single unified inspection and enforcement program.

  6. 49 CFR 175.25 - Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS... passengers in locations where the aircraft operator issues tickets, checks baggage, and maintains...

  7. Method and apparatus for the management of hazardous waste material

    DOEpatents

    Murray, Jr., Holt

    1995-01-01

    A container for storing hazardous waste material, particularly radioactive waste material, consists of a cylindrical body and lid of precipitation hardened C17510 beryllium-copper alloy, and a channel formed between the mated lid and body for receiving weld filler material of C17200 copper-beryllium alloy. The weld filler material has a precipitation hardening temperature lower than the aging kinetic temperature of the material of the body and lid, whereby the weld filler material is post weld heat treated for obtaining a weld having substantially the same physical, thermal, and electrical characteristics as the material of the body and lid. A mechanical seal assembly is located between an interior shoulder of the body and the bottom of the lid for providing a vacuum seal.

  8. Method and apparatus for the management of hazardous waste material

    DOEpatents

    Murray, H. Jr.

    1995-02-21

    A container for storing hazardous waste material, particularly radioactive waste material, consists of a cylindrical body and lid of precipitation hardened C17510 beryllium-copper alloy, and a channel formed between the mated lid and body for receiving weld filler material of C17200 copper-beryllium alloy. The weld filler material has a precipitation hardening temperature lower than the aging kinetic temperature of the material of the body and lid, whereby the weld filler material is post weld heat treated for obtaining a weld having substantially the same physical, thermal, and electrical characteristics as the material of the body and lid. A mechanical seal assembly is located between an interior shoulder of the body and the bottom of the lid for providing a vacuum seal. 40 figs.

  9. Analysis of hazardous material releases due to natural hazards in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Hatice; Santella, Nicholas; Steinberg, Laura J; Cruz, Ana Maria

    2012-10-01

    Natural hazards were the cause of approximately 16,600 hazardous material (hazmat) releases reported to the National Response Center (NRC) between 1990 and 2008-three per cent of all reported hazmat releases. Rain-induced releases were most numerous (26 per cent of the total), followed by those associated with hurricanes (20 per cent), many of which resulted from major episodes in 2005 and 2008. Winds, storms or other weather-related phenomena were responsible for another 25 per cent of hazmat releases. Large releases were most frequently due to major natural disasters. For instance, hurricane-induced releases of petroleum from storage tanks account for a large fraction of the total volume of petroleum released during 'natechs' (understood here as a natural hazard and the hazardous materials release that results). Among the most commonly released chemicals were nitrogen oxides, benzene, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Three deaths, 52 injuries, and the evacuation of at least 5,000 persons were recorded as a consequence of natech events. Overall, results suggest that the number of natechs increased over the study period (1990-2008) with potential for serious human and environmental impacts.

  10. 77 FR 17394 - Hazardous Materials: Approval and Communication Requirements for the Safe Transportation of Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... transportation of hazardous materials by highway, rail, vessel, and air. The scope of the HMR includes hazardous.... Congress expressly authorized DOT to issue variances in the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act of 1975... include: The safety record for hazardous materials transported; transportation operations......

  11. 75 FR 43898 - Hazardous Materials Transportation: Revisions of Special Permits Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... Hazardous Materials Transportation: Revisions of Special Permits Procedures AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The Federal hazardous material transportation law (Federal hazmat law... transportation of hazardous material in commerce. (49 U.S.C. 5103) Federal hazmat law authorizes the Secretary to...

  12. 76 FR 454 - Hazardous Materials Transportation: Revisions of Special Permits Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... Hazardous Materials Transportation: Revisions of Special Permits Procedures AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The Federal hazardous material transportation law (Federal hazmat law... transportation of hazardous material in commerce. (49 U.S.C. 5103) Section 5117(a) authorizes the Secretary of...

  13. 49 CFR 1.96 - The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety..., including security, in multi-modal hazardous materials transportation including identifying hazardous... DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.96 The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety...

  14. 49 CFR 1.96 - The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety..., including security, in multi-modal hazardous materials transportation including identifying hazardous... DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.96 The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety...

  15. 49 CFR 171.1 - Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to persons and functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations... Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS... and functions. Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5101 et seq.) directs the...

  16. 49 CFR 1.96 - The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety..., including security, in multi-modal hazardous materials transportation including identifying hazardous... DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.96 The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety...

  17. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2...

  18. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2...

  19. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2...

  20. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2...

  1. 29 CFR 1917.23 - Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2 Hazardous cargo, material, substance or atmosphere). 1917.23 Section 1917.23 Labor Regulations Relating to... TERMINALS Marine Terminal Operations § 1917.23 Hazardous atmospheres and substances (see also § 1917.2...

  2. HAZBOT - A hazardous materials emergency response mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, H. W.; Edmonds, G.

    The authors describe the progress that has been made towards the development of a mobile robot that can be used by hazardous materials emergency response teams to perform a variety of tasks including incident localization and characterization, hazardous material identification/classification, site surveillance and monitoring, and ultimately incident mitigation. In September of 1991, the HAZBOT II vehicle performed its first end-to-end demonstration involving a scenario in which the vehicle: navigated to the incident location from a distant (150-200 ft.) deployment site; entered a building through a door with thumb latch style handle and door closer; located and navigated to the suspected incident location (a chemical storeroom); unlocked and opened the storeroom's door; climbed over the storeroom's 12 in. high threshold to enter the storeroom; and located and identified a broken container of benzene.

  3. Routing Hazardous Materials around the District of Columbia Area

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Shih-Miao; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Peterson, B E; Han, Lee; Chin, Charles

    2009-12-01

    ABSTRACT The recent hazardous material (hazmat) shipment ban in Washington, DC has led to debates, legal challenges, and considerations by other major cities to pursue similar actions. This paper presents a methodology for evaluating hazmat shipment routing options on railroad networks under situations such as the shipment ban. A case study involves three alternatives is presented. Population and other vulnerable people within a 0.8 km (or 0.5 mile) radius buffer zone along the rail line are used to evaluate the potential risk associated with ultra hazardous material shipments. Based on this study, it is concluded that moderate increases in ton-km, subsequently time in-transit, will be resulted from the rerouting. On the other hand, the overall population-at-risk will see a reduction. The population-atrisk burden, however, is simply shifted from one location to other locations. This paper also identifies areas for potential follow-up efforts.

  4. [Hazardous materials and work safety in veterinary practice. 1: Hazardous material definition and characterization, practice documentation and general rules for handling].

    PubMed

    Sliwinski-Korell, A; Lutz, F

    1998-04-01

    In the last years the standards for professional handling of hazardous material as well as health and safety in the veterinary practice became considerably more stringent. This is expressed in various safety regulations, particularly the decree of hazardous material and the legislative directives concerning health and safety at work. In part 1, a definition based on the law for hazardous material is given and the potential risks are mentioned. The correct documentation regarding the protection of the purchase, storage, working conditions and removal of hazardous material and of the personal is explained. General rules for the handling of hazardous material are described. In part 2, particular emphasis is put on the handling of flammable liquids, disinfectants, cytostatica, pressurised gas, liquid nitrogen, narcotics, mailing of potentially infectious material and safe disposal of hazardous waste. Advice about possible unrecognized hazards and references is also given.

  5. Performance-oriented packagings for hazardous materials: Resource guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This document provides recommendations to US Department of Energy (DOE) shippers regarding packaging that meet performance-oriented packaging requirements implemented by US Department of Transportation (DOT) in rulemaking HM-181 (December 21, 1990) and subsequent actions. The packaging described in this document are certified by their vendor to comply with requirements for Packing Group I, II, or III hazardous materials packaging. The intent of this document is to share information between DOE and contractors and at all DOE facilities.

  6. Hazardous Materials Management System. A Guide for Local Emergency Managers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    Office of Emergency Management 12240 N.E. Glisan, Portland, Oregon 97230 81 9 21 043 whom- son MCOEM 0779 July, 1981 Final Report HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...Emergency Management 12210 N. E. Glisan, Portland, Oregon 97230 FEMA REVIEW NOTICE "This report has been reviewed in the Federal Emergency Management Agency...Management Agency." SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF ’.IS PAGE (When. Dot* f’Aor i . lb M INSTRUCTIONS REPORT DOCUENTATION PAGE BEOR COMPLETIORM I. REPORT NUMBER

  7. Mission: Possible. Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, W.T.; Prather-Stroud, W.

    2006-07-01

    The Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management (CEHMM) was established in May 2004 as a nonprofit research organization. Its purpose is to develop a sustainable technical/scientific community located in Carlsbad, New Mexico, that interacts worldwide to find solutions to hazardous materials management issues. An important part of the mission is to achieve improved protection of worker safety, human health, and the environment. Carlsbad has a large technical community due to the presence of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and its many contractors and support organizations. These groups include the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center, Washington Group International, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. These organizations form the basis of a unique knowledge community with strengths in many areas, such as geosciences, actinide chemistry, environmental monitoring, and waste transportation. CEHMM works cooperatively with these organizations and others to develop projects that will maintain this knowledge community beyond the projected closure date of WIPP. At present, there is an emphasis in bio-monitoring, air monitoring, hazardous materials educational programs, and endangered species remediation. CEHMM is also currently working with a group from the American Nuclear Society to help facilitate their conference scheduled for April 2006 in Carlsbad. CEHMM is growing rapidly and is looking forward to a diverse array of new projects. (authors)

  8. Ecology and Oil Spills, 17-1. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Quartermaster School, Ft. Lee, VA.

    This single-lesson course in ecology and oil spills for the secondary/postsecondary level comprises one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. The purpose stated for the 2-hour course is to provide students with an understanding of…

  9. Hazards on Hazards, Ensuring Spacecraft Safety While Sampling Asteroid Surface Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. A.; DellaGiustina, D. N.

    2016-12-01

    The near-Earth object Bennu is a carbonaceous asteroid that is a remnant from the earliest stages of the solar-system formation. It is also a potentially hazardous asteroid with a relatively high probability of impacting Earth late in the 22nd century. While the primary focus of the NASA funded OSIRIS-REx mission is the return of pristine organic material from the asteroid's surface, information about Bennu's physical and chemical properties gleaned throughout operations will be critical for a possible future impact mitigation mission. In order to ensure a regolith sample can be successfully acquired, the sample site and surrounding area must be thoroughly assessed for any potential hazards to the spacecraft. The OSIRIS-REx Image Processing Working Group has been tasked with generating global and site-specific hazard maps using mosaics and a trio of fea­­­ture identification techniques. These techniques include expert-lead manual classification, internet-based amateur classification using the citizen science platform CosmoQuest, and automated classification using machine learning and computer vision tools. Because proximity operations around Bennu do not begin until the end of 2018, we have an opportunity to test t­­­he performance of our software on analogue surfaces of other asteroids from previous NASA and other space agencies missions. The entire pipeline from image processing and mosaicking to hazard identification, analysis and mapping will be performed on asteroids of varying size, shape and surface morphology. As a result, upon arrival at Bennu, we will have the software and processes in place to quickly and confidently produce the hazard maps needed to ensure the success of our mission.

  10. 75 FR 27273 - Hazardous Materials; Packages Intended for Transport by Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Materials, Federal Aviation Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 490 L'Enfant Plaza, SW., Room... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 171 and 173 RIN 2137-AE32 Hazardous Materials; Packages Intended for Transport by Aircraft AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety...

  11. 75 FR 13333 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT... Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, Subpart B), notice is hereby given that the Office of...

  12. 76 FR 77589 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... Energy Washington, 173.417(a)(l)(i). transportation in DC. commerce of radioactive materials without... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT...

  13. 77 FR 36607 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... radioactive material packagings after October 1, 2008. (mode 1) BILLING CODE 4909-60-M ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Notice of Application for Special Permits AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT...

  14. Hydrothermal oxidation of Navy shipboard excess hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    LaJeunesse, C.A.; Haroldsen, B.L.; Rice, S.F.; Brown, B.G.

    1997-03-01

    This study demonstrated effective destruction, using a novel supercritical water oxidation reactor, of oil, jet fuel, and hydraulic fluid, common excess hazardous materials found on-board Navy vessels. This reactor uses an advanced injector design to mix the hazardous compounds with water, oxidizer, and a supplementary fuel and it uses a transpiring wall to protect the surface of the reactor from corrosion and salt deposition. Our program was divided into four parts. First, basic chemical kinetic data were generated in a simple, tubular-configured reactor for short reaction times (<1 second) and long reaction times (>5 seconds) as a function of temperature. Second, using the data, an engineering model was developed for the more complicated industrial reactor mentioned above. Third, the three hazardous materials were destroyed in a quarter-scale version of the industrial reactor. Finally, the test data were compared with the model. The model and the experimental results for the quarter-scale reactor are described and compared in this report. A companion report discusses the first part of the program to generate basic chemical kinetic data. The injector and reactor worked as expected. The oxidation reaction with the supplementary fuel was initiated between 400 {degrees}C and 450 {degrees}C. The released energy raised the reactor temperature to greater than 600 {degrees}C. At that temperature, the hazardous materials were efficiently destroyed in less than five seconds. The model shows good agreement with the test data and has proven to be a useful tool in designing the system and understanding the test results. 16 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Oil spill hazard assessment using a reverse trajectory method for the Egadi marine protected area (Central Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Ciappa, Achille; Costabile, Salvatore

    2014-07-15

    The Egadi Marine Protected Area (MPA) on the western side of the Sicily Channel (Central Mediterranean) is exposed to a high risk of oil pollution from the tanker routes connecting the eastern and western basins of the Mediterranean Sea. Areas where an oil spill would do most damage, and thus where surveillance should be concentrated, are identified in this study by Lagrangian tracers tracked backwards in time from points along the MPA perimeter using data spanning six years from 2006 to 2011. Results indicate that the areas where oil surveillance would be most beneficial are segments of the tanker routes south of Sicily (highly frequented) and north of Sicily (scarcely frequented), both extending about 150 miles from November to March and 100 miles in the other months. The third route, close to the Tunisian shore, is the most frequented by oil tankers but the threat period is limited to November and December.

  16. Expert systems for the transportation of hazardous and radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, C.E.; Clover, J.C.; Ferrada, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    Under the supervision of the Transportation Technologies Group which is in the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, an expert system prototype for the transportation and packaging of hazardous and radioactive materials has been designed and developed. The development of the expert system prototype focused on using the combination of hypermedia elements and the Visual Basic{trademark} programming language. Hypermedia technology uses software that allows the user to interact with the computing environment through many formats: text, graphics, audio, and full-motion video. With the use of hypermedia, a user-friendly prototype has been developed to sort through numerous transportation regulations, thereby leading to the proper packaging for the materials. The expert system performs the analysis of regulations that an expert in shipping information would do; only the expert system performs the work more quickly. Currently, enhancements in a variety of categories are being made to the prototype. These include further expansion of non-radioactive materials, which includes any material that is hazardous but not radioactive; and the addition of full-motion video, which will depict regulations in terms that are easy to understand and which will show examples of how to handle the materials when packaging them.

  17. Chemical and Equipment-Free Strategy To Fabricate Water/Oil Separating Materials for Emergent Oil Spill Accidents.

    PubMed

    Ju, Guannan; Liu, Jing; Li, Donglin; Cheng, Mengjiao; Shi, Feng

    2017-03-14

    Oil spill accidents normally have two important features when considering practical cleanup strategies: (1) unexpected occurrence in any situations possibly without specific equipment and chemicals; (2) emergency to be cleaned to minimize the influences on ecosystems. To address these two practical problems regarding removal of spilt oil, we have proposed an in situ, rapid, and facile candle-soot strategy to fabricate water/oil separating materials based on superhydrophobicity/superoleophilicity. The one-step fabrication method is independent of any chemicals or equipment and can be ready for use through short smoking processes within 5 min by using raw materials available in daily life such as textiles. The as-prepared materials perform good durability for repeated separation test and high recovery rate of various oils from water/oil mixtures. This strategy provides possibility of rapid response to sudden oil spill accidents, especially in cases without any equipment or chemicals and in poor countries/areas those could hardly afford transportation and storage of expensive separating materials.

  18. 75 FR 4441 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Department of Transportation's Hazardous Material Regulations (49 CFR part 107, subpart B), notice is...

  19. A note on the influence of rail defects on the risk associated with shipping hazardous materials by rail.

    PubMed

    McNeil, S; Oh, S C

    1991-06-01

    Existing approaches to routing hazardous material shipments by rail recognize that track condition is an important influence, but have not included it in the risk assessment and routing models. This note explores the influence of track condition based on predictions of internal defects in the rail. The method developed predicts the expected frequency of accidents and subsequent consequences in terms of the expected number of fatalities accounting for one aspect of track condition-internal defects. It is intended to indicate the magnitude and impact of track condition. The formulation integrates models of consequences and the risk of a hazardous spill found in the literature with the frequency of accidents as a function of the number of defects. The number of defects may be based on observations or predicted as a function of the cumulative traffic. The models are used to calculate the expected number of fatalities per year for a particular route. Application of the methodology to a hypothetical route shows that the risk associated with the transportation of hazardous material shipments varies significantly with the expected number of defects in the track. Therefore, risk not only varies from route to route but over time for any section of track as the condition deteriorates.

  20. 76 FR 5483 - Hazardous Materials: Incorporation of Certain Cargo Tank Special Permits Into Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ...The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration is amending the Hazardous Materials Regulations by incorporating provisions contained in certain widely used or longstanding cargo tank special permits that are granted to multiple parties and have established safety records. Special permits allow a company or individual to package or ship a hazardous material in a manner that varies......

  1. 75 FR 15613 - Hazardous Materials Transportation; Registration and Fee Assessment Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... Transportation; Registration and Fee Assessment Program AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... registration program are to gather information about the transportation of hazardous materials, and to fund the... transportation system each day. It is impossible to predict when and where a hazardous materials incident......

  2. 75 FR 59197 - Hazardous Materials: Limiting the Use of Electronic Devices by Highway

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... of transportation incidents involving hazardous materials when CMV drivers are distracted by... transportation of hazardous materials as defined in this section. In a final rule published today addressing the... of Hazardous Materials Safety is the Federal safety authority for the transportation of...

  3. 49 CFR 173.33 - Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles... Transportation § 173.33 Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles. (a) General requirements. (1) No person may offer or accept a hazardous material for transportation in a cargo tank motor vehicle except as...

  4. 49 CFR 173.33 - Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles... Transportation § 173.33 Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles. (a) General requirements. (1) No person may offer or accept a hazardous material for transportation in a cargo tank motor vehicle except as...

  5. 49 CFR 173.33 - Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles... Transportation § 173.33 Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles. (a) General requirements. (1) No person may offer or accept a hazardous material for transportation in a cargo tank motor vehicle except as...

  6. 78 FR 66326 - Hazardous Materials: Rail Petitions and Recommendations To Improve the Safety of Railroad Tank...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... Transportation (RRR) AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Advance... requirements to enhance the safe transportation of Packing Group I and II hazardous materials; (3) afford DOT... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 173, 174, 178, 179, and 180 RIN 2137...

  7. 75 FR 43906 - Hazardous Materials: Requirements for the Storage of Explosives During Transportation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... Materials: Requirements for the Storage of Explosives During Transportation AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous... Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE... Explosives Stored During Transportation A. Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR), 49 CFR Parts 171-180...

  8. 76 FR 44496 - Hazardous Materials Transportation: Revisions of Special Permits Procedures; Response to Appeals...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ...) identifier; an estimated quantity of the hazardous material planned for transportation; an estimate of the... CEO be aware of the hazardous materials transportation functions executed by that company, and... transportation of hazardous materials under the guidelines of a special permit. For clarification, applicants are...

  9. 78 FR 22798 - Hazardous Materials: Revision of Maximum and Minimum Civil Penalties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... reflect the changes to Section 5123 of the Federal hazardous material transportation law. In 49 CFR 107... rule is published under the authority of the Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C... hazardous material transportation law or a regulation, order, special permit, or approval issued under that...

  10. 41 CFR 102-42.75 - How are gifts containing hazardous materials handled?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hazardous materials handled? 102-42.75 Section 102-42.75 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... § 102-42.75 How are gifts containing hazardous materials handled? Gifts containing hazardous materials are handled in accordance with the requirements and provisions of this part and part 101-42 of...

  11. 49 CFR 176.72 - Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials. 176.72... VESSEL General Handling and Stowage § 176.72 Handling of break-bulk hazardous materials. (a) A metal bale hook may not be used for handling any package of hazardous materials. (b) The use of equipment...

  12. 49 CFR 172.312 - Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings... INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.312 Liquid hazardous materials in non... packagings containing liquid hazardous materials, single packaging fitted with vents, or open...

  13. 49 CFR 176.99 - Permit requirements for certain hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permit requirements for certain hazardous materials. 176.99 Section 176.99 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Special Requirements...

  14. 49 CFR 176.146 - Segregation from non-hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Segregation from non-hazardous materials. 176.146 Section 176.146 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 1...

  15. 49 CFR 176.98 - Stowage of hazardous materials on board barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of hazardous materials on board barges. 176.98 Section 176.98 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Special Requirements for Barges...

  16. 49 CFR 173.204 - Non-bulk, non-specification packagings for certain hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-bulk, non-specification packagings for certain hazardous materials. 173.204 Section 173.204 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS...

  17. 49 CFR 175.88 - Inspection, orientation and securing packages of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inspection, orientation and securing packages of hazardous materials. 175.88 Section 175.88 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY AIRCRAFT...

  18. 49 CFR 172.312 - Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings. 172.312 Section 172.312 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  19. 49 CFR 172.312 - Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings. 172.312 Section 172.312 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  20. 49 CFR 172.312 - Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings. 172.312 Section 172.312 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  1. 49 CFR 172.312 - Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liquid hazardous materials in non-bulk packagings. 172.312 Section 172.312 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  2. 76 FR 5107 - Regulation of Oil-Bearing Hazardous Secondary Materials From the Petroleum Refining Industry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 260 and 261 RIN-2050-AE78 Regulation of Oil-Bearing Hazardous Secondary Materials..., ``Regulation of Oil-Bearing ] Hazardous Secondary Materials from the Petroleum Refining Industry Processed in a... reconsider the final rule, ``Regulation of Oil-Bearing Hazardous Secondary Materials from the...

  3. 41 CFR 101-42.304 - Special requirements for donation of certain hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... donation of certain hazardous materials. 101-42.304 Section 101-42.304 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.3-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.304...

  4. 41 CFR 101-42.304 - Special requirements for donation of certain hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... donation of certain hazardous materials. 101-42.304 Section 101-42.304 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.3-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.304...

  5. 41 CFR 101-42.303 - Hazardous materials distributed to donees by State agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Hazardous materials... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.3-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.303...

  6. 41 CFR 101-42.401 - Sales responsibilities for hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for hazardous materials. 101-42.401 Section 101-42.401 Public Contracts and Property Management... DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property §...

  7. 41 CFR 101-42.302 - Responsibilities for donation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... donation of hazardous materials. 101-42.302 Section 101-42.302 Public Contracts and Property Management... DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.3-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.302 Responsibilities...

  8. 41 CFR 101-42.401 - Sales responsibilities for hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for hazardous materials. 101-42.401 Section 101-42.401 Public Contracts and Property Management... DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property §...

  9. 41 CFR 101-42.404 - Special requirements for the sale of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the sale of hazardous materials. 101-42.404 Section 101-42.404 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42... Property § 101-42.404 Special requirements for the sale of hazardous materials. Special sales...

  10. 41 CFR 101-42.303 - Hazardous materials distributed to donees by State agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Hazardous materials... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.3-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.303...

  11. 41 CFR 101-42.302 - Responsibilities for donation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... donation of hazardous materials. 101-42.302 Section 101-42.302 Public Contracts and Property Management... DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.3-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.302 Responsibilities...

  12. 41 CFR 101-42.404 - Special requirements for the sale of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the sale of hazardous materials. 101-42.404 Section 101-42.404 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42... Property § 101-42.404 Special requirements for the sale of hazardous materials. Special sales...

  13. 48 CFR 252.223-7006 - Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. 252.223-7006 Section 252.223-7006 Federal Acquisition... and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. As prescribed in 223.7103(a), use the following clause: Prohibition on Storage and Disposal of Toxic and Hazardous Materials (APR 1993) (a) Definitions. As used...

  14. 48 CFR 252.223-7006 - Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. 252.223-7006 Section 252.223-7006 Federal Acquisition... and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. As prescribed in 223.7103(a), use the following clause: Prohibition on Storage and Disposal of Toxic and Hazardous Materials (APR 2012) (a) Definitions. As used...

  15. Spill prevention control and countermeasure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This report includes facility descriptions for both oil and hazardous chemicals storage. It gives oil spill history; regulatory guideline conformance; local emergency arrangements; evacuation procedures and the contingency plan for oil and hazardous substances. (PSB)

  16. EMS response at a hazardous material incident: some basic guidelines.

    PubMed

    Plante, D M; Walker, J S

    1989-01-01

    Emergency medical response to a scene where hazardous materials are potentially involved is becoming more commonplace. Following routine response procedures could result in the incapacitation of the rescue crew. Unique to this paper are some suggestions from the fire fighting literature on how to deal with these incidents. As with any type of potential disaster, it has been found that response is much more effective if potential problems are examined beforehand and protocols developed. Emergency physicians in their role as on-site emergency medical services (EMS) medical controllers should play a leading part in the development and implementation of these protocols.

  17. The Exxon Valdez oil spill; The environmental health response to man-made disasters

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, R.

    1990-01-01

    The environmental health professions faced many challenges in 1989, among them the protection of public health in the wake of both natural and man-made disasters. Following hurricanes in the Caribbean and southeast United States, the earthquake in northern California and the Exxon oil spill in Alaska, environmental health officials and consultants were confronted with extraordinary problems concerning housing, drinking water, hazardous materials spills, solid waste management, waste water management and sanitation. This article discusses the environmental health response to one of these events - the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

  18. Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Gotovchikov, Vitaly T.; Ivanov, Alexander V.; Filippov, Eugene A.

    1998-05-12

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

  19. Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

    1998-05-12

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

  20. 33 CFR 150.628 - How must the operator label, tag, and mark a container of hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hazardous material with the identity of the hazardous material and the appropriate physical, health... transfer hazardous material from a labeled container to the work site for immediate use by the person who...

  1. 33 CFR 150.628 - How must the operator label, tag, and mark a container of hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hazardous material with the identity of the hazardous material and the appropriate physical, health... transfer hazardous material from a labeled container to the work site for immediate use by the person who...

  2. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested

  3. Development of a national spill test facility data base. Topical report, February 1994--February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    In the United States, the production of gas, liquid and solid fuels and the associated chemical use accounts for significant volumes of material with the potential of becoming hazardous. Accidental spills or releases of these hazardous materials do occur, and action must be taken to minimize damage to life, property, and the environment. Because of the hazards of testing with chemical spills, a national spill test facility (STF) and an associated testing program have been established to systematically develop new data on the effects and mitigation of hazardous chemical spills Western Research Institute (WRI), in conjunction with the DOE, is developing a comprehensive national spill test data base. I The data base will be easily accessible by industry and the public on the Spill Research Bulletin Board System and will allow users to download spill test data and test descriptions, as well as an extensive bibliography. The 1990 Clean Air Act and Amendments (CAAA) requires that at least two chemicals be field tested at the STF and at least 10 chemicals be studied each year. The chemicals to be studied are chosen with priority given to those that present the greatest risk to human health. The National Spill Test Facility Data Base will include a common chemical data base covering the overlap of federal chemical lists and significant information from other sources. Also, the (CAAA) directs the DOE and EPA to work together with the STF and industry to provide a scientific and engineering basis for writing regulations for implementation of the (CAAA). The data base will be a primary resource in this effort.

  4. [Preparation and performance investigation of Trichoderma viride-modified corn stalk as sorbent materials for oil spills].

    PubMed

    Lan, Zhou-Lin; Peng, Dan; Guo, Chu-Ling; Zhu, Chao-Fei; Xue, Xiu-Ling; Dang, Zhi

    2013-04-01

    This work aims at preparing oil spill sorbent (TCS, Trichoderma viride-modified corn stalk) through solid-state fermentation of corn stalk by Trichoderma viride. Single-factor experiments, including the effect of modification time, solid-liquid ratio of modification and modification temperature, and adsorption experiments simulating oil spill condition, were carried out. The results indicated that the maximum oil adsorption of TCS, 13.84 g x g(-1), could be obtained under the conditions of 6 days of modification, with a solid-liquid ratio of 1:4 and a modification temperature of 25 degrees C. This oil absorption was 110.33% of that of the raw material (RCS, Raw Corn Stalk). Comparing RCS and TCS by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD), the results separately showed that TCS had rougher surface, lower cellulose content and higher instability, which explains the increase of oil absorption. Also, the component analysis indicated that bio-modification could reduce the contents of celluloses and hemicelluloses from corn stalk. Besides, sorption kinetics and oil retention performance test showed that, TCS, which could reach adsorption equilibrium after 1 h of 80 r x min(-1) oscillating, had fast oil adsorption rate, and it also had good oil retention performance, which could keep 74. 87% of the initial adsorption rate when trickling 10 min after reaching adsorption equilibrium.

  5. Oil spill chemical dispersants: Research, experience and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.E.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents papers on the use of surfactants for the control of oil spills. Topics considered include laboratory toxicity effectiveness testing, the characteristics of spilled oil, salinity, water temperature, field effectiveness, dilution processes, remote sensing, oil spill fire hazards, the toxicity of oil spill dispersants to marine organisms, the effects of dispersed oil in marine sediments, dispersants for spill countermeasures on arctic beaches, contingency planning and guidelines, ecological considerations, and a multifaceted approach to applying dispersants.

  6. 49 CFR 173.2a - Classification of a material having more than one hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Classification of a material having more than one... having more than one hazard. (a) Classification of a material having more than one hazard. Except as... meets the definition of more than one hazard class or division as defined in this part, shall be...

  7. 49 CFR 173.2a - Classification of a material having more than one hazard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Classification of a material having more than one... having more than one hazard. (a) Classification of a material having more than one hazard. Except as... meets the definition of more than one hazard class or division as defined in this part, shall be...

  8. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Certifications for Professional Hazardous Materials and Waste Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Kenneth E.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need for determining a curriculum to provide qualified hazardous waste personnel. Describes the needed role of colleges and universities and current hazardous materials certification requirements. Lists requirements for 18 professional certifications. (MVL)

  9. Hazardous materials management and control program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory--health protection.

    PubMed

    Ketchen, E; Porter, W

    1981-12-01

    Maintaining reasonable control of all hazardous materials used in a large research laboratory can be a formidable task. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a Hazardous Material Coordinator for Health Protection (HMC-Hlth) and a Hazardous Material Coordinator for Environmental Protection (HMC-Env) control hazardous materials from acquisition to disposal. The HMC-Hlth, a member of the Industrial Hygiene Department, is responsible for control of the purchase and use of hazardous materials. If the material has not had a hazard evaluation, the user is required to contact the HMC-Hlth to find out if the material is hazardous before ordering it. If the material is hazardous, the user must get permission from his divisional representative to purchase it. The user is required to fill out Part 2 of a Hazardous Material Control Card (HMCC), describing the proposed use and location of the material and to return HMCC to the HMC-Hlth. This allows the Industrial Hygiene Department to evaluate the use of the materials and to take air samples as needed. Part 1 of the HMCC also contains computer printed information on the hazards.

  10. Using transportation accident databases to investigate ignition and explosion probabilities of flammable spills.

    PubMed

    Ronza, A; Vílchez, J A; Casal, J

    2007-07-19

    Risk assessment of hazardous material spill scenarios, and quantitative risk assessment in particular, make use of event trees to account for the possible outcomes of hazardous releases. Using event trees entails the definition of probabilities of occurrence for events such as spill ignition and blast formation. This study comprises an extensive analysis of ignition and explosion probability data proposed in previous work. Subsequently, the results of the survey of two vast US federal spill databases (HMIRS, by the Department of Transportation, and MINMOD, by the US Coast Guard) are reported and commented on. Some tens of thousands of records of hydrocarbon spills were analysed. The general pattern of statistical ignition and explosion probabilities as a function of the amount and the substance spilled is discussed. Equations are proposed based on statistical data that predict the ignition probability of hydrocarbon spills as a function of the amount and the substance spilled. Explosion probabilities are put forth as well. Two sets of probability data are proposed: it is suggested that figures deduced from HMIRS be used in land transportation risk assessment, and MINMOD results with maritime scenarios assessment. Results are discussed and compared with previous technical literature.

  11. Evaluation of electrospun polyvinyl chloride/polystyrene fibers as sorbent materials for oil spill cleanup.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haitao; Qiu, Shanshan; Jiang, Wei; Wu, Daxiong; Zhang, Canying

    2011-05-15

    A novel, high-capacity oil sorbent consisting of polyvinyl chloride (PVC)/polystyrene (PS) fiber was prepared by an electrospinning process. The sorption capacity, oil/water selectivity, and sorption mechanism of the PVC/PS sorbent were studied. The results showed that the sorption capacities of the PVC/PS sorbent for motor oil, peanut oil, diesel, and ethylene glycol were 146, 119, 38, and 81 g/g, respectively. It was about 5-9 times that of a commercial polypropylene (PP) sorbent. The PVC/PS sorbent also had excellent oil/water selectivity (about 1000 times) and high buoyancy in the cleanup of oil over water. The SEM analysis indicated that voids among fibers were the key for the high capacity. The electrospun PVC/PS sorbent is a better alternative to the widely used PP sorbent for oil spill cleanup.

  12. 33 CFR 127.1313 - Storage of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Operations § 127.1313 Storage of... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Storage of hazardous...

  13. 33 CFR 127.1313 - Storage of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Operations § 127.1313 Storage of... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Storage of hazardous...

  14. 33 CFR 127.1313 - Storage of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Operations § 127.1313 Storage of... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Storage of hazardous...

  15. Hazardous-materials regulations withdrawal of certain Bureau of Explosives delegations of authority

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-19

    The U.S. Materials Transportation Bureau amends its hazardous-materials regulations and withdraws or cancels the remaining delegations of authority to the U.S. Bureau of Explosives (BOE) to make existing programs conform with the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act. BOE will continue to contribute in the testing of explosives and other hazardous materials, including ethylene oxide, nitric and sulfuric acids, phosgene or diphosgene, hydrocyanic acid, certain corrosive liquids, compressed gases, and liquid nitrogen dioxide, peroxide, and tetroxide. The amended requirements for the safe transportation of these and other hazardous materials are discussed.

  16. The leaking tank car on TC-4. [Industry and government response to hazardous material emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    Most hazardous waste spills are taken care of by the industries directly involved. U.S. EPA's Emergency Response Program encourages industry and the States to take all possible countermeasures without federal intervention.An example is given of an incident involving a leak of approximately one ton of sulfur dioxide from a tank car in Kansas. What might have been a serious problem was controlled successfully by a railroad environmental emergency response team with no injuries to the team personnel or to the community. (JMT)

  17. Smoldering combustion hazards of thermal-insulation materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlemiller, J.

    1981-08-01

    The smoldering combustion hazards of cellulosic loose fill insulation materials fall into three categories: smolder initiation, smolder propagation, and transition from smoldering into flaming. Previous findings on the initiation problem are summarized briefly. They serve as the basis for recommendations on an improved smolder ignition test method which is designed to give ignition temperatures comparable to those in practice. The proposed test method requires checking against full-scale mock-up results before it can be considered for implementation. Smolder propagation, driven by buoyant convection, through a thick (18 cm) layer of cellulosic insulation has been extensively examined. A heavy (25% add-on) loading of boric acid (a widely used smolder retardant) cuts the propagation rate in half (from approx. 0.3 to 0.15 cm/min) but does not come close to stopping this process. Analysis of experimental profiles for temperature, oxygen level, and remaining organic fraction strongly indicates that the smolder wave is oxygen-supply controlled and that it involves both first and second stages of oxidative heat release from the insulation material. The balance of involvement of the two stages varies with depth in the layer. It appears that efforts to develop improved means of suppressing smolder propagation must be directed at the entire oxidation process. However, since boric acid is fairly effective at slowing the second stage of oxidation, most new efforts should be aimed at the first stage of oxidation (which also is responsible for smolder initiation).

  18. Rapid test for the detection of hazardous microbiological material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordmueller, Mario; Bohling, Christian; John, Andreas; Schade, Wolfgang

    2009-09-01

    After attacks with anthrax pathogens have been committed since 2001 all over the world the fast detection and determination of biological samples has attracted interest. A very promising method for a rapid test is Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS is an optical method which uses time-resolved or time-integrated spectral analysis of optical plasma emission after pulsed laser excitation. Even though LIBS is well established for the determination of metals and other inorganic materials the analysis of microbiological organisms is difficult due to their very similar stoichiometric composition. To analyze similar LIBS-spectra computer assisted chemometrics is a very useful approach. In this paper we report on first results of developing a compact and fully automated rapid test for the detection of hazardous microbiological material. Experiments have been carried out with two setups: A bulky one which is composed of standard laboratory components and a compact one consisting of miniaturized industrial components. Both setups work at an excitation wavelength of λ=1064nm (Nd:YAG). Data analysis is done by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) with an adjacent neural network for fully automated sample identification.

  19. Development of a centralized inland marine hazardous materials response database.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, James P; Abkowitz, Mark D

    2003-08-29

    The state of the practice for obtaining chemical reference at a typical hazardous materials transportation accident scene is to consult multiple printed references. This often leads to confusion. This paper describes the design and development of a centralized response database. This is accomplished by identifying the most commonly used emergency response databases for all modes of transportation, developing relationships between the data, and building intuitive interfaces that allow for rapid information retrieval. The tool is subsequently applied to a previous accident to demonstrate the value-added from its availability in a response scenario. By combining all datasets in one application, data redundancy, errors and lags between updates of the data sets can be reduced. The linkages between the database and supporting files enables the data to be easily updated. While the database is designed to aid response to marine transportation accidents, the tool could also be applied to other modes of transportation. Moreover, facility and vessel operators could benefit from having a comprehensive chemical source accessible in case of release or human contact with the material. Finally, the inclusion of commodity flow information enables decision makers to prepare for high risk commodities.

  20. Hazardous materials flows by rail. Final report, January 1986-December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, F.; Hussey, L.; Zebe, P.

    1990-03-01

    The report presents a quantitative overview of the movement of hazardous materials by rail in the United States. The data used is a hazardous materials rail waybill sample developed at TSC from the 1983 Rail Waybill Sample. The report examines (1) the Rail Waybill Sample, (2) the characteristics of hazardous materials rail transport, (3) non-interchange versus interchange hazardous materials traffic, (4) the origins and destinations of hazardous materials traffic, and (5) specific information on the rail flows of STCC 289--Misc. Chemical Products, STCC 287--Agricultural Chemicals, STCC 291--Products of Petroleum Refining, and STCC 281--Industrial Organic Chemicals. The basic purpose of the report is to provide analysts and policymakers with information on the movement of hazardous materials by rail that can be used in the decision-making process.

  1. Regulation of the transportation of hazardous materials: a critique and a proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    This article is a description and analysis of the system of regulation of hazardous-materials transportation and a proposal for reform. It has four parts. Part I surveys the present scheme of federal, state, and local safety regulation of hazardous-materials transportation. Part II describes the failures of the present regulatory system and presents a framework for analyzing alternative approaches to preventing hazardous-materials-transportation accidents. Part III compares the present system with one such alternative, a system of strict liability. Part IV is a proposal for reforming hazardous-materials-transportation regulation by deregulating materials that are not extremely hazardous, and imposing strict liability on all transporters of hazardous materials.

  2. Assessment of synfuel spill cleanup options

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, S.E.; Wakamiya, W.; English, C.J.; Strand, J.A.; Mahlum, D.D.

    1982-04-01

    Existing petroleum-spill cleanup technologies are reviewed and their limitations, should they be used to mitigate the effects of synfuels spills, are discussed. The six subsections of this report address the following program goals: synfuels production estimates to the year 2000; possible sources of synfuel spills and volumes of spilled fuel to the year 2000; hazards of synfuels spills; assessment of existing spill cleanup technologies for oil spills; assessment of cleanup technologies for synfuel spills; and disposal of residue from synfuel spill cleanup operations. The first goal of the program was to obtain the most current estimates on synfuel production. These estimates were then used to determine the amount of synfuels and synfuel products likely to be spilled, by location and by method of transportation. A review of existing toxicological studies and existing spill mitigation technologies was then completed to determine the potential impacts of synthetic fuel spills on the environment. Data are presented in the four appendixes on the following subjects: synfuel production estimates; acute toxicity of synfuel; acute toxicity of alcohols.

  3. 49 CFR 171.1 - Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to persons and functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... materials in commerce, as the Secretary considers appropriate. The Secretary is authorized to apply these regulations to persons who transport hazardous materials in commerce. In addition, the law authorizes the Secretary to apply these regulations to persons who cause hazardous materials to be transported in...

  4. 41 CFR 101-42.207 - Transfer of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.207 Section 101-42.207 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.207 Transfer...

  5. 41 CFR 101-42.207 - Transfer of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.207 Section 101-42.207 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.207 Transfer...

  6. 41 CFR 101-42.402 - Reporting hazardous materials for sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... materials for sale. 101-42.402 Section 101-42.402 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.402 Reporting...

  7. 41 CFR 101-42.402 - Reporting hazardous materials for sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... materials for sale. 101-42.402 Section 101-42.402 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.4-Sale, Abandonment, or Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.402 Reporting...

  8. 41 CFR 101-42.207 - Transfer of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.207 Section 101-42.207 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.207 Transfer...

  9. 41 CFR 101-42.207 - Transfer of hazardous materials and certain categories of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... materials and certain categories of property. 101-42.207 Section 101-42.207 Public Contracts and Property... AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42.2-Utilization of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.207 Transfer...

  10. The Element of Surprise: Preparing for the Possibility of Hazardous Materials within Archival Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Judith A.

    2007-01-01

    Unprocessed archival collections can contain unknown and potentially hazardous materials that can be harmful to other collections and staff. Archival literature largely focuses on collection and personnel dangers posed by environmental hazards such as mold and insect infestation but not on pharmaceutical and chemical hazards. In this article, the…

  11. The Element of Surprise: Preparing for the Possibility of Hazardous Materials within Archival Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Judith A.

    2007-01-01

    Unprocessed archival collections can contain unknown and potentially hazardous materials that can be harmful to other collections and staff. Archival literature largely focuses on collection and personnel dangers posed by environmental hazards such as mold and insect infestation but not on pharmaceutical and chemical hazards. In this article, the…

  12. 77 FR 36607 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... additional hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are... rigid outer packaging capable of passing the Flame Penetration and Resistance Test and the...

  13. 76 FR 15046 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in..., IN. 180.205. permit to authorize a change in mating sealing surface configuration design....

  14. 76 FR 27300 - Hazardous Materials: Cargo Tank Motor Vehicle Loading and Unloading Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... Materials: Cargo Tank Motor Vehicle Loading and Unloading Operations AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous... impacting interested parties affected by the cargo tank motor vehicle proposals in this notice, we...

  15. A Descriptive Analysis of Prehospital Response to Hazardous Materials Events.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ashley J; Lohse, Christine M; Sztajnkrycer, Matthew D

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about the overall frequency of hazardous materials (HazMat) events in the United States and the nature of prehospital care for those exposed. The purpose of the current study was to perform a descriptive analysis of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) activations reported to a national EMS database. Analysis of the 2012 National EMS Information System (NEMSIS) Public Release Research Data Set v.2.2.1, containing EMS emergency response data submitted by 41 states, was conducted. Mandatory data elements E0207 (Type of Response Delay), E0208 (Type of Scene Delay), and E0209 (Type of Transport Delay) contained specific codes for HazMat events and were used to identify specific EMS activation records for subsequent analysis. Overlapping data elements were identified and combined in order to prevent duplicate entries. Descriptive analyses were generated from the NEMSIS Research Data Set. A total of 17,479,328 EMS activations were reported, of which 2,527 unique activations involved HazMat response. Mass-casualty incident was coded for 5.6% of activations. The most common level of prehospital care present on scene was Basic Life Support (BLS; 51.1%); 2.1% required aggressive Advanced Life Support (ALS) response. The most common locations for HazMat activations were homes (36.2%), streets or highways (26.3%), and health care facilities (11.6%). The primary symptoms observed by EMS personnel were pain (29.6%), breathing problems (12.2%), and change in responsiveness (9.6%). Two percent of HazMat activations involved cardiac arrest, with 21.7% occurring after EMS arrival. Delays in patient care included response delay, scene delay, and transport delay. Hazardous materials events are rare causes of EMS activation in the United States. The majority occur in non-industrial venues and involve two or fewer patients. Scene time frequently is delayed due to multiple barriers. Cardiac arrest is rare but occurred after EMS arrival in one-fifth of patients.

  16. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    John A. McLachlan

    2003-12-01

    In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how

  17. Chemical comparison of weathered spilled oil and Exxon/Valdez hold oil from an occupational health standpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, W.H.; Ho, Chen-h.; Guerin, M.R.; Tyndall, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    On March 24, 1989, the oil tanker Exxon/Valdez ran aground on Bligh Reef located off the coast of Alaska, and 11 million gallons of Northslope Alaska crude oil were spilled into Prince William Sound. More than 11,000 workers and uncounted volunteers participated in the clean up operation. The exposure of cleanup workers to spilled oil over several months of cleanup operations suggests the need for an assessment of any unusual occupational health hazards. To address this issue, weathered spilled oil and hold oil were subjected to biodirected chemical fractionation and target chemical analyses. Potential inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact hazards were investigated. The characterization methods of the DOE/Office of Health and Environmental Research Synthetic Fuels Program were applied to samples related to the spill to permit inter-comparability with that data base. Two oil spills were obtained for characterization. Exxon/Valdez hold oil collected directly from the hold of the tanker was provided by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Also provided was a 75-days old weathered spilled oil sampled on June 6, 1989, from a skimmer collecting oil washed off of Knight Island. Because 40 wt % of the weathered oil consisted of non-oil materials such as sand, entrapped water, and leaves, an oil fraction was prepared by suspending the oil benzene/chloroform drying with anhydrous magnesium sulfate, filtering, and removing the solvent by rotary evaporation. The tests conducted here suggest that there is no unusual human health hazard associated with the weathered Exxon/Valdez spilled oil in the context of other petroleum crude oils. Clearly, the volatile organics in the freshly spilled oil present a potential inhalation hazard, but such a threat is considerably mitigated by weathering. The polar neutral chemical class fraction increases notably during weathering, but does not appear to represent an increased genotoxic hazard. 20 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. 49 CFR 173.201 - Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.201 Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group I. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a liquid hazardous...

  19. 49 CFR 173.202 - Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.202 Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group II. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a liquid hazardous...

  20. 49 CFR 173.201 - Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.201 Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group I. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a liquid hazardous...

  1. 49 CFR 173.202 - Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.202 Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group II. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a liquid hazardous...

  2. 49 CFR 173.203 - Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group III.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.203 Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group III. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a liquid hazardous...

  3. 49 CFR 173.203 - Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group III.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.203 Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group III. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a liquid hazardous...

  4. 49 CFR 173.202 - Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.202 Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group II. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a liquid hazardous...

  5. 49 CFR 173.201 - Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.201 Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group I. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a liquid hazardous...

  6. 49 CFR 173.203 - Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group III.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.203 Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group III. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a liquid hazardous...

  7. 49 CFR 173.201 - Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.201 Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group I. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a liquid hazardous...

  8. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the Hazardous Materials Transportation and Packaging Program. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Calihan, T.W. III; Votaw, E.F.

    1995-05-01

    This QAPP covers only the implementation accomplished through Level I and II manuals. It covers the quality affecting activities identified in USDOE orders (both HQ and Richland Operations Office), US DOT, US EPA, and NRC regulations, IAEA guidelines, and the WHC manuals. It covers activities related to hazardous materials transportation performed on and off the Hanford site under the jurisdictional authority of WHC. (Hazardous materials include radioactive, hazardous waste, and mixed waste.)

  9. Comparative Investigation of Source Term Estimation Algorithms for Hazardous Material Atmospheric Transport and Dispersion Prediction Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    model was a simple, normally distributed measurement error model . DSTL’s Urban Dispersion Model ...field trial data or code-on-code comparisons. V&V of Urban Dispersion Modeling . Complex Urban dispersion modeling is an active area where T&D...Validation Analysis of Hazardous Material Assessment Model , Support for DTRA in the Validation Analysis of Hazardous Material Transport and Dispersion

  10. 49 CFR 173.240 - Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials. 173.240 Section 173.240 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.240 Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials. When §...

  11. 49 CFR 171.1 - Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to persons and functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... marking, or other medium, or, in the case of a rail car, until the car is delivered to a private track or.... Movement of a hazardous material by rail car, aircraft, motor vehicle, or vessel (except as delegated by...; and (B) A rail car containing a hazardous material that is stored on track that does not meet the...

  12. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  13. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  14. 33 CFR 155.310 - Containment of oil and hazardous material cargo discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Containment of oil and hazardous material cargo discharges. 155.310 Section 155.310 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS...

  15. 41 CFR 101-42.303 - Hazardous materials distributed to donees by State agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Hazardous materials... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 42-UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF PROPERTY 42...

  16. 25 CFR 170.905 - How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Transportation § 170.905 How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material? (a) Tribes cannot use IRR Program funds to train personnel to handle radioactive and hazardous material. (b) Tribes can seek... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can tribes obtain training in handling...

  17. 49 CFR 175.25 - Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notification at air passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions. 175.25 Section 175.25 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... passenger facilities of hazardous materials restrictions. Each person who engages in for-hire air...

  18. 49 CFR 173.241 - Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS... portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64; and non-DOT Specification portable tanks suitable for transport of liquids are authorized. For transportation by vessel, also see §...

  19. 49 CFR 173.205 - Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. 173.205 Section 173.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.205 Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. When §...

  20. 49 CFR 173.205 - Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. 173.205 Section 173.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.205 Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. When §...

  1. 49 CFR 173.205 - Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. 173.205 Section 173.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.205 Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. When §...

  2. 49 CFR 173.205 - Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. 173.205 Section 173.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.205 Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. When §...

  3. 49 CFR 173.205 - Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. 173.205 Section 173.205 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.205 Specification cylinders for liquid hazardous materials. When §...

  4. 78 FR 1101 - Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ...This document responds to administrative appeals generated as a result of certain amendments adopted in an international harmonization final rule published on January 19, 2011. The January 19, 2011 final rule amended the Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) by revising, removing or adding proper shipping names, the hazard class of a material, packing group assignments, special provisions,......

  5. 46 CFR 54.20-2 - Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)). 54.20-2 Section 54.20-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-2 Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces...

  6. 49 CFR 171.1 - Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to persons and functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (HMR) to persons and functions. 171.1 Section 171.1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... and functions. Federal hazardous materials transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5101 et seq.) directs the... transportation of hazardous materials in commerce and to pre-transportation and transportation functions....

  7. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  8. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  9. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  10. 46 CFR 54.20-2 - Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)). 54.20-2 Section 54.20-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-2 Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces...

  11. Hazardous Materials Technology: A Community College's Response to a Critical Employment Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedel, Janice N.; And Others

    Studies conducted by the Eastern Iowa Community College District in 1986 revealed a lack of credit programs and curricula for training individuals in the technical aspects of hazardous materials management and need for hazardous materials technicians by local industry. In response, an associate of applied science (AAS) degree program in Hazardous…

  12. An Expert System for the Management of Hazardous Materials at a Naval Supply Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    This thesis analyzes, designs and implements an expert system for the management of hazardous material at a Naval Supply Center (NSC). This system is...warehouse worker. The Hazardous Material Expert System (HAZMAT ES) will facilitate making the storage decision and will allow a warehouse worker to

  13. Hazardous Materials Technology: A Community College's Response to a Critical Employment Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedel, Janice N.; And Others

    Studies conducted by the Eastern Iowa Community College District in 1986 revealed a lack of credit programs and curricula for training individuals in the technical aspects of hazardous materials management and need for hazardous materials technicians by local industry. In response, an associate of applied science (AAS) degree program in Hazardous…

  14. 49 CFR 176.74 - On deck stowage of break-bulk hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false On deck stowage of break-bulk hazardous materials... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL General Handling and Stowage § 176.74 On deck stowage of break-bulk hazardous materials... water damage must be protected so that it will not be exposed to the weather or to sea water. (c) Not...

  15. 46 CFR 54.20-2 - Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)). 54.20-2 Section 54.20-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-2 Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces...

  16. 46 CFR 54.20-2 - Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)). 54.20-2 Section 54.20-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-2 Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces...

  17. 46 CFR 54.20-2 - Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces UW-2(a)). 54.20-2 Section 54.20-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Fabrication by Welding § 54.20-2 Fabrication for hazardous materials (replaces...

  18. 40 CFR 262.215 - Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unwanted material that is not solid or... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Alternative... Eligible Academic Entities § 262.215 Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste. (a) If...

  19. 40 CFR 262.215 - Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unwanted material that is not solid or... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Alternative... Eligible Academic Entities § 262.215 Unwanted material that is not solid or hazardous waste. (a) If...

  20. 49 CFR 1.97 - Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Federal hazardous material transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5101 et seq.) except as delegated by §§ 1.83(d)(2... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator. 1.97 Section 1.97 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation...

  1. 49 CFR 1.97 - Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Federal hazardous material transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5101 et seq.) except as delegated by §§ 1.83(d)(2... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator. 1.97 Section 1.97 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation...

  2. 49 CFR 1.97 - Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Federal hazardous material transportation law (49 U.S.C. 5101 et seq.) except as delegated by §§ 1.83(d)(2... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Delegations to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administrator. 1.97 Section 1.97 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation...

  3. 49 CFR 173.33 - Hazardous materials in cargo tank motor vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... material lading would have a dangerous reaction with the hazardous material. (2) A cargo tank may not be... tanks equipped with a 1 psig normal vent, the sum of the tank static head plus 1 psig. In addition,...

  4. Monohydrocalcite: a promising remediation material for hazardous anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Munemoto, Takashi; Sakai, Minoru; Yagi, Shintaro

    2011-12-01

    The formation conditions, solubility and stability of monohydrocalcite (MHC, CaCO3·H2O), as well as sorption behaviors of toxic anions on MHC, are reviewed to evaluate MHC as a remediation material for hazardous oxyanions. MHC is a rare mineral in geological settings that occurs in recent sediments in saline lakes. Water temperature does not seem to be an important factor for MHC formation. The pH of lake water is usually higher than 8 and the Mg/Ca ratio exceeds 4. MHC synthesis experiments as a function of time indicate that MHC is formed from amorphous calcium carbonate and transforms to calcite and/or aragonite. Most studies show that MHC forms from solutions containing Mg, which inhibits the formation of stable calcium carbonates. The solubility of MHC is higher than those of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, but lower than those of ikaite and amorphous calcium carbonate at ambient temperature. The solubility of MHC decreases with temperature. MHC is unstable and readily transforms to calcite or aragonite. The transformation consists of the dissolution of MHC and the subsequent formation of stable phases from the solution. The rate-limiting steps of the transformation of MHC are the nucleation and growth of stable crystalline phases. Natural occurrences indicate that certain additives, particularly PO4 and Mg, stabilize MHC. Laboratory studies confirm that a small amount of PO4 in solution (>30 μM) can significantly inhibit the transformation of MHC. MHC has a higher sorption capacity for PO4 than calcite and aragonite. The modes of PO4 uptake are adsorption on the MHC surface at moderate phosphate concentrations and precipitation of secondary calcium phosphate minerals at higher concentrations. Arsenate is most likely removed from the solution during the transformation of MHC. The proposed sorption mechanism of arsenate is coprecipitation during crystallization of aragonite. The arsenic sorption capacity by MHC is significantly higher than simple adsorption

  5. Monohydrocalcite: a promising remediation material for hazardous anions

    PubMed Central

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Munemoto, Takashi; Sakai, Minoru; Yagi, Shintaro

    2011-01-01

    The formation conditions, solubility and stability of monohydrocalcite (MHC, CaCO3·H2O), as well as sorption behaviors of toxic anions on MHC, are reviewed to evaluate MHC as a remediation material for hazardous oxyanions. MHC is a rare mineral in geological settings that occurs in recent sediments in saline lakes. Water temperature does not seem to be an important factor for MHC formation. The pH of lake water is usually higher than 8 and the Mg/Ca ratio exceeds 4. MHC synthesis experiments as a function of time indicate that MHC is formed from amorphous calcium carbonate and transforms to calcite and/or aragonite. Most studies show that MHC forms from solutions containing Mg, which inhibits the formation of stable calcium carbonates. The solubility of MHC is higher than those of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, but lower than those of ikaite and amorphous calcium carbonate at ambient temperature. The solubility of MHC decreases with temperature. MHC is unstable and readily transforms to calcite or aragonite. The transformation consists of the dissolution of MHC and the subsequent formation of stable phases from the solution. The rate-limiting steps of the transformation of MHC are the nucleation and growth of stable crystalline phases. Natural occurrences indicate that certain additives, particularly PO4 and Mg, stabilize MHC. Laboratory studies confirm that a small amount of PO4 in solution (>30 μM) can significantly inhibit the transformation of MHC. MHC has a higher sorption capacity for PO4 than calcite and aragonite. The modes of PO4 uptake are adsorption on the MHC surface at moderate phosphate concentrations and precipitation of secondary calcium phosphate minerals at higher concentrations. Arsenate is most likely removed from the solution during the transformation of MHC. The proposed sorption mechanism of arsenate is coprecipitation during crystallization of aragonite. The arsenic sorption capacity by MHC is significantly higher than simple adsorption

  6. Core temperature monitoring of firefighters during hazardous materials training sessions.

    PubMed

    Menze, R; McMullen, M J; White, L J; Dougherty, J M

    1996-01-01

    To determine core temperature (Tc) elevations in hazardous materials (HazMat) technicians wearing level-A fully encapsulated, chemically resistive suits (FECRSs) during training scenarios. Cross-sectional, observational feasibility study with Institutional Review Board approval. HazMat training scenarios held during the summer of 1994. Weather conditions included both rainy and sunny days, with a mean ambient temperature of 75.8 degrees F (24.3 degrees C) (range 69-83 degrees F [20.6-28.3 degrees C). Nine male firefighters participating in training scenarios in the Midwestern United States. Each volunteer swallowed a capsule containing a Tc sensor developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The capsule continuously monitored Tc and stored data in an ambulatory recorder worn under the level-A FECRS during training. Mean age of the volunteers was 34 years, mean weight was 92.6 kg, and average baseline Tc was 36.7 degrees C (97.1 degrees F) (range 35.3-38.2 degrees C [95.5-100 degrees F]). Time in the FECRS averaged 25.4 minutes (range 14-35 minutes). All subjects demonstrated increased Tc while in the suit; the mean Tc increase was 0.8 degree C (1.4 degrees F) (range 0.2-1.3 degrees C [0.4-2.3 degrees F]). The Tc continued to increase during wet decontamination procedures and after suit removal. Mean heat storage values (delta Tcx LBMx 3.47 kJ) were calculated, and found to be moderately elevated to 3.6 kJ/kg (range 2.1-4.6 kJ/kg). These observations support the validity and significance of implementing prophylactic measures for firefighters using protective clothing. Simple protective measures include enforced time limitations, hydration, and efforts to minimize heat buildup by avoiding both direct sunlight and unnecessary time encapsulated in the suit.

  7. Monohydrocalcite: a promising remediation material for hazardous anions.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Munemoto, Takashi; Sakai, Minoru; Yagi, Shintaro

    2011-12-01

    The formation conditions, solubility and stability of monohydrocalcite (MHC, CaCO3·H2O), as well as sorption behaviors of toxic anions on MHC, are reviewed to evaluate MHC as a remediation material for hazardous oxyanions. MHC is a rare mineral in geological settings that occurs in recent sediments in saline lakes. Water temperature does not seem to be an important factor for MHC formation. The pH of lake water is usually higher than 8 and the Mg/Ca ratio exceeds 4. MHC synthesis experiments as a function of time indicate that MHC is formed from amorphous calcium carbonate and transforms to calcite and/or aragonite. Most studies show that MHC forms from solutions containing Mg, which inhibits the formation of stable calcium carbonates. The solubility of MHC is higher than those of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, but lower than those of ikaite and amorphous calcium carbonate at ambient temperature. The solubility of MHC decreases with temperature. MHC is unstable and readily transforms to calcite or aragonite. The transformation consists of the dissolution of MHC and the subsequent formation of stable phases from the solution. The rate-limiting steps of the transformation of MHC are the nucleation and growth of stable crystalline phases. Natural occurrences indicate that certain additives, particularly PO4 and Mg, stabilize MHC. Laboratory studies confirm that a small amount of PO4 in solution (>30 μM) can significantly inhibit the transformation of MHC. MHC has a higher sorption capacity for PO4 than calcite and aragonite. The modes of PO4 uptake are adsorption on the MHC surface at moderate phosphate concentrations and precipitation of secondary calcium phosphate minerals at higher concentrations. Arsenate is most likely removed from the solution during the transformation of MHC. The proposed sorption mechanism of arsenate is coprecipitation during crystallization of aragonite. The arsenic sorption capacity by MHC is significantly higher than simple adsorption

  8. Preparedness of hazardous materials emergencies in railyards: Guidance for railroads and adjacent communities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Railroads are a key part of the distribution system for hazardous materials and, thus, much hazardous material passes through railyards en route to intermediate or final consumers. While the vast majority of these materials are shipped without incident, both the number of shipments and the nature of the materials themselves dictate that railyards and surrounding communities be prepared to respond quickly and effectively to emergencies. This report contains information on 11 emergency preparedness functions and 150 guidance recommendations.

  9. Determination of the fire hazards of mine materials using a radiant panel

    PubMed Central

    Harteis, S.P.; Litton, C.D.; Thomas, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a laboratory-scale method to rank the ignition and fire hazards of commonly used underground mine materials and to eliminate the need for the expensive large-scale tests that are currently being used. A radiant-panel apparatus was used to determine the materials’ relevant thermal characteristics: time to ignition, critical heat flux for ignition, heat of gasification, and mass-loss rate. Three thermal parameters, TRP, TP1 and TP4, were derived from the data, then developed and subsequently used to rank the combined ignition and fire hazards of the combustible materials from low hazard to high hazard. The results compared favorably with the thermal and ignition hazards of similar materials reported in the literature and support this approach as a simpler one for quantifying these combustible hazards. PMID:26877552

  10. Truck transportation of hazardous materials: a national overview. Final report, October 1983-October 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Maio, D.J.; Liu, T.K.

    1987-12-01

    The primary objective of the effort has been to provide government regulators and policymakers with (a) an estimate of the aggregate national volume of hazardous chemical and petroleum products transportation in trucks, (b) a profile of the truck fleet involved in hazardous-materials transport, and (c) the geographical distribution of the transport activity. After defining data sources and methods, hazardous chemical and petroleum products transport is quantified in terms of total tons, ton-miles, and haul distances. Truck-transport categories include domestic production from U.S. plants, imports from ports of entry, and distribution from regional storage facilities. Next, the report characterizes the truck fleet involved in hazardous-materials transport in terms of truck size, type, and placarded operations. Geographical distribution of truck transport of hazardous materials is then presented graphically, with traffic patterns mapped in terms of major highway corridors. Finally, trends in truck transport of hazardous chemical and petroleum products since 1977 are analyzed.

  11. Use of magnetic carbon composites from renewable resource materials for oil spill clean up and recovery

    DOEpatents

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2015-10-27

    A method of separating a liquid hydrocarbon material from a body of water, includes: (a) mixing magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites with a liquid hydrocarbon material dispersed in a body of water to allow the magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each to be adhered by the liquid hydrocarbon material to form a mixture; (b) applying a magnetic force to the mixture to attract the magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by the liquid hydrocarbon material; and (c) removing the body of water from the magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by the liquid hydrocarbon material while maintaining the applied magnetic force. The magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites is formed by subjecting one or more metal lignosulfonates or metal salts to microwave radiation, in presence of lignin/derivatives either in presence of alkali or a microwave absorbing material, for a period of time effective to allow the carbon-metal nanocomposites to be formed.

  12. Automated accountability of hazardous materials at AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division

    SciTech Connect

    Depew, P.L.

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Kansas City Plant (KCP), currently operated by AlliedSignal Inc. has developed a comprehensive Hazardous Material Information System (HMIS). The purpose of this system is to provide a practical and automated method to collect, analyze and distribute hazardous material information to DOE, KCP associates, and regulatory agencies. The drivers of the HMIS are compliance with OSHA Hazard Communications, SARA reporting, pollution prevention, waste minimization, control and tracking of hazards, and emergency response. This report provides a discussion of this system.

  13. Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100

    SciTech Connect

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-11-09

    The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations.

  14. Use of magnetic carbon composites from renewable resource materials for oil spill clean up and recovery

    DOEpatents

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2014-02-11

    A method for separating a liquid hydrocarbon material from a body of water. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of mixing a plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites with a liquid hydrocarbon material dispersed in a body of water to allow the plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each to be adhered by an amount of the liquid hydrocarbon material to form a mixture, applying a magnetic force to the mixture to attract the plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by an amount of the liquid hydrocarbon material, and removing said plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by an amount of the liquid hydrocarbon material from said body of water while maintaining the applied magnetic force, wherein the plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites is formed by subjecting one or more metal lignosulfonates or metal salts to microwave radiation, in presence of lignin/derivatives either in presence of alkali or a microwave absorbing material.

  15. Prospective study of hepatic, renal, and haematological surveillance in hazardous materials firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Kales, S; Polyhronopoulos, G; Aldrich, J; Mendoza, P; Suh, J; Christiani, D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate possible health effects related to work with hazardous materials as measured by end organ effect markers in a large cohort over about 2 years, and in a subcohort over 5 years.
METHODS—Hepatic, renal, and haematological variables were analysed from 1996-98 in hazardous materials firefighters including 288 hazardous materials technicians (81%) and 68 support workers (19%). The same end organ effect markers in a subcohort of the technicians were also analysed (n=35) from 1993-98. Support workers were considered as controls because they are also firefighters, but had a low potential exposure to hazardous materials.
RESULTS—During the study period, no serious injuries or exposures were reported. For the end organ effect markers studied, no significant differences were found between technicians and support workers at either year 1 or year 3. After adjustment for a change in laboratory, no significant longitudinal changes were found within groups for any of the markers except for creatinine which decreased for both technicians (p<0.001) and controls (p<0.01).
CONCLUSIONS—Health effects related to work are infrequent among hazardous materials technicians. Haematological, hepatic, and renal testing is not required on an annual basis and has limited use in detecting health effects in hazardous materials technicians.


Keywords: hazardous materials; firefighters; medical surveillance PMID:11160986

  16. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials. (a...

  17. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials. (a...

  18. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials....

  19. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials....

  20. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials....

  1. Harbor Oil Spill Removal/Recovery Systems. Phase 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-01

    conducting a human factors study of oil spill cleanup equipment; development of oil spill cleanup scenarios, an oil spill cleanup data report form, and...alternative methods of using oil spill containment boom; and a study of boom materials. This report summarizes Phase II. The objectives of Phase III...currently underway, are to conduct cost and system effectiveness studies of oil spill cleanup procedures, and to evaluate new equipment at OHMSETT. (MM)

  2. Hazardous materials management and control program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory - environmental protection

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhower, B.M.; Oakes, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    In the Federal Register of May 19, 1980, the US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated final hazardous waste regulations according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976. The major substantive portions of these regulations went into effect on November 19, 1980, and established a federal program to provide comprehensive regulation of hazardous waste from its generation to its disposal. In an effort to comply with these regulations, a Hazardous Materials Management and Control Program was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The program is administered by two Hazardous Materials Coordinators, who together with various support groups, ensure that all hazardous materials and wastes are handled in such a manner that all personnel, the general public, and the environment are adequately protected.

  3. Using choice experiments to assess people's preferences for railway transports of hazardous materials.

    PubMed

    Winslott Hiselius, Lena

    2005-10-01

    This article investigates whether the choice experiment approach can be used to assess people's preferences and the determinants of these preferences in order to estimate the costs and benefits of different configurations of the transport of hazardous materials by rail. Changes in the exposure to hazardous materials that people are subjected to are used rather than changes in accident risk. To the best knowledge of the author, this has not been done before in a study of people's preferences toward hazardous materials. A mail survey, carried out in two cities in Sweden, is used to obtain tentative estimates of the willingness to pay for a reduction in exposure as well as the willingness to accept an increase in exposure. Special attention is given to viability, since the complexity of the activity studied, transport of hazardous materials, and the method used pose particular challenges. The response rate and tests of validity and consistency indicate that this method can be applied. Moreover, the results suggest that studies of this kind may provide guidance on changes in the transport of hazardous materials, especially because policymakers may influence the attributes presented here. Referring to the exposure of hazardous materials highlights the importance of providing the respondents with adequate information regarding hazardous transports. An important finding is that the amount of background information may have some effect on the stated preferences.

  4. 49 CFR 173.241 - Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and solid materials. 173.241 Section 173.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.241 Bulk packagings for certain low hazard liquid and...

  5. 77 FR 70895 - New Marking Standards for Parcels Containing Hazardous Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ...), hazard Class 5.2 (organic peroxides) and hazard Class 8 (corrosives). The DOT will no longer define a... Organic Peroxides Mailable Limited Division-- Quantity materials 5.1 Oxidizing per 10.15.2. Substances 5.2 Organic Peroxides 6 Toxic Substances and Division 6.1: Only Infectious mailable air- Substances...

  6. 77 FR 60334 - New Marking Standards for Parcels Containing Hazardous Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... class 5.1 (oxidizing substances), hazard class 5.2 (organic peroxides) and hazard class 8 (corrosives...'' column (only) as follows:] 5 Oxidizing Substances, Only Mailable Limited Organic Peroxides. Quantity materials Division per 10.15.2. 5.1 Oxidizing Substances.. 5.2 Organic Peroxides. * * * * * 6...

  7. 25 CFR 170.901 - What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What standards govern transportation of radioactive and... Transportation § 170.901 What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials? DOT, the... Protection Agency have established standards and regulations for the shipment of radioactive and hazardous...

  8. 25 CFR 170.901 - What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What standards govern transportation of radioactive and... Transportation § 170.901 What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials? DOT, the... Protection Agency have established standards and regulations for the shipment of radioactive and hazardous...

  9. 49 CFR 173.155 - Exceptions for Class 9 (miscellaneous hazardous materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing Group... the material meets the definition of a hazardous substance, hazardous waste, marine pollutant, or is offered for transportation and transported by aircraft or vessel, and is eligible for the...

  10. 49 CFR 173.155 - Exceptions for Class 9 (miscellaneous hazardous materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing Group... the material meets the definition of a hazardous substance, hazardous waste, marine pollutant, or is offered for transportation and transported by aircraft or vessel, and is eligible for the...

  11. 49 CFR 173.155 - Exceptions for Class 9 (miscellaneous hazardous materials).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing Group... the material meets the definition of a hazardous substance, hazardous waste, marine pollutant, or is offered for transportation and transported by aircraft or vessel, and is eligible for the...

  12. Teaching about Hazardous Materials. ERIC/SMEAC Environmental Education Digest No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Disinger, John F.

    Problems related to the handling of hazardous substances and toxic wastes have escalated making this environmental dilemma a national concern. This digest provides an update of key legislative and management efforts associated with hazardous wastes and reviews current instructional materials in the area. Major topics addressed include: (1) waste…

  13. 49 CFR 173.240 - Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.240 Bulk packaging for certain low hazard solid materials. When § 172... portable tanks; UN portable tanks; marine portable tanks conforming to 46 CFR part 64; and sift-proof...

  14. 25 CFR 170.905 - How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material? 170.905 Section 170.905 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear...

  15. 25 CFR 170.905 - How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material? 170.905 Section 170.905 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear...

  16. 25 CFR 170.905 - How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material? 170.905 Section 170.905 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear...

  17. 25 CFR 170.905 - How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How can tribes obtain training in handling hazardous material? 170.905 Section 170.905 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear...

  18. 40 CFR 241.3 - Standards and procedures for identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... unit, and are produced from the processing of discarded non-hazardous secondary materials and that meet... industrial process. (iv) The non-hazardous secondary material must result in products that...

  19. 49 CFR 173.243 - Bulk packaging for certain high hazard liquids and dual hazard materials which pose a moderate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Class 8, Packing Group I and II) by a closure activated at a temperature not over 121 °C (250 °F); MC... requirements in § 178.337-11 of this subchapter. (c) Portable tanks. DOT Specification 51 and 60 portable tanks... liquid hazardous material that is a Class 3, PG I or II, or PG III with a flash point of less than 38...

  20. Screening tests for hazard classification of complex waste materials - Selection of methods

    SciTech Connect

    Weltens, R.; Vanermen, G.; Tirez, K.; Robbens, J.; Deprez, K.; Michiels, L.

    2012-12-15

    In this study we describe the development of an alternative methodology for hazard characterization of waste materials. Such an alternative methodology for hazard assessment of complex waste materials is urgently needed, because the lack of a validated instrument leads to arbitrary hazard classification of such complex waste materials. False classification can lead to human and environmental health risks and also has important financial consequences for the waste owner. The Hazardous Waste Directive (HWD) describes the methodology for hazard classification of waste materials. For mirror entries the HWD classification is based upon the hazardous properties (H1-15) of the waste which can be assessed from the hazardous properties of individual identified waste compounds or - if not all compounds are identified - from test results of hazard assessment tests performed on the waste material itself. For the latter the HWD recommends toxicity tests that were initially designed for risk assessment of chemicals in consumer products (pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, biocides, food, etc.). These tests (often using mammals) are not designed nor suitable for the hazard characterization of waste materials. With the present study we want to contribute to the development of an alternative and transparent test strategy for hazard assessment of complex wastes that is in line with the HWD principles for waste classification. It is necessary to cope with this important shortcoming in hazardous waste classification and to demonstrate that alternative methods are available that can be used for hazard assessment of waste materials. Next, by describing the pros and cons of the available methods, and by identifying the needs for additional or further development of test methods, we hope to stimulate research efforts and development in this direction. In this paper we describe promising techniques and argument on the test selection for the pilot study that we have performed on different types of