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Sample records for hcmv ie1 exon4

  1. A Fusion Protein of HCMV IE1 exon4 and IE2 exon5 Stimulates Potent Cellular Immunity in an MVA Vaccine Vector

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Zhou, W; Srivastava, T; La Rosa, C; Mandarino, A; Forman, SJ; Zaia, JA; Britt, WJ; Diamond, DJ

    2008-01-01

    A therapeutic CMV vaccine incorporating an antigenic repertoire capable of eliciting a cellular immune response has yet to be successfully implemented for patients who already have acquired an infection. To address this problem, we have developed a vaccine candidate derived from modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) that expresses three immunodominant antigens (pp65, IE1, IE2) from CMV. The novelty of this vaccine is the fusion of two adjacent exons from the immediate-early region of CMV, their successful expression in MVA, and robust immunogenicity in both primary and memory response models. Evaluation of the immunogenicity of the viral vaccine in mouse models shows that it can stimulate primary immunity against all three antigens in both the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets. Evaluation of human PBMC from healthy CMV-positive donors or patients within 6 months of receiving hematopoietic cell transplant shows robust stimulation of existing CMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells subsets. PMID:18538366

  2. A fusion protein of HCMV IE1 exon4 and IE2 exon5 stimulates potent cellular immunity in an MVA vaccine vector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Zhou, W.; Srivastava, T.; La Rosa, C.; Mandarino, A.; Forman, S.J.; Zaia, J.A.; Britt, W.J.; Diamond, D.J.

    2008-08-01

    A therapeutic CMV vaccine incorporating an antigenic repertoire capable of eliciting a cellular immune response has yet to be successfully implemented for patients who already have acquired an infection. To address this problem, we have developed a vaccine candidate derived from modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) that expresses three immunodominant antigens (pp65, IE1, IE2) from CMV. The novelty of this vaccine is the fusion of two adjacent exons from the immediate-early region of CMV, their successful expression in MVA, and robust immunogenicity in both primary and memory response models. Evaluation of the immunogenicity of the viral vaccine in mouse models shows that it can stimulate primary immunity against all three antigens in both the CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cell subsets. Evaluation of human PBMC from healthy CMV-positive donors or patients within 6 months of receiving hematopoietic cell transplant shows robust stimulation of existing CMV-specific CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cell subsets.

  3. Identification of HLA-A*2402-restricted HCMV immediate early-1 (IE-1) epitopes as targets for CD8+ HCMV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jong-Baeck; Kim, Hyun Ok; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Ha, Joo Eun; Jang, Sunphil; Lee, Sang-Guk; Lee, Kyungwon; Stroncek, David

    2009-08-23

    To identify novel HLA-A*2402-restricted human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate early-1 (IE-1) epitopes for adoptive immunotherapy, we explored 120 overlapping 15-amino acid spanning IE-1. These peptides were screened by measuring the frequency of polyclonal CD8+ T cells producing intracellular interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) using flow cytometry and the epitopes were validated with a HCMV-infected target Cr release cytotoxicity assay. Initial screening was performed with 12 mini-pools of 10 consecutive peptides made from 120 overlapping peptides15-amino acids in length that spanned IE-1. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HLA-A*2402 HCMV-seropositive donors were sensitized with each of the 12 mini-pools, mini-pools 1 and 2 induced the highest frequency of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) producing IFN-gamma. When PBMCs were stimulated with each of the twenty peptides belonging to mini-pools 1 and 2, peptides IE-11-15MESSAKRKMDPDNPD and IE-15-19AKRKMDPDNPDEGPS induced the greatest quantities of IFN-gamma production and cytotoxicity of HLA-matched HCMV-infected fibroblasts. To determine the exact HLA-A*2402-restricted epitopes within the two IE-1 proteins, we synthesized a total of twenty-one overlapping 9- or 10 amino acid peptides spanning IE-11-15 and IE-15-19. Peptide IE-13-12SSAKRKMDPD induced the greatest quantities of IFN-gamma production and target cell killing by CD8+ CTLs. HCMV IE-13-12SSAKRKMDPD is a HLA-A*2402-restricted HCMV IE-1 epitope that can serve as a common target for CD8+ HCMV-specific CTLs.

  4. Modulation of Homology-Directed Repair in T98G Glioblastoma Cells Due to Interactions between Wildtype p53, Rad51 and HCMV IE1-72

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Amit S.; Fortunato, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous pathogen capable of causing life threatening consequences in neonates and immune-compromised individuals. HCMV inflicts site-specific double strand breaks (DSBs) in the cellular genome. DNA damage infliction raises the corollary question of virus modulation of DNA repair. We recently reported HDR was stimulated in wt human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) during fully permissive infection or expression of the HCMV protein IE1-72 (IE72). These studies have been extended into semi-permissive T98G glioblastoma cells. T98Gs encode a mutant p53, which may contribute to their high baseline rate of HDR. We fully expected HCMV infection to increase HDR in T98Gs, similar to its effects in HFFs. Surprisingly in T98Gs HCMV infection, or sole expression of IE72, decreased HDR by two-fold. Transient expression of wt p53 in T98Gs also reduced HDR by two-fold. Dual transient expression of wt p53 and IE72 restored high baseline HDR levels. GST pulldown experiments revealed that both IE72 and wt p53 bound the important HDR protein, Rad51. We conclude that the expression of certain HCMV proteins can modulate HDR in an infected cell, dependent upon p53 status. We propose a model of the protein interactions explaining this behavior. PMID:24576846

  5. Characterization of an epitope of the human cytomegalovirus protein IE1 recognized by a CD4+ T cell clone.

    PubMed

    Gautier, N; Chavant, E; Prieur, E; Monsarrat, B; Mazarguil, H; Davrinche, C; Gairin, J E; Davignon, J L

    1996-05-01

    CD4+ T cells specific for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE1 protein are potential effectors of the control of HCMV infection through cytokine production. Better knowledge of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-peptide-T cell receptor (TcR) interactions in the CD4+ T cell response should result in a better design of immunizing peptides and is a prerequisite for the development of vaccines or anti-cytomegalovirus therapy. In this study, the recombinant protein comprising residues 86-491 encoded by exon 4 of IE1 (GST-e4) was cleaved by enzymatic digestion and analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS). We identified the 14-residue epitope 162-DKREMWMACIKELH-175 recognized by an HLA-DR8-restricted clone, BeA3. Synthetic elongated, truncated and di-Ala-substituted peptides of the 18-mer IE1 158-IVPEDKREMWMACIKELH-175 sequence were used to analyze the amino acid motifs involved in binding to HLA-DR8 and recognition by the BeA3 clone. Substitutions which abolished (MW --> AA), or decreased (RE --> AA and MA --> AA) T cell clone proliferation, cytokine production and cytotoxicity were identified. Loss of T cell function induced by the MW --> AA substitution was associated with poor HLA-DR8 binding. Decreased T cell function (RE --> AA and MA --> AA) was associated with good HLA-DR8 binding, which suggested that these motifs were involved in TcR binding. Other substitutions induced potentiation of the T cell clone response: the IV --> AA substitution induced stronger proliferation, but equivalent cytokine production, when compared with the reference peptide IE1 (158-175). CI --> AA substitution induced strong potentiation of HLA-DR8 binding, proliferation and interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 production, possibly due to the removal of negative effects of Cys, Ile, or both side chains. Cytotoxicity was not improved by any substitution. Our results show modulation of the CD4+ T cell response according to the peptide residues involved in the

  6. Inconsistent responses of cytomegalovirus-specific T cells to pp65 and IE-1 versus infected dendritic cells in organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lilleri, D; Zelini, P; Fornara, C; Comolli, G; Gerna, G

    2007-08-01

    CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells specific for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and two immunodominant HCMV antigens (pp65 and IE-1) were monitored in 20 solid organ transplant recipients undergoing primary (n = 4) or reactivated (n = 16) HCMV infection during the first year after transplantation by using as a stimulator either HCMV-infected autologous dendritic cells (DCs) or pp65- or IE-1 peptide mixtures. Turnaround times for test performance were 7 days for infected DCs and 24 h for peptides. Using infected DCs, HCMV-specific T-cell restoration occurred in all patients for CD8(+) and in 18/20 (90%) for CD4(+) T-cell subpopulations, resulting in virus clearance from blood. Using peptide mixtures, T-cell responses were less frequently detected. In detail, 14 (70%) patients showed pp65-specific CD8(+) T cells and 10 (50%) patients IE-1-specific CD8(+) T cells, whereas pp65-specific CD4(+) T cells were detected in 14 (70%) patients, and IE-1-specific CD4(+) T cells in three (15%) patients only. Protection from HCMV infection was associated with the presence of a HCMV-specific T-cell response directed against multiple viral proteins, but not against pp65 or IE-1 only. In conclusion, the use of pp65 and IE-1 peptide mixtures for rapid monitoring of HCMV-specific T-cell responses in solid organ transplant recipients underestimates the actual T-cell immune response against HCMV.

  7. Human cytomegalovirus IE1 protein alters the higher-order chromatin structure by targeting the acidic patch of the nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qianglin; Chen, Ping; Wang, Mingzhu; Fang, Junnan; Yang, Na; Li, Guohong; Xu, Rui-Ming

    2016-01-26

    Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) immediate early 1 (IE1) protein associates with condensed chromatin of the host cell during mitosis. We have determined the structure of the chromatin-tethering domain (CTD) of IE1 bound to the nucleosome core particle, and discovered that IE1-CTD specifically interacts with the H2A-H2B acidic patch and impairs the compaction of higher-order chromatin structure. Our results suggest that IE1 loosens up the folding of host chromatin during hCMV infections.

  8. The essential role of guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) IE1 and IE2 homologs in viral replication and IE1-mediated ND10 targeting.

    PubMed

    Hornig, Julia; Choi, K Yeon; McGregor, Alistair

    2017-04-01

    Guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) immediate early proteins, IE1 and IE2, demonstrated structural and functional homologies with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). GPCMV IE1 and IE2 co-localized in the nucleus with each other, the viral polymerase and guinea pig ND10 components (gpPML, gpDaxx, gpSp100, gpATRX). IE1 showed direct interaction with ND10 components by immunoprecipitation unlike IE2. Additionally, IE1 protein disrupted ND10 bodies. IE1 mutagenesis mapped the nuclear localization signal to the C-terminus and identified the core domain for gpPML interaction. Individual knockout of GPCMV GP122 or GP123 (IE2 and IE1 unique exons respectively) was lethal to the virus. However, an IE1 mutant (codons 234-474 deleted), was viable with attenuated viral growth kinetics and increased susceptibility to type I interferon (IFN-I). In HCMV, the IE proteins are important T cell target antigens. Consequently, characterization of the homologs in GPCMV provides a basis for their evaluation in candidate vaccines against congenital infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Human Cytomegalovirus IE1 Protein Disrupts Interleukin-6 Signaling by Sequestering STAT3 in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Reitsma, Justin M.; Sato, Hiromi; Nevels, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In the canonical STAT3 signaling pathway, binding of agonist to receptors activates Janus kinases that phosphorylate cytoplasmic STAT3 at tyrosine 705 (Y705). Phosphorylated STAT3 dimers accumulate in the nucleus and drive the expression of genes involved in inflammation, angiogenesis, invasion, and proliferation. Here, we demonstrate that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection rapidly promotes nuclear localization of STAT3 in the absence of robust phosphorylation at Y705. Furthermore, infection disrupts interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 and expression of a subset of IL-6-induced STAT3-regulated genes, including SOCS3. We show that the HCMV 72-kDa immediate-early 1 (IE1) protein associates with STAT3 and is necessary to localize STAT3 to the nucleus during infection. Furthermore, expression of IE1 is sufficient to disrupt IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3, binding of STAT3 to the SOCS3 promoter, and SOCS3 gene expression. Finally, inhibition of STAT3 nuclear localization or STAT3 expression during infection is linked to diminished HCMV genome replication. Viral gene expression is also disrupted, with the greatest impact seen following viral DNA synthesis. Our study identifies IE1 as a new regulator of STAT3 intracellular localization and IL-6 signaling and points to an unanticipated role of STAT3 in HCMV infection. PMID:23903834

  10. Exon4 amelogenin transcripts in enamel biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Stahl, J; Nakano, Y; Horst, J; Zhu, L; Le, M; Zhang, Y; Liu, H; Li, W; Den Besten, P K

    2015-06-01

    Amelogenins are proteins formed by alternative splicing of the amelogenin gene, and are essential for tooth enamel formation. However, the unique functions of various alternatively spliced amelogenins in enamel formation are not well understood. In this study, we determined the spatiotemporal location of amelogenins derived from transcripts containing exon4 (AMG+4) in the enamel matrix, and the relative binding of recombinant AMG+4 to hydroxyapatite (HAP). Immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry analyses showed that AMG+4 proteins were secreted into the enamel matrix at the early maturation stage. A stage-specific increase in the synthesis of AMG+4 was further supported by our observation that in mice overexpressing leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (TgLRAP), in which ameloblasts differentiate earlier, AMG+4 transcripts were also upregulated earlier. In vitro binding studies, supported by in silico modeling of protein binding to calcium and phosphate, showed that more recombinant AMG+4 bound to hydroxyapatite (HAP) as compared with recombinant AMG-4. The temporal and spatial localization of amelogenins containing exon4 peptide, and their functional differences in HAP binding, suggests that the unique properties of amelogenins containing exon4 cause a specific enhancement of biomineralization related to stabilization of early-formed HAP at the maturation stage. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  11. Human Cytomegalovirus IE1 Protein Elicits a Type II Interferon-Like Host Cell Response That Depends on Activated STAT1 but Not Interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    Knoblach, Theresa; Grandel, Benedikt; Seiler, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) is a highly prevalent pathogen that, upon primary infection, establishes life-long persistence in all infected individuals. Acute hCMV infections cause a variety of diseases in humans with developmental or acquired immune deficits. In addition, persistent hCMV infection may contribute to various chronic disease conditions even in immunologically normal people. The pathogenesis of hCMV disease has been frequently linked to inflammatory host immune responses triggered by virus-infected cells. Moreover, hCMV infection activates numerous host genes many of which encode pro-inflammatory proteins. However, little is known about the relative contributions of individual viral gene products to these changes in cellular transcription. We systematically analyzed the effects of the hCMV 72-kDa immediate-early 1 (IE1) protein, a major transcriptional activator and antagonist of type I interferon (IFN) signaling, on the human transcriptome. Following expression under conditions closely mimicking the situation during productive infection, IE1 elicits a global type II IFN-like host cell response. This response is dominated by the selective up-regulation of immune stimulatory genes normally controlled by IFN-γ and includes the synthesis and secretion of pro-inflammatory chemokines. IE1-mediated induction of IFN-stimulated genes strictly depends on tyrosine-phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and correlates with the nuclear accumulation and sequence-specific binding of STAT1 to IFN-γ-responsive promoters. However, neither synthesis nor secretion of IFN-γ or other IFNs seems to be required for the IE1-dependent effects on cellular gene expression. Our results demonstrate that a single hCMV protein can trigger a pro-inflammatory host transcriptional response via an unexpected STAT1-dependent but IFN-independent mechanism and identify IE1 as a candidate determinant of hCMV pathogenicity. PMID:21533215

  12. Protective CD8+ T-cell responses to cytomegalovirus driven by rAAV/GFP/IE1 loading of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuefei; Pilgrim, Petra; Yan, Juqiang; Zhou, Wei; Jenkins, Marjorie; Gagliano, Nicoletta; Bumm, Klaus; Cannon, Martin; Milzani, Aldo; Dalle-Donne, Isabella; Kast, W Martin; Cobos, Everardo; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent studies demonstrate that recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-based antigen loading of dendritic cells (DCs) generates in vitro, significant and rapid cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses against viral antigens. Methods We used the rAAV system to induce specific CTLs against CVM antigens for the development of cytomegalovirus HCMV) gene therapy. As an extension of the versatility of the rAAV system, we incorporated immediate-early 1 (IE1), expressed in HCMV. Our rAAV vector induced a strong stimulation of CTLs directed against the HCMV antigen IE1. We then investigated the efficiency of the CTLs in killing IE1 targeted cells. Results A significant MHC Class I-restricted, anti-IE1-specific CTL killing was demonstrated against IE1 positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after one, in vitro, stimulation. Conclusion In summary, single PBMC stimulation with rAAV/IE1 pulsed DCs induces strong antigen specific-CTL generation. CTLs were capable to lyse low doses of peptides pulsed into target cells. These data suggest that AAV-based antigen loading of DCs is highly effective for generating human CTL responses against HCMV antigens. PMID:18834548

  13. Two Polypyrimidine Tracts in Intron 4 of the Major Immediate Early Gene Are Critical for Gene Expression Switching from IE1 to IE2 and for Replication of Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Wangheng; Torres, Lilith; Cruz-Cosme, Ruth; Arroyo, Fernando; Irizarry, Luis; Luciano, Dalia; Márquez, Arturo; Rivera, Leslie L.; Sala, Antonio L.; Luo, Min-hua

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) major immediate early (MIE) gene is essential for viral replication. The most abundant products encoded by the MIE gene include IE1 and IE2. Genes of IE1 and IE2 share the MIE promoter (MIEP), the first 3 exons, and the first 2 introns. IE1 is expressed earlier than IE2 after CMV infection or MIE gene transfection. In this study, we identified 2 polypyrimidine (Py) tracts in intron 4 (between exons 4 and 5) that are responsible for transcriptional switching from IE1 to IE2. The first Py is important and the second one is essential for the splicing and expression of IE2. In searching for the mechanisms of MIE gene switching from IE1 to IE2, we found that the second Py was required for the IE2's fourth intron to bind to a splicing factor such as U2AF65, as determined by an RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay and a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, while the first Py enhanced the binding of U2AF65 with the intron. An HCMV BACmid with the second Py mutated failed to produce any virus, while the HCMV with the first Py mutated replicated with a defective phenotype. Furthermore, we designed a small RNA (scRNAPy) that is complementary to the intron RNA covering the two Pys. The scRNAPy interfered with the interaction of U2AF65 with the intron and repressed the IE2 expression. Therefore, our studies implied that IE2 gene splicing might be an anti-CMV target. IMPORTANCE CMV is a ubiquitous herpesvirus and a significant cause of disease and death in the immunocompromised and elderly. Insights into its gene regulation will provide clues in designing anti-CMV strategies. The MIE gene is one of the earliest genes of CMV and is essential for CMV replication. It is known that the MIE gene needs to be spliced to produce more than two proteins; however, how MIE gene splicing is regulated remains elusive. In the present studies, we identified two Pys in intron 4 and found that the first Py is important and the second is

  14. Two Polypyrimidine Tracts in Intron 4 of the Major Immediate Early Gene Are Critical for Gene Expression Switching from IE1 to IE2 and for Replication of Human Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wangheng; Torres, Lilith; Cruz-Cosme, Ruth; Arroyo, Fernando; Irizarry, Luis; Luciano, Dalia; Márquez, Arturo; Rivera, Leslie L; Sala, Antonio L; Luo, Min-Hua; Tang, Qiyi

    2016-08-15

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) major immediate early (MIE) gene is essential for viral replication. The most abundant products encoded by the MIE gene include IE1 and IE2. Genes of IE1 and IE2 share the MIE promoter (MIEP), the first 3 exons, and the first 2 introns. IE1 is expressed earlier than IE2 after CMV infection or MIE gene transfection. In this study, we identified 2 polypyrimidine (Py) tracts in intron 4 (between exons 4 and 5) that are responsible for transcriptional switching from IE1 to IE2. The first Py is important and the second one is essential for the splicing and expression of IE2. In searching for the mechanisms of MIE gene switching from IE1 to IE2, we found that the second Py was required for the IE2's fourth intron to bind to a splicing factor such as U2AF65, as determined by an RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay and a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, while the first Py enhanced the binding of U2AF65 with the intron. An HCMV BACmid with the second Py mutated failed to produce any virus, while the HCMV with the first Py mutated replicated with a defective phenotype. Furthermore, we designed a small RNA (scRNAPy) that is complementary to the intron RNA covering the two Pys. The scRNAPy interfered with the interaction of U2AF65 with the intron and repressed the IE2 expression. Therefore, our studies implied that IE2 gene splicing might be an anti-CMV target. CMV is a ubiquitous herpesvirus and a significant cause of disease and death in the immunocompromised and elderly. Insights into its gene regulation will provide clues in designing anti-CMV strategies. The MIE gene is one of the earliest genes of CMV and is essential for CMV replication. It is known that the MIE gene needs to be spliced to produce more than two proteins; however, how MIE gene splicing is regulated remains elusive. In the present studies, we identified two Pys in intron 4 and found that the first Py is important and the second is required for the splicing

  15. Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-Specific CD4(+) T Cells Are Polyfunctional and Can Respond to HCMV-Infected Dendritic Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sarah E; Sedikides, George X; Mason, Gavin M; Okecha, Georgina; Wills, Mark R

    2017-03-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection and periodic reactivation are generally well controlled by the HCMV-specific T cell response in healthy people. While the CD8(+) T cell response to HCMV has been extensively studied, the HCMV-specific CD4(+) T cell effector response is not as well understood, especially in the context of direct interactions with HCMV-infected cells. We screened the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) responses to 6 HCMV peptide pools (pp65, pp71, IE1, IE2, gB, and US3, selected because they were the peptides most frequently responded to in our previous studies) in 84 donors aged 23 to 74 years. The HCMV-specific CD4(+) T cell response to pp65, IE1, IE2, and gB was predominantly Th1 biased, with neither the loss nor the accumulation of these responses occurring with increasing age. A larger proportion of donors produced an IL-10 response to pp71 and US3, but the IFN-γ response was still dominant. CD4(+) T cells specific to the HCMV proteins studied were predominantly effector memory cells and produced both cytotoxic (CD107a expression) and cytokine (macrophage inflammatory protein 1β secretion) effector responses. Importantly, when we measured the CD4(+) T cell response to cytomegalovirus (CMV)-infected dendritic cells in vitro, we observed that the CD4(+) T cells produced a range of cytotoxic and secretory effector functions, despite the presence of CMV-encoded immune evasion molecules. CD4(+) T cell responses to HCMV-infected dendritic cells were sufficient to control the dissemination of virus in an in vitro assay. Together, the results show that HCMV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses, even those from elderly individuals, are highly functional and are directly antiviral.IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is carried for a lifetime and in healthy people is kept under control by the immune system. HCMV has evolved many mechanisms to evade the immune response, possibly explaining why the virus is never eliminated

  16. Characterization of Recombinant Human Cytomegaloviruses Encoding IE1 Mutants L174P and 1-382 Reveals that Viral Targeting of PML Bodies Perturbs both Intrinsic and Innate Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Myriam; Otto, Victoria; Stump, Joachim D; Klingl, Stefan; Müller, Regina; Reuter, Nina; Muller, Yves A; Sticht, Heinrich; Stamminger, Thomas

    2015-11-11

    PML is the organizer of cellular structures termed nuclear domain 10 (ND10) or PML-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) that act as key mediators of intrinsic immunity against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and other viruses. The antiviral function of ND10 is antagonized by viral regulatory proteins such as the immediate early protein IE1 of HCMV. IE1 interacts with PML through its globular core domain (IE1CORE) and induces ND10 disruption in order to initiate lytic HCMV infection. Here, we investigate the consequences of a point mutation (L174P) in IE1CORE, which was shown to abrogate the interaction with PML, for lytic HCMV infection. We found that a recombinant HCMV encoding IE1-L174P displays a severe growth defect similar to that of an IE1 deletion virus. Bioinformatic modeling based on the crystal structure of IE1CORE suggested that insertion of proline into the highly alpha-helical domain severely affects its structural integrity. Consistently, L174P mutation abrogates the functionality of IE1CORE and results in degradation of the IE1 protein during infection. In addition, our data provide evidence that IE1CORE as expressed by a recombinant HCMV encoding IE1 1-382 not only is required to antagonize PML-mediated intrinsic immunity but also affects a recently described function of PML in innate immune signaling. We demonstrate a coregulatory role of PML in type I and type II interferon-induced gene expression and provide evidence that upregulation of interferon-induced genes is inhibited by IE1CORE. In conclusion, our data suggest that targeting PML by viral regulatory proteins represents a strategy to antagonize both intrinsic and innate immune mechanisms. PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), which represent nuclear multiprotein complexes consisting of PML and additional proteins, represent important cellular structures that mediate intrinsic resistance against many viruses, including human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). During HCMV infection, the major immediate early protein IE1 binds

  17. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication dynamics in HCMV-naive and -experienced immunocompromised hosts.

    PubMed

    Emery, Vincent C; Hassan-Walker, Aycan F; Burroughs, Andrew K; Griffiths, Paul D

    2002-06-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can infect both HCMV-naive and -experienced transplant patients. In this study, the growth rate of HCMV in HCMV-naive hosts (1.82 units/day; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-2.56 units/day) was shown to be significantly faster than the growth rate of virus in HCMV-experienced hosts undergoing recurrent infection (0.61 units/day; 95% CI, 0.55-0.7 units/day; P<.0001). The basic reproductive number (R(0)) for HCMV-naive liver transplant patients was 15.1 (95% CI, 8.9-44) but was only 2.4 (95% CI, 2.35-2.8) for HCMV-experienced transplant recipients, corresponding to an anti-HCMV immune efficacy of approximately 84%, despite immunosuppressive therapy. The R(0) values suggest that an anti-HCMV drug or vaccine with an efficacy of >93% (95% CI, 89%-98%) is required to eliminate viral growth during infection of HCMV-naive liver transplant recipients, whereas lower efficacy levels are sufficient to reduce the R(0) value to <1 in hosts with prior HCMV immunity.

  18. Crystal structure of cytomegalovirus IE1 protein reveals targeting of TRIM family member PML via coiled-coil interactions.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Myriam; Klingl, Stefan; Sevvana, Madhumati; Otto, Victoria; Schilling, Eva-Maria; Stump, Joachim D; Müller, Regina; Reuter, Nina; Sticht, Heinrich; Muller, Yves A; Stamminger, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are enigmatic structures of the cell nucleus that act as key mediators of intrinsic immunity against viral pathogens. PML itself is a member of the E3-ligase TRIM family of proteins that regulates a variety of innate immune signaling pathways. Consequently, viruses have evolved effector proteins to modify PML-NBs; however, little is known concerning structure-function relationships of viral antagonists. The herpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) expresses the abundant immediate-early protein IE1 that colocalizes with PML-NBs and induces their dispersal, which correlates with the antagonization of NB-mediated intrinsic immunity. Here, we delineate the molecular basis for this antagonization by presenting the first crystal structure for the evolutionary conserved primate cytomegalovirus IE1 proteins. We show that IE1 consists of a globular core (IE1CORE) flanked by intrinsically disordered regions. The 2.3 Å crystal structure of IE1CORE displays an all α-helical, femur-shaped fold, which lacks overall fold similarity with known protein structures, but shares secondary structure features recently observed in the coiled-coil domain of TRIM proteins. Yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that IE1CORE binds efficiently to the TRIM family member PML, and is able to induce PML deSUMOylation. Intriguingly, this results in the release of NB-associated proteins into the nucleoplasm, but not of PML itself. Importantly, we show that PML deSUMOylation by IE1CORE is sufficient to antagonize PML-NB-instituted intrinsic immunity. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that IE1CORE binds via the coiled-coil domain to PML and also interacts with TRIM5α We propose that IE1CORE sequesters PML and possibly other TRIM family members via structural mimicry using an extended binding surface formed by the coiled-coil region. This mode of interaction might render the antagonizing activity less susceptible to

  19. Identification of proteins in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) particles: the HCMV proteome.

    PubMed

    Varnum, Susan M; Streblow, Daniel N; Monroe, Matthew E; Smith, Patricia; Auberry, Kenneth J; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Wang, Dai; Camp, David G; Rodland, Karin; Wiley, Steven; Britt, William; Shenk, Thomas; Smith, Richard D; Nelson, Jay A

    2004-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a member of the herpesvirus family, is a large complex enveloped virus composed of both viral and cellular gene products. While the sequence of the HCMV genome has been known for over a decade, the full set of viral and cellular proteins that compose the HCMV virion are unknown. To approach this problem we have utilized gel-free two-dimensional capillary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance MS to identify and determine the relative abundances of viral and cellular proteins in purified HCMV AD169 virions and dense bodies. Analysis of the proteins from purified HCMV virion preparations has indicated that the particle contains significantly more viral proteins than previously known. In this study, we identified 71 HCMV-encoded proteins that included 12 proteins encoded by known viral open reading frames (ORFs) previously not associated with virions and 12 proteins from novel viral ORFs. Analysis of the relative abundance of HCMV proteins indicated that the predominant virion protein was the pp65 tegument protein and that gM rather than gB was the most abundant glycoprotein. We have also identified over 70 host cellular proteins in HCMV virions, which include cellular structural proteins, enzymes, and chaperones. In addition, analysis of HCMV dense bodies indicated that these viral particles are composed of 29 viral proteins with a reduced quantity of cellular proteins in comparison to HCMV virions. This study provides the first comprehensive quantitative analysis of the viral and cellular proteins that compose infectious particles of a large complex virus.

  20. Identification of Proteins in Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Particles: the HCMV Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Patricia; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Wang, Dai; Camp, David G.; Rodland, Karin D.; Wiley, H S.; Britt, William; Shenk, Thomas; Smith, Richard D.; Nelson, Jay

    2004-10-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a member of the herpes virus family, is a large complex enveloped virus composed of both viral and cellular gene products. While the sequence of the HCMV genome has been known for over a decade, the full set of viral and cellular proteins that compose the HCMV virion are unknown. To approach this problem we have utilized gel-free two-dimensional capillary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance MS to identify and determine the relative abundances of viral and cellular proteins in purified HCMV AD169 virions and dense bodies. Analysis of the proteins from purified HCMV virion preparations has indicated that the particle contains significantly more viral proteins than previously known. In this study, we identified 71 HCMV-encoded proteins that included 12 proteins encoded by known viral open reading frames (ORFs) previously not associated with virions and 12 proteins from novel viral ORFs. Analysis of the relative abundance of HCMV proteins indicated that the predominant virion protein was the pp65 tegument protein and that gM rather than gB was the most abundant glycoprotein. We have also identified over 70 host cellular proteins in HCMV virions, which include cellular structural proteins, enzymes, and chaperones. In addition, analysis of HCMV dense bodies indicated that these viral particles are composed of 29 viral proteins with a reduced quantity of cellular proteins in comparison to HCMV virions. This study provides the first comprehensive quantitative analysis of the viral and cellular proteins that compose infectious particles of a large complex virus.

  1. The Human Cytomegalovirus IE1 Protein Antagonizes PML Nuclear Body-Mediated Intrinsic Immunity via the Inhibition of PML De Novo SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Eva-Maria; Scherer, Myriam; Reuter, Nina; Schweininger, Johannes; Muller, Yves A; Stamminger, Thomas

    2017-02-15

    PML nuclear bodies (NBs) are accumulations of cellular proteins embedded in a scaffold-like structure built by SUMO-modified PML/TRIM19. PML and other NB proteins act as cellular restriction factors against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV); however, this intrinsic defense is counteracted by the immediate early protein 1 (IE1) of HCMV. IE1 directly interacts with the PML coiled-coil domain via its globular core region and disrupts NB foci by inducing a loss of PML SUMOylation. Here, we demonstrate that IE1 acts via abrogating the de novo SUMOylation of PML. In order to overcome reversible SUMOylation dynamics, we made use of a cell-based assay that combines inducible IE1 expression with a SUMO mutant resistant to SUMO proteases. Interestingly, we observed that IE1 expression did not affect preSUMOylated PML; however, it clearly prevented de novo SUMO conjugation. Consistent results were obtained by in vitro SUMOylation assays, demonstrating that IE1 alone is sufficient for this effect. Furthermore, IE1 acts in a selective manner, since K160 was identified as the main target lysine. This is strengthened by the fact that IE1 also prevents As2O3-mediated hyperSUMOylation of K160, thereby blocking PML degradation. Since IE1 did not interfere with coiled-coil-mediated PML dimerization, we propose that IE1 affects PML autoSUMOylation either by directly abrogating PML E3 ligase function or by preventing access to SUMO sites. Thus, our data suggest a novel mechanism for how a viral protein counteracts a cellular restriction factor by selectively preventing the de novo SUMOylation at specific lysine residues without affecting global protein SUMOylation. The human cytomegalovirus IE1 protein acts as an important antagonist of a cellular restriction mechanism that is mediated by subnuclear structures termed PML nuclear bodies. This function of IE1 is required for efficient viral replication and thus constitutes a potential target for antiviral strategies. In this paper, we further

  2. Binding STAT2 by the acidic domain of human cytomegalovirus IE1 promotes viral growth and is negatively regulated by SUMO.

    PubMed

    Huh, Yong Ho; Kim, Young Eui; Kim, Eui Tae; Park, Jung Jin; Song, Moon Jung; Zhu, Hua; Hayward, Gary S; Ahn, Jin-Hyun

    2008-11-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) 72-kDa immediate-early 1 (IE1) protein is thought to modulate cellular antiviral functions impacting on promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling. IE1 consists of four distinct regions: an amino-terminal region required for nuclear localization, a large central hydrophobic region responsible for PML targeting and transactivation activity, an acidic domain, and a carboxyl-terminal chromatin tethering domain. We found that the acidic domain of IE1 is required for binding to STAT2. A mutant HCMV encoding IE1(Delta421-475) with the acidic domain deleted was generated. In mutant virus-infected cells, IE1(Delta421-475) failed to bind to STAT2. The growth of mutant virus was only slightly delayed at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI) but was severely impaired at a low MOI with low-level accumulation of viral proteins. When cells were pretreated with beta interferon, the mutant virus showed an additional 1,000-fold reduction in viral growth, even at a high MOI, compared to the wild type. The inhibition of STAT2 loading on the target promoter upon infection was markedly reduced with mutant virus. Furthermore, sumoylation of IE1 at this acidic domain was found to abolish the activity of IE1 to bind to STAT2 and repress the interferon-stimulated genes. Our results provide genetic evidence that IE1 binding to STAT2 requires the 55-amino-acid acidic domain and promotes viral growth by interfering with interferon signaling and demonstrate that this viral activity is negatively regulated by a cellular sumoylation pathway.

  3. Lymphoproliferative response in primary human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is delayed in HCMV transmitter mothers.

    PubMed

    Revello, Maria Grazia; Lilleri, Daniele; Zavattoni, Maurizio; Furione, Milena; Genini, Emilia; Comolli, Giuditta; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2006-01-15

    The T cell-mediated immune response to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) after primary infection, as well as the determinants of intrauterine transmission, are poorly understood. Sequential peripheral blood leukocyte samples from 74 pregnant women and 29 nonpregnant individuals with primary infection were examined for HCMV-specific CD4+ T cells by cytokine flow cytometry (CFC) and lymphoproliferative response (LPR) analysis. Immunological results for 19 transmitter and 21 nontransmitter mothers were compared. Comparison of CFC and LPR analysis results showed that (1) there was no difference between pregnant and nonpregnant individuals; (2) HCMV-specific CD4+ T cells were detected by CFC, in the absence of an LPR to HCMV, in the great majority or the totality (according to different intervals) of samples collected from both pregnant and nonpregnant individuals during follow-up; and (3) LPR to HCMV was significantly (P<.001) lowered or delayed in transmitter mothers, compared with that in nontransmitter mothers. Pregnancy does not influence the HCMV-specific immune response. A dissociation between CFC response and LPR is commonly observed in patients with primary infections, and ad hoc studies aimed at understanding the mechanism(s) of the reduced LPR in transmitter mothers are warranted.

  4. Analysis of the CoIE1 stability determinant Rcd.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, M E; Chatwin, H M; Macpherson, C; Withers, H L; Summers, D K

    1999-08-01

    Multimer formation is an important cause of instability for many multicopy plasmids. Plasmid CoIE1 is maintained stably because multimers are converted to monomers by Xer-mediated site-specific recombination at the cer site. However, multimer resolution is not the whole story; inactivation of a promoter (Pcer) within cer causes plasmid instability even though recombination is unaffected. The promoter directs the synthesis of a short transcript (Rcd) which is proposed to delay the division of multimer-containing cells. Mapping of the 5' terminus of Rcd confirms that transcription initiates from Pcer. The 3' terminus shows considerable heterogeneity, consistent with a primary transcript of 95 nt being degraded via intermediates of 79 and 70 nt. Secondary structure predictions for Rcd are presented. Of four mutations which abolish Rcd-mediated growth inhibition, one reduces the activity of Pcer while the other three map to the rcd coding sequence and reduce the steady-state level of the transcript. RNA folding analysis suggests that these three mutant transcripts adopt a common secondary structure in which the major stem-loop differs from that of wild-type Rcd. A survey of 24 cer-like multimer resolution sites revealed six which contain Pcer-like sequences. The putative transcripts from these sites have similar predicted secondary structures to Rcd and contain a highly conserved 15 base sequence. To test the hypothesis that Rcd acts as an anti-sense RNA, interacting with its target gene(s) through the 15 nt sequence, we used DNA hybridization and sequence analysis to find matches to this sequence in the Escherichia coli chromosome. Our failure to find plausible anti-sense targets has led to the suggestion that Rcd may interact directly with a protein target.

  5. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate-early enhancer/promoter specificity during embryogenesis defines target tissues of congenital HCMV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Koedood, M; Fichtel, A; Meier, P; Mitchell, P J

    1995-01-01

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is a common cause of deafness and neurological disabilities. Many aspects of this prenatal infection, including which cell types are infected and how infection proceeds, are poorly understood. Transcription of HCMV immediate-early (IE) genes is required for expression of all other HCMV genes and is dependent on host cell transcription factors. Cell type-specific differences in levels of IE transcription are believed to underlie differences in infection permissivity. However, DNA transfection experiments have paradoxically suggested that the HCMV major IE enhancer/promoter is a broadly active transcriptional element with little cell type specificity. In contrast, we show here that expression of a lacZ gene driven by the HCMV major IE enhancer/promoter -524 to +13 segment is restricted in transgenic mouse embryos to sites that correlate with known sites of congenital HCMV infection in human fetuses. This finding suggests that the IE enhancer/promoter is a major determinant of HCMV infection sites in humans and that transcription factors responsible for its regulation are cell type-specifically conserved between humans and mice. The lacZ expression patterns of these transgenic embryos yield insight into congenital HCMV pathogenesis by providing a spatiotemporal map of the sets of vascular, neural, and epithelial cells that are likely targets of infection. These transgenic mice may constitute a useful model system for investigating IE enhancer/promoter regulation in vivo and for identifying factors that modulate active and latent HCMV infections in humans. PMID:7884867

  6. A Model for HCMV Infection in Immunosuppressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kepler, G.M.; Banks, H.T.; Davidian, M.; Rosenberg, E.S.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a model for HCMV infection in healthy and immunosuppressed patients. First, we present the biological model and formulate a system of ordinary differential equations to describe the pathogenesis of primary HCMV infection in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed individuals. We then investigate how clinical data can be applied to this model. Approximate parameter values for the model are derived from data available in the literature and from mathematical and physiological considerations. Simulations with the approximated parameter values demonstrates that the model is capable of describing primary, latent, and secondary (reactivated) HCMV infection. Reactivation simulations with this model provide a window into the dynamics of HCMV infection in (D-R+) transplant situations, where latently-infected recipients (R+) receive transplant tissue from HCMV-naive donors (D-). PMID:20161307

  7. Vaccine Properties of a Novel Marker Gene-Free Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Ankara Expressing Immunodominant CMV Antigens pp65 and IE1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongde; La Rosa, Corinna; Li, Zhongqi; Ly, Heang; Krishnan, Aparna; Martinez, Joy; Britt, William J.; Diamond, Don

    2007-01-01

    CMV tegument protein pp65 and CMV immediate early gene product IE1 are both considered immunodominant targets of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and potentially capable of controlling CMV infection. To better assess their role in host defense, we have constructed a novel MVA transfer vector named pZWIIA and generated a recombinant MVA (rMVA) expressing both full-length pp65 and exon4 of IE1 (pp65-IE1-MVA) at high levels, followed by the genetic removal of the bacterial marker gene used to distinguish recombinant forms. Immunogenicity evaluation indicates that pp65-IE1-MVA not only can induce robust primary CMI to both antigens in HLA A2.1 Tg mice, but also can stimulate vigorous expansion of memory T lymphocyte responses to pp65 and IE1 in PBMC of CMV-positive donors. These properties make the MVA-based vaccine ideal for the dual role of priming and boosting CMV-specific T cell immunity as a means to control CMV disease in recipients of hematopoietic cell or solid organ transplantation (HCT or SOT). pZWIIA alone or in combination with other MVA transfer vectors can be used to generate MVA based multiple-antigen vaccine which have application in vaccine development for a wide spectrum of infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:17049414

  8. Immediate-Early (IE) gene regulation of cytomegalovirus: IE1- and pp71-mediated viral strategies against cellular defenses.

    PubMed

    Torres, Lilith; Tang, Qiyi

    2014-12-01

    Three crucial hurdles hinder studies on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV): strict species specificity, differences between in vivo and in vitro infection, and the complexity of gene regulation. Ever since the sequencing of the whole genome was first accomplished, functional studies on individual genes have been the mainstream in the CMV field. Gene regulation has therefore been elucidated in a more detailed fashion. However, viral gene regulation is largely controlled by both cellular and viral components. In other words, viral gene expression is determined by the virus-host interaction. Generally, cells respond to viral infection in a defensive pattern; at the same time, viruses try to counteract the cellular defense or else hide in the host (latency). Viruses evolve effective strategies against cellular defense in order to achieve replicative success. Whether or not they are successful, cellular defenses remain in the whole viral replication cycle: entry, immediate-early (IE) gene expression, early gene expression, DNA replication, late gene expression, and viral egress. Many viral strategies against cellular defense, and which occur in the immediate-early time of viral infection, have been documented. In this review, we will summarize the documented biological functions of IE1 and pp71 proteins, especially with regard to how they counteract cellular intrinsic defenses.

  9. Immediate–Early (IE) gene regulation of cytomegalovirus: IE1- and pp71-mediated viral strategies against cellular defenses

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Lilith; Tang, Qiyi

    2015-01-01

    Three crucial hurdles hinder studies on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV): strict species specificity, differences between in vivo and in vitro infection, and the complexity of gene regulation. Ever since the sequencing of the whole genome was first accomplished, functional studies on individual genes have been the mainstream in the CMV field. Gene regulation has therefore been elucidated in a more detailed fashion. However, viral gene regulation is largely controlled by both cellular and viral components. In other words, viral gene expression is determined by the virus–host interaction. Generally, cells respond to viral infection in a defensive pattern; at the same time, viruses try to counteract the cellular defense or else hide in the host (latency). Viruses evolve effective strategies against cellular defense in order to achieve replicative success. Whether or not they are successful, cellular defenses remain in the whole viral replication cycle: entry, immediate–early (IE) gene expression, early gene expression, DNA replication, late gene expression, and viral egress. Many viral strategies against cellular defense, and which occur in the immediate–early time of viral infection, have been documented. In this review, we will summarize the documented biological functions of IE1 and pp71 proteins, especially with regard to how they counteract cellular intrinsic defenses. PMID:25501994

  10. Modification of the HCMV-specific IFN-γ release test (QuantiFERON-CMV) and a novel proposal for its application.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takahiro; Sato, Jun-Ichi; Ikuta, Kazufumi; Kanno, Ryoko; Nishiyama, Kyoko; Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Ishioka, Ken; Suzutani, Tatsuo

    2017-08-09

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is universally distributed among humans without any adverse effects; however, it induces severe diseases in immunocompromised patients such as organ transplant recipients and AIDS patients. To manage these immunocompromised patients, an easy clinical examination for the monitoring of disease risk is required. In this study, we modified the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release test (QuantiFERON(®)-CMV) using HCMV immediate early-1 (IE-1) or pp65 whole proteins, or UV-inactivated HCMV particles as an antigen. The response of heparinized peripheral blood from healthy volunteers to the pp65 protein showed an obvious dose-dependent sigmoid curve, although no correlation was observed between results of this assay and an ELISPOT assay. The addition of pp65 to the blood samples at a final concentration of 1×10(3) to 1×10(5) pg/ml was found to be optimum. Using this assay, we observed a significant enhancement in cellular immunity in volunteers after the daily ingestion of yogurt for 8 weeks, which suggested a novel application of the assay in addition to monitoring HCMV infection risk. IFN-γ secretion from peripheral blood cells on HCMV-antigen stimulation differed significantly between individuals; therefore, the assay could not be normalized. Nevertheless, it was found to be particularly useful for observing fluctuations in cellular immune activity on an individual level.

  11. Identification of a tyrosinase (TYR) exon 4 deletion in albino ferrets (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Blaszczyk, W M; Distler, C; Dekomien, G; Arning, L; Hoffmann, K-P; Epplen, J T

    2007-08-01

    Albinism is due to a lack of pigmentation in hair, skin and eye, and has been shown to occur in several animal species. Mutations of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene account for albinism in domestic cats, rabbits, cattle, mice and rats. In this study, we demonstrate that a TYR mutation accounts for albinism in the ferret (Mustela putorius furo). The coding sequence of the five exons of TYR was determined in genomic DNA from wild-type pigmented 'sable' coloured and albino ferrets. It was not possible to amplify TYR exon 4 in albino ferrets originating from different breeds. The deletion of exon 4 in albino ferrets was confirmed by Southern blot hybridization of genomic DNA from albino and pigmented ferrets. This is the first report of a deletion of a TYR exon in a non-human mammal.

  12. Defining the ends of Parkin exon 4 deletions in two different families with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Clarimon, Jordi; Johnson, Janel; Dogu, Okan; Horta, Wagner; Khan, Naheed; Lees, Andrew J; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew

    2005-02-05

    Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP, PARK2) is characterized by an early onset parkinsonism, often presenting with dystonia as an early feature. Mutations in Parkin are a relatively common cause of AR-JP and are estimated to be present in approximately 30% of familial young onset Parkinson disease (PD) [Abbas et al. (1999); Hum Mol Genet 8:567-574]. These mutations include exon rearrangements (deletions and duplications), point mutations, and small deletions. Similar genomic mutations have been described in unrelated patients, thereby indicating independent mutational events or ancient founder effects. We have identified homozygous deletion mutations of exon 4 in Parkin in two unrelated families, one from Brazil and the other from Turkey [Dogu et al. (2004); Mov Dis 9:812-816; Khan et al., Mov Dis, in press]. We have performed molecular analysis of the deletion breakpoints and this data indicates these mutations originated independently. We present here data demonstrating that the mutation responsible for disease in the Brazilian kindred consists of two separate deletions (1,069 and 1,750 bp) surrounding and including exon 4. The deletion removing parkin exon 4 identified in the Turkish family extended 156,203 bp. In addition to demonstrating that disease in these families is not caused by a single founder mutation, these data show that there is no common fragile site between these mutational events.

  13. Circulating endothelial giant cells permissive for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are detected in disseminated HCMV infections with organ involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Percivalle, E; Revello, M G; Vago, L; Morini, F; Gerna, G

    1993-01-01

    Giant cells fully permissive for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) were found to circulate, at a variable proportion, in peripheral blood of 21 out of 25 immunocompromised patients with disseminated HCMV infection. Circulating endothelial giant cells (EGC) were identified by a specific monoclonal antibody of endothelial origin and shown to express immediate-early, early, and late viral proteins. Immunostaining patterns of different viral proteins were comparable to those detected in vitro in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. EGC counts > 10 were associated with high levels (> 100) of HCMV viremia and antigenemia, as well as with an overt clinical syndrome in transplanted patients, and to an untreated long lasting organ localization in AIDS patients. On the other hand, EGC counts were < 10 during disseminated HCMV infections of both transplant recipients with no apparent organ syndrome and AIDS patients with recent organ involvement. In tissue sections from AIDS patients, infected endothelial cells were found to progressively enlarge till detaching from the small vessel wall and entering blood stream. HCMV-infected EGC represent a new systemic parameter suitable for the diagnosis of HCMV organ involvement and for the study of the pathogenesis of disseminated infections. Images PMID:8394385

  14. Alternative splicing of Wilms tumor suppressor 1 (Wt1) exon 4 results in protein isoforms with different functions.

    PubMed

    Schnerwitzki, Danny; Perner, Birgit; Hoppe, Beate; Pietsch, Stefan; Mehringer, Rebecca; Hänel, Frank; Englert, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    The Wilms tumor suppressor gene Wt1 encodes a zinc finger transcription factor that is essential for development of multiple organs including kidneys, gonads, spleen and heart. In mammals Wt1 comprises 10 exons with two characteristic splicing events: inclusion or skipping of exon 5 and alternative usage of two splice donor sites between exons 9 and 10. Most fish including zebrafish and medaka possess two wt1 paralogs, wt1a and wt1b, both lacking exon 5. Here we have characterized wt1 in guppy, platyfish and the short-lived African killifish Nothobranchius furzeri. All fish except zebrafish show alternative splicing of exon 4 of wt1a but not of wt1b with the wt1a(-exon 4) isoform being the predominant splice variant. With regard to function, Wt1a(+exon 4) showed less dimerization but stimulated transcription more effectively than the Wt1a(-exon 4) isoform. A specific knockdown of wt1a exon 4 in zebrafish was associated with anomalies in kidney development demonstrating a physiological function for Wt1a exon 4. Interestingly, alternative splicing of exon 4 seems to be an early evolutionary event as it is observed in the single wt1 gene of the sturgeon, a species that has not gone through teleost-specific genome duplication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. hnRNP F directs formation of an exon 4 minus variant of tumor-associated NADH oxidase (ENOX2).

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Kane, Vanessa D; Morré, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2011-11-01

    HUVEC or mouse 3T3 cells infected with SV-40 generate within 3 to 5 days post-infection an ENOX2 species corresponding to the exon-4 minus splice variant of a tumor-associated NADH oxidase (ENOX2 or tNOX) expressed at the cancer cell surface. This study was to seek evidence for splicing factors that might direct formation of the exon 4 minus ENOX2 splice variant. To determine if silencing of ENOX2 exon 4 occurs because of motifs located in exon 4, transfections were performed on MCF-10A (mammary non-cancer), BT-20 (mammary cancer), and HeLa (cervical cancer) cells using a GFP minigene construct containing either a constitutively spliced exon (albumin exon 2) or the alternatively spliced ENOX2 exon 4 between the two GFP halves. Removal of exon 4 from the processed RNA of the GFP minigene construct occurred with HeLa and to a lesser extent with BT-20 but not in non-cancer MCF-10A cells. The Splicing Rainbow Program was used to identify all of the possible hnRNPs binding sites of exon 4 of ENOX2. There are 8 Exonic Splicing Silencers (ESSs) for hnRNP binding in the exon 4 sequences. Each of these sites were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis to test if any were responsible for the splicing skip. Results showed MutG75 ESS mutation changed the GFP expression which is a sign of splicing silence, while other mutations did not. As MutG75 changed the ESS binding site for hnRNP F, this result suggests that hnRNP F directs formation of the exon 4 minus variant of ENOX2.

  16. HHEX: A Crosstalker between HCMV Infection and Proliferation of VSMCs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lingfang; Liu, Meitong; Kang, Leitao; Li, Yifan; Dai, Ziyu; Wang, Bing; Liu, Shuiping; Chen, Liyu; Tan, Yurong; Wu, Guojun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The study was designed to evaluate the role of Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection on homebox (HOX) gene expression and the effects of overexpression of HOX genes on proliferation and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Methods: Viral infection was verified by observation of cytopathic effects through inverted microscopy, viral particles by electron microscopy and HCMV IE gene amplification by RT-PCR. cDNA profiling technology was used to screen expression of HOX genes after HCMV infection in VSMCs. Abnormal expression of Haematopoietically-expressed homeobox (HHEX) was selected to construct over-expressed vector and transfected into VSMCs. The effects of over expression of HHEX on cell proliferation and apoptosis of VSMCs were assayed by flow cytometry. Apoptosis and proliferation-associated genes were also assayed by RT-PCR. Results: Multiple HOX gene expression levels had obvious changes after HCMV infection, among which expression of HHEX gene increased obviously at 24, 48, and 72 h after infection. Over expression of HHEX can promote VSMCs proliferation by promoting G0/G1 phase cells into S phase and inhibit VSMCs apoptosis. HHEX inhibited the expression of apoptosis-associated caspase 2 and caspase3 and promoted the expression of cell cycle-related genes such as CDK2 and CDK6, CyclinB2 and CyclinD2. Conclusion: HHEX over expression induced by HCMV infection closely associated with vascular proliferative diseases. PMID:27965937

  17. DNA repair mechanisms and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection.

    PubMed

    Smolarz, Beata; Wilczyński, Jan; Nowakowska, Dorota

    2015-05-01

    Herpesvirus infections, such as those induced by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), induce specific DNA damages. DNA damages can lead to cell mutation, death, apoptosis and immune system activation. Various types of DNA damage are repaired through multiple repair pathways, such as base excision, nucleotide excision, homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining. Changes in the activity of DNA repair proteins during viral infection can cause disturbances in the DNA repair system and change its mechanisms. This report reviews results from studies, assaying a DNA repair system in HCMV infection.

  18. Human cytomegalovirus hyperimmune globulin not only neutralizes HCMV infectivity, but also inhibits HCMV-induced intracellular NF-kappaB, Sp1, and PI3-K signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Andreoni, Kenneth A; Wang, Xin; Huang, Shu-Mei; Huang, Eng-Shang

    2002-05-01

    Inhibition of virus-induced intracellular signaling pathways and viral infectivity are our ultimate goals in the development of effective antiviral agents to control human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. The HCMV hyperimmune globulin may meet such criteria. In a human embryonic lung (HEL) fibroblast culture model, pretreatment of Towne strain HCMV with HCMV hyperimmune globulin was shown to inhibit viral infectivity successfully, as measured by a standard plaque assay. The extracellular viral titers and extracellular viral DNA, as measured by plaque assay and PCR, respectively, were also decreased. In addition, the HCMV hyperimmune globulin prevented HCMV from inducing the intracellular activation of NF-kappaB, Sp-1, and PI3-K signaling pathways. The PI3-K pathway was examined by following phosphorylation (activation) of two of its downstream kinases, Akt and p70S6K. HCMV hyperimmune globulin also prevented the production of immediate early, early, and late viral proteins. These studies show that HCMV hyperimmune globulin neutralization of HCMV prevents the earliest known events observed after viral envelope glycoproteins bind their cell membrane receptors, i.e., NF-kappaB, Sp-1 and PI3-K activation. This suggests that HCMV hyperimmune globulin not only can inhibit viral infectivity, but can also prevent the abnormal cellular signaling that may induce unwanted cellular proliferation or cytokine synthesis. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. CMV pp65 and IE-1 T cell epitopes recognized by healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Slezak, Stefanie L; Bettinotti, Maria; Selleri, Silvia; Adams, Sharon; Marincola, Francesco M; Stroncek, David F

    2007-03-28

    Adoptive immune and vaccine therapies have been used to prevent cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease in recipients of hematopoietic progenitor cell transplants, but the nature of T cell responses to CMV have not been completely characterized. Peptide pools and individual peptides derived from the immune-dominant CMV proteins pp65 and IE-1 and antigen-specific, cytokine flow cytometry were used to characterize the prevalence and frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ memory T cells in 20 healthy CMV-seropositive subjects. CD8+ T cell responses to pp65 were detected in 35% of subjects and to IE-1 in 40% of subjects. CD4+ T cell responses to pp65 were detected in 50% of subjects, but none were detected to IE-1. Several new IE-1 HLA class I epitopes were identified, including 4 restricted to HLA-C antigens. One region of IE-1 spanning amino acids 300 to 327 was rich in class I epitopes. The HLA class I restrictions of IE-1 peptides were more promiscuous than those of pp65 peptides. Since naturally occurring CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to pp65 were detectable in many subjects, but only CD8+ T cell responses to IE-1 were detected, pp65 may be better than IE-1 for use in vaccine and adoptive immune therapies.

  20. Baculoviruses deficient in ie1 gene function abrogate viral gene expression in transduced mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Efrose, Rodica; Swevers, Luc; Iatrou, Kostas

    2010-10-25

    One of the newest niches for baculoviruses-based technologies is their use as vectors for mammalian cell transduction and gene therapy applications. However, an outstanding safety issue related to such use is the residual expression of viral genes in infected mammalian cells. Here we show that infectious baculoviruses lacking the major transcriptional regulator, IE1, can be produced in insect host cells stably transformed with IE1 expression constructs lacking targets of homologous recombination that could promote the generation of wt-like revertants. Such ie1-deficient baculoviruses are unable to direct viral gene transcription to any appreciable degree and do not replicate in normal insect host cells. Most importantly, the residual viral gene expression, which occurs in mammalian cells infected with wt baculoviruses is reduced 10 to 100 fold in cells infected with ie1-deficient baculoviruses. Thus, ie1-deficient baculoviruses offer enhanced safety features to baculovirus-based vector systems destined for use in gene therapy applications.

  1. Identification and characterization of a putative baculoviral transcriptional factor IE-1 from Choristoneura fumiferana granulovirus.

    PubMed

    Rashidan, Kianoush Khajeh; Nassoury, Nasha; Merzouki, Abderrazzak; Guertin, Claude

    2002-11-30

    A gene that encodes a protein homologue to baculoviral IE-1 was identified and sequenced in the genome of the Choristoneura fumiferana granulovirus (ChfuGV). The gene has an 1278 nucleotide (nt) open-reading frame (ORF) that encodes 426 amino acids with an estimated molecular weight of 50.33 kDa. At the nucleotide level, several cis-acting regulatory elements were detected within the promoter region of the ie-1 gene of ChfuGV along with other studied granuloviruses (GVs). Two putative CCAAT elements were detected within the noncoding leader region of this gene; one was located on the opposite strand at -92 and the other at -420 nt from the putative start triplet. Two baculoviral late promoter motifs (TAAG) were also detected within the promoter region of the ie-1 gene of ChfuGV. A single polyadenylation signal, AATAAA, was located 18nt downstream of the putative translational stop codon of ie-1 from ChfuGV. At the protein level, the amino acid sequence data that was derived from the nucleotide sequence in ChfuGV IE-1 was compared to those of the Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV), Xestia c-nigrum granulovirus (XcGV) and Plutella xylostella granulovirus (PxGV). The C-terminal regions of the granuloviral IE-1 sequences appeared to be more conserved when compared to the N-terminal regions. A domain, similar to the basic helix-loop-helix like (bHLH-like) domain in NPVs, was detected at the C-terminal region of IE-1 from ChfuGV (residues 387 to 414). A phylogenetic tree for baculoviral IE-1 was constructed using a maximum parsimony analysis. A phylogenetic estimation demonstrates that ChfuGV IE-1 is most closely related to that of CpGV.

  2. Molecular Genetic Analysis of a Suprasellar Immature Teratoma : Mutation of Exon 4 P53 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Udin, Nujaimin; Ahmad, Ku Asmarina Ku; Ahmad, Farizan; Omar, Effat; Aziz, Mohd Ezanee; Kumar, Raj; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2008-01-01

    We described an intracranial immature teratoma in a 13 year old Malay boy who presented with history of chronic headache and blurring of vision. Physical findings revealed bilateral papilloedema but no other localizing sign. A Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the brain revealed a suprasellar well defined lobulated midline heterogenous mass which was intraoperatively described as mainly solid tumour with multiple small cystic component filled with yellowish jelly like material. Histopathological finding confirmed the case as immature teratoma. Molecular genetic analysis of p53 and p27 genes revealed substitution of nucleotide G to C at location nucleotide 12139, exon 4 of gene p53. No alteration was detected at exon 5–6 and 8 of p53 gene and exon 1 and 2 of p27 gene. This is the first case report of an intracranial immature teratoma with genetic mutation occuring in a Malay boy. PMID:22589625

  3. Human cytomegalovirus latency-associated protein LUNA is expressed during HCMV infections in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bego, Mariana G; Keyes, Lisa R; Maciejewski, Jarek; St Jeor, Stephen C

    2011-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency is poorly understood. We previously described a novel HCMV latency-associated transcript, UL81-82ast, coding for a protein designated LUNA (latency unique natural antigen). The aim of this study was to confirm the presence of LUNA in HCMV-seropositive donors. Standard co-immunoprecipitation and ELISA assays were used to detect antibodies against the LUNA protein in the sera of HCMV-seropositive donors. Specific antibodies against LUNA were detected in all HCMV-seropositive donors but in none of the seronegative donors. These data confirm that LUNA is expressed during in vivo infections and is capable of eliciting an immune response.

  4. 11 CFR 300.60 - Scope (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Scope (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)). 300.60 Section 300.60 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002-(BCRA) REGULATIONS NON-FEDERAL FUNDS Federal Candidates and Officeholders § 300.60 Scope (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)). This...

  5. 11 CFR 300.60 - Scope (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Scope (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)). 300.60 Section 300.60 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002-(BCRA) REGULATIONS NON-FEDERAL FUNDS Federal Candidates and Officeholders § 300.60 Scope (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)). This...

  6. 11 CFR 300.60 - Scope (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Scope (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)). 300.60 Section 300.60 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002-(BCRA) REGULATIONS NON-FEDERAL FUNDS Federal Candidates and Officeholders § 300.60 Scope (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)). This...

  7. Analysis of the Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus ie-1 promoter in insect, mammalian, plant, and bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Ryosuke; Ono, Chikako; Ono, Isamu; Asano, Shin-Ichiro; Bando, Hisanori

    2015-09-04

    The Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) ie-1 promoter exhibits strong transcriptional activity and is used in transient foreign gene expression systems in insect cells. In a reporter assay experiment using the BmNPV ie-1 promoter, we found that it exhibited activity even in non-host mammalian BHK cells, plant BY-2 cells, and also bacterial Escherichia coli cells. An analysis using a deletion series of the BmNPV ie-1 promoter demonstrated that the core promoter region of this promoter was sufficient to display promoter activity in BHK cells, BY-2 cells, and E. coli cells, whereas upstream elements were required for higher activity in insect cells. Furthermore, we found that the BmNPV ie-1 promoter exhibited sufficient activity for a β-galactosidase assay in E. coli cells. The results obtained here suggest that the BmNPV ie-1 promoter has potential as a universal promoter for transient expression systems in insect, mammalian, plant, and bacterial cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Further genotype-phenotype correlation emerging from two families with PLP1 exon 4 skipping.

    PubMed

    Biancheri, Roberta; Grossi, Serena; Regis, Stefano; Rossi, Andrea; Corsolini, Fabio; Rossi, Daniela Paola; Cavalli, Pietro; Severino, Mariasavina; Filocamo, Mirella

    2014-03-01

    Proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1) gene-related disorders due to mutations in the PLP1 include a wide spectrum of X-linked disorders ranging from severe connatal Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) to spastic paraplegia 2 (SPG2). Duplications, deletions or point mutations in coding and noncoding regions of the PLP1 gene may occur. We report the clinical, neuroradiologic and molecular findings in six patients from two unrelated families. The affected males showed severe mental retardation, spastic tetraparesis, inability of walking and pes cavus at onset in early infancy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hypomyelination and brain atrophy. Nystagmus was never observed. The affected females showed adult-onset progressive spastic paraparesis leading to wheel-chair dependency and subtle white matter changes on brain MRI. Molecular studies in the two families identified two different intronic mutations, the novel c.622+2T>C and the known c.622+1G>A, leading to the skipping of PLP1-exon 4. The clinical presentation of the affected males did not consistently fit in any of the PLP1-related disorder subtypes (i.e., connatal or classic PMD, SPG2 and 'PLP1 null syndrome'), and in addition, the carrier females were symptomatic despite the severe clinical picture of their respective probands. This study provides new insight into the genotype-phenotype correlations of patients with PLP1 splice-site mutations.

  9. HCMV infection of humanized mice after transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells from HCMV-seropositive donors.

    PubMed

    Hakki, Morgan; Goldman, Devorah C; Streblow, Daniel N; Hamlin, Kimberly L; Krekylwich, Craig N; Fleming, William H; Nelson, Jay A

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, including primary infection resulting from transmission from a seropositive donor to a seronegative recipient (D(+)/R(-)), remains a significant problem in the setting of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). The lack of a suitable animal model for studying HCMV transmission after PBSCT is a major barrier to understanding this process and, consequently, developing novel interventions to prevent HCMV infection. Our previous work demonstrated that human CD34(+) progenitor cell-engrafted NOD-scid IL2Rγc(null) (NSG) mice support latent HCMV infection after direct inoculation and reactivation after treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. To more accurately recapitulate HCMV infection in the D(+)/R(-) PBSCT setting, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells from seropositive donors were used to engraft NSG mice. All recipient mice demonstrated evidence of HCMV infection in liver, spleen, and bone marrow. These findings validate the NSG mouse model for studying HCMV transmission during PBSCT.

  10. PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase is necessary for lipogenic activation during HCMV infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongjun; Pierciey, Francis J; Maguire, Tobi G; Alwine, James C

    2013-01-01

    PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum (ER) kinase (PERK) is an ER-associated stress sensor protein which phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) to induce translation attenuation in response to ER stress. PERK is also a regulator of lipogenesis during adipocyte differentiation through activation of the cleavage of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1), resulting in the upregulation of lipogenic enzymes. Our recent studies have shown that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in human fibroblasts (HF) induces adipocyte-like lipogenesis through the activation of SREBP1. Here, we report that PERK expression is highly increased in HCMV-infected cells and is necessary for HCMV growth. Depletion of PERK, using short hairpin RNA (shRNA), resulted in attenuation of HCMV growth, inhibition of lipid synthesis and reduction of lipogenic gene expression. Examination of the cleavage of SREBP proteins showed PERK depletion inhibited the cleavage of SREBP1, but not SREBP2, in HCMV-infected cells, suggesting different cleavage regulatory mechanisms for SREBP1 and 2. Further studies showed that the depletion of SREBP1, but not SREBP2, reduced lipid synthesis in HCMV infection, suggesting that activation of SREBP1 is sufficient to induce lipogenesis in HCMV infection. The reduction of lipid synthesis by PERK depletion can be partially restored by expressing a Flag-tagged nuclear form of SREBP1a. Our studies also suggest that the induction of PERK in HCMV-infected cells stimulates SREBP1 cleavage by reducing levels of Insig1 (Insulin inducible gene 1) protein; this occurs independent of the phosphorylation of eIF2α. Introduction of an exogenous Insig1-Myc into HCMV infected cells significantly reduced HCMV growth and lipid synthesis. Our data demonstrate that the induction of PERK during HCMV infection is necessary for full activation of lipogenesis; this effect appears to be mediated by limiting the levels of Insig1 thus freeing SREBP1-SCAP complexes for

  11. Coding region variant 186H/R in Exon 4 of APOBEC3G among individuals of Western India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hariom; Marathe, Shruti; Nain, Sumitra; Nema, Vijay; Angadi, Mansa; Bapat, Shradha; Pawar, Jyoti; Ghate, Manisha; Sahay, Seema; Gangakhedkar, Raman R

    2016-05-01

    The allelic variations in the AIDS restriction genes have been associated with the acquisition of HIV-1 and its progression. The distribution of antiviral gene variants significantly differs between populations. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the distribution of variant allele of 186H/R in exon4 of APOBEC3G between HIV infected individuals and healthy controls among western Indian.In the present cross-sectional study, we enrolled a total of 153 HIV-infected patients confirmed and 156 unrelated healthy individuals. Polymorphism for 186H/R in exon4 of APOBEC3G gene was genotyped by PCR-RFLP. With the frequency of 186HR heterozygous genotype of APOBEC3G was found to be 13% in healthy controls and none in HIV infected cases. The frequency of 186HH common genotype of APOBEC3G was observed higher in HIV infected individuals compared with healthy controls (100% vs 91.7%). The variant genotype 186RR in APOBEC3G was not found in both the groups. The frequency of 186R allele of APOBEC3G was found 4.16% in healthy controls and nil in HIV-infected cases. The frequency of 186H allele of APOBEC3G was found to be higher in HIV-infected cases compared with healthy controls (100% vs 95.83%). The frequency of 186R allele in exon4 of APOBEC3G was found to be 4.16% in healthy controls. This observation differs from the previous report published from North India stating the absence of 186R allele of APOBEC3G in the North Indian individuals. The variant 186H/R in exon4 of APOBEC3G was neither associated with risk of acquisition of HIV-1 nor its progression.

  12. Placental pericytes and cytomegalovirus infectivity: Implications for HCMV placental pathology and congenital disease.

    PubMed

    Aronoff, David M; Correa, Hernan; Rogers, Lisa M; Arav-Boger, Ravit; Alcendor, Donald J

    2017-09-01

    Placental pericytes are essential for placental microvascular function, stability, and integrity. Mechanisms of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) pathogenesis incorporating placental pericytes are unknown. HCMV-infected placental tissue was stained by dual-labeled immunohistochemistry. Primary placental pericytes, cytotrophoblasts, and villous fibroblasts were exposed to HCMV; and infectivity was analyzed by microscopy and immunofluorescence. Cytokine expression was examined by Luminex assay. A HCMV-GFP recombinant virus was used to examine replication kinetics. Immunohistochemistry showed HCMV in trophoblast and the villous core with T-cell and macrophage infiltration. Primary HCMV isolate from a patient (SBCMV)- infected pericytes showed dysregulation of proinflammatory and angiogenic cytokines when compared to control cells. A tri-cell model of the villous floor showed a unique expression profile. Finally, we show pericytes infected in vivo with HCMV in placental tissue from a congenitally infected child. Placental pericytes support HCMV replication, inducing proinflammatory and angiogenic cytokines that likely contribute to viral dissemination, placenta inflammation, and dysregulation of placental angiogenesis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Polymorphism in exon 4 of TP53 gene associated to HPV 16 and 18 in Mexican women with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Hernández-Hernández, Dulce María; Taja-Chayeb, Lucia; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; González-Herrera, Ana Lilia; Rodea-Avila, Carlos; Apresa-García, Teresa; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Vázquez-Ortíz, Guelaguetza; Mendoza-Lorenzo, Patricia; Dueñas-González, Alfonso; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2011-12-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common cancer in Mexican women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is necessary but not sufficient for CC development. Furthermore, genetic factors as polymorphisms could be important susceptibility factors. Controversial results regarding TP53 polymorphisms specifically in codon 72 of CC have been reported. In the present work, the exon 4 sequence of TP53 gene in CC and healthy Mexican-mestizo women were analyzed. A group of 111 women with CC and 126 healthy women (control) were included. Peripheral blood cells for polymorphism analysis and cervical scrape for HPV detection were used. PCR of exon 4 of TP53 were subjected to denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) analysis and sequencing. HPV detection was subjected to PCR and sequencing. The statistical analysis was carried out using the Arlequin software. Codon 72 Arg/Arg was the most common SNP detected, and Hardy-Weinberg analysis showed equilibrium in control and CC samples (P>0.05). Wild type sequence of TP53 exon 4 was detected in 66 and 57% in control and CC samples, respectively. For codon 72 Arg/Arg, differences between control and CC women were found (P=0.043). An association between HPV 16/18 infection and 72 Arg/Arg in woman with CC was found (P=0.026). Haplotype GC (codon 36 and 72) was statistically significantly associated with CC (P=0.011). HPV 16 was the most common viral type. Codon 72 Arg/Arg is the most common polymorphism in the Mexican population and could be associated to HPV 16 and/or HPV 18 infection in CC.

  14. Molecular Detection of Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Among Infants with Congenital Anomalies in Khartoum State, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahim, Maha G.; Ali, Aisha S.; Mustafa, Mohamed O.; Musa, Dalal F.; El Hussein, Abdel Rahim M.; Elkhidir, Isam M.; Enan, Khalid A.

    2015-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection still represents the most common potentially serious viral complication in humans and is a major cause of congenital anomalies in infants. This study is aimed to detect HCMV in infants with congenital anomalies. Study subjects consisted of infants born with neural tube defect, hydrocephalus and microcephaly. Fifty serum specimens (20 males, 30 females) were collected from different hospitals in Khartoum State. The sera were investigated for cytomegalovirus specific immunoglobin M (IgM) antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and for Cytomegalovirus DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Out of the 50 sera tested, one patient’s (2%) sample showed HCMV IgM, but with no detectable DNA, other 4(8.2 %) sera were positive for HCMV DNA but with no detectable IgM. Various diagnostic techniques should be considered to evaluate HCMV disease and routine screening for HCMV should be introduced for pregnant women in this setting. It is vital to initiate further research work with many samples from different area to assess prevalence and characterize HCMV and evaluate its maternal health implications. PMID:26862356

  15. Compound heterozygous mutations in the SRD5A2 gene exon 4 in a male pseudohermaphrodite patient of Chinese origin.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cancio, Mónica; Nistal, Manuel; Gracia, Ricardo; Molina, M Antonia; Tovar, Juan Antonio; Esteban, Cristina; Carrascosa, Antonio; Audí, Laura

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study was to perform 5-alpha-reductase type 2 gene (SRD5A2) analysis in a male pseudohermaphrodite (MPH) patient with normal testosterone (T) production and normal androgen receptor (AR) gene coding sequences. A patient of Chinese origin with ambiguous genitalia at 14 months, a 46,XY karyotype, and normal T secretion under human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulation underwent a gonadectomy at 20 months. Exons 1-8 of the AR gene and exons 1-5 of the SRD5A2 gene were sequenced from peripheral blood DNA. AR gene coding sequences were normal. SRD5A2 gene analysis revealed 2 consecutive mutations in exon 4, each located in a different allele: 1) a T nucleotide deletion, which predicts a frameshift mutation from codon 219, and 2) a missense mutation at codon 227, where the substitution of guanine (CGA) by adenine (CAA) predicts a glutamine replacement of arginine (R227Q). Testes located in the inguinal canal showed a normal morphology for age. The patient was a compound heterozygote for SRD5A2 mutations, carrying 2 mutations in exon 4. The patient showed an R227Q mutation that has been described in an Asian population and MPH patients, along with a novel frameshift mutation, Tdel219. Testis morphology showed that, during early infancy, the 5-alpha-reductase enzyme deficiency may not have affected interstitial or tubular development.

  16. Is HCMV vaccine an unmet need? The state of art of vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Chiurchiu, S; Calo Carducci, F I; Rocchi, F; Simonetti, A; Bonatti, G; Salmaso, S; Melchiorri, D; Pani, L; Rossi, P

    2013-01-01

    Congenital HCMV infection is the most frequent congenital infection, with an incidence of 0.2- 2.5 percent among all live births. About 11 percent of infected newborns show symptoms at birth, including hepato-splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, neurologic involvement, hearing impairment and visual deficit. Moreover, 5-25 percent of the asymptomatic congenital HCMV-infected neonates will develop sequelae over months or even years. The relevant social burden, the economic costs of pre-natal screening, post-natal diagnosis, follow-up and possible therapy, although still limited, are the major factors to be considered. Several types of vaccines have been explored in order to develop an effective and safe HCMV vaccine: live attenuated, subunit, vectored, peptide, DNA, and subviral ones, but none are available for use. This review illustrates the different vaccine types studied to date, focusing on the possible vaccination strategy to be implemented once the HCMV vaccine is available, in terms of target population.

  17. HCMV induces dysregulation of glutamate uptake and transporter expression in human fetal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Li, Ling; Wang, Bin; Qian, Dong-Meng; Song, Xu-Xia; Hu, Ming

    2014-12-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections are the leading cause of viral induced birth defects, affecting the central nervous system (CNS) primarily. Fetal CNS is especially vulnerable to CMV induced injury. As HCMV permissive cells, astrocytes are responsible for major glutamate transport and regulate extracellular levels of glutamate avoiding its accumulation which is implicated in neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, highly purified astrocytes isolated from human first trimester aborted fetal brain were infected with HCMV AD169, glutamate uptake function was detected by (3)H labeling technic, and the expression level alterations of glutamate transporters (GLAST, GLT-1), glutamine synthetase (GS) and its activity were also investigated. Protein kinases C (PKC) inhibitor treatment was to identify whether PKC signalling involved in regulating glutamate uptake, protein expression of GLAST, GLT-1, GS and GS activity. Results indicated HCMV AD169 infection could modulate glutamate uptake, expression levels of GLAST, GLT-1, GS and it activity through PKC signalling, suggesting a great susceptibility of human fetal astrocytes to HCMV infection, which significantly alters the uptake and metabolism of an important excitatory amino acid, glutamate, may be a potential mechanism for HCMV associated neurological disease, and an effective therapeutic target in neural diseases.

  18. Altered Striatal Synaptic Function and Abnormal Behaviour in Shank3 Exon4-9 Deletion Mouse Model of Autism.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Thomas C; Speed, Haley E; Xuan, Zhong; Reimers, Jeremy M; Liu, Shunan; Powell, Craig M

    2016-03-01

    Shank3 is a multi-domain, synaptic scaffolding protein that organizes proteins in the postsynaptic density of excitatory synapses. Clinical studies suggest that ∼ 0.5% of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) cases may involve SHANK3 mutation/deletion. Patients with SHANK3 mutations exhibit deficits in cognition along with delayed/impaired speech/language and repetitive and obsessive/compulsive-like (OCD-like) behaviors. To examine how mutation/deletion of SHANK3 might alter brain function leading to ASD, we have independently created mice with deletion of Shank3 exons 4-9, a region implicated in ASD patients. We find that homozygous deletion of exons 4-9 (Shank3(e4-9) KO) results in loss of the two highest molecular weight isoforms of Shank3 and a significant reduction in other isoforms. Behaviorally, both Shank3(e4-9) heterozygous (HET) and Shank3(e4-9) KO mice display increased repetitive grooming, deficits in novel and spatial object recognition learning and memory, and abnormal ultrasonic vocalizations. Shank3(e4-9) KO mice also display abnormal social interaction when paired with one another. Analysis of synaptosome fractions from striata of Shank3(e4-9) KO mice reveals decreased Homer1b/c, GluA2, and GluA3 expression. Both Shank3(e4-9) HET and KO demonstrated a significant reduction in NMDA/AMPA ratio at excitatory synapses onto striatal medium spiny neurons. Furthermore, Shank3(e4-9) KO mice displayed reduced hippocampal LTP despite normal baseline synaptic transmission. Collectively these behavioral, biochemical and physiological changes suggest Shank3 isoforms have region-specific roles in regulation of AMPAR subunit localization and NMDAR function in the Shank3(e4-9) mutant mouse model of autism.

  19. Altered Striatal Synaptic Function and Abnormal Behaviour in Shank3 Exon4–9 Deletion Mouse Model of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Thomas C.; Speed, Haley E.; Xuan, Zhong; Reimers, Jeremy M.; Liu, Shunan; Powell, Craig M.

    2016-01-01

    Shank3 is a multi-domain, synaptic scaffolding protein that organizes proteins in the postsynaptic density of excitatory synapses. Clinical studies suggest that ~0.5% of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) cases may involve SHANK3 mutation/deletion. Patients with SHANK3 mutations exhibit deficits in cognition along with delayed/impaired speech/language and repetitive and obsessive/compulsive-like (OCD-like) behaviors. To examine how mutation/deletion of SHANK3 might alter brain function leading to ASD, we have independently created mice with deletion of Shank3 exons 4–9, a region implicated in ASD patients. We find that homozygous deletion of exons 4–9 (Shank3e4–9 KO) results in loss of the two highest molecular weight isoforms of Shank3 and a significant reduction in other isoforms. Behaviorally, both Shank3e4–9 heterozygous (HET) and Shank3e4–9 KO mice display increased repetitive grooming, deficits in novel and spatial object recognition learning and memory, and abnormal ultrasonic vocalizations. Shank3e4–9 KO mice also display abnormal social interaction when paired with one another. Analysis of synaptosome fractions from striata of Shank3e4–9 KO mice reveals decreased Homer1b/c, GluA2, and GluA3 expression. Both Shank3e4–9 HET and KO demonstrated a significant reduction in NMDA/AMPA ratio at excitatory synapses onto striatal medium spiny neurons. Furthermore, Shank3e4–9 KO mice displayed reduced hippocampal LTP despite normal baseline synaptic transmission. Collectively these behavioral, biochemical and physiological changes suggest Shank3 isoforms have region-specific roles in regulation of AMPAR subunit localization and NMDAR function in the Shank3e4–9 mutant mouse model of autism. PMID:26559786

  20. 11 CFR 300.62 - Non-Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(B)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Non-Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(B)). 300.62 Section 300.62 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF... elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(B)). A person described in 11 CFR 300.60 may solicit, receive,...

  1. 11 CFR 300.61 - Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)). 300.61 Section 300.61 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF... elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)). No person described in 11 CFR 300.60 shall solicit, receive,...

  2. HCMV Activates the IL-6-JAK-STAT3 Axis in HepG2 Cells and Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Tripathy, Manoj K.; Herbein, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Objectives There has been increased interest in the possible role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in carcinogenesis during the last decade. HCMV seroprevalence was enhanced in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but a possible relationship between HCC and HCMV infection remained to be assessed. The aim of this work was to investigate the pro-tumor influence of HCMV on primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and HepG2 cells. Methods Following infection of PHH and HepG2 cells by two different strains of HCMV, we measured the production of IL-6 in culture supernatants by ELISA and the protein levels of STAT3, pSTAT3, JAK, cyclin D1, survivin, p53, p21, and Mdm2 by western Blotting in infected and uninfected cells. Cell proliferation and transformation were investigated using Ki67Ag expression measurement and soft-agar colony formation assay respectively. Results Infection of HepG2 cells and PHH by HCMV resulted in the production of IL-6 and the subsequent activation of the IL-6R-JAK-STAT3 pathway. HCMV increased the expression of cyclin D1 and survivin. Cell proliferation was enhanced in HepG2 and PHH infected with HCMV, despite a paradoxical overexpression of p53 and p21. More importantly, we observed the formation of colonies in soft agar seeded with PHH infected with HCMV and when we challenged the HepG2 cultures to form tumorspheres, we found that the HCMV-infected cultures formed 2.5-fold more tumorspheres than uninfected cultures. Conclusion HCMV activated the IL-6-JAK-STAT3 pathway in PHH and HepG2 cells, favored cellular proliferation, induced PHH transformation and enhanced HepG2 tumorsphere formation. Our observations raise the possibility that HCMV infection might be involved in the genesis of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:23555719

  3. In vivo expression of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) microRNAs during latency.

    PubMed

    Meshesha, Mesfin K; Bentwich, Zvi; Solomon, Semaria A; Avni, Yonat Shemer

    2016-01-01

    Viral encoded microRNAs play key roles in regulating gene expression and the life cycle of human herpes viruses. Latency is one of the hallmarks of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV or HHV5) life cycle, and its control may have immense practical applications. The present study aims to identify HCMV encoded microRNAs during the latency phase of the virus. We used a highly sensitive real time PCR (RTPCR) assay that involves a pre-amplification step before RTPCR. It can detect HCMV encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) during latency in purified monocytes and PBMCs from HCMV IgG positive donors and in latently infected monocytic THP-1 cell lines. During the latency phase, only eight HCMV encoded microRNAs were detected in PBMCs, monocytes and in the THP-1 cells. Five originated from the UL region of the virus genome and three from the US region. Reactivation of the virus from latency, in monocytes obtained from the same donor, using dexamethasone restored the expression of all known HCMV encoded miRNAs including those that were absent during latency. We observed a shift in the abundance of the two arms of mir-US29 between the productive and latency stages of the viral life cycle, suggesting that the star "passenger" form of this microRNA is preferentially expressed during latency. As a whole, our study demonstrates that HCMV expresses during the latency phase, both in vivo and in vitro, only a subset of its microRNAs, which may indicate that they play an important role in maintenance and reactivation of latency.

  4. PMP22 exon 4 deletion causes ER retention of PMP22 and a gain-of-function allele in CMT1E.

    PubMed

    Wang, David S; Wu, Xingyao; Bai, Yunhong; Zaidman, Craig; Grider, Tiffany; Kamholz, John; Lupski, James R; Connolly, Anne M; Shy, Michael E

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether predicted fork stalling and template switching (FoSTeS) during mitosis deletes exon 4 in peripheral myelin protein 22 KD (PMP22) and causes gain-of-function mutation associated with peripheral neuropathy in a family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1E. Two siblings previously reported to have genomic rearrangements predicted to involve exon 4 of PMP22 were evaluated clinically and by electrophysiology. Skin biopsies from the proband were studied by RT-PCR to determine the effects of the exon 4 rearrangements on exon 4 mRNA expression in myelinating Schwann cells. Transient transfection studies with wild-type and mutant PMP22 were performed in Cos7 and RT4 cells to determine the fate of the resultant mutant protein. Both affected siblings had a sensorimotor dysmyelinating neuropathy with severely slow nerve conduction velocities (<10 m/sec). RT-PCR studies of Schwann cell RNA from one of the siblings demonstrated a complete in-frame deletion of PMP22 exon 4 (PMP22Δ4). Transfection studies demonstrated that PMP22Δ4 protein is retained within the endoplasmic reticulum and not transported to the plasma membrane. Our results confirm that that FoSTeS-mediated genomic rearrangement produced a deletion of exon 4 of PMP22, resulting in expression of both PMP22 mRNA and protein lacking this sequence. In addition, we provide experimental evidence for endoplasmic reticulum retention of the mutant protein suggesting a gain-of-function mutational mechanism consistent with the observed CMT1E in this family. PMP22Δ4 is another example of a mutated myelin protein that is misfolded and contributes to the pathogenesis of the neuropathy.

  5. Resistance of transgenic silkworm to BmNPV could be improved by silencing ie-1 and lef-1 genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Wang, J; Lu, Y; Hu, Y; Xue, R; Cao, G; Gong, C

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated viral inhibition has been used in several organisms for improving viral resistance. In the present study, we reported the use of transgenic RNAi in preventing Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) multiplication in the transgenic silkworm B. mori. We targeted the BmNPV immediate-early-1 (ie-1) and late expression factor-1 (lef-1) genes in the transiently transfected BmN cells, in the stable transformed BmN cell line and in the transgenic silkworms. We generated four piggyBac-based vectors containing short double-stranded ie-1 RNA (sdsie-1), short double-stranded lef-1 RNA (sdslef-1), long double-stranded ie-1 RNA (ldsie-1) and both sdsie-1 and sdslef-1 (sds-ie1-lef1) expression cassettes. Strong viral repression was observed in the transiently transfected cells and in the stable transformed BmN cells transfected with sds-ie-1, sdslef-1, ldsie-1 or sds-ie-lef. The decrease of ie-1 mRNA level in the sds-ie1-lef1 transiently transfected cells was most obvious among the cells transfected with different vectors. The inhibitory effect of viral multiplication was decreased in a viral dose-dependent manner; the infection ratio of transfected cells for sds-ie-1, sdslef-1, ldsie-1 and sds-ie-lef decreased by 18.83%, 13.73%, 6.93% and 30.63%, respectively, compared with control cells 5 days after infection. We generated transgenic silkworms using transgenic vector piggyantiIE-lef1-neo with sds-ie1-lef1 expression cassette; the fourth instar larvae of transgenic silkworms of generation G5 exhibited stronger resistance to BmNPV, the mortalities for the transgenic silkworms and control silkworms were 60% and 100%, respectively, at 11 days after inoculation with BmNPV (10(6) occlusion bodies per ml). These results suggest that double-stranded RNA expression of essential genes of BmNPV is a feasible method for breeding silkworms with a high antiviral capacity.

  6. Primary HCMV infection in pregnancy from classic data towards metabolomics: An exploratory analysis.

    PubMed

    Fattuoni, Claudia; Palmas, Francesco; Noto, Antonio; Barberini, Luigi; Mussap, Michele; Grapov, Dmitry; Dessì, Angelica; Casu, Mariano; Casanova, Andrea; Furione, Milena; Arossa, Alessia; Spinillo, Arsenio; Baldanti, Fausto; Fanos, Vassilios; Zavattoni, Maurizio

    2016-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is one of the most frequent risk of viral infections during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic profile in amniotic fluid (AF) samples obtained from HCMV-infected, and uninfected fetuses in order to elucidate changes in metabolic pathways during congenital HCMV infection and to recognize new potential diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 63 pregnant women: 20 contracted primary HCMV infection during pregnancy and, subsequently, transmitted the virus to the fetus (transmitters); 20 contracted the infection without transmitting the virus to the fetus (non-transmitters); 23 who underwent amniocentesis for cytogenetic-based diagnosis were considered controls. Metabolomics analysis was performed by using the hyphenated technique Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) followed by a multivariate statistical approach. Four PLS-DA models were generated: controls vs. transmitters; controls vs. non-transmitters; transmitters vs. non-transmitters; and asymptomatic infected vs. symptomatic infected newborns. Subsequently, these models were exploited for network mapping. Compared with controls, HCMV transmitters showed significantly increased levels in glutamine, glycine, serine, pyruvic acid, threonine, threonic acid, and cystine; conversely, unknown U1715 and U1804, glutamic acid, U1437, fructose, sugar-like A203003 and A203005, and tyrosine levels were found decreased. In non-transmitters, glutamine, serine, glycine, threonic acid, threonine, 1-monostearin, urea, and cystine were found increased, while sorbitol, unknown U1804, sugar-like A203003, U1751, xylitol, leucine and fructose were decreased. The comparison between transmitters and non-transmitters did not produce a statistically significant model. Unlike controls' profile, a common feature of HCMV infected subjects (transmitters and non-transmitters) was the activation of glutamine-glutamate and pyrimidine

  7. Structure of HCMV glycoprotein B in the postfusion conformation bound to a neutralizing human antibody

    PubMed Central

    Chandramouli, Sumana; Ciferri, Claudio; Nikitin, Pavel A.; Caló, Stefano; Gerrein, Rachel; Balabanis, Kara; Monroe, James; Hebner, Christy; Lilja, Anders E.; Settembre, Ethan C.; Carfi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) poses a significant threat to immunocompromised individuals and neonates infected in utero. Glycoprotein B (gB), the herpesvirus fusion protein, is a target for neutralizing antibodies and a vaccine candidate due to its indispensable role in infection. Here we show the crystal structure of the HCMV gB ectodomain bound to the Fab fragment of 1G2, a neutralizing human monoclonal antibody isolated from a seropositive subject. The gB/1G2 interaction is dominated by aromatic residues in the 1G2 heavy chain CDR3 protruding into a hydrophobic cleft in the gB antigenic domain 5 (AD-5). Structural analysis and comparison with HSV gB suggest the location of additional neutralizing antibody binding sites on HCMV gB. Finally, immunoprecipitation experiments reveal that 1G2 can bind to HCMV virion gB suggesting that its epitope is exposed and accessible on the virus surface. Our data will support the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies against HCMV infection. PMID:26365435

  8. Structure of HCMV glycoprotein B in the postfusion conformation bound to a neutralizing human antibody.

    PubMed

    Chandramouli, Sumana; Ciferri, Claudio; Nikitin, Pavel A; Caló, Stefano; Gerrein, Rachel; Balabanis, Kara; Monroe, James; Hebner, Christy; Lilja, Anders E; Settembre, Ethan C; Carfi, Andrea

    2015-09-14

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) poses a significant threat to immunocompromised individuals and neonates infected in utero. Glycoprotein B (gB), the herpesvirus fusion protein, is a target for neutralizing antibodies and a vaccine candidate due to its indispensable role in infection. Here we show the crystal structure of the HCMV gB ectodomain bound to the Fab fragment of 1G2, a neutralizing human monoclonal antibody isolated from a seropositive subject. The gB/1G2 interaction is dominated by aromatic residues in the 1G2 heavy chain CDR3 protruding into a hydrophobic cleft in the gB antigenic domain 5 (AD-5). Structural analysis and comparison with HSV gB suggest the location of additional neutralizing antibody binding sites on HCMV gB. Finally, immunoprecipitation experiments reveal that 1G2 can bind to HCMV virion gB suggesting that its epitope is exposed and accessible on the virus surface. Our data will support the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies against HCMV infection.

  9. C-deletion in exon 4 codon 63 of p53 gene as a molecular marker for oral squamous cell carcinoma: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Sukhija, Hemani; Krishnan, Rajkumar; Balachander, N.; Raghavendhar, Karthik; Ramadoss, Ramya; Sen, Sukanta

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exfoliated oral cancer cells in saliva samples from patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) can be used to determine the incidence and type of mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. The purpose of this study was to identify C-deletion mutation in exon 4 codon 63 of p53 gene in the saliva of OSCC patients by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: Saliva samples of 20 newly histopathologically diagnosed OSCC patients and 5 healthy volunteers were subjected to isolation of the total genomic DNA and PCR amplification for C-deletion on exon 4 of p53 gene. The resulting products were resolved by agarose gel electrophoresis, viewed and photographed on ultraviolet-transilluminator. Results: The relationship between the frequencies of genetic alterations was assessed by Chi-square test. Differences with values of P < 0.05 were statistically significant. Conclusion: The study concluded a 100% presence of C-deletion mutation in exon 4 codon 63 of p53 in the saliva of OSCC patients. This study suggests that detection of mutation in exon 4 codon 63 of p53 by PCR is a fast, reliable, accurate, and sensitive molecular method for OSCC diagnosis. PMID:26604578

  10. HCMV Displays a Unique Transcriptome of Immunomodulatory Genes in Primary Monocyte-Derived Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Ellen; Thys, Kim; Tuefferd, Marianne; Van Hove, Carl; Aerssens, Jeroen; Van Loock, Marnix

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a betaherpesvirus which rarely presents problems in healthy individuals, yet may result in severe morbidity in immunocompromised patients and in immune-naïve neonates. HCMV has a large 235 kb genome with a coding capacity of at least 165 open reading frames (ORFs). This large genome allows complex gene regulation resulting in different sets of transcripts during lytic and latent infection. While latent virus mainly resides within monocytes and CD34+ progenitor cells, reactivation to lytic infection is driven by differentiation towards terminally differentiated myeloid dendritic cells and macrophages. Consequently, it has been suggested that macrophages and dendritic cells contribute to viral spread in vivo. Thus far only limited knowledge is available on the expression of HCMV genes in terminally differentiated myeloid primary cells and whether or not the virus exhibits a different set of lytic genes in primary cells compared with lytic infection in NHDF fibroblasts. To address these questions, we used Illumina next generation sequencing to determine the HCMV transcriptome in macrophages and dendritic cells during lytic infection and compared it to the transcriptome in NHDF fibroblasts. Here, we demonstrate unique expression profiles in macrophages and dendritic cells which significantly differ from the transcriptome in fibroblasts mainly by modulating the expression of viral transcripts involved in immune modulation, cell tropism and viral spread. In a head to head comparison between macrophages and dendritic cells, we observed that factors involved in viral spread and virion composition are differentially regulated suggesting that the plasticity of the virion facilitates the infection of surrounding cells. Taken together, this study provides the full transcript expression analysis of lytic HCMV genes in monocyte-derived type 1 and type 2 macrophages as well as in monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Thereby underlining the potential

  11. 11 CFR 300.62 - Non-Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(B)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Non-Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(B)). 300.62 Section 300.62 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002-(BCRA) REGULATIONS NON-FEDERAL FUNDS Federal Candidates and Officeholders § 300.62 Non-Federal...

  12. 11 CFR 300.61 - Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)). 300.61 Section 300.61 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002-(BCRA) REGULATIONS NON-FEDERAL FUNDS Federal Candidates and Officeholders § 300.61 Federal...

  13. 11 CFR 300.62 - Non-Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(B)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Non-Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(B)). 300.62 Section 300.62 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002-(BCRA) REGULATIONS NON-FEDERAL FUNDS Federal Candidates and Officeholders § 300.62 Non-Federal...

  14. 11 CFR 300.61 - Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)). 300.61 Section 300.61 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002-(BCRA) REGULATIONS NON-FEDERAL FUNDS Federal Candidates and Officeholders § 300.61 Federal...

  15. 11 CFR 300.61 - Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(A)). 300.61 Section 300.61 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002-(BCRA) REGULATIONS NON-FEDERAL FUNDS Federal Candidates and Officeholders § 300.61 Federal...

  16. 11 CFR 300.62 - Non-Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(B)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Non-Federal elections (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)(B)). 300.62 Section 300.62 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002-(BCRA) REGULATIONS NON-FEDERAL FUNDS Federal Candidates and Officeholders § 300.62 Non-Federal...

  17. Recombinant HCMV UL128 expression and functional identification of PBMC-attracting activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huihui; Hui-Hui, Gao; Tao, Ran; Ran, Tao; Zheng, Qi; Qi, Zheng; Xu, Jun; Jun, Xu; Shang, Shiqiang; Shi-Qiang, Shang

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has evolved several immune evasion strategies. One strategy is controlling the movement of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by encoding homologues of chemokines. Our aim was to determine whether HCMV open reading frame (ORF) UL128 could encode a protein that attracts PBMCs like a β-chemokine. The recombinant UL128 protein was synthesized by construction of a stably transfected CHO-UL128 cell line, and a chemotaxis assay showed that UL128 was able to attract PBMCs with a potency equal to that of MIP-1α in vitro. We hypothesize that UL128 protein may act as a β-chemokine homologue in viral pathogenesis.

  18. In Vitro Drug Combination Studies of Letermovir (AIC246, MK-8228) with Approved Anti-Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Anti-HIV Compounds in Inhibition of HCMV and HIV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wildum, Steffen; Zimmermann, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Despite modern prevention and treatment strategies, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) remains a common opportunistic pathogen associated with serious morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals, such as transplant recipients and AIDS patients. All drugs currently licensed for the treatment of HCMV infection target the viral DNA polymerase and are associated with severe toxicity issues and the emergence of drug resistance. Letermovir (AIC246, MK-8228) is a new anti-HCMV agent in clinical development that acts via a novel mode of action and has demonstrated anti-HCMV activity in vitro and in vivo. For the future, drug combination therapies, including letermovir, might be indicated under special medical conditions, such as the emergence of multidrug-resistant virus strains in transplant recipients or in HCMV-HIV-coinfected patients. Accordingly, knowledge of the compatibility of letermovir with other HCMV or HIV antivirals is of medical importance. Here, we evaluated the inhibition of HCMV replication by letermovir in combination with all currently approved HCMV antivirals using cell culture checkerboard assays. In addition, the effects of letermovir on the antiviral activities of selected HIV drugs, and vice versa, were analyzed. Using two different mathematical techniques to analyze the experimental data, (i) additive effects were observed for the combination of letermovir with anti-HCMV drugs and (ii) no interaction was found between letermovir and anti-HIV drugs. Since none of the tested drug combinations significantly antagonized letermovir efficacy (or vice versa), our findings suggest that letermovir may offer the potential for combination therapy with the tested HCMV and HIV drugs. PMID:25779572

  19. Non-nucleoside structures retain full anti-HCMV potency of the dideoxy furanopyrimidine family.

    PubMed

    Bidet, Olivier; McGuigan, Christopher; Snoeck, Robert; Andrei, Graciela; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan

    2004-11-01

    We have recently reported that 2',3'dideoxy analogues of our exquisitely potent anti-VZV furanopyrimidine deoxynucleosides are shifted to selective anti-HCMV agents. We now find that the fully deoxygenated 2',3',5'-trideoxy analogue is fully antivirally active. This is taken as proof that these agents act by a novel non-nucleoside mechanism of action.

  20. Impact of HCMV Infection on NK Cell Development and Function after HSCT

    PubMed Central

    Della Chiesa, Mariella; Falco, Michela; Muccio, Letizia; Bertaina, Alice; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cell function is regulated by an array of inhibitory and activating surface receptors that during NK cell differentiation, at variance with T and B cells, do not require genetic rearrangement. Importantly, NK cells are the first lymphocyte population recovering after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Thus, their role in early immunity after HSCT is considered crucial, as they can importantly contribute to protect the host from tumor recurrence and viral infections before T-cell immunity is fully recovered. In order to acquire effector functions and regulatory receptors, NK cell precursors undergo a maturation process that can be analyzed during immune reconstitution after HSCT. In this context, the occurrence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection/reactivation was shown to accelerate NK cell maturation by promoting the differentiation of high frequencies of NK cells characterized by a KIR+NKG2A− and NKG2C+ mature phenotype. Thus, it appears that the development of NK cells and the distribution of NK cell receptors can be deeply influenced by HCMV infection. Moreover, in HCMV-infected subjects the emergence of so called “memory-like” or “long-lived” NK cells has been documented. These cells could play an important role in protecting from infections and maybe from relapse in patients transplanted for leukemia. All the aspects regarding the influence of HCMV infection on NK cell development will be discussed. PMID:24379818

  1. HCMV Reprogramming of Infected Monocyte Survival and Differentiation: A Goldilocks Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Emily V.; Collins-McMillen, Donna; Kim, Jung Heon; Cieply, Stephen J.; Bentz, Gretchen L.; Yurochko, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    The wide range of disease pathologies seen in multiple organ sites associated with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection results from the systemic hematogenous dissemination of the virus, which is mediated predominately by infected monocytes. In addition to their role in viral spread, infected monocytes are also known to play a key role in viral latency and life-long persistence. However, in order to utilize infected monocytes for viral spread and persistence, HCMV must overcome a number of monocyte biological hurdles, including their naturally short lifespan and their inability to support viral gene expression and replication. Our laboratory has shown that HCMV is able to manipulate the biology of infected monocytes in order to overcome these biological hurdles by inducing the survival and differentiation of infected monocytes into long-lived macrophages capable of supporting viral gene expression and replication. In this current review, we describe the unique aspects of how HCMV promotes monocyte survival and differentiation by inducing a “finely-tuned” macrophage cell type following infection. Specifically, we describe the induction of a uniquely polarized macrophage subset from infected monocytes, which we argue is the ideal cellular environment for the initiation of viral gene expression and replication and, ultimately, viral spread and persistence within the infected host. PMID:24531335

  2. Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1), slow (exon 3, 113His) and fast (exon 4, 139Arg) alleles confer susceptibility to squamous cell esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Meenu; Tilak, Anup Raj; Upadhyay, Rohit; Kumar, Ashwani; Mittal, Balraj

    2008-07-15

    Genetic polymorphisms in xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes may alter risk of various cancers. Present case-control study evaluated the influence of EPHX1 genetic variations on squamous cell esophageal cancer (ESCC) susceptibility in 107 patients and 320 controls. EPHX1 polymorphic alleles were genotyped by direct sequencing (exon 3, Tyr113His) or PCR-RFLP (exon 4, His139Arg). Patients with exon 3 genotypes (Tyr113His, His113His) and 113His allele were at risk of ESCC (OR{sub Tyr113His} 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2-3.4, p = 0.007; OR{sub His113His} 2.3 95% CI = 1.0-5.2, p = 0.03 and OR{sub His} 1.5, 95% CI = 1.0-2.1, p = 0.01). In contrast, individuals with exon 4, 139Arg allele were at low risk of cancer (OR 0.34, 95% CI = 0.20-0.56, p = 0.001). However, none of haplotype combinations of exon 3 (Tyr113His) and exon 4 (His139Arg) polymorphisms showed modulation of risk for ESCC. Sub-grouping of patients based on anatomical location of tumor predicted that patients with exon 3, His113His and Tyr113His genotypes were at higher risk for developing ESCC tumor at upper and middle third locations (OR 4.4, 95% CI = 1.0-18.5, p = 0.04; OR 2.5, 95% CI = 1.3-5.0, p = 0.005 respectively). The frequency of exon 4, His139Arg genotype was significantly lower in ESCC patients with lower third tumor location as compared to controls (14.8% vs. 36.3%, p = 0.02). In case-only study, gene-environment interaction of EPHX1 genotypes with tobacco, alcohol and occupational exposures did not appear to modulate the cancer susceptibility. In conclusion, exon 3, Tyr113His genotype was associated with higher risk of ESCC particularly at upper and middle-third anatomical locations of tumor. However, His139Arg genotype of exon 4, exhibited low risk for ESCC as well as its clinical characteristics.

  3. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and hearing impairment: infection of fibroblast cells with HCMV induces chromosome breaks at 1q23.3, between loci DFNA7 and DFNA49 -- both involved in dominantly inherited, sensorineural, hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Nystad, Mona; Fagerheim, Toril; Brox, Vigdis; Fortunato, Elizabeth A; Nilssen, Øivind

    2008-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is the most common congenital infection in developed countries and is responsible for a substantial fraction of sensorineural hearing impairment (SNHI) in children. The risk of hearing impairment is associated with viral load in urine and blood collected during the first postnatal month. However, although inner ear abnormalities are observed in some children with HCMV-induced SNHI, the exact mechanism whereby congenital HCMV infection causes hearing impairment is unknown. Earlier studies using standard cytogenetic mapping techniques showed that infection of S-phase human fibroblast cells with HCMV resulted in two specific, site-directed, chromosome breaks at band positions 1q21 and 1q42 which include loci involved in dominantly and recessively inherited hearing impairment, respectively. These findings suggested that cells infected with HCMV might provide a reservoir for genetic damage and, in a clinical perspective, a scenario could be envisioned whereby hearing impairment could result from early DNA damage of dividing fetal cells rather than viral replication and cell lysis. In this work we demonstrate, using fine mapping techniques, that HCMV infection in S-phase fibroblast cells induces genetic damage at 1q23.3, within a maximal region of 37 kb, containing five low copy repeat (LCR) elements. The breakpoint is situated between two hearing impairment (HI) loci, DFNA49 and DFNA7, and in close proximity to the MPZ gene previously shown to be involved in autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome (CMT1B) with auditory neuropathy.

  4. Recombinant Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) RL13 Binds Human Immunoglobulin G Fc

    PubMed Central

    Cortese, Mirko; Calò, Stefano; D'Aurizio, Romina; Lilja, Anders; Pacchiani, Nicola; Merola, Marcello

    2012-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) protein RL13 has recently been described to be present in all primary isolates but rapidly mutated in culture adapted viruses. Although these data suggest a crucial role for this gene product in HCMV primary infection, no function has so far been assigned to this protein. Working with RL13 expressed in isolation in transfected human epithelial cells, we demonstrated that recombinant RL13 from the clinical HCMV isolates TR and Merlin have selective human immunoglobulin (Ig)-binding properties towards IgG1 and IgG2 subtypes. An additional Fc binding protein, RL12, was also identified as an IgG1 and IgG2 binding protein but not further characterized. The glycoprotein RL13 trafficked to the plasma membrane where it bound and internalized exogenous IgG or its constant fragment (Fcγ). Analysis of RL13 ectodomain mutants suggested that the RL13 Ig-like domain is responsible for the Fc binding activity. Ligand-dependent internalization relied on a YxxL endocytic motif located in the C-terminal tail of RL13. Additionally, we showed that the tyrosine residue could be replaced by phenylalanine but not by alanine, indicating that the internalization signal was independent from phosphorylation events. In sum, RL13 binds human IgG and may contribute to HCMV immune evasion in the infected host, but this function does not readily explain the instability of the RL13 gene during viral propagation in cultured cells. PMID:23226246

  5. Sperm viral infection and male infertility: focus on HBV, HCV, HIV, HPV, HSV, HCMV, and AAV.

    PubMed

    Garolla, Andrea; Pizzol, Damiano; Bertoldo, Alessandro; Menegazzo, Massimo; Barzon, Luisa; Foresta, Carlo

    2013-11-01

    Chronic viral infections can infect sperm and are considered a risk factor in male infertility. Recent studies have shown that the presence of HIV, HBV or HCV in semen impairs sperm parameters, DNA integrity, and in particular reduces forward motility. In contrast, very little is known about semen infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV), herpesviruses (HSV), cytomegalovirus (HCMV), and adeno-associated virus (AAV). At present, EU directives for the viral screening of couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques require only the evaluation of HIV, HBV, and HCV. However, growing evidence suggests that HPV, HSV, and HCMV might play a major role in male infertility and it has been demonstrated that HPV semen infection has a negative influence on sperm parameters, fertilization, and the abortion rate. Besides the risk of horizontal or vertical transmission, the negative impact of any viral sperm infection on male reproductive function seems to be dramatic. In addition, treatment with antiviral and antiretroviral therapies may further affect sperm parameters. In this review we attempted to focus on the interactions between defined sperm viral infections and their association with male fertility disorders. All viruses considered in this article have a potentially negative effect on male reproductive function and dangerous infections can be transmitted to partners and newborns. In light of this evidence, we suggest performing targeted sperm washing procedures for each sperm infection and to strongly consider screening male patients seeking fertility for HPV, HSV, and HCMV, both to avoid viral transmission and to improve assisted or even spontaneous fertility outcome.

  6. BRCA2 minor transcript lacking exons 4–7 supports viability in mice and may account for survival of humans with a pathogenic biallelic mutation

    PubMed Central

    Thirthagiri, Eswary; Klarmann, Kimberly D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Southon, Eileen; Biswas, Kajal; Martin, Betty K.; North, Susan Lynn; Magidson, Valentin; Burkett, Sandra; Haines, Diana C.; Noer, Kathleen; Matthai, Roberta; Tessarollo, Lino; Loncarek, Jadranka; Keller, Jonathan R.; Sharan, Shyam K.

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer gene, BRCA2, is essential for viability, yet patients with Fanconi anemia-D1 subtype are born alive with biallelic mutations in this gene. The hypomorphic nature of the mutations is believed to support viability, but this is not always apparent. One such mutation is IVS7+2T>G, which causes premature protein truncation due to skipping of exon 7. We previously identified a transcript lacking exons 4–7, which restores the open-reading frame, encodes a DNA repair proficient protein and is expressed in IVS7+2T>G carriers. However, because the exons 4–7 encoded region contains several residues required for normal cell-cycle regulation and cytokinesis, this transcript's ability to support viability can be argued. To address this, we generated a Brca2 knock-in mouse model lacking exons 4–7 and demonstrated that these exons are dispensable for viability as well as tumor-free survival. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the functional significance of a minor transcript of BRCA2 that can play a major role in the survival of humans who are homozygous for a clearly pathogenic mutation. Our results highlight the importance of assessing protein function restoration by premature truncating codon bypass by alternative splicing when evaluating the functional significance of variants such as nonsense and frame-shift mutations that are assumed to be clearly pathogenic. Our findings will impact not only the assessment of variants that map to this region, but also influence counseling paradigms and treatment options for such mutation carriers. PMID:26920070

  7. BRCA2 minor transcript lacking exons 4-7 supports viability in mice and may account for survival of humans with a pathogenic biallelic mutation.

    PubMed

    Thirthagiri, Eswary; Klarmann, Kimberly D; Shukla, Anil K; Southon, Eileen; Biswas, Kajal; Martin, Betty K; North, Susan Lynn; Magidson, Valentin; Burkett, Sandra; Haines, Diana C; Noer, Kathleen; Matthai, Roberta; Tessarollo, Lino; Loncarek, Jadranka; Keller, Jonathan R; Sharan, Shyam K

    2016-05-15

    The breast cancer gene, BRCA2, is essential for viability, yet patients with Fanconi anemia-D1 subtype are born alive with biallelic mutations in this gene. The hypomorphic nature of the mutations is believed to support viability, but this is not always apparent. One such mutation is IVS7+2T>G, which causes premature protein truncation due to skipping of exon 7. We previously identified a transcript lacking exons 4-7, which restores the open-reading frame, encodes a DNA repair proficient protein and is expressed in IVS7+2T>G carriers. However, because the exons 4-7 encoded region contains several residues required for normal cell-cycle regulation and cytokinesis, this transcript's ability to support viability can be argued. To address this, we generated a Brca2 knock-in mouse model lacking exons 4-7 and demonstrated that these exons are dispensable for viability as well as tumor-free survival. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of the functional significance of a minor transcript of BRCA2 that can play a major role in the survival of humans who are homozygous for a clearly pathogenic mutation. Our results highlight the importance of assessing protein function restoration by premature truncating codon bypass by alternative splicing when evaluating the functional significance of variants such as nonsense and frame-shift mutations that are assumed to be clearly pathogenic. Our findings will impact not only the assessment of variants that map to this region, but also influence counseling paradigms and treatment options for such mutation carriers. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  8. Predictive value of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) T-cell response in the control of HCMV infection by seropositive solid-organ transplant recipients according to different assays and stimuli.

    PubMed

    Gabanti, Elisa; Bruno, Francesca; Scaramuzzi, Lucia; Mangione, Filippo; Zelini, Paola; Gerna, Giuseppe; Lilleri, Daniele

    2016-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is still the most common viral infection in solid-organ transplant recipients (SOTR). Our study aimed to identify the predictive values of the T-cell response able to protect from HCMV disease, according to different assays. Viral DNA was determined by real-time PCR. The T-cell immune response to HCMV infection was investigated in SOTR according to the following assays and stimuli: cytokine flow cytometry (CFC) after peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) stimulation with autologous HCMV-infected dendritic cells (iDC) vs three ELISPOT assays using PBMCs stimulated with: 1. HCMV-infected cell lysate (iCL); 2. a pool of 34 epitopic peptides (PP) from different HCMV proteins; 3. a commercial pp65 peptide pool (CPM). ELISPOT results were normalized to T-cell counts. Overall, 51 SOTR were enrolled: 29 (57%) had low viral load (LVL) self-resolving infections, 19 (37%) high viral load (HVL) infections treated with antiviral drugs, and 3 (6%) tissue-invasive disease (TID). At DNAemia peak, ROC analysis showed that CFC-iDC CD4+ and the ELISPOT-iCL assays yielded overlapping area under the curve (AUC) results. The time needed to reconstitute protective T-cell immunity in SOTR with HVL infections was significantly longer with each assay compared to LVL infections. Using the CFC-iDC assay as a reference test (requiring 7 days to complete), the 24h ELISPOT-iCL assay provides similar results in terms of protection prediction from HCMV infection.

  9. TTV DNA plasma load and its association with age, gender, and HCMV IgG serostatus in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Haloschan, Mats; Bettesch, Rainer; Görzer, Irene; Weseslindtner, Lukas; Kundi, Michael; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Understanding immunosenescence and changes in antimicrobial immune response with age is of high importance. The association of immunosenescence with gender and persistent infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a matter of intensive research. We determined whether replication of another persistent and highly prevalent virus, Torque teno virus (TTV), is related to age, gender, and HCMV IgG serostatus of the host. TTV DNA load in plasma was assessed by real-time PCR in 313 healthy persons: 20-30 years old (young, n = 104), 50-60 years old (middle-aged, n = 101), or >80 years old (elderly, n = 108). TTV DNA loads were further associated with age-groups, gender, and HCMV IgG serostatus. TTV load was significantly higher in the elderly compared to the young group (p < 0.001; Tukey's honest significant difference (HSD)), and the higher TTV DNA levels over age were found to be gender-specific (p = 0.002; ANOVA), with young women showing the lowest TTV load compared to young men (p = 0.009, t test) and compared to the other female age-groups (middle-aged p = 0.005; elderly p < 0.001; Tukey's HSD). TTV load of HCMV IgG-seropositive persons was significantly higher than that of the HCMV IgG seronegative in the young (p = 0.005; t test) and middle-aged (p = 0.016; t test) groups. These results indicate that the host's immune control of TTV replication decreases with age and is gender-specific. Persistent HCMV infection is significantly related to higher TTV DNA loads, especially at a younger age. Therefore, the influence of gender and HCMV on immunosenescence earlier in life should be further explored.

  10. Baseline antibody level may help predict the risk of active human cytomegalovirus infection in a HCMV seropositive population.

    PubMed

    Li, T-D; Li, J-J; Huang, X; Wang, H; Guo, X-Y; Ge, S-X; Zhang, J

    2017-05-01

    Recurrent human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection during pregnancy could lead to congenital HCMV infection and permanent sequelae. However, knowledge regarding the risk factors associated with recurrent HCMV infection is limited. In the present study, 1,659 paired serum samples from the natural population were collected in Guangxi Province, China, from 2003 to 2004 with a 1-year interval. The serum anti-pp150 titre was quantitatively determined using a homemade recombinant pp150-based ELISA, and the IgG titre that increased at least 4-fold was defined as a recurrent infection. The HCMV seroprevalence was above 98.6% (1,636/1,659) in Guangxi in 2003, and the infection rate during the 1-year follow-up was approximately 10% (171/1,659). The seronegative population has the highest infection risk, while the risk of recurrent infection in the seropositive population was negatively correlated with the baseline anti-pp150 titre. With a cutoff of 1:80 (the baseline anti-pp150 IgG titre), the sensitivity and specificity were 73.1% (125/171) and 85.7% (1,275/1,488) respectively, and the relative risk of infection in the high-risk group compared to the low-risk group was 10.6 (95% CI: 7.7-14.6). In conclusion, the baseline anti-pp150 IgG was negatively correlated with the risk of HCMV infection and could be an excellent predictor of HCMV infection in HCMV seropositive populations.

  11. Molecular characterization of HCMV-specific immune responses: Parallels between CD8(+) T cells, CD4(+) T cells, and NK cells.

    PubMed

    Vieira Braga, Felipe A; Hertoghs, Kirsten M L; van Lier, René A W; van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M

    2015-09-01

    CD8(+) T cells are important for immunity against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The HCMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell response is characterized by the accumulation of terminally differentiated effector cells that have downregulated the costimulatory molecules CD27 and CD28. These HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells maintain high levels of cytotoxic molecules such as granzyme B and rapidly produce the inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ upon activation. Remarkably, HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells are able to persist long term as fully functional effector cells, suggesting a unique differentiation pathway that is distinct from the formation of memory CD8(+) T cells after infection with acute viruses. In this review, we aim to highlight the most recent developments in HCMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell differentiation, maintenance, tissue distribution, metabolism and function. HCMV also induces the differentiation of effector CD4(+) T cells and NK cells, which share characteristics with HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells. We propose that the overlap in differentiation of NK cells, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells after HCMV infection may be regulated by a shared transcriptional machinery. A better understanding of the molecular framework of HCMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses may benefit vaccine design, as these cells uniquely combine the capacity to rapidly respond to infection with long-term survival. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Identification of one novel causative mutation in exon 4 of WFS1 gene in two Italian siblings with classical DIDMOAD syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Rigoli, Luciana; Lombardo, Fortunato; Salzano, Giuseppina; Di Bella, Chiara; Messina, Maria Francesca; De Luca, Filippo; Iafusco, Dario

    2013-09-10

    The aim of the present paper is to describe a novel missense mutation (G107R) of WFS1 gene that was unexpectedly detected, in two siblings from Southern Italy, outside exon 8; a very unusual finding which has previously been reported only twice in Italian patients with Wolfram syndrome (WS). Although in Spanish pedigrees' WFS1 mutations are frequently located in exon 4, this finding is very infrequent in other pedigrees, particularly in Italian patients. a) our report of two siblings with one novel WSF1 mutation (G107R) expands the molecular spectrum of WS; b) this is the 3rd report of Italian patients harbouring one mutation outside exon 8 and the 2nd with one mutation in exon 4; c) on the basis of the present observations, and literature data we can infer that mutation locations outside exon 8 do not seem to be clearly associated with peculiar phenotype expressions of WFS1 gene. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. HCMV gB shares structural and functional properties with gB proteins from other herpesviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sapna; Wisner, Todd W.; Johnson, David C.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2013-01-20

    Glycoprotein B (gB) facilitates HCMV entry into cells by binding receptors and mediating membrane fusion. The crystal structures of gB ectodomains from HSV-1 and EBV are available, but little is known about the HCMV gB structure. Using multiangle light scattering and electron microscopy, we show here that HCMV gB ectodomain is a trimer with the overall shape similar to HSV-1 and EBV gB ectodomains. HCMV gB ectodomain forms rosettes similar to rosettes formed by EBV gB and the postfusion forms of other viral fusogens. Substitution of several bulky hydrophobic residues within the putative fusion loops with more hydrophilic residues reduced rosette formation and abolished cell fusion. We propose that like gB proteins from HSV-1 and EBV, HCMV gB has two internal hydrophobic fusion loops that likely interact with target membranes. Our work establishes structural and functional similarities between gB proteins from three subfamilies of herpesviruses.

  14. Evolution of the ability to modulate host chemokine networks via gene duplication in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV).

    PubMed

    Scarborough, Jessica A; Paul, John R; Spencer, Juliet V

    2017-03-14

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widespread pathogen that is particularly skillful at evading immune detection and defense mechanisms, largely due to extensive co-evolution with its host. One aspect of this co-evolution involves the acquisition of virally encoded G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with homology to the chemokine receptor family. GPCRs are the largest family of cell surface proteins, found in organisms from yeast to humans, and they regulate a variety of cellular processes including development, sensory perception, and immune cell trafficking. The US27 and US28 genes are encoded by human and primate CMVs, but homologs are not found in the genomes of viruses infecting rodents or other species. Phylogenetic analysis was used to investigate the US27 and US28 genes, which are adjacent in the unique short (US) region of the HCMV genome, and their relationship to one another and to human chemokine receptor genes. The results indicate that both US27 and US28 share the same common ancestor with human chemokine receptor CX3CR1, suggesting that a single host gene was captured and a subsequent viral gene duplication event occurred. The US28 gene product (pUS28) has maintained the function of the ancestral gene and has the ability to bind and signal in response to CX3CL1/fractalkine, the natural ligand for CX3CR1. In contrast, pUS27 does not bind to any known chemokine ligand, and the sequence has diverged significantly, highlighted by the fact that pUS27 currently exhibits greater sequence similarity to human CCR1. While the evolutionary advantage of the gene duplication and neofunctionalization event remains unclear, the US27 and US28 genes are highly conserved among different HCMV strains and retained even in laboratory strains that have lost many virulence genes, suggesting that US27 and US28 have each evolved distinct, important functions during virus infection.

  15. Modification of selected anti-HCMV drugs with lipophilic boron cluster modulator.

    PubMed

    Olejniczak, Agnieszka B; Adamska, Anna M; Paradowska, Edyta; Studzinska, Mirosława; Suski, Patrycja; Leśnikowski, Zbigniew J

    2013-01-01

    Methods for the modification of ganciclovir (GCV), acyclovir (ACV), cidofovir (CDV) and valganciclovir (VCDV) with boron cluster have been developed. Toxicity of the new derivatives was evaluated in adherent cells; no cytotoxicity was observed in five different cell lines up to 1000 microM with the exception of modified valganciclovir which was cytotoxic above 300 microM. The compounds were active against HCMV or HSV-1 by cytopathic effect or plaque reduction assays. None of the tested compounds had activity against HPIV-3 or VSV.

  16. Ablation of the Regulatory IE1 Protein of Murine Cytomegalovirus Alters In Vivo Pro-inflammatory TNF-alpha Production during Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmi, Vanessa; Lisnic, Vanda Juranic; Hsieh, Wei Yuan; Blanc, Mathieu; Livingston, Andrew; Busche, Andreas; Tekotte, Hille; Messerle, Martin; Auer, Manfred; Fraser, Iain; Jonjic, Stipan; Angulo, Ana; Reddehase, Matthias J.; Ghazal, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the role of viral genes in modulating host cytokine responses. Here we report a new functional role of the viral encoded IE1 protein of the murine cytomegalovirus in sculpting the inflammatory response in an acute infection. In time course experiments of infected primary macrophages (MΦs) measuring cytokine production levels, genetic ablation of the immediate-early 1 (ie1) gene results in a significant increase in TNFα production. Intracellular staining for cytokine production and viral early gene expression shows that TNFα production is highly associated with the productively infected MΦ population of cells. The ie1- dependent phenotype of enhanced MΦ TNFα production occurs at both protein and RNA levels. Noticeably, we show in a series of in vivo infection experiments that in multiple organs the presence of ie1 potently inhibits the pro-inflammatory cytokine response. From these experiments, levels of TNFα, and to a lesser extent IFNβ, but not the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL10, are moderated in the presence of ie1. The ie1- mediated inhibition of TNFα production has a similar quantitative phenotype profile in infection of susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (C57BL/6) mouse strains as well as in a severe immuno-ablative model of infection. In vitro experiments with infected macrophages reveal that deletion of ie1 results in increased sensitivity of viral replication to TNFα inhibition. However, in vivo infection studies show that genetic ablation of TNFα or TNFRp55 receptor is not sufficient to rescue the restricted replication phenotype of the ie1 mutant virus. These results provide, for the first time, evidence for a role of IE1 as a regulator of the pro-inflammatory response and demonstrate a specific pathogen gene capable of moderating the host production of TNFα in vivo. PMID:22952450

  17. Modeling the human MTM1 p.R69C mutation in murine Mtm1 results in exon 4 skipping and a less severe myotubular myopathy phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Christopher R.; Dulin-Smith, Ashley N.; Durban, Ashley N.; Marshall, Morgan L.; Marshall, Jordan T.; Snyder, Andrew D.; Naiyer, Nada; Gladman, Jordan T.; Chandler, Dawn S.; Lawlor, Michael W.; Buj-Bello, Anna; Dowling, James J.; Beggs, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (MTM) is a severe neuromuscular disease of infancy caused by mutations of MTM1, which encodes the phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase, myotubularin. The Mtm1 knockout (KO) mouse has a severe phenotype and its short lifespan (8 weeks) makes it a challenge to use as a model in the testing of certain preclinical therapeutics. Many MTM patients succumb early in life, but some have a more favorable prognosis. We used human genotype–phenotype correlation data to develop a myotubularin-deficient mouse model with a less severe phenotype than is seen in Mtm1 KO mice. We modeled the human c.205C>T point mutation in Mtm1 exon 4, which is predicted to introduce the p.R69C missense change in myotubularin. Hemizygous male Mtm1 p.R69C mice develop early muscle atrophy prior to the onset of weakness at 2 months. The median survival period is 66 weeks. Histopathology shows small myofibers with centrally placed nuclei. Myotubularin protein is undetectably low because the introduced c.205C>T base change induced exon 4 skipping in most mRNAs, leading to premature termination of myotubularin translation. Some full-length Mtm1 mRNA bearing the mutation is present, which provides enough myotubularin activity to account for the relatively mild phenotype, as Mtm1 KO and Mtm1 p.R69C mice have similar muscle phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate levels. These data explain the basis for phenotypic variability among human patients with MTM1 p.R69C mutations and establish the Mtm1 p.R69C mouse as a valuable model for the disease, as its less severe phenotype will expand the scope of testable preclinical therapies. PMID:22068590

  18. Induction of a subnuclear structure by the simultaneous expression of baculovirus proteins, IE1, LEF3, and P143 in the presence of hr

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamine, Toshihiro . E-mail: tnaga@riken.jp; Kawasaki, Yu; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2006-09-01

    Baculoviruses elicit the formation of a nuclear domain, called the virogenic stroma, in which viral DNA replication and nucleocapsid assembly occur. We had previously reported that nuclear focus formation of a transcriptional activator, IE1, is triggered by its binding to a viral DNA element, hr, and predicted that this hr-induced IE1 focus is an initial scaffold for the virogenic stroma. However, LEF3, a component of the virogenic stroma, did not localize to the IE1 foci. In exploring a mediator for its localization, we found that a baculovirus DNA helicase (P143), in combination with IE1 and hr, induced a subnuclear structure to which LEF3 localized and also that another component of the virogenic stroma, DBP, is able to localize to this structure. These results reveal that only four viral molecules are necessary to establish a nuclear domain which possesses a recruiting ability for a component of the virogenic stroma.

  19. 11 CFR 300.52 - Fundraising by Federal candidates and Federal officeholders (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)&(4)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fundraising by Federal candidates and Federal officeholders (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)&(4)). 300.52 Section 300.52 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION... Fundraising by Federal candidates and Federal officeholders (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)&(4)). A Federal candidate,...

  20. Anti-human cytomegalovirus activity of cytokines produced by CD4+ T-cell clones specifically activated by IE1 peptides in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Davignon, J L; Castanié, P; Yorke, J A; Gautier, N; Clément, D; Davrinche, C

    1996-01-01

    The control of latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections by the immune system is poorly understood. We have previously shown that CD4+ T cells specific for the human CMV major regulatory protein IE1 are frequent in latently infected healthy blood donors. In order to learn about the possible role of these cells, we have developed IE1-specific CD4+ T-cell clones and, in this study, analyzed their epitope specificity and function in vitro. We measured their cytokine production when stimulated with specific IE1 peptides or whole recombinant IE1 protein. Their cytokine profiles, as deduced from gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-6 production, were of the Th0- and Th1-like phenotypes. Supernatants from IE1-specific clones producing IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were shown to inhibit CMV replication in U373 MG cells. This effect was due, as found by using cytokine-specific neutralizing antibodies, mostly to IFN-gamma, which was secreted at higher levels than TNF-alpha. To better assess the anti-CMV activity of cytokines, recombinant IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were used and shown to have a synergistic effect on the inhibition of CMV replication and protein expression. Thus, IE1-specific CD4+ T cells display in vitro anti-CMV activity through cytokine secretion and may play a role in the control of in vivo latent infections. PMID:8642638

  1. Role of Litopenaeus vannamei Yin Yang 1 in the Regulation of the White Spot Syndrome Virus Immediate Early Gene ie1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping-Han; Huang, Ting-Yi; Cai, Pei-Si; Chang, Li-Kwan

    2017-03-15

    Yin Yang 1 (YY1) is a multifunctional zinc finger transcription factor that regulates many key cellular processes. In this study, we report the cloning of YY1 from Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp (LvYY1). This study shows that LvYY1 is ubiquitously expressed in shrimp tissues, and knockdown of LvYY1 expression by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) injection in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-infected shrimp reduced both mRNA levels of the WSSV immediate early gene ie1 as well as overall copy numbers of the WSSV genome. The cumulative mortality rate of infected shrimp also declined with LvYY1 dsRNA injection. Using an insect cell model, we observed that LvYY1 activates ie1 expression, and a mutation introduced into the ie1 promoter subsequently repressed this capability. Moreover, reporter assay results suggested that LvYY1 is involved in basal transcriptional regulation via an interaction with L. vannamei TATA-binding protein (LvTBP). Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) results further indicated that LvYY1 binds to a YY1-binding site in the region between positions -119 and -126 in the ie1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis also confirmed that LvYY1 binds to the ie1 promoter in WSSV-infected shrimp. Taken together, these results indicate that WSSV uses host LvYY1 to enhance ie1 expression via a YY1-binding site and the TATA box in the ie1 promoter, thereby facilitating lytic activation and viral replication.IMPORTANCE WSSV has long been a scourge of the shrimp industry and remains a serious global threat. Thus, there is a pressing need to understand how the interactions between WSSV and its host drive infection, lytic development, pathogenesis, and mortality. Our successful cloning of L. vannamei YY1 (LvYY1) led to the elucidation of a critical virus-host interaction between LvYY1 and the WSSV immediate early gene ie1 We observed that LvYY1 regulates ie1 expression via a consensus YY1-binding site and TATA box. LvYY1 was also found to interact with L

  2. HCMV activation of ERK-MAPK drives a multi-factorial response promoting the survival of infected myeloid progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Kew, Verity; Wills, Mark; Reeves, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Viral binding and entry provides the first trigger of a cell death response and thus how human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) evades this – particularly during latent infection where a very limited pattern of gene expression is observed – is less well understood. It has been demonstrated that the activation of cellular signalling pathways upon virus binding promotes the survival of latently infected cells by the activation of cell encoded anti-apoptotic responses. In CD34+ cells, a major site of HCMV latency, ERK signalling is important for survival and we now show that the activation of this pathway impacts on multiple aspects of cell death pathways. The data illustrate that HCMV infection triggers activation of pro-apoptotic Bak which is then countered through multiple ERK-dependent functions. Specifically, ERK promotes ELK1 mediated transcription of the key survival molecule MCL-1, along with a concomitant decrease of the pro-apoptotic BIM and PUMA proteins. Finally, we show that the elimination of ELK-1 from CD34+ cells results in elevated Bak activation in response to viral infection, resulting in cell death. Taken together, these data begin to shed light on the poly-functional response elicited by HCMV via ERK-MAPK to promote cell survival. PMID:28491825

  3. Soluble expression and complex formation of proteins required for HCMV DNA replication using the SFV expression system.

    PubMed

    McCue, L A; Anders, D G

    1998-08-01

    Several of the viral proteins required for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA replication have been difficult to study due to their low abundance in infected cells and low solubility in bacterial or insect-cell expression systems. Therefore we used the Semliki Forest virus expression system to express these proteins in mammalian cells. All of the recombinant proteins were soluble, on the basis of ultracentrifugation properties and their ability to be immunoprecipitated from solution with specific antibodies. Pulse-chase analysis of the 86-kDa major immediate-early protein (IE86) revealed two expressed forms-a precursor and a product-indicating that this recombinant protein, like the native HCMV protein, is posttranslationally processed. The recombinant proteins (polymerase core and accessory as well as the IE86 and pUL84) formed stable complexes similar to those known to form in HCMV-infected cells. The recombinant DNA polymerase holoenzyme also exhibited enzyme activity that was phosphonoformic acid sensitive, as is the infected-cell DNA polymerase activity. This expression system offers many advantages for the expression and study of the HCMV replication proteins, including the expression of soluble, active proteins that are able to interact to form complexes. Additionally, the relative ease with which SFV recombinants can be made lends itself to the construction and evaluation of mutants.

  4. HCMV protein LUNA is required for viral reactivation from latently infected primary CD14⁺ cells.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Lisa R; Hargett, Danna; Soland, Melisa; Bego, Mariana G; Rossetto, Cyprian C; Almeida-Porada, Graca; St Jeor, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a member of the Herpesviridae family that infects individuals throughout the world. Following an initial lytic stage, HCMV can persist in the individual for life in a non-active (or latent) form. During latency, the virus resides within cells of the myeloid lineage. The mechanisms controlling HCMV latency are not completely understood. A latency associated transcript, UL81-82ast, encoding the protein LUNA (Latency Unique Natural Antigen) was identified from latently infected donors in vivo. To address the role of the UL81-82ast protein product LUNA, in the context of the viral genome, we developed a recombinant HCMV bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) that does not express LUNA. This construct, LUNA knockout FIX virus (FIX-ΔLUNA), was used to evaluate LUNA's role in HCMV latency. The FIX-ΔLUNA virus was able to lytically infect Human Fibroblast (HF) cells, showing that LUNA is not required to establish a lytic infection. Interestingly, we observed significantly higher viral copy numbers in HF cells infected with FIX-ΔLUNA when compared to FIX-WT virus. Furthermore, FIX-WT and FIX-ΔLUNA genomic DNA and transcription of UL81-82ast persisted over time in primary monocytes. In contrast, the levels of UL138 transcript expression in FIX-ΔLUNA infected HF and CD14⁺ cells was 100 and 1000 fold lower (respectively) when compared to the levels observed for FIX-WT infection. Moreover, FIX-ΔLUNA virus failed to reactivate from infected CD14⁺ cells following differentiation. This lack of viral reactivation was accompanied by a lack of lytic gene expression, increase in viral copy numbers, and lack of the production of infectious units following differentiation of the cells. Our study suggests that the LUNA protein is involved in regulating HCMV reactivation, and that in the absence of LUNA, HCMV may not be able to enter a proper latent state and therefore cannot be rescued from the established persistent infection in CD14⁺ cells.

  5. Controlled crystal dehydration triggers a space-group switch and shapes the tertiary structure of cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 (IE1) protein.

    PubMed

    Klingl, Stefan; Scherer, Myriam; Stamminger, Thomas; Muller, Yves A

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 (IE1) protein is a key viral effector protein that reprograms host cells. Controlled dehydration experiments with IE1 crystals not only extended their diffraction limit from 2.85 to 2.3 Å resolution but also triggered a monoclinic to tetragonal space-group transition with only minor alterations in the unit-cell parameters. An analysis of the pre-dehydration and post-dehydration crystal structures shows how dehydration rearranges the packing of IE1 molecules to meet the unit-cell constraints of the higher lattice symmetry. The transition from P21 to P43 reduces the number of copies in the asymmetric unit from four to two, and molecules previously related by noncrystallographic symmetry merge into identical crystallographic copies in the tetragonal space group. At the same time, dehydration considerably alters the tertiary structure of one of the two remaining IE1 chains in the asymmetric unit. It appears that this conformational switch is required to compensate for a transition that is assumed to be unfavourable, namely from a highly preferred to a rarely observed space group. At the same time, the dehydration-triggered molecular reshaping could reveal an inherent molecular flexibility that possibly informs on the biological function of IE1, namely on its binding to target proteins from the host cell.

  6. Shrimp STAT was hijacked by white spot syndrome virus immediate-early protein IE1 involved in modulation of viral genes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Defu; Ruan, Lingwei; Lu, Huasong; Shi, Hong; Xu, Xun

    2016-12-01

    STATs are a family of transcription factors that regulate a cascade of cellular processes including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and immune responses. However, they are usually targeted by viruses to assist infection. In this study, we identified that white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) immediate-early protein IE1 interacted with Litopenaeus vannamei STAT (LvSTAT) and thereby led to its phosphorylation activation. In addition, we demonstrated that LvSTAT could bind to the promoters of the viral immediate-early genes wsv051 and ie1 through STAT-binding motifs in vitro and vivo, allowing the enhancement of their promoters' activities. Moreover, IE1 could promote the transcriptional activation activity of LvSTAT to augment the transcription of wsv051 and ie1. In conclusion, our findings revealed a novel linkage between WSSV IE1 and shrimp STAT, which was a clue to well understand how WSSV adopted the active strategies to modulate the shrimp signaling pathway.

  7. Congenital HCMV infection: a collaborative and comparative study of virus detection in amniotic fluid by culture and by PCR.

    PubMed

    Gouarin, S; Palmer, P; Cointe, D; Rogez, S; Vabret, A; Rozenberg, F; Denis, F; Freymuth, F; Lebon, P; Grangeot-Keros, L

    2001-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is the leading cause of congenital virus infection in developed countries, affecting an estimated 1% of births. This antenatal infection can cause serious sequelae. Strategies for prevention and treatment must, therefore, be agreed upon, entailing a preliminary performance assessment of antenatal virus diagnosis techniques. Between 1992 and 1999, HCMV serology status was established for 19456 pregnant women in four French hospitals. Seronegative patients (55.4%) were given serology screening, and antenatal diagnosis was given to 152 women who had shown seroconversion during their pregnancies (1.4%). The detection of HCMV transmission from mother to fetus was finally established in 95 cases, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and viral culture methods for detecting HCMV in the amniotic fluid. These results were compared with viral culture of children's urine after birth, enabling us to distinguish between children really infected in utero (30%) and non-infected children (70%). The results of the virus culture and those of PCR were identical in 94 of the 95 cases, with one discrepancy (culture-/PCR+). The two diagnosis techniques had identical sensitivity (72%), with culture proving slightly more specific than PCR (98.4% as opposed to 96.9%). Positive prediction values for culture and for PCR were, respectively, 95.6 and 91.3%. Antenatal virus diagnosis on amniotic fluid was negative with both techniques in 8 out of 29 cases of children born with HCMV infection (VPN=89%). Over half of these wrongly negative results can be explained by amniocentesis carried out too early in the pregnancy or too early with respect to the mother's primary infection.

  8. HCMV pUS28 initiates pro-migratory signaling via activation of Pyk2 kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Vomaske, Jennifer; Varnum, Susan M.; Melnychuk, Ryan; Smith, Patricia; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Streblow, Daniel N.

    2010-12-10

    The HCMV-encoded chemokine receptor US28 mediates smooth muscle cell (SMC) and macrophage motility and this activity has been implicated in the acceleration of vascular disease. US28 induced SMC migration involves the activation of the protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) Src and Focal adhesion kinase as well as the small GTPase RhoA. In the current study, we examined the involvement of the PTK Pyk2 in US28-induced cellular motility. Expression of a Pyk2 lacking the autophosphorylation site (Tyr-402) blocks US28-mediated SMC migration in response to RANTES, while the kinase-inactive mutant failed to elicit the same negative effect on migration. US28 stimulation with RANTES results in ligand-dependent and calcium-dependent phosphorylation of Pyk2 Tyr-402 and induced the formation of an active Pyk2 kinase complex containing several novel Pyk2 binding proteins. Interestingly, expression of the autophosphorylation site mutant Pyk2 F402Y did not abrogate the formation of an active Pyk2 kinase complex, but instead prevented US28-mediated activation of RhoA. These findings represent the first demonstration that US28 signals through Pyk2 and that this PTK participates in US28-mediated cellular motility via activation of RhoA. Additionally, US28 activated RhoA via Pyk2 in the U373 glioblastoma cells. Interestingly, the Pyk2 kinase complex in U373 contained several proteins known to participate in glioma tumorigenesis. These results provide a potential mechanistic link between HCMV-US28 and glioblastoma cell activation and motility.

  9. LPAC syndrome associated with deletion of the full exon 4 in a ABCB4 genetic mutation in a patient with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Fombuena, Blanca; Ampuero, Javier; Álvarez, Luis; Aparcero, Reyes; Llorca, Rocío; Millán, Raquel; Pastor, Helena; Andueza, Sara; Barbu, Veronique; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2014-12-01

    Low-phospholipid-associated cholelithiasis syndrome (LPAC) is associated with ABCB4 genetic mutation. ABCB4 encodes MDR3 protein, involved in biliary phosphatidylcholine excretion.Higher prevalence in women, biliary symptoms in young adults and ursodesoxycholic acid (UDCA) response are the main features. We report the case of a 48-year-old man with hepatitis C, genotype 1b, fibrosis F3, null responder to Peg-IFN-alpha-2b/ribavirin and nephritic colic. In 2011 he developed jaundice, pruritus and epigastric pain.He showed increased serum levels of AST, ALT, GGT, bilirubin and alpha-fetoprotein, and viral load (14,600,000 IU/mL). Pancreatic- CT, endoscopic ultrasonography and echo-Doppler showed noncirrhotic chronic liver disease. The episode resolved spontaneously and one year later he suffered a similar episode. UDCA was started with excellent response. An immunohistochemistry study and sequencing of ABCB4 did not find alteration. MLPA® technique detected heterozygous deletion of the full exon 4 confirming LPAC syndrome diagnosis.

  10. Large genomic mutations within the ATM gene detected by MLPA, including a duplication of 41 kb from exon 4 to 20.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, Simona; Funaro, Ada; Pappi, Patrizia; Migone, Nicola; Gatti, Richard A; Brusco, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    Mutation detection remains problematic for large genes, primarily because PCR-based methodology fails to detect heterozygous deletions and any duplication. In the ATM gene only a handful of multi-exon deletions have been described to date, and this type of mutation has been considered rare. To address this issue we tested a new MLPA (Multiplex Ligation Probe Amplification) kit that covers 33 of the 66 ATM exons, using for controls two previously characterized genomic deletions in addition to three A-T patients, taken from a survey of nine, who had missing four mutations unidentified after conventional mutation screening. We identified for the first time: 1) a approximately 41 kb genomic duplication spanning exons 4-20 (c.-30_2816dup41kb)(a.k.a., ATM dup 41 kb); 2) a novel genomic deletion including exon 31, and 3) in hemizygosis a point mutation in the non-deleted exon 31. In this study we extended mutation detection to nine new Italian A-T patients, using a combined approach of haplotype analysis, DHPLC and MLPA. Overall we achieved a mutation detection rate of >97%, and can now define a spectrum of ATM mutations based on twenty-one consecutive Italian families with A-T.

  11. The human gastrin/cholecystokinin type B receptor gene: Alternative splice donor site in exon 4 generates two variant mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Song, I.; Brown, D.R.; Wiltshire, R.N.; Gantz, I.; Trent, J.M.; Yamada, T. )

    1993-10-01

    Gastrin and its carboxyl-terminal homolog cholecystokinin (CCK) exert a variety of biological actions in the brain and gastrointestinal tract that are mediated in part through one or more G protein-coupled receptors which exhibit similar affinity for both peptides. Genomic clones encoding a human gastrin/CCK[sub B] receptor were isolated by screening a human EMBL phage library with a partial-length DNA fragment which was based on the nucleotide sequence of the canine gastrin receptor. The gene contained a 1356-bp open reading frame consisting of five exons interrupted by 4 introns and was assigned to human chromosome 11p15.4. A region of exon 4, which encodes a portion of the putative third intracellular loop, appears to be alternatively spliced to yield two different mRNAs, one containing (452 aminio acids; long isoform) and the other lacking (447 amino acids; short isoform) the pentapeptide sequence Gly-Gly-Ala-Gly-Pro. The two receptor isoforms may contribute to functional differences in gastrin- and CCK-mediated signal transduction. 28 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. 11 CFR 300.52 - Fundraising by Federal candidates and Federal officeholders (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)&(4)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Fundraising by Federal candidates and Federal officeholders (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)&(4)). 300.52 Section 300.52 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002-(BCRA) REGULATIONS NON-FEDERAL FUNDS Tax-Exempt Organizations § 300.52...

  13. 11 CFR 300.52 - Fundraising by Federal candidates and Federal officeholders (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)&(4)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fundraising by Federal candidates and Federal officeholders (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)&(4)). 300.52 Section 300.52 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002-(BCRA) REGULATIONS NON-FEDERAL FUNDS Tax-Exempt Organizations § 300.52...

  14. 11 CFR 300.65 - Exceptions for certain tax-exempt organizations (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1) and (4)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exceptions for certain tax-exempt organizations (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1) and (4)). 300.65 Section 300.65 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002-(BCRA) REGULATIONS NON-FEDERAL FUNDS Federal Candidates and...

  15. 11 CFR 300.52 - Fundraising by Federal candidates and Federal officeholders (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)&(4)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fundraising by Federal candidates and Federal officeholders (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1)&(4)). 300.52 Section 300.52 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002-(BCRA) REGULATIONS NON-FEDERAL FUNDS Tax-Exempt Organizations § 300.52...

  16. 11 CFR 300.65 - Exceptions for certain tax-exempt organizations (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1) and (4)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Exceptions for certain tax-exempt organizations (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1) and (4)). 300.65 Section 300.65 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002-(BCRA) REGULATIONS NON-FEDERAL FUNDS Federal Candidates and...

  17. 11 CFR 300.65 - Exceptions for certain tax-exempt organizations (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1) and (4)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exceptions for certain tax-exempt organizations (2 U.S.C. 441i(e)(1) and (4)). 300.65 Section 300.65 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION BIPARTISAN CAMPAIGN REFORM ACT OF 2002-(BCRA) REGULATIONS NON-FEDERAL FUNDS Federal Candidates and...

  18. Expansion of cytomegalovirus pp65 and IE-1 specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes for cytomegalovirus-specific immunotherapy following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Dunham, Kimberly; Stamer, Mindy; Mulieri, Kevin M; Lucas, Kenneth G

    2008-10-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) has proven effective in restoring cellular immunity to cytomegalovirus (CMV) and preventing viral reactivation after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). In an effort to develop a cost-effective, relatively rapid method of CMV CTL expansion, we investigated the use of a pool of overlapping CMV peptides. Because the possibility exists of vaccinating CMV-seronegative donors, and these individuals may have T cell responses predominantly against IE-1, commercially available peptide mixes for pp65 as well as IE-1 were used to stimulate CTLs from 10 seropositive donors. Of these 10 donors, 4 responded to pp65 only, 1 did not respond to either pp65 or IE-1, 4 responded to both pp65 and IE-1, and 1 responded to IE-1 only. These CMV- specific T cells included a mixture of CD4(+) and CD8(+) effectors, and specific cytotoxicity correlated with interferon-gamma production. The costs associated with a 28-day maintenance course of intravenous ganciclovir, cidofovir, foscarnet, and valganciclovir, as well as the preparation and shipping a single dose of CTLs, were determined. The price of generating CMV CTLs using this method was comparable to or less expensive than a 28-day maintenance course for these agents, not including the costs associated with drug administration, supportive care, and the treatment of drug-related complications. Considering the relative ease, low cost, and the fact that CTL administration can result in CMV-specific immune reconstitution, this option should be considered for patients with CMV reactivation or for prophylaxis in patients at high risk for infection.

  19. Pretransplant CD8 T-cell response to IE-1 discriminates seropositive kidney recipients at risk of developing CMV infection posttransplant.

    PubMed

    López-Oliva, Maria Ovidia; Martinez, Virginia; Buitrago, Agueda; Jiménez, Carlos; Rivas, Begoña; Escuin, Fernando; Santana, María José; Selgas, Rafael; Bellón, Teresa

    2014-04-27

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is an ongoing clinical problem in solid-organ transplantation (SOT). Pretransplant CMV serology is currently the only tool for assessing the risk of CMV infection, although cellular immune responses driven by CMV-specific CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes are important for controlling viral replication. Therefore, the analysis of CMV-specific T cells may be useful for estimating the risk of infection. This is a prospective study of patients with kidney transplants and no prophylactic treatment for CMV replication. CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses to the major CMV pp65 and IE-1 antigens in 15 seropositive patients at intermediate risk of CMV infection were investigated, according to current algorithms. Intracellular flow cytometry was employed to determine IFN-γ production as a functional readout. The response was analyzed in pretransplant samples and prospectively at 1 and 6 months and at 1 year posttransplant. It was observed that the CD8 responses to IE-1 antigen were practically absent pretransplant in patients who developed CMV infection posttransplant. Within the group of patients free of infection, CD8 responses to IE-1 were detected more frequently and were significantly higher (P=0.0083). In a receiver operating characteristics curve analysis (AUC=0.929; P=0.010; 95% CI: 0.078-1.0), low CD8 responses to IE-1 (≤0.05%) pretransplant predicted the development of CMV infection under the immunosuppressive regime after transplant with 100% specificity and 85.7% sensitivity. Assessment of IE-1-specific CD8 T-cell frequencies pretransplant may be a useful tool for identifying seropositive SOT patients at risk of developing CMV infection posttransplant.

  20. High levels of CMV-IE-1-specific memory T cells are associated with less alloimmunity and improved renal allograft function.

    PubMed

    Nickel, Peter; Bold, Gantuja; Presber, Franziska; Biti, Didier; Babel, Nina; Kreutzer, Stephanie; Pratschke, Johann; Schönemann, Constanze; Kern, Florian; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Reinke, Petra

    2009-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection has been associated with allograft rejection in solid organ transplantation. However, the immunologic mechanisms behind this observation have not been elucidated. One proposed mechanism is direct cross-reactivity of antiviral T-cells with allogeneic MHC/peptide complexes, a process termed heterologous immunity. Another model favours indirect stimulation of alloimmunity by CMV-induced proinflammatory cytokines and upregulation of MHC class II and adhesion molecules. Recently, we found that protection from CMV disease was correlated with high levels of CMV-immediate early-1 (IE-1) specific IFN-gamma-producing T-cell responses in heart and lung transplant recipients. The aim of this study was to define the relation of CMV-specific T-cell responses to acute rejection, donor-reactive memory T cells, and allograft function after kidney transplantation. To address this issue, IFN-gamma-producing T-cell responses following ex-vivo stimulation with pools of overlapping peptides representing the CMV pp65 and IE-1 proteins, as well as donor-reactive IFN-gamma-producing T-cells were determined at multiple time points before (pre-Tx) and during the first 6 months posttransplant (post-Tx) in 36 kidney transplant recipients using an enzyme linked immunoabsorbent spot assay (ELISPOT). CMV-specific T cells were not exclusively detectable in CMV seropositive patients, as 3/12 seronegative patients had significant pre- and post-Tx pp65/IE-1-specific T-cell responses. In patients with detectable anti-CMV antibody or T-cell responses, no difference in CMV-specific T-cell frequencies was found between patients with versus without acute rejection. However, early (week 1, r=0.457, p=0.037) and average IE-1-specific T-cell responses (r=-0.415, p=0.032) during 6 months post-Tx showed a significant inverse correlation with average post-Tx donor-reactive T-cell responses. Furthermore, average post-Tx IE-1-specific T-cell responses correlated significantly with

  1. Late emergence of A594V and L595W mutations related to ganciclovir resistance in a patient with HCMV retinitis and long-term HIV progression

    PubMed Central

    Slavov, S.N.; Vilar, F.C.; Wagatsuma, V.M.D.; Santana, R.C.; Machado, A.A.; da Fonseca, B.A.L.; Kashima, S.; Covas, D.T.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of ganciclovir (GCV) resistance during the treatment of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is a serious clinical challenge, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In this case report, we describe the emergence of two consecutive mutations (A594V and L595W) related to GCV resistance in a patient with HCMV retinitis and long-term HIV progression after approximately 240 days of GCV use. Following the diagnosis of retinitis, the introduction of GCV did not result in viral load reduction. The detected mutations appeared late in the treatment, and we propose that other factors (high initial HCMV load, previous GCV exposure, low CD4+ cell count), in addition to the presence of resistance mutations, may have contributed to the treatment failure of HCMV infection in this patient. PMID:26270327

  2. Glucocorticosteroids trigger reactivation of human cytomegalovirus from latently infected myeloid cells and increase the risk for HCMV infection in D+R+ liver transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Ellen; Sauviller, Sarah; Lau, Betty; Kesteleyn, Bart; Griffiths, Paul; Burroughs, Andrew; Emery, Vincent; Sinclair, John

    2015-01-01

    Graft rejection in transplant patients is managed clinically by suppressing T-cell function with immunosuppressive drugs such as prednisolone and methylprednisolone. In such immunocompromised hosts, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important opportunistic pathogen and can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Currently, the effect of glucocorticosteroids (GCSs) on the HCMV life cycle remains unclear. Previous reports showed enhanced lytic replication of HCMV in vitro in the presence of GCSs. In the present study, we explored the implications of steroid exposure on latency and reactivation. We observed a direct effect of several GCSs used in the clinic on the activation of a quiescent viral major immediate-early promoter in stably transfected THP-1 monocytic cells. This activation was prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist Ru486 and by shRNA-mediated knockdown of the GR. Consistent with this observation, prednisolone treatment of latently infected primary monocytes resulted in HCMV reactivation. Analysis of the phenotype of these cells showed that treatment with GCSs was correlated with differentiation to an anti-inflammatory macrophage-like cell type. On the basis that these observations may be pertinent to HCMV reactivation in post-transplant settings, we retrospectively evaluated the incidence, viral kinetics and viral load of HCMV in liver transplant patients in the presence or absence of GCS treatment. We observed that combination therapy of baseline prednisolone and augmented methylprednisolone, upon organ rejection, significantly increased the incidence of HCMV infection in the intermediate risk group where donor and recipient are both HCMV seropositive (D+R+) to levels comparable with the high risk D+R− group. PMID:25312585

  3. Glucocorticosteroids trigger reactivation of human cytomegalovirus from latently infected myeloid cells and increase the risk for HCMV infection in D+R+ liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Ellen; Sauviller, Sarah; Lau, Betty; Kesteleyn, Bart; Griffiths, Paul; Burroughs, Andrew; Emery, Vincent; Sinclair, John; Van Loock, Marnix

    2015-01-01

    Graft rejection in transplant patients is managed clinically by suppressing T-cell function with immunosuppressive drugs such as prednisolone and methylprednisolone. In such immunocompromised hosts, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important opportunistic pathogen and can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Currently, the effect of glucocorticosteroids (GCSs) on the HCMV life cycle remains unclear. Previous reports showed enhanced lytic replication of HCMV in vitro in the presence of GCSs. In the present study, we explored the implications of steroid exposure on latency and reactivation. We observed a direct effect of several GCSs used in the clinic on the activation of a quiescent viral major immediate-early promoter in stably transfected THP-1 monocytic cells. This activation was prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist Ru486 and by shRNA-mediated knockdown of the GR. Consistent with this observation, prednisolone treatment of latently infected primary monocytes resulted in HCMV reactivation. Analysis of the phenotype of these cells showed that treatment with GCSs was correlated with differentiation to an anti-inflammatory macrophage-like cell type. On the basis that these observations may be pertinent to HCMV reactivation in post-transplant settings, we retrospectively evaluated the incidence, viral kinetics and viral load of HCMV in liver transplant patients in the presence or absence of GCS treatment. We observed that combination therapy of baseline prednisolone and augmented methylprednisolone, upon organ rejection, significantly increased the incidence of HCMV infection in the intermediate risk group where donor and recipient are both HCMV seropositive (D+R+) to levels comparable with the high risk D+R- group.

  4. Polymorphism in the exon 4 of β-lactoglobulin variant B precursor gene and its association with milk traits and protein structure in Chinese Holstein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Li, Lian; Liu, Huiling; Cai, Yafei; Wang, Genlin

    2012-04-01

    β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) is the major whey protein in the milk. In order to investigate the polymorphism of β-LG variant B precursor (β-LG B*: GenBank accession no. DQ489319) gene and its effects on the milk traits, the single-strand conformation polymorphism method (PCR-SSCP) were adopted to analyze polymorphism between 5229th and 5476th bp in the β-LG B* gene in Chinese Holstein. Four genotypes were found (AA, AB, AC and ABC) and 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected (g.5239C>A, g.5240A>C, g.5305C>T and mix type g.5305C/T) in the exon 4 of β-LG B* gene. It was also found that the protein contents of AB, AC and ABC dairy cows were higher than AA (P < 0.05), and AC cows were the highest among them. Three SNPs (g.5239C>A, g.5240A>C and g.5305C>T) might affect the milk trait and all of them were high polymorphism (0.5 < PIC < 1.0). In further researches, the three SNPs also caused amino acid change (Asp>Glu, Thr>Pro and Ala>Val) respectively, and the spatial secondary and tertiary structure forecasting result also showed that single amino acid change influence protein spatial structure change in Chinese Holstein. Taken together, it is suggested that these SNPs change β-LG B* gene structure and expression. The polymorphism possibly holds the secret of milk protein and fat contents in the milk of Chinese Holstein.

  5. Mosaic tissue distribution of the tandem duplication of LAMP2 exons 4 and 5 demonstrates the limits of Danon disease cellular and molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Majer, Filip; Pelak, Ondrej; Kalina, Tomas; Vlaskova, Hana; Dvorakova, Lenka; Honzik, Tomas; Palecek, Tomas; Kuchynka, Petr; Masek, Martin; Zeman, Jiri; Elleder, Milan; Sikora, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Alu-mediated tandem duplication of exons 4 and 5 (g.15815_22218dup6404) is a novel mutation that has been detected in the LAMP2 gene (Xq24). This exon copy number variation was found in two brothers with the typical phenotype of Danon disease, including characteristic myocardial changes on magnetic resonance imaging. The 6.4 kb duplication was identified in both boys by a combination of exon dosage qPCR analyses and duplication breakpoint/junction mapping. The rearrangement results in a plethora of abnormal LAMP2 splicing variants and also in use of likely cryptic splice sites in the 3' terminus of LAMP2 gene. Although we found minute amounts of normal LAMP2B and LAMP2A mRNAs, no protein was detectable in peripheral blood leukocytes by flow cytometry in both brothers. Uniquely, the fraction of LAMP2-deficient granulocytes (0.06%) assessed by flow cytometry in the patients' asymptomatic mother substantially differed from the random distribution of X-chromosome inactivation in her leukocytes. This discrepancy was later explained by molecular genetic methods as a consequence of mosaic distribution of the mutation in her somatic tissues. Altogether, we report a novel and mosaically distributed exon copy number rearrangement in the LAMP2 gene and comment on obstacles this genetic setup presents to the overall cellular and molecular diagnostic algorithm of Danon disease. Our observations of the mosaicism in the asymptomatic mother suggest that similarly affected females could be a potentially under-diagnosed Danon disease carrier group and that LAMP2 flow cytometry, because of its supreme sensitivity, can be an efficient method for pedigree screening.

  6. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) IE1- and pp65-specific CD8+ T cell responses broaden over time after primary CMV infection in infants.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Laura; Dooley, Sheryl; Trzmielina, Sonia; Somasundaran, Mohan; Fisher, Donna; Revello, Maria Grazia; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2007-06-15

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in young children. We have previously shown that CD8+ T cell responses to CMV pp65 or IE1 protein were readily detectable in children with congenital or postnatal CMV infection. Here, we have further characterized the evolution of the peptide specificity of these responses in 7 infants<6 months of age at the start of the study. Thirteen pp65 and 15 IE1 peptides (median, 5 peptides/infant) were targeted, and most (61%) represented sequences not previously reported. Peptide specificity remained stable or broadened over time despite the clearance of CMV viremia. Loss of peptide recognition was not observed. Responses with the highest functional peptide avidity were not necessarily detected earliest. These data provide additional evidence that young infants can generate diverse CMV-specific CD8+ T cell responses but show that early responses may exhibit relatively focused peptide specificity and lower peptide avidity.

  7. White spot syndrome virus IE1 and WSV056 modulate the G1/S transition by binding to the host retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Ran, Xiaozhuo; Bian, Xiaofang; Ji, Yongchang; Yan, Xiumin; Yang, Feng; Li, Fang

    2013-12-01

    DNA viruses often target cellular proteins to modulate host cell cycles and facilitate viral genome replication. However, whether proliferation of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) requires regulation of the host cell cycle remains unclear. In the present study, we show that two WSSV paralogs, IE1 and WSV056, can interact with Litopenaeus vannamei retinoblastoma (Rb)-like protein (lv-RBL) through the conserved LxCxE motif. Further investigation revealed that IE1 and WSV056 could also bind to Drosophila retinoblastoma family protein 1 (RBF1) in a manner similar to how they bind to lv-RBL. Using the Drosophila RBF-E2F pathway as a model system, we demonstrated that both IE1 and WSV056 could sequester RBF1 from Drosophila E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F1) and subsequently activate E2F1 to stimulate the G1/S transition. Our findings provide the first evidence that WSSV may regulate cell cycle progression by targeting the Rb-E2F pathway.

  8. Effect of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US27 on CXCR4 receptor internalization measured by fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Boeck, Jordan M.; Spencer, Juliet V.

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widespread pathogen and a member of the Herpesviridae family. HCMV has a large genome that encodes many genes that are non-essential for virus replication but instead play roles in manipulation of the host immune environment. One of these is the US27 gene, which encodes a protein with homology to the chemokine receptor family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The US27 protein has no known chemokine ligands but can modulate the signaling activity of host receptor CXCR4. We investigated the mechanism for enhanced CXCR4 signaling in the presence of US27 using a novel biosensor system comprised of fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs). FAP-tagged CXCR4 and US27 were used to explore receptor internalization and recovery dynamics, and the results demonstrate that significantly more CXCR4 internalization was observed in the presence of US27 compared to CXCR4 alone upon stimulation with CXCL12. While ligand-induced endocytosis rates were higher, steady state internalization of CXCR4 was not affected by US27. Additionally, US27 underwent rapid endocytosis at a rate that was independent of either CXCR4 expression or CXCL12 stimulation. These results demonstrate that one mechanism by which US27 can enhance CXCR4 signaling is to alter receptor internalization dynamics, which could ultimately have the effect of promoting virus dissemination by increasing trafficking of HCMV-infected cells to tissues where CXCL12 is highly expressed. PMID:28207860

  9. Effect of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US27 on CXCR4 receptor internalization measured by fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) biosensors.

    PubMed

    Boeck, Jordan M; Spencer, Juliet V

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widespread pathogen and a member of the Herpesviridae family. HCMV has a large genome that encodes many genes that are non-essential for virus replication but instead play roles in manipulation of the host immune environment. One of these is the US27 gene, which encodes a protein with homology to the chemokine receptor family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The US27 protein has no known chemokine ligands but can modulate the signaling activity of host receptor CXCR4. We investigated the mechanism for enhanced CXCR4 signaling in the presence of US27 using a novel biosensor system comprised of fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs). FAP-tagged CXCR4 and US27 were used to explore receptor internalization and recovery dynamics, and the results demonstrate that significantly more CXCR4 internalization was observed in the presence of US27 compared to CXCR4 alone upon stimulation with CXCL12. While ligand-induced endocytosis rates were higher, steady state internalization of CXCR4 was not affected by US27. Additionally, US27 underwent rapid endocytosis at a rate that was independent of either CXCR4 expression or CXCL12 stimulation. These results demonstrate that one mechanism by which US27 can enhance CXCR4 signaling is to alter receptor internalization dynamics, which could ultimately have the effect of promoting virus dissemination by increasing trafficking of HCMV-infected cells to tissues where CXCL12 is highly expressed.

  10. Autoreactivity of primary human immunoglobulins ancestral to hypermutated human antibodies that neutralize HCMV.

    PubMed

    McLean, Gary R; Cho, Chin-wen; Schrader, John W

    2006-05-01

    The human antibody response to the AD-2S1 epitope of glycoprotein B (gB) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is dominated by a family of closely related somatically mutated antibodies. These antibodies neutralize viral infectivity and the genes encoding them are derived from two commonly used germ-line variable (V) region genes, IGHV3-30 and IGKV3-11. Recombination of these V genes with the appropriate junctional diversity generates genes that encode primary immunoglobulins that bind to AD-2S1. To further understand the initial primary immunoglobulin response to AD-2S1 we synthesized the germ-line-based ancestor of one such family of antibodies and showed that it bound gB at the AD-2S1 epitope. Here we show that the germ-line ancestor of a second family of antibodies likewise binds to gB. We further show that one of the ancestral primary immunoglobulins, but not the other, also recognized autoantigens. In contrast, the hypermutated derivatives did not demonstrate autoreactivity and minor structural changes in the primary immunoglobulin were sufficient to generate or abolish autoreactivity or to change specificity. Thus, our demonstration that the ancestor of a highly mutated, non-autoreactive antiviral IgG antibody binds nuclear and cell-surface autoantigens indicates for the first time that self-reactivity is not necessarily a barrier to development into a follicular B lymphocyte that undergoes antigen-initiated affinity maturation.

  11. Quantitative monitoring of HCMV DNAlactia in human milk by real time PCR assay: Implementation of internal control contributes to standardization and quality control.

    PubMed

    Hartleif, Steffen; Göhring, Katharina; Goelz, Rangmar; Jahn, Gerhard; Hamprecht, Klaus

    2016-11-01

    For cytomegalovirus screening of breastfeeding mothers of preterm infants under risk, we present a rapid, quantitative real-time PCR protocol using the hybridization format of the viral gB target region. For quantification, we used an external gB fragment cloned into a vector system. For standardization, we created an internal control-plasmid by site-directed mutagenesis with an exchange of 9 nucleotides. Spiked with internal control, patient wildtype amplicons could be discriminated from internal controls by hybridization probes using two-channel fluorescence detection. Potential bias of formerly reported false nucleotide sequence data of gB-hybridization probes was excluded. Using this approach, we could demonstrate excellent analytical performance and high reproducibility of HCMV detection during lactation. This assay shows very good correlation with a commercial quantitative HCMV DNA PCR and may help to identify rapidly HCMV shedding mothers of very low birth weight preterm infants to prevent HCMV transmission. On the other hand, negative DNA amplification results allow feeding of milk samples of seropositive mothers to their preterm infants under risk (<30 weeks of gestational age, <1000g birth weight) during the onset and late stage of HCMV shedding during lactation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of an in-house specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) avidity ELISA for distinguishing recent primary from long-term human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Silmara; Bonon, Sandra H A; Costa, Sandra C B; Rossi, Cláudio L

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the standardization and evaluation of an in-house specific IgG avidity ELISA for distinguishing recent primary from long-term human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. The test was standardized with the commercial kit ETI-CYTOK G Plus (Sorin Biomedica, Italy) using 8 M urea in phosphate-buffered saline to dissociate low-avidity antibodies after the antigen-antibody interaction. The performance of the in-house assay was compared to that of the commercial automated VIDAS CMV IgG avidity test (bioM rieux, France). Forty-nine sera, 24 from patients with a recent primary HCMV infection and 25 from patients with a long-term HCMV infection and a sustained persistence of specific IgM antibodies, were tested. Similar results were obtained with the two avidity methods. All 24 sera from patients with recently acquired infection had avidity indices compatible with acute HCMV infection by the VIDAS method, whereas with the in-house method, one serum sample had an equivocal result. In the 25 sera from patients with long-term infection, identical results were obtained with the two methods, with only one serum sample having an incompatible value. These findings suggest that our in-house avidity test could be a potentially useful tool for the immunodiagnosis of HCMV infection.

  13. Role of HCMV miR-UL70-3p and miR-UL148D in overcoming the cellular apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Babu, Sunil G; Pandeya, Abhishek; Verma, Neelam; Shukla, Nikita; Kumar, R Venkatesh; Saxena, Sangeeta

    2014-08-01

    The studies into the pathophysiology of viral miRNAs are still in infancy; the interspecies regulation at the miRNA level fuels the spark of the investigation into the repertoire of virus-host interactions. Reports pertaining to the viral miRNAs role in modulating/evading the host immune response are surging up; we initiated this in silico study to speculate the role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded miRNAs on human antiviral mechanisms such as apoptosis and autophagy. The results indicate that both the above mechanisms were targeted by the HCMV miRNAs, located in the unique long region of the HCMV genome. The proapoptotic genes MOAP1, PHAP, and ERN1 are identified to be the potential targets for the miR-UL70-3p and UL148D, respectively. The ERN1 gene plays a role in the initiation of Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis as well as autophagosome formation. This study shows that HCMV employs its miRNA repertoire for countering the cellular apoptosis and autophagy, particularly the mitochondrial-dependent intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In addition, the homology studies reveal no HCMV miRNA bears sequence homology with human miRNAs.

  14. Structural and biochemical studies of HCMV gH/gL/gO and Pentamer reveal mutually exclusive cell entry complexes.

    PubMed

    Ciferri, Claudio; Chandramouli, Sumana; Donnarumma, Danilo; Nikitin, Pavel A; Cianfrocco, Michael A; Gerrein, Rachel; Feire, Adam L; Barnett, Susan W; Lilja, Anders E; Rappuoli, Rino; Norais, Nathalie; Settembre, Ethan C; Carfi, Andrea

    2015-02-10

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in transplant patients and the leading viral cause of birth defects after congenital infection. The glycoprotein complexes gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/UL128/UL130/UL131A (Pentamer) are key targets of the human humoral response against HCMV and are required for HCMV entry into fibroblasts and endothelial/epithelial cells, respectively. We expressed and characterized soluble forms of gH/gL, gH/gL/gO, and Pentamer. Mass spectrometry and mutagenesis analysis revealed that gL-Cys144 forms disulfide bonds with gO-Cys351 in gH/gL/gO and with UL128-Cys162 in the Pentamer. Notably, Pentamer harboring the UL128-Cys162Ser/gL-Cys144Ser mutations had impaired syncytia formation and reduced interference of HCMV entry into epithelial cells. Electron microscopy analysis showed that HCMV gH/gL resembles HSV gH/gL and that gO and UL128/UL130/UL131A bind to the same site at the gH/gL N terminus. These data are consistent with gH/gL/gO and Pentamer forming mutually exclusive cell entry complexes and reveal the overall location of gH/gL-, gH/gL/gO-, and Pentamer-specific neutralizing antibody binding sites. Our results provide, to our knowledge, the first structural view of gH/gL/gO and Pentamer supporting the development of vaccines and antibody therapeutics against HCMV.

  15. 3D Analysis of HCMV Induced-Nuclear Membrane Structures by FIB/SEM Tomography: Insight into an Unprecedented Membrane Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Villinger, Clarissa; Neusser, Gregor; Kranz, Christine; Walther, Paul; Mertens, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We show that focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) tomography is an excellent method to analyze the three-dimensional structure of a fibroblast nucleus infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). We found that the previously described infoldings of the inner nuclear membrane, which are unique among its kind, form an extremely complex network of membrane structures not predictable by previous two-dimensional studies. In all cases they contained further invaginations (2nd and 3rd order infoldings). Quantification revealed 5498 HCMV capsids within two nuclear segments, allowing an estimate of 15,000 to 30,000 capsids in the entire nucleus five days post infection. Only 0.8% proved to be enveloped capsids which were exclusively detected in 1st order infoldings (perinuclear space). Distribution of the capsids between 1st, 2nd and 3rd order infoldings is in complete agreement with the envelopment/de-envelopment model for egress of HCMV capsids from the nucleus and we confirm that capsid budding does occur at the large infoldings. Based on our results we propose the pushing membrane model: HCMV infection induces local disruption of the nuclear lamina and synthesis of new membrane material which is pushed into the nucleoplasm, forming complex membrane infoldings in a highly abundant manner, which then may be also used by nucleocapsids for budding. PMID:26556360

  16. Transactivation of cellular genes involved in nucleotide metabolism by the regulatory IE1 protein of murine cytomegalovirus is not critical for viral replicative fitness in quiescent cells and host tissues.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmi, Vanessa; Simon, Christian O; Podlech, Jürgen; Böhm, Verena; Däubner, Torsten; Emde, Simone; Strand, Dennis; Renzaho, Angélique; Lemmermann, Niels A W; Seckert, Christof K; Reddehase, Matthias J; Grzimek, Natascha K A

    2008-10-01

    Despite its high coding capacity, murine CMV (mCMV) does not encode functional enzymes for nucleotide biosynthesis. It thus depends on cellular enzymes, such as ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) and thymidylate synthase (TS), to be supplied with deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) for its DNA replication. Viral transactivation of these cellular genes in quiescent cells of host tissues is therefore a parameter of viral fitness relevant to pathogenicity. Previous work has shown that the IE1, but not the IE3, protein of mCMV transactivates RNR and TS gene promoters and has revealed an in vivo attenuation of the mutant virus mCMV-DeltaIE1. It was attractive to propose the hypothesis that lack of transactivation by IE1 and a resulting deficiency in the supply of dNTPs are the reasons for growth attenuation. Here, we have tested this hypothesis with the mutant virus mCMV-IE1-Y165C expressing an IE1 protein that selectively fails to transactivate RNR and TS in quiescent cells upon transfection while maintaining the capacity to disperse repressive nuclear domains (ND10). Our results confirm in vivo attenuation of mCMV-DeltaIE1, as indicated by a longer doubling time in host organs, whereas mCMV-IE1-Y165C replicated like mCMV-WT and the revertant virus mCMV-IE1-C165Y. Notably, the mutant virus transactivated RNR and TS upon infection of quiescent cells, thus indicating that IE1 is not the only viral transactivator involved. We conclude that transactivation of cellular genes of dNTP biosynthesis is ensured by redundancy and that attenuation of mCMV-DeltaIE1 results from the loss of other critical functions of IE1, with its function in the dispersal of ND10 being a promising candidate.

  17. HCMV-encoded miR-UL112-3p promotes glioblastoma progression via tumour suppressor candidate 3

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qing; Wang, Kejia; Wang, Bin; Cai, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent and lethal type of primary malignant brain tumour. Recent studies suggest that the discovery of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) might play a role in the pathogenesis of diseases, including GBM. In this study, we aimed to analyse the expression and function of HCMV-encoded miRNAs in GBM. We found that miR-UL112-3p expression was significantly elevated in GBM, and its expression levels were highly associated with glioma size, differentiation, WHO stage and the overall and disease-free survival of patients. The overexpression of miR-UL112-3p in the GBM cells promoted cell proliferation, clone formation, migration and invasion. In contrast, the down-regulation of miR-UL112-3p exerted an inverse effects. Tumour suppressor candidate 3 (TUSC3), a potential target gene of miR-UL112-3p, was inversely correlated with miR-UL112-3p expression in GBM tissues and cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TUSC3 was directly regulated by miR-UL112-3p, and the ectopic expression of TUSC3 reversed the effects of miR-UL112-3p on GBM progression via the AKT signalling pathway. Taken together, these findings collectively demonstrate that miR-UL112-3p exerts its oncogene function by directly targeting TUSC3 in GBM, indicating a potential novel therapeutic target for GBM. PMID:28303930

  18. A Luciferase Gene Driven by an Alphaherpesviral Promoter Also Responds to Immediate Early Antigens of the Betaherpesvirus HCMV, Allowing Comparative Analyses of Different Human Herpesviruses in One Reporter Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Villinger, Clarissa; Schubert, Axel; Walther, Paul; Sinzger, Christian; Lieber, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Widely used methods for quantification of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in cell culture such as immunoblotting or plaque reduction assays are generally restricted to low throughput and require time-consuming evaluation. Up to now, only few HCMV reporter cell lines have been generated to overcome these restrictions and they are afflicted with other limitations because permanently expandable cell lines are normally not fully permissive to HCMV. In this work, a previously existing epithelial cell line hosting a luciferase gene under control of a Varicella-zoster virus promoter was adopted to investigate HCMV infection. The cells were susceptible to different HCMV strains at infection efficiencies that corresponded to their respective degree of epithelial cell tropism. Expression of early and late viral antigens, formation of nuclear inclusions, release of infectious virus progeny, and focal growth indicated productive viral replication. However, viral release and spread occurred at lower levels than in primary cell lines which appears to be due to a malfunction of virion morphogenesis during the nuclear stage. Expression of the luciferase reporter gene was specifically induced in HCMV infected cultures as a function of the virus dose and dependent on viral immediate early gene expression. The level of reporter activity accurately reflected infection efficiencies as determined by viral antigen immunostaining, and hence could discriminate the cell tropism of the tested virus strains. As proof-of-principle, we demonstrate that this cell line is applicable to evaluate drug resistance of clinical HCMV isolates and the neutralization capacity of human sera, and that it allows comparative and simultaneous analysis of HCMV and human herpes simplex virus type 1. In summary, the permanent epithelial reporter cell line allows robust, rapid and objective quantitation of HCMV infection and it will be particularly useful in higher throughput analyses as well as in

  19. AcMNPV AC16 (DA26, BV/ODV-E26) regulates the levels of IE0 and IE1 and binds to both proteins via a domain located within the acidic transcriptional activation domain.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yingchao; Fang, Minggang; Theilmann, David A

    2009-03-15

    IE0 and IE1 are the primary viral regulatory proteins of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) involved in the transactivation of early genes, stimulation of late gene expression, and viral DNA replication. The protein interactions required for IE0 or IE1 to achieve these varied roles are not well defined, so to identify proteins that interact with IE0 and IE1, tandem affinity purification (TAP) and LC-MS/MS was used. Analysis of purified proteins identified AC16 (DA26, BV/ODV-E26) from TAP tagged IE0 virus infected Sf9 cells. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed that AC16 interacts with both IE0 and IE1 and yeast 2-hybrid analysis mapped the domain required for interaction with AC16. Mutation of the AC16 binding domain enhanced BV production by viruses expressing only IE0 but had no effect if only IE1 is expressed. An ac16 deletion virus was constructed and was shown not to affect the temporal expression of IE0 and IE1; however the relative level of IE0 to IE1 was significantly increased.

  20. The association of ICAM-1 Exon 6 (E469K) but not of ICAM-1 Exon 4 (G241R) and PECAM-1 Exon 3 (L125V) polymorphisms with the development of differentiation syndrome in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dore, Adriana I; Santana-Lemos, Barbara A A; Coser, Virginia M; Santos, Flávia L S; Dalmazzo, Leandro F; Lima, Ana S G; Jacomo, Rafael H; Elias, Jorge; Falcão, Roberto Passetto; Pereira, Waldir V; Rego, Eduardo M

    2007-11-01

    The use of all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) is the basis of treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and represents the paradigm of differentiation therapy. In general, ATRA is well-tolerated but may be associated with a potentially lethal side-effect, referred to as retinoic acid or differentiation syndrome (DS). The cellular and molecular mechanisms of DS are poorly understood and involve changes in the adhesive qualities and cytokine secretion of leukemic cells during ATRA-induced differentiation. As leukocyte extravasation is a key event in DS pathogenesis, we analyzed the association between the polymorphisms at Exon 4 (G241R) and Exon 6 (E469K) of ICAM-1 and Exon 3 (L125V) of PECAM-1 genes with DS development in APL patients treated with ATRA and anthracyclines. DS was diagnosed in 23/127 (18.1%) APL patients at an average of 11.5 days after the start of ATRA. All patients presented respiratory distress associated with increased ground-glass opacity in chest radiographies. Other accompanying symptoms were: fever not attributable to infection (65.2%), generalized edema (37.5%), weight gain (37.5%), and impairment of renal function (8.6%). We detected an association between development of DS and the AA genotype at Codon 469 of ICAM-1 (odds ratio of 3.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.2-10.2). Conversely, no significant association was detected between G241R or L125V polymorphisms at Exon 4 of ICAM-1 and Exon 3 of PECAM-1, respectively. Our results suggest that susceptibility to DS in APL patients may be influenced by genetic variation in adhesion molecule loci.

  1. Plasma membrane profiling defines an expanded class of cell surface proteins selectively targeted for degradation by HCMV US2 in cooperation with UL141.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jye-Lin; van den Boomen, Dick J H; Tomasec, Peter; Weekes, Michael P; Antrobus, Robin; Stanton, Richard J; Ruckova, Eva; Sugrue, Daniel; Wilkie, Gavin S; Davison, Andrew J; Wilkinson, Gavin W G; Lehner, Paul J

    2015-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US2, US3, US6 and US11 act in concert to prevent immune recognition of virally infected cells by CD8+ T-lymphocytes through downregulation of MHC class I molecules (MHC-I). Here we show that US2 function goes far beyond MHC-I degradation. A systematic proteomic study using Plasma Membrane Profiling revealed US2 was unique in downregulating additional cellular targets, including: five distinct integrin α-chains, CD112, the interleukin-12 receptor, PTPRJ and thrombomodulin. US2 recruited the cellular E3 ligase TRC8 to direct the proteasomal degradation of all its targets, reminiscent of its degradation of MHC-I. Whereas integrin α-chains were selectively degraded, their integrin β1 binding partner accumulated in the ER. Consequently integrin signaling, cell adhesion and migration were strongly suppressed. US2 was necessary and sufficient for degradation of the majority of its substrates, but remarkably, the HCMV NK cell evasion function UL141 requisitioned US2 to enhance downregulation of the NK cell ligand CD112. UL141 retained CD112 in the ER from where US2 promoted its TRC8-dependent retrotranslocation and degradation. These findings redefine US2 as a multifunctional degradation hub which, through recruitment of the cellular E3 ligase TRC8, modulates diverse immune pathways involved in antigen presentation, NK cell activation, migration and coagulation; and highlight US2's impact on HCMV pathogenesis.

  2. Antigenic Characterization of the HCMV gH/gL/gO and Pentamer Cell Entry Complexes Reveals Binding Sites for Potently Neutralizing Human Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ciferri, Claudio; Chandramouli, Sumana; Leitner, Alexander; Donnarumma, Danilo; Cianfrocco, Michael A.; Gerrein, Rachel; Friedrich, Kristian; Aggarwal, Yukti; Palladino, Giuseppe; Aebersold, Ruedi; Norais, Nathalie; Settembre, Ethan C.; Carfi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in transplant patients and in fetuses following congenital infection. The glycoprotein complexes gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/UL128/UL130/UL131A (Pentamer) are required for HCMV entry in fibroblasts and endothelial/epithelial cells, respectively, and are targeted by potently neutralizing antibodies in the infected host. Using purified soluble forms of gH/gL/gO and Pentamer as well as a panel of naturally elicited human monoclonal antibodies, we determined the location of key neutralizing epitopes on the gH/gL/gO and Pentamer surfaces. Mass Spectrometry (MS) coupled to Chemical Crosslinking or to Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange was used to define residues that are either in proximity or part of neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein complexes. We also determined the molecular architecture of the gH/gL/gO- and Pentamer-antibody complexes by Electron Microscopy (EM) and 3D reconstructions. The EM analysis revealed that the Pentamer specific neutralizing antibodies bind to two opposite surfaces of the complex, suggesting that they may neutralize infection by different mechanisms. Together, our data identify the location of neutralizing antibodies binding sites on the gH/gL/gO and Pentamer complexes and provide a framework for the development of antibodies and vaccines against HCMV. PMID:26485028

  3. Contrasting effect of new HCMV pUL54 mutations on antiviral drug susceptibility: Benefits and limits of 3D analysis.

    PubMed

    Andouard, D; Mazeron, M-C; Ligat, G; Couvreux, A; Pouteil-Noble, C; Cahen, R; Yasdanpanah, Y; Deering, M; Viget, N; Alain, S; Hantz, S

    2016-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) resistance to antiviral drugs is a major drawback of repeated or long-duration treatment in immunocompromised patients. Resistance testing is usually performed by genotypic assays. For accurate interpretation of these assays, the role of new mutations in HCMV resistance has to be assessed. Two previously unknown UL54 single point mutations (D515Y and V787A) were characterized for phenotypic drug-resistance by marker transfer analysis using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) mutagenesis. Increases in 50% inhibitory concentrations of ganciclovir and foscarnet were found for both mutated recombinant strains showing that mutations D515Y and V787A induce resistance to both antivirals. Importantly, none of those impacted the viral growth kinetics. For a better understanding of their molecular resistance mechanisms, a 3D homology model was used to localize the mutated amino-acids in functional domains of UL54 and predict their impact on UL54 function and resistance. However, 3D homology model analysis has limits and phenotypic characterization using BAC-HCMV is still essential to measure the role of unknown mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. EBV, HCMV, HHV6, and HHV7 Screening in Bone Marrow Samples from Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Sánchez, A.; Pompa-Mera, E. N.; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, A.; Alvarez-Rodríguez, F. J.; Bekker-Méndez, V. C.; Flores-Chapa, J. de Diego; Flores-Lujano, J.; Jiménez-Hernández, E.; Peñaloza-González, J. G.; Rodríguez-Zepeda, M. C.; Torres-Nava, J. R.; Velázquez-Aviña, M. M.; Amador-Sánchez, R.; Alvarado-Ibarra, M.; Reyes-Zepeda, N.; Espinosa-Elizondo, R. M.; Pérez-Saldivar, M. L.; Núñez-Enríquez, J. C.; Mejía-Aranguré, J. M.; Fuentes-Pananá, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in childhood worldwide and Mexico has reported one of the highest incidence rates. An infectious etiology has been suggested and supported by epidemiological evidences; however, the identity of the involved agent(s) is not known. We considered that early transmitted lymphotropic herpes viruses were good candidates, since transforming mechanisms have been described for them and some are already associated with human cancers. In this study we interrogated the direct role of EBV, HCMV, HHV6, and HHV7 human herpes viruses in childhood ALL. Viral genomes were screened in 70 bone marrow samples from ALL patients through standard and a more sensitive nested PCR. Positive samples were detected only by nested PCR indicating a low level of infection. Our result argues that viral genomes were not present in all leukemic cells, and, hence, infection most likely was not part of the initial genetic lesions leading to ALL. The high statistical power of the study suggested that these agents are not involved in the genesis of ALL in Mexican children. Additional analysis showed that detected infections or coinfections were not associated with prognosis. PMID:25309913

  5. Real-time analysis of the transcriptional regulation of HIV and hCMV promoters in single mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    White, M R; Masuko, M; Amet, L; Elliott, G; Braddock, M; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1995-02-01

    The regulation of human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gene expression has been studied in single intact mammalian cells. Viral promoters were placed upstream of the firefly luciferase reporter gene and the resulting hybrid reporter constructs were stably integrated into the HeLa cell genome. A highly sensitive photon-counting camera system was used to study the level of gene expression in single intact cells. Luciferase expression was studied in the absence of activators of viral gene expression, in the presence of the HIV-1 TAT transactivator protein, or in the presence of sodium butyrate, a non-viral activator of gene expression. In the absence of any activator of gene expression, while expression was undetectable in most cells, significant levels of basal luciferase activity were observed in a few cells, indicating heterogeneity in gene expression in the cell population. In the presence of the general activator of viral gene expression, sodium butyrate, transcriptional activation from the viral promoters gave rise to significant and relatively homogeneous levels of luciferase expression in a majority of cells. The luciferase imaging technology was used for the real-time analysis of changes of gene expression within a single cell. This non-invasive reporter assay should become important for studies of the temporal regulation of gene expression in single cells.

  6. EBV, HCMV, HHV6, and HHV7 screening in bone marrow samples from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Morales-Sánchez, A; Pompa-Mera, E N; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, A; Alvarez-Rodríguez, F J; Bekker-Méndez, V C; Flores-Chapa, J de Diego; Flores-Lujano, J; Jiménez-Hernández, E; Peñaloza-González, J G; Rodríguez-Zepeda, M C; Torres-Nava, J R; Velázquez-Aviña, M M; Amador-Sánchez, R; Alvarado-Ibarra, M; Reyes-Zepeda, N; Espinosa-Elizondo, R M; Pérez-Saldivar, M L; Núñez-Enríquez, J C; Mejía-Aranguré, J M; Fuentes-Pananá, E M

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in childhood worldwide and Mexico has reported one of the highest incidence rates. An infectious etiology has been suggested and supported by epidemiological evidences; however, the identity of the involved agent(s) is not known. We considered that early transmitted lymphotropic herpes viruses were good candidates, since transforming mechanisms have been described for them and some are already associated with human cancers. In this study we interrogated the direct role of EBV, HCMV, HHV6, and HHV7 human herpes viruses in childhood ALL. Viral genomes were screened in 70 bone marrow samples from ALL patients through standard and a more sensitive nested PCR. Positive samples were detected only by nested PCR indicating a low level of infection. Our result argues that viral genomes were not present in all leukemic cells, and, hence, infection most likely was not part of the initial genetic lesions leading to ALL. The high statistical power of the study suggested that these agents are not involved in the genesis of ALL in Mexican children. Additional analysis showed that detected infections or coinfections were not associated with prognosis.

  7. Identification of NURR1 (Exon 4) and FOXA1 (Exon 3) Haplotypes Associated with mRNA Expression Levels in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes of Parkinson's Patients in Small Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Tippabathani, Jayakrishna; Radhakrishnan, Vaishnavie; Banik, Somashree; Kapoor, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Here, we study the expression of NURR1 and FOXA1 mRNA in peripheral blood lymphocytes and its haplotypes in coding region in a small Chennai population of India. Thirty cases of Parkinson's patients (PD) with anti-PD medications (20 males aged 65.85 ± 1.19 and 10 females aged 65.7 ± 1.202) and 30 age matched healthy people (20 males aged 68.45 ± 1.282 and 10 females aged 65.8 ± 1.133) were included. The expression of NURR1 and FOXA1 in PBL was detected by Q-PCR and haplotypes were identified by PCR-SSCP. In the 30 PD cases examined, NURR1 and FOXA1 expression was significantly reduced in both male and female PD patients. However, NURR1 (57.631% reduced in males; 28.93% in females) and FOXA1 (64.42% in males; 55.76% in females) mRNA expression did differ greatly between male and female PD patients. Polymorphisms were identified at exon 4 of the NURR1 and at exon 3 of the FOXA1, respectively, in both male and female patients. A near significant difference in SSCP patterns between genders of control and PD population was analyzed suggesting that further investigations of more patients, more molecular markers, and coding regions should be performed. Such studies could potentially reveal peripheral molecular marker of early PD and different significance to the respective genders. PMID:28255498

  8. Monitoring cytomegalovirus IE-1 and pp65-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation may identify patients at risk for recurrent CMV reactivations.

    PubMed

    Gratama, Jan W; Brooimans, Rik A; van der Holt, Bronno; Sintnicolaas, Kees; van Doornum, Gerard; Niesters, Hubertus G; Löwenberg, Bob; Cornelissen, Jan J

    2008-07-01

    We studied the recovery of CMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell immunity in 52 recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). The proportions of IFN-gamma-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells upon in vitro activation using peptide pools representing the CMV pp65 and IE-1 proteins were assessed at multiple time points post SCT, and correlated with the occurrence of CMV reactivation. In a retrospective analysis, recurrent CMV reactivations occurred in 9 patients and were associated with low pp65-specific CD4+ T-cell and low IE-1-specific CD8(+) T-cell reactivities, whereas patients without detectable CMV reactivation (n = 30) or a single reactivation (n = 13) showed a better recovery of these immune responses. CD4+ T-cell responses to IE-1 were infrequent in most patients, whereas CD8+ T-cell responses to pp65 occurred frequently, but did not correlate with protection against (recurrent) reactivation. Prospectively, CMV-specific T-cell responses could be studied prior to 14 reactivation episodes in 8 patients. CD4+ T-cell responses to IE-1 and pp65 were positive in only 1 and 2 episodes, respectively. CD8+ T-cell responses against IE-1 were positive in 4, but against pp65 in 12 episodes, again showing that CD8+ T-cell reactivity against pp65 did not prevent CMV reactivation. Thus, monitoring of particular CMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses after allogeneic SCT may identify patients at risk for recurrent CMV reactivations. (c) 2008 Clinical Cytometry Society

  9. Monoclonal Antibodies to Different Components of the Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Pentamer gH/gL/pUL128L and Trimer gH/gL/gO as well as Antibodies Elicited during Primary HCMV Infection Prevent Epithelial Cell Syncytium Formation.

    PubMed

    Gerna, Giuseppe; Percivalle, Elena; Perez, Laurent; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Lilleri, Daniele

    2016-07-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) may cause disseminated/end-organ disease in congenitally infected newborns and immunosuppressed transplant recipients. Two glycoprotein complexes, gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/pUL128/pUL130/pUL131 (gH/gL/pUL128L; referred to as the pentamer), are required for HCMV entry into fibroblasts and endothelial/epithelial cells, respectively, in the presence of the viral fusion protein gB. In addition, gH/gL/gO was recently reported to also be required for infection of endothelial/epithelial cells. Virus entry into human fibroblasts involves fusion of the virus envelope with the plasma membrane, whereas entry into endothelial/epithelial cells involves macropinocytosis or endocytosis and low-pH-dependent fusion with endosomes. A large set of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), directed to gH, gB, and multiple components of the pentamer, was developed. In addition, novel anti-gO human monoclonal antibodies were recently isolated. It is known that epithelial cell infection with a wild HCMV strain at a high multiplicity of infection produces a large number of syncytia. Incubation of heavily HCMV VR1814-infected ARPE-19 epithelial cells with neutralizing MAbs to one, two, or three components of the pUL128L portion of the pentamer blocked syncytium formation at an antibody concentration of 10 μg/ml, whereas only a partial inhibitory effect was displayed for MAbs to gO, gH, or gB at the same concentration. A blocking effect was also exhibited by convalescent-phase sera from primary HCMV infections. These findings indicate that the pentamer is required for syncytium formation in epithelial cells. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) mostly infects epithelial and endothelial cells in vivo Recently, the pentamer protein complex (gH/gL/pUL128L) was identified as being required for infection of these cells, in association with the other protein complex, gH/gL/gO. In primary infections, HCMV migrates to endothelial cells and then to leukocytes, which disseminate the

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies to Different Components of the Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Pentamer gH/gL/pUL128L and Trimer gH/gL/gO as well as Antibodies Elicited during Primary HCMV Infection Prevent Epithelial Cell Syncytium Formation

    PubMed Central

    Percivalle, Elena; Perez, Laurent; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Lilleri, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) may cause disseminated/end-organ disease in congenitally infected newborns and immunosuppressed transplant recipients. Two glycoprotein complexes, gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/pUL128/pUL130/pUL131 (gH/gL/pUL128L; referred to as the pentamer), are required for HCMV entry into fibroblasts and endothelial/epithelial cells, respectively, in the presence of the viral fusion protein gB. In addition, gH/gL/gO was recently reported to also be required for infection of endothelial/epithelial cells. Virus entry into human fibroblasts involves fusion of the virus envelope with the plasma membrane, whereas entry into endothelial/epithelial cells involves macropinocytosis or endocytosis and low-pH-dependent fusion with endosomes. A large set of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), directed to gH, gB, and multiple components of the pentamer, was developed. In addition, novel anti-gO human monoclonal antibodies were recently isolated. It is known that epithelial cell infection with a wild HCMV strain at a high multiplicity of infection produces a large number of syncytia. Incubation of heavily HCMV VR1814-infected ARPE-19 epithelial cells with neutralizing MAbs to one, two, or three components of the pUL128L portion of the pentamer blocked syncytium formation at an antibody concentration of 10 μg/ml, whereas only a partial inhibitory effect was displayed for MAbs to gO, gH, or gB at the same concentration. A blocking effect was also exhibited by convalescent-phase sera from primary HCMV infections. These findings indicate that the pentamer is required for syncytium formation in epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) mostly infects epithelial and endothelial cells in vivo. Recently, the pentamer protein complex (gH/gL/pUL128L) was identified as being required for infection of these cells, in association with the other protein complex, gH/gL/gO. In primary infections, HCMV migrates to endothelial cells and then to leukocytes

  11. Breast Milk HCMV viral load is associated with the establishment of breast milk CMV-pp65-specific CD8 T cells in Human CMV infected Mothers.

    PubMed

    Moylan, David C; Pati, Sunil K; Ross, Shannon A; Fowler, Karen B; Boppana, Suresh B; Sabbaj, Steffanie

    2017-08-29

    The role of HCMV-specific T-cell responses in breast milk of HCMV-seropositive mothers is not well defined. In these studies, we demonstrate that the frequency of CMV-pp65-specific T-cell responses in PBMC and breast milk cells (BMC) is increased for CD8+ T-cells in both sample sources when compared to CD4+ T-cells. The frequency of pp55-specific CD8 T-cells producing IFN- alone or dual IFN-/GrB producers is increased in breast milk compared to PBMC. Lastly, we observed a positive correlation between breast milk viral load and the CD8 pp65-specific response suggesting that local virus replication drives antigen-specific CD8 T-cells into the breast. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Identification of a short sequence in the HCMV terminase pUL56 essential for interaction with pUL89 subunit.

    PubMed

    Ligat, G; Jacquet, C; Chou, S; Couvreux, A; Alain, S; Hantz, S

    2017-08-18

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) terminase complex consists of several components acting together to cleave viral DNA into unit length genomes and translocate them into capsids, a critical process in the production of infectious virions subsequent to DNA replication. Previous studies suggest that the carboxyl-terminal portion of the pUL56 subunit interacts with the pUL89 subunit. However, the specific interacting residues of pUL56 remain unknown. We identified a conserved sequence in the C-terminal moiety of pUL56 (671WMVVKYMGFF680). Overrepresentation of conserved aromatic amino acids through 20 herpesviruses homologues of pUL56 suggests an involvement of this short peptide into the interaction between the larger pUL56 terminase subunit and the smaller pUL89 subunit. Use of Alpha technology highlighted an interaction between pUL56 and pUL89 driven through the peptide 671WMVVKYMGFF680. A deletion of these residues blocks viral replication. We hypothesize that it is the consequence of the disruption of the pUL56-pUL89 interaction. These results show that this motif is essential for HCMV replication and could be a target for development of new small antiviral drugs or peptidomimetics.

  13. Replication inhibition by nucleoside analogues of a recombinant Autographa californica multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus harboring the herpes thymidine kinase gene driven by the IE-1(0) promoter: a new way to select recombinant baculoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Godeau, F; Saucier, C; Kourilsky, P

    1992-01-01

    The expression of the thymidine-thymidylate kinase (HSV1-TK), (ATP: thymidine 5'-phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.21) of herpes simplex virus type 1 endows the host cell with a conditional lethal phenotype which depends on the presence of nucleoside analogues metabolized by this enzyme into toxic inhibitors of DNA replication. To generate a recombinant baculovirus that could be selected against by nucleoside analogs, the HSV1-tk coding sequence was placed under the control of the Autographa californica multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) immediate early promoterm IE-1(0), and this construction was introduced via homologous recombination into the polyhedrin locus of AcMNPV. Two recombinant baculoviruses harboring this gene construct at the polyhedrin locus were isolated and tested for their ability to replicate in the presence of various concentrations of the nucleoside analog 9-(1,3-Dihydroxy-2-propoxymethyl)guanine (Ganciclovir). Neither Sf9 lepidopteran cell viability nor replication of wild type or beta-Galactosidase-expressing recombinant AcMNPVs were affected by concentrations of Ganciclovir up to 100 microM. In contrast, replication of the recombinant AcMNPV virus harboring the HSV1-tk gene was inhibited by Ganciclovir in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was detectable at 2 microM and complete at 100 microM. This property was exploited in model isolations aimed at purifying new recombinant viruses having lost this counter-selectable gene marker as a result of homologous recombination at the polyhedrin locus after cotransfection of the viral DNA with a replacement vector. After being propagated in the presence of Ganciclovir, the progeny of such co-transfections contained over 85% recombinant viruses, demonstrating that counter-selection of parental HSV1-tk-containing viruses by Ganciclovir constitutes a novel approach for recombinant baculovirus isolation. Images PMID:1335569

  14. Toward the discovery of dual HCMV-VZV inhibitors: Synthesis, structure activity relationship analysis, and cytotoxicity studies of long chained 2-uracil-3-yl-N-(4-phenoxyphenyl)acetamides.

    PubMed

    Babkov, Denis A; Khandazhinskaya, Anastasia L; Chizhov, Alexander O; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert; Seley-Radtke, Katherine L; Novikov, Mikhail S

    2015-11-01

    The need for novel therapeutic options to fight herpesvirus infections still persists. Herein we report the design, synthesis and antiviral evaluation of a new family of non-nucleoside antivirals, derived from 1-[ω-(4-bromophenoxy)alkyl]uracil derivatives--previously reported inhibitors of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Introduction of the N-(4-phenoxyphenyl)acetamide side chain at N(3) increased their potency and widened activity spectrum. The most active compounds in the series exhibit submicromolar activity against different viral strains of HCMV and varicella zoster virus (VZV) replication in HEL cell cultures. Inactivity against other DNA and RNA viruses, including herpes simplex virus 1/2, points to a novel mechanism of antiviral action. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Microgravity Analogues of Herpes Virus Pathogenicity: Human Cytomegalovirus (hCMV) and Varicella Zoster (VZV) Infectivity in Human Tissue Like Assemblies (TLAs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Albrecht, T.; Cohrs, R.

    2009-01-01

    The old adage we are our own worst enemies may perhaps be the most profound statement ever made when applied to man s desire for extraterrestrial exploration and habitation of Space. Consider the immune system protects the integrity of the entire human physiology and is comprised of two basic elements the adaptive or circulating and the innate immune system. Failure of the components of the adaptive system leads to venerability of the innate system from opportunistic microbes; viral, bacteria, and fungal, which surround us, are transported on our skin, and commonly inhabit the human physiology as normal and imunosuppressed parasites. The fine balance which is maintained for the preponderance of our normal lives, save immune disorders and disease, is deregulated in microgravity. Thus analogue systems to study these potential Risks are essential for our progress in conquering Space exploration and habitation. In this study we employed two known physiological target tissues in which the reactivation of hCMV and VZV occurs, human neural and lung systems created for the study and interaction of these herpes viruses independently and simultaneously on the innate immune system. Normal human neural and lung tissue analogues called tissue like assemblies (TLAs) were infected with low MOIs of approximately 2 x 10(exp -5) pfu hCMV or VZV and established active but prolonged low grade infections which spanned .7-1.5 months in length. These infections were characterized by the ability to continuously produce each of the viruses without expiration of the host cultures. Verification and quantification of viral replication was confirmed via RT_PCR, IHC, and confocal spectral analyses of the respective essential viral genomes. All host TLAs maintained the ability to actively proliferate throughout the entire duration of the experiments as is analogous to normal in vivo physiological conditions. These data represent a significant advance in the ability to study the triggering

  16. Evaluation of a Probe-Based PCR-ELISA System for Simultaneous Semi Quantitative Detection and Genotyping of Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Infection in Clinical Specimens.

    PubMed

    Talkhabifard, Majid; Javid, Naeme; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Ghaemi, Amir; Tabarraei, Alijan

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common opportunistic pathogen that causes serious complications in immunosuppressed patients and infected newborns. In this study, PCR-ELISA was optimized for semi-quantitative detection of infection in clinical specimens and simultaneous genotyping of glycoprotein B for 4 major genotypes, due to its significance. During DIG-labeling PCR, a pair of primers amplifies a fragment of variable region of the glycoprotein B encoding sequence. Under optimized conditions, labeled Target amplicons hybridize to biotinated specific probes and are detected in an ELISA system. PCR-ELISA system showed specific performance with detection limit of approximately 100 copies of CMV DNA. The linear correlation was observed between the PCR-ELISA results (OD) and logarithmic scale of CMV (r=0.979). Repeatability of PCR-ELISA detection system for intra-assay and inter-assay was evaluated for negative and positive samples. In optimized conditions of hybridization, differentiation between genotypes of glycoprotein B was feasible using genotype-specific probes in PCR-ELISA genotyping system. In comparison with sequencing method, genotyping system was confirmed with kappa index of 1. PCR-ELISA is proposed as an applicable and reliable technique for semi-quantitative diagnosis and typing of the infection. This technique is flexible to apply in a variety of molecular fields.

  17. Interaction of HCMV UL84 with C/EBPalpha transcription factor binding sites within oriLyt is essential for lytic DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Kagele, Dominique; Gao, Yang; Smallenburg, Kate; Pari, Gregory S

    2009-09-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic DNA replication is initiated at the cis-acting oriLyt region and requires six core replication proteins along with UL84 and IE2. Although UL84 is thought to be the replication initiator protein, little is known about its interaction with oriLyt. We have now performed chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP) using antibodies specific to UL84, IE2, UL44, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBPalpha) and PCR primers that span the entire oriLyt region to reveal an evaluation of specific protein binding across oriLyt. UL84 interacted with several regions of oriLyt that contain C/EBPalpha transcription factor binding sites. Mutation of either of one of C/EBPalpha (92,526 or 92,535) sites inactivated oriLyt and resulted in the loss of binding of UL84. These data reveal the regions of interaction within oriLyt for several key replication proteins and show that the interaction between UL84 and C/EBPalpha sites within oriLyt is essential for lytic DNA replication.

  18. Members of the HCMV US12 family of predicted heptaspanning membrane proteins have unique intracellular distributions, including association with the cytoplasmic virion assembly complex

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Subhendu; Pellett, Philip E. . E-mail: pelletp@ccf.org

    2007-05-10

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US12 gene family is a group of 10 predicted seven-transmembrane domain proteins that have some features in common with G-protein-coupled receptors. Little is known of their patterns of expression, localization, or functional interactions. Here, we studied the intracellular localization of three US12 family members, US14, US17, and US18, with respect to various intracellular markers and the cytoplasmic virion assembly compartment (AC). The three proteins have distinct patterns of expression, which include associations with the AC. US14 is often distributed in a uniform granular manner throughout the cytoplasm, concentrating in the AC in some cells. US17 is expressed in a segmented manner, with its N-terminal domain localizing to the periphery of what we show here to be the AC and the C-terminal domain localizing to nuclei and the cytoplasm [Das, S., Skomorovska-Prokvolit, Y., Wang, F. Z., Pellett, P.E., 2006. Infection-dependent nuclear localization of US17, a member of the US12 family of human cytomegalovirus-encoded seven-transmembrane proteins. J. Virol. 80, 1191-1203]. Here, we show that the C-terminal domain is present at the center of the AC, in close association with markers of early endosomes; the N-terminal staining corresponds to an area stained by markers for the Golgi and trans-Golgi. US18 is distributed throughout the cytoplasm, concentrating in the AC at later stages of infection; it is localized more to the periphery of the AC than are US14 and US17C, in association with markers of the trans-Golgi. Although not detected in virions, their structures and localization in various zones within the AC suggest possible roles for these proteins in the process of virion maturation and egress.

  19. Structure of the HCMV UL16-MICB Complex Elucidates Select Binding of a Viral Immunoevasin to Diverse NKG2D Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Steffen; Zocher, Georg; Steinle, Alexander; Stehle, Thilo

    2010-01-01

    The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D promotes elimination of infected or malignant cells by cytotoxic lymphocytes through engagement of stress-induced MHC class I-related ligands. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded immunoevasin UL16 subverts NKG2D-mediated immune responses by retaining a select group of diverse NKG2D ligands inside the cell. We report here the crystal structure of UL16 in complex with the NKG2D ligand MICB at 1.8 Å resolution, revealing the molecular basis for the promiscuous, but highly selective, binding of UL16 to unrelated NKG2D ligands. The immunoglobulin-like UL16 protein utilizes a three-stranded β-sheet to engage the α-helical surface of the MHC class I-like MICB platform domain. Intriguingly, residues at the center of this β-sheet mimic a central binding motif employed by the structurally unrelated C-type lectin-like NKG2D to facilitate engagement of diverse NKG2D ligands. Using surface plasmon resonance, we find that UL16 binds MICB, ULBP1, and ULBP2 with similar affinities that lie in the nanomolar range (12–66 nM). The ability of UL16 to bind its ligands depends critically on the presence of a glutamine (MICB) or closely related glutamate (ULBP1 and ULBP2) at position 169. An arginine residue at this position however, as found for example in MICA or ULBP3, would cause steric clashes with UL16 residues. The inability of UL16 to bind MICA and ULBP3 can therefore be attributed to single substitutions at key NKG2D ligand locations. This indicates that selective pressure exerted by viral immunoevasins such as UL16 contributed to the diversification of NKG2D ligands. PMID:20090832

  20. A Diverse Repertoire of CD4 T Cells Targets the Immediate-Early 1 Protein of Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Ameres, Stefanie; Liang, Xiaoling; Wiesner, Martina; Mautner, Josef; Moosmann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    T-cell responses to the immediate-early 1 (IE-1) protein of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are associated with protection from viral disease. Thus, IE-1 is a promising target for immunotherapy. CD8 T-cell responses to IE-1 are generally strong. In contrast, CD4 T-cell responses to IE-1 were described to be comparatively infrequent or undetectable in HCMV carriers, and information on their target epitopes and their function has been limited. To analyze the repertoire of IE-1-specific CD4 T cells, we expanded them from healthy donors with autologous IE-1-expressing mini-Epstein–Barr virus-transformed B-cell lines and established IE-1-specific CD4 T-cell clones. Clones from seven out of seven HCMV-positive donors recognized endogenously processed IE-1 epitopes restricted through HLA-DR, DQ, or DP. Three to seven IE-1 epitopes were recognized per donor. Cumulatively, about 27 different HLA/peptide class II complexes were recognized by 117 IE-1-specific clones. Our results suggest that a highly diversified repertoire of IE-1-specific CD4 T cells targeting multiple epitopes is usually present in healthy HCMV carriers. Therefore, multiepitope approaches to immunomonitoring and immunotherapy will make optimal use of this potentially important class of HCMV-specific effector cells. PMID:26635812

  1. Single Chain Antibodies Against gp55 of Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) for Prophylaxis and Treatment of HCMV Infections

    PubMed Central

    Moazen, Bahareh; Ebrahimi, Elahe; Nejatollahi, Foroogh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Immunotherapy is a promising prospective new treatment for cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections. Neutralizing effects have been reported using monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant single chain antibodies (scFvs) due to their advantages over monoclonal antibodies are potential alternatives and provide valuable clinical agents. Objectives: The aim of this study was to select specific single chain antibodies against gp55 of CMV and to evaluate their neutralizing effects. In the present study, we selected specific single chain antibodies against glycoprotein 55 (gp55) of CMV for their use in treatment and diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Single chain antibodies specific against an epitope located in the C-terminal part of gp55 were selected from a phage antibody display library. After four rounds of panning, twenty clones were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fingerprinted by MvaI restriction enzyme. The reactivities of the specific clones were tested by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the neutralizing effects were evaluated by the plaque reduction assay. Results: Fingerprinting of selected clones revealed three specific single chain antibodies (scFv1, scFv2 and scFv3) with frequencies 25%, 20 and 20%. The clones produced positive ELISA with the corresponding peptide. The percentages of plaque reduction for scFv1, scFv2 and scFv3 were 23.7, 68.8 and 11.6, respectively. Conclusions: Gp55 of human CMV is considered as an important candidate for immunotherapy. In this study, we selected three specific clones against gp55. The scFvs reacted only with the corresponding peptide in a positive ELISA. The scFv2 with 68.8% neutralizing effect showed the potential to be considered for prophylaxis and treatment of CMV infections, especially in solid organ transplant recipients, for whom treatment of CMV is urgently needed. The scFv2 with neutralizing effect of 68.8%, has the potential to be considered for treatment of these patients. The specific scFv1 and scFv3 with lower neutralizing effects can be used for diagnostic purposes. PMID:27217918

  2. Human cytomegalovirus and mucoepidermoid carcinoma of salivary glands: cell-specific localization of active viral and oncogenic signaling proteins is confirmatory of a causal relationship.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Michael; Sedghizadeh, Parish P; Allen, Carl M; Jaskoll, Tina

    2012-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) infection is common. Although still controversial, there is growing evidence that active hCMV infection is associated with a variety of malignancies, including brain, breast, lung, colon, and prostate. Given that hCMV is frequently resident in salivary gland (SG) ductal epithelium, we hypothesized that hCMV would be important to the pathogenesis of SG mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC). This was initially supported by our finding that purified CMV induces malignant transformation in SG cells in an in vitro mouse model, and utilizes a pathogenic pathway previously reported for human MEC. Here we present the histologic and molecular characterizations of 39 human SG MECs selected randomly from a repository of cases spanning 2004-2011. Serial sections were obtained from formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded, tissue blocks from previous incisional or excisional biopsies. Immunohistochemical assays were performed for active hCMV proteins (IE1 and pp65) and the activated COX/AREG/EGFR/ERK signaling pathway. All four prospective causal criteria for viruses and cancer are fully satisfied: (1) protein markers for active hCMV are present in 97% of MECs; (2) markers of active hCMV are absent in non-neoplastic SG tissues; (3) hCMV-specific proteins (IE1, pp65) are in specific cell types and expression is positively correlated with severity; (4) hCMV correlates and colocalizes with an upregulation and activation of an established oncogenic signaling pathway (COX/AREG/EGFR/ERK). Thus, the evidential support reported here and previously in a mouse model is strongly confirmatory of a causal relationship between hCMV and SG mucoepidermoid carcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of hCMV's role in human oncogenesis that fully responds to all of Koch's Postulates as revised for viruses and cancer. In the absence of any contrary evidence, hCMV can reasonably be designated an "oncovirus."

  3. Human Cytomegalovirus miR-UL148D Facilitates Latent Viral Infection by Targeting Host Cell Immediate Early Response Gene 5

    PubMed Central

    Li, Limin; Li, Donghai; Liu, Fenyong; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency remain incompletely understood. Here, we showed that a HCMV-encoded miRNA, miR-UL148D, robustly accumulates during late stages of experimental latent HCMV infection in host cells and promotes HCMV latency by modulating the immediate early response gene 5 (IER5)-cell division cycle 25B (CDC25B) axis in host cells. miR-UL148D inhibited IER5 expression by directly targeting the three-prime untranslated region(3’UTR) of IER5 mRNA and thus rescued CDC25B expression during the establishment of viral latency. Infection with NR-1ΔmiR-UL148D, a derivative of the HCMV clinical strain NR-1 with a miR-UL148D knockout mutation, resulted in sustained induction of IER5 expression but decreased CDC25B expression in host cells. Mechanistically, we further showed that CDC25B plays an important role in suppressing HCMV IE1 and lytic gene transcription by activating cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK-1). Both gain-of-function and lose-of-function assays demonstrated that miR-UL148D promotes HCMV latency by helping maintain CDC25B activity in host cells. These results provide a novel mechanism through which a HCMV miRNA regulates viral latency. PMID:27824944

  4. Cytomegalovirus immediate early proteins promote stemness properties in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Soroceanu, Liliana; Matlaf, Lisa; Khan, Sabeena; Akhavan, Armin; Singer, Eric; Bezrookove, Vladimir; Decker, Stacy; Ghanny, Saleena; Hadaczek, Piotr; Bengtsson, Henrik; Ohlfest, John; Luciani-Torres, Maria-Gloria; Harkins, Lualhati; Perry, Arie; Guo, Hong; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Cobbs, Charles S

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive human brain tumor. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate early (IE) proteins that are endogenously expressed in GBM cells are strong viral transactivators with onconcogenic properties. Here, we show how HCMV IE are preferentially expressed in glioma stem-like cells (GSC), where they co-localize with the other GBM stemness markers, CD133, Nestin, and Sox2. In patient-derived GSC that are endogenously infected with HCMV, attenuating IE expression by an RNA-i-based strategy, was sufficient to inhibit tumorsphere formation, Sox2 expression, cell cycle progression, and cell survival. Conversely, HCMV infection of HMCV-negative GSC elicited robust self-renewal and proliferation of cells that could be partially reversed by IE attenuation. In HCMV-positive GSC, IE attenuation induced a molecular program characterized by enhanced expression of mesenchymal markers and pro-inflammatory cytokines, resembling the therapeutically-resistant GBM phenotype. Mechanistically, HCMV/IE regulation of Sox2 occurred via inhibition of miRNA-145, a negative regulator of Sox2 protein expression. In a spontaneous mouse model of glioma, ectopic expression of the IE1 gene (UL123) specifically increased Sox2 and Nestin levels in the IE1-positive tumors, upregulating stemness and proliferation markers in vivo. Similarly, human GSC infected with the HCMV strain Towne but not the IE1-deficient strain CR208 showed enhanced growth as tumorspheres and intracranial tumor xenografts, compared to mock-infected human GSC. Overall, our findings offer new mechanistic insights into how HCMV/IE control stemness properties in glioblastoma cells. PMID:26239477

  5. Human cytomegalovirus immediate early proteins promote degradation of connexin 43 and disrupt gap junction communication: implications for a role in gliomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zahidul; Yaiw, Koon-Chu; Wilhelmi, Vanessa; Lam, Hoyin; Rahbar, Afsar; Stragliotto, Giuseppe; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    A lack of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is common in cancer. Many oncogenic viruses have been shown to downregulate the junctional protein connexin 43 (Cx43) and reduce GJIC. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous, species-specific betaherpesvirus that establishes life-long latency after primary infection. It encodes two viral gene products, immediate early (IE) proteins IE1 and IE2, which are crucial in viral replication and pathogenesis of many diseases. Emerging evidence demonstrates that HCMV DNA and proteins are highly prevalent in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and in other tumors, but HCMV's role in tumorigenesis remains obscure. In the present study, we examined the effects of HCMV infection on Cx43 expression and GJIC as well as the viral mechanism mediating the effects in human GBM cells and tissue samples. We found that HCMV downregulated Cx43 protein, resulting in disruption of functional GJIC as assayed by fluorescent dye transfer assay. We show that both HCMV-IE72 and IE86 mediate downregulation of Cx43 by silencing RNA targeting either IE72 or IE86 coupled with ganciclovir. This finding was further validated by transfection with expression vectors encoding IE72 or IE86, and we show that viral-mediated Cx43 depletion involved proteasomal degradation. Importantly, we also observed that the Cx43 protein levels and IE staining correlated inversely in 10 human GBM tissue specimens. Thus, HCMV regulates Cx43 expression and GJIC, which may contribute to gliomagenesis.

  6. Human Cytomegalovirus Carries a Cell-Derived Phospholipase A2 Required for Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Allal, Cuider; Buisson-Brenac, Claire; Marion, Vincent; Claudel-Renard, Clotilde; Faraut, Thomas; Dal Monte, Paola; Streblow, Daniel; Record, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is known to carry host cell-derived proteins and mRNAs whose role in cell infection is not understood. We have identified a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity borne by HCMV by using an assay based on the hydrolysis of fluorescent phosphatidylcholine. This activity was found in all virus strains analyzed and in purified strains. It was calcium dependent and was sensitive to inhibitors of cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2) but not to inhibitors of soluble PLA2 or calcium-independent PLA2. No other phospholipase activity was detected in the virus. Purified virus was found to contain human cellular cPLA2α, as detected by monoclonal antibody. No homology with PLA2 was found in the genome of HCMV, indicating that HCMV does not code for a PLA2. Decreased de novo expression of immediate-early proteins 1 and 2 (IE1 and IE2), tegument phosphoprotein pp65, and virus production was observed when HCMV was treated with inhibitors of cPLA2. Cell entry of HCMV was not altered by those inhibitors, suggesting the action of cPLA2 was postentry. Together, our results indicate a selective sorting of a cell-derived cPLA2 during HCMV maturation, which is further required for infectivity. PMID:15220446

  7. Human Cytomegalovirus Requires Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling To Enter and Initiate the Early Steps in the Establishment of Latency in CD34(+) Human Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Heon; Collins-McMillen, Donna; Buehler, Jason C; Goodrum, Felicia D; Yurochko, Andrew D

    2017-03-01

    The establishment of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency and persistence relies on the successful infection of hematopoietic cells, which serve as sites of viral persistence and contribute to viral spread. Here, using blocking antibodies and pharmacological inhibitors, we document that HCMV activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and downstream phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) mediates viral entry into CD34(+) human progenitor cells (HPCs), resulting in distinct cellular trafficking and nuclear translocation of the virus compared to that in other immune cells, such as we have documented in monocytes. We argue that the EGFR allows HCMV to regulate the cellular functions of these replication-restricted cells via its signaling activity following viral binding. In addition to regulating HCMV entry/trafficking, EGFR signaling may also shape the early steps required for the successful establishment of viral latency in CD34(+) cells, as pharmacological inhibition of EGFR increases the transcription of lytic IE1/IE2 mRNA while curbing the expression of latency-associated UL138 mRNA. EGFR signaling following infection of CD34(+) HPCs may also contribute to changes in hematopoietic potential, as treatment with the EGFR kinase (EGFRK) inhibitor AG1478 alters the expression of the cellular hematopoietic cytokine interleukin 12 (IL-12) in HCMV-infected cells but not in mock-infected cells. These findings, along with our previous work with monocytes, suggest that EGFR likely serves as an important determinant of HCMV tropism for select subsets of hematopoietic cells. Moreover, our new data suggest that EGFR is a key receptor for efficient viral entry and that the ensuing signaling regulates important early events required for successful infection of CD34(+) HPCs by HCMV.IMPORTANCE HCMV establishes lifelong persistence within the majority of the human population without causing overt pathogenesis in healthy individuals. Despite this, reactivation of HCMV

  8. The nucleotide sequence of HLA-B{sup *}2704 reveals a new amino acid substitution in exon 4 which is also present in HLA-B{sup *}2706

    SciTech Connect

    Rudwaleit, M.; Bowness, P.; Wordsworth, P.

    1996-12-31

    The HLA-B27 subtype HLA-B{sup *}2704 is virtually absent in Caucasians but common in Orientals, where it is associated with ankylosing spondylitis. The amino acid sequence of HLA-B{sup *}2704 has been established by peptide mapping and was shown to differ by two amino acids from HLA-B{sup *}2705, HLA-B{sup *}2704 is characterized by a serine for aspartic acid substitution at position 77 and glutamic acid for valine at position 152. To date, however, no nucleotide sequence confirming these changes at the DNA level has been published. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Identification of a novel missense mutation in exon 4 of the human factor VIII gene associated with sever hemophilia A patient.

    PubMed

    Onsori, Habib; Hosseinpour, Mohammad Ali; Montaser-Kouhsari, Sheideh; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Hosseinpour, Abbas Ali

    2007-12-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked congenital bleeding disorder caused by factor VIII deficiency. The factor VIII gene is on the long arm of the X chromosome at Xq28 spans 186 kb and consists of 26 exons. In this study to identify defects in the factor VIII gene, Single-Stranded Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was used. A novel missense mutation due to T --> C transition at codon 153 (TGC) of the factor VIII gene which replace a cysteine with an arginine residue, was found in a patient of North-Western of Iran with sever hemophilia A. Direct sequencing of the amplified fragment was performed to confirm the mutation. This study shows that we can use of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and silver staining of SSCP methods for detecting most of the point mutations causative hemophilia A.

  10. Restriction of Human Cytomegalovirus Replication by ISG15, a Host Effector Regulated by cGAS-STING Double-Stranded-DNA Sensing.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Christopher; Mohr, Ian

    2017-05-01

    Accumulation of the interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) protein product, which is reversibly conjugated to numerous polypeptide targets, impacts the proteome and physiology of uninfected and infected cells. While many viruses, including human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), blunt host antiviral defenses by limiting ISG expression, the overall abundance of ISG15 monomer and protein conjugates rises in HCMV-infected cells. However, the molecular signals underlying ISG15 accumulation and whether the ISG15 polypeptide itself influences HCMV infection biology remain unknown. Here, we establish that the ISG15 gene product itself directly regulates HCMV replication and that its accumulation restricts productive virus growth. Although ISG15 monomer and protein conjugate accumulation was induced in cells infected with UV-inactivated HCMV, it was subsequently reduced, but not eliminated, by an immediate-early (IE) or early (E) virus-encoded function(s). Instead, HCMV-induced ISG15 monomer and protein conjugate accumulation was dependent upon the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) sensor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), the innate immune adaptor STING, and interferon signaling. Significantly, dsDNA itself was sufficient to induce cGAS-, STING-, and interferon signaling-dependent ISG15 monomer and conjugate protein accumulation in uninfected cells. Accumulation of ISGylated proteins in uninfected cells treated with dsDNA was prevented by expressing the HCMV multifunctional IE1 transactivator. This demonstrates that expression of a single host interferon-stimulated gene, ISG15, restricts HCMV replication, and that IE1 is sufficient to blunt ISGylation in response to dsDNA sensing in uninfected cells. Moreover, it establishes that ISGylation modifies the proteomes of virus-infected and uninfected normal cells in response to cell-intrinsic dsDNA sensing dependent upon cGAS-STING.IMPORTANCE By antagonizing type I interferon production and action, many viruses, including human cytomegalovirus

  11. Positive Expression of Human Cytomegalovirus Phosphoprotein 65 in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Mingming; Wang, Xiaojing; Chi, Hongjie; Feng, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is associated with atherosclerosis. However, local vascular atherosclerosis related HCMV infection and protein expression remain unclear. This study aimed to assess the relationship between HCMV infection and atherosclerosis. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded peripheral artery specimens were obtained from 15 patients with atherosclerosis undergoing vascular surgery from 2008 to 2010 at Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University. Pathological analyses were carried out after hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson trichrome staining. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry with two different monoclonal antibodies were employed to detect HCMV nucleic acids and proteins, respectively. H&E and Masson trichrome staining showed homogeneous extracellular matrix in femoral artery, while smooth muscle fibers were interlaced with collagen fibers; in carotid artery, inflammatory cell infiltration, foam cell vascular change, cholesterol crystals, and layered collagen fibers were observed. In situ hybridization showed no expression of HCMV nucleic acids in all 15 cases. Immunohistochemical staining for protein immediate-early protein (IE1 72) was negative in all cases, while phosphoprotein 65 (pp65) expression was detected in 14 cases. A high rate of positive pp65 signals was found in patients with atherosclerosis, suggesting that local HCMV infection may be associated with the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Further studies on this relationship are warranted. PMID:27990427

  12. Presentation of an Immunodominant Immediate-Early CD8+ T Cell Epitope Resists Human Cytomegalovirus Immunoevasion

    PubMed Central

    Ameres, Stefanie; Mautner, Josef; Schlott, Fabian; Neuenhahn, Michael; Busch, Dirk H.; Plachter, Bodo; Moosmann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) depends on CD8+ T cell responses that are shaped by an individual's repertoire of MHC molecules. MHC class I presentation is modulated by a set of HCMV-encoded proteins. Here we show that HCMV immunoevasins differentially impair T cell recognition of epitopes from the same viral antigen, immediate-early 1 (IE-1), that are presented by different MHC class I allotypes. In the presence of immunoevasins, HLA-A- and HLA-B-restricted T cell clones were ineffective, but HLA-C*0702-restricted T cell clones recognized and killed infected cells. Resistance of HLA-C*0702 to viral immunoevasins US2 and US11 was mediated by the alpha3 domain and C-terminal region of the HLA heavy chain. In healthy donors, HLA-C*0702-restricted T cells dominated the T cell response to IE-1. The same HLA-C allotype specifically protected infected cells from attack by NK cells that expressed a corresponding HLA-C-specific KIR. Thus, allotype-specific viral immunoevasion allows HCMV to escape control by NK cells and HLA-A- and HLA-B-restricted T cells, while the virus becomes selectively vulnerable to an immunodominant population of HLA-C-restricted T cells. Our work identifies a T cell population that may be of particular efficiency in HCMV-specific immunotherapy. PMID:23717207

  13. Seroprevalence of Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in pregnant women and outcomes of pregnancies with active infection.

    PubMed

    Mujtaba, Ghulam; Shaukat, Shahzad; Angez, Mehar; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Hasan, Fariha; Zahoor Zaidi, Syed Sohail; Shah, Aamer Ali

    2016-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of cytomegalovirus in pregnant women and types of overt congenital infection in neonates. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences and Federal Government Services Hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan, from March 2010 to June 2011, and comprised blood samples of pregnant women. Seroprevalence of human cytomegalovirus, immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay while its deoxyribonucleic acid was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction.The congenital human cytomegalovirus infection was also identified in newborn babies from actively infected pregnant women. SPSS 18 was used for data analysis. Of the 409 pregnant women enrolled, 399(97.55%) were seropositive for cytomegalovirus immunoglobulinG and 52(12.71%) for immunoglobulinM, while cytomegalovirus deoxyribonucleic acid was detected in 82(20%). Of the cytomegalovirus immunoglobulinM-positive women, sera of 40(80%) had immunoglobulinG avidity >50%. The remaining 12(23%) sera had avidity assay value <50%. Among the 82(20%) infected pregnant women, 70(85.4%) were successfully followed up. Among them, the virus was isolated from 41(58.5%) newborns babies, of which 15(21%) were symptomatic while 26(47.2%) were asymptomatic. Of the former, 4(26.6%) had hepatosplenomegaly. Human cytomegalovirus infection in pregnant women was the main reason of congenital defects among neonates.

  14. HCMV IE72 Control Over PML, the Human Breast Cancer Tumor Suppressor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    Over PML, the Human Breast Cancer Tumor Suppressor PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mary L. Spengler, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Health Research... Cancer Tumor DAMD17-00-1-0654 Suppressor 6. AUTHOR(S) Mary L. Spengler, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING...identification of these important regulatory phospho-amino acids will allow for the design of a PML based anti- cancer strategy. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15

  15. Dynamics behind affinity maturation of an anti-HCMV antibody family influencing antigen binding.

    PubMed

    Di Palma, Francesco; Tramontano, Anna

    2017-08-03

    The investigation of antibody affinity maturation and its effects on antigen binding is important with respect to understanding the regulation of the immune response. To shed light on this crucial process, we analyzed two Igs neutralizing the human cytomegalovirus: the primary germline antibody M2J1 and its related mature antibody 8F9. Both antibodies target the AD-2S1 epitope of the gB envelope protein and are considered to establish similar interactions with the cognate antigen. We used molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of mutations on the antibody-antigen interactions. The results provide a qualitative explanation for the increased 8F9 peptide affinity compared with that of M2J1. The emerging atomistic-detailed description of these complexes reveals the molecular effects of the somatic hypermutations occurring during affinity maturation. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. Antiviral effects of IFIT1 in human cytomegalovirus-infected fetal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Bin; Li, Ling; Qian, Dong-Meng; Yu, Hong; Xue, Mei-Lan; Hu, Ming; Song, Xu-Xia

    2017-04-01

    The prominent feature of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is cell tropism specificity for human fetal nervous system, which leads to severe fetal nervous system damage especially in first-trimester gestation. In this study, human astrocytes isolated from fetal brain were infected with HCMV AD169 and whole genome transcriptome profile was performed. The results showed that the gene expression of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs), chemokine and chemokine receptors were significantly up-regulated (P < 0.01). The antiviral replication effects of IFIT1 (Interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 1, Fc = 148.17) was investigated. Lentivirus with IFIT1 overexpression or knockdown was transduced into astrocytes, respectively. The viral mRNA, protein expression and HCMV titers were determined. The results showed that IE1, IE2, pp65, and viral titers were significantly decreased in IFIT1 overexpression group and enhanced in the knockdown group compared with control one (P < 0.01). Taken together, this study revealed IFIT1 played an important antiviral role in HCMV infected fetal astrocytes. The prominent feature of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is cellular tropism specificity for human fetal brain nervous system leading to severe fetal nervous damage especially in first-trimester gestation. In this study, human astrocytes isolated from first-trimester fetal brain were infected with HCMV AD169 and IFIT1 was studied for its antiviral replication effects. The results provided insights into the function of IFIT1 as a key factor in antiviral defense contributing to development of targeted therapeutics to fetal brain with HCMV infection. J. Med. Virol. 89:672-684, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. RNA interference-mediated targeting of human cytomegalovirus immediate-early or early gene products inhibits viral replication with differential effects on cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Xiaofei, E; Stadler, Bradford M; Debatis, Michelle; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kowalik, Timothy F

    2012-05-01

    Viral drug toxicity, resistance, and an increasing immunosuppressed population warrant continued research into new avenues for limiting diseases associated with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). In this study, a small interfering RNA (siRNA), siX3, was designed to target coding sequences within shared exon 3 of UL123 and UL122 transcripts encoding IE1 and IE2 immediate-early proteins of HCMV. Pretreatment of cells with siX3 reduced the levels of viral protein expression, DNA replication, and progeny virus production compared to control siRNA. Two siRNAs against UL54 and overlapping transcripts (UL55-57) were compared to siX3 in HCMV infection and were also found to be effective at inhibiting HCMV replication. Further investigation into the effects of the siRNAs on viral replication showed that pretreatment with each of the siRNAs resulted in an inhibition in the formation of mature replication compartments. The ability of these siRNAs to prevent or reduce certain cytopathic effects associated with HCMV infection was also examined. Infected cells pretreated with siX3, but not siUL54, retained promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein in cellular PML bodies, an essential component of this host intrinsic antiviral defense. DNA damage response proteins, which are localized in nuclear viral replication compartments, were reduced in the siX3- and siUL54-treated cells. siX3, but not siUL54, prevented DNA damage response signaling early after infection. Therapeutic efficacy was demonstrated by treating cells with siRNAs after HCMV replication had commenced. Together, these findings suggest that siRNAs targeting exon 3 of the major IE genes or the UL54-57 transcripts be further studied for their potential development into anti-HCMV therapeutics.

  18. Nucleosome maps of the human cytomegalovirus genome reveal a temporal switch in chromatin organization linked to a major IE protein.

    PubMed

    Zalckvar, Einat; Paulus, Christina; Tillo, Desiree; Asbach-Nitzsche, Alexandra; Lubling, Yaniv; Winterling, Carla; Strieder, Nicholas; Mücke, Katrin; Goodrum, Felicia; Segal, Eran; Nevels, Michael

    2013-08-06

    Human CMV (hCMV) establishes lifelong infections in most of us, causing developmental defects in human embryos and life-threatening disease in immunocompromised individuals. During productive infection, the viral >230,000-bp dsDNA genome is expressed widely and in a temporal cascade. The hCMV genome does not carry histones when encapsidated but has been proposed to form nucleosomes after release into the host cell nucleus. Here, we present hCMV genome-wide nucleosome occupancy and nascent transcript maps during infection of permissive human primary cells. We show that nucleosomes occupy nuclear viral DNA in a nonrandom and highly predictable fashion. At early times of infection, nucleosomes associate with the hCMV genome largely according to their intrinsic DNA sequence preferences, indicating that initial nucleosome formation is genetically encoded in the virus. However, as infection proceeds to the late phase, nucleosomes redistribute extensively to establish patterns mostly determined by nongenetic factors. We propose that these factors include key regulators of viral gene expression encoded at the hCMV major immediate-early (IE) locus. Indeed, mutant virus genomes deficient for IE1 expression exhibit globally increased nucleosome loads and reduced nucleosome dynamics compared with WT genomes. The temporal nucleosome occupancy differences between IE1-deficient and WT viruses correlate inversely with changes in the pattern of viral nascent and total transcript accumulation. These results provide a framework of spatial and temporal nucleosome organization across the genome of a major human pathogen and suggest that an hCMV major IE protein governs overall viral chromatin structure and function.

  19. Impact of Persistent Cytomegalovirus Infection on Dynamic Changes in Human Immune System Profile

    PubMed Central

    Vescovini, Rosanna; Telera, Anna Rita; Pedrazzoni, Mario; Abbate, Barbara; Rossetti, Pietro; Verzicco, Ignazio; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; Calderaro, Adriana; Volpi, Riccardo; Sansoni, Paolo; Fagnoni, Francesco Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) imprints the immune system after primary infection, however its effect during chronic infection still needs to be deciphered. In this study we report the variation of blood cell count along with anti-HCMV IgG and T cell responses to pp-65 and IE-1 antigens, that occurred after an interval of five years in a cohort of 25 seropositive healthy adults. We found increased anti-viral IgG antibody responses and intracellular interferon-gamma secreting CD8+ T cell responses to pp-65: a result consistent with memory inflation. With the only exception of shortage in naive CD8+ T cells most memory T cell subsets as well as total CD8+ T cells, T cells, lymphocytes, monocytes and leukocytes had increased. By contrast, none of the cell types tested were found to have increased in 14 subjects stably seronegative. Rather, in addition to a shortage in naive CD8+ T cells, also memory T cell subsets and most other cell types decreased, either in a statistically significant or non-significant manner. The trend of T cell pool representation with regard to CD4/CD8 ratio was in the opposing directions depending on HCMV serology. Globally, this study demonstrates different dynamic changes of most blood cell types depending on presence or absence of HCMV infection. Therefore, HCMV plays a continual role in modulating homeostasis of blood T cells and a broader expanding effect on other cell populations of lymphoid and myeloid origin. PMID:26990192

  20. Human Cytomegalovirus IE2 Protein Disturbs Brain Development by the Dysregulation of Neural Stem Cell Maintenance and the Polarization of Migrating Neurons.

    PubMed

    Han, Dasol; Byun, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Juwan; Kwon, Mookwang; Pleasure, Samuel J; Ahn, Jin-Hyun; Yoon, Keejung

    2017-09-01

    the context of the embryonic brain using an in utero gene transfer tool. Surprisingly, IE2, but not HCMV IE1 or murine CMV ie3, interferes pleiotropically with key neurodevelopmental processes, including neural stem cell regulation, proper positioning of migrating neurons, and the callosal axon projections important for communication between the hemispheres. Our data suggest that the wide spectrum of clinical outcomes, ranging from mental retardation to microcephaly, caused by congenital HCMV infection can be sufficiently explained in terms of IE2 action alone. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Direct Quantification of Human Cytomegalovirus Immediate-Early and Late mRNA Levels in Blood of Lung Transplant Recipients by Competitive Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Greijer, Astrid E.; Verschuuren, Erik A. M.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Dekkers, Chantal A. J.; Adriaanse, Henriëtte M. A.; The, T. Hauw; Middeldorp, Jaap M.

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of active human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection was monitored by competitive nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assays for quantification of IE1 (UL123) and pp67 (UL65) mRNA expression levels in the blood of patients after lung transplantation. RNA was isolated from 339 samples of 13 lung transplant recipients and analyzed by the quantitative IE1 and pp67 NASBA in parallel with pp65 antigenemia and serology. Rapid increases in IE1 RNA exceeding 104 copies per 100 μl of blood were associated with active infection, whereas lower levels were suggestive for abortive, subclinical viral activity. Any positive value for pp67 RNA was indicative for active infection, and quantification of pp67 mRNA did not give additional diagnostic information. The onset of IE1-positive NASBA preceded pp67 NASBA and was earlier than the pp65 antigenemia assay, confirming previous studies with qualitative NASBA. Effective antiviral treatment was reflected by a rapid disappearance of pp67 mRNA, whereas IE1 mRNA remained detectable for longer periods. Quantification of IE1 might be relevant to monitor progression of HCMV infection but should be validated in prospective studies. PMID:11136779

  2. Positively Selected Sites at HCMV gB Furin Processing Region and Their Effects in Cleavage Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Stangherlin, Lucas M; de Paula, Felipe N; Icimoto, Marcelo Y; Ruiz, Leonardo G P; Nogueira, Maurício L; Braz, Antônio S K; Juliano, Luiz; da Silva, Maria C C

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is a ubiquitous infectious agent that affects mainly immunosuppressed, fetuses, and newborns. The virus has several polymorphic regions, in particular in the envelope glycoproteins. The UL55 gene encodes the glycoprotein B that has a variable region, containing a furin cleavage site and according to the variability different genotypes are characterized. Here we investigated variability and existence of selective pressure on the UL55 variable region containing the furin cleavage site in 213 clinical sequences from patients worldwide. We showed the occurrence of positive selective pressure on gB codons 461 and 462, near the furin cleavage site. Cleavage analysis of synthesized peptides demonstrated that most mutations confer better cleavage by furin, suggesting that evolution is acting in order to increase the efficiency cleavage and supporting the hypothesis that gB processing is important in the host. We also demonstrated that peptides containing sequences, that characterize genotypes gB2 and 3, are differentially cleaved by furin. Our data demonstrate for the first time that variability in the cleavage site is related to degree of gB processing by furin.

  3. MicroRNA-613 is downregulated in HCMV-positive glioblastoma and inhibits tumour progression by targeting arginase-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhao, Peng; Qian, Dongmeng; Hu, Ming; Zhang, Li; Shi, Hailei; Wang, Bin

    2017-07-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and malignant tumour that occurs primarily in nervous system and has a high morbidity. Research on glioblastoma has recently focused on human cytomegalovirus, belonging to the beta subfamily of Herpesviridae that plays crucial roles in cancer development and progression. This study aimed to investigate the role of human cytomegalovirus-associated microRNA-613 in glioblastoma. In this study, we demonstrate that microRNA-613 expression was frequently reduced in human cytomegalovirus-positive glioblastoma specimens/cells compared with human cytomegalovirus-negative glioblastoma tissue/cells, and a significant correlation was observed between the reduction in microRNA-613 expression and the presence of unfavourable variables, including tumour size (p = 0.0118), World Health Organization stage (p = 0.0169), the overall survival (p = 0.0107) and disease-free (p = 0.0159) survival of patients. Overexpression of microRNA-613 in the glioblastoma cell lines U87 and U251 retarded cell growth and induced cell apoptosis. Upregulation of microRNA-613 inhibited glioblastoma cell clone formation, invasion and migration. Furthermore, we demonstrated that arginase-2 was directly regulated by microRNA-613 and played an essential role in mediating the biological effects of microRNA-613 in glioblastoma. Re-expression of arginase-2 markedly reversed the inhibitory properties of microRNA-613 in glioblastoma cells. Taken together, our data provide compelling evidence that human cytomegalovirus reduced the level of microRNA-613 which functions as an anti-onco-miRNA in glioblastoma, primarily by downregulating the expression of arginase-2.

  4. Human cytomegalovirus US3 and UL36-38 immediate-early proteins regulate gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Colberg-Poley, A M; Santomenna, L D; Harlow, P P; Benfield, P A; Tenney, D J

    1992-01-01

    We have established the ability of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL36-38 and US3 immediate-early (IE) gene products to alter gene expression in human cells by using transient transfection assays. The cellular heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) promoter was transactivated following cotransfection with the HCMV IE regions in nonpermissive HeLa cells by UL36-38, US3, or IE1 and in permissive human diploid fibroblasts (HFF) by IE1 or IE2. Moreover, hsp70 expression was synergistically increased in HeLa cells cotransfected with US3 and UL36, with US3 and UL37, or with US3 and UL37x1. The synergistic transactivation of hsp70 expression by US3 and UL36-38 was not observed in HFF cells. Synergy was also not observed in HeLa cells between US3 and UL38, an early gene product encoded by the UL36-38 IE locus. Synergistic transactivation of hsp70 expression in HeLa cells required the syntheses of UL36-38 and US3 IE proteins, since nonsense mutants were not functional. hsp70 expression increased with increasing amounts of transfected US3 and UL37 DNA and occurred at the level of stable hsp70-promoted RNA. In contrast to the broad hsp70 response, promoters from the HCMV UL112 early gene and another cellular gene, brain creatine kinase, both responded strongly only to singly transfected IE2 in HeLa cells. Nevertheless, IE2 transactivation of the UL112 promoter was further stimulated by cotransfection of IE1 or of UL36-38 in both HeLa and HFF cells. Thus, different patterns of promoter transactivation and interactions between HCMV IE gene products in transactivation were found in HFF cells and in HeLa cells. These results establish the ability of the HCMV US3 and UL36-38 proteins to alter cellular and viral gene expression and are consistent with involvement of cellular transcription factors in HCMV IE regulation of gene expression. Images PMID:1370097

  5. Human Cytomegalovirus Immediate-Early 1 Protein Rewires Upstream STAT3 to Downstream STAT1 Signaling Switching an IL6-Type to an IFNγ-Like Response

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Simone; Zenger, Marion; Reitberger, Tobias; Danzer, Daniela; Übner, Theresa; Munday, Diane C.; Paulus, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) major immediate-early 1 protein (IE1) is best known for activating transcription to facilitate viral replication. Here we present transcriptome data indicating that IE1 is as significant a repressor as it is an activator of host gene expression. Human cells induced to express IE1 exhibit global repression of IL6- and oncostatin M-responsive STAT3 target genes. This repression is followed by STAT1 phosphorylation and activation of STAT1 target genes normally induced by IFNγ. The observed repression and subsequent activation are both mediated through the same region (amino acids 410 to 445) in the C-terminal domain of IE1, and this region serves as a binding site for STAT3. Depletion of STAT3 phenocopies the STAT1-dependent IFNγ-like response to IE1. In contrast, depletion of the IL6 receptor (IL6ST) or the STAT kinase JAK1 prevents this response. Accordingly, treatment with IL6 leads to prolonged STAT1 instead of STAT3 activation in wild-type IE1 expressing cells, but not in cells expressing a mutant protein (IE1dl410-420) deficient for STAT3 binding. A very similar STAT1-directed response to IL6 is also present in cells infected with a wild-type or revertant hCMV, but not an IE1dl410-420 mutant virus, and this response results in restricted viral replication. We conclude that IE1 is sufficient and necessary to rewire upstream IL6-type to downstream IFNγ-like signaling, two pathways linked to opposing actions, resulting in repressed STAT3- and activated STAT1-responsive genes. These findings relate transcriptional repressor and activator functions of IE1 and suggest unexpected outcomes relevant to viral pathogenesis in response to cytokines or growth factors that signal through the IL6ST-JAK1-STAT3 axis in hCMV-infected cells. Our results also reveal that IE1, a protein considered to be a key activator of the hCMV productive cycle, has an unanticipated role in tempering viral replication. PMID:27387064

  6. Consecutive Inhibition of ISG15 Expression and ISGylation by Cytomegalovirus Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Eui; Lee, Myoung Kyu; Kwon, Ki Mun; Kim, Keun Il; Stamminger, Thomas; Ahn, Jin-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) encodes an ubiquitin-like protein that covalently conjugates protein. Protein modification by ISG15 (ISGylation) is known to inhibit the replication of many viruses. However, studies on the viral targets and viral strategies to regulate ISGylation-mediated antiviral responses are limited. In this study, we show that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication is inhibited by ISGylation, but the virus has evolved multiple countermeasures. HCMV-induced ISG15 expression was mitigated by IE1, a viral inhibitor of interferon signaling, however, ISGylation was still strongly upregulated during virus infection. RNA interference of UBE1L (E1), UbcH8 (E2), Herc5 (E3), and UBP43 (ISG15 protease) revealed that ISGylation inhibits HCMV growth by downregulating viral gene expression and virion release in a manner that is more prominent at low multiplicity of infection. A viral regulator pUL26 was found to interact with ISG15, UBE1L, and Herc5, and be ISGylated. ISGylation of pUL26 regulated its stability and inhibited its activities to suppress NF-κB signaling and complement the growth of UL26-null mutant virus. Moreover, pUL26 reciprocally suppressed virus-induced ISGylation independent of its own ISGylation. Consistently, ISGylation was more pronounced in infections with the UL26-deleted mutant virus, whose growth was more sensitive to IFNβ treatment than that of the wild-type virus. Therefore, pUL26 is a viral ISG15 target that also counteracts ISGylation. Our results demonstrate that ISGylation inhibits HCMV growth at multiple steps and that HCMV has evolved countermeasures to suppress ISG15 transcription and protein ISGylation, highlighting the importance of the interplay between virus and ISGylation in productive viral infection. PMID:27564865

  7. Functional interaction of nuclear domain 10 and its components with cytomegalovirus after infections: cross-species host cells versus native cells.

    PubMed

    Cosme, Ruth Cruz; Martínez, Francisco Puerta; Tang, Qiyi

    2011-04-28

    Species-specificity is one of the major characteristics of cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) and is the primary reason for the lack of a mouse model for the direct infection of human CMV (HCMV). It has been determined that CMV cross-species infections are blocked at the post-entry level by intrinsic cellular defense mechanisms, but few details are known. It is important to explore how CMVs interact with the subnuclear structure of the cross-species host cell. In our present study, we discovered that nuclear domain 10 (ND10) of human cells was not disrupted by murine CMV (MCMV) and that the ND10 of mouse cells was not disrupted by HCMV, although the ND10-disrupting protein, immediate-early protein 1 (IE1), also colocalized with ND10 in cross-species infections. In addition, we found that the UL131-repaired HCMV strain AD169 (vDW215-BADrUL131) can infect mouse cells to produce immediate-early (IE) and early (E) proteins but that neither DNA replication nor viral particles were detectable in mouse cells. Unrepaired AD169 can express IE1 only in mouse cells. In both HCMV-infected mouse cells and MCMV-infected human cells, the knocking-down of ND10 components (PML, Daxx, and SP100) resulted in significantly increased viral-protein production. Our observations provide evidence to support our hypothesis that ND10 and ND10 components might be important defensive factors against the CMV cross-species infection.

  8. The host ubiquitin-dependent segregase VCP/p97 is required for the onset of human cytomegalovirus replication

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yao-Tang; Grey, Finn

    2017-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus major immediate early proteins IE1 and IE2 are critical drivers of virus replication and are considered pivotal in determining the balance between productive and latent infection. IE1 and IE2 are derived from the same primary transcript by alternative splicing and regulation of their expression likely involves a complex interplay between cellular and viral factors. Here we show that knockdown of the host ubiquitin-dependent segregase VCP/p97, results in loss of IE2 expression, subsequent suppression of early and late gene expression and, ultimately, failure in virus replication. RNAseq analysis showed increased levels of IE1 splicing, with a corresponding decrease in IE2 splicing following VCP knockdown. Global analysis of viral transcription showed the expression of a subset of viral genes is not reduced despite the loss of IE2 expression, including UL112/113. Furthermore, Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that VCP strongly colocalised with the viral replication compartments in the nucleus. Finally, we show that NMS-873, a small molecule inhibitor of VCP, is a potent HCMV antiviral with potential as a novel host targeting therapeutic for HCMV infection. PMID:28494016

  9. An intein-mediated modulation of protein stability system and its application to study human cytomegalovirus essential gene function

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Deng; Xuan, Baoqin; Sun, Yamei; Huang, Shaowu; Xie, Maorong; Bai, Yadan; Xu, Wenjia; Qian, Zhikang

    2016-01-01

    Functional analysis of the essential proteins encoded by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is hindered by the lack of complementing systems. To overcome this difficulty, we have established a novel approach, termed the intein-mediated modulation of protein stability (imPS), in which a destabilizing domain and part of a split intein are fused to the essential protein. The growth of the mutant virus can then be regulated by the degradation and splicing of the protein. We found that an ultrafast gp41-1 split intein was able to rescue or degrade the protein of interest (POI) by removing or adding a strong degron through protein splicing. As a result, the function of the POI was turned on or off during the process. Using HCMV essential gene IE1/IE2, we confirmed that imPS worked remarkably well in conditionally regulating protein stability during viral infection. This conditional approach is likely to be applicable for dissecting the gene functions of HCMV or other viruses. PMID:27188239

  10. Antiviral activity of a phosphorothioate oligonucleotide complementary to RNA of the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early region.

    PubMed Central

    Azad, R F; Driver, V B; Tanaka, K; Crooke, R M; Anderson, K P

    1993-01-01

    Phosphorothioate oligonucleotides complementary to mRNA of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA polymerase gene or to RNA transcripts of the major immediate-early regions 1 and 2 (IE1 and IE2) of HCMV were evaluated for antiviral activity in a 96-well immunoassay with primary human dermal fibroblasts as host cells. Oligonucleotides complementary to RNA of the IE2 region exhibited the most potent antiviral activity. One of these oligonucleotides, ISIS 2922, was at least 30-fold more potent than the nucleoside analog, ganciclovir, with a 50% effective concentration of 0.37 microM in the 96-well immunoassay. In an infectious virus yield reduction assay, ISIS 2922 and ganciclovir reduced production of infectious virus by 2 log units at concentrations of 2.2 and 36 microM, respectively. A control oligonucleotide showed no inhibition of virus production at concentrations as high as 3 microM. ISIS 2922 reduced IE protein synthesis in HCMV-infected cells in a dose-dependent manner which correlated with antiviral activity. The antiviral activity of ISIS 2922 was not due to oligonucleotide-induced cytotoxicity since effects on cell viability or proliferation were observed only at concentrations well in excess of effective antiviral concentrations. The specificity and potency of ISIS 2922 suggest that it may be useful for the treatment of cytomegalovirus disease in humans. Images PMID:8239610

  11. A Phase 1 Study of 4 Live, Recombinant Human Cytomegalovirus Towne/Toledo Chimera Vaccines in Cytomegalovirus-Seronegative Men.

    PubMed

    Adler, Stuart P; Manganello, Anne-Marie; Lee, Ronzo; McVoy, Michael A; Nixon, Daniel E; Plotkin, Stanley; Mocarski, Edward; Cox, Josephine H; Fast, Patricia E; Nesterenko, Pavlo A; Murray, Susan E; Hill, Ann B; Kemble, George

    2016-11-01

     Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection causes disease in newborns and transplant recipients. A HCMV vaccine (Towne) protects transplant recipients.  The genomes of Towne and the nonattenuated Toledo strain were recombined, yielding 4 Towne/Toledo chimera vaccines. Each of 36 HCMV-seronegative men received 1 subcutaneous dose of 10, 100, or 1000 plaque-forming units (PFU) in cohorts of 3. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated over 12 weeks after immunization and for 52 weeks for those who seroconverted.  There were no serious local or systemic reactions. No subject had HCMV in urine or saliva. For chimera 3, none of 9 subjects seroconverted. For chimera 1, 1 of 9 seroconverted (the seroconverter received 100 PFU). For chimera 2, 3 subjects seroconverted (1 received 100 PFU, and 2 received 1000 PFU). For chimera 4, 7 subjects seroconverted (1 received 10 PFU, 3 received 100 PFU, and 3 received 1000 PFU). All 11 seroconverters developed low but detectable levels of neutralizing activity. CD4(+) T-cell responses were detectable in 1 subject (who received 100 PFU of chimera 4). Seven subjects receiving chimera 2 or 4 had detectable CD8(+) T-cell responses to IE1; 3 responded to 1-2 additional antigens.  The Towne/Toledo chimera vaccine candidates were well tolerated and were not excreted. Additional human trials of chimeras 2 and 4 are appropriate.  NCT01195571. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. NMDA receptor subunit and CaMKII changes in rat hippocampus by congenital HCMV infection: a mechanism for learning and memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Wu, De; Yang, Li; Bu, Xiaosong; Tang, Jiulai; Fan, Xiaocheng

    2017-03-22

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of congenital human cytomegalovirus infection on the expression levels of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NRs) and Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in the hippocampal neurons of neonatal Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Pregnant SD rats were divided into an experimental group and a control group (n=10 in each group). Spatial learning and memory of the offspring of SD rats were evaluated using the Morris water-maze test. Pathological studies of hippocampus sections were carried out. The concentration of [Ca] was measured using a dual-wavelength spectrophotometer method. The expression levels of NRs were detected by an immunohistochemical study. Western blot was performed to detect the expression level of CaMKII. In the Morris water-maze test, the rats in the experimental group showed significantly increased escape latency and distance traveled than the control group. Damaged and structural disorders of the dentate granule in the hippocampus were found in the experimental rats. Immunohistochemistry results showed that the expression levels of NR subunits in the hippocampus of the experimental group were significantly decreased. The concentration of [Ca] in the experimental group was significantly increased. In contrast, the level of CaMKII in the experimental group was significantly decreased. The expressions of the NR subunit and CaMKII were decreased in rat hippocampus by human cytomegalovirus congenital infection, which may be associated with the mechanism underlying the impairment of learning and memory function.

  13. Multiple phosphorylation sites at the C-terminus regulate nuclear import of HCMV DNA polymerase processivity factor ppUL44

    SciTech Connect

    Alvisi, Gualtiero; Marin, Oriano; Pari, Gregory; Mancini, Manuela; Avanzi, Simone; Loregian, Arianna; Jans, David A.; Ripalti, Alessandro

    2011-09-01

    The processivity factor of human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase, phosphoprotein ppUL44, is essential for viral replication. During viral infection ppUL44 is phosphorylated by the viral kinase pUL97, but neither the target residues on ppUL44 nor the effect of phosphorylation on ppUL44's activity are known. We report here that ppUL44 is phosphorylated when transiently expressed in mammalian cells and coimmunoprecipitates with cellular kinases. Of three potential phosphorylation sites (S413, S415, S418) located upstream of ppUL44's nuclear localization signal (NLS) and one (T427) within the NLS itself, protein kinase CK2 (CK2) specifically phosphorylates S413, to trigger a cascade of phosphorylation of S418 and S415 by CK1 and CK2, respectively. Negative charge at the CK2/CK1 target serine residues facilitates optimal nuclear accumulation of ppUL44, whereas negative charge on T427, a potential cyclin-dependent 1 phosphorylation site, strongly decreases nuclear accumulation. Thus, nuclear transport of ppUL44 is finely tuned during viral infection through complex phosphorylation events.

  14. Impact of recombinant DNA technology and protein engineering on structure-based drug design: case studies of HIV-1 and HCMV proteases.

    PubMed

    Kan, Chen-Chen

    2002-03-01

    Structure-based drug design is an organized, multidisciplinary endeavor undertaken by scientists from many different scientific fields. The success of structure-based drug design was only made possible by advances in structure biology that provides the three-dimensional structure of the drug design target with which small molecular chemical ligands interact. Visualization of the conformation and interactions of a small molecule ligand bound to the protein target in the co-crystal structure of the protein:ligand complex enables the design of new chemical compounds with improved binding affinity and specificity. With the advances in molecular biology, lab automation, and computational science, genomic data have now become available for the human genome, as well as various other organisms. The pharmaceutical industry is currently putting forth tremendous effort in the area of functional genomics and structural genomics in attempts to decipher functions and structures of protein encoded by genes, with the ultimate goal of identifying novel targets for drug discovery and development. This chapter discusses the significant impact made by recombinant DNA technology and protein engineering on structural biology and, more specifically, on structure-based drug design.

  15. Synthesis and Potent Anti-HCMV Activity of 2',5',5'-trifluoro-3'-hydroxy-apiosyl Nucleoside Phosphonic Acid Analogues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seyeon; Hong, Joon Hee

    2016-01-01

    As antiviral nucleosides containing a fluorine atom at 2'-position are endowed with increased stabilization of glycosyl bond, it was of interest to investigate the influence of three fluorine atoms at 2'- and 5'-positions of apiosyl nucleoside phosphonate analogues. Various pyrimidine and purine 2',5',5'-trifluoro-3'-hydroxy-apiose nucleoside phosphonic acid analogues were synthesized from 1,3-dihydroxyacetone. Electrophilic fluorination of lactone was performed using N-fluorodibenzenesulfonimide. Difluorophosphonation was performed by direct displacement of triflate intermediate with diethyl(lithiodifluoromethyl) phosphonate to give the corresponding (α,α-difluoroalkyl) phosphonate. Condensation successfully proceeded from a glycosyl donor with persilylated bases to yield nucleoside phosphonate analogues. Deprotection of diethyl phosphonates provided the final phosphonic acid sodium salts. The synthesized nucleoside analogues were subjected to antiviral screening against various viruses.

  16. Incidence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection and T-cell response in psoriatic patients before and during anti-TNF-α therapy.

    PubMed

    Fornara, L; Fornara, C; Cananzi, R; Lilleri, D; Furione, M; Brazzelli, V

    2017-05-11

    psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects approximately 2-3% of the world population.(1) Among the cytokines produced by T cells, TNF-α has a crucial role in psoriasis.(2) Thus, TNF-α blocking therapy is efficient in the treatment of psoriasis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of Cellular Proteins that Interact with Human Cytomegalovirus Immediate-Early Protein 1 by Protein Array Assay

    PubMed Central

    Puerta Martínez, Francisco; Tang, Qiyi

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene expression during infection is characterized as a sequential process including immediate-early (IE), early (E), and late (L)-stage gene expression. The most abundantly expressed gene at the IE stage of infection is the major IE (MIE) gene that produces IE1 and IE2. IE1 has been the focus of study because it is an important protein, not only for viral gene expression but also for viral replication. It is believed that IE1 plays important roles in viral gene regulation by interacting with cellular proteins. In the current study, we performed protein array assays and identified 83 cellular proteins that interact with IE1. Among them, seven are RNA-binding proteins that are important in RNA processing; more than half are nuclear proteins that are involved in gene regulations. Tumorigenesis-related proteins are also found to interact with IE1, implying that the role of IE1 in tumorigenesis might need to be reevaluated. Unexpectedly, cytoplasmic proteins, such as Golgi autoantigen and GGA1 (both related to the Golgi trafficking protein), are also found to be associated with IE1. We also employed a coimmunoprecipitation assay to test the interactions of IE1 and some of the proteins identified in the protein array assays and confirmed that the results from the protein array assays are reliable. Many of the proteins identified by the protein array assay have not been previously reported. Therefore, the functions of the IE1-protein interactions need to be further explored in the future. PMID:24385082

  18. Functionally inactivated dominant viral antigens of human cytomegalovirus delivered in replication incompetent adenovirus type 6 vectors as vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Tang, Aimin; Freed, Daniel C; Li, Fengsheng; Meschino, Steve; Prokop, Michael; Bett, Andrew; Casimiro, Danilo; Wang, Dai; Fu, Tong-Ming

    2017-05-11

    T cell immunity is critical in controlling human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in transplant recipients, and T cells targeting viral immediate early proteins such as IE1, IE2 and pp65 have been speculated to be more effective against reactivation. Here we report efforts to construct replication incompetent adenovirus 6 vectors expressing these viral antigens as vaccine candidates. To reduce the potential liabilities of these viral proteins as vaccine antigens, we introduced mutations to inactivate their reported functions including their nuclear localization signals. The modifications greatly reduced their localization to the nuclei, thus limiting their interactions with cellular proteins important for cell cycle modulation and transactivation. The immunogenicity of modified pp65, IE1 and IE2 vaccines was comparable to their wild-type counterparts in mice and the immunogenicity of the modified antigens was demonstrated in non-human primates.

  19. Association of Human Cytomegalovirus with Hodgkin’s Disease and Non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas

    PubMed

    Mehravaran, Hamide; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Samarbaf Zade, Alireza; Neisi, Niloofar; Kiani, Hadis; Radmehr, Hashem; Shahani, Toran; Hoseini, Seyedeh Zeinab; Ranjbari, Nastaran; Nahid Samiei, Rahil

    2017-03-01

    Background and Objective: The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can persist lifelong as a latent infection and may result in a series of disorders. Associations with both Hodgkin’s disease and non-Hodgkin´s lymphomas have been reported. Expression of the unique long (UL)138 gene of HCMV is linked with the viral latency phase while that of the immediate-early (IE)1 gene is typical of the viral replication phase in patients. This study conducted to determine the prevalence of CMV latent infection in histological tissue samples from patients with Hodgkin’s and Non-Hodgkin´s lymphomas. Material and Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out with a total of 50 paraffin embedded tissues blocks, including 25 samples for Hodgkin’s disease and 25 samples for non-Hodgkin´s lymphomas. After RNA extraction and cDNA preparation, detection of IE1 mRNA was conducted by RT-PCR and identification of mRNA UL138 was achieved by nested PCR. Results: Among 25 cases of Non-Hodgkin´s lymphoma, 5 (20%) were positive for UL 138 and 1 (4%) for both IE1 and UL 138. Among 25 cases of Hodgkin only 1 (4%) was positive for UL 138 and all were negative for IE1 .Conclusion: A relatively high 20% rate of expression of UL 138 was detected in patients with non-Hodgkin´s lymphoma, so that latent CMV infection may play a role in development of the disease. Creative Commons Attribution License

  20. Association of Human Cytomegalovirus with Hodgkin’s Disease and Non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mehravaran, Hamide; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Zade, Alireza Samarbaf; Neisi, Niloofar; Kiani, Hadis; Radmehr, Hashem; Shahani, Toran; Hoseini, Seyedeh Zeinab; Ranjbari, Nastaran; Samiei, Rahil Nahid

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can persist lifelong as a latent infection and may result in a series of disorders. Associations with both Hodgkin’s disease and non-Hodgkin´s lymphomas have been reported. Expression of the unique long (UL)138 gene of HCMV is linked with the viral latency phase while that of the immediate-early (IE)1 gene is typical of the viral replication phase in patients. This study conducted to determine the prevalence of CMV latent infection in histological tissue samples from patients with Hodgkin’s and Non-Hodgkin´s lymphomas. Material and Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out with a total of 50 paraffin embedded tissues blocks, including 25 samples for Hodgkin’s disease and 25 samples for non-Hodgkin´s lymphomas. After RNA extraction and cDNA preparation, detection of IE1 mRNA was conducted by RT-PCR and identification of mRNA UL138 was achieved by nested PCR. Results: Among 25 cases of Non-Hodgkin´s lymphoma, 5 (20%) were positive for UL 138 and 1 (4%) for both IE1 and UL 138. Among 25 cases of Hodgkin only 1 (4%) was positive for UL 138 and all were negative for IE1 Conclusion: A relatively high 20% rate of expression of UL 138 was detected in patients with non-Hodgkin´s lymphoma, so that latent CMV infection may play a role in development of the disease. PMID:28440608

  1. Human immune responses to major human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y N; Kari, B; Gehrz, R C

    1988-01-01

    Sera from both human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-seropositive adults and infants with congenital HCMV infection recognized two major HCMV glycoprotein complexes. However, proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to these complexes varied among seropositive adults and were not detected in any of the infants. Thus, these glycoproteins alone may not be sufficient to develop a subviral HCMV vaccine. Images PMID:2828655

  2. Reconstitution of Human Cytomegalovirus-Specific CD4+ T Cells is Critical for Control of Virus Reactivation in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients but Does Not Prevent Organ Infection.

    PubMed

    Gabanti, Elisa; Lilleri, Daniele; Ripamonti, Francesco; Bruno, Francesca; Zelini, Paola; Furione, Milena; Colombo, Anna A; Alessandrino, Emilio P; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    The relative contribution of human cytomegalovirus (HMCV)-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells to the control of HCMV infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients is still controversial. HCMV reactivation and HCMV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell reconstitution were monitored for 1 year in 63 HCMV-seropositive patients receiving HSCT. HCMV reactivation was detected in all but 2 patients. In 20 of 63 (31.7%) patients (group 1) HCMV infection resolved spontaneously, whereas 32 of 63 (50.8%) patients (group 2) controlled the infection after a single short-course of pre-emptive therapy and the remaining 9 (14.3%) patients (group 3) suffered from relapsing episodes of HCMV infection, requiring multiple courses of antiviral therapy. The kinetics and magnitude of HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cell reconstitution were comparable among the 3 groups, but HCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells were lower in number in patients requiring antiviral treatment. HCMV-seronegative donors, as well as unrelated donors (receiving antithymocyte globulin) and acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were associated with both delayed HCMV-specific CD4(+) T cell reconstitution and severity of infection. Conversely, these risk factors had no impact on HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells. Eight patients with previous GVHD suffered from HCMV gastrointestinal disease, although in the presence of HCMV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) systemic immunity and undetectable HCMV DNA in blood. Reconstitution of systemic HCMV-specific CD4(+) T cell immunity is required for control of HCMV reactivation in adult HSCT recipients, but it may not be sufficient to prevent late-onset organ localization in patients with GVHD. HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells contribute to control of HCMV infection, but only after HCMV-specific CD4(+) T cell reconstitution.

  3. Discordant humoral and cellular immune responses to Cytomegalovirus (CMV) in glioblastoma patients whose tumors are positive for CMV

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Afsar; Peredo, Inti; Solberg, Nina Wolmer; Taher, Chato; Dzabic, Mensur; Xu, Xinling; Skarman, Petra; Fornara, Olesja; Tammik, Charlotte; Yaiw, Koon; Wilhelmi, Vanessa; Assinger, Alice; Stragliotto, Giuseppe; Söderberg-Naucler, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Background. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults and is nearly always fatal. Emerging evidence suggests that human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is present in 90–100% of GBMs and that add-on antiviral treatment for HCMV show promise to improve survival. Methods. In a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of valganciclovir in 42 GBM patients, blood samples were collected for analyses of HCMV DNA, RNA, reactivity against HCMV peptides, IgG, and IgM at baseline and at 3, 12, and 24 weeks of treatment. Results. All 42 tumors were positive for HCMV protein. All patients examined had at least one blood sample positive for HCMV DNA, 63% were HCMV RNA positive, and 21% were IgM positive. However, 29% of GBM patients were IgG negative for HCMV. Five of these samples were positive in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that used antigens derived from a clinical isolate. Blood T cells from 11 of 13 (85%) HCMV IgG-negative GBM patients reacted against HCMV peptides. Valganciclovir did not affect IgG titers, DNA, or RNA levels of the HCMV immediate early (HCMV IE) gene in blood. Conclusion. In GBM patients, HCMV activity is higher than in healthy controls and serology is a poor test to define previous or active HCMV infection in these patients. PMID:25949880

  4. Discordant humoral and cellular immune responses to Cytomegalovirus (CMV) in glioblastoma patients whose tumors are positive for CMV.

    PubMed

    Rahbar, Afsar; Peredo, Inti; Solberg, Nina Wolmer; Taher, Chato; Dzabic, Mensur; Xu, Xinling; Skarman, Petra; Fornara, Olesja; Tammik, Charlotte; Yaiw, Koon; Wilhelmi, Vanessa; Assinger, Alice; Stragliotto, Giuseppe; Söderberg-Naucler, Cecilia

    2015-02-01

    Background. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults and is nearly always fatal. Emerging evidence suggests that human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is present in 90-100% of GBMs and that add-on antiviral treatment for HCMV show promise to improve survival. Methods. In a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of valganciclovir in 42 GBM patients, blood samples were collected for analyses of HCMV DNA, RNA, reactivity against HCMV peptides, IgG, and IgM at baseline and at 3, 12, and 24 weeks of treatment. Results. All 42 tumors were positive for HCMV protein. All patients examined had at least one blood sample positive for HCMV DNA, 63% were HCMV RNA positive, and 21% were IgM positive. However, 29% of GBM patients were IgG negative for HCMV. Five of these samples were positive in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that used antigens derived from a clinical isolate. Blood T cells from 11 of 13 (85%) HCMV IgG-negative GBM patients reacted against HCMV peptides. Valganciclovir did not affect IgG titers, DNA, or RNA levels of the HCMV immediate early (HCMV IE) gene in blood. Conclusion. In GBM patients, HCMV activity is higher than in healthy controls and serology is a poor test to define previous or active HCMV infection in these patients.

  5. Proteomic analyses of human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 derivatives reveal highly conserved patterns of viral and cellular proteins in infected fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Reyda, Sabine; Büscher, Nicole; Tenzer, Stefan; Plachter, Bodo

    2014-01-07

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) particle morphogenesis in infected cells is an orchestrated process that eventually results in the release of enveloped virions. Proteomic analysis has been employed to reveal the complexity in the protein composition of these extracellular particles. Only limited information is however available regarding the proteome of infected cells preceding the release of HCMV virions. We used quantitative mass spectrometry to address the pattern of viral and cellular proteins in cells, infected with derivatives of the AD169 laboratory strain. Our analyses revealed a remarkable conservation in the patterns of viral and of abundant cellular proteins in cells, infected for 2 hours, 2 days, or 4 days. Most viral proteins increased in abundance as the infection progressed over time. Of the proteins that were reliably detectable by mass spectrometry, only IE1 (pUL123), pTRS1, and pIRS1 were downregulated at 4 days after infection. In addition, little variation of viral proteins in the virions of the different viruses was detectable, independent of the expression of the major tegument protein pp65. Taken together these data suggest that there is little variation in the expression program of viral and cellular proteins in cells infected with related HCMVs, resulting in a conserved pattern of viral proteins ultimately associated with extracellular virions.

  6. Clinical and biologic aspects of human cytomegalovirus resistance to antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Baldanti, Fausto; Lurain, Nell; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2004-05-01

    The emergence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) drug resistant strains is a life-threatening condition in immunocompromised individuals with active HCMV infection. HCMV drug resistance represented a major problem in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome until the recent introduction of highly active antiretroviral combination therapy, which dramatically decreased the incidence in this clinical setting. However, HCMV resistance to antiviral drugs is now an emerging problem in the transplantation setting. The molecular mechanisms of HCMV drug resistance have been elucidated and rely on the selection during treatment of HCMV strains harboring mutations in two key viral genes: UL97 coding for a viral phosphotransferase and UL54 coding for the viral DNA polymerase.

  7. Long and Short Isoforms of the Human Cytomegalovirus UL138 Protein Silence IE Transcription and Promote Latency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Song Hee; Caviness, Katie; Albright, Emily R; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Gelbmann, Christopher B; Rak, Mike; Goodrum, Felicia; Kalejta, Robert F

    2016-10-15

    The UL133-138 locus present in clinical strains of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes proteins required for latency and reactivation in CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells and virion maturation in endothelial cells. The encoded proteins form multiple homo- and hetero-interactions and localize within secretory membranes. One of these genes, UL136 gene, is expressed as at least five different protein isoforms with overlapping and unique functions. Here we show that another gene from this locus, the UL138 gene, also generates more than one protein isoform. A long form of UL138 (pUL138-L) initiates translation from codon 1, possesses an amino-terminal signal sequence, and is a type one integral membrane protein. Here we identify a short protein isoform (pUL138-S) initiating from codon 16 that displays a subcellular localization similar to that of pUL138-L. Reporter, short-term transcription, and long-term virus production assays revealed that both pUL138-L and pUL138-S are able to suppress major immediate early (IE) gene transcription and the generation of infectious virions in cells in which HCMV latency is studied. The long form appears to be more potent at silencing IE transcription shortly after infection, while the short form seems more potent at restricting progeny virion production at later times, indicating that both isoforms of UL138 likely cooperate to promote HCMV latency. Latency allows herpesviruses to persist for the lives of their hosts in the face of effective immune control measures for productively infected cells. Controlling latent reservoirs is an attractive antiviral approach complicated by knowledge deficits for how latently infected cells are established, maintained, and reactivated. This is especially true for betaherpesviruses. The functional consequences of HCMV UL138 protein expression during latency include repression of viral IE1 transcription and suppression of virus replication. Here we show that short and long isoforms of UL138

  8. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Upregulates the Mitochondrial Transcription and Translation Machineries.

    PubMed

    Karniely, S; Weekes, M P; Antrobus, R; Rorbach, J; van Haute, L; Umrania, Y; Smith, D L; Stanton, R J; Minczuk, M; Lehner, P J; Sinclair, J H

    2016-03-29

    Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) profoundly affects cellular metabolism. Like in tumor cells, HCMV infection increases glycolysis, and glucose carbon is shifted from the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle to the biosynthesis of fatty acids. However, unlike in many tumor cells, where aerobic glycolysis is accompanied by suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, HCMV induces mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Here, we affinity purified mitochondria and used quantitative mass spectrometry to determine how the mitochondrial proteome changes upon HCMV infection. We found that the mitochondrial transcription and translation systems are induced early during the viral replication cycle. Specifically, proteins involved in biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosome were highly upregulated by HCMV infection. Inhibition of mitochondrial translation with chloramphenicol or knockdown of HCMV-induced ribosome biogenesis factor MRM3 abolished the HCMV-mediated increase in mitochondrially encoded proteins and significantly impaired viral growth under bioenergetically restricting conditions. Our findings demonstrate how HCMV manipulates mitochondrial biogenesis to support its replication. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a betaherpesvirus, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality during congenital infection and among immunosuppressed individuals. HCMV infection significantly changes cellular metabolism. Akin to tumor cells, in HCMV-infected cells, glycolysis is increased and glucose carbon is shifted from the tricarboxylic acid cycle to fatty acid biosynthesis. However, unlike in tumor cells, HCMV induces mitochondrial biogenesis even under aerobic glycolysis. Here, we have affinity purified mitochondria and used quantitative mass spectrometry to determine how the mitochondrial proteome changes upon HCMV infection. We find that the mitochondrial transcription and translation systems are induced early during the viral replication cycle

  9. Interactions between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and human cytomegalovirus in human term syncytiotrophoblast cells coinfected with both viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, F D; Mosborg-Petersen, P; Kiss, J; Aboagye-Mathiesen, G; Hager, H; Juhl, C B; Gergely, L; Zdravkovic, M; Aranyosi, J; Lampé, L

    1995-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) may interact in the pathogenesis of AIDS. The placental syncytiotrophoblast layer serves as the first line of defense of the fetus against viruses. We analyzed the patterns of replication of HIV-1 and HCMV in singly an dually infected human term syncytiotrophoblast cells cultured in vitro. Syncytiotrophoblast cells exhibited restricted permissiveness for HIV-1, while HCMV replication was restricted at the level of immediate-early and early gene products in the singly infected cells. We found that the syncytiotrophoblasts as an overlapping cell population could be coinfected with HIV-1 and HCMV. HIV-1 replication was markedly upregulated by previous or simultaneous infection of the cells with HCMV, whereas prior HIV-1 infection of the cells converted HCMV infection from a nonpermissive to a permissive one. No simultaneous enhancement of HCMV and HIV-1 expression was observed in the dually infected cell cultures. Major immediate-early proteins of HCMV were necessary for enhancement of HIV-1 replication, and interleukin-6 production induced by HCMV and further increased by replicating HIV-1 synergized with these proteins to produce this effect. Permissive replication cycle of HCMV was induced by the HIV-1 tat gene product. We were unable to detect HIV-1 (HCMV) or HCMV (HIV-1) pseudotypes in supernatant fluids from dually infected cell cultures. Our results suggest that interactions between HIV-1 and HCMV in coinfected syncytiotrophoblast cells may contribute to the transplacental transmission of both viruses. PMID:7884869

  10. Human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B genotypes in blood of AIDS patients: lack of association with either the viral DNA load in leukocytes or presence of retinitis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, C; Handfield, J; Toma, E; Lalonde, R; Bergeron, M G; Boivin, G

    1999-09-01

    It has been suggested that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) glycoprotein B (gB) genotypes could be used as a marker for viral virulence in patients with AIDS. The present study was designed to evaluate a possible association between specific gB genotypes, the presence of HCMV retinitis, and the HCMV viral load. Fifty-four blood samples were obtained from 54 HIV- and HCMV-infected patients. Twenty-seven of these patients were asymptomatic for HCMV, whereas the other 27 patients had been diagnosed recently with HCMV retinitis. HCMV gB genotyping was carried out by using restriction enzyme analysis of PCR-amplified PMNL extracts. Determination of the HCMV viral load in the same specimens was carried out using a quantitative-PCR. HCMV gB genotype 2 was found more frequently than other genotypes in PCR-amplified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) of patients with AIDS (P < 0.05) but not more frequently in samples from patients with HCMV retinitis. No significant association was found between any HCMV gB genotypes and the viral load in blood. In conclusion, the actual HCMV gB genotyping system using PMNL provides no additional benefit over the viral load in blood for identification of HIV-infected subjects at risk of HCMV disease.

  11. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Upregulates the Mitochondrial Transcription and Translation Machineries

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, M. P.; Antrobus, R.; Rorbach, J.; van Haute, L.; Umrania, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Minczuk, M.; Lehner, P. J.; Sinclair, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) profoundly affects cellular metabolism. Like in tumor cells, HCMV infection increases glycolysis, and glucose carbon is shifted from the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle to the biosynthesis of fatty acids. However, unlike in many tumor cells, where aerobic glycolysis is accompanied by suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, HCMV induces mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Here, we affinity purified mitochondria and used quantitative mass spectrometry to determine how the mitochondrial proteome changes upon HCMV infection. We found that the mitochondrial transcription and translation systems are induced early during the viral replication cycle. Specifically, proteins involved in biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosome were highly upregulated by HCMV infection. Inhibition of mitochondrial translation with chloramphenicol or knockdown of HCMV-induced ribosome biogenesis factor MRM3 abolished the HCMV-mediated increase in mitochondrially encoded proteins and significantly impaired viral growth under bioenergetically restricting conditions. Our findings demonstrate how HCMV manipulates mitochondrial biogenesis to support its replication. PMID:27025248

  12. High frequency of Human Cytomegalovirus DNA in the Liver of Infants with Extrahepatic Neonatal Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    De Tommaso, Adriana MA; Andrade, Paula D; Costa, Sandra CB; Escanhoela, Cecília AF; Hessel, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Background Biliary atresia (BA) is the most severe hepatic disorder in newborns and its etiopathogenesis remains unknown. Viral involvement has been proposed, including the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The aims of the study were to use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to screen the liver tissue of infants with extrahepatic cholestasis for HCMV and to correlate the results with serological antibodies against HCMV and histological findings. Methods A retrospective study in a tertiary care setting included 35 patients (31 BA, 1 BA associated with a choledochal cyst, 2 congenital stenosis of the distal common bile duct and 1 hepatic cyst). HCMV serology was determined by ELISA. Liver and porta hepatis were examined histologically. Liver samples from infants and a control group were screened for HCMV DNA. Results Twelve patients had HCMV negative serology, 9 were positive for IgG antibodies and 14 were positive for IgG and IgM. Nine liver and seven porta hepatis samples were positive for HCMV DNA but none of the control group were positive (general frequency of positivity was 34.3% – 12/35). There was no correlation between HCMV positivity by PCR and the histological findings. The accuracy of serology for detecting HCMV antibodies was low. Conclusion These results indicate an elevated frequency of HCMV in pediatric patients with extrahepatic neonatal cholestasis. They also show the low accuracy of serological tests for detecting active HCMV infection and the lack of correlation between HCMV positivity by PCR and the histopathological changes. PMID:16321152

  13. Diagnostic value of amplification of human cytomegalovirus DNA from gastrointestinal biopsies from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Cotte, L; Drouet, E; Bissuel, F; Denoyel, G A; Trepo, C

    1993-01-01

    In order to assess the value of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA amplification of gastrointestinal biopsies, we studied 57 human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with and without gastrointestinal HCMV diseases. After DNA extraction, a 406-bp fragment from the unique short region of the HCMV genome was amplified by 35 cycles of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and semiquantified from 80 to 80,000 HCMV genomic copies. Among 12 non-AIDS patients, the PCR assay was negative for 11 of 12 duodenal and 8 of 8 colorectal samples. It was also negative for 28 of 31 duodenal and 12 of 15 colorectal samples from 31 AIDS patients without gastrointestinal HCMV diseases. Among 14 AIDS patients with gastrointestinal HCMV diseases, the PCR assay was positive for 12 of 12 patients with HCMV duodenitis and for 13 of 13 patients with HCMV colitis. Results were dichotomized between high and low HCMV-DNA copy numbers. For duodenitis, sensitivity was 92% and specificity was 100%. For colitis, sensitivity was 92% and specificity was 93%. Specificity and sensitivity were not influenced by shedding status for HCMV or by other gastrointestinal infections. HCMV DNA amplification of gastrointestinal biopsies is a sensitive and specific tool for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal HCMV diseases in AIDS patients. Images PMID:8396587

  14. Clinical evaluation of a chemiluminescence immunoassay for determination of immunoglobulin g avidity to human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Revello, Maria Grazia; Gorini, Giovanna; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2004-07-01

    Clinical evaluation of a novel fully automated chemiluminescence immunoassay for determination of immunoglobulin G avidity to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) showed 92.8% sensitivity and 84.7% specificity in detecting a recent (< or =90 days) primary HCMV infection. The assay appears useful for accurately diagnosing recent primary HCMV infections.

  15. Seroprevalence of Cytomegalovirus among pregnant women and hospitalized children in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Neirukh, Tahani; Qaisi, Ayda; Saleh, Niveen; Rmaileh, Areej Abu; Zahriyeh, Eman Abu; Qurei, Lina; Dajani, Firas; Nusseibeh, Taghreed; Khamash, Hatem; Baraghithi, Sabri; Azzeh, Maysa

    2013-11-09

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common cause of congenital infections. The maternal immune status plays a major role in the likelihood of congenital infection. The aim of this study is to shed light on the seroprevalence of HCMV in pregnant women, hospitalized children and newborns including cases of congenital infections in Palestine. We analyzed HCMV IgG and IgM test results that had been ordered for pregnant women, hospitalized children and newborns in the years 2006-2012 at Al-Makassed Islamic Charitable Hospital (MICH) in East Jerusalem. Furthermore, we reviewed the medical charts of newborns and HCMV IgM-positive children. HCMV IgG was positive in 96.6% of pregnant women, in 88% of hospitalized children and in 98.4% of hospitalized newborns. HCMV IgM was positive in 11.5% of pregnant women, in 11.7% of hospitalized children and in 2% of hospitalized newborns respectively. The HCMV avidity assay revealed that 95% of IgM-positive pregnant women had high avidity (>60%) indicating that most Palestinian women were undergoing a recurrent HCMV infection. Real time PCR on limited number of cases indicated that 62.5% of infants, mostly born to IgM-positive mothers and 83.3% of HCMV IgM-positive children had detectable HCMV DNA in their urine. Out of the 249 newborns tested during this study period, four (1.6%) were subjected to Gancyclovir treatment because of symptomatic congenital HCMV infection. This is the first report to provide an insight into HCMV seroprevalence in Palestine. Despite the high rate of seropositivity, the importance of HCMV testing during pregnancy should not be underestimated. A comprehensive study with a long term follow-up examination of offspring born to HCMV IgM-positive mothers would be required to provide estimates of an accurate percentage of symptomatic congenital HCMV infection in Palestine.

  16. Study of human cytomegalovirus replication in body fluids, placental infection, and miscarriage during the first trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao Chuan; Wang, Jian Hua; Wang, Bo; Huang, Li Li; Zhou, Li Qin; Zhu, Bo; Liang, Yun

    2015-06-01

    Intrauterine infection caused by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can lead to embryo, fetal, and neonatal damage. The prevalence of HCMV replication in body fluids (blood, urine, and cervicovaginal secretion) was investigated, and its effects on HCMV vertical transmission and miscarriages in early pregnant women were evaluated. HCMV DNA in body fluids was detected in 1,064 early pregnant women (624 normal pregnancies and 440 miscarriages). There were 101 cases who were HCMV DNA positive in cervicovaginal secretion and the rates were 10.9% (48/440 cases) and 8.5% (53/624 cases) in miscarriages and normal pregnancies, respectively (P > 0.05). A total of 101 cases (63 and 38 cases with and without HCMV DNA in cervicovaginal secretion, respectively) were given HCMV DNA detection in placental villi/deciduas. There were five cases (7.9%; two normal pregnancies and three miscarriages) with HCMV DNA in placental villi/deciduas among the 63 cases with HCMV DNA in cervicovaginal secretion, whereas none of the other 38 cases were detected HCMV DNA positive in their placental villi/deciduas. The percentage of HCMV DNA in placental villi/deciduas was higher in miscarriage group (9.1% [3/33]) than that in the normal pregnancy group (6.7% [2/30]), but there was no statistical significance (P > 0.05). Two cases with a higher HCMV loads in cervicovaginal secretion and placental villi/deciduas had miscarriages. These findings suggest that HCMV replication in cervicovaginal secretion can involve in placental HCMV infection, and high HCMV DNA loads in cervicovaginal secretion and placental villi/deciduas are associated with miscarriage. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Detection of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection in Wheezing Infants by Urine DNA and Serum IgG Testing

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhao-cheng; Chang, Qing; Sun, Zhi-wei; Song, Ming-mei; Jin, Xin-ling; Jiang, Shu-ya; Yang, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of CMV infection in wheezing infants and the association between CMV-DNA and immunoglobulins (Igs). Material/Methods A total of 243 wheezing infants and 3,000 parturients were enrolled in this study. The infants were randomly grouped to receive blood HCMV-DNA tests (n=46) or urine HCMV-DNA tests (n=197). Furthermore, all participants had serum CMV-specific IgM and IgG testing. Afterwards, 10 HCMV-IgG positive infants were randomly selected for simultaneous blood and urine HCMV-DNA tests, and 25 HCMV-IgG positive puerperants were randomly selected for urine HCMV-DNA tests. Results The detection rate of urine HCMV-DNA was significantly higher than that of blood HCMV-DNA (67.5% vs. 13.0%, p<0.001). Fifteen (6.2%) and 190 (80.0%) infants showed positive CMV-specific IgM and IgG results (p<0.001), respectively. Among the 10 HCMV-IgG positive infants tested further, only two infants had positive HCMV-DNA blood tests, while all of the 10 infants had positive HCMV-DNA urine tests. However, HCMV-DNA was not detected in the urine of the 25 randomly selected parturients positive for HCMV-IgG. Conclusions CMV infection may be one of the causes of wheezing in infants; CMV infection can be detected by urine-HCMV-DNA and serum HCMV-IgG testing. Infants were more susceptible to CMV infection than parturients. PMID:28283676

  18. Human cytomegalovirus resistance to antiviral drugs: diagnosis, monitoring and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Baldanti, Fausto; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2003-09-01

    The incidence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) disease in AIDS patients decreased dramatically after the introduction, a few years ago, of highly active antiretroviral combination therapy. As a consequence, the emergence of drug-resistant HCMV strains is no longer a major problem in HIV-infected individuals. However, HCMV resistance to antiviral drugs is presently recognized as an emerging problem in transplantation settings. The mechanisms of HCMV drug resistance will be analysed along with the clinical features relevant to the emergence of drug-resistant HCMV strains during antiviral treatment of patients receiving either solid organ or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  19. Absence of human cytomegalovirus infection in childhood brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Iacopo; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Becciani, Sabrina; Facchini, Ludovica; Guidi, Milena; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Moriondo, Maria; Baroni, Gianna; Stival, Alessia; Farina, Silvia; Genitori, Lorenzo; de Martino, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common human pathogen which induces different clinical manifestations related to the age and the immune conditions of the host. HCMV infection seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of adult glioblastomas. The aim of our study was to detect the presence of HCMV in high grade gliomas and other pediatric brain tumors. This hypothesis might have important therapeutic implications, offering a new target for adjuvant therapies. Among 106 pediatric patients affected by CNS tumors we selected 27 patients with a positive HCMV serology. The serological analysis revealed 7 patients with positive HCMV IGG (≥14 U/mL), whom had also a high HCMV IgG avidity, suggesting a more than 6 months-dated infection. Furthermore, HCMV IGM were positive (≥22 U/mL) in 20 patients. Molecular and immunohistochemical analyses were performed in all the 27 samples. Despite a positive HCMV serology, confirmed by ELISA, no viral DNA was shown at the PCR analysis in the patients’ neoplastic cells. At immunohistochemistry, no expression of HCMV antigens was observed in tumoral cells. Our results are in agreement with recent results in adults which did not evidence the presence of HCMV genome in glioblastoma lesions. We did not find any correlation between HCMV infection and pediatric CNS tumors. PMID:26396923

  20. Human cytomegalovirus function inhibits replication of herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Cockley, K.D.; Shiraki, K.; Rapp, F.

    1988-01-01

    Human embryonic lung (HEL) cells infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) restricted the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). A delay in HSV replication of 15 h as well as a consistent, almost 3 log inhibition of HSV replication in HCMV-infected cell cultures harvested 24 to 72 h after superinfection were observed compared with controls infected with HSV alone. Treatment of HCMV-infected HEL cells with cycloheximide (100 ..mu..g/ml) for 3 or 24 h was demonstrated effective in blocking HCMV protein synthesis, as shown by immunoprecipitation with HCMV antibody-positive polyvalent serum. Cycloheximide treatment of HCMV-infected HEL cells and removal of the cycloheximide block before superinfection inhibited HSV-1 replication more efficiently than non-drug-treated superinfected controls. HCMV DNA-negative temperature-sensitive mutants restricted HSV as efficiently as wild-type HCMV suggesting that immediate-early and/or early events which occur before viral DNA synthesis are sufficient for inhibition of HSV. Inhibition of HSV-1 in HCMV-infected HEL cells was unaffected by elevated temperature (40.5/sup 0/C). However, prior UV irradiation of HCMV removed the block to HSV replication, demonstrating the requirement for an active HCMV genome. HSV-2 replication was similarly inhibited in HCMV-infected HEL cells. Superinfection of HCMV-infected HEL cells with HSV-1 labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine provided evidence that the labeled virus could penetrate to the nucleus of cells after superinfection. Evidence for penetration of superinfecting HSV into HCMV-infected cells was also provided by blot hybridization of HSV DNA synthesized in cells infected with HSV alone versus superinfected cell cultures at 0 and 48 h after superinfection.

  1. High Human Cytomegalovirus IgG Level is Associated with Increased Incidence of Diabetic Atherosclerosis in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Yuan-yuan; Sun, Hui-ling; Li, Shan; Xiong, Hai-rong; Yang, Zhan-qiu; Xiang, Guang-da; Jiang, Xiao-jing

    2015-01-01

    Background At present, whether human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is debatable. The effect of active HCMV infection on glucose regulation has been poorly studied. Although HCMV infection is correlated with atherosclerosis in cardiovascular disease, the role of HCMV infection in the development of diabetic atherosclerosis in T2DM is unclear and is usually neglected by endocrinologists. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of HCMV infection on glucose regulation and the development of diabetic atherosclerosis in T2DM patients. Material/Methods A total of 222 hospitalized T2DM patients were enrolled. Nested polymerase chain reactions were used to detect HCMV DNA extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine viral load. HCMV IgG antibody concentrations were analyzed by chemiluminescence immunoassay. Results HCMV active infection, viral load, and HCMV IgG titers were not correlated with glucose regulation. Binary logistic regression demonstrated that the highest quartile of HCMV IgG concentration (>500 U/ml) was correlated with the incidence of diabetic atherosclerosis (OR: 8.0, 95%CI: 2.3–27.2), and that titer >127U/ml of HCMV IgG is an independent predictor for the development of diabetic atherosclerosis in T2DM patients (OR: 4.6, 95%CI: 1.9–11.3) after adjustment for all potential confounding factors. Conclusions Active HCMV infection is unlikely to influence glucose regulation in T2DM. However, HCMV IgG titers are associated with the incidence of diabetic atherosclerosis, and titer >127U/ml of HCMV IgG might be an independent risk factor for the development of diabetic atherosclerosis in T2DM patients. PMID:26717490

  2. Two novel human cytomegalovirus NK cell evasion functions target MICA for lysosomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Ceri A; Aicheler, Rebecca; Stanton, Richard J; Wang, Eddie C Y; Han, Song; Seirafian, Sepehr; Davies, James; McSharry, Brian P; Weekes, Michael P; Antrobus, P Robin; Prod'homme, Virginie; Blanchet, Fabien P; Sugrue, Daniel; Cuff, Simone; Roberts, Dawn; Davison, Andrew J; Lehner, Paul J; Wilkinson, Gavin W G; Tomasec, Peter

    2014-05-01

    NKG2D plays a major role in controlling immune responses through the regulation of natural killer (NK) cells, αβ and γδ T-cell function. This activating receptor recognizes eight distinct ligands (the MHC Class I polypeptide-related sequences (MIC) A andB, and UL16-binding proteins (ULBP)1-6) induced by cellular stress to promote recognition cells perturbed by malignant transformation or microbial infection. Studies into human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) have aided both the identification and characterization of NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs). HCMV immediate early (IE) gene up regulates NKGDLs, and we now describe the differential activation of ULBP2 and MICA/B by IE1 and IE2 respectively. Despite activation by IE functions, HCMV effectively suppressed cell surface expression of NKGDLs through both the early and late phases of infection. The immune evasion functions UL16, UL142, and microRNA(miR)-UL112 are known to target NKG2DLs. While infection with a UL16 deletion mutant caused the expected increase in MICB and ULBP2 cell surface expression, deletion of UL142 did not have a similar impact on its target, MICA. We therefore performed a systematic screen of the viral genome to search of addition functions that targeted MICA. US18 and US20 were identified as novel NK cell evasion functions capable of acting independently to promote MICA degradation by lysosomal degradation. The most dramatic effect on MICA expression was achieved when US18 and US20 acted in concert. US18 and US20 are the first members of the US12 gene family to have been assigned a function. The US12 family has 10 members encoded sequentially through US12-US21; a genetic arrangement, which is suggestive of an 'accordion' expansion of an ancestral gene in response to a selective pressure. This expansion must have be an ancient event as the whole family is conserved across simian cytomegaloviruses from old world monkeys. The evolutionary benefit bestowed by the combinatorial effect of US18 and US20 on MICA

  3. Human cytomegalovirus miR-UL36-5p inhibits apoptosis via downregulation of adenine nucleotide translocator 3 in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Huang, Yujing; Qi, Ying; Liu, Zhongyang; Ma, Yanping; Shao, Yaozhong; Jiang, Shujuan; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes at least 26 microRNAs (miRNA). These miRNAs are utilized by HCMV to regulate its own genes as well as the genes of the host cell during infection. It has been reported that a cellular gene, solute carrier family 25, member 6 (SLC25A6), which is also designated adenine nucleotide translocator 3 (ANT3), was identified as a candidate target of hcmv-miR-UL36-5p by hybrid PCR. In this study, ANT3 was further demonstrated to be a direct target of hcmv-miR-UL36-5p by luciferase reporter assays. The expression level of ANT3 protein was confirmed, by western blotting, to be directly downregulated by overexpression of hcmv-miR-UL36-5p in HEK293 cells, U373 cells and HELF cells. Moreover, HCMV-infected cells showed a decrease in the ANT3 protein level. Using ANT3-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) and an inhibitor for hcmv-miR-UL36-5p, it was shown that inhibition of apoptosis by hcmv-miR-UL36-5p in these cells specifically occurred via inhibition of ANT3 expression. These results imply that hcmv-miR-UL36-5 may play the same role during actual HCMV infection in order to establish a balance between the host cell and the virus.

  4. Toll-like receptor 4 is involved in the cell cycle modulation and required for effective human cytomegalovirus infection in THP-1 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina; Germini, Diego; Rodighiero, Isabella; Mirandola, Prisco; De Conto, Flora; Medici, Maria-Cristina; Gatti, Rita; Chezzi, Carlo; Calderaro, Adriana

    2013-05-25

    Suitable host cell metabolic conditions are fundamental for the effective development of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic cycle. Indeed, several studies have demonstrated the ability of this virus to interfere with cell cycle regulation, mainly by blocking proliferating cells in G1 or G1/S. In the present study, we demonstrate that HCMV deregulates the cell cycle of THP-1 macrophages (a cell line irreversibly arrested in G0) by pushing them into S and G2 phases. Moreover, we show that HCMV infection of THP-1 macrophages leads to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Since various studies have indicated TLR4 to be involved in promoting cell proliferation, here we investigate the possible role of TLR4 in the observed HCMV-induced cell cycle perturbation. Our data strongly support TLR4 as a mediator of HCMV-triggered cell cycle activation in THP-1 macrophages favouring, in turn, the development of an efficient viral lytic cycle. - Highlights: ► We studied HCMV infection impact on THP-1 macrophage cell cycle. ► We analysed the role played by Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 upon HCMV infection. ► HCMV pushes THP-1 macrophages (i.e. resting cells) to re-enter the cell cycle. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition strongly affects the effectiveness of HCMV replication. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition significantly decreases HCMV-induced cell cycle re-entry.

  5. Comparison of Real-time PCR to ELISA for the detection of human cytomegalovirus infection in renal transplant patients in the Sudan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to detect human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IgG and IgM antibodies using an Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in renal transplant patients in Khartoum state, Sudan and to improve the diagnosis of HCMV through the introduction of Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) testing. A total of 98 plasma samples were collected randomly from renal transplant patients at Ibin Sina Hospital and Salma Centre for Transplantation and Haemodialysis during the period from August to September 2006. Results Among the 98 renal transplant patients, 65 were males and 33 females. The results revealed that HCMV IgG was present in all patients' plasma 98/98 (100%), while only 6/98 (6.1%) had IgM antibodies in their plasma. HCMV DNA viral loads were detected in 32 patients 32/98 (32.7%) using Real-time PCR. Conclusions The HCMV IgG results indicate a high prevalence of past HCMV infection in all tested groups, while the finding of IgM may reflect a recent infection or reactivation. HCMV detection by real-time PCR in the present study indicated a high prevalence among renal transplant patients in Khartoum. In conclusion, the prevalence of HCMV in Khartoum State was documented through detection of HCMV-specific antibodies. Further study using various diagnostic methods should be considered to determine the prevalence of HCMV disease at the national level. PMID:21569506

  6. The multi-targeted kinase inhibitor sorafenib inhibits human cytomegalovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Martin; Paulus, Christina; Löschmann, Nadine; Dauth, Stephanie; Stange, Elisabeth; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Nevels, Michael; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2011-03-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. Here, non-toxic concentrations of the anti-cancer kinase inhibitor sorafenib were shown to inhibit replication of different HCMV strains (including a ganciclovir-resistant strain) in different cell types. In contrast to established anti-HCMV drugs, sorafenib inhibited HCMV major immediate early promoter activity and HCMV immediate early antigen (IEA) expression. Sorafenib is known to inhibit Raf. Comparison of sorafenib with the MEK inhibitor U0126 suggested that sorafenib inhibits HCMV IEA expression through inhibition of Raf but independently of signaling through the Raf downstream kinase MEK 1/2. In concordance, siRNA-mediated depletion of Raf but not of MEK-reduced IEA expression. In conclusion, sorafenib diminished HCMV replication in clinically relevant concentrations and inhibited HCMV IEA expression, a pathophysiologically relevant event that is not affected by established anti-HCMV drugs. Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that Raf activation is involved in HCMV IEA expression.

  7. Glucocorticoids facilitate the transcription from the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early promoter in glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor-I-like protein-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue-Toyoda, Maki; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-27

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common and usually asymptomatic virus agent in healthy individuals. Initiation of HCMV productive infection depends on expression of the major immediate early (MIE) genes. The transcription of HCMV MIE genes is regulated by a diverse set of transcription factors. It was previously reported that productive HCMV infection is triggered probably by elevation of the plasma hydroxycorticoid level. However, it is poorly understood whether the transcription of MIE genes is directly regulated by glucocorticoid. Here, we found that the dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, facilitates the transcription of HCMV MIE genes through the MIE promoter and enhancer in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent manner. By competitive EMSA and reporter assays, we revealed that an NF-I like protein is involved in DEX-mediated transcriptional activation of the MIE promoter. Thus, this study supports a notion that the increased level of hydroxycorticoid in the third trimester of pregnancy reactivates HCMV virus production from the latent state. - Highlights: • DEX facilitates the transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • GR is involved in DEX-dependent transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • A 17 bp repeat is responsible for the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX. • An NF-I-like protein is involved in the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX.

  8. Human Cytomegalovirus Tegument Protein pp65 Is Detected in All Intra- and Extra-Axial Brain Tumours Independent of the Tumour Type or Grade

    PubMed Central

    Libard, Sylwia; Popova, Svetlana N.; Amini, Rose-Marie; Kärjä, Vesa; Pietiläinen, Timo; Hämäläinen, Kirsi M.; Sundström, Christer; Hesselager, Göran; Bergqvist, Michael; Ekman, Simon; Zetterling, Maria; Smits, Anja; Nilsson, Pelle; Pfeifer, Susan; de Ståhl, Teresita Diaz; Enblad, Gunilla; Ponten, Fredrik; Alafuzoff, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has been indicated being a significant oncomodulator. Recent reports have suggested that an antiviral treatment alters the outcome of a glioblastoma. We analysed the performance of commercial HCMV-antibodies applying the immunohistochemical (IHC) methods on brain sample obtained from a subject with a verified HCMV infection, on samples obtained from 14 control subjects, and on a tissue microarray block containing cores of various brain tumours. Based on these trials, we selected the best performing antibody and analysed a cohort of 417 extra- and intra-axial brain tumours such as gliomas, medulloblastomas, primary diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, and meningiomas. HCMV protein pp65 immunoreactivity was observed in all types of tumours analysed, and the IHC expression did not depend on the patient's age, gender, tumour type, or grade. The labelling pattern observed in the tumours differed from the labelling pattern observed in the tissue with an active HCMV infection. The HCMV protein was expressed in up to 90% of all the tumours investigated. Our results are in accordance with previous reports regarding the HCMV protein expression in glioblastomas and medulloblastomas. In addition, the HCMV protein expression was seen in primary brain lymphomas, low-grade gliomas, and in meningiomas. Our results indicate that the HCMV protein pp65 expression is common in intra- and extra-axial brain tumours. Thus, the assessment of the HCMV expression in tumours of various origins and pathologically altered tissue in conditions such as inflammation, infection, and even degeneration should certainly be facilitated. PMID:25268364

  9. Wnt modulating agents inhibit human cytomegalovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Arun; He, Ran; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Forman, Michael; Arav-Boger, Ravit

    2013-06-01

    Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) continues to be a threat for pregnant women and immunocompromised hosts. Although limited anti-HCMV therapies are available, development of new agents is desired. The Wnt signaling pathway plays a critical role in embryonic and cancer stem cell development and is targeted by gammaherpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). HCMV infects stem cells, including neural progenitor cells, during embryogenesis. To investigate the role of Wnt in HCMV replication in vitro, we tested monensin, nigericin, and salinomycin, compounds that inhibit cancer stem cell growth by modulating the Wnt pathway. These compounds inhibited the replication of HCMV Towne and a clinical isolate. Inhibition occurred prior to DNA replication but persisted throughout the full replication cycle. There was a significant decrease in expression of IE2, UL44, and pp65 proteins. HCMV infection resulted in a significant and sustained decrease in expression of phosphorylated and total lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (pLRP6 and LRP6, respectively), Wnt 5a/b, and β-catenin and a modest decrease in Dvl2/3, while levels of the negative regulator axin 1 were increased. Nigericin decreased the expression of pLRP6, LRP6, axin 1, and Wnt 5a/b in noninfected and HCMV-infected cells. For all three compounds, a correlation was found between expression levels of Wnt 5a/b and axin 1 and HCMV inhibition. The decrease in Wnt 5a/b and axin 1 expression was more significant in HCMV-infected cells than noninfected cells. These data illustrate the complex effects of HCMV on the Wnt pathway and the fine balance between Wnt and HCMV, resulting in abrogation of HCMV replication. Additional studies are required to elucidate how HCMV targets Wnt for its benefit.

  10. Wnt Modulating Agents Inhibit Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Arun; He, Ran; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Forman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) continues to be a threat for pregnant women and immunocompromised hosts. Although limited anti-HCMV therapies are available, development of new agents is desired. The Wnt signaling pathway plays a critical role in embryonic and cancer stem cell development and is targeted by gammaherpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). HCMV infects stem cells, including neural progenitor cells, during embryogenesis. To investigate the role of Wnt in HCMV replication in vitro, we tested monensin, nigericin, and salinomycin, compounds that inhibit cancer stem cell growth by modulating the Wnt pathway. These compounds inhibited the replication of HCMV Towne and a clinical isolate. Inhibition occurred prior to DNA replication but persisted throughout the full replication cycle. There was a significant decrease in expression of IE2, UL44, and pp65 proteins. HCMV infection resulted in a significant and sustained decrease in expression of phosphorylated and total lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (pLRP6 and LRP6, respectively), Wnt 5a/b, and β-catenin and a modest decrease in Dvl2/3, while levels of the negative regulator axin 1 were increased. Nigericin decreased the expression of pLRP6, LRP6, axin 1, and Wnt 5a/b in noninfected and HCMV-infected cells. For all three compounds, a correlation was found between expression levels of Wnt 5a/b and axin 1 and HCMV inhibition. The decrease in Wnt 5a/b and axin 1 expression was more significant in HCMV-infected cells than noninfected cells. These data illustrate the complex effects of HCMV on the Wnt pathway and the fine balance between Wnt and HCMV, resulting in abrogation of HCMV replication. Additional studies are required to elucidate how HCMV targets Wnt for its benefit. PMID:23571549

  11. Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Glioblastoma Cells Display Stem Cell-Like Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Che; Clark, Paul A.; Kuo, John S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common brain tumor in adults. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genomes are present in GBM tumors, yielding hope that antiviral treatments could prove therapeutic and improve the poor prognosis of GBM patients. We discovered that GBM cells infected in vitro with HCMV display properties of cancer stem cells. HCMV-infected GBM cells grow more slowly than mock-infected controls, demonstrate a higher capacity for self-renewal determined by a sphere formation assay, and display resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug temozolomide. Our data suggest that HCMV, while present in only a minority of the cells within a tumor, could contribute to the pathogenesis of GBMs by promoting or prolonging stem cell-like phenotypes, thereby perpetuating tumors in the face of chemotherapy. Importantly, we show that temozolomide sensitivity is restored by the antiviral drug ganciclovir, indicating a potential mechanism underlying the positive effects observed in GBM patients treated with antiviral therapy. IMPORTANCE A role for HCMV in GBMs remains controversial for several reasons. Some studies find HCMV in GBM tumors, while others do not. Few cells within a GBM may harbor HCMV, making it unclear how the virus could be contributing to the tumor phenotype without infecting every cell. Finally, HCMV does not overtly transform cells in vitro. However, tumors induced by other viruses can be treated with antiviral remedies, and initial results indicate that this may be true for anti-HCMV therapies and GBMs. With such a poor prognosis for GBM patients, any potential new intervention deserves exploration. Our work here describes an evidence-based model for how HCMV could contribute to GBM biology while infecting very few cells and without transforming them. It also illuminates why anti-HCMV treatments may be beneficial to GBM patients. Our observations provide blueprints for future in vitro studies examining how HCMV manipulates stem cell

  12. Cell Surface THY-1 Contributes to Human Cytomegalovirus Entry via a Macropinocytosis-Like Process.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingxue; Fischer, Elizabeth; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2016-11-01

    Previously we showed that THY-1 has a critical role in the initial stage of infection of certain cell types with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and that THY-1 is important for HCMV-mediated activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt during virus entry. THY-1 is known to interact with integrins and is a major cargo protein of clathrin-independent endocytic vesicles. Since macropinocytosis involves integrin signaling, is PI3K/Akt dependent, and is a clathrin-independent endocytic process, we determined whether THY-1 has a role in HCMV entry by macropinocytosis. Using electron microscopy in two cell lines that support HCMV infection in a THY-1-dependent manner, we found that HCMV enters these cells by a macropinocytosis-like process. THY-1 associated with HCMV virions on the cell surface and colocalized with virus inside macropinosomes. 5-(N-Ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride (EIPA) and soluble THY-1 blocked HCMV infection in the cell lines by ≥80% and 60%, respectively. HCMV entry into the cells triggered increased influx of extracellular fluid, a marker of macropinocytosis, and this increased fluid uptake was inhibited by EIPA and by soluble THY-1. Blocking actin depolymerization, Na(+)/H(+) exchange, PI3K, and Pak1 kinase, which are critical for macropinocytosis, impaired HCMV infection. Neither internalized HCMV virions nor THY-1 in virus-infected cells colocalized with transferrin as determined by confocal microscopy, indicating that clathrin-mediated endocytosis was not involved in THY-1-associated virus entry. These results suggest that HCMV has adapted to utilize THY-1, a cargo protein of clathrin-independent endocytotic vesicles, to facilitate efficient entry into certain cell types by a macropinocytosis-like process. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infects over half of the population and is the most common infectious cause of birth defects. The virus is the most important infection occurring in transplant recipients. The mechanism of how HCMV enters cells

  13. Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a target for cytomegalovirus infection: Implications for hematopoiesis, self-renewal and differentiation potential

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Sergey V.; Harbacheuski, Ryhor; Lewis-Antes, Anita; Zhu Hua; Rameshwar, Pranela; Kotenko, Sergei V. . E-mail: kotenkse@umdnj.edu

    2007-03-30

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in bone marrow (BM) regulate the differentiation and proliferation of adjacent hematopoietic precursor cells and contribute to the regeneration of mesenchymal tissues, including bone, cartilage, fat and connective tissue. BM is an important site for the pathogenesis of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) where the virus establishes latency in hematopoietic progenitors and can transmit after reactivation to neighboring cells. Here we demonstrate that BM-MSCs are permissive to productive HCMV infection, and that HCMV alters the function of MSCs: (i) by changing the repertoire of cell surface molecules in BM-MSCs, HCMV modifies the pattern of interaction between BM-MSCs and hematopoietic cells; (ii) HCMV infection of BM-MSCs undergoing adipogenic or osteogenic differentiation impaired the process of differentiation. Our results suggest that by altering BM-MSC biology, HCMV may contribute to the development of various diseases.

  14. Glucocorticoids facilitate the transcription from the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early promoter in glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor-I-like protein-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Inoue-Toyoda, Maki; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-27

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common and usually asymptomatic virus agent in healthy individuals. Initiation of HCMV productive infection depends on expression of the major immediate early (MIE) genes. The transcription of HCMV MIE genes is regulated by a diverse set of transcription factors. It was previously reported that productive HCMV infection is triggered probably by elevation of the plasma hydroxycorticoid level. However, it is poorly understood whether the transcription of MIE genes is directly regulated by glucocorticoid. Here, we found that the dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, facilitates the transcription of HCMV MIE genes through the MIE promoter and enhancer in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent manner. By competitive EMSA and reporter assays, we revealed that an NF-I like protein is involved in DEX-mediated transcriptional activation of the MIE promoter. Thus, this study supports a notion that the increased level of hydroxycorticoid in the third trimester of pregnancy reactivates HCMV virus production from the latent state.

  15. Inhibition of ganciclovir-resistant human cytomegalovirus replication by Kampo (Japanese herbal medicine).

    PubMed

    Murayama, Tsugiya; Yamaguchi, Nobuo; Iwamoto, Kozo; Eizuru, Yoshito

    2006-01-01

    We examined the effect of Kampo on the replication of ganciclovir (GCV)-resistant human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in the human embryonic fibroblast cell line MRC-5. Treatment of HCMV-infected cells with Sho-seiryu-to (SST; Xiao-Qing-Long-Tang in Chinese) resulted in the inhibition of viral replication without affecting the cell growth. SST treatment decreased the synthesis of viral DNA, but had no virucidal effect on cell-free HCMV. However, the inhibitory effect of SST on HCMV replication was ablated by anti-interferon-beta (IFN-beta) antibody suggesting that SST inhibits the replication of GCV-resistant HCMV through the induction of IFN-beta. These results suggest that SST is a novel compund with potential as an anti-HCMV.

  16. Interleukin-2 from Adaptive T Cells Enhances Natural Killer Cell Activity against Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zeguang; Frascaroli, Giada; Bayer, Carina; Schmal, Tatjana; Mertens, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) requires a continuous immune surveillance, thus HCMV is the most important viral pathogen in severely immunocompromised individuals. Both innate and adaptive immunity contribute to the control of HCMV. Here, we report that peripheral blood natural killer cells (PBNKs) from HCMV-seropositive donors showed an enhanced activity toward HCMV-infected autologous macrophages. However, this enhanced response was abolished when purified NK cells were applied as effectors. We demonstrate that this enhanced PBNK activity was dependent on the interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion of CD4(+) T cells when reexposed to the virus. Purified T cells enhanced the activity of purified NK cells in response to HCMV-infected macrophages. This effect could be suppressed by IL-2 blocking. Our findings not only extend the knowledge on the immune surveillance in HCMV-namely, that NK cell-mediated innate immunity can be enhanced by a preexisting T cell antiviral immunity-but also indicate a potential clinical implication for patients at risk for severe HCMV manifestations due to immunosuppressive drugs, which mainly suppress IL-2 production and T cell responsiveness. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is never cleared by the host after primary infection but instead establishes a lifelong latent infection with possible reactivations when the host's immunity becomes suppressed. Both innate immunity and adaptive immunity are important for the control of viral infections. Natural killer (NK) cells are main innate effectors providing a rapid response to virus-infected cells. Virus-specific T cells are the main adaptive effectors that are critical for the control of the latent infection and limitation of reinfection. In this study, we found that IL-2 secreted by adaptive CD4(+) T cells after reexposure to HCMV enhances the activity of NK cells in response to HCMV-infected target cells. This is the first direct evidence that the adaptive T cells can help NK cells to act

  17. Monitoring of Human Cytomegalovirus and Virus-Specific T-Cell Response in Young Patients Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lilleri, Daniele; Gerna, Giuseppe; Zelini, Paola; Chiesa, Antonella; Rognoni, Vanina; Mastronuzzi, Angela; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Zecca, Marco; Locatelli, Franco

    2012-01-01

    In allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients, outcome of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection results from balance between viral load/replication and pathogen-specific T-cell response. Using a cut-off of 30,000 HCMV DNA copies/ml blood for pre-emptive therapy and cut-offs of 1 and 3 virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells/µl blood for T-cell protection, we conducted in 131 young patients a prospective 3-year study aimed at verifying whether achievement of such immunological cut-offs protects from HCMV disease. In the first three months after transplantation, 55/89 (62%) HCMV-seropositive patients had infection and 36/55 (65%) were treated pre-emptively, whereas only 7/42 (17%) HCMV-seronegative patients developed infection and 3/7 (43%) were treated. After 12 months, 76 HCMV-seropositive and 9 HCMV-seronegative patients (cumulative incidence: 90% and 21%, respectively) displayed protective HCMV-specific immunity. Eighty of these 85 (95%) patients showed spontaneous control of HCMV infection without additional treatment. Five patients after reaching protective T-cell levels needed pre-emptive therapy, because they developed graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). HSCT recipients reconstituting protective levels of HCMV-specific T-cells in the absence of GvHD are no longer at risk for HCMV disease, at least within 3 years after transplantation. The decision to treat HCMV infection in young HSCT recipients may be taken by combining virological and immunological findings. PMID:22848556

  18. Evolution of human cytomegalovirus-seronegative donor/-seropositive recipient high-risk combination frequency in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations at Institute of Hematology and Blood Transfusion during 1995-2014.

    PubMed

    Nemeckova, S; Sroller, V; Stastna-Markova, M

    2016-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) establishes lifelong latent infection that can result in severe life-threatening disease in immunosuppressed patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). An HCMV-seropositive transplant recipient who receives a graft from a seronegative donor (R+/D-) is at high risk of recurrent HCMV reactivation. To assess the incidence of R+/D- combination, we retrospectively evaluated HCMV-seronegative donors for 746 allogeneic HSCT treatments carried out at our center during 1995-2014. In our cohort, 20% HCMV-seronegative HSCT recipients, 21% HCMV-seronegative related graft donors, and 52% HCMV-seronegative unrelated graft donors were included. Analyses of the HCMV serostatus of hematopoietic stem cell donors during 2 consecutive calendar periods (1995-2005 and 2006-2014) showed a significant increase in the proportion of seronegative donors (odds ratio [OR] = 1.947). In addition, the number of HSCT treatments using an unrelated donor increased (OR = 2.376). Finally, the use of grafts from countries with a very low HCMV prevalence increased. This increase in HCMV seronegativity in unrelated donors and the increased proportion of unrelated donors were responsible for the increased occurrence of the high-risk combination R+/D- (OR = 1.680). If the reduction in the rate of HCMV-seropositive graft donors continues, an increased frequency of HCMV reactivation events in our transplant recipients can be expected, because of the increasing occurrence of the high-risk R+/D- combination. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Sequestration of human cytomegalovirus by human renal and mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Twite, Nicolas; Andrei, Graciela; Kummert, Caroline; Donner, Catherine; Perez-Morga, David; De Vos, Rita; Snoeck, Robert; Marchant, Arnaud

    2014-07-15

    Urine and breast milk represent the main routes of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) transmission but the contribution of renal and mammary epithelial cells to viral excretion remains unclear. We observed that kidney and mammary epithelial cells were permissive to HCMV infection and expressed immediate early, early and late antigens within 72 h of infection. During the first 24 h after infection, high titers of infectious virus were measured associated to the cells and in culture supernatants, independently of de novo synthesis of virus progeny. This phenomenon was not observed in HCMV-infected fibroblasts and suggested the sequestration and the release of HCMV by epithelial cells. This hypothesis was supported by confocal and electron microscopy analyses. The sequestration and progressive release of HCMV by kidney and mammary epithelial cells may play an important role in the excretion of the virus in urine and breast milk and may thereby contribute to HCMV transmission. - Highlights: • Primary renal and mammary epithelial cells are permissive to HCMV infection. • HCMV is sequestered by epithelial cells and this phenomenon does not require viral replication. • HCMV sequestration by epithelial cells is reduced by antibodies and IFN-γ.

  20. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection

    MedlinePlus

    CMV mononucleosis; Cytomegalovirus; CMV; Human cytomegalovirus; HCMV ... infection is spread by: Blood transfusions Organ transplants ... viruses remain in your body for the rest of your life. If your ...

  1. Roles of host and viral microRNAs in human cytomegalovirus biology

    PubMed Central

    Dhuruvasan, Kavitha; Sivasubramanian, Geetha; Pellett, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has a relatively large and complex genome, a protracted lytic replication cycle, and employs a strategy of replicational latency as part of its lifelong persistence in the infected host. An important form of gene regulation in plants and animals revolves around a type of small RNA known as microRNA (miRNA). miRNAs can serve as major regulators of key developmental pathways, as well as provide subtle forms of regulatory control. The human genome encodes over 900 miRNAs, and miRNAs are also encoded by some viruses, including HCMV, which encodes at least 14 miRNAs. Some of the HCMV miRNAs are known to target both viral and cellular genes, including important immunomodulators. In addition to expressing their own miRNAs, infections with some viruses, including HCMV, can result in changes in the expression of cellular miRNAs that benefit virus replication. In this review, we summarize the connections between miRNAs and HCMV biology. We describe the nature of miRNA genes, miRNA biogenesis and modes of action, methods for studying miRNAs, HCMV-encoded miRNAs, effects of HCMV infection on cellular miRNA expression, roles of miRNAs in HCMV biology, and possible HCMV-related diagnostic and therapeutic applications of miRNAs. PMID:20969901

  2. In vitro generation of human cytomegalovirus pp65 antigenemia, viremia, and leukoDNAemia.

    PubMed Central

    Revello, M G; Percivalle, E; Arbustini, E; Pardi, R; Sozzani, S; Gerna, G

    1998-01-01

    Immunocompromised patients with disseminated human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection have circulating PMN carrying HCMV pp65 (antigenemia), infectious virus (viremia), and viral DNA (leukoDNAemia). Because HCMV does not fully replicate in PMN, it is generally hypothesized that virions and viral materials are taken up by phagocytosis from fully permissive HCMV-infected endothelial cells. However, no experimental evidence has ever been provided for these PMN-endothelium interactions. PMN from 11 donors were cocultured with endothelial cells infected with an endothelium-adapted HCMV strain and with human fibroblasts infected with low-passaged clinical and laboratory-adapted HCMV strains. pp65-positive PMN were detected after coculture with both HCMV-infected endothelial and fibroblast cells, provided that wild and not laboratory-adapted strains were used. In addition, cocultured PMN carried infectious virus as demonstrated by virus isolation and presence of complete virus particles by electron microscopy. Moreover, high levels of viral DNA were consistently detected by quantitative PCR in cocultured PMN. Thus, we have generated in vitro the three most important viral parameters detected in patients with disseminated HCMV infection (antigenemia, viremia, and leukoDNAemia). The failure of laboratory-adapted HCMV strain to induce this phenomenon demonstrates that important modifications have occurred in attenuated viral strains affecting basic biological functions. PMID:9637702

  3. Active human cytomegalovirus infection and glycoprotein b genotypes in brazilian pediatric renal or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    de Campos Dieamant, Débora; Bonon, Sandra Helena Alves; Prates, Liliane Cury; Belangelo, Vera Maria Santoro; Pontes, Erika R.; Costa, Sandra Cecília Botelho

    2010-01-01

    A prospective analysis of active Human Cytomegalovirus infection (HCMV) was conducted on 33 pediatric renal or hematopoietic stem cell post-transplant patients. The HCMV-DNA positive samples were evaluated for the prevalence of different gB subtypes and their subsequent correlation with clinical signs. The surveillance of HCMV active infection was based on the monitoring of antigenemia (AGM) and on a nested polymerase chain reaction (N-PCR) for the detection of HCMV in the patients studied. Using restriction analysis of the gB gene sequence by PCR-RFLP (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism), different HCMV strains could be detected and classified in at least four HCMV genotypes. Thirty-three pediatric recipients of renal or bone marrow transplantation were monitored. Twenty out of thirty-three (60.6%) patients demonstrated active HCMV infection. gB1 and gB2 genotypes were more frequent in this population. In this study, we observed that gB2 had correlation with reactivation of HCMV infection and that patients with mixture of genotypes did not show any symptoms of HCMV disease. Future studies has been made to confirm this. PMID:24031463

  4. Role of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) and its variants in human cytomegalovirus control in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yi-Hsin; Roy, Sujayita; Mukhopadhyay, Rupkatha; Kapoor, Arun; Duggal, Priya; Wojcik, Genevieve L.; Pass, Robert F.; Arav-Boger, Ravit

    2016-01-01

    Induction of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) and downstream receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 2 (RIPK2) by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is known to up-regulate antiviral responses and suppress virus replication. We investigated the role of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1), which also signals through RIPK2, in HCMV control. NOD1 activation by Tri-DAP (NOD1 agonist) suppressed HCMV and induced IFN-β. Mouse CMV was also inhibited through NOD1 activation. NOD1 knockdown (KD) or inhibition of its activity with small molecule ML130 enhanced HCMV replication in vitro. NOD1 mutations displayed differential effects on HCMV replication and antiviral responses. In cells overexpressing the E56K mutation in the caspase activation and recruitment domain, virus replication was enhanced, but in cells overexpressing the E266K mutation in the nucleotide-binding domain or the wild-type NOD1, HCMV was inhibited, changes that correlated with IFN-β expression. The interaction of NOD1 and RIPK2 determined the outcome of virus replication, as evidenced by enhanced virus growth in NOD1 E56K mutant cells (which failed to interact with RIPK2). NOD1 activities were executed through IFN-β, given that IFN-β KD reduced the inhibitory effect of Tri-DAP on HCMV. Signaling through NOD1 resulting in HCMV suppression was IKKα-dependent and correlated with nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of IRF3. Finally, NOD1 polymorphisms were significantly associated with the risk of HCMV infection in women who were infected with HCMV during participation in a glycoprotein B vaccine trial. Collectively, our data indicate a role for NOD1 in HCMV control via RIPK2- IKKα-IRF3 and suggest that its polymorphisms predict the risk of infection. PMID:27856764

  5. Comparison of homologous and heterologous prime-boost vaccine approaches using Modified Vaccinia Ankara and soluble protein to induce neutralizing antibodies by the human cytomegalovirus pentamer complex in mice.

    PubMed

    Chiuppesi, Flavia; Wussow, Felix; Scharf, Louise; Contreras, Heidi; Gao, Han; Meng, Zhuo; Nguyen, Jenny; Barry, Peter A; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Diamond, Don J

    2017-01-01

    Since neutralizing antibodies (NAb) targeting the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) pentamer complex (PC) potently block HCMV host cell entry, anti-PC NAb induction is thought to be important for a vaccine formulation to prevent HCMV infection. By developing a vaccine strategy based on soluble PC protein and using a previously generated Modified Vaccinia Ankara vector co-expressing all five PC subunits (MVA-PC), we compared HCMV NAb induction by homologous immunization using prime-boost vaccine regimen employing only PC protein or MVA-PC and heterologous immunization using prime-boost combinations of PC protein and MVA-PC. Utilizing a recently isolated anti-PC NAb, we produced highly pure soluble PC protein that displayed conformational and linear neutralizing epitopes, interfered with HCMV entry, and was recognized by antibodies induced by HCMV during natural infection. Mice vaccinated by different immunization routes with the purified PC protein in combination with a clinically approved adjuvant formulation elicited high-titer and durable HCMV NAb. While MVA-PC and soluble PC protein either alone or in combination elicited robust HCMV NAb, significantly different potencies of these vaccine approaches were observed in dependence on immunization schedule. Using only two immunizations, vaccination with MVA-PC alone or prime-boost combinations of MVA-PC and PC protein was significantly more effective in stimulating HCMV NAb than immunization with PC protein alone. In contrast, with three immunizations, NAb induced by soluble PC protein either alone or combined with two boosts of MVA-PC increased to levels that exceeded NAb titer stimulated by MVA-PC alone. These results provide insights into the potency of soluble protein and MVA to elicit NAb by the HCMV PC via homologous and heterologous prime-boost immunization, which may contribute to develop clinically deployable vaccine strategies to prevent HCMV infection.

  6. Comparison of homologous and heterologous prime-boost vaccine approaches using Modified Vaccinia Ankara and soluble protein to induce neutralizing antibodies by the human cytomegalovirus pentamer complex in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chiuppesi, Flavia; Wussow, Felix; Scharf, Louise; Contreras, Heidi; Gao, Han; Meng, Zhuo; Nguyen, Jenny; Barry, Peter A.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    2017-01-01

    Since neutralizing antibodies (NAb) targeting the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) pentamer complex (PC) potently block HCMV host cell entry, anti-PC NAb induction is thought to be important for a vaccine formulation to prevent HCMV infection. By developing a vaccine strategy based on soluble PC protein and using a previously generated Modified Vaccinia Ankara vector co-expressing all five PC subunits (MVA-PC), we compared HCMV NAb induction by homologous immunization using prime-boost vaccine regimen employing only PC protein or MVA-PC and heterologous immunization using prime-boost combinations of PC protein and MVA-PC. Utilizing a recently isolated anti-PC NAb, we produced highly pure soluble PC protein that displayed conformational and linear neutralizing epitopes, interfered with HCMV entry, and was recognized by antibodies induced by HCMV during natural infection. Mice vaccinated by different immunization routes with the purified PC protein in combination with a clinically approved adjuvant formulation elicited high-titer and durable HCMV NAb. While MVA-PC and soluble PC protein either alone or in combination elicited robust HCMV NAb, significantly different potencies of these vaccine approaches were observed in dependence on immunization schedule. Using only two immunizations, vaccination with MVA-PC alone or prime-boost combinations of MVA-PC and PC protein was significantly more effective in stimulating HCMV NAb than immunization with PC protein alone. In contrast, with three immunizations, NAb induced by soluble PC protein either alone or combined with two boosts of MVA-PC increased to levels that exceeded NAb titer stimulated by MVA-PC alone. These results provide insights into the potency of soluble protein and MVA to elicit NAb by the HCMV PC via homologous and heterologous prime-boost immunization, which may contribute to develop clinically deployable vaccine strategies to prevent HCMV infection. PMID:28813507

  7. Human cytomegalovirus infant infection adversely affects growth and development in maternally HIV-exposed and unexposed infants in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Gompels, U A; Larke, N; Sanz-Ramos, M; Bates, M; Musonda, K; Manno, D; Siame, J; Monze, M; Filteau, S

    2012-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) coinfections have been shown to increase infant morbidity, mortality, and AIDS progression. In HIV-endemic regions, maternal HIV-exposed but HIV-uninfected infants, which is the majority of children affected by HIV, also show poor growth and increased morbidity. Although nutrition has been examined, the effects of HCMV infection have not been evaluated. We studied the effects of HCMV infection on the growth, development, and health of maternally HIV-exposed and unexposed infants in Zambia. Infants were examined in a cohort recruited to a trial of micronutrient-fortified complementary foods. HIV-infected mothers and infants had received perinatal antiretroviral therapy to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission. Growth, development, and morbidity were analyzed by linear regression analyses in relation to maternal HIV exposure and HCMV infection, as screened by sera DNA for viremia at 6 months of age and by antibody for infection at 18 months. All HCMV-seropositive infants had decreased length-for-age by 18 months compared with seronegative infants (standard deviation [z]-score difference: -0.44 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -.72 to -.17]; P = .002). In HIV-exposed infants, those who were HCMV positive compared with those who were negative, also had reduced head size (mean z-score difference: -0.72 [95% CI, -1.23 to -.22]; P = .01) and lower psychomotor development (Bayley test score difference: -4.1 [95% CI, -7.8 to -.5]; P = .03). HIV-exposed, HCMV-viremic infants were more commonly referred for hospital treatment than HCMV-negative infants. The effects of HCMV were unaffected by micronutrient fortification. HCMV affects child growth, development, and morbidity of African infants, particularly in those maternally exposed to HIV. HCMV is therefore a risk factor for child health in this region.

  8. Bacterial Muramyl Dipeptide (MDP) Restricts Human Cytomegalovirus Replication via an IFN-β-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Arun; Fan, Yi-Hsin; Arav-Boger, Ravit

    2016-02-02

    We recently reported that induction of NOD2 by human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) resulted in virus inhibition and upregulation of antiviral and inflammatory cytokines. Here we investigated the effects of muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a bacterial cell wall component that activates NOD2, on HCMV replication and antiviral responses. HCMV infection of human foreskin fibroblasts induced NOD2, the downstream receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 2 (RIPK2), resulting in phosphorylation of TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). MDP treatment following infection at low multiplicity (MOI = 0.1 PFU/cell) inhibited HCMV in a dose-dependent manner and further induced phosphorylation of TBK1, IRF3 and expression of IFN-β. None of these effects of MDP were observed following infection at multiplicity of 1. In infected NOD2 knocked-down cells MDP did not induce IFN-β, irrespective of MOI. Treatment with MDP before infection also inhibited HCMV, an effect augmented with treatment duration. Treatment with an IFN-β receptor blocking antibody or knockdown of IFN-β significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of MDP on HCMV. MDP treatment before or after infection with herpesvirus 1 did not inhibit its replication. Summarized, NOD2 activation exerts anti-HCMV activities predominantly via IFN-β. Since MDP is a bacterial cell wall component, ongoing microbial exposure may influence HCMV replication.

  9. Human cytomegalovirus microRNA miR-US25-1-5p inhibits viral replication by targeting multiple cellular genes during infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shujuan; Qi, Ying; He, Rong; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Ma, Yanping; Guo, Xin; Shao, Yaozhong; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in regulating various cellular processes in plants, animals, and viruses. This mechanism is also utilized by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in the process of infection and pathogenesis. The HCMV-encoded miRNA, hcmv-miR-US25-1-5p, was highly expressed during lytic and latent infections, and was found to inhibit viral replication. Identification of functional target genes of this microRNA is important in that it will enable a better understanding of the function of hcmv-miR-US25-1-5p during HCMV infection. In the present study, 35 putative cellular transcript targets of hcmv-miR-US25-1-5p were identified. Down-regulation of the targets YWHAE, UBB, NPM1, and HSP90AA1 by hcmv-miR-US25-1-5p was validated by luciferase reporter assay and Western blot analysis. In addition, we showed that hcmv-miR-US25-1-5p could inhibit viral replication by interacting with these targets, the existence of which may impact virus replication directly or indirectly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Integrin αvβ3 is a Coreceptor for Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Huang, David Y.; Huong, Shu-Mei; Huang, Eng-Shang

    2006-01-01

    HCMV is a widespread opportunistic pathogen that causes birth defects in newborns and severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. The broad tropism of HCMV infection suggests that it utilizes multiple receptors. We recently demonstrated that EGFR serves as a receptor for HCMV. Here we show that HCMV also uses integrin αvβ3 as a coreceptor. Upon infection, HCMV glycoproteins gB and gH independently bind to EGFR and αvβ3, respectively, to initiate viral entry and signaling. αvβ3 then translocates to lipid rafts where it interacts with EGFR to induce coordinated signaling. The coordination between EGFR and αvβ3 is essential for the early events of HCMV infection, including viral entry, RhoA downregulation, stress fiber disassembly, and viral nuclear trafficking. Our findings support a model where EGFR and αvβ3 work together as coreceptors for HCMV entry and signaling. This discovery is fundamental to understanding HCMV pathogenesis and developing treatment strategies targeted to viral receptors. PMID:15834425

  11. Presence of antibodies to human cytomegalovirus in patients with different forms of cancer and in other categories of subjects.

    PubMed

    Stoian, M; Hozoc, M; Iosipenco, M; Bolocan, J; Nastac, E

    1982-01-01

    Complement fixing (CF) antibodies to the AD--129 strain of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) were detected in patients with different forms of cancer, as well as in blood donors, in a proportion of 16.6% and 73.2%, respectively. The prevalence of CF antibodies to HCMV, strain AT--129, in the population of Romania is similar to that reported in other countries.

  12. Associations between anti-cytomegalovirus IgG responses and health effect biomarkers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a member of the herpes simplex virus family that infects approximately 50% of US adults. HCMV is transmitted from person to person through bodily fluids, congenitally or from donors to transplant recipients. It causes a lifelong latent infection th...

  13. Human cytomegalovirus-induced NKG2C(hi) CD57(hi) natural killer cells are effectors dependent on humoral antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zeguang; Sinzger, Christian; Frascaroli, Giada; Reichel, Johanna; Bayer, Carina; Wang, Li; Schirmbeck, Reinhold; Mertens, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies indicate that expansion of NKG2C-positive natural killer (NK) cells is associated with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV); however, their activity in response to HCMV-infected cells remains unclear. We show that NKG2C(hi) CD57(hi) NK cells gated on CD3(neg) CD56(dim) cells can be phenotypically identified as HCMV-induced NK cells that can be activated by HCMV-infected cells. Using HCMV-infected autologous macrophages as targets, we were able to show that these NKG2C(hi) CD57(hi) NK cells are highly responsive to HCMV-infected macrophages only in the presence of HCMV-specific antibodies, whereas they are functionally poor effectors of natural cytotoxicity. We further demonstrate that NKG2C(hi) CD57(hi) NK cells are intrinsically responsive to signaling through CD16 cross-linking. Our findings show that the activity of pathogen-induced innate immune cells can be enhanced by adaptive humoral immunity. Understanding the activity of NKG2C(hi) CD57(hi) NK cells against HCMV-infected cells will be of relevance for the further development of adoptive immunotherapy.

  14. The effect of human cytomegalovirus on the formation of CFU-MK in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junxia; Song, Sanjun; Hu, Lihua

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism and the suppressive effect of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) on colony forming unit-megakaryocyte (CFU-MK), semi-solid culture system was used to observe the effect of HCMV AD169 strain on CFU-MK's growth of 18 cord blood samples. HCMV DNA and immediate early (IE) protein mRNA in CFU-MK was detected by PCR and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Our results showed that HCMV AD169 significantly suppressed the formation of CFU-MK in vitro. Compared with the mock group, the CFU-MK colonies decreased by 21.6%, 33.8% and 46.3%, respectively, in all the 3 infected groups (P<0.05), suggesting the suppression and the titer of the virus was dose-dependent. Both HCMV DNA and the expression of HCMV IE protein mRNA were positively detected in the colony cells of viral infected group. It is concluded that HCMV AD169 strain could inhibit the differentiation and proliferation of CFU-MK by directly infecting their progenitors. There was early transcription of HCMV IE protein in CFU-MK infected by virus.

  15. Bacterial Muramyl Dipeptide (MDP) Restricts Human Cytomegalovirus Replication via an IFN-β-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Arun; Fan, Yi-Hsin; Arav-Boger, Ravit

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that induction of NOD2 by human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) resulted in virus inhibition and upregulation of antiviral and inflammatory cytokines. Here we investigated the effects of muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a bacterial cell wall component that activates NOD2, on HCMV replication and antiviral responses. HCMV infection of human foreskin fibroblasts induced NOD2, the downstream receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 2 (RIPK2), resulting in phosphorylation of TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). MDP treatment following infection at low multiplicity (MOI = 0.1 PFU/cell) inhibited HCMV in a dose-dependent manner and further induced phosphorylation of TBK1, IRF3 and expression of IFN-β. None of these effects of MDP were observed following infection at multiplicity of 1. In infected NOD2 knocked-down cells MDP did not induce IFN-β, irrespective of MOI. Treatment with MDP before infection also inhibited HCMV, an effect augmented with treatment duration. Treatment with an IFN-β receptor blocking antibody or knockdown of IFN-β significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of MDP on HCMV. MDP treatment before or after infection with herpesvirus 1 did not inhibit its replication. Summarized, NOD2 activation exerts anti-HCMV activities predominantly via IFN-β. Since MDP is a bacterial cell wall component, ongoing microbial exposure may influence HCMV replication. PMID:26830977

  16. Human cytomegalovirus renders cells non-permissive for replication of herpes simplex viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Cockley, K.D.

    1988-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) genome during production infection in vitro may be subject to negative regulation which results in modification of the cascade of expression of herpes virus macromolecular synthesis leading to establishment of HSV latency. In the present study, human embryonic lung (HEL) cells infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) restricted the replication of HSV type-1 (HSV-1). A delay in HSV replication of 15 hr as well as a consistent, almost 1000-fold inhibition of HSV replication in HCMV-infected cell cultures harvested 24 to 72 hr after superinfection were observed compared with controls infected with HSV alone. HSV type-2 (HSV-2) replication was similarly inhibited in HCMV-infected HEL cells. Prior ultraviolet-irradiation (UV) of HCMV removed the block to HSV replication, demonstrating the requirement for an active HCMV genome. HCMV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) negative temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants inhibited HSV replications as efficiently as wild-type (wt) HCMV at the non-permissive temperature. Evidence for penetration and replication of superinfecting HSV into HCMV-infected cells was provided by blot hybridization of HSV DNA synthesized in HSV-superinfected cell cultures and by cesium chloride density gradient analysis of ({sup 3}H)-labeled HSV-1-superinfected cells.

  17. Severe Symptomatic Primary Human Cytomegalovirus Infection despite Effective Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Riou, Raphaëlle; Bressollette-Bodin, Céline; Boutoille, David; Gagne, Katia; Rodallec, Audrey; Lefebvre, Maeva; Raffi, François; Senitzer, David; Imbert-Marcille, Berthe-Marie; Retière, Christelle

    2017-03-01

    Primary human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection usually goes unnoticed, causing mild or no symptoms in immunocompetent individuals. However, some rare severe clinical cases have been reported without investigation of host immune responses or viral virulence. In the present study, we investigate for the first time phenotypic and functional features, together with gene expression profiles in immunocompetent adults experiencing a severe primary HCMV infection. Twenty primary HCMV-infected patients (PHIP) were enrolled, as well as 26 HCMV-seronegative and 39 HCMV-seropositive healthy controls. PHIP had extensive lymphocytosis marked by massive expansion of natural killer (NK) and T cell compartments. Interestingly, PHIP mounted efficient innate and adaptive immune responses with a deep HCMV imprint, revealed mainly by the expansion of NKG2C(+) NK cells, CD16(+) Vδ2(-) γδ T cells, and conventional HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells. The main effector lymphocytes were activated and displayed an early immune phenotype that developed toward a more mature differentiated status. We suggest that both massive lymphocytosis and excessive lymphocyte activation could contribute to massive cytokine production, known to mediate tissue damage observed in PHIP. Taken together, these findings bring new insights into the comprehensive understanding of immune mechanisms involved during primary HCMV infection in immunocompetent individuals.IMPORTANCE HCMV-specific immune responses have been extensively documented in immunocompromised patients and during in utero acquisition. While it usually goes unnoticed, some rare severe clinical cases of primary HCMV infection have been reported in immunocompetent patients. However, host immune responses or HCMV virulence in these patients has not so far been investigated. In the present study, we show massive expansion of NK and T cell compartments during the symptomatic stage of acute HCMV infection. The patients mounted efficient innate and adaptive

  18. Sociodemographic factors associated with IgG and IgM seroprevalence for human cytomegalovirus infection in adult populations of Pakistan: a seroprevalence survey.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Saira; Siddiqui, Anwar A; Siddiqui, Amna R; Ahmed, Waquaruddin; Moss, Paul A H; Lalani, El-Nasir M A

    2016-10-22

    The seroprevalence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection ranges from 30 to 90 % in developed countries. Reliable estimates of HCMV seroprevalence are not available for Pakistan. This study determined the seroprevalence and sociodemographic factors associated with HCMV infection in adult populations of Karachi, Pakistan. A seroprevalence survey was conducted on 1000 adults, including residents of two semi-urban communities, and visitors to a government and a private hospital. Questionnaire-based interviews were conducted. Sera were analysed for HCMV-specific IgG and IgM. Chi-square or Fisher's exact test was used for comparing sociodemographic variables against seropositivity of HCMV-IgG or IgM. Multiple logistic regression modeling was performed for IgG seroprevalence and adjusted odds ratios were computed. The seroprevalence of HCMV-IgG and IgM was 93.2 and 4.3 % respectively. 95.3 % of individuals who were IgM seropositive were also seropositive for IgG. Around 6 % (15/250) of women of childbearing age remained uninfected and were therefore susceptible to primary infection. HCMV-IgG seroprevalence was associated with being female (p = 0.001), increasing age (p = 0.002) and crowding index (p = 0.003) and also with lower levels of both education (p < 0.001) and income (p = 0.008). Seroprevalence also differed significantly by marital status (p = 0.008) and sampling location (p < 0.001). A logistic regression model for HCMV-IgG seroprevalence showed associations with being female (OR = 1.89; 95 % CI: 1.10-3.25), increasing age (OR = 3.95; 95 % CI: 1.79-8.71) and decreasing income (OR = 0.72; 95 % CI: 0.54-0.96). A strong association was observed between increased seroprevalence of HCMV-IgM and decreasing household size (p = 0.008). Seroprevalence of HCMV is very high in Pakistan, although 6 % of women of childbearing age remain at risk of primary infection. The IgM seropositivity observed in some individuals

  19. Diagnostic significance and clinical impact of quantitative assays for diagnosis of human cytomegalovirus infection/disease in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Gerna, G; Percivalle, E; Baldanti, F; Sarasini, A; Zavattoni, M; Furione, M; Torsellini, M; Revello, M G

    1998-07-01

    In recent years several assays have been developed for quantitation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in blood of immunocompromised (transplanted and AIDS) patients. It is currently agreed that the only reliable indication of the degree of dissemination of HCMV infection/disease is the measurement of HCMV in blood. Diagnosis of HCMV end-organ disease (organ localizations) often does not benefit from quantitation of virus in blood, but requires detection and quantification of virus in samples taken locally. The most important and clinically useful diagnostic assays for HCMV quantitation in blood are: i) viremia, quantifying infectious HCMV carried by peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL); ii) pp65-antigenemia, quantifying the number of PBL positive for HCMV pp65 in the nucleus; iii) circulating cytomegalic endothelial cell (CEC) viremia (CEC-viremia) measuring the number of circulating CEC carrying infectious HCMV (during the antigenemia assay); iv) leuko- and plasma-DNAemia, quantifying the number of HCMV genome equivalents present in PBL or plasma, respectively, by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Other less widely used assays are: i) determination of immediate early and late gene transcripts (mRNA) to detect active viral infection; ii) in situ hybridization to detect viral nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) in tissue sections or cell smears; iii) in situ PCR to detect a low DNA copy number in single cells. Monitoring of HCMV infection/disease in transplant recipients and AIDS patients has established threshold values for different assays above which HCMV-related clinical symptoms are likely to appear. These values are approximately 10 for viremia, 100 for antigenemia and 1,000 GE for leukoDNAemia, and are valid for both solid organ and bone marrow transplant recipients as well as AIDS patients, whereas presence of even a single circulating CEC is sufficient to suggest the presence of a disseminated HCMV infection with potential organ involvement. Monitoring of

  20. The life cycle and pathogenesis of human cytomegalovirus infection: lessons from proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, Pierre M. Jean; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses have co-evolved with their hosts, acquiring strategies to subvert host cellular pathways for effective viral replication and spread. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a widely-spread β-herpesvirus, is a major cause of birth defects and opportunistic infections in HIV-1/AIDS patients. HCMV displays an intricate system-wide modulation of the human cell proteome. An impressive array of virus–host protein interactions occurs throughout the infection. To investigate the virus life cycle, proteomics has recently become a significant component of virology studies. Here, we review the mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches used in HCMV studies, as well as their contribution to understanding the HCMV life cycle and the virus-induced changes to host cells. The importance of the biological insights gained from these studies clearly demonstrate the impact that proteomics has had and can continue to have on understanding HCMV biology and identifying new therapeutic targets. PMID:25327590

  1. Is human cytomegalovirus associated with breast cancer progression?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) may be associated with breast cancer progression. However, the role of HCMV infection in breast cancer remains controversial. We aimed to assess whether HCMV genes (UL122 and UL83) could be detected in breast carcinomas and reinvestigated their possible association with breast cancer progression. DNA from paraffin-embedded tissues was analyzed by real-time PCR. We investigated 20 fibroadenomas and 27 primary breast carcinomas (stages II, III, and IV). Findings Two carcinomas were positive for HCMV, one was positive for two TaqMan viral detection probes, and one was positive for a sole TaqMan viral detection probe (UL83), whereas the remainder of the samples was negative. Conclusions Samples studied showed no association between HCMV infection and breast cancer progression. PMID:23557440

  2. Human cytomegalovirus: propagation, quantification, and storage.

    PubMed

    Britt, William J

    2010-08-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the largest and perhaps the most structurally complex member of the family of human herpesviruses. It is the prototypic virus of the beta-herpesvirus subfamily. As with other cytomegaloviruses, HCMV is exquisitely species specific and undergoes lytic replication only in cells of human origin. In addition, its replication is limited almost entirely to primary cells and a limited number of transformed cell lines. Together with its prolonged replicative cycle of approximately 48 hr, the propagation and quantification of HCMV can present technical challenges. In this brief set of protocols, the propagation of laboratory strains of HCMV and their quantitation is described. In a third series of protocols, the concentration and gradient purification of HCMV for more specialized downstream applications is described.

  3. Knowledge of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Prevention in Pregnant Women: A Baseline, Operational Survey

    PubMed Central

    Micieli, Mariella; Votino, Carmela; Visconti, Federica; Quaresima, Paola; Torti, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the only efficient way to prevent human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in pregnancy is primary prophylaxis through hygienic measures. So, we evaluated knowledge of HCMV and its prevention in a group of pregnant women. An anonymous questionnaire with multiple-choice answers was administered to all pregnant women who were followed up at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit of “Pugliese-Ciaccio Hospital,” a third-level hospital in Catanzaro (Southern Italy), from November 2015 to March 2016. Previously prescribed serology results for HCMV were also evaluated. Three hundred and fifty women participated in the study and the results clearly demonstrated that knowledge of pregnant women about HCMV is poor. Moreover, prescribed screening procedures need to be optimized, since one out of three pregnant women has not been tested for HCMV or the screening was not performed adequately. For this reason, it is important to implement informative campaign in both pregnant women and providing physicians. PMID:28831237

  4. Nuclear domain 10 components upregulated via interferon during human cytomegalovirus infection potently regulate viral infection.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Caroline L; Glass, Mandy S; Abendroth, Allison; McSharry, Brian P; Slobedman, Barry

    2017-07-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous betaherpesvirus that causes life-threatening disease in immunocompromised and immunonaïve individuals. Type I interferons (IFNs) are crucial molecules in the innate immune response to HCMV and are also known to upregulate several components of the interchromosomal multiprotein aggregates collectively referred to as nuclear domain 10 (ND10). In the context of herpesvirus infection, ND10 components are known to restrict gene expression. This raises the question as to whether key ND10 components (PML, Sp100 and hDaxx) act as anti-viral IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) during HCMV infection. In this study, analysis of ND10 component transcription during HCMV infection demonstrated that PML and Sp100 were significantly upregulated whilst hDaxx expression remained unchanged. In cells engineered to block the production of, or response to, type I IFNs, upregulation of PML and Sp100 was not detected during HCMV infection. Furthermore, pre-treatment with an IFN-β neutralizing antibody inhibited upregulation of PML and Sp100 during both infection and treatment with HCMV-infected cell supernatant. The significance of ND10 components functioning as anti-viral ISGs during HCMV infection was determined through knockdown of PML, Sp100 and hDaxx. ND10 knockdown cells were significantly more permissive to HCMV infection, as previously described but, in contrast to control cells, could support HCMV plaque formation following IFN-β pre-treatment. This ability of HCMV to overcome the potently anti-viral effects of IFN-β in ND10 expression deficient cells provides evidence that ND10 component upregulation is a key mediator of the anti-viral activity of IFN-β.

  5. Evaluation of human cytomegalovirus-specific CD8+ T-cells in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients using pentamer and interferon-γ-enzyme-linked immunospot assays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anbing; Ma, Yadan; Wu, Wei; Chen, Xiaoming; Huang, Yaping; Hu, Jianhua; Liang, Hanying; Wang, Huiqi; Yang, Rong; Fan, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Reactivation of latent human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a frequent complication following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Evaluation of the quantity and function of HCMV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses after HSCT may play a crucial role in the prevention of HCMV reactivation. To investigate the mechanism of HCMV-specific T-cell immune responses after HSCT in HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells. HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells were quantified using human leucocyte antigen (HLA) pentamer staining and functionally analysed by interferon-γ-enzyme-linked immunospot (IFN-γ-ELISPOT) assay with a pp65495-503 peptide in recipients four years after HSCT. The absolute number of pp65495-503-specific CD8+ T cells did not differ significantly (p>0.05) between samples with antigenaemia and those without antigenaemia given a mean of 54.5/μl and 40.5/μl, respectively, in 21 HLA-A* 0201 patients after HSCT. The level of pp65495-503-specific CD8+ T cells>20/μl of peripheral blood was maintained 90 days after transplantation. There was a significant difference in the spot count of IFN-γ-secreting T cells between samples with antigenaemia (mean, 507/2.5×10(5)PBMCs) and those without antigenaemia (mean, 216/2.5×10(5)PBMCs; p<0.05). pp65495-503-specific CD8+ T cells may not be sufficient to control HCMV reactivation in recipients after HSCT. However, the combination of pentamer and IFN-γ-ELISPOT assays may be valuable for evaluating HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells. Further studies on HCMV-specific T-cell immune responses continue to be performed for the prevention of persistent HCMV reactivation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Human cytomegalovirus detection in gastric cancer and its possible association with lymphatic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Guo, Gangqiang; Xu, Jianfeng; Sun, Xiangwei; Chen, Wenjing; Jin, Jinji; Hu, Changyuan; Zhang, Peichen; Shen, Xian; Xue, Xiangyang

    2017-02-08

    Increasing evidence suggests that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is associated with many human malignancies. However, its prevalence in gastric cancer (GC) and clinical association remain unknown. HCMV IgG and IgM antibodies in the sera of 80 GC patients and 80 healthy controls were detected using a microparticle enzyme immunoassay. The prevalence of HCMV UL47, UL55, UL56, and UL77 genes among 102 GC tumor tissues and adjacent normal specimens was measured by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or nested PCR. Quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) was used to determine viral load. Virus localization in neoplastic tissues was determined by immunohistochemistry. No significant difference of HCMV IgG and IgM seropositivity was found between GC patients and the healthy group. However, the overall HCMV DNA positivity rate was significantly higher in GC cancerous tissue compared with in paired normal tissue (P<0.01). HCMV infection was mainly localized in the tumorous epithelium. Q-PCR in HCMV-positive specimens indicated that the viral copy number was notably higher in GC tissues than in adjacent normal specimens (P<0.001). Clinical statistical analysis indicated that HCMV load in GC tumor tissue was positively associated with lymphatic metastasis (P=0.043), the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.6638. Our data clearly provide the prevalence of HCMV in GC patients. We conclude that HCMV infection in malignant tissues might be associated with carcinogenesis or progression of GC and possibly relates to lymphatic metastasis.

  7. Detection of Human Cytomegalovirus pp67 Late Gene Transcripts in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Patients by Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Tetali, Surya; Wang, Xue Ping; Kaplan, Mark H.; Cromme, Frans V.; Ginocchio, Christine C.

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the clinical correlation between the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) pp67 mRNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and active HCMV central nervous system (CNS) disease in patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In total, 76 CSF specimens collected from 65 HIV-1-positive patients diagnosed with HCMV CNS disease, other non-HCMV-related CNS diseases, or no CNS disease were tested for the presence of HCMV pp67 mRNA using the NucliSens cytomegalovirus (CMV) pp67 assay (Organon Teknika, Durham, N.C.). The results were compared to those of a nested PCR for the detection of HCMV glycoprotein B DNA and to those obtained by viral culture (54 samples). CSF specimens collected from patients without HCMV CNS disease yielded the following results: pp67 assay negative, 62 of 62 specimens; culture negative, 41 of 41 specimens; and PCR negative, 56 of 62 specimens (6 specimens were positive). CSF specimens collected from patients with HCMV CNS disease yielded the following results: pp67 assay positive, 9 of 13 specimens; PCR positive, 13 of 13 specimens; and culture positive, 2 of 13 specimens. After resolution of the discordant results, the following positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively) for the diagnosis of HCMV CNS disease were determined. The PPV for PCR, pp67 assay, and culture were 68.4, 100, and 100%, respectively, and the NPV for PCR, pp67 assay, and culture were 100, 97.0, and 82.7%, respectively. The sensitivities for DNA PCR, pp67 assay, and culture for the detection of HCMV were 100, 84.6, and 18%, respectively, and the clinical specificities were 90.5, 100, and 100%, respectively. This study indicates that the detection of HCMV pp67 mRNA in CSF has good correlation with active HCMV CNS disease, whereas CSF culture is insensitive and qualitative DNA PCR may detect latent nonreplicating virus in CSF from patients without HCMV CNS disease. PMID:10790122

  8. Detection of human cytomegalovirus pp67 late gene transcripts in cerebrospinal fluid of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients by nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F; Tetali, S; Wang, X P; Kaplan, M H; Cromme, F V; Ginocchio, C C

    2000-05-01

    This study examined the clinical correlation between the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) pp67 mRNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and active HCMV central nervous system (CNS) disease in patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In total, 76 CSF specimens collected from 65 HIV-1-positive patients diagnosed with HCMV CNS disease, other non-HCMV-related CNS diseases, or no CNS disease were tested for the presence of HCMV pp67 mRNA using the NucliSens cytomegalovirus (CMV) pp67 assay (Organon Teknika, Durham, N.C.). The results were compared to those of a nested PCR for the detection of HCMV glycoprotein B DNA and to those obtained by viral culture (54 samples). CSF specimens collected from patients without HCMV CNS disease yielded the following results: pp67 assay negative, 62 of 62 specimens; culture negative, 41 of 41 specimens; and PCR negative, 56 of 62 specimens (6 specimens were positive). CSF specimens collected from patients with HCMV CNS disease yielded the following results: pp67 assay positive, 9 of 13 specimens; PCR positive, 13 of 13 specimens; and culture positive, 2 of 13 specimens. After resolution of the discordant results, the following positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively) for the diagnosis of HCMV CNS disease were determined. The PPV for PCR, pp67 assay, and culture were 68.4, 100, and 100%, respectively, and the NPV for PCR, pp67 assay, and culture were 100, 97.0, and 82. 7%, respectively. The sensitivities for DNA PCR, pp67 assay, and culture for the detection of HCMV were 100, 84.6, and 18%, respectively, and the clinical specificities were 90.5, 100, and 100%, respectively. This study indicates that the detection of HCMV pp67 mRNA in CSF has good correlation with active HCMV CNS disease, whereas CSF culture is insensitive and qualitative DNA PCR may detect latent nonreplicating virus in CSF from patients without HCMV CNS disease.

  9. Natural Killer Cells Can Inhibit the Transmission of Human Cytomegalovirus in Cell Culture by Using Mechanisms from Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zeguang; Sinzger, Christian; Reichel, Johanna Julia; Just, Marlies

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) transmission within the host is important for the pathogenesis of HCMV diseases. Natural killer (NK) cells are well known to provide a first line of host defense against virus infections. However, the role of NK cells in the control of HCMV transmission is still unknown. Here, we provide the first experimental evidence that NK cells can efficiently control HCMV transmission in different cell types. NK cells engage different mechanisms to control the HCMV transmission both via soluble factors and by cell contact. NK cell-produced interferon gamma (IFN-γ) suppresses HCMV production and induces resistance of bystander cells to HCMV infection. The UL16 viral gene contributes to an immune evasion from the NK cell-mediated control of HCMV transmission. Furthermore, the efficacy of the antibody-dependent NK cell-mediated control of HCMV transmission is dependent on a CD16-158V/F polymorphism. Our findings indicate that NK cells may have a clinical relevance in HCMV infection and highlight the need to consider potential therapeutic strategies based on the manipulation of NK cells. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infects 40% to 100% of the human population worldwide. After primary infection, mainly in childhood, the virus establishes a lifelong persistence with possible reactivations. Most infections remain asymptomatic; however, HCMV represents a major health problem since it is the most frequent cause of infection-induced birth defects and is responsible for high morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. The immune system normally controls the infection by antibodies and immune effector cells. One type of effector cells are the natural killer (NK) cells, which provide a rapid response to virus-infected cells. NK cells participate in viral clearance by inducing the death of infected cells. NK cells also secrete antiviral cytokines as a consequence of the interaction with an infected cell. In this study, we

  10. Activation of telomerase by human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Strååt, Klas; Liu, Cheng; Rahbar, Afsar; Zhu, Qingjun; Liu, Li; Wolmer-Solberg, Nina; Lou, Fenglan; Liu, Zhaoxu; Shen, Jie; Jia, Jihui; Kyo, Satoru; Björkholm, Magnus; Sjöberg, Jan; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia; Xu, Dawei

    2009-04-01

    The mechanism by which human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) stimulates oncogenesis is unclear. Because cellular immortalization and transformation require telomerase activation by expression of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene, we examined the role of HCMV in telomerase activation. Normal human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) and human malignant glioma (MG) cell lines were infected with HCMV or transfected with expression vectors encoding HCMV immediate early (IE) antigen 72 or 86. hTERT expression and promoter activity and telomerase activity were evaluated using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, a luciferase reporter assay, and a telomeric repeat amplification protocol, respectively. hTERT promoter occupancy by the transcription factor Sp1, IE antigens, and histone deacetylases (HDACs) was assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. hTERT and IE protein expression in human primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was determined immunohistochemically. All statistical tests were two-sided. In telomerase and hTERT-negative HDFs, HCMV infection induced constitutive hTERT expression and telomerase activation. The hTERT promoter activity in HDFs and MG cell lines was statistically significantly enhanced by HCMV in a dose-dependent manner (mean luciferase activity [arbitrary units] in control HDFs and in HDFs infected with HCMV at multiplicities of infection [MOIs] of 0.1 = 6 and 521, respectively, difference = 515, 95% CI = 178 to 850; mean activity at MOI of 1 and 10 = 8828 and 59,923, respectively; P < .001 comparing control with HCMV-infected cells at all MOIs). Ectopic expression of HCMV IE-72 protein also stimulated hTERT promoter activity in HDFs. HCMV-mediated transactivation of the hTERT gene was dependent on the presence of Sp1-binding sites in the hTERT promoter and was accompanied by increases in Sp1 binding, acetylation of histone H3, and a reduction in HDAC binding at the core promoter. In specimens of GBM, HCMV IE and hTERT proteins were

  11. Bioactive Molecules Released From Cells Infected with the Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Luganini, Anna; Terlizzi, Maria E.; Gribaudo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Following primary infection in humans, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) persists in a latent state throughout the host’s lifetime despite a strong and efficient immune response. If the host experiences some form of immune dysregulation, such as immunosuppression or immunodeficiency, HCMV reactivates, thereby emerging from latency. Thus, in the absence of effective functional immune responses, as occurs in immunocompromised or immunoimmature individuals, both HCMV primary infections and reactivations from latency can cause significant morbidity and mortality. However, even in immunocompetent hosts, HCMV represents a relevant risk factor for the development of several chronic inflammatory diseases and certain forms of neoplasia. HCMV infection may shift between the lytic and latent state, regulated by a delicate and intricate balance between virus-mediated immunomodulation and host immune defenses. Indeed, HCMV is a master in manipulating innate and adaptive host defense pathways, and a large portion of its genome is devoted to encoding immunomodulatory proteins; such proteins may thus represent important virulence determinants. However, the pathogenesis of HCMV-related diseases is strengthened by the activities of bioactive molecules, of both viral and cellular origin, that are secreted from infected cells and collectively named as the secretome. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the composition and functions of HCMV-derived secretomes. In lytic infections of fibroblasts and different types of endothelial cells, the majority of HCMV-induced secreted proteins act in a paracrine fashion to stimulate the generation of an inflammatory microenvironment around infected cells; this may lead to vascular inflammation and angiogenesis that, in turn, foster HCMV replication and its dissemination through host tissues. Conversely, the HCMV secretome derived from latently infected hematopoietic progenitor cells induces an immunosuppressive extracellular environment that

  12. Diagnosis of Human Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection by Amplification of Viral DNA from Dried Blood Spots on Perinatal Cards

    PubMed Central

    Scanga, Lori; Chaing, Shu; Powell, Cynthia; Aylsworth, Arthur S.; Harrell, Lizzie J.; Henshaw, Nancy G.; Civalier, Chris J.; Thorne, Leigh B.; Weck, Karen; Booker, Jessica; Gulley, Margaret L.

    2006-01-01

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection affects 1% of children and is the most common infectious cause of sensorineural hearing loss. Due to the difficulty of diagnosing deafness and other neurological disorders in infants, affected individuals may not be recognized until much later when active infection has resolved and culture is no longer informative. To overcome this problem, congenital HCMV infection was diagnosed retrospectively by testing residual blood samples collected from newborns and dried on perinatal cards as part of the North Carolina Newborn Screening Program. We modified the Qiagen method for purifying DNA from dried blood spots to increase the sample size and recovery of the lysate. A multiplex, real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction assay on an ABI 7900 instrument measured a highly conserved segment of the HCMV polymerase gene and the APOB human control gene. HCMV DNA was detected in blood dried on perinatal cards from all seven infants with culture-proven congenital infection, and all 24 negative control cases lacked detectable HCMV DNA. Our findings suggest that it is possible to diagnose congenital HCMV infection using dried blood collected up to 20 months earlier. Further studies are warranted on patients with hearing loss or other neurological deficits to determine the percentage that is attributable to congenital HCMV infection. PMID:16645211

  13. BST2/Tetherin Enhances Entry of Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Kasinath; Smith, M. Shane; Malouli, Daniel; Mansouri, Mandana; Nelson, Jay A.; Früh, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Interferon-induced BST2/Tetherin prevents budding of vpu-deficient HIV-1 by tethering mature viral particles to the plasma membrane. BST2 also inhibits release of other enveloped viruses including Ebola virus and Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV), indicating that BST2 is a broadly acting antiviral host protein. Unexpectedly however, recovery of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) from supernatants of BST2-expressing human fibroblasts was increased rather than decreased. Furthermore, BST2 seemed to enhance viral entry into cells since more virion proteins were released into BST2-expressing cells and subsequent viral gene expression was elevated. A significant increase in viral entry was also observed upon induction of endogenous BST2 during differentiation of the pro-monocytic cell line THP-1. Moreover, treatment of primary human monocytes with siRNA to BST2 reduced HCMV infection, suggesting that BST2 facilitates entry of HCMV into cells expressing high levels of BST2 either constitutively or in response to exogenous stimuli. Since BST2 is present in HCMV particles we propose that HCMV entry is enhanced via a reverse-tethering mechanism with BST2 in the viral envelope interacting with BST2 in the target cell membrane. Our data suggest that HCMV not only counteracts the well-established function of BST2 as inhibitor of viral egress but also employs this anti-viral protein to gain entry into BST2-expressing hematopoietic cells, a process that might play a role in hematogenous dissemination of HCMV. PMID:22072961

  14. Infection of Vascular Endothelial Cells with Human Cytomegalovirus under Fluid Shear Stress Reveals Preferential Entry and Spread of Virus in Flow Conditions Simulating Atheroprone Regions of the Artery

    PubMed Central

    DuRose, Jenny B.; Li, Julie; Chien, Shu

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major pathogenic factor in cardiovascular diseases, which are the leading cause of mortality in developed countries. While risk factors for atherosclerosis tend to be systemic, the distribution of atherosclerotic plaques within the vasculature is preferentially located at branch points and curves where blood flow is disturbed and shear stress is low. It is now widely accepted that hemodynamic factors can modulate endothelial gene expression and function and influence the pathophysiological changes associated with atherosclerosis. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a ubiquitous pathogen, has long been proposed as a risk factor for atherosclerosis. To date, the role of HCMV in atherogenesis has been explored only in static conditions, and it is not known how HCMV infection is influenced by the physiological context of flow. In this study, we utilized a parallel-plate flow system to simulate the effects of shear stresses in different regions of the vasculature in vitro. We found that endothelial cells cultured under low shear stress, which simulates the flow condition of atheroprone regions in vivo, are more permissive to HCMV infection than cells experiencing high shear stress or static conditions. Cells exposed to low shear stress show increased entry of HCMV compared to cells exposed to high shear stress or static conditions. Viral structural gene expression, viral titers, and viral spread are also enhanced in endothelial cells exposed to low shear stress. These results suggest that hemodynamic factors modulate HCMV infection of endothelial cells, thus providing new insights into the induction/acceleration of atherosclerosis by HCMV. PMID:23055562

  15. Diagnostic Value of Monitoring Human Cytomegalovirus Late pp67 mRNA Expression in Renal-Allograft Recipients by Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Blok, Marinus J.; Goossens, Valere J.; Vanherle, Sabina J. V.; Top, Bert; Tacken, Nicole; Middeldorp, Jaap M.; Christiaans, Maarten H. L.; van Hooff, Johannes P.; Bruggeman, Cathrien A.

    1998-01-01

    The diagnostic value of monitoring human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) late pp67 mRNA expression by nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) after renal-allograft transplantation was evaluated. RNAs were isolated from 489 whole-blood specimens of 42 patients for the specific amplification of the late pp67 (UL65) mRNA. NASBA results were compared to results from the pp65 antigenemia assay, virus isolation by cell culture, and serology. The sensitivity value for NASBA proved to be higher than that for the antigenemia assay (50 versus 35%) for the detection of HCMV infection, while the sensitivity values of cell culture and NASBA were comparable (54 and 50%, respectively). NASBA detected the onset of HCMV infection simultaneously with cell culture and the antigenemia assay. Both the antigenemia assay and NASBA are very specific (100%) and highly predictive (100%) for the onset of HCMV infection. Antiviral therapy with ganciclovir resulted in negative results for cell culture, the antigenemia assay, and NASBA. In conclusion, monitoring HCMV pp67 mRNA expression by NASBA is a highly specific method for the detection of HCMV infection in renal-allograft recipients and is more sensitive than the antigenemia assay. Furthermore, NASBA can be used to monitor the progression of HCMV infections and the effect of antiviral therapy on viral activity. PMID:9574702

  16. Human Cytomegalovirus Manipulation of Latently Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, John H.; Reeves, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    Primary infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) results in the establishment of a lifelong infection of the host which is aided by the ability of HCMV to undergo a latent infection. One site of HCMV latency in vivo is in haematopoietic progenitor cells, resident in the bone marrow, with genome carriage and reactivation being restricted to the cells of the myeloid lineage. Until recently, HCMV latency has been considered to be relatively quiescent with the virus being maintained essentially as a “silent partner” until conditions are met that trigger reactivation. However, advances in techniques to study global changes in gene expression have begun to show that HCMV latency is a highly active process which involves expression of specific latency-associated viral gene products which orchestrate major changes in the latently infected cell. These changes are argued to help maintain latent infection and to modulate the cellular environment to the benefit of latent virus. In this review, we will discuss these new findings and how they impact not only on our understanding of the biology of HCMV latency but also how they could provide tantalising glimpses into mechanisms that could become targets for the clearance of latent HCMV. PMID:24284875

  17. Detection of Low Frequency Multi-Drug Resistance and Novel Putative Maribavir Resistance in Immunocompromised Pediatric Patients with Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J; Bryant, Josephine M; Depledge, Daniel P; Margetts, Ben K; Simmonds, Jacob; Nicolaou, Stephanos; Tutill, Helena J; Williams, Rachel; Worth, Austen J J; Marks, Stephen D; Veys, Paul; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Breuer, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a significant pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, with the potential to cause fatal pneumonitis and colitis, as well as increasing the risk of organ rejection in transplant patients. With the advent of new anti-HCMV drugs there is therefore considerable interest in using virus sequence data to monitor emerging resistance to antiviral drugs in HCMV viraemia and disease, including the identification of putative new mutations. We used target-enrichment to deep sequence HCMV DNA from 11 immunosuppressed pediatric patients receiving single or combination anti-HCMV treatment, serially sampled over 1-27 weeks. Changes in consensus sequence and resistance mutations were analyzed for three ORFs targeted by anti-HCMV drugs and the frequencies of drug resistance mutations monitored. Targeted-enriched sequencing of clinical material detected mutations occurring at frequencies of 2%. Seven patients showed no evidence of drug resistance mutations. Four patients developed drug resistance mutations a mean of 16 weeks after starting treatment. In two patients, multiple resistance mutations accumulated at frequencies of 20% or less, including putative maribavir and ganciclovir resistance mutations P522Q (UL54) and C480F (UL97). In one patient, resistance was detected 14 days earlier than by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis suggested recombination or superinfection in one patient. Deep sequencing of HCMV enriched from clinical samples excluded resistance in 7 of 11 subjects and identified resistance mutations earlier than conventional PCR-based resistance testing in 2 patients. Detection of multiple low level resistance mutations was associated with poor outcome.

  18. Novel human cytomegalovirus viral chemokines, vCXCL-1s, display functional selectivity for neutrophil signaling and function

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jinho; Dogra, Pranay; Masi, Tom J.; Pitt, Elisabeth A.; de Kruijf, Petra; Smit, Martine J.; Sparer, Tim E.

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) uses members of the hematopoietic system including neutrophils for dissemination throughout the body. HCMV encodes a viral chemokine, vCXCL-1, that is postulated to attract neutrophils for dissemination within the host. The gene encoding vCXCL-1, UL146, is one of the most variable genes in the HCMV genome. Why HCMV has evolved this hypervariability and how this affects the virus’ dissemination/pathogenesis is unknown. Because the vCXCL-1 hypervariability maps to important binding and activation domains, we hypothesized that vCXCL-1s differentially activate neutrophils, which could contribute to HCMV dissemination and/or pathogenesis. In order to test whether these viral chemokines affect neutrophil function, we generated vCXCL-1 proteins from 11 different clades from clinical isolates from HCMV-congenitally infected infants. All vCXCL-1s were able to induce calcium flux at a concentration of 100 nM and integrin expression on human peripheral blood neutrophils (PBNs) in spite of differences in affinity for the CXCR1 and CXCR2 receptors. In fact their affinity for CXCR1 or CXCR2 did not directly correlate with chemotaxis, G protein-dependent and independent (β-arrestin2) activation, or secondary chemokine (CCL22) expression. Our data suggest that vCXCL-1 polymorphisms impact the binding affinity, receptor usage, and differential PBN activation that could contribute to HCMV dissemination and/or pathogenesis. PMID:25987741

  19. Characterization of Human Cytomegalovirus Genome Diversity in Immunocompromised Hosts by Whole-Genome Sequencing Directly From Clinical Specimens.

    PubMed

    Hage, Elias; Wilkie, Gavin S; Linnenweber-Held, Silvia; Dhingra, Akshay; Suárez, Nicolás M; Schmidt, Julius J; Kay-Fedorov, Penelope C; Mischak-Weissinger, Eva; Heim, Albert; Schwarz, Anke; Schulz, Thomas F; Davison, Andrew J; Ganzenmueller, Tina

    2017-06-01

    Advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies allow comprehensive studies of genetic diversity over the entire genome of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a significant pathogen for immunocompromised individuals. Next-generation sequencing was performed on target enriched sequence libraries prepared directly from a variety of clinical specimens (blood, urine, breast milk, respiratory samples, biopsies, and vitreous humor) obtained longitudinally or from different anatomical compartments from 20 HCMV-infected patients (renal transplant recipients, stem cell transplant recipients, and congenitally infected children). De novo-assembled HCMV genome sequences were obtained for 57 of 68 sequenced samples. Analysis of longitudinal or compartmental HCMV diversity revealed various patterns: no major differences were detected among longitudinal, intraindividual blood samples from 9 of 15 patients and in most of the patients with compartmental samples, whereas a switch of the major HCMV population was observed in 6 individuals with sequential blood samples and upon compartmental analysis of 1 patient with HCMV retinitis. Variant analysis revealed additional aspects of minor virus population dynamics and antiviral-resistance mutations. In immunosuppressed patients, HCMV can remain relatively stable or undergo drastic genomic changes that are suggestive of the emergence of minor resident strains or de novo infection.

  20. Control of human cytomegalovirus gene expression by differential histone modifications during lytic and latent infection of a monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Ioudinkova, Elena; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Rynditch, Alla; De Conto, Flora; Motta, Federica; Covan, Silvia; Pinardi, Federica; Razin, Sergey V; Chezzi, Carlo

    2006-12-15

    Non-differentiated THP-1 cells can be infected by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Towne strain, which persists in these cells in a non-active (latent) form without undergoing a productive cycle. The same cells become permissive for HCMV lytic infection after induction of cell differentiation by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. We used this cellular model to study the possible role of histone modifications in the control of HCMV latency. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation with antibodies against histone H3 acetylated or dimethylated in position K9, we demonstrated that in lytically infected cells the HCMV enhancer was associated with heavy acetylated but not dimethylated H3. In the case of latent infection, the HCMV enhancer was associated with neither acetylated nor dimethylated H3. HCMV genes encoding DNA polymerase (early), pp65 (early-late) and pp150 (late) proteins were associated preferentially with acetylated H3 in lytically infected cells and with dimethylated H3 in latently infected cells. These data strongly suggest that K9 methylation of H3 is involved in HCMV gene repression, while association of the above genes with acetylated histones is likely to be necessary for active transcription. It can be postulated that the same histone modifications are used to mark active and repressed genes in both cellular and viral chromatin.

  1. Limits and patterns of cytomegalovirus genomic diversity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Renzette, Nicholas; Pokalyuk, Cornelia; Gibson, Laura; Bhattacharjee, Bornali; Schleiss, Mark R.; Hamprecht, Klaus; Yamamoto, Aparecida Y.; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M.; Britt, William J.; Jensen, Jeffrey D.; Kowalik, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) exhibits surprisingly high genomic diversity during natural infection although little is known about the limits or patterns of HCMV diversity among humans. To address this deficiency, we analyzed genomic diversity among congenitally infected infants. We show that there is an upper limit to HCMV genomic diversity in these patient samples, with ∼25% of the genome being devoid of polymorphisms. These low diversity regions were distributed across 26 loci that were preferentially located in DNA-processing genes. Furthermore, by developing, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide mutation and recombination rate maps for HCMV, we show that genomic diversity is positively correlated with these two rates. In contrast, median levels of viral genomic diversity did not vary between putatively single or mixed strain infections. We also provide evidence that HCMV populations isolated from vascular compartments of hosts from different continents are genetically similar and that polymorphisms in glycoproteins and regulatory proteins are enriched in these viral populations. This analysis provides the most highly detailed map of HCMV genomic diversity in human hosts to date and informs our understanding of the distribution of HCMV genomic diversity within human hosts. PMID:26150505

  2. Infected T98G glioblastoma cells support human cytomegalovirus reactivation from latency.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuang; Jiang, Xuan; Yang, Bo; Wen, Le; Zhao, Fei; Zeng, Wen-Bo; Liu, Xi-Juan; Dong, Xiao; Sun, Jin-Yan; Ming, Ying-Zi; Zhu, Hua; Rayner, Simon; Tang, Qiyi; Fortunato, Elizabeth; Luo, Min-Hua

    2017-10-01

    T98G cells have been shown to support long-term human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome maintenance without infectious virus release. However, it remains unclear whether these viral genomes could be reactivated. To address this question, a recombinant HCMV (rHCMV) containing a GFP gene was used to infect T98G cells, and the infected cells absent of infectious virus production were designated T98G-LrV. Upon dibutyryl cAMP plus IBMX (cAMP/IBMX) treatment, a serial of phenomena were observed, including GFP signal increase, viral genome replication, lytic genes expression and infectious viruses release, indicating the reactivation of HCMV in T98G-LrV cells from a latent status. Mechanistically, HCMV reactivation in the T98G-LrV cells induced by cAMP/IBMX was associated with the PKA-CREB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that HCMV was latent in T98G-LrV cells and could be reactivated. The T98G-LrV cells represent an effective model for investigating the mechanisms of HCMV reactivation from latency in the context of neural cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Induction of Pluripotent Protective Immunity Following Immunisation with a Chimeric Vaccine against Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jie; Rist, Michael; Cooper, Leanne; Smith, Corey; Khanna, Rajiv

    2008-01-01

    Based on the life-time cost to the health care system, the Institute of Medicine has assigned the highest priority for a vaccine to control human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) disease in transplant patients and new born babies. In spite of numerous attempts successful licensure of a HCMV vaccine formulation remains elusive. Here we have developed a novel chimeric vaccine strategy based on a replication-deficient adenovirus which encodes the extracellular domain of gB protein and multiple HLA class I & II-restricted CTL epitopes from HCMV as a contiguous polypeptide. Immunisation with this chimeric vaccine consistently generated strong HCMV-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells which co-expressed IFN-γ and TNF-α, while the humoral response induced by this vaccine showed strong virus neutralizing capacity. More importantly, immunization with adenoviral chimeric vaccine also afforded protection against challenge with recombinant vaccinia virus encoding HCMV antigens and this protection was associated with the induction of a pluripotent antigen-specific cellular and antibody response. Furthermore, in vitro stimulation with this adenoviral chimeric vaccine rapidly expanded multiple antigen-specific human CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells from healthy virus carriers. These studies demonstrate that the adenovirus chimeric HCMV vaccine provides an excellent platform for reconstituting protective immunity to prevent HCMV diseases in different clinical settings. PMID:18806877

  4. A novel flow cytometry-based tool for determining the efficiency of human cytomegalovirus infection in THP-1 derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Huifen; Mao, Genxiang; Carlson, Joshua; Leng, Sean X

    2015-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that causes congenital infection and severe infections in immunocompromised patients. Chronic hCMV infection may also play an important role in immunosenescence and adverse health outcomes in older adults. THP-1, a human monocytic cell line and its derived macrophages serve as a useful cell culture model for mechanistic studies of hCMV infection and its underlying biology. A major methodological challenge is the lack of a quick and reliable tool to accurately determine the efficiency of hCMV infection in THP-1 derived macrophages. In this study, we developed a flow cytometry based method using commercially available monoclonal antibody (MAb) against hCMV immediate early (IE) antigen that can accurately determine infection efficiency. We used 0.5% formaldehyde for fixation, 90% methanol for permeabilization, and incubation with FITC conjugated MAb at 37°C. The method was tested by hCMV infection with laboratory Towne strain in the presence or absence of hydrocortisone. It was also compared with the routine flow cytometry protocol using Cytofix/Cytoperm solution and with immunofluorescence. The results indicate that this new method is reliable and time saving for accurate determination of infection efficiency. It may facilitate further investigations into the underlying biological mechanisms of hCMV infection.

  5. Enhanced capacity of DNA repair in human cytomegalovirus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Y.; Rapp, F.

    1981-04-01

    Plaque formation in Vero cells by UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus was enhanced by infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), UV irradiation, or treatment with methylmethanesulfonate. Preinfection of Vero cells with HCMV enhanced reactivation of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus more significantly than did treatment with UV or methylmethanesulfonate alone. A similar enhancement by HCMV was observed in human embryonic fibroblasts, but not in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP12BE) cells. It was also found that HCMV infection enhanced hydroxyurea-resistant DNA synthesis induced by UV light or methylmethanesulfonate. Alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis revealed an enhanced rate of synthesis of all size classes of DNA in UV-irradiated HCMV-infected Vero cells. However, HCMV infection did not induce repairable lesions in cellular DNA and did not significantly inhibit host cell DNA synthesis, unlike UV or methylmethanesulfonate. These results indicate that HCMV enhanced DNA repair capacity in the host cells without producing detectable lesions in cellular DNA and without inhibiting DNA synthesis. This repair appeared to be error proof for UV-damaged herpes simplex virus DNA when tested with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase-negative mutants.

  6. Human cytomegalovirus miR-US33-5p inhibits viral DNA synthesis and viral replication by down-regulating expression of the host Syntaxin3.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Ma, Yanping; Shao, Yaozhong; Jiang, Shujuan; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2015-02-13

    During infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), overexpression of hcmv-miR-US33 can inhibit the lytic viral replication and down-regulate US29 mRNA. However, it remains unknown whether inhibition of viral replication by miR-US33 is mediated by down-regulation of expression of US29 or another host gene. Here, we identified the host gene Syntaxin3 (STX3) to be a direct target of hcmv-miR-US33-5p using Hybrid-PCR and luciferase-reporter assays. It was further demonstrated that the levels of STX3 protein were down-regulated in hcmv-miR-US33-5p-overexpressing cells. Experiments with STX3-specific siRNA, or with an inhibitor of hcmv-miR-US33-5p confirmed that hcmv-miR-US33-5p-mediated inhibition of HCMV DNA synthesis and of viral replication are specifically mediated by down-regulation of STX3 expression.

  7. Human cytomegalovirus decreases constitutive transcription of MHC class II genes in mature Langerhans cells by reducing CIITA transcript levels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew W; Wang, Nan; Hornell, Tara M C; Harding, James J; Deshpande, Chetan; Hertel, Laura; Lacaille, Vashti; Pashine, Achal; Macaubas, Claudia; Mocarski, Edward S; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2011-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) productively infects CD34(+) progenitor-derived, mature Langerhans-type dendritic cells (matLC) and reduces surface expression of MHC class II complexes (MHC II) by increasing intracellular retention of these molecules. To determine whether HCMV also inhibits MHC II expression by other mechanisms, we assessed mRNA levels of the class II transcriptional regulator, CIITA, and several of its target genes in infected matLC. Levels of CIITA, HLA-DRA (DRA) and DRB transcripts, and new DR protein synthesis were compared in mock-infected and HCMV-infected cells by quantitative PCR and pulse-chase immunoprecipitation analyses, respectively. CIITA mRNA levels were significantly lower in HCMV-infected matLC as compared to mock-infected cells. When assessed in the presence of Actinomycin D, the stability of CIITA transcripts was not diminished by HCMV. Analysis of promoter-specific CIITA isoforms revealed that types I, III and IV all were decreased by HCMV, a result that differs from changes after incubation of these cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure to UV-inactivated virus failed to reduce CIITA mRNA levels, implicating de novo viral gene expression in this effect. HCMV-infected matLC also expressed lower levels of DR transcripts and reduced DR protein synthesis rates compared to mock-infected matLC. In summary, we demonstrate that HCMV infection of a human dendritic cell subset inhibits constitutive CIITA expression, most likely at the transcriptional level, resulting in reduced MHC II biosynthesis. We suggest this represents a new mechanism of modulation of mature LC by HCMV.

  8. Human cytomegalovirus infection contributes to glioma disease progression via upregulating endocan expression.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yan; Wang, Yisong; Wang, Shijie; Wang, Xin; Fan, Dongying; Zhou, Dabiao; An, Jing

    2016-11-01

    The etiology of malignant glioma remains unclear. To examine the association between glioma and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection and the possible mechanism through which HCMV contributes to malignant glioma, we investigated the expression of HCMV components and an angiogenesis marker, endocan, in 79 glioma specimens and 8 control brain samples. HCMV pp65 protein and DNA were detected in 65.8% (52 of 79) and 54.4% (43 of 79) of glioma specimens, respectively. The positive rate and expression levels of pp65 were significantly correlated with the glioma grades. The endocan expression was detected in 78.5% (62 of 79) of glioma specimens, and elevated endocan immunoreactivity was also significantly associated with high-grade glioma. The pp65 was predominantly detected and colocalized with endocan in the cytoplasm of tumor cells. Importantly, there was a significant positive correlation in detection rates between those 2 proteins. In control samples, neither HCMV pp65 nor endocan expression was detected. Moreover, the serum endocan levels in glioma patients were markedly higher than that in healthy subjects. In in vitro study, HCMV infection induced the expression of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in human glioblastoma U87 MG (U87) cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Furthermore, elevated endocan levels were also observed in HCMV-infected U87 cells and HUVECs and antiviral treatment with ganciclovir reduced the endocan expression. These results suggest HCMV infection leads to glioma progression through an upregulation of endocan and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Thus, anti-HCMV treatment may represent a potentially novel therapeutic strategy for glioma. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of human cytomegalovirus in the proliferation and invasion of extravillous cytotrophoblasts isolated from early placentae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Zheng, Xiaofei; Li, Qin; Chen, Juanjuan; Yin, Zongzhi; Xiao, Juan; Zhang, Dandan; Li, Wei; Qiao, Yuan; Chen, Suhua

    2015-01-01

    Aim: We investigated the role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and its mechanism in extravillous cytotrophoblast (EVT) proliferation and invasion in vitro. Methods: Differential enzymatic digestion combined with gradient centrifugation, was used to isolate primary EVT from human chorionic villi collected from early placentae of healthy pregnant women. HCMV infection was determined by immunofluorescence staining of HCMVpp65 antigen expression. An MTT assay was used to examine the role of HCMV in the proliferation of EVT. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), immunocytochemical staining and Western blots were carried out in a control group (EVT) and a virus group (EVT+HCMV) to examine the expression of major genes and protein in TGF-β/Smad signaling pathways in EVT 48 h after inoculation with HCMV. An in vitro cell invasion assay was performed to analyze the influence of HCMV on EVT invasion. Results: HCMV significantly inhibited the proliferation of EVT 48 h after viral infection (P < 0.05). The expression of TGF-β1, Smad1, Smad2, Smad3, Smad4, and Smad5 genes was significantly increased (P < 0.05), but that of TGF-β2, TGF-β3, TGFβRI, TGFβRII, Smad7, MMP2, and MMP9 was significantly decreased in the virus group 48 h after HCMV infection (P < 0.05). Smad7, MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein levels were significantly decreased and the TGF-β1 protein level was significantly increased in infected EVT (all P < 0.05). Conclusions: HCMV may act on multiple steps of the TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway to impede EVT proliferation and invasion. PMID:26770317

  10. Human cytomegalovirus decreases constitutive transcription of MHC class II genes in mature Langerhans cells by reducing CIITA transcript levels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Andrew W.; Wang, Nan; Hornell, Tara M.C.; Harding, James J.; Deshpande, Chetan; Hertel, Laura; Lacaille, Vashti; Pashine, Achal; Macaubas, Claudia; Mocarski, Edward S.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) productively infects CD34+ progenitor-derived, mature Langerhans-type dendritic cells (matLC) and reduces surface expression of MHC class II complexes (MHC II) by increasing intracellular retention of these molecules. To determine whether HCMV also inhibits MHC II expression by other mechanisms, we assessed mRNA levels of the class II transcriptional regulator, CIITA, and several of its target genes in infected matLC. Levels of CIITA, HLA-DRA (DRA) and DRB transcripts, and new DR protein synthesis were compared in mock-infected and HCMV-infected cells by quantitative PCR and pulse-chase immunoprecipitation analyses, respectively. CIITA mRNA levels were significantly lower in HCMV-infected matLC as compared to mock-infected cells. When assessed in the presence of Actinomycin D, the stability of CIITA transcripts was not diminished by HCMV. Analysis of promoter-specific CIITA isoforms revealed that types I, III and IV all were decreased by HCMV, a result that differs from changes after incubation of these cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure to UV-inactivated virus failed to reduce CIITA mRNA levels, implicating de novo viral gene expression in this effect. HCMV-infected matLC also expressed lower levels of DR transcripts and reduced DR protein synthesis rates compared to mock-infected matLC. In summary, we demonstrate that HCMV infection of a human dendritic cell subset inhibits constitutive CIITA expression, most likely at the transcriptional level, resulting in reduced MHC II biosynthesis. We suggest this represents a new mechanism of modulation of mature LC by HCMV. PMID:21458073

  11. Follicular helper T-cells and virus-specific antibody response in primary and reactivated human cytomegalovirus infections of the immunocompetent and immunocompromised transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Francesca; Fornara, Chiara; Zelini, Paola; Furione, Milena; Carrara, Elena; Scaramuzzi, Lucia; Cane, Ilaria; Mele, Federico; Sallusto, Federica; Lilleri, Daniele; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) primary infection in immunocompetent (n=40) and immunocompromised transplant patients (n=20) revealed that the median peak antibody titre neutralizing infection of epithelial cells was 16-fold higher in immunocompromised patients. The mechanism of this finding was investigated by measuring: (i) HCMV DNAemia; (ii) HCMV neutralizing antibodies; (iii) ELISA IgG antibody titre to HCMV glycoprotein complexes gHgLpUL128L, gHgLgO and gB; and (iv) HCMV-specific (IFN-γ+) CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Circulating CXCR5+ CD4+ (memory T follicular helper - TFH-cells) were identified as activated TFH (ICOS+PD-1++CCR7lo) and quiescent cells. In the early stages of primary infection, activated TFH cells increased in number. Concomitantly, both neutralizing and IgG antibodies to HCMV glycoproteins reached a peak, followed by a plateau. A stop in antibody rise occurred upon appearance of HCMV-specific CD4+ T-cells, HCMV clearance and progressive reduction in activated TFH cells. The main differences between healthy and transplant patients were that the latter had a delayed DNA peak, a much higher DNA load and delayed activated TFH cells and antibody peaks. Similar events were observed in clinically severe HCMV reactivations of transplant patients. A preliminary analysis of the specificity of the activated TFH cell response to viral proteins showed a major response to the pentamer gHgLpUL128L and gB. In conclusion, in the absence of T-cell immunity, one of the first lines of defence, during primary infection, is conferred by antibodies produced through the interaction of TFH cells and B-cells of germinal centres, resulting in differentiation of B-cells into antibody producing plasma cells.

  12. Analysis of human cytomegalovirus replication in primary cultured human corneal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hosogai, Mayumi; Shima, Nobuyuki; Nakatani, Yoko; Inoue, Teruki; Iso, Tatsuya; Yokoo, Hideaki; Yorifuji, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Hideo; Kishi, Shoji; Isomura, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Background/aims Since the first case of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-induced corneal endotheliitis in which HCMV DNA was detected from the patient's aqueous humour using PCR, the clinical evidence for HCMV endotheliitis has been accumulating. However, it remains to be confirmed whether HCMV can efficiently replicate in corneal endothelial cells. We, therefore, sought to determine whether primary cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) could support HCMV replication. Methods Human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) have been shown to be fully permissive for HCMV replication, and are commonly used as an in vitro model for HCMV lytic replication. Therefore, primary cultured HCECs or HFFs were infected with the vascular endotheliotropic HCMV strain TB40/E or laboratory strain Towne. We then compared viral mRNA and protein expression, genome replication and growth between the TB40/E-infected and Towne-infected HCECs and HFFs. Results When HCECs were infected with TB40/E or Towne, rounded cells resembling owl's eyes as well as viral antigens were detected. Viral mRNA synthesis and protein expression proceeded efficiently in the HCECs and HFFs infected with TB40/E or Towne at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI). Similarly, the viral genome was also effectively replicated, with UL44—a viral DNA polymerase processivity factor—foci observed in the nuclei of HCECs. HCECs produced a substantial number of infectious virions after infection with TB40/E at both a high and low MOI. Conclusions Primary cultured HCECs could efficiently support HCMV replication after infection at both a high and low MOI. PMID:26261231

  13. Human cytomegalovirus and human umbilical vein endothelial cells: restriction of primary isolation to blood samples and susceptibilities of clinical isolates from other sources to adaptation.

    PubMed

    Gerna, Giuseppe; Percivalle, Elena; Sarasini, Antonella; Revello, M Grazia

    2002-01-01

    In immunocompromised patients with disseminated infection, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is widespread in the microvascular endothelium of multiple organs. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used in parallel to human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELF) to recover HCMV from blood samples of immunocompromised patients. Using the shell vial technique, comparable median numbers of p72-positive HUVEC and HELF cells were found with the 26 HCMV-positive buffy coat samples out of 150 examined. Analysis of other clinical samples inoculated as controls revealed, in the presence of highly infected HELF monolayers, either the presence of very few infected HUVEC with urine specimens (n = 10 samples) or the lack of infected HUVEC with throat washes (n = 3) or amniotic fluid samples (n = 2). Thus, peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) appear essential for primary isolation of HCMV in HUVEC. In this respect, HCMV strains, recovered from clinical samples other than buffy coats in HELF only, could be readily adapted to growth in HUVEC by coculturing PBL from healthy blood donors with infected HELF and then inoculating infected PBL onto HUVEC. Recently elucidated mechanisms of interaction of leukocytes and HUVEC with bidirectional transfer of virus seem to provide the basis for the restriction of HCMV primary isolation in HUVEC to blood samples. However, virus strains recovered from only HELF could be adapted to growth in HUVEC when inoculated with HELF-derived (either cell-associated or cell-free) HCMV strains upon primary isolation. In conclusion, due to the in vitro selection of virus variants provided with both PBL tropism and HUVEC tropism, HCMV recovery in HUVEC is PBL mediated and substantially restricted to blood samples. Lack of HCMV recovery in HUVEC from clinical samples other than blood leads to the assumption that epithelial cells, such as urinary, amniotic, or pharyngeal cells, do not possess adequate adhesion molecules to establish close contacts with HUVEC.

  14. Infection and upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines in human brain vascular pericytes by human cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections can result in CNS abnormalities in newborn babies including vision loss, mental retardation, motor deficits, seizures, and hearing loss. Brain pericytes play an essential role in the development and function of the blood–brain barrier yet their unique role in HCMV dissemination and neuropathlogy has not been reported. Methods Primary human brain vascular pericytes were exposed to a primary clinical isolate of HCMV designated ‘SBCMV’. Infectivity was analyzed by microscopy, immunofluorescence, Western blot, and qRT-PCR. Microarrays were performed to identify proinflammatory cytokines upregulated after SBCMV exposure, and the results validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methodology. In situ cytokine expression of pericytes after exposure to HCMV was examined by ELISA and in vivo evidence of HCMV infection of brain pericytes was shown by dual-labeled immunohistochemistry. Results HCMV-infected human brain vascular pericytes as evidenced by several markers. Using a clinical isolate of HCMV (SBCMV), microscopy of infected pericytes showed virion production and typical cytomegalic cytopathology. This finding was confirmed by the expression of major immediate early and late virion proteins and by the presence of HCMV mRNA. Brain pericytes were fully permissive for CMV lytic replication after 72 to 96 hours in culture compared to human astrocytes or human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC). However, temporal transcriptional expression of pp65 virion protein after SBCMV infection was lower than that seen with the HCMV Towne laboratory strain. Using RT-PCR and dual-labeled immunofluorescence, proinflammatory cytokines CXCL8/IL-8, CXCL11/ITAC, and CCL5/Rantes were upregulated in SBCMV-infected cells, as were tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Pericytes exposed to SBCMV elicited higher levels of IL-6

  15. Human Cytomegalovirus Promotes Survival of Infected Monocytes via a Distinct Temporal Regulation of Cellular Bcl-2 Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Collins-McMillen, Donna; Kim, Jung Heon; Nogalski, Maciej T.; Stevenson, Emily V.; Caskey, Joshua R.; Cieply, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocytes play a key role in the hematogenous dissemination of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) to target organ systems. To infect monocytes and reprogram them to deliver infectious virus, HCMV must overcome biological obstacles, including the short life span of monocytes and their antiviral proapoptotic response to infection. We have shown that virally induced upregulation of cellular Mcl-1 promotes early survival of HCMV-infected monocytes, allowing cells to overcome an early apoptotic checkpoint at around 48 h postinfection (hpi). Here, we demonstrate an HCMV-dependent shift from Mcl-1 as the primary antiapoptotic player to the related protein, Bcl-2, later during infection. Bcl-2 was upregulated in HCMV-infected monocytes beginning at 48 hpi. Treatment with the Bcl-2 antagonist ABT-199 only reduced the prosurvival effects of HCMV in target monocytes beginning at 48 hpi, suggesting that Mcl-1 controls survival prior to 48 hpi, while Bcl-2 promotes survival after 48 hpi. Although Bcl-2 was upregulated following viral binding/signaling through cellular integrins (compared to Mcl-1, which is upregulated through binding/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR]), it functioned similarly to Mcl-1, adopting the early role of Mcl-1 in preventing caspase-3 cleavage/activation. This distinct, HCMV-induced shift from Mcl-1 to Bcl-2 occurs in response to a cellular upregulation of proapoptotic Bax, as small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of Bax reduced the upregulation of Bcl-2 in infected monocytes and rescued the cells from the apoptotic effects of Bcl-2 inhibition. Our data demonstrate a distinct survival strategy whereby HCMV induces a biphasic regulation of cellular Bcl-2 proteins to promote host cell survival, leading to viral dissemination and the establishment of persistent HCMV infection. IMPORTANCE Hematogenous dissemination of HCMV via infected monocytes is a crucial component of the viral survival strategy and is required for the

  16. Human Cytomegalovirus Stimulates the Synthesis of Select Akt-Dependent Antiapoptotic Proteins during Viral Entry To Promote Survival of Infected Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Peppenelli, Megan A.; Arend, Kyle C.; Cojohari, Olesea; Moorman, Nathaniel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Primary peripheral blood monocytes are responsible for the hematogenous dissemination of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) following a primary infection. To facilitate viral spread, we have previously shown HCMV to extend the short 48-h life span of monocytes. Mechanistically, HCMV upregulated two specific cellular antiapoptotic proteins, myeloid leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1) and heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), to block the two proteolytic cleavages necessary for the formation of fully active caspase 3 and the subsequent initiation of apoptosis. We now show that HCMV more robustly upregulated Mcl-1 than normal myeloid growth factors and that Mcl-1 was the only myeloid survival factor to rapidly induce HSP27 prior to the 48-h cell fate checkpoint. We determined that HCMV glycoproteins gB and gH signal through the cellular epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and αvβ3 integrin, respectively, during viral entry in order to drive the increase of Mcl-1 and HSP27 in an Akt-dependent manner. Although Akt is known to regulate protein stability and transcription, we found that gB- and gH-initiated signaling preferentially and cooperatively stimulated the synthesis of Mcl-1 and HSP27 through mTOR-mediated translation. Overall, these data suggest that the unique signaling network generated during the viral entry process stimulates the upregulation of select antiapoptotic proteins allowing for the differentiation of short-lived monocytes into long-lived macrophages, a key step in the viral dissemination strategy. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is endemic within the human population. Although primary infection is generally asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals, HCMV is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the immunocompromised. The multiorgan inflammatory diseases associated with symptomatic HCMV infection are a direct consequence of the monocyte-mediated systemic spread of the virus. In order for peripheral blood monocytes to

  17. Viral affects on metabolism: changes in glucose and glutamine utilization during human cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yongjun; Clippinger, Amy J.; Alwine, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection causes dramatic alterations of intermediary metabolism, similar to those found in tumor cells. In infected cells, glucose carbon is not completely broken down by the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle for energy; instead it is used biosynthetically. This process requires increased glucose uptake, increased glycolysis and the diversion of glucose carbon, in the form of citrate, from the TCA cycle for use in HCMV-induced fatty acid biosynthesis. The diversion of citrate from the TCA cycle (cataplerosis) requires induction of enzymes to promote glutaminolysis, the conversion of glutamine to -ketoglutarate in order to maintain the TCA cycle (anaplerosis) and ATP production. Such changes could result in heretofore uncharacterized pathogenesis, potentially implicating HCMV as a subtle co-factor in many maladies, including oncogenesis. Recognition of the effects of HCMV, and other viruses, on host cell metabolism will provide new understanding of viral pathogenesis and novel avenues for antiviral therapy. PMID:21570293

  18. Use of recombination-mediated genetic engineering for construction of rescue human cytomegalovirus bacterial artificial chromosome clones.

    PubMed

    Dulal, Kalpana; Silver, Benjamin; Zhu, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology has contributed immensely to manipulation of larger genomes in many organisms including large DNA viruses like human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The HCMV BAC clone propagated and maintained inside E. coli allows for accurate recombinant virus generation. Using this system, we have generated a panel of HCMV deletion mutants and their rescue clones. In this paper, we describe the construction of HCMV BAC mutants using a homologous recombination system. A gene capture method, or gap repair cloning, to seize large fragments of DNA from the virus BAC in order to generate rescue viruses, is described in detail. Construction of rescue clones using gap repair cloning is highly efficient and provides a novel use of the homologous recombination-based method in E. coli for molecular cloning, known colloquially as recombineering, when rescuing large BAC deletions. This method of excising large fragments of DNA provides important prospects for in vitro homologous recombination for genetic cloning.

  19. Diverse immune evasion strategies by human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Vanessa; Redmann, Veronika; Gardner, Thomas; Tortorella, Domenico

    2012-12-01

    Members of the Herpesviridae family have the capacity to undergo both lytic and latent infection to establish a lifelong relationship with their host. Following primary infection, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can persist as a subclinical, recurrent infection for the lifetime of an individual. This quiescent portion of its life cycle is termed latency and is associated with periodic bouts of reactivation during times of immunosuppression, inflammation, or stress. In order to exist indefinitely and establish infection, HCMV encodes a multitude of immune modulatory mechanisms devoted to escaping the host antiviral response. HCMV has become a paradigm for studies of viral immune evasion of antigen presentation by both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules. By restricting the presentation of viral antigens during both productive and latent infection, HCMV limits elimination by the human immune system. This review will focus on understanding how the virus manipulates the pathways of antigen presentation in order to modulate the host response to infection.

  20. A Neutralizing Anti-gH/gL Monoclonal Antibody Is Protective in the Guinea Pig Model of Congenital CMV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Marcy R.; Yan, Donghong; Vij, Rajesh; Hongo, Jo-Anne; Nakamura, Gerald; Vernes, Jean-Michel; Meng, Y. Gloria; Lein, Samantha; Chan, Pamela; Ross, Jed; Carano, Richard; Deng, Rong; Lewin-Koh, Nicholas; Xu, Min; Feierbach, Becket

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common cause of congenital virus infection. Congenital HCMV infection occurs in 0.2–1% of all births, and causes birth defects and developmental abnormalities, including sensorineural hearing loss and developmental delay. Several key studies have established the guinea pig as a tractable model for the study of congenital HCMV infection and have shown that polyclonal antibodies can be protective [1]–[3]. In this study, we demonstrate that an anti-guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) glycoprotein H/glycoprotein L neutralizing monoclonal antibody protects against fetal infection and loss in the guinea pig. Furthermore, we have delineated the kinetics of GPCMV congenital infection, from maternal infection (salivary glands, seroconversion, placenta) to fetal infection (fetus and amniotic fluid). Our studies support the hypothesis that a neutralizing monoclonal antibody targeting an envelope GPCMV glycoprotein can protect the fetus from infection and may shed light on the therapeutic intervention of HCMV congenital infection in humans. PMID:24722349

  1. Use of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine labelling and flow cytometry to study cell cycle-dependent regulation of human cytomegalovirus gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wiebusch, Lüder; Hagemeier, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The cell cycle position at the time of infection has a profound influence on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene expression and therefore needs consideration in the design and control of HCMV experiments. While G0/G1 cells support the immediate onset of viral transcription, cells progressing through the S and G2 cell cycle phases prevent HCMV from entering the lytic replication cycle. Here, we provide two fast and reliable protocols that allow one to determine the cell cycle distribution of the designated host cells and monitor viral protein expression as a function of the cell cycle state. Both protocols make use of the thymidine analogue 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine and "click" chemistry to label HCMV-non-permissive S phase cells in a gentle and sensitive way.

  2. Alteration of lipid metabolism in cells infected with human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Veronica; Dong, Jennifer J

    2010-08-15

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) envelope contains 12 virus-encoded glycoproteins and glycoprotein complexes but the lipid composition of the envelope has not been clearly defined. Given the specificity of the interactions between integral membrane proteins and lipids, it is likely that the lipid content of the virion envelope is regulated during infection. In an effort to determine the effects of HCMV infection on lipid metabolism, we have used PCR array technology to investigate how infection affects the expression of genes involved in lipoprotein signaling and cholesterol homeostasis pathways. Our results indicate that HCMV infection leads to down-regulation of the ABCA1 transporter. Decreased levels of ABCA1 appear to be the result of enhanced calpain-mediated cleavage in virus-infected cells. In addition, our data also show that HCMV infection inhibits the development of the foam cell phenotype in conditionally permissive THP-1 derived macrophages

  3. Human cytomegalovirus latent infection alters the expression of cellular and viral microRNA.

    PubMed

    Fu, Miao; Gao, Yan; Zhou, Qiuju; Zhang, Qi; Peng, Ying; Tian, Kegang; Wang, Jinhua; Zheng, Xiaoqun

    2014-02-25

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in regulating gene expression of plants, animals and viruses. Comprehensive characterization of host and viral miRNA will help uncover the molecular mechanisms that underlie the progression of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latent infection. To investigate the miRNA expression profile of HCMV and host cells during latent infection, we performed deep-sequencing analysis of the small RNAs isolated from HCMV-infected and mock-infected human monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1. We established a HCMV latent infection cell model using the THP-1 cells. High-throughput sequencing technology was used to sequence small RNA libraries of the HCMV-infected and mock-infected THP-1 and to investigate their small RNA transcriptomes. We found eight miRNAs including miR-US25-1, miR-US25-2-5p and miR-UL112 that were expressed by HCMV during latent infection. The expressions of the host miRNAs were also affected by HCMV latent infection. At least 49 cellular miRNAs were differentially expressed: 39 were up-regulated and 10 were down-regulated upon HCMV latent infection. The expression of the human miRNA hsa-miR-124-3p was significantly up-regulated in the HCMV latent infection library. In addition, we found 14 cellular novel miRNAs in the HCMV-infected and mock-infected THP-1 libraries. Functional annotation of the target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs suggested that the majority of the genes are involved in melanogenesis, pathways in cancer, endocytosis and wnt signaling pathway. The small RNA transcriptomes obtained in this study demonstrate the usefulness of the deep-sequencing combined with bioinformatics approach in understanding of the expression and function of host and viral small RNAs in HCMV latent infection. This approach can also be applied to the study of other kinds of viruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Low levels of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection in Glioblastoma multiforme associates with patient survival; -a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represent the most aggressive brain tumor with a median overall survival of about 12-15 months. Over 90% of GBM tumors have recently been shown to be infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). In this case-control study, we evaluated whether there was an association between the grade of HCMV infection and long-term survival (> 18 months) in GBM patients. Material and methods Brain tumor tissue sections from consecutive GBMs patients who survived more than 18 months (n = 40), and an equal number of GBM patients, matched to date of diagnosis and surgery, operated at Karolinska University Hospital in 2000-2005 were selected. HCMV infection grade was determined by estimation of the number of HCMV positive cells (scored negative or grade 1-4) in tumor tissue specimens. Using Chi-Square test and logistic regression analysis, we analyzed whether there was an association between long-term survival and HCMV low-grade infection or other clinical parameters known to be associated with prolonged survival of GBM patients; age under 50 years, radical surgery or low recursive partition analysis (RPA) subclass. Results HCMV infection was detected in tumor samples from 79 of 80 patients (99%). Among patients surviving > 18 months, HCMV infection grade 1 in the GBM tumor was predominant. A low grade HCMV infection was found in 19 patients, of these 16 survived > 18 months. Thus, 16 of 40 (40%) GBM patients who lived > 18 months had low-grade HCMV infection while only 3 of 40 (8%) GBM patients who lived < 18 months did (p .0006, Chi-Square test). Multiple logistic regression analyses yielded an odds ratio estimate of 6.604 with 95% confidence interval (1.36-32.1) (p .019) for low grade HCMV after adjustment for RPA class III and IV, radical surgery, age and gamma knife treatment. Conclusion In conclusion, we found that low-grade HCMV infection was strongly associated with long-term survival in GBM patients. PMID:22424569

  5. Human Cytomegalovirus Infant Infection Adversely Affects Growth and Development in Maternally HIV-Exposed and Unexposed Infants in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Larke, N.; Sanz-Ramos, M.; Bates, M.; Musonda, K.; Manno, D.; Siame, J.; Monze, M.; Filteau, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) coinfections have been shown to increase infant morbidity, mortality, and AIDS progression. In HIV-endemic regions, maternal HIV-exposed but HIV-uninfected infants, which is the majority of children affected by HIV, also show poor growth and increased morbidity. Although nutrition has been examined, the effects of HCMV infection have not been evaluated. We studied the effects of HCMV infection on the growth, development, and health of maternally HIV-exposed and unexposed infants in Zambia. Methods. Infants were examined in a cohort recruited to a trial of micronutrient-fortified complementary foods. HIV-infected mothers and infants had received perinatal antiretroviral therapy to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission. Growth, development, and morbidity were analyzed by linear regression analyses in relation to maternal HIV exposure and HCMV infection, as screened by sera DNA for viremia at 6 months of age and by antibody for infection at 18 months. Results. All HCMV-seropositive infants had decreased length-for-age by 18 months compared with seronegative infants (standard deviation [z]-score difference: −0.44 [95% confidence interval {CI}, −.72 to −.17]; P = .002). In HIV-exposed infants, those who were HCMV positive compared with those who were negative, also had reduced head size (mean z-score difference: −0.72 [95% CI, −1.23 to −.22]; P = .01) and lower psychomotor development (Bayley test score difference: −4.1 [95% CI, −7.8 to −.5]; P = .03). HIV-exposed, HCMV-viremic infants were more commonly referred for hospital treatment than HCMV-negative infants. The effects of HCMV were unaffected by micronutrient fortification. Conclusion. HCMV affects child growth, development, and morbidity of African infants, particularly in those maternally exposed to HIV. HCMV is therefore a risk factor for child health in this region. PMID:22247303

  6. Human Cytomegalovirus Vaccine Based on the Envelope gH/gL Pentamer Complex

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Joy; Campo, John; Johnson, Erica; Flechsig, Christin; Newell, Maegan; Tran, Elaine; Ortiz, Jose; La Rosa, Corinna; Herrmann, Andreas; Longmate, Jeff; Chakraborty, Rana; Barry, Peter A.; Diamond, Don J.

    2014-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) utilizes two different pathways for host cell entry. HCMV entry into fibroblasts requires glycoproteins gB and gH/gL, whereas HCMV entry into epithelial and endothelial cells (EC) requires an additional complex composed of gH, gL, UL128, UL130, and UL131A, referred to as the gH/gL-pentamer complex (gH/gL-PC). While there are no established correlates of protection against HCMV, antibodies are thought to be important in controlling infection. Neutralizing antibodies (NAb) that prevent gH/gL-PC mediated entry into EC are candidates to be assessed for in vivo protective function. However, these potent NAb are predominantly directed against conformational epitopes derived from the assembled gH/gL-PC. To address these concerns, we constructed Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) viruses co-expressing all five gH/gL-PC subunits (MVA-gH/gL-PC), subsets of gH/gL-PC subunits (gH/gL or UL128/UL130/UL131A), or the gB subunit from HCMV strain TB40/E. We provide evidence for cell surface expression and assembly of complexes expressing full-length gH or gB, or their secretion when the corresponding transmembrane domains are deleted. Mice or rhesus macaques (RM) were vaccinated three times with MVA recombinants and serum NAb titers that prevented 50% infection of human EC or fibroblasts by HCMV TB40/E were determined. NAb responses induced by MVA-gH/gL-PC blocked HCMV infection of EC with potencies that were two orders of magnitude greater than those induced by MVA expressing gH/gL, UL128-UL131A, or gB. In addition, MVA-gH/gL-PC induced NAb responses that were durable and efficacious to prevent HCMV infection of Hofbauer macrophages, a fetal-derived cell localized within the placenta. NAb were also detectable in saliva of vaccinated RM and reached serum peak levels comparable to NAb titers found in HCMV hyperimmune globulins. This vaccine based on a translational poxvirus platform co-delivers all five HCMV gH/gL-PC subunits to achieve robust humoral

  7. Association between human cytomegalovirus and onset of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hong-Yan; Yang, Dai-Qun; Li, Yu-Xin; Wang, Li-Quan; Zheng, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the association between human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and epilepsy. Methods: Epilepsy patients (n = 112) in neurology clinic of our hospital during January 2012 and December 2014 were allocated to the case groups, including intractable epilepsy group (n = 96) and non-intractable epilepsy group (n = 16). Healthy individual (n = 120) who received physical examination during the same period were allocated to the control group. The expression of serum HCMV late gene pp67-RNA was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expressions of serum HCMV immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin M (IgM) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serum hypersensitive c-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was detected by latex-enhanced immunoturbidimetry. The electroencephalogram (EEG) of refractory epilepsy group, non-refractory epilepsy group and control group were recorded. Results: The expression of pp67-mRNA was significantly higher in intractable epilepsy group than non-intractable epilepsy group (P < 0.05) and control group (P < 0.001). The HCMV-IgG positive rate and HCMV-IgM positive rate were significantly higher in intractable epilepsy group than control group (both P < 0.001). The HCMV-IgM positive rate was significantly higher in intractable epilepsy group than non-intractable epilepsy group (P < 0.001). The HCMV-IgM positive rate was significantly higher in non-intractable epilepsy group than control group (P < 0.001). The hs-CRP and IL-6 levels presented descending trends respectively in intractable epilepsy group, non-intractable epilepsy group and control group (all P < 0.001). Conclusion: HCMV was prominently expressed in epilepsy and might contribute to the development of epilepsy. PMID:26884973

  8. Insertion of core CpG island element into human CMV promoter for enhancing recombinant protein expression stability in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Mariati; Yeo, Jessna H M; Koh, Esther Y C; Ho, Steven C L; Yang, Yuansheng

    2014-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus promoter (hCMV) is susceptible to gene silencing in CHO cells, most likely due to epigenetic events, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications. The core CpG island element (IE) from the hamster adenine phosphoribosyltransferase gene has been shown to prevent DNA methylation. A set of modified hCMV promoters was developed by inserting one or two copies of IE in either forward or reverse orientations either upstream of the hCMV enhancer, between the enhancer and core promoter (CP), or downstream of the CP. The modified hCMV with one copy of IE inserted between the enhancer and core promoter in reverse orientation (MR1) was most effective at enhancing expression stability without compromising expression level when compared with the wild-type (WT) hCMV. A third of 18 EGFP expressing clones generated using MR1 retained 70% of their starting expression level after 8 weeks of culture in the absence of selection pressure, while none of 18 WT hCMV generated clones had expression above 50%. MR1 also improved antibody expression stability of methotrexate (MTX) amplified CHO cell lines. Stably transfected pools generated using MR1 maintained 62% of their original monoclonal antibody titer after 8 weeks of culture in the absence of MTX, compared to only 37% for WT hCMV pools. Low levels of CpG methylation within both WT hCMV and MR1 were observed in all the analyzed cell lines and the methylation levels did not correlate to the expression stability, suggesting IE enhances expression stability by other mechanisms other than preventing methylation. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  9. Limited Effector Memory B-Cell Response to Envelope Glycoprotein B During Primary Human Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Dauby, Nicolas; Sartori, Delphine; Kummert, Caroline; Lecomte, Sandra; Haelterman, Edwige; Delforge, Marie-Luce; Donner, Catherine; Mach, Michael; Marchant, Arnaud

    2016-05-15

    Following primary human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, the production of antibodies against envelope glycoprotein B (gB) is delayed, compared with production of antibodies against tegument proteins, and this likely reduces the control of HCMV dissemination. The frequency and the phenotype of gB-specific and tegument protein-specific B cells were studied in a cohort of pregnant women with primary HCMV infection. Healthy adults who had chronic HCMV infection or were recently immunized with tetanus toxoid (TT) were included as controls. Primary HCMV infection was associated with high and similar frequencies of gB-specific and tegument protein-specific B cells following primary HCMV infection. During primary infection, tegument protein-specific B cells expressed an activated (CD21(low)) memory B-cell (MBC) phenotype. Activated MBCs were also induced by TT booster immunization, indicating that the expansion of this subset is part of the physiological B-cell response to protein antigens. In contrast, gB-specific B cells had a predominant classical (CD21(+)) MBC phenotype during both primary and chronic infections. The delayed production of gB-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) during primary HCMV infection is associated with a limited induction of MBCs with effector potential. This novel mechanism by which HCMV may interfere with the production of neutralizing antibodies could represent a target for therapeutic immunization. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. RhoB is a component of the human cytomegalovirus assembly complex and is required for efficient viral production

    PubMed Central

    Goulidaki, Nektaria; Alarifi, Saud; Alkahtani, Saad H; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Stournaras, Christos; Sourvinos, George

    2015-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV), an ubiquitous β-herpesvirus, is a significant pathogen that causes medically severe diseases in immunocompromised individuals and in congenitally infected neonates. RhoB belongs to the family of Rho GTPases, which regulates diverse cellular processes. Rho proteins are implicated in the entry and egress from the host cell of mainly α- and γ-herpesviruses, whereas β-herpesviruses are the least studied in this regard. Here, we studied the role of RhoB GTPase during HCMV lytic infection. Microscopy analysis, both in fixed and live infected cells showed that RhoB was translocated to the assembly complex/compartment (AC) of HCMV, a cytoplasmic zone in infected cells where many viral structural proteins are known to accumulate and assembly of new virions takes place. Furthermore, RhoB was localized at the AC even when the expression of the late HCMV AC proteins was inhibited. At the very late stages of infection, cellular projections were formed containing RhoB and HCMV virions, potentially contributing to the successful viral spread. Interestingly, the knockdown of RhoB in HCMV-infected cells resulted in a significant reduction of the virus titer and could also affect the accumulation of AC viral proteins at this subcellular compartment. RhoB knockdown also affected actin fibers' structure. Actin reorganization was observed at late stages of infection originating from the viral AC and surrounding the cellular projections, implying a potential interplay between RhoB and actin during HCMV assembly and egress. In conclusion, our results demonstrate for the first time that RhoB is a constituent of the viral AC and is required for HCMV productive infection. PMID:26114383

  11. TLR9 -1486T/C and 2848C/T SNPs Are Associated with Human Cytomegalovirus Infection in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Paradowska, Edyta; Jabłońska, Agnieszka; Studzińska, Mirosława; Skowrońska, Katarzyna; Suski, Patrycja; Wiśniewska-Ligier, Małgorzata; Woźniakowska-Gęsicka, Teresa; Nowakowska, Dorota; Gaj, Zuzanna; Wilczyński, Jan; Leśnikowski, Zbigniew J.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes non-methylated viral CpG-containing DNA and serves as a pattern recognition receptor that signals the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Here, we present the genotype distribution of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the TLR9 gene in infants and the relationship between TLR9 polymorphisms and HCMV infection. Four polymorphisms (-1237T/C, rs5743836; -1486T/C, rs187084; 1174G/A, rs352139; and 2848C/T, rs352140) in the TLR9 gene were genotyped in 72 infants with symptomatic HCMV infection and 70 healthy individuals. SNP genotyping was performed by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Digested fragments were separated and identified by capillary electrophoresis. The HCMV DNA copy number was measured by a quantitative real-time PCR assay. We found an increased frequency of heterozygous genotypes TLR9 -1486T/C and 2848C/T in infants with HCMV infection compared with uninfected cases. Heterozygous variants of these two SNPs increased the risk of HCMV disease in children (P = 0.044 and P = 0.029, respectively). In infants with a mutation present in at least one allele of -1486T/C and 2848C/T SNPs, a trend towards increased risk of cytomegaly was confirmed after Bonferroni’s correction for multiple testing (Pc = 0.063). The rs352139 GG genotype showed a significantly reduced relative risk for HCMV infection (Pc = 0.006). In contrast, the -1237T/C SNP was not related to viral infection. We found no evidence for linkage disequilibrium with the four examined TLR9 SNPs. The findings suggest that the TLR9 -1486T/C and 2848C/T polymorphisms could be a genetic risk factor for the development of HCMV disease. PMID:27105145

  12. Comparative magnitude and kinetics of human cytomegalovirus-specific CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T-cell responses in pregnant women with primary versus remote infection and in transmitting versus non-transmitting mothers: Its utility for dating primary infection in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Fornara, Chiara; Furione, Milena; Arossa, Alessia; Gerna, Giuseppe; Lilleri, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    To discriminate between primary (PI) and remote (RI) human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, several immunological parameters were monitored for a 2-year period in 53 pregnant women with PI, and 33 pregnant women experiencing HCMV PI at least 5 years prior. Cytokine (IFN-γ and IL-2) production by and phenotype (effector/memory CD45RA(+)) of HCMV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells as well as the lymphoproliferative responses (LPR) were evaluated, with special reference to the comparison between a group of women transmitting (T) and a group of non-transmitting (NT) the infection to fetus. While HCMV-specific CD4(+) T-cells reached at 90 days post-infection (p.i.) values comparable to RI, CD8(+) T-cells reached at 60 days p.i. levels significantly higher and persisting throughout the entire follow-up. Instead, IL-2 production and lymphoproliferative responses were lower in PI than RI for the entire follow-up period. Effector memory CD45RA(+) CD4(+) and CD8(+) HCMV-specific T-cells increased until 90 days p.i., reaching and maintaining levels higher than RI. The comparison between T and NT women showed that, at 30 days p.i., in NT women there was a significantly higher IL-2 production by HCMV-specific CD4(+) T-cells, and at 60 days p.i. a significantly higher frequency of both specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) CD45RA(+) T-cells. HCMV T-cell response appears to correlate with virus transmission to fetus and some parameters (CD4(+) lymphoproliferation, and frequency of HCMV-specific CD8(+) IL2(+) T-cells) may help in dating PI during pregnancy.

  13. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner.

    PubMed

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins.

  14. Neutralizing and ELISA IgG antibodies to human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein complexes may help date the onset of primary infection in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lilleri, D; Gerna, G; Furione, M; Zavattoni, M; Spinillo, A

    2016-08-01

    Definition of onset for primary human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection during pregnancy is critical for several reasons, including diagnosis of pre-conceptional infections and definition of gestational age at the time of infection. To determine the onset of primary HCMV infection, differential kinetics of antibodies neutralizing infection of epithelial and fibroblast cells, as well as ELISA IgG antibodies to HCMV glycoprotein complexes (gC) gH/gL/pUL128L, gH/gL/gO, and gB were exploited and compared with conventional assays. In a series of 40 pregnant women with primary HCMV infection and ascertained HCMV-related mild clinical symptoms, the kinetics of different types of neutralizing and ELISA IgG antibodies were investigated with the aim of establishing criteria for dating the onset of primary infection in pregnant women without clinical symptoms. IgG antibodies to gB and gH/gL/pUL128L, as well as antibodies neutralizing infection of epithelial cells appeared early after infection onset (within 2-3 weeks) and increased rapidly, whereas antibodies to gH/gL/gO and antibodies neutralizing infection of fibroblasts appeared later (>30 days) and increased slowly. Both the conventional diagnostic assays (IgG, and IgM antibody, and IgG avidity index) and the novel assays for determination of antibody responses directed against HCMV gC allowed the definition of an algorithm indicating the onset of primary HCMV infection in asymptomatic women within a period of 1-2 months. New neutralization and ELISA IgG assays to HCMV gC provide additional tools for dating the onset of primary infection in pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Antenatal screening for Toxoplasma gondii, Cytomegalovirus, rubella and Treponema pallidum infections in northern Benin.

    PubMed

    De Paschale, Massimo; Ceriani, Cristina; Cerulli, Teresa; Cagnin, Debora; Cavallari, Serena; Cianflone, Annalisa; Diombo, Kouma; Ndayaké, Joseph; Aouanou, Guy; Zaongo, Dieudonné; Priuli, Gianbattista; Viganò, Paolo; Clerici, Pierangelo

    2014-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and rubella virus infections are among the most serious of those contracted during pregnancy in terms of foetal consequences. Toxoplasma, HCMV and rubella antibody screening is unusual in Africa, and there are few published data. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of these markers among pregnant women in northern Benin on the occasion of routine syphilis screening. Toxoplasma, HCMV and rubella IgG and IgM antibodies were determined in the serum of 283 women attending Saint Jean de Dieu de Tanguiéta hospital, using an enzyme immunoassay, and IgM were confirmed using an enzyme-linked fluorescent assay (ELFA). In the case of IgM positivity, the avidity of anti-HCMV and anti-Toxoplasma IgG was measured. Total anti-Treponema pallidum antibodies were determined using an enzyme immunoassay and confirmed by immunoblotting. In the case of positivity, the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test was used. The prevalence of anti-Toxoplasma, anti-HCMV, anti-rubella IgG and total anti-Treponema antibodies was, respectively, 30.0%, 100%, 94% and 2.5%. The VDRL test was positive in 62.5% of the anti-Treponema-positive samples. The prevalence of anti-Toxoplasma, anti-HCMV and anti-rubella IgM was, respectively, 0.4%, 1.4% and 0%. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of age class or trimester of pregnancy. Anti-Toxoplasma and anti-HCMV IgG avidity was always high. The prevalence of HCMV and rubella antibodies is high in northern Benin, whereas that of Toxoplasma antibodies is lower. As nearly two-thirds of the pregnant women were anti-Toxoplasma seronegative, antibody screening should be introduced. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Detection of human cytomegalovirus in normal and neoplastic breast epithelium

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) establishes a persistent life-long infection, and can cause severe pathology in the fetus and the immunocompromised host[1]. Breast milk is the primary route of transmission in humans worldwide, and breast epithelium is thus a likely site of persistent infection and/or reactivation, though this phenomenon has not previously been demonstrated. Increasing evidence indicates HCMV infection can modulate signaling pathways associated with oncogenesis. We hypothesized that persistent HCMV infection occurs in normal adult breast epithelium and that persistent viral expression might be associated with normal and neoplastic ductal epithelium. Methods Surgical biopsy specimens of normal breast (n = 38) breast carcinoma (n = 39) and paired normal breast from breast cancer patients (n = 21) were obtained. Specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, PCR and DNA sequencing for evidence of HCMV antigens and nucleic acids. Results We detected HCMV expression specifically in glandular epithelium in 17/27 (63%) of normal adult breast cases evaluated. In contrast, HCMV expression was evident in the neoplastic epithelium of 31/32 (97%) patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) cases evaluated (p = 0.0009). Conclusions These findings are the first to demonstrate that persistent HCMV infection occurs in breast epithelium in a significant percentage of normal adult females. HCMV expression was also evident in neoplastic breast epithelium in a high percentage of normal and neoplastic breast tissues obtained from breast cancer patients, raising the possibility that viral infection may be involved in the neoplastic process. PMID:21429243

  17. High-Resolution Profiling and Analysis of Viral and Host Small RNAs during Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Thomas J.; Arnold, Justin D.; Spector, Deborah H.

    2012-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) contributes its own set of microRNAs (miRNAs) during lytic infection of cells, likely fine-tuning conditions important for viral replication. To enhance our understanding of this component of the HCMV-host transcriptome, we have conducted deep-sequencing analysis of small RNAs (smRNA-seq) from infected human fibroblast cells. We found that HCMV-encoded miRNAs accumulate to ∼20% of the total smRNA population at late stages of infection, and our analysis led to improvements in viral miRNA annotations and identification of two novel HCMV miRNAs, miR-US22 and miR-US33as. Both of these miRNAs were capable of functionally repressing synthetic targets in transient transfection experiments. Additionally, through cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) of Argonaute (Ago)-bound RNAs from infected cells, followed by high-throughput sequencing, we have obtained direct evidence for incorporation of all HCMV miRNAs into the endogenous host silencing machinery. Surprisingly, three HCMV miRNA precursors exhibited differential incorporation of their mature miRNA arms between Ago2 and Ago1 complexes. Host miRNA abundances were also affected by HCMV infection, with significant upregulation observed for an miRNA cluster containing miR-96, miR-182, and miR-183. In addition to miRNAs, we also identified novel forms of virus-derived smRNAs, revealing greater complexity within the smRNA population during HCMV infection. PMID:22013051

  18. The Human Cytomegalovirus UL51 Protein Is Essential for Viral Genome Cleavage-Packaging and Interacts with the Terminase Subunits pUL56 and pUL89

    PubMed Central

    Borst, Eva Maria; Kleine-Albers, Jennifer; Gabaev, Ildar; Babić, Marina; Wagner, Karen; Binz, Anne; Degenhardt, Inga; Kalesse, Markus; Jonjić, Stipan; Bauerfeind, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    Cleavage of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genomes as well as their packaging into capsids is an enzymatic process mediated by viral proteins and therefore a promising target for antiviral therapy. The HCMV proteins pUL56 and pUL89 form the terminase and play a central role in cleavage-packaging, but several additional viral proteins, including pUL51, had been suggested to contribute to this process, although they remain largely uncharacterized. To study the function of pUL51 in infected cells, we constructed HCMV mutants encoding epitope-tagged versions of pUL51 and used a conditionally replicating virus (HCMV-UL51-ddFKBP), in which pUL51 levels could be regulated by a synthetic ligand. In cells infected with HCMV-UL51-ddFKBP, viral DNA replication was not affected when pUL51 was knocked down. However, no unit-length genomes and no DNA-filled C capsids were found, indicating that cleavage of concatemeric HCMV DNA and genome packaging into capsids did not occur in the absence of pUL51. pUL51 was expressed mainly with late kinetics and was targeted to nuclear replication compartments, where it colocalized with pUL56 and pUL89. Upon pUL51 knockdown, pUL56 and pUL89 were no longer detectable in replication compartments, suggesting that pUL51 is needed for their correct subnuclear localization. Moreover, pUL51 was found in a complex with the terminase subunits pUL56 and pUL89. Our data provide evidence that pUL51 is crucial for HCMV genome cleavage-packaging and may represent a third component of the viral terminase complex. Interference with the interactions between the terminase subunits by antiviral drugs could be a strategy to disrupt the HCMV replication cycle. PMID:23175377

  19. Modeling of Human Cytomegalovirus Maternal-Fetal Transmission in a Novel Decidual Organ Culture ▿

    PubMed Central

    Weisblum, Yiska; Panet, Amos; Zakay-Rones, Zichria; Haimov-Kochman, Ronit; Goldman-Wohl, Debra; Ariel, Ilana; Falk, Haya; Natanson-Yaron, Shira; Goldberg, Miri D.; Gilad, Ronit; Lurain, Nell S.; Greenfield, Caryn; Yagel, Simcha; Wolf, Dana G.

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the leading cause of congenital infection, associated with severe birth defects and intrauterine growth retardation. The mechanism of HCMV transmission via the maternal-fetal interface is largely unknown, and there are no animal models for HCMV. The initial stages of infection are believed to occur in the maternal decidua. Here we employed a novel decidual organ culture, using both clinically derived and laboratory-derived viral strains, for the ex vivo modeling of HCMV transmission in the maternal-fetal interface. Viral spread in the tissue was demonstrated by the progression of infected-cell foci, with a 1.3- to 2-log increase in HCMV DNA and RNA levels between days 2 and 9 postinfection, the expression of immediate-early and late proteins, the appearance of typical histopathological features of natural infection, and dose-dependent inhibition of infection by ganciclovir and acyclovir. HCMV infected a wide range of cells in the decidua, including invasive cytotrophoblasts, macrophages, and endothelial, decidual, and dendritic cells. Cell-to-cell viral spread was revealed by focal extension of infected-cell clusters, inability to recover infectious extracellular virus, and high relative proportions (88 to 93%) of cell-associated viral DNA. Intriguingly, neutralizing HCMV hyperimmune globulins exhibited inhibitory activity against viral spread in the decidua even when added at 24 h postinfection—providing a mechanistic basis for their clinical use in prenatal prevention. The ex vivo-infected decidual cultures offer unique insight into patterns of viral tropism and spread, defining initial stages of congenital HCMV transmission, and can facilitate evaluation of the effects of new antiviral interventions within the maternal-fetal interface milieu. PMID:21976654

  20. cGAS Senses Human Cytomegalovirus and Induces Type I Interferon Responses in Human Monocyte-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paijo, Jennifer; Döring, Marius; Spanier, Julia; Grabski, Elena; Nooruzzaman, Mohammed; Schmidt, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Messerle, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Kaever, Volkhard; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of healthy individuals are mostly unnoticed and result in viral latency. However, HCMV can also cause devastating disease, e.g., upon reactivation in immunocompromised patients. Yet, little is known about human immune cell sensing of DNA-encoded HCMV. Recent studies indicated that during viral infection the cyclic GMP/AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA and catalyzes formation of the cyclic di-nucleotide cGAMP, which triggers stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and thus induces antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) responses. We found that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) as well as monocyte-derived DC and macrophages constitutively expressed cGAS and STING. HCMV infection further induced cGAS, whereas STING expression was only moderately affected. Although pDC expressed particularly high levels of cGAS, and the cGAS/STING axis was functional down-stream of STING, as indicated by IFN-I induction upon synthetic cGAMP treatment, pDC were not susceptible to HCMV infection and mounted IFN-I responses in a TLR9-dependent manner. Conversely, HCMV infected monocyte-derived cells synthesized abundant cGAMP levels that preceded IFN-I production and that correlated with the extent of infection. CRISPR/Cas9- or siRNA-mediated cGAS ablation in monocytic THP-1 cells and primary monocyte-derived cells, respectively, impeded induction of IFN-I responses following HCMV infection. Thus, cGAS is a key sensor of HCMV for IFN-I induction in primary human monocyte-derived DC and macrophages. PMID:27058035

  1. MVA vaccine encoding CMV antigens safely induces durable expansion of CMV-specific T cells in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Corinna; Longmate, Jeff; Martinez, Joy; Zhou, Qiao; Kaltcheva, Teodora I; Tsai, Weimin; Drake, Jennifer; Carroll, Mary; Wussow, Felix; Chiuppesi, Flavia; Hardwick, Nicola; Dadwal, Sanjeet; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Zaia, John A; Diamond, Don J

    2017-01-05

    Attenuated poxvirus modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) is a useful viral-based vaccine for clinical investigation, because of its excellent safety profile and property of inducing potent immune responses against recombinant (r) antigens. We developed Triplex by constructing an rMVA encoding 3 immunodominant cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigens, which stimulates a host antiviral response: UL83 (pp65), UL123 (IE1-exon4), and UL122 (IE2-exon5). We completed the first clinical evaluation of the Triplex vaccine in 24 healthy adults, with or without immunity to CMV and vaccinia virus (previous DryVax smallpox vaccination). Three escalating dose levels (DL) were administered IM in 8 subjects/DL, with an identical booster injection 28 days later and 1-year follow-up. Vaccinations at all DL were safe with no dose-limiting toxicities. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were documented. Local and systemic reactogenicity was transient and self-limiting. Robust, functional, and durable Triplex-driven expansions of CMV-specific T cells were detected by measuring T-cell surface levels of 4-1BB (CD137), binding to CMV-specific HLA multimers, and interferon-γ production. Marked and durable CMV-specific T-cell responses were also detected in Triplex-vaccinated CMV-seronegatives, and in DryVax-vaccinated subjects. Long-lived memory effector phenotype, associated with viral control during CMV primary infection, was predominantly found on the membrane of CMV-specific and functional T cells, whereas off-target vaccine responses activating memory T cells from the related herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus remained undetectable. Combined safety and immunogenicity results of MVA in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients and Triplex in healthy adults motivated the initiation of a placebo-controlled multicenter trial of Triplex in HCT patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT02506933. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. Correlation between different genotypes of human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus and peri-implant tissue status.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, S; Aleksic, Z; Dimitrijevic, B; Lekovic, V; Milinkovic, I; Kenney, B

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of different genotypes of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in peri-implantitis and mucositis sites, and to evaluate the correlation between herpesvirus presence and clinical parameters. A total of 80 dental implants (mean time of loading, 4.16 ± 1.8 years) were evaluated during the course of the study (30 peri-implantitis, 25 mucositis and 25 healthy peri-implant sites). The following clinical parameters were assessed: visible plaque index, bleeding on probing, suppuration and probing depth. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to identify the presence of different HCMV and EBV genotypes in peri-implant tissue plaque samples. HCMV-2 was detected in 53.3% and EBV-1 in 46.6% of the 30 peri-implantitis sites evaluated. By contrast, HCMV-2 was not detected in healthy periodontal sites and EBV-1 was detected in one healthy site. A statistically significant correlation was found between the presence of HCMV-2 and EBV-1 genotypes and clinical parameters of peri-implantitis. The results from the present study confirmed the high prevalence of HCMV-2 and EBV-1 in the peri-implant tissue plaque of peri-implantitis sites and suggests a possible active pathogenic role of the viruses in peri-implantitis. © 2011 Australian Dental Association.

  3. Prevalence of human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus in subgingival plaque at peri-implantitis, mucositis and healthy sites. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, S; Aleksic, Z; Dimitrijevic, B; Lekovic, V; Camargo, P; Kenney, B

    2011-03-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in peri-implantitis and mucositis sites and the correlation between herpesvirus and clinical parameters. Fifty-six dental implants (mean time of loading, 4.27±1.6 years) were evaluated (20 peri-implantitis, 18 mucositis, 18 healthy peri-implant sites.) The clinical parameters assessed were: visible plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP), suppuration (SUP), probing depth (PD). A polymerase chain reaction assay identified HCMV and EBV in subgingival plaque samples. The percent of sites with plaque and BOP was significantly higher around mucositis and peri-implantitis compared with healthy implants (p<0.05). The mean PD around the implants was significantly higher in peri-implantitis, followed by mucositis and healthy implants (p<0.05). HCMV was detected in 13 (65%) and EBV in 9 (45%) of the 20 peri-implantitis sites. HCMV was found in 1 of the 18 (6%) healthy periodontal sites and EBV in 2 (11%). A statistically significant correlation was found between presence of HCMV and EBV subgingivally and clinical parameters of peri-implantitis and healthy sites. These results confirm the high prevalence of HCMV and EBV in subgingival plaque of peri-implantitis sites and suggest the viruses have a possible active pathogenic role in peri-implantitis. Copyright © 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  4. Failure to detect an association between aggressive periodontitis and the prevalence of herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Stein, Jamal M; Said Yekta, Sareh; Kleines, Michael; Ok, Dilara; Kasaj, Adrian; Reichert, Stefan; Schulz, Susanne; Scheithauer, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) have been suspected to play a causal role in periodontitis pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of these viruses in subgingival plaque samples of Caucasian patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis compared to periodontally healthy controls. A total of 65 patients with aggressive periodontitis and 65 unmatched controls from Germany were investigated in the study. Subgingival plaque samples were analysed for the presence of HSV-1, EBV and HCMV by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. Viral antibody titres were determined quantitatively by immunosorbent assays. DNA of HSV-1 and HCMV were detected in 1.5% of the patients and controls, whereas EBV DNA was present in 10.8% and 13.9% respectively. Detection rates of serum IgG against HSV-1 (76.1% versus 73.9%), EBV (98.5% versus 96.9%), HCMV (47.7% versus 46.2%) and IgM levels against HSV-1 (6.2% versus 1.5%), EBV (0% versus 0%), HCMV (0% versus 1.5%) did not significantly differ between patients and controls. The data of our study do not suggest any contribution of HSV-1, EBV or HCMV to aggressive periodontitis in a German population. Ethnic and methodological aspects might have caused conflicting results of previous studies. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Development and optimization of a sensitive TaqMan® real-time PCR with synthetic homologous extrinsic control for quantitation of Human cytomegalovirus viral load.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Svetoslav Nanev; Otaguiri, Katia Kaori; de Figueiredo, Glauciane Garcia; Yamamoto, Aparecida Yulie; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa Marcia; Kashima, Simone; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2016-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (Human herpesvirus 5, HCMV) causes frequent asymptomatic infections in the general population. However, in immunosuppressed patients or congenitally infected infants, HCMV is related to high morbidity and mortality. In such cases, a rapid viral detection is crucial for monitoring the clinical outcome and the antiviral treatment. In this study, we optimized a sensitive biplex TaqMan® real-time PCR for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of a partial HCMV UL97 sequence and homologous extrinsic control (HEC) in the same tube. HEC was represented by a plasmid containing a modified HCMV sequence retaining the original primer binding sites, while the probe sequence was substituted by a phylogenetically divergent one (chloroplast CF0 subunit plant gene). It was estimated that the optimal HEC concentration, which did not influence the HCMV amplification is 1,000 copies/reaction. The optimized TaqMan® PCR demonstrated high analytical sensitivity (6.97 copies/reaction, CI = 95%) and specificity (100%). Moreover, the reaction showed adequate precision (repeatability, CV = 0.03; reproducibility, CV = 0.0027) and robustness (no carry-over or cross-contamination). The diagnostic sensitivity (100%) and specificity (97.8%) were adequate for the clinical application of the molecular platform. The optimized TaqMan® real-time PCR is suitable for HCMV detection and quantitation in predisposed patients and monitoring of the applied antiviral therapy. J. Med. Virol. 88:1604-1612, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Human Cytomegalovirus Encoded Homologs of Cytokines, Chemokines and their Receptors: Roles in Immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    McSharry, Brian P.; Avdic, Selmir; Slobedman, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), the largest human herpesvirus, infects a majority of the world’s population. Like all herpesviruses, following primary productive infection, HCMV establishes a life-long latent infection, from which it can reactivate years later to produce new, infectious virus. Despite the presence of a massive and sustained anti-HCMV immune response, productively infected individuals can shed virus for extended periods of time, and once latent infection is established, it is never cleared from the host. It has been proposed that HCMV must therefore encode functions which help to evade immune mediated clearance during productive virus replication and latency. Molecular mimicry is a strategy used by many viruses to subvert and regulate anti-viral immunity and HCMV has hijacked/developed a range of functions that imitate host encoded immunomodulatory proteins. This review will focus on the HCMV encoded homologs of cellular cytokines/chemokines and their receptors, with an emphasis on how these virus encoded homologs may facilitate viral evasion of immune clearance. PMID:23202490

  7. Genetic variation in Micro-RNA genes of host genome affects clinical manifestation of symptomatic Human Cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Misra, Maneesh Kumar; Mishra, Aditi; Pandey, Shashi Kant; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sharma, Raj Kumar; Agrawal, Suraksha

    2015-10-01

    Micro-RNAs are implicated in various physiological and pathologic processes. In this study, we tested whether Micro-RNA gene variants of host-genome affect clinical manifestation of symptomatic HCMV infection. HCMV infection was detected by fluorescent PCR and immuno-histochemistry. The detection of genetic variants of four studied Micro-RNA tag-SNPs was done through PCR-RFLP assay and validated with DNA sequencing. We observed an increased risk ranged from 3-folds to 5-folds among symptomatic HCMV cases for mutant genotype of rs2910164 (crude OR=3.11, p=0.009 and adjusted OR=3.25, p=0.007), rs11614913 (crude OR=3.20, p=0.006 and adjusted OR=3.48, p=0.004) and rs3746444 (crude OR=4.91, p=0.002 and adjusted OR=5.28, p=0.002) tag-SNPs. Interestingly, all the tag-SNPs that were significant after multiple comparisons at a FDR of 5% in symptomatic HCMV cases remained significant even after bootstrap analysis, providing internal validation to these results. Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR) analysis revealed 5-folds increased risk for symptomatic HCMV cases under the four-factor model (rs2910164, rs2292832, rs11614913 and rs3746444). These results suggest that Micro-RNA gene variants of host-genome may affect clinical manifestation of symptomatic HCMV infection. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Controversies in the natural history of congenital human cytomegalovirus infection: the paradox of infection and disease in offspring of women with immunity prior to pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Britt, William

    2015-06-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common virus infection in the developing fetus. A fraction of infants infected in utero develop significant life-threatening and organ-threatening disease with over 90% of infected infants exhibiting no clinical evidence of infection in the newborn period. However, about 10% of all infected infants will develop long-term sequelae. Early studies stressed the importance of primary maternal HCMV infection during pregnancy as a critical determinant of intrauterine transmission and outcome. This concept serves as the foundation for the development of prophylactic vaccines and biologics such as HCMV immune globulins. More recently, studies in maternal populations with high HCMV seroprevalence have challenged the concept of protective maternal immunity. Findings from multiple studies suggest that preexisting maternal HCMV immunity provides at best, partial protection from disease in the infected offspring and similarly may have limited impact on intrauterine transmission. This brief review will provide some considerations about the apparent paradox of maternal HCMV immunity and congenital infection.

  9. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells are fully permissive for human cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Guan-Hua; Zhao, Fei; Cheng, Shuang; Luo, Min-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is a leading infectious cause of birth defects. Previous studies have reported birth defects with multiple organ maldevelopment in congenital HCMV-infected neonates. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a group of stem/progenitor cells that are multi-potent and can self-renew, and they play a vital role in multi-organ formation. Whether MSCs are susceptible to HCMV infection is unclear. In this study, MSCs were isolated from Wharton's jelly of the human umbilical cord and identified by their plastic adherence, surface marker pattern, and differentiation capacity. Then, the MSCs were infected with the HCMV Towne strain, and infection status was assessed via determination of viral entry, replication initiation, viral protein expression, and infectious virion release using western blotting, immunofluorescence assays, and plaque forming assays. The results indicate that the isolated MSCs were fully permissive for HCMV infection and provide a preliminary basis for understanding the pathogenesis of HCMV infection in non-nervous system diseases, including multi-organ malformation during fetal development.

  10. Human cytomegalovirus replicates in gamma-irradiated fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Shanley, J.D.

    1986-12-01

    Because of the unique interdependence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and the physiological state of the host cell, we evaluated the ability of human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF), exposed to gamma radiation, to support HCMV growth. Irradiation of HFF with 2,500 rADS prevented cellular proliferation and suppressed cellular DNA, but not RNA or protein synthesis. Treatment of HFF cells with 2,500 rADS 6 or 48 hours prior to infection did not alter the time course or virus yield during HCMV replication. Virus plaquing efficiency in irradiated cells was comparable to that of nonirradiated cells. As judged by thymidine incorporation and BUdR inhibition of virus replication, HCMV infection induced both thymidine kinase activity and host cell DNA synthesis in irradiated cells. In addition, virus could be recovered from HFF exposed to radiation 0-2 days after infection with HCMV. These studies indicate that the damage to cells by gamma irradiation does not alter the capacity of host cells to support HCMV replication.

  11. Activation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity by a Recombinant Human Cytomegalovirus Strain Expressing an NKG2D Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Tomić, Adriana; Varanasi, Pavankumar R.; Golemac, Mijo; Malić, Suzana; Riese, Peggy; Borst, Eva M.; Guzmán, Carlos A.; Krmpotić, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Development of an effective vaccine against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a need of utmost medical importance. Generally, it is believed that a live attenuated vaccine would best provide protective immunity against this tenacious pathogen. Here, we propose a strategy for an HCMV vaccine that aims at the simultaneous activation of innate and adaptive immune responses. An HCMV strain expressing the host ligand ULBP2 for the NKG2D receptor was found to be susceptible to control by natural killer (NK) cells, and preserved the ability to stimulate HCMV-specific T cells. Infection with the ULBP2-expressing HCMV strain caused diminished cell surface levels of MHC class I molecules. While expression of the NKG2D ligand increased the cytolytic activity of NK cells, NKG2D engagement in CD8+ T cells provided co-stimulation and compensated for lower MHC class I expression. Altogether, our data indicate that triggering of both arms of the immune system is a promising approach applicable to the generation of a live attenuated HCMV vaccine. PMID:27907183

  12. Sequence and transcription analysis of the human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzarides, T.; Bankier, A.T.; Satchwell, S.C.; Weston, K.; Tomlinson, P.; Barrell, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis has revealed that the gene coding for the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA polymerase is present within the long unique region of the virus genome. Identification is based on extensive amino acid homology between the predicted HCMV open reading frame HFLF2 and the DNA polymerase of herpes simplex virus type 1. The authors present here a 5280 base-pair DNA sequence containing the HCMV pol gene, along with the analysis of transcripts encoded within this region. Since HCMV pol also shows homology to the predicted Epstein-Barr virus pol, they were able to analyze the extent of homology between the DNA polymerases of three distantly related herpes viruses, HCMV, Epstein-Barr virus, and herpes simplex virus. The comparison shows that these DNA polymerases exhibit considerable amino acid homology and highlights a number of highly conserved regions; two such regions show homology to sequences within the adenovirus type 2 DNA polymerase. The HCMV pol gene is flanked by open reading frames with homology to those of other herpes viruses; upstream, there is a reading frame homologous to the glycoprotein B gene of herpes simplex virus type I and Epstein-Barr virus, and downstream there is a reading frame homologous to BFLF2 of Epstein-Barr virus.

  13. Adenovirus E1A/E1B Transformed Amniotic Fluid Cells Support Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Krömmelbein, Natascha; Wiebusch, Lüder; Schiedner, Gudrun; Büscher, Nicole; Sauer, Caroline; Florin, Luise; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Plachter, Bodo

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replicates to high titers in primary human fibroblast cell cultures. A variety of primary human cells and some tumor-derived cell lines do also support permissive HCMV replication, yet at low levels. Cell lines established by transfection of the transforming functions of adenoviruses have been notoriously resistant to HCMV replication and progeny production. Here, we provide first-time evidence that a permanent cell line immortalized by adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B (CAP) is supporting the full HCMV replication cycle and is releasing infectious progeny. The CAP cell line had previously been established from amniotic fluid cells which were likely derived from membranes of the developing fetus. These cells can be grown under serum-free conditions. HCMV efficiently penetrated CAP cells, expressed its immediate-early proteins and dispersed restrictive PML-bodies. Viral DNA replication was initiated and viral progeny became detectable by electron microscopy in CAP cells. Furthermore, infectious virus was released from CAP cells, yet to lower levels compared to fibroblasts. Subviral dense bodies were also secreted from CAP cells. The results show that E1A/E1B expression in transformed cells is not generally repressive to HCMV replication and that CAP cells may be a good substrate for dense body based vaccine production. PMID:26848680

  14. Cytomegalovirus-mediated activation of pyrimidine biosynthesis drives UDP–sugar synthesis to support viral protein glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    DeVito, Stefanie Renee; Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Munger, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) induces numerous changes to the host metabolic network that are critical for high-titer viral replication. We find that HCMV infection substantially induces de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic flux. This activation is important for HCMV replication because inhibition of pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes substantially decreases the production of infectious virus, which can be rescued through medium supplementation with pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates. Metabolomic analysis revealed that pyrimidine biosynthetic inhibition considerably reduces the levels of various UDP–sugar metabolites in HCMV-infected, but not mock-infected, cells. Further, UDP–sugar biosynthesis, which provides the sugar substrates required for glycosylation reactions, was found to be induced during HCMV infection. Pyrimidine biosynthetic inhibition also attenuated the glycosylation of the envelope glycoprotein B (gB). Both glycosylation of gB and viral growth were restored by medium supplementation with either UDP–sugar metabolites or pyrimidine precursors. These results indicate that HCMV drives de novo-synthesized pyrimidines to UDP–sugar biosynthesis to support virion protein glycosylation. The importance of this link between pyrimidine biosynthesis and UDP–sugars appears to be partially shared among diverse virus families, because UDP–sugar metabolites rescued the growth attenuation associated with pyrimidine biosynthetic inhibition during influenza A and vesicular stomatitis virus infection, but not murine hepatitis virus infection. In total, our results indicate that viruses can specifically modulate pyrimidine metabolic flux to provide the glycosyl subunits required for protein glycosylation and production of high titers of infectious progeny. PMID:25472841

  15. Cytomegalovirus-mediated activation of pyrimidine biosynthesis drives UDP-sugar synthesis to support viral protein glycosylation.

    PubMed

    DeVito, Stefanie Renee; Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Munger, Joshua

    2014-12-16

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) induces numerous changes to the host metabolic network that are critical for high-titer viral replication. We find that HCMV infection substantially induces de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic flux. This activation is important for HCMV replication because inhibition of pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes substantially decreases the production of infectious virus, which can be rescued through medium supplementation with pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates. Metabolomic analysis revealed that pyrimidine biosynthetic inhibition considerably reduces the levels of various UDP-sugar metabolites in HCMV-infected, but not mock-infected, cells. Further, UDP-sugar biosynthesis, which provides the sugar substrates required for glycosylation reactions, was found to be induced during HCMV infection. Pyrimidine biosynthetic inhibition also attenuated the glycosylation of the envelope glycoprotein B (gB). Both glycosylation of gB and viral growth were restored by medium supplementation with either UDP-sugar metabolites or pyrimidine precursors. These results indicate that HCMV drives de novo-synthesized pyrimidines to UDP-sugar biosynthesis to support virion protein glycosylation. The importance of this link between pyrimidine biosynthesis and UDP-sugars appears to be partially shared among diverse virus families, because UDP-sugar metabolites rescued the growth attenuation associated with pyrimidine biosynthetic inhibition during influenza A and vesicular stomatitis virus infection, but not murine hepatitis virus infection. In total, our results indicate that viruses can specifically modulate pyrimidine metabolic flux to provide the glycosyl subunits required for protein glycosylation and production of high titers of infectious progeny.

  16. Recombinant human monoclonal antibodies to human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B neutralize virus in a complement-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Akane; Fujita, Ayano; Murayama, Tsugiya; Iba, Yoshitaka; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Asano, Yoshizo

    2009-11-01

    Human antibodies specific for HCMV are currently considered as potential anti-HCMV therapeutic agents. In this study, we used a combinatorial human antibody library to isolate and characterize complete human monoclonal antibodies that effectively neutralize HCMV in a complement-dependent manner. One hundred and six clones were isolated in two independent screens using HCMV virions and recombinant glycoprotein B, gB654, as antigens. All of the clones recognized the same molecule gB and were classified into 14 groups based on the amino acid sequence of the V(H) region. Seven representative clones from these 14 groups had a strong gB654 binding affinity by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). A pairwise binding competition analysis suggested that there were three groups based on differences in the gB recognition sites. Although Fab fragments of the seven groups showed strong affinity for gB, none of the Fab fragments neutralized HCMV infectivity in vitro. In contrast, complete human IgG(1) antibodies of at least three groups neutralized HCMV in a complement-dependent manner. These data suggest that potent therapeutic antibodies can be obtained from a human antibody library, including most of the functional antibodies that mediate humoral immunity to the selected pathogen.

  17. A collaborative study to establish the 1st WHO International Standard for human cytomegalovirus for nucleic acid amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Jacqueline F; Heath, Alan B; Minor, Philip D

    2016-07-01

    Variability in the performance of nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT)-based assays presents a significant problem in the diagnosis and management of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. Here we describe a collaborative study to evaluate the suitability of candidate reference materials to harmonize HCMV viral load measurements in a wide range of NAT assays. Candidate materials comprised lyophilized Merlin virus, liquid Merlin virus, liquid AD169 virus, and purified HCMV Merlin DNA cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome. Variability in the laboratory mean HCMV concentrations determined for virus samples across the different assays was 2 log10. Variability for the purified DNA sample was higher (>3 log10). The agreement between laboratories was markedly improved when the potencies of the liquid virus samples were expressed relative to the lyophilized virus candidate. In contrast, the agreement between laboratories for the purified DNA sample was not improved. Results indicated the suitability of the lyophilized Merlin virus preparation as the 1st WHO International Standard for HCMV for NAT. It was established in October 2010, with an assigned potency of 5 × 10(6) International Units (IU) (NIBSC code 09/162). It is intended to be used to calibrate secondary references, used in HCMV NAT assays, in IU.

  18. Seroprevalence of Cytomegalovirus Infection Among a Rural Population of Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Anoh, Augustin Etile; Mossoun, Arsène; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Pauly, Maude; Leendertz, Siv-Aina; Kouakou N'goran, Eliezer; Schubert, Grit; Weiss, Sabrina; Hofmann, Jörg; Leendertz, Fabian H; Ehlers, Bernhard

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a betaherpesvirus that can be pathogenic to humans. In particular, immunocompromised patients can develop life-threatening symptoms. In the present study, HCMV seroprevalence was investigated in a rural population of Western Côte d'Ivoire. Plasma samples collected from 166 apparently healthy subjects living in 8 villages surrounding the Taï Forest National Park were tested for anti-HCMV immunoglobulin G and M antibody with two commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Prevalence of anti-HCMV IgG and IgM antibody was 100% and 5.4%, respectively. Anti-HCMV IgM positive was 10.2% (5/49) of the children and adolescents and 3.4% (4/117) of the adults. This observed decrease of IgM seropositivity and the seroprevalence difference between males and females (3.8% vs. 6.1%) was not statistically significant. In plasma of one IgM-positive participant, a low CMV load was detected indicating low-level replication. A second IgM-positive participant showed signs of local CMV replication. The other seven IgM-positive plasma samples likely reacted nonspecifically or due to polyclonal stimulation. Taken together, the results indicate that HCMV infection is hyperendemic in Côte d'Ivoire.

  19. Partial deletion in the JK locus causing a Jk(null) phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lucien, Nicole; Chiaroni, Jacques; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Bailly, Pascal

    2002-02-01

    A new alteration of the blood group JK*A allele was identified in a Jk(null) patient from Tunisia with an allo-anti-Jk3 in her serum. Southern blot and exon mapping analyses revealed an internal deletion within the Kidd (JK) locus encompassing exons 4 and 5. Sequence analysis of the Jk transcript showed that exons 4 and 5 were missing but were replaced by a 136-base-pair (bp) intron 3 sequence located 315 bp and 179 bp upstream from exon 4. This sequence is flanked by typical donor-acceptor cryptic splice sites used in the mutant but not in the normal JK gene. Because the translation initiation codon is located in exon 4, the Jk protein is not produced.

  20. High-Throughput Small Interfering RNA Screening Identifies Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Class II Alpha as Important for Production of Human Cytomegalovirus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Polachek, William S.; Moshrif, Hanan F.; Franti, Michael; Coen, Donald M.; Sreenu, Vattipally B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-throughput small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening is a useful methodology to identify cellular factors required for virus replication. Here we utilized a high-throughput siRNA screen based on detection of a viral antigen by microscopy to interrogate cellular protein kinases and phosphatases for their importance during human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication and identified the class II phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class II alpha (PI3K-C2A) as being involved in HCMV replication. Confirming this observation, infected cells treated with either pooled or individual siRNAs targeting PI3K-C2A mRNA produced approximately 10-fold less infectious virus than the controls. Western blotting and quantitative PCR analysis of infected cells treated with siRNAs indicated that depletion of PI3K-C2A slightly reduced the accumulation of late but not immediate early or early viral antigens and had no appreciable effect on viral DNA synthesis. Analysis of siRNA-treated cells by electron microscopy and Western blotting indicated that PI3K-C2A was not required for the production of viral capsids but did lead to increased numbers of enveloped capsids in the cytoplasm that had undergone secondary envelopment and a reduction in the amount of viral particles exiting the cell. Therefore, PI3K-C2A is a factor important for HCMV replication and has a role in the production of HCMV virions. IMPORTANCE There is limited information about the cellular factors required for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication. Therefore, to identify proteins involved in HCMV replication, we developed a methodology to conduct a high-throughput siRNA screen of HCMV-infected cells. From our screening data, we focused our studies on the top hit from our screen, the lipid kinase phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class II alpha (PI3K-C2A), as its role in HCMV replication was unknown. Interestingly, we found that PI3K-C2A is important for the production of HCMV virions and is involved in virion production

  1. Human cytomegalovirus infection interferes with the maintenance and differentiation of trophoblast progenitor cells of the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Takako; Petitt, Matthew; Zydek, Martin; Fang-Hoover, June; Larocque, Nicholas; Tsuge, Mitsuru; Gormley, Matthew; Kauvar, Lawrence M; Pereira, Lenore

    2015-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major cause of birth defects that include severe neurological deficits, hearing and vision loss, and intrauterine growth restriction. Viral infection of the placenta leads to development of avascular villi, edema, and hypoxia associated with symptomatic congenital infection. Studies of primary cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) revealed that HCMV infection impedes terminal stages of differentiation and invasion by various molecular mechanisms. We recently discovered that HCMV arrests earlier stages involving development of human trophoblast progenitor cells (TBPCs), which give rise to the mature cell types of chorionic villi-syncytiotrophoblasts on the surfaces of floating villi and invasive CTBs that remodel the uterine vasculature. Here, we show that viral proteins are present in TBPCs of the chorion in cases of symptomatic congenital infection. In vitro studies revealed that HCMV replicates in continuously self-renewing TBPC lines derived from the chorion and alters expression and subcellular localization of proteins required for cell cycle progression, pluripotency, and early differentiation. In addition, treatment with a human monoclonal antibody to HCMV glycoprotein B rescues differentiation capacity, and thus, TBPCs have potential utility for evaluation of the efficacies of novel antiviral antibodies in protecting and restoring placental development. Our results suggest that HCMV replicates in TBPCs in the chorion in vivo, interfering with the earliest steps in the growth of new villi, contributing to virus transmission and impairing compensatory development. In cases of congenital infection, reduced responsiveness of the placenta to hypoxia limits the transport of substances from maternal blood and contributes to fetal growth restriction. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a leading cause of birth defects in the United States. Congenital infection can result in permanent neurological defects, mental retardation, hearing loss, visual

  2. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Interferes with the Maintenance and Differentiation of Trophoblast Progenitor Cells of the Human Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Takako; Petitt, Matthew; Zydek, Martin; Fang-Hoover, June; Larocque, Nicholas; Tsuge, Mitsuru; Gormley, Matthew; Kauvar, Lawrence M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major cause of birth defects that include severe neurological deficits, hearing and vision loss, and intrauterine growth restriction. Viral infection of the placenta leads to development of avascular villi, edema, and hypoxia associated with symptomatic congenital infection. Studies of primary cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) revealed that HCMV infection impedes terminal stages of differentiation and invasion by various molecular mechanisms. We recently discovered that HCMV arrests earlier stages involving development of human trophoblast progenitor cells (TBPCs), which give rise to the mature cell types of chorionic villi—syncytiotrophoblasts on the surfaces of floating villi and invasive CTBs that remodel the uterine vasculature. Here, we show that viral proteins are present in TBPCs of the chorion in cases of symptomatic congenital infection. In vitro studies revealed that HCMV replicates in continuously self-renewing TBPC lines derived from the chorion and alters expression and subcellular localization of proteins required for cell cycle progression, pluripotency, and early differentiation. In addition, treatment with a human monoclonal antibody to HCMV glycoprotein B rescues differentiation capacity, and thus, TBPCs have potential utility for evaluation of the efficacies of novel antiviral antibodies in protecting and restoring placental development. Our results suggest that HCMV replicates in TBPCs in the chorion in vivo, interfering with the earliest steps in the growth of new villi, contributing to virus transmission and impairing compensatory development. In cases of congenital infection, reduced responsiveness of the placenta to hypoxia limits the transport of substances from maternal blood and contributes to fetal growth restriction. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a leading cause of birth defects in the United States. Congenital infection can result in permanent neurological defects, mental retardation

  3. Association of TLR3 L412F Polymorphism with Cytomegalovirus Infection in Children.

    PubMed

    Studzińska, Mirosława; Jabłońska, Agnieszka; Wiśniewska-Ligier, Małgorzata; Nowakowska, Dorota; Gaj, Zuzanna; Leśnikowski, Zbigniew J; Woźniakowska-Gęsicka, Teresa; Wilczyński, Jan; Paradowska, Edyta

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) recognizes viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and activates antiviral immune responses through the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and inflammatory cytokines. This receptor binds to dsRNA molecules produced during human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication. TLR7 senses viral single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) in endosomes, and it can interact with endogenous RNAs. We determined the genotype distribution of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the TLR3 and TLR7 genes in children with HCMV infection and the relationship between TLR polymorphisms and viral infection. We genotyped 59 children with symptomatic HCMV infection and 78 healthy individuals for SNPs in the TLR3 (rs3775290, c.1377C>T, F459F; rs3775291, c.1234C>T, L412F; rs3775296, c.-7C>A) and TLR7 (rs179008, c.32A>T, Q11L; rs5741880, c.3+1716G>T) genes. SNP genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and capillary electrophoresis. The HCMV DNA load was quantified by real-time PCR. We found an increased frequency of the heterozygous genotype TLR3 L412F in children with HCMV infection compared with uninfected cases. In individuals with a mutation present in at least one allele of the L412F SNP, an increased risk of HCMV disease was found, and this result remained highly significant after Bonferroni's correction for multiple testing (Pc < 0.001). The heterozygous genotype of this SNP was associated with the increased risk of HCMV disease in an adjusted model that included the HCMV DNA copy number in whole blood and urine (P < 0.001 and P = 0.008, respectively). Moreover, those with a heterozygous genotype of rs3775296 showed an increased relative risk of HCMV infection (P = 0.042), but this association did not reach statistical significance after correction for multiple testing. In contrast, the rs3775290 SNP of TLR3 and TLR7 SNPs were not related to viral infection. A moderate linkage disequilibrium

  4. Regulatory Interaction between the Cellular Restriction Factor IFI16 and Viral pp65 (pUL83) Modulates Viral Gene Expression and IFI16 Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pautasso, Sara; von Einem, Jens; Marschall, Manfred; Plachter, Bodo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A key player in the intrinsic resistance against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the interferon-γ-inducible protein 16 (IFI16), which behaves as a viral DNA sensor in the first hours postinfection and as a repressor of viral gene transcription in the later stages. Previous studies on HCMV replication demonstrated that IFI16 binds to the viral protein kinase pUL97, undergoes phosphorylation, and relocalizes to the cytoplasm of infected cells. In this study, we demonstrate that the tegument protein pp65 (pUL83) recruits IFI16 to the promoter of the UL54 gene and downregulates viral replication, as shown by use of the HCMV mutant v65Stop, which lacks pp65 expression. Interestingly, at late time points of HCMV infection, IFI16 is stabilized by its interaction with pp65, which stood in contrast to IFI16 degradation, observed in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1)-infected cells. Moreover, we found that its translocation to the cytoplasm, in addition to pUL97, strictly depends on pp65, as demonstrated with the HCMV mutant RV-VM1, which expresses a form of pp65 unable to translocate into the cytoplasm. Thus, these data reveal a dual role for pp65: during early infection, it modulates IFI16 activity at the promoter of immediate-early and early genes; subsequently, it delocalizes IFI16 from the nucleus into the cytoplasm, thereby stabilizing and protecting it from degradation. Overall, these data identify a novel activity of the pp65/IFI16 interactome involved in the regulation of UL54 gene expression and IFI16 stability during early and late phases of HCMV replication. IMPORTANCE The DNA sensor IFI16, a member of the PYHIN proteins, restricts HCMV replication by impairing viral DNA synthesis. Using a mutant virus lacking the tegument protein pp65 (v65Stop), we demonstrate that pp65 recruits IFI16 to the early UL54 gene promoter. As a putative counteraction to its restriction activity, pp65 supports the nucleocytoplasmic export of IFI16, which was demonstrated with the

  5. Association of TLR3 L412F Polymorphism with Cytomegalovirus Infection in Children

    PubMed Central

    Studzińska, Mirosława; Jabłońska, Agnieszka; Wiśniewska-Ligier, Małgorzata; Nowakowska, Dorota; Gaj, Zuzanna; Leśnikowski, Zbigniew J.; Woźniakowska-Gęsicka, Teresa; Wilczyński, Jan; Paradowska, Edyta

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) recognizes viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and activates antiviral immune responses through the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and inflammatory cytokines. This receptor binds to dsRNA molecules produced during human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication. TLR7 senses viral single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) in endosomes, and it can interact with endogenous RNAs. We determined the genotype distribution of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the TLR3 and TLR7 genes in children with HCMV infection and the relationship between TLR polymorphisms and viral infection. We genotyped 59 children with symptomatic HCMV infection and 78 healthy individuals for SNPs in the TLR3 (rs3775290, c.1377C>T, F459F; rs3775291, c.1234C>T, L412F; rs3775296, c.-7C>A) and TLR7 (rs179008, c.32A>T, Q11L; rs5741880, c.3+1716G>T) genes. SNP genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and capillary electrophoresis. The HCMV DNA load was quantified by real-time PCR. We found an increased frequency of the heterozygous genotype TLR3 L412F in children with HCMV infection compared with uninfected cases. In individuals with a mutation present in at least one allele of the L412F SNP, an increased risk of HCMV disease was found, and this result remained highly significant after Bonferroni’s correction for multiple testing (Pc < 0.001). The heterozygous genotype of this SNP was associated with the increased risk of HCMV disease in an adjusted model that included the HCMV DNA copy number in whole blood and urine (P < 0.001 and P = 0.008, respectively). Moreover, those with a heterozygous genotype of rs3775296 showed an increased relative risk of HCMV infection (P = 0.042), but this association did not reach statistical significance after correction for multiple testing. In contrast, the rs3775290 SNP of TLR3 and TLR7 SNPs were not related to viral infection. A moderate linkage

  6. Vaccine-Derived Neutralizing Antibodies to the Human Cytomegalovirus gH/gL Pentamer Potently Block Primary Cytotrophoblast Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chiuppesi, Flavia; Wussow, Felix; Johnson, Erica; Bian, Chao; Zhuo, Meng; Rajakumar, Augustine; Barry, Peter A.; Britt, William J.; Chakraborty, Rana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) elicits neutralizing antibodies (NAb) of various potencies and cell type specificities to prevent HCMV entry into fibroblasts (FB) and epithelial/endothelial cells (EpC/EnC). NAb targeting the major essential envelope glycoprotein complexes gB and gH/gL inhibit both FB and EpC/EnC entry. In contrast to FB infection, HCMV entry into EpC/EnC is additionally blocked by extremely potent NAb to conformational epitopes of the gH/gL/UL128/130/131A pentamer complex (PC). We recently developed a vaccine concept based on coexpression of all five PC subunits by a single modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vector, termed MVA-PC. Vaccination of mice and rhesus macaques with MVA-PC resulted in a high titer and sustained NAb that blocked EpC/EnC infection and lower-titer NAb that inhibited FB entry. However, antibody function responsible for the neutralizing activity induced by the MVA-PC vaccine is uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that MVA-PC elicits NAb with cell type-specific neutralization potency and antigen recognition pattern similar to human NAb targeting conformational and linear epitopes of the UL128/130/131A subunits or gH. In addition, we show that the vaccine-derived PC-specific NAb are significantly more potent than the anti-gH NAb to prevent HCMV spread in EpC and infection of human placental cytotrophoblasts, cell types thought to be of critical importance for HCMV transmission to the fetus. These findings further validate MVA-PC as a clinical vaccine candidate to elicit NAb that resembles those induced during HCMV infection and provide valuable insights into the potency of PC-specific NAb to interfere with HCMV cell-associated spread and infection of key placental cells. IMPORTANCE As a consequence of the leading role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in causing permanent birth defects, developing a vaccine against HCMV has been assigned a major public health priority. We have recently introduced a vaccine strategy based

  7. Vaccine-Derived Neutralizing Antibodies to the Human Cytomegalovirus gH/gL Pentamer Potently Block Primary Cytotrophoblast Infection.

    PubMed

    Chiuppesi, Flavia; Wussow, Felix; Johnson, Erica; Bian, Chao; Zhuo, Meng; Rajakumar, Augustine; Barry, Peter A; Britt, William J; Chakraborty, Rana; Diamond, Don J

    2015-12-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) elicits neutralizing antibodies (NAb) of various potencies and cell type specificities to prevent HCMV entry into fibroblasts (FB) and epithelial/endothelial cells (EpC/EnC). NAb targeting the major essential envelope glycoprotein complexes gB and gH/gL inhibit both FB and EpC/EnC entry. In contrast to FB infection, HCMV entry into EpC/EnC is additionally blocked by extremely potent NAb to conformational epitopes of the gH/gL/UL128/130/131A pentamer complex (PC). We recently developed a vaccine concept based on coexpression of all five PC subunits by a single modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vector, termed MVA-PC. Vaccination of mice and rhesus macaques with MVA-PC resulted in a high titer and sustained NAb that blocked EpC/EnC infection and lower-titer NAb that inhibited FB entry. However, antibody function responsible for the neutralizing activity induced by the MVA-PC vaccine is uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that MVA-PC elicits NAb with cell type-specific neutralization potency and antigen recognition pattern similar to human NAb targeting conformational and linear epitopes of the UL128/130/131A subunits or gH. In addition, we show that the vaccine-derived PC-specific NAb are significantly more potent than the anti-gH NAb to prevent HCMV spread in EpC and infection of human placental cytotrophoblasts, cell types thought to be of critical importance for HCMV transmission to the fetus. These findings further validate MVA-PC as a clinical vaccine candidate to elicit NAb that resembles those induced during HCMV infection and provide valuable insights into the potency of PC-specific NAb to interfere with HCMV cell-associated spread and infection of key placental cells. As a consequence of the leading role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in causing permanent birth defects, developing a vaccine against HCMV has been assigned a major public health priority. We have recently introduced a vaccine strategy based on a widely used

  8. Human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gO uses PDGFR-α as a key for entry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiquan; Prager, Adrian; Boos, Simone; Resch, Moritz; Brizic, Ilija; Mach, Michael; Wildner, Sabrina; Scrivano, Laura; Adler, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    Herpesvirus gH/gL envelope glycoprotein complexes are key players in virus entry as ligands for host cell receptors and by promoting fusion of viral envelopes with cellular membranes. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has two alternative gH/gL complexes, gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/UL128,130,131A which both shape the HCMV tropism. By studying binding of HCMV particles to fibroblasts, we could for the first time show that virion gH/gL/gO binds to platelet-derived growth factor-α (PDGFR-α) on the surface of fibroblasts and that gH/gL/gO either directly or indirectly recruits gB to this complex. PDGFR-α functions as an entry receptor for HCMV expressing gH/gL/gO, but not for HCMV mutants lacking the gH/gL/gO complex. PDGFR-α-dependent entry is not dependent on activation of PDGFR-α. We could also show that the gH/gL/gO-PDGFR-α interaction starts the predominant entry pathway for infection of fibroblasts with free virus. Cell-associated virus spread is either driven by gH/gL/gO interacting with PDGFR-α or by the gH/gL/UL128,130,131A complex. PDGFR-α-positive cells may thus be preferred first target cells for infections with free virus which might have implications for the design of future HCMV vaccines or anti-HCMV drugs.

  9. UL69 of human cytomegalovirus, an open reading frame with homology to ICP27 of herpes simplex virus, encodes a transactivator of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, M; Rice, S A; Stamminger, T

    1994-01-01

    The UL69 open reading frame of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is homologous to the immediate-early protein ICP27 of herpes simplex virus, an essential viral regulatory protein involved in the transition from early to late gene expression. Genes with homology to ICP27 have been detected in all subclasses of herpesviruses so far. While the respective proteins in alpha- and gammaherpesviruses have been defined as trans-regulatory molecules, nothing is known about these genes in betaherpesviruses. This study was therefore undertaken in order to investigate expression from the UL69 gene locus of HCMV. Northern (RNA) blot experiments revealed a complex pattern of transcripts that changed during the time course of the HCMV replicative cycle: two transcripts of 2.7 and 3.5 kb that were regulated differentially could be detected as early as 7 h after infection. However, these transcripts could not be detected in the presence of cycloheximide. Additional, larger transcripts were present exclusively at late times after infection. To analyze protein expression from the UL69 gene region, the UL69 open reading frame was expressed as a histidine-tagged protein in Escherichia coli. A specific antiserum was generated and used to detect the UL69 protein in HCMV-infected cells which revealed its localization within the intranuclear inclusions that are characteristic for HCMV infection. In cotransfection experiments, an HCMV true late promoter could not be activated by UL69, whereas an early promoter and several heterologous promoters were stimulated about 10-fold. Complementation studies showed that the UL69 protein cannot substitute for ICP27 in the context of the HSV infection, suggesting functional differences between these two proteins. In summary, these experiments define a novel regulatory protein encoded by HCMV that is expressed as an early-late gene and appears to exert a broad stimulatory effect on gene expression. Images PMID:8189530

  10. Sequence homology between HLA-bound cytomegalovirus and human peptides: A potential trigger for alloreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Koparde, Vishal N.; Jameson-Lee, Maximilian; Elnasseh, Abdelrhman G.; Scalora, Allison F.; Kobulnicky, David J.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Roberts, Catherine H.; Buck, Gregory A.; Neale, Michael C.; Nixon, Daniel E.; Toor, Amir A.

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) reactivation may often coincide with the development of graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) in stem cell transplantation (SCT). Seventy seven SCT donor-recipient pairs (DRP) (HLA matched unrelated donor (MUD), n = 50; matched related donor (MRD), n = 27) underwent whole exome sequencing to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) generating alloreactive peptide libraries for each DRP (9-mer peptide-HLA complexes); Human CMV CROSS (Cross-Reactive Open Source Sequence) database was compiled from NCBI; HLA class I binding affinity for each DRPs HLA was calculated by NetMHCpan 2.8 and hCMV- derived 9-mers algorithmically compared to the alloreactive peptide-HLA complex libraries. Short consecutive (≥6) amino acid (AA) sequence homology matching hCMV to recipient peptides was considered for HLA-bound-peptide (IC50<500nM) cross reactivity. Of the 70,686 hCMV 9-mers contained within the hCMV CROSS database, an average of 29,658 matched the MRD DRP alloreactive peptides and 52,910 matched MUD DRP peptides (p<0.001). In silico analysis revealed multiple high affinity, immunogenic CMV-Human peptide matches (IC50<500 nM) expressed in GVHD-affected tissue-specific manner. hCMV+GVHD was found in 18 patients, 13 developing hCMV viremia before GVHD onset. Analysis of patients with GVHD identified potential cross reactive peptide expression within affected organs. We propose that hCMV peptide sequence homology with human alloreactive peptides may contribute to the pathophysiology of GVHD. PMID:28800601

  11. Generation of potent neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies against cytomegalovirus infection from immune B cells

    PubMed Central

    Funaro, Ada; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Luganini, Anna; Ortolan, Erika; Lo Buono, Nicola; Vicenzi, Elisa; Cassetta, Luca; Landolfo, Santo; Buick, Richard; Falciola, Luca; Murphy, Marianne; Garotta, Gianni; Malavasi, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    Background Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) generated as a result of the immune response are likely to be the most effective therapeutic antibodies, particularly in the case of infectious diseases against which the immune response is protective. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an ubiquitous opportunistic virus that is the most serious pathogenic agent in transplant patients. The available therapeutic armamentarium (e.g. HCMV hyperimmune globulins or antivirals) is associated with severe side effects and the emergence of drug-resistant strains; therefore, neutralizing human mAb may be a decisive alternative in the prevention of primary and re-activated HCMV infections in these patients. Results The purpose of this study was to generate neutralizing mAb against HCMV from the immunological repertoire of immune donors. To this aim, we designed an efficient technology relying on two discrete and sequential steps: first, human B-lymphocytes are stimulated with TLR9-agonists and IL-2; second, after both additives are removed, the cells are infected with EBV. Using this strategy we obtained 29 clones secreting IgG neutralizing the HCMV infectivity; four among these were further characterized. All of the mAbs neutralize the infection in different combinations of HCMV strains and target cells, with a potency ~20 fold higher than that of the HCMV hyperimmune globulins, currently used in transplant recipients. Recombinant human monoclonal IgG1 suitable as a prophylactic or therapeutic tool in clinical applications has been generated. Conclusion The technology described has proven to be more reproducible, efficient and rapid than previously reported techniques, and can be adopted at low overall costs by any cell biology laboratory for the development of fully human mAbs for immunotherapeutic uses. PMID:19014469

  12. Detection of Low Frequency Multi-Drug Resistance and Novel Putative Maribavir Resistance in Immunocompromised Pediatric Patients with Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J.; Bryant, Josephine M.; Depledge, Daniel P.; Margetts, Ben K.; Simmonds, Jacob; Nicolaou, Stephanos; Tutill, Helena J.; Williams, Rachel; Worth, Austen J. J.; Marks, Stephen D.; Veys, Paul; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Breuer, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a significant pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, with the potential to cause fatal pneumonitis and colitis, as well as increasing the risk of organ rejection in transplant patients. With the advent of new anti-HCMV drugs there is therefore considerable interest in using virus sequence data to monitor emerging resistance to antiviral drugs in HCMV viraemia and disease, including the identification of putative new mutations. We used target-enrichment to deep sequence HCMV DNA from 11 immunosuppressed pediatric patients receiving single or combination anti-HCMV treatment, serially sampled over 1–27 weeks. Changes in consensus sequence and resistance mutations were analyzed for three ORFs targeted by anti-HCMV drugs and the frequencies of drug resistance mutations monitored. Targeted-enriched sequencing of clinical material detected mutations occurring at frequencies of 2%. Seven patients showed no evidence of drug resistance mutations. Four patients developed drug resistance mutations a mean of 16 weeks after starting treatment. In two patients, multiple resistance mutations accumulated at frequencies of 20% or less, including putative maribavir and ganciclovir resistance mutations P522Q (UL54) and C480F (UL97). In one patient, resistance was detected 14 days earlier than by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis suggested recombination or superinfection in one patient. Deep sequencing of HCMV enriched from clinical samples excluded resistance in 7 of 11 subjects and identified resistance mutations earlier than conventional PCR-based resistance testing in 2 patients. Detection of multiple low level resistance mutations was associated with poor outcome. PMID:27667983

  13. The Major Immediate-Early Protein IE2 of Human Cytomegalovirus Is Sufficient to Induce Proteasomal Degradation of CD83 on Mature Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heilingloh, Christiane S.; Grosche, Linda; Kummer, Mirko; Mühl-Zürbes, Petra; Kamm, Lisa; Scherer, Myriam; Latzko, Melanie; Stamminger, Thomas; Steinkasserer, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the prototypic beta-herpesvirus and widespread throughout the human population. While infection is asymptomatic in healthy individuals, it can lead to high morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised persons. Importantly, HCMV evolved multiple strategies to interfere with immune cell function in order to establish latency in infected individuals. As mature DCs (mDCs) are antigen-presenting cells able to activate naïve T cells they play a crucial role during induction of effective antiviral immune responses. Interestingly, earlier studies demonstrated that the functionally important mDC surface molecule CD83 is down-regulated upon HCMV infection resulting in a reduced T cell stimulatory capacity of the infected cells. However, the viral effector protein and the precise mechanism of HCMV-mediated CD83 reduction remain to be discovered. Using flow cytometric analyses, we observed significant down-modulation of CD83 surface expression becoming significant already 12 h after HCMV infection. Moreover, Western bot analyses revealed that, in sharp contrast to previous studies, loss of CD83 is not restricted to the membrane-bound molecule, but also occurs intracellularly. Furthermore, inhibition of the proteasome almost completely restored CD83 surface expression during HCMV infection. Results of infection kinetics and cycloheximide-actinomycin D-chase experiments, strongly suggested that an HCMV immediate early gene product is responsible for the induction of CD83 down-modulation. Consequently, we were able to identify the major immediate early protein IE2 as the viral effector protein that induces proteasomal CD83 degradation. PMID:28203230

  14. The eIF4AIII RNA helicase is a critical determinant of human cytomegalovirus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Ziehr, Ben; Lenarcic, Erik; Cecil, Chad; Moorman, Nathaniel J.

    2016-02-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) was recently shown to encode a large number of spliced mRNAs. While the nuclear export of unspliced viral transcripts has been extensively studied, the role of host mRNA export factors in HCMV mRNA trafficking remains poorly defined. We found that the eIF4AIII RNA helicase, a component of the exon junction complex, was necessary for efficient virus replication. Depletion of eIF4AIII limited viral DNA accumulation, export of viral mRNAs from the nucleus, and the production of progeny virus. However eIF4AIII was dispensable for the association of viral transcripts with ribosomes. We found that pateamine A, a natural compound that inhibits both eIF4AI/II and eIF4AIII, has potent antiviral activity and inhibits HCMV replication throughout the virus lytic cycle. Our results demonstrate that eIF4AIII is required for efficient HCMV replication, and suggest that eIF4A family helicases may be a new class of targets for the development of host-directed antiviral therapeutics. - Highlights: • The host eIF4AIII RNA helicase is required for efficient HCMV replication. • Depleting eIF4AIII inhibited the nuclear export of HCMV mRNAs. • HCMV mRNAs did not require eIF4AIII to associate with polyribosomes. • The eIF4A family helicases may be new targets for host-directed antiviral drugs.

  15. Primary human cytomegalovirus infections: kinetics of ELISA-IgG and neutralizing antibody in pauci/asymptomatic pregnant women vs symptomatic non-pregnant subjects.

    PubMed

    Fornara, Chiara; Furione, Milena; Lilleri, Daniele; Cane, Ilaria; Revello, M Grazia; Zavattoni, Maurizio; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    Human cytomegalovirus infections are mostly asymptomatic in infants and young children, while they are often associated with overt clinical symptoms in adults. To verify whether the antibody response to HCMV is more potent in symptomatic non-pregnant adults as compared to asymptomatic/paucisymptomatic pregnant women. Overall, 36 consecutive pregnant women with primary HCMV infection were compared with 10 consecutive symptomatic non-pregnant subjects with primary HCMV infection and overt clinical symptoms. Levels of IgG antibody responses to HCMV-infected cell lysate and the pentamer gH/gL/pUL128L, gH/gL and gB HCMV glycoprotein complexes as well as neutralizing antibodies preventing infection of epithelial cells (ARPE-19) and human embryonic lung fibroblast (HELF) cells were compared at intervals of 1-30, 31-60, 61-90, 91-180 and 181-360 days after onset of infection. In parallel, viral load was quantified by real-time PCR. In symptomatic non-pregnant subjects, the IgG responses to HCMV lysate as well as to gH/gL and ARPE-19 neutralizing antibodies were significantly higher from 31 to 60 through 180 days after infection onset. In the same patients, the IgG antibody responses to the pentamer and HELF-neutralizing antibody were significantly higher starting 90 days post-infection. The presence of overt clinical symptoms is associated with a significantly higher antibody response (concomitantly with a higher viral load) in non-pregnant subjects with symptomatic primary HCMV infection as compared to pregnant women with paucisymptomatic/ asymptomatic primary infection (and lower viral load). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Human cytomegalovirus-specific CD8+ T-cell expansions contain long-lived cells that retain functional capacity in both young and elderly subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Diana L; Masters, Joanne E; de Lara, Catherine M; Henson, Sian M; Worth, Andrew; Zhang, Yan; Kumar, Shikha R; Beverley, Peter C; Akbar, Arne N; Macallan, Derek C

    2011-01-01

    The immune response to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is characterized by the accumulation of HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells, particularly in the elderly; such expansions may impair immune responses to other pathogens. We investigated mechanisms underlying HCMV-specific expansions in 12 young and 21 old healthy subjects (although not all analyses were performed on all subjects). Phenotypically, HCMV-pentamer+ CD8+ T cells were characterized by marked Vβ restriction, advanced differentiation (being predominantly CD27− CD28−), and variable CD45RO/RA expression. Although more common and larger in older subjects, expansions had similar phenotypic characteristics in the young. In one old subject, repeated studies demonstrated stability in size and Vβ distribution of pentamer+ populations over 6 years. We tested whether HCMV-specific CD8+ T-cell expansions arose from accelerated proliferation or extended lifespan by in vivo labelling with deuterated glucose and ex vivo Ki-67 expression. Uptake of deuterated glucose was lower in pentamer+ cells than in pentamer– CD8+ CD45RO+ or CD8+ CD45RA+ cells in three old subjects, consistent with reduced proliferation and extended lifespan. Similarly Ki-67 labelling showed no evidence for increased proliferation in HCMV-specific CD8+ expansions in older subjects, although pentamer– CD45RA+ cells from young donors expressed very little Ki-67. We investigated Bcl-2 and CD95 as possible anti-apoptotic mediators, but neither was associated with pentamer-positivity. To investigate whether expansion represents a compensatory response to impaired functionality, we performed two tests of functionality, peptide-stimulated proliferation and CD107 expression; both were intact in pentamer+ cells. Our data suggest that HCMV-specific CD8+ expansions in older subjects accumulate by extended lifespan, rather than accelerated proliferation. PMID:20738423

  17. Human cytomegalovirus tropism for endothelial/epithelial cells: scientific background and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Revello, M Grazia; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has been routinely isolated from and propagated in vitro in human embryonic lung fibroblast (HELF) cell cultures, while in vivo it is known to infect predominantly endothelial and epithelial cells. In recent years, genetic determinants of the HCMV tropism for endothelial/epithelial cells were identified in the UL131A/UL130/UL128 locus of HCMV genome of wild-type strains. UL131A-UL128 gene products form a complex with glycoprotein H (gH) and L (gL) resulting in a gH/gL/UL131A-UL128 complex that is required for HCMV entry into endothelial/epithelial cells. In contrast, virus entry into fibroblasts has its genetic determinants in the complex gH/gL/gO (or gH/gL). During primary HCMV infection, the neutralising antibody response measured in endothelial cells (EC) is potent, occurs very early and is directed mostly against combinations of two or three gene products of the UL131A-128 locus. On the contrary, neutralising antibodies measured in fibroblasts appear late, are relatively weak in potency and are directed against gH and gB. The T-cell immune response to UL131A-UL128 gene products remains to be investigated. Recently, a role has been proposed for neutralising antibody in conferring prevention/protection against HCMV infection/disease in pregnant women with primary HCMV infection. However, the level of cooperation between humoral immunity and the well-established T-cell protection remains to be defined.

  18. Human Cytomegalovirus US28 Is Important for Latent Infection of Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Humby, Monica S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) resides latently in hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). During latency, only a subset of HCMV genes is transcribed, including one of the four virus-encoded G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), US28. Although US28 is a multifunctional lytic protein, its function during latency has remained undefined. We generated a panel of US28 recombinant viruses in the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-derived clinical HCMV strain TB40/E-mCherry. We deleted the entire US28 open reading frame (ORF), deleted all four of the viral GPCR ORFs, or deleted three of the HCMV GPCRs but not the US28 wild-type protein. Using these recombinant viruses, we assessed the requirement for US28 during latency in the Kasumi-3 in vitro latency model system and in primary ex vivo-cultured CD34+ HPCs. Our data suggest that US28 is required for latency as infection with viruses lacking the US28 ORF alone or in combination with the remaining HCMV-encoded GPCR results in transcription from the major immediate early promoter, the production of extracellular virions, and the production of infectious virus capable of infecting naive fibroblasts. The other HCMV GPCRs are not required for this phenotype as a virus expressing only US28 but not the remaining virus-encoded GPCRs is phenotypically similar to that of wild-type latent infection. Finally, we found that US28 copurifies with mature virions and is expressed in HPCs upon virus entry although its expression at the time of infection does not complement the US28 deletion latency phenotype. This work suggests that US28 protein functions to promote a latent state within hematopoietic progenitor cells. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widespread pathogen that, once acquired, remains with its host for life. HCMV remains latent, or quiescent, in cells of the hematopoietic compartment and upon immune challenge can reactivate to cause disease. HCMV-encoded US28 is one of several genes expressed during

  19. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Primitive Neural Stem Cells Is Restricted at Several Steps but Leads to the Persistence of Viral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Belzile, Jean-Philippe; Stark, Thomas J.; Yeo, Gene W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is a major cause of central nervous system structural anomalies and sensory impairments. It is likely that the stage of fetal development, as well as the state of differentiation of susceptible cells at the time of infection, affects the severity of the disease. We used human embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived primitive prerosette neural stem cells (pNSCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) maintained in chemically defined conditions to study HCMV replication in cells at the early stages of neural development. In contrast to what was observed previously using fetus-derived NPCs, infection of ES cell-derived pNSCs with HCMV was nonprogressive. At a low multiplicity of infection, we observed only a small percentage of cells expressing immediate-early genes (IE) and early genes. IE expression was found to be restricted to cells negative for the anterior marker FORSE-1, and treatment of pNSCs with retinoic acid restored IE expression. Differentiation of pNSCs into NPCs restored IE expression but not the transactivation of early genes. Virions produced in NPCs and pNSCs were exclusively cell associated and were mostly non-neural tropic. Finally, we found that viral genomes could persist in pNSC cultures for up to a month after infection despite the absence of detectable IE expression by immunofluorescence, and infectious virus could be produced upon differentiation of pNSCs to neurons. In conclusion, our results highlight the complex array of hurdles that HCMV must overcome in order to infect primitive neural stem cells and suggest that these cells might act as a reservoir for the virus. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a betaherpesvirus that is highly prevalent in the population. HCMV infection is usually asymptomatic but can lead to severe consequences in immunosuppressed individuals. HCMV is also the most important infectious cause of congenital developmental birth defects. Manifestations of fetal

  20. Innate Nuclear Sensor IFI16 Translocates into the Cytoplasm during the Early Stage of In Vitro Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Is Entrapped in the Egressing Virions during the Late Stage

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Oste, Valentina; Gatti, Deborah; Gugliesi, Francesca; De Andrea, Marco; Bawadekar, Mandar; Lo Cigno, Irene; Biolatti, Matteo; Vallino, Marta; Marschall, Manfred; Gariglio, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intrinsic immune mechanisms mediated by constitutively expressed proteins termed “restriction factors” provide frontline antiviral defense. We recently demonstrated that the DNA sensor IFI16 restricts human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication by downregulating viral early and late but not immediate-early mRNAs and their protein expression. We show here that at an early time point during the in vitro infection of low-passage-number human embryonic lung fibroblasts, IFI16 binds to HCMV DNA. However, during a later phase following infection, IFI16 is mislocalized to the cytoplasmic virus assembly complex (AC), where it colocalizes with viral structural proteins. Indeed, upon its binding to pUL97, IFI16 undergoes phosphorylation and relocalizes to the cytoplasm of HCMV-infected cells. ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) machinery regulates the translocation of IFI16 into the virus AC by sorting and trafficking IFI16 into multivesicular bodies (MVB), as demonstrated by the interaction of IFI16 with two MVB markers: Vps4 and TGN46. Finally, IFI16 becomes incorporated into the newly assembled virions as demonstrated by Western blotting of purified virions and electron microscopy. Together, these results suggest that HCMV has evolved mechanisms to mislocalize and hijack IFI16, trapping it within mature virions. However, the significance of this IFI16 trapping following nuclear mislocalization remains to be established. IMPORTANCE Intracellular viral DNA sensors and restriction factors are critical components of host defense, which alarm and sensitize immune system against intruding pathogens. We have recently demonstrated that the DNA sensor IFI16 restricts human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication by downregulating viral early and late but not immediate-early mRNAs and their protein expression. However, viruses are known to evolve numerous strategies to cope and counteract such restriction factors and neutralize the first line of host

  1. Clinical significance of expression of human cytomegalovirus pp67 late transcript in heart, lung, and bone marrow transplant recipients as determined by nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Gerna, G; Baldanti, F; Middeldorp, J M; Furione, M; Zavattoni, M; Lilleri, D; Revello, M G

    1999-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection was monitored retrospectively by qualitative determination of pp67 mRNA (a late viral transcript) by nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) in a series of 50 transplant recipients, including 26 solid-organ (11 heart and 15 lung) transplant recipients (SOTRs) and 24 bone marrow transplant recipients (BMTRs). NASBA results were compared with those obtained by prospective quantitation of HCMV viremia and antigenemia and retrospective quantitation of DNA in leukocytes (leukoDNAemia). On the whole, 29 patients were NASBA positive, whereas 10 were NASBA negative, and the blood of 11 patients remained HCMV negative. NASBA detected HCMV infection before quantitation of viremia did but after quantitation of leukoDNAemia and antigenemia did. In NASBA-positive blood samples, median levels of viremia, antigenemia, and leukoDNAemia were significantly higher than the relevant levels detected in NASBA-negative HCMV-positive blood samples. By using the quantitation of leukoDNAemia as the "gold standard," the analytical sensitivity (47.3%), as well as the negative predictive value (68. 3%), of NASBA for the diagnosis of HCMV infection intermediate between that of antigenemia quantitation (analytical sensitivity, 72. 3%) and that of viremia quantitation (analytical sensitivity, 28.7%), while the specificity and the positive predictive value were high (90 to 100%). However, with respect to the clinically relevant antigenemia cutoff of >/=100 used in this study for the initiation of preemptive therapy in SOTRs with reactivated HCMV infection, the clinical sensitivity of NASBA reached 100%, with a specificity of 68. 9%. Upon the initiation of antigenemia quantitation-guided treatment, the actual median antigenemia level was 158 (range, 124 to 580) in SOTRs who had reactivated infection and who presented with NASBA positivity 3.5 +/- 2.6 days in advance and 13.5 (range, 1 to 270) in the group that included BMTRs and SOTRs who had primary

  2. CD2-CD58 interactions are pivotal for the activation and function of adaptive natural killer cells in human cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Rölle, Alexander; Halenius, Anne; Ewen, Eva-Maria; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Hengel, Hartmut; Momburg, Frank

    2016-10-01

    The existence and expansion of adaptive NK-cell subsets have been linked to HCMV infection. Phenotypically, a majority of adaptive NK cells expresses the activating receptor NKG2C and CD57. Some of the molecular factors driving the expansion of NKG2C(+) CD57(+) NK cells in HCMV infection have been identified. The direct interaction of adaptive NK cells with HCMV-infected cells, preceding the expansion, however, remains less studied. Recently, adaptive NK cells were reported to express higher levels of the co-activating receptor CD2. We explored whether CD2 was directly involved in the response of adaptive NK cells to HCMV. In a co-culture system of human PBMCs and productively infected fibroblasts, we observed an upregulation of CD69, CD25, and HLA-DR on all NK cells. However, only in adaptive NK cells was this increase largely blocked by antibodies against CD2 and CD58. Functionally, this blockade also resulted in diminished production of IFN-γ and TNF-α by adaptive human NK cells in response to HCMV-infected cells. Our results demonstrate that binding of CD2 to upregulated CD58 on infected cells is a critical event for antibody-mediated activation and subsequent effector functions of adaptive NKG2C(+) CD57(+) NK cells during the antiviral response. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. [Relationship between herpesviruses and periodontal pathogenic bacteria in subgingival plaque].

    PubMed

    Ding, Fang; Feng, Xiang Hui; Meng, Huan Xin; Zhao, Yi Bing; Zhang, Li; Lu, Rui Fang; Chen, Zhi Bin

    2008-06-18

    To evaluate the prevalence rates of human cytomegalovirus(HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus-1(EBV-1) in subgingival plaque and analyze the relationship between herpesviruses, periodontal pathogenic bacteria and periodontal clinical parameters in Chinese patients with aggressive periodontitis(AgP). A total of one hundred and twenty subgingival plaque samples were collected from 89 AgP patients and 31 healthy subjects. HCMV and EBV-1 were detected using nested polymerase chain reaction(PCR).Contemporaneously, 8 periodontal pathogenic bacteria including Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans(Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis(Pg), Tannerella forsythensis(Tf), Prevotella intermedia(Pi), Campylobacter rectus(Cr),Fusobacterium nucleatum(Fn), Treponema denticola(Td), Prevotella nigrescens(Pn) were detected by 16S rRNA based PCR. HCMV was more frequently detected in AgP patients (43.8%) than in healthy controls (12.9%, P<0.01). The prevalence rates of HCMV and EBV-1 in AgP patients with 6-8 kinds of bacteria detected were 54.4% and 17.4%, respectively, significantly higher than those with 3-5 kinds of bacteria detected (P<0.05). The prevalence rates of HCMV and EBV was higher in AgP patients than in healthy controls. Herpesviruses and periodontal pathogenic bacteria may cooperate synergistically in the development of AgP, which could be considered as a pathogenetic consortium in future investigation of periodontaltitis.

  4. ACSS2-mediated acetyl-CoA synthesis from acetate is necessary for human cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Vysochan, Anna; Sengupta, Arjun; Weljie, Aalim M; Alwine, James C; Yu, Yongjun

    2017-02-21

    Recent studies have shown that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can induce a robust increase in lipid synthesis which is critical for the success of infection. In mammalian cells the central precursor for lipid biosynthesis, cytosolic acetyl CoA (Ac-CoA), is produced by ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY) from mitochondria-derived citrate or by acetyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family member 2 (ACSS2) from acetate. It has been reported that ACLY is the primary enzyme involved in making cytosolic Ac-CoA in cells with abundant nutrients. However, using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we have shown that ACLY is not essential for HCMV growth and virally induced lipogenesis. Instead, we found that in HCMV-infected cells glucose carbon can be used for lipid synthesis by both ACLY and ACSS2 reactions. Further, the ACSS2 reaction can compensate for the loss of ACLY. However, in ACSS2-KO human fibroblasts both HCMV-induced lipogenesis from glucose and viral growth were sharply reduced. This reduction suggests that glucose-derived acetate is being used to synthesize cytosolic Ac-CoA by ACSS2. Previous studies have not established a mechanism for the production of acetate directly from glucose metabolism. Here we show that HCMV-infected cells produce more glucose-derived pyruvate, which can be converted to acetate through a nonenzymatic mechanism.

  5. Proteomic identification of nuclear processes manipulated by cytomegalovirus early during infection.

    PubMed

    Carter, Dominique M; Westdorp, Kristen; Noon, Kathleen R; Terhune, Scott S

    2015-06-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a herpesvirus that is ubiquitously distributed worldwide and causes life-threating disease upon immunosuppression. HCMV expresses numerous proteins that function to establish an intracellular environment that supports viral replication. Like most DNA viruses, HCMV manipulates processes within the nucleus. We have quantified changes in the host cell nuclear proteome at 24 h post infection following infection with a clinical viral isolate. We have combined SILAC with multiple stages of fractionation to define changes. Tryptic peptides were analyzed by RP-HPLC combined with LC-MS/MS on an LTQ Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer. Data from three biological replicates were processed with MaxQuant. A total of 1281 cellular proteins were quantified and 77 were found to be significantly differentially expressed. In addition, we observed 36 viral proteins associated with the nucleus. Diverse biological processes were significantly altered, including increased aspects of cell cycling, mRNA metabolism, and nucleocytoplasmic transport and decreased immune responses. We validated changes for several proteins including a subset of classical nuclear transport proteins. In addition, we demonstrated that disruption of these import factors is inhibitory to HCMV replication. Overall, we have identified HCMV-induced changes in the nuclear proteome and uncovered several processes that are important for infection. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001909 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001909). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Human embryonic stem cell lines model experimental human cytomegalovirus latency.

    PubMed

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Kalejta, Robert F

    2013-05-28

    Herpesviruses are highly successful pathogens that persist for the lifetime of their hosts primarily because of their ability to establish and maintain latent infections from which the virus is capable of productively reactivating. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a betaherpesvirus, establishes latency in CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells during natural infections in the body. Experimental infection of CD34(+) cells ex vivo has demonstrated that expression of the viral gene products that drive productive infection is silenced by an intrinsic immune defense mediated by Daxx and histone deacetylases through heterochromatinization of the viral genome during the establishment of latency. Additional mechanistic details about the establishment, let alone maintenance and reactivation, of HCMV latency remain scarce. This is partly due to the technical challenges of CD34(+) cell culture, most notably, the difficulty in preventing spontaneous differentiation that drives reactivation and renders them permissive for productive infection. Here we demonstrate that HCMV can establish, maintain, and reactivate in vitro from experimental latency in cultures of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), for which spurious differentiation can be prevented or controlled. Furthermore, we show that known molecular aspects of HCMV latency are faithfully recapitulated in these cells. In total, we present ESCs as a novel, tractable model for studies of HCMV latency.

  7. Toward stable gene expression in CHO cells

    PubMed Central

    Mariati; Koh, Esther YC; Yeo, Jessna HM; Ho, Steven CL; Yang, Yuansheng

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high gene expression level during long-term culture is critical when producing therapeutic recombinant proteins using mammalian cells. Transcriptional silencing of promoters, most likely due to epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, is one of the major mechanisms causing production instability. Previous studies demonstrated that the core CpG island element (IE) from the hamster adenine phosphoribosyltransferase gene is effective to prevent DNA methylation. We generated one set of modified human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) promoters by insertion of one or two copies of IE in either forward or reverse orientations into different locations of the hCMV promoter. The modified hCMV with one copy of IE inserted between the hCMV enhancer and core promoter in reverse orientation (MR1) was most effective at enhancing expression stability in CHO cells without comprising expression level when compared with the wild type hCMV. We also found that insertion of IE into a chimeric murine CMV (mCMV) enhancer and human elongation factor-1α core (hEF) promoter in reverse orientation did not enhance expression stability, indicating that the effect of IE on expression stability is possibly promoter specific. PMID:25482237

  8. Investigation of promoter variations in dendritic cell-specific ICAM3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) (CD209) and their relevance for human cytomegalovirus reactivation and disease after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mezger, M; Steffens, M; Semmler, C; Arlt, E-M; Zimmer, M; Kristjanson, G-I; Wienker, T F; Toliat, M R; Kessler, T; Einsele, H; Loeffler, J

    2008-03-01

    Promoter variations in Toll-like receptor genes (n = 7) and genes encoding pathogen recognition and virus entry receptors (n = 7) were screened to detect any association with human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) reactivation and disease in patients following allogeneic stem-cell transplantation. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs735240, G>A; rs2287886, C>T) in the promoter region of the dendritic cell-specific ICAM3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) showed a significant association with an increased risk of development of hCMV reactivation and disease. Furthermore, these genetic markers influenced the expression levels of DC-SIGN on immature dendritic cells, as well as the infection efficiency of immature dendritic cells by hCMV, as determined by hCMV immediate-early antigen staining. Screening of patients following allogeneic stem-cell transplantation for the presence of these defined genetic polymorphisms might help to predict the individual risk of hCMV reactivation and disease.

  9. Fast Screening Procedures for Random Transposon Libraries of Cloned Herpesvirus Genomes: Mutational Analysis of Human Cytomegalovirus Envelope Glycoprotein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hobom, Urs; Brune, Wolfram; Messerle, Martin; Hahn, Gabriele; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

    2000-01-01

    We have cloned the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) in Escherichia coli. Here, we have subjected the HCMV BAC to random transposon (Tn) mutagenesis using a Tn1721-derived insertion sequence and have provided the conditions for excision of the BAC cassette. We report on a fast and efficient screening procedure for a Tn insertion library. Bacterial clones containing randomly mutated full-length HCMV genomes were transferred into 96-well microtiter plates. A PCR screening method based on two Tn primers and one primer specific for the desired genomic position of the Tn insertion was established. Within three consecutive rounds of PCR a Tn insertion of interest can be assigned to a specific bacterial clone. We applied this method to retrieve mutants of HCMV envelope glycoprotein genes. To determine the infectivities of the mutant HCMV genomes, the DNA of the identified BACs was transfected into permissive fibroblasts. In contrast to BACs with mutations in the genes coding for gB, gH, gL, and gM, which did not yield infectious virus, BACs with disruptions of open reading frame UL4 (gp48) or UL74 (gO) were viable, although gO-deficient viruses showed a severe growth deficit. Thus, gO (UL74), a component of the glycoprotein complex III, is dispensable for viral growth. We conclude that our approach of PCR screening for Tn insertions will greatly facilitate the functional analysis of herpesvirus genomes. PMID:10933677

  10. Kissing as an evolutionary adaptation to protect against Human Cytomegalovirus-like teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hendrie, C A; Brewer, G

    2010-02-01

    Mouth to mouth sexual kissing is seen in more than 90% of human cultures. Various theories have been put forward to account for this but none offer a full explanation within an evolutionary framework. As mouth to mouth sexual kissing exposes each participant to the diseases of the other, it must confer significant benefit. Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous infection that carries a severe teratogenic risk if primary infection is acquired during certain critical periods. As HCMV is present in salivary gland epithelial cells and sheds from periodontitis induced lesions, female inoculation with a specific male's HCMV is most efficiently achieved through mouth to mouth contact and saliva exchange, particularly where the flow of saliva is from the male to the typically shorter female. The current hypothesis proposes that mouth to mouth sexual kissing enables females to control when they become infected with a particular male's HCMV and so protect their offspring from the threat of teratogenesis from primary infection during vulnerable times in their development. Females only gain this benefit if they also avoid becoming infected by other males. Hence HCMV induced teratogenesis is a strong viral pressure towards the development of monogamy as well as kissing as a behavioural strategy to protect against it.

  11. Analysis of the complete DNA sequence of murine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlinson, W D; Farrell, H E; Barrell, B G

    1996-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the Smith strain of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) was determined from virion DNA by using a whole-genome shotgun approach. The genome has an overall G+C content of 58.7%, consists of 230,278 bp, and is arranged as a single unique sequence with short (31-bp) terminal direct repeats and several short internal repeats. Significant similarity to the genome of the sequenced human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) strain AD169 is evident, particularly for 78 open reading frames encoded by the central part of the genome. There is a very similar distribution of G+C content across the two genomes. Sequences toward the ends of the MCMV genome encode tandem arrays of homologous glycoproteins (gps) arranged as two gene families. The left end encodes 15 gps that represent one family, and the right end encodes a different family of 11 gps. A homolog (m144) of cellular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes is located at the end of the genome opposite the HCMV MHC class I homolog (UL18). G protein-coupled receptor (GCR) homologs (M33 and M78) occur in positions congruent with two (UL33 and UL78) of the four putative HCMV GCR homologs. Counterparts of all of the known enzyme homologs in HCMV are present in the MCMV genome, including the phosphotransferase gene (M97), whose product phosphorylates ganciclovir in HCMV-infected cells, and the assembly protein (M80). PMID:8971012

  12. The immunology of human cytomegalovirus latency: could latent infection be cleared by novel immunotherapeutic strategies?

    PubMed

    Wills, Mark R; Poole, Emma; Lau, Betty; Krishna, Ben; Sinclair, John H

    2015-03-01

    While the host immune response following primary human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is generally effective at stopping virus replication and dissemination, virus is never cleared by the host and like all herpesviruses, persists for life. At least in part, this persistence is known to be facilitated by the ability of HCMV to establish latency in myeloid cells in which infection is essentially silent with, importantly, a total lack of new virus production. However, although the viral transcription programme during latency is much suppressed, a number of viral genes are expressed during latent infection at the protein level and many of these have been shown to have profound effects on the latent cell and its environment. Intriguingly, many of these latency-associated genes are also expressed during lytic infection. Therefore, why the same potent host immune responses generated during lytic infection to these viral gene products are not recognized during latency, thereby allowing clearance of latently infected cells, is far from clear. Reactivation from latency is also a major cause of HCMV-mediated disease, particularly in the immune compromised and immune naive, and is also likely to be a major source of virus in chronic subclinical HCMV infection which has been suggested to be associated with long-term diseases such as atherosclerosis and some neoplasias. Consequently, understanding latency and why latently infected cells appear to be immunoprivileged is crucial for an understanding of the pathogenesis of HCMV and may help to design strategies to eliminate latent virus reservoirs, at least in certain clinical settings.

  13. Human cytomegalovirus immediate early gene expression in the osteosarcoma line U2OS is repressed by the cell protein ATRX.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Steven; Preston, Chris M

    2011-04-01

    The control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate early (IE) gene expression in infected human fibroblasts was compared with that in the U2OS human osteosarcoma cells. Viral IE expression was stimulated by the virion protein pp71 and repressed by the cell protein hDaxx in fibroblasts, as expected from published data. Neither of these events occurred in infected U2OS cells, suggesting that this cell line lacks one or more factors that repress HCMV IE expression. The chromatin remodeling factor ATRX is absent from U2OS cells, therefore the effect of introducing this protein by electroporation of plasmid DNA was investigated. Provision of ATRX inhibited HCMV IE expression, and the presence of the HCMV-specified virion phosphoprotein pp71 overcame the repression. The experiments demonstrate that ATRX can act as a cellular intrinsic antiviral defense in U2OS cells by blocking gene expression from incoming HCMV genomes. In contrast, ATRX did not affect the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1, showing that there are differences in the way U2OS cells respond to the presence of the herpesviral genomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Genomic localization, sequence analysis, and transcription of the putative human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronn, R; Jahn, G; Bürkle, A; Freese, U K; Fleckenstein, B; zur Hausen, H

    1987-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-induced DNA polymerase has been well characterized biochemically and functionally, but its genomic location has not yet been assigned. To identify the coding sequence, cross-hybridization with the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) polymerase gene was used, as suggested by the close similarity of the herpes group virus-induced DNA polymerases to the HCMV DNA polymerase. A cosmid and plasmid library of the entire HCMV genome was screened with the BamHI Q fragment of HSV-1 at different stringency conditions. One PstI-HincII restriction fragment of 850 base pairs mapping within the EcoRI M fragment of HCMV cross-hybridized at Tm - 25 degrees C. Sequence analysis revealed one open reading frame spanning the entire sequence. The amino acid sequence showed a highly conserved domain of 133 amino acids shared with the HSV and putative Epstein-Barr virus polymerase sequences. This domain maps within the C-terminal part of the HSV polymerase gene, which has been suggested to contain part of the catalytic center of the enzyme. Transcription analysis revealed one 5.4-kilobase early transcript in the sense orientation with respect to the open reading frame identified. This transcript appears to code for the 140-kilodalton HCMV polymerase protein. Images PMID:3023689

  15. Detection of human cytomegalovirus in plasma of AIDS patients during acute visceral disease by DNA amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, S A; Merrill, R; Wolf, D; Dankner, W M

    1992-01-01

    By using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification procedure, 19 (83%) of 23 plasma specimens obtained from individuals with AIDS and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) visceral disease were found to be positive for plasma viremia as detected by PCR (PV-PCR), whereas 78% of cultures of peripheral blood leukocytes from the same samples were found to be positive. All 11 specimens prospectively obtained from individuals with acute HCMV disease were positive by PV-PCR. Plasma specimens from patients who received ganciclovir therapy rapidly became both culture and PV-PCR negative, and there was an excellent correlation between the two procedures. DNA detected by PV-PCR was unaffected by filtering plasma through a 0.2-microns-pore-size filter, although a conserved cellular gene, HLA-DQ alpha, was undetectable by PCR following filtration. HCMV DNA in plasma could be quantitated by PV-PCR by using endpoint serial dilutions, with detectable virus being present in 10(1) to 10(-2) microliters of plasma. A low titer of infectious virus could be detected in 2 of 11 plasma samples. The detection of HCMV DNA in plasma by PV-PCR promises to be a useful procedure for monitoring patients with AIDS suspected of having impending, acute, or recurrent HCMV visceral disease and suggests an additional route by which virus may disseminate in the immunocompromised host. Images PMID:1328287

  16. A novel TaqMAMA assay for allelic discrimination of TLR9 rs352140 polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Bergallo, Massimiliano; Montanari, Paola; Mareschi, Katia; Rassu, Marco; Galliano, Ilaria; Ravanini, Paolo

    2017-05-01

    TaqMAMA is an allele-specific PCR-based (ASPCR) method that may be suitable for broad and cost-effective genotyping applications in all types of laboratories. There is evidence that interactions between some toll like receptors (TLRs) with viruses influence both the immune response and outcome of HCMV infection. We developed a TaqMAMA genotyping assay for the detection of rs352140 TLR9 polymorphism in transplant recipients with and without HCMV infections. Performance parameters to ensure a solid pre-validation protocol have been here argued. We analysed a population of 74 kidney transplants recipients subdivided in 58 HCMV PCR positive and 16 HCMV PCR negative in the post-transplant routine control. All 74 samples were tested with 31/74 (41.9%) homozygotes (11 CC and 20 TT) and 43/74 (58.1%) heterozygotes (CT). Our preliminary data suggest that there is no correlation between TLR9 rs352140 polymorphism and frequency of HCMV infection.

  17. Interaction of the human cytomegalovirus particle with the host cell induces hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Steven; Nicholl, Mary Jane; Sutherland, Jane S.; Preston, Chris M.

    2011-05-25

    The cellular protein hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) was induced after infection of human fibroblasts with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). HCMV irradiated with ultraviolet light (uv-HCMV) also elicited the effect, demonstrating that the response was provoked by interaction of the infecting virion with the cell and that viral gene expression was not required. Although induction of HIF-1{alpha} was initiated by an early event, accumulation of the protein was not detected until 9 hours post infection, with levels increasing thereafter. Infection with uv-HCMV resulted in increased abundance of HIF-1{alpha}-specific RNA, indicating stimulation of transcription. In addition, greater phosphorylation of the protein kinase Akt was observed, and the activity of this enzyme was required for induction of HIF-1{alpha} to occur. HIF-1{alpha} controls the expression of many cellular gene products; therefore the findings reveal new ways in which interaction of the HCMV particle with the host cell may cause significant alterations to cellular physiology.

  18. Host protein Snapin interacts with human cytomegalovirus pUL130 and affects viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guili; Ren, Gaowei; Cui, Xin; Lu, Zhitao; Ma, Yanpin; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    The interplay between the host and Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) plays a pivotal role in the outcome of an infection. HCMV growth in endothelial and epithelial cells requires expression of viral proteins UL128, UL130, and UL131 proteins (UL128-131), of which UL130 is the largest gene and the only one that is not interrupted by introns.Mutation of the C terminus of the UL130 protein causes reduced tropism of endothelial cells (EC). However, very few host factors have been identified that interact with the UL130 protein. In this study, HCMV UL130 protein was shown to directly interact with the human protein Snapin in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells by Yeast two-hybrid screening, in vitro glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, and co-immunoprecipitation. Additionally, heterologous expression of protein UL130 revealed co-localization with Snapin in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of HEK293 cells using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Furthermore, decreasing the level of Snapin via specific small interfering RNAs decreased the number of viral DNA copies and titer inHCMV-infected U373-S cells. Taken together, these results suggest that Snapin, the pUL130 interacting protein, has a role in modulating HCMV DNA synthesis.

  19. Examination of brains of AIDS cases for human immunodeficiency virus and human cytomegalovirus nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D G; Itagaki, S; Berry, K; McGeer, P L

    1989-01-01

    The role of direct virus infection as a determining factor in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia was investigated using in situ hybridisation for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Four of the five AIDS dementia patients in this series demonstrated HIV infected cells distributed in widely different parts of the brain, but only one case showed HCMV infected cells. The greater abundance of HIV was in subcortical white matter in nodular areas consisting of monocyte/macrophage infiltrates. The cells were occasionally arranged as a multinucleated syncitium. In two cases, a few large cells with the appearance of neurons were positive for HIV hybridisation. By appropriate treatment with ribonuclease, it was shown that hybridisation was primarily to HIV RNA. HCMV infected cells were observed in small numbers in only one of the positive cases, suggesting that HCMV is not a determining factor in AIDS dementia. HCMV positive cells were located in the grey matter, with an appearance suggestive of neurons. Cells expressing the MHC-class II antigen HLA-DR, a marker of reactive microglia and macrophages, were observed to be extensive in affected brain sections in the one case examined. These cells were present in greater number than HIV infected cells. In this case, extensive numbers of HIV infected cells were noticed along the peripheral margin of the substantia innominata. This could indicate infection in this case of a critical brain region from the cerebrospinal fluid. Images PMID:2543795

  20. Immediate-early gene region of human cytomegalovirus trans-activates the promoter of human immunodeficiency virus

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.G.; Kenney, S.C.; Kamine, J.; Pagano, J.S.; Huang, E.S.

    1987-12-01

    Almost all homosexual patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are also actively infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The authors have hypothesized that an interaction between HCMV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may exist at a molecular level and contribute to the manifestations of HIV infection. In this report, they demonstrate that the immediate-early gene region of HCMV, in particular immediate-early region 2, trans-activates the expression of the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase that is fused to the HIV long terminal repeat and carried by plasmid pHIV-CAT. The HCMV immediate-early trans-activator increases the level of mRNA from the plamid pHIV-CAT. The sequences of HIV that are responsive to trans-activation by the HDMV immediate-early region are distinct from HIV sequences that are required for response to the HIV tat. The stimulation of HIV gene expression by HDMV gene functions could enhance the consequences of HIV infection in persons with previous or concurrent HCMV infection.

  1. Preliminary exploration of HLA-A 1101-restricted human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B-specific CD8⁺ T cells in allogeneic stem-cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anbing; Hu, Jianhua; Wu, Wei; Huang, Yaping; Liang, Hanying; Wang, Huiqi; Yang, Rong; Fan, Jun

    2014-08-08

    T-cell responses directed against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) glycoprotein B (gB) contribute to protective immunity against HCMV infection in both animal models and humans. However, the gB-specific human CD8(+) T cell responses remain poorly understood. gB antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells were stained with seven major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-peptide pentamers in 16 human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A 1101-positive, HCMV-seropositive patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Of these seven pentamers, the most frequent CD8(+) T-cell responses were directed against the gB332-340 peptide. These gB332-340-specific CD8(+) T cells were strongly associated with the presence of plasma HCMV immunoglobulin M in all HSCT recipients and exhibited a probable causal relationship with the level of pp65 antigenemia. Together, these data suggest a role for gB332-340-specific CD8(+) T cells in HCMV reactivation after HSCT. Furthermore, the pentamer assay may be valuable in detecting antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells.

  2. Significance of human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus in inducing cytokine expression in periapical lesions.

    PubMed

    Sabeti, Mohammad; Kermani, Vali; Sabeti, Sara; Simon, James H

    2012-01-01

    Because herpesviruses might be etiologically involved in periapical pathosis of endodontic origin, this study aimed to determine the occurrence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and the expression of mRNA transcripts of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, γ-interferon (IFN), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-10 in periapical granulomatous lesions collected in conjunction with apicoectomy. A total of 9 symptomatic and 6 asymptomatic teeth with periapical lesions were studied. Periapical samples were collected in conjunction with apicoectomy, which was being performed because of radiographic evidence of incomplete periapical healing after conventional root canal therapy. By using established polymerase chain reaction primers and procedures, polymerase chain reaction assays were used to identify herpesvirus and cytokine gene expression. The difference in occurrence of HCMV, EBV, and cytokines between symptomatic and asymptomatic periapical lesions was statistically significant: HCMV (P = .048), EBV (P = .002), IFN (P = .001), IL-1 (P = .012), IL-6 (P = .026), IL-10 (P = .026), IL-12 (P = .012), and TNF (P < .001) (Mann-Whitney U test). There was a significant correlation between EBV, HCMV, and TNF, γ-IFN, IL-1, and IL-12 in symptomatic periapical lesions (Spearman test). The present findings provide evidence of a putative role of HCMV and EBV in the pathogenesis of symptomatic periapical pathosis. The release of tissue-destructive cytokines might be of pathogenetic significance. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Upregulation of functionally active vascular endothelial growth factor by human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Barbara; Schaarschmidt, Peter; Bossert, Andrea; Lüske, Anke; Finkenzeller, Günter; Mertens, Thomas; Michel, Detlef

    2005-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is known to modulate host gene expression and has been linked to the pathogenesis of vasculopathies; however, relevant pathomechanisms are still unclear. It was shown that HCMV infection leads to upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in human foreskin fibroblasts and coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMC). Activation of VEGF transcription by HCMV infection was confirmed by transient-expression experiments, which revealed that a short promoter fragment, pLuc135 (-85 to +50), is sufficient for activation. Site-directed mutagenesis of Sp1-recognition sites within this fragment abolished the upregulation of transcription. Functional VEGF protein is released into the culture supernatant of infected SMC. Incubation of endothelial cells with supernatants from HCMV-infected SMC cultures induced upregulation of VEGF receptor-2 expression on endothelial cells, as well as a significant upregulation of DNA synthesis, implicating cell proliferation. The mean incline of DNA synthesis at 48 and 72 h post-infection was 148 and 197 %, respectively. Addition of neutralizing antibodies against VEGF completely abolished this effect. Supernatants from SMC cultures incubated with UV-inactivated virus induced a comparable effect. This virus-induced paracrine effect may represent a molecular mechanism for HCMV-induced pathogenesis, such as inflammatory vasculopathies, by inducing a proatherogenic phenotype in SMC.

  4. Evaluating Human T-Cell Therapy of Cytomegalovirus Organ Disease in HLA-Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Simone; Klobuch, Sebastian; Podlech, Jürgen; Plachter, Bodo; Hoffmann, Petra; Renzaho, Angelique; Theobald, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can cause severe disease in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although preclinical research in murine models as well as clinical trials have provided 'proof of concept' for infection control by pre-emptive CD8 T-cell immunotherapy, there exists no predictive model to experimentally evaluate parameters that determine antiviral efficacy of human T cells in terms of virus control in functional organs, prevention of organ disease, and host survival benefit. We here introduce a novel mouse model for testing HCMV epitope-specific human T cells. The HCMV UL83/pp65-derived NLV-peptide was presented by transgenic HLA-A2.1 in the context of a lethal infection of NOD/SCID/IL-2rg-/- mice with a chimeric murine CMV, mCMV-NLV. Scenarios of HCMV-seropositive and -seronegative human T-cell donors were modeled by testing peptide-restimulated and T-cell receptor-transduced human T cells, respectively. Upon transfer, the T cells infiltrated host tissues in an epitope-specific manner, confining the infection to nodular inflammatory foci. This resulted in a significant reduction of viral load, diminished organ pathology, and prolonged survival. The model has thus proven its potential for a preclinical testing of the protective antiviral efficacy of HCMV epitope-specific human T cells in the evaluation of new approaches to an immunotherapy of CMV disease. PMID:26181057

  5. Tumor control by human cytomegalovirus in a murine model of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Coquard, Laurie; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Russo, Laetitia; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Borg, Christophe; Pothier, Pierre; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Although viruses can cause cancer, other studies reported the regression of human tumors upon viral infections. We investigated the cytoreductive potential of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in a murine model of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in severe-immunodeficient mice. Infection of HepG2 cells with HCMV resulted in the absence of tumor or in a limited tumor growth following injection of cells subcutaneously. By contrast all mice injected with uninfected HepG2 cells and with HepG2 cells infected with UV-treated HCMV did develop tumors without any significant restriction. Analysis of tumors indicated that in mice injected with HCMV-infected-HepG2 cells, but not in controls, a restricted cellular proliferation was observed parallel to a limited activation of the STAT3-cyclin D1 axis, decreased formation of colonies in soft agar, and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. We conclude that HCMV can provide antitumoral effects in a murine model of HCC which requires replicative virus at some stages that results in limitation of tumor cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis mediated through the intrinsic caspase pathway. PMID:27626063

  6. Genomic localization, sequence analysis, and transcription of the putative human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, T.; Jahn, G.; Buerkle, A.; Freese, U.K.; Fleckenstein, B.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-induced DNA polymerase has been well characterized biochemically and functionally, but its genomic location has not yet been assigned. To identify the coding sequence, cross-hybridization with the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) polymerase gene was used, as suggested by the close similarity of the herpes group virus-induced DNA polymerases to the HCMV DNA polymerase. A cosmid and plasmid library of the entire HCMV genome was screened with the BamHI Q fragment of HSF-1 at different stringency conditions. One PstI-HincII restriction fragment of 850 base pairs mapping within the EcoRI M fragment of HCMV cross-hybridized at T/sub m/ - 25/degrees/C. Sequence analysis revealed one open reading frame spanning the entire sequence. The amino acid sequence showed a highly conserved domain of 133 amino acids shared with the HSV and putative Esptein-Barr virus polymerase sequences. This domain maps within the C-terminal part of the HSV polymerase gene, which has been suggested to contain part of the catalytic center of the enzyme. Transcription analysis revealed one 5.4-kilobase early transcript in the sense orientation with respect to the open reading frame identified. This transcript appears to code for the 140-kilodalton HCMV polymerase protein.

  7. Inhibition of human cytomegalovirus IE gene expression by dihydro-beta-agarofuran sesquiterpenes isolated from Euonymus species.

    PubMed

    Pusztai, Rozália; Hohmann, Judit; Rédei, Dora; Engi, Helga; Molnár, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The development of strategies intended to inhibit human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate-early (IE) antigen expression is an important goal in research designed to prevent and treat certain forms of cancer. The aim of this study was to identify potent IE antigen-targeting natural compounds as antitumor promoters in an in vitro model of tumor promotion. Nineteen dihydro-beta-agarofuran sesquiterpenes isolated from Euonymus species were evaluated for their ability to inhibit HCMV IE antigen expression in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. Five esters of penta- and hexahydroxydihydro-beta-agarofuran proved to be active components in these Euonymus species, inhibiting the IE antigen expression of HCMV. The highest activity was displayed by 2beta,6alpha,15-triacetoxy1beta-benzoyloxy-9alpha-nicotinoyloxydihydro-beta-agarofuran. These effective compounds may be regarded as prototypes of antitumor promoters, as secondary chemopreventive agents which can modify or halt tumor promotion in general.

  8. Interplay between Human Cytomegalovirus and Intrinsic/Innate Host Responses: A Complex Bidirectional Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Rossini, Giada; Cerboni, Cristina; Santoni, Angela; Landini, Maria Paola; Landolfo, Santo; Gatti, Deborah; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Varani, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and its host is a complex process that begins with viral attachment and entry into host cells, culminating in the development of a specific adaptive response that clears the acute infection but fails to eradicate HCMV. We review the viral and cellular partners that mediate early host responses to HCMV with regard to the interaction between structural components of virions (viral glycoproteins) and cellular receptors (attachment/entry receptors, toll-like receptors, and other nucleic acid sensors) or intrinsic factors (PML, hDaxx, Sp100, viperin, interferon inducible protein 16), the reactions of innate immune cells (antigen presenting cells and natural killer cells), the numerous mechanisms of viral immunoevasion, and the potential exploitation of events that are associated with early phases of virus-host interplay as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:22701276

  9. Successful ganciclovir treatment of primary cytomegalovirus infection containing the UL97 mutation N510S in an intestinal graft recipient.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, R; Hamprecht, K; Lange, J; Ladurner, R; Nadalin, S; Jahn, G; Königsrainer, A; Heininger, A

    2013-08-01

    In solid organ transplantation, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is considered to be the most important viral pathogen. We report a case of a CMV R-/D+ small intestine transplant recipient with a primary CMV infection on valganciclovir prophylaxis. Sequencing of the HCMV DNA for drug resistance-associated mutations revealed the UL97 mutation N510S. This mutation has been initially reported to confer ganciclovir resistance. Based on in vitro recombinant phenotyping, this assumption has recently been questioned. Switching the antiviral treatment to an intravenous regimen of ganciclovir eliminated HCMV DNAemia, showing the in vivo efficacy of ganciclovir for the UL97 mutation N510S. Hence, knowledge of drug efficacy is crucial for an adequate choice of antiviral medication, carefully balancing antiviral potency versus the risk of harmful side effects.

  10. Systems-level metabolic flux profiling identifies fatty acid synthesis as a target for antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Joshua; Bennett, Bryson D; Parikh, Anuraag; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; McArdle, Jessica; Rabitz, Herschel A; Shenk, Thomas; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2010-01-01

    Viruses rely on the metabolic network of their cellular hosts to provide energy and building blocks for viral replication. We developed a flux measurement approach based on liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry to quantify changes in metabolic activity induced by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). This approach reliably elucidated fluxes in cultured mammalian cells by monitoring metabolome labeling kinetics after feeding cells 13C-labeled forms of glucose and glutamine. Infection with HCMV markedly upregulated flux through much of the central carbon metabolism, including glycolysis. Particularly notable increases occurred in flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle and its efflux to the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. Pharmacological inhibition of fatty acid biosynthesis suppressed the replication of both HCMV and influenza A, another enveloped virus. These results show that fatty acid synthesis is essential for the replication of two divergent enveloped viruses and that systems-level metabolic flux profiling can identify metabolic targets for antiviral therapy. PMID:18820684

  11. Multiplex PCR for identification of herpes virus infections in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Durzyńska, Julia; Pacholska-Bogalska, Joanna; Kaczmarek, Maria; Hanć, Tomasz; Durda, Magdalena; Skrzypczak, Magdalena; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a multiplex PCR (mPCR) for a rapid and simultaneous detection of herpes simplex 1 (HSV-1), herpes simplex 2 (HSV-2), and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA in squamous oral cells obtained from adolescents. Accuracy of the method was tested in a group of 513 adolescents, almost 11% of subjects were positive for infection with herpes viruses. Correlations with gender, age, and place of residence were sought. A similar incidence of HSV-2 and HCMV was found (4.3% and 5.4%, respectively) and the incidence of HSV-1 was the lowest (1%) in the study group. Conversely to HSV-2, HCMV was detected mostly in the youngest individuals. The same occurrence of all viruses was observed in boys and girls. The mPCR method described is suggested as a useful tool for epidemiologic studies of active herpes infections.

  12. Detection of human cytomegalovirus by slot-blot hybridization assay employing oligo-primed /sup 32/P-labelled probe

    SciTech Connect

    Agha, S.A.; Coleman, J.C.; Selwyn, S.; Mahmound, L.A.; Abd-Elaal, A.M.; Archard, L.C.

    1988-12-01

    A /sup 32/P-labelled Hind III-0 DNA fragment (nine Kilobases; Kb) from human cytomegalovirus AD-169 (HCMV) was used in slot-blot hybridization assay for the detection of HCMV in clinical samples. The results obtained with DNA hybridization assay (DNA HA) were compared with virus isolation using conventional tube cell culture (CTC) and centrifugation vial culture (CVC), immunofluorescence (IF), and complement fixation test (CFT). Of 15 CTC-positive samples, 13 were positive with DNA HA (sensitivity 86.7%). Also, 14 additional samples were DNA HA-positive but CTC-negative. CVC and/or IF confirmed the diagnosis in nine of 14; the remaining five samples were from three patients who showed fourfold rising antibody titre by CFT. Although DNA HA using /sup 32/P-labelled probes is relatively cumbersome and expensive, it is a valuable test for quantitation of viral shedding in patients with HCMV infections who may benefit from antiviral therapy.

  13. Can we build it better? Using BAC genetics to engineer more effective cytomegalovirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Schleiss, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    The magnitude and durability of immunity to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) following natural infection is compromised by the presence of immune modulation genes that appear to promote evasion of host clearance mechanisms. Since immunity to HCMV offers limited protection, rational design of effective vaccines has been challenging. In this issue of the JCI, Slavuljica and colleagues employ techniques to genetically modify the highly related mouse CMV (MCMV), in the process generating a virus that was rapidly cleared by NK cells. The virus functioned as a safe and highly effective vaccine. Demonstration of the ability to engineer a safe and highly effective live virus vaccine in a relevant rodent model of CMV infection may open the door to clinical trials of safer and more immunogenic HCMV vaccines. PMID:21099107

  14. Can we build it better? Using BAC genetics to engineer more effective cytomegalovirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Schleiss, Mark R

    2010-12-01

    The magnitude and durability of immunity to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) following natural infection is compromised by the presence of immune modulation genes that appear to promote evasion of host clearance mechanisms. Since immunity to HCMV offers limited protection, rational design of effective vaccines has been challenging. In this issue of the JCI, Slavuljica and colleagues employ techniques to genetically modify the highly related mouse CMV (MCMV), in the process generating a virus that was rapidly cleared by NK cells. The virus functioned as a safe and highly effective vaccine. Demonstration of the ability to engineer a safe and highly effective live virus vaccine in a relevant rodent model of CMV infection may open the door to clinical trials of safer and more immunogenic HCMV vaccines.

  15. Latency-Associated Degradation Of The MRP1 Drug Transporter During Latent Human Cytomegalovirus Infection‡

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Michael P.; Tan, Shireen Y. L.; Poole, Emma; Talbot, Suzanne; Antrobus, Robin; Smith, Duncan L.; Montag, Christina; Gygi, Steven P.; Sinclair, John H.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Reactivation of latent human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection following transplantation is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In vivo, myeloid cells and their progenitors are an important site of HCMV latency, whose establishment and/or maintenance requires expression of UL138. Using SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture)-based mass spectrometry, we found a dramatic UL138-mediated loss of cell surface Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein-1 (MRP1), and reduction of substrate export by this transporter. Latency-associated loss of MRP1 and accumulation of the cytotoxic drug vincristine, an MRP1 substrate, depleted virus from naturally latent CD14+ and CD34+ progenitors, all in vivo sites of latency. The UL138-mediated loss of MRP1 provides a marker for detecting latent HCMV infection and a therapeutic target for eliminating latently-infected cells prior to transplantation. PMID:23580527

  16. Expression of human cytomegalovirus pp150 gene in transgenic Vicia faba L. and immunogenicity of pp150 protein in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hua; Yan, Huishen; Li, Guocai; Gong, Weijuan; Jiao, Hongmei; Chen, Hongju; Ji, Mingchun

    2010-03-01

    The pp150 gene of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) was transferred into Vicia faba plants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Three of five hygromycin resistant V. faba plants were identified as positive by PCR and dot-blot hybridization. The ELISA results indicated that pp150 protein from three plants of transformed V. faba leaves and seeds made up 0.005-0.015% of the total soluble protein. The results of detection by immunoblot and inhibition of immunofluorescent assay (IFA) showed that pp150 soluble protein had immunity activity. HCMV pp150-specific antibody (IgG, IgA) and IFN-gamma producing T cells were detected in 100% of the mice immunized with pp150 transgenic V. faba seeds by ELISA and intracellular staining and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. The transgenic V. faba plants will provide new material for the development of edible vaccination against HCMV infection.

  17. Mechanisms Underlying T Cell Immunosenescence: Aging and Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Wenjuan; Rao, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the human immune system to protect against infectious disease declines with age and efficacy of vaccination reduces significantly in the elderly. Aging of the immune system, also termed as immunosenescence, involves many changes in human T cell immunity that is characterized by a loss in naïve T cell population and an increase in highly differentiated CD28- memory T cell subset. There is extensive data showing that latent persistent human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is also associated with age-related immune dysfunction in the T cells, which might enhance immunosenescence. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related and HCMV-related immunosenescence is critical for the development of effective age-targeted vaccines and immunotherapies. In this review, we will address the role of both aging and HCMV infection that contribute to the T cell senescence and discuss the potential molecular mechanisms in aged T cells. PMID:28082969

  18. Human cytomegalovirus: bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) cloning and genetic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Anne M; Yu, Dong

    2012-02-01

    The understanding of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) biology was long hindered by the inability to perform efficient viral genetic analysis. This hurdle was recently overcome when the genomes of multiple HCMV strains were cloned as infectious bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The BAC system takes advantage of the single-copy F plasmid of E. coli that can stably carry large pieces of foreign DNA. In this system, a recombinant HCMV virus carrying a modified F plasmid is first generated in eukaryotic cells. Recombinant viral genomes are then isolated and recovered in E. coli as BAC clones. BAC-captured viral genomes can be manipulated using prokaryotic genetics, and recombinant virus can be reconstituted from BAC transfection in eukaryotic cells. The BAC reverse genetic system provides a reliable and efficient method to introduce genetic alterations into the viral genome in E.coli and subsequently analyze their effects on virus biology in eukaryotic cells.

  19. Increased expression of LDL receptor-related protein 1 during human cytomegalovirus infection reduces virion cholesterol and infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Gudleski-O’Regan, Nicole; Greco, Todd M.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Shenk, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In response to virus infection, cells can alter protein expression to modify cellular functions and limit viral replication. To examine host protein expression during infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), an enveloped DNA virus, we performed a semi-quantitative, temporal analysis of the cell surface proteome in infected fibroblasts. We determined that resident low density lipoprotein related receptor 1 (LRP1), a plasma membrane receptor that regulates lipid metabolism, is elevated early after HCMV infection, resulting in decreased intracellular cholesterol. siRNA knockdown or antibody-mediated inhibition of LRP1 increased intracellular cholesterol, and concomitantly increased the infectious virus yield. Virions produced under these conditions contained elevated cholesterol, resulting in increased infectivity. Depleting cholesterol from virions reduced their infectivity by blocking fusion of the virion envelope with the cell membrane. Thus, LRP1 restricts HCMV infectivity by controlling the availability of cholesterol for the virion envelope and increased LRP1 expression is likely a defense response to infection. PMID:22817990

  20. Rapid intrahost evolution of human cytomegalovirus is shaped by demography and positive selection.

    PubMed

    Renzette, Nicholas; Gibson, Laura; Bhattacharjee, Bornali; Fisher, Donna; Schleiss, Mark R; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Kowalik, Timothy F

    2013-01-01

    Populations of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a large DNA virus, are highly polymorphic in patient samples, which may allow for rapid evolution within human hosts. To understand HCMV evolution, longitudinally sampled genomic populations from the urine and plasma of 5 infants with symptomatic congenital HCMV infection were analyzed. Temporal and compartmental variability of viral populations were quantified using high throughput sequencing and population genetics approaches. HCMV populations were generally stable over time, with ~88% of SNPs displaying similar frequencies. However, samples collected from plasma and urine of the same patient at the same time were highly differentiated with approximately 1700 consensus sequence SNPs (1.2% of the genome) identified between compartments. This inter-compartment differentiation was comparable to the differentiation observed in unrelated hosts. Models of demography (i.e., changes in population size and structure) and positive selection were evaluated to explain the observed patterns of variation. Evidence for strong bottlenecks (>90% reduction in viral population size) was consistent among all patients. From the timing of the bottlenecks, we conclude that fetal infection occurred between 13-18 weeks gestational age in patients analyzed, while colonization of the urine compartment followed roughly 2 months later. The timing of these bottlenecks is consistent with the clinical histories of congenital HCMV infections. We next inferred that positive selection plays a small but measurable role in viral evolution within a single compartment. However, positive selection appears to be a strong and pervasive driver of evolution associated with compartmentalization, affecting ≥ 34 of the 167 open reading frames (~20%) of the genome. This work offers the most detailed map of HCMV in vivo evolution to date and provides evidence that viral populations can be stable or rapidly differentiate, depending on host environment. The

  1. Latency-Associated Viral Interleukin-10 (IL-10) Encoded by Human Cytomegalovirus Modulates Cellular IL-10 and CCL8 Secretion during Latent Infection through Changes in the Cellular MicroRNA hsa-miR-92a

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Emma; Avdic, Selmir; Hodkinson, Jemima; Jackson, Sarah; Wills, Mark; Slobedman, Barry

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The UL111A gene of human cytomegalovirus encodes a viral homologue of the cellular immunomodulatory cytokine interleukin 10 (cIL-10), which, due to alternative splicing, results in expression of two isoforms designated LAcmvIL-10 (expressed during both lytic and latent infection) and cmvIL-10 (identified only during lytic infection). We have analyzed the functions of LAcmvIL-10 during latent infection of primary myeloid progenitor cells and found that LAcmvIL-10 is responsible, at least in part, for the known increase in secretion of cellular IL-10 and CCL8 in the secretomes of latently infected cells. This latency-associated increase in CCL8 expression results from a concomitant LAcmvIL-10-mediated suppression of the expression of the cellular microRNA (miRNA) hsa-miR-92a, which targets CCL8 directly. Taking the data together, we show that the previously observed downregulation of hsa-miR-92a and upregulation of CCL8 during HCMV latent infection of myeloid cells are intimately linked via the latency-associated expression of LAcmvIL-10. IMPORTANCE HCMV latency causes significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals, yet HCMV is carried silently (latently) in 50 to 90% of the population. Understanding how HCMV maintains infection for the lifetime of an infected individual is critical for the treatment of immunocompromised individuals suffering with disease as a result of HCMV. In this study, we analyze one of the proteins that are expressed during the “latent” phase of HCMV, LAcmvIL-10, and find that the expression of the gene modulates the microenvironment of the infected cell, leading to evasion of the immune system. PMID:25253336

  2. Cytomegalovirus protease targeted prodrug development.

    PubMed

    Sabit, Hairat; Dahan, Arik; Sun, Jing; Provoda, Chester J; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Hilfinger, John H; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a prevalent virus that infects up to 90% of the population. The goal of this research is to determine if small molecular prodrug substrates can be developed for a specific HCMV encoded protease and thus achieve site-specific activation. HCMV encodes a 256 amino acid serine protease that is responsible for capsid assembly, an essential process for herpes virus production. The esterase activity of the more stable HCMV A143T/A144T protease mutant was evaluated with model p-nitrophenol (ONp) esters, Boc-Xaa-ONp (Ala, Leu, Ile, Val, Gln, Phe at the Xaa position). We demonstrate that the A143T/A144T mutant has esterase activity toward specific small ester compounds, e.g., Boc-L-Ala-ONp. Mono amino acid and dipeptide prodrugs of ganciclovir (GCV) were also synthesized and evaluated for hydrolysis by the A143T/A144T protease mutant in solution. Hydrolysis of these prodrugs was also evaluated in Caco-2 cell homogenates, human liver microsomes (HLMs), and rat and human plasma. For the selectivity potential of the prodrugs, the hydrolysis ratio was evaluated as a percentage of prodrug hydrolyzed by the HCMV protease over the percentages of prodrug hydrolyses by Caco-2 cell homogenates, HLMs, and human/rat plasma. A dipeptide prodrug of ganciclovir, Ac-l-Gln-l-Ala-GCV, emerged as a potential selective prodrug candidate. The results of this research demonstrate that targeting prodrugs for activation by a specific protease encoded by the infectious HCMV pathogen may be achievable.

  3. Human cytomegalovirus alters localization of MHC class II and dendrite morphology in mature Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew W; Hertel, Laura; Louie, Ryan K; Burster, Timo; Lacaille, Vashti; Pashine, Achal; Abate, Davide A; Mocarski, Edward S; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2006-09-15

    Hemopoietic stem cell-derived mature Langerhans-type dendritic cells (LC) are susceptible to productive infection by human CMV (HCMV). To investigate the impact of infection on this cell type, we examined HLA-DR biosynthesis and trafficking in mature LC cultures exposed to HCMV. We found decreased surface HLA-DR levels in viral Ag-positive as well as in Ag-negative mature LC. Inhibition of HLA-DR was independent of expression of unique short US2-US11 region gene products by HCMV. Indeed, exposure to UV-inactivated virus, but not to conditioned medium from infected cells, was sufficient to reduce HLA-DR on mature LC, implicating particle binding/penetration in this effect. Reduced surface levels reflected an altered distribution of HLA-DR because total cellular HLA-DR was not diminished. Accumulation of HLA-DR was not explained by altered cathepsin S activity. Mature, peptide-loaded HLA-DR molecules were retained within cells, as assessed by the proportion of SDS-stable HLA-DR dimers. A block in egress was implicated, as endocytosis of surface HLA-DR was not increased. Immunofluorescence microscopy corroborated the intracellular retention of HLA-DR and revealed markedly fewer HLA-DR-positive dendritic projections in infected mature LC. Unexpectedly, light microscopic analyses showed a dramatic loss of the dendrites themselves and immunofluorescence revealed that cytoskeletal elements crucial for the formation and maintenance of dendrites are disrupted in viral Ag-positive cells. Consistent with these dendrite effects, HCMV-infected mature LC exhibit markedly reduced chemotaxis in response to lymphoid chemokines. Thus, HCMV impedes MHC class II molecule trafficking, dendritic projections, and migration of mature LC. These changes likely contribute to the reduced activation of CD4+ T cells by HCMV-infected mature LC.

  4. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Epitope-Specific CD4(+) T Cells Are Inflated in HIV(+) CMV(+) Subjects.

    PubMed

    Abana, Chike O; Pilkinton, Mark A; Gaudieri, Silvana; Chopra, Abha; McDonnell, Wyatt J; Wanjalla, Celestine; Barnett, Louise; Gangula, Rama; Hager, Cindy; Jung, Dae K; Engelhardt, Brian G; Jagasia, Madan H; Klenerman, Paul; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Koelle, David M; Kalams, Spyros A; Mallal, Simon A

    2017-10-02

    Select CMV epitopes drive life-long CD8(+) T cell memory inflation, but the extent of CD4 memory inflation is poorly studied. CD4(+) T cells specific for human CMV (HCMV) are elevated in HIV(+) HCMV(+) subjects. To determine whether HCMV epitope-specific CD4(+) T cell memory inflation occurs during HIV infection, we used HLA-DR7 (DRB1*07:01) tetramers loaded with the glycoprotein B DYSNTHSTRYV (DYS) epitope to characterize circulating CD4(+) T cells in coinfected HLA-DR7(+) long-term nonprogressor HIV subjects with undetectable HCMV plasma viremia. DYS-specific CD4(+) T cells were inflated among these HIV(+) subjects compared with those from an HIV(-) HCMV(+) HLA-DR7(+) cohort or with HLA-DR7-restricted CD4(+) T cells from the HIV-coinfected cohort that were specific for epitopes of HCMV phosphoprotein-65, tetanus toxoid precursor, EBV nuclear Ag 2, or HIV gag protein. Inflated DYS-specific CD4(+) T cells consisted of effector memory or effector memory-RA(+) subsets with restricted TCRβ usage and nearly monoclonal CDR3 containing novel conserved amino acids. Expression of this near-monoclonal TCR in a Jurkat cell-transfection system validated fine DYS specificity. Inflated cells were polyfunctional, not senescent, and displayed high ex vivo levels of granzyme B, CX3CR1, CD38, or HLA-DR but less often coexpressed CD38(+) and HLA-DR(+) The inflation mechanism did not involve apoptosis suppression, increased proliferation, or HIV gag cross-reactivity. Instead, the findings suggest that intermittent or chronic expression of epitopes, such as DYS, drive inflation of activated CD4(+) T cells that home to endothelial cells and have the potential to mediate cytotoxicity and vascular disease. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. The Smallest Capsid Protein Mediates Binding of the Essential Tegument Protein pp150 to Stabilize DNA-Containing Capsids in Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xinghong; Yu, Xuekui; Gong, Hao; Jiang, Xiaohong; Abenes, Gerrado; Liu, Hongrong; Shivakoti, Sakar; Britt, William J.; Zhu, Hua; Liu, Fenyong; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus that causes birth defects in newborns and life-threatening complications in immunocompromised individuals. Among all human herpesviruses, HCMV contains a much larger dsDNA genome within a similarly-sized capsid compared to the others, and it was proposed to require pp150, a tegument protein only found in cytomegaloviruses, to stabilize its genome-containing capsid. However, little is known about how pp150 interacts with the underlying capsid. Moreover, the smallest capsid protein (SCP), while dispensable in herpes simplex virus type 1, was shown to play essential, yet undefined, role in HCMV infection. Here, by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM), we determine three-dimensional structures of HCMV capsid (no pp150) and virion (with pp150) at sub-nanometer resolution. Comparison of these two structures reveals that each pp150 tegument density is composed of two helix bundles connected by a long central helix. Correlation between the resolved helices and sequence-based secondary structure prediction maps the tegument density to the N-terminal half of pp150. The structures also show that SCP mediates interactions between the capsid and pp150 at the upper helix bundle of pp150. Consistent with this structural observation, ribozyme inhibition of SCP expression in HCMV-infected cells impairs the formation of DNA-containing viral particles and reduces viral yield by 10,000 fold. By cryoEM reconstruction of the resulting “SCP-deficient” viral particles, we further demonstrate that SCP is required for pp150 functionally binding to the capsid. Together, our structural and biochemical results point to a mechanism whereby SCP recruits pp150 to stabilize genome-containing capsid for the production of infectious HCMV virion. PMID:23966856

  6. Human cytomegalovirus UL7, a homologue of the SLAM-family receptor CD229, impairs cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Engel, Pablo; Pérez-Carmona, Natàlia; Albà, M Mar; Robertson, Kevin; Ghazal, Peter; Angulo, Ana

    2011-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), the β-herpesvirus prototype, has evolved a wide spectrum of mechanisms to counteract host immunity. Among them, HCMV uses cellular captured genes encoding molecules capable of interfering with the original host function or of fulfilling new immunomodulatory tasks. Here, we report on UL7, a novel HCMV heavily glycosylated transmembrane protein, containing an Ig-like domain that exhibits remarkable amino acid similarity to CD229, a cell-surface molecule of the signalling lymphocyte-activation molecule (SLAM) family involved in leukocyte activation. The UL7 Ig-like domain, which is well-preserved in all HCMV strains, structurally resembles the SLAM-family N-terminal Ig-variable domain responsible for the homophilic and heterophilic interactions that trigger signalling. UL7 is transcribed with early-late kinetics during the lytic infectious cycle. Using a mAb generated against the viral protein, we show that it is constitutively shed, through its mucine-like stalk, from the cell-surface. Production of soluble UL7 is enhanced by PMA and reduced by a broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor. Although UL7 does not hold the ability to interact with CD229 or other SLAM-family members, it shares with them the capacity to mediate adhesion to leukocytes, specifically to monocyte-derived DCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that UL7 expression attenuates the production of proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IL-8 and IL-6 in DCs and myeloid cell lines. Thus, the ability of UL7 to interfere with cellular proinflammatory responses may contribute to viral persistence. These results enhance our understanding of those HCMV-encoded molecules involved in sustaining the balance between HCMV and the host immune system.

  7. Characterization of human cytomegalovirus UL145 and UL136 genes in low-passage clinical isolates from infected Chinese infants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Hu, Jing-Jing; Yan, Cui-Fang; Su, Hai-Hao; Ding, Jun-Cai; Guo, Yuan-Yuan; Ye, Ning; Huang, Shui-Qing; Zhang, Xiao-Zhuang; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals. The unique long b’ (ULB’) region of HCMV contains at least 19 open reading frames (ORFs); however, little is known about the function of UL145 and UL136. We characterized UL145 and UL136 in low-passage clinical isolates from Chinese infants. Material/Methods The clinical strains of HCMV were recovered from the urine from HCMV-infected infants. Human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELFs) were infected with clinical isolates of HCMV, and the viral DNA and mRNA for UL145 and UL136 were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing techniques. We also predicted the structure and function of UL145 and UL136 proteins. Results Sixty-two Chinese infants infected with HCMV were recruited into this study and the clinical isolates were recovered from the urine. Two strains among the low-passage isolates, D2 and D3, were obtained. The UL145 and UL136 sequences were deposited with GenBank under accession numbers of DQ180367, DQ180381, DQ180377, and DQ180389. The mRNA expression of both UL145 and UL136 was confirmed by reverse transcription (RT-PCR) assays. UL145 was predicted to contain 1 protein kinase C phosphorylation site, 2 casein kinase II phosphorylation sites and a zinc finger structure. UL136 was predicted to contain a protein kinase C phosphorylation site, N-myristoylation site, cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site and tyrosine kinase II phosphorylation site. Both UL145 and UL136 are highly conserved. Conclusions UL145 may act as an intranuclear regulating factor by direct binding to DNA, while UL136 may be a membrane receptor involving signal transduction. PMID:21804461

  8. Detection of human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in symptomatic and asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions by real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Ozbek, Selcuk M.; Yavuz, Muhammed S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent studies have investigated the occurrence of human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in samples from apical periodontitis lesions and a role in the pathogenesis of this disease has been suggested. Because genotype distribution and seroprevalence of EBV and HCMV differ among populations, it is important to determine the presence of these viruses in endodontic periapical lesions of different populations. The aims of this study were to determine the presence of HCMV and EBV DNAs in samples from Turkish patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions using real-time polymerase chain reaction method and to evaluate their presence in both symptomatic and asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions. Study Design: Periapical samples were collected from 12 asymptomatic and 16 symptomatic periapical lesions in conjunction with apicectomy. HCMV and EBV DNAs were identified in the samples by real-time PCR. The chi-squared test with Yates’s correction or the Fisher’s exact test was used to analyse the significance of differences. Results: HCMV DNA was detected in 10 of the 16 (62.5%) symptomatic and in five of the 12 (41.7 %) asymptomatic periapical study lesions. The EBV DNA was identified in seven of the 16 (43.7 %) symptomatic and three of the 12 (25 %) asymptomatic periapical lesions. The difference in occurrence of HCMV and EBV DNA between symptomatic and asymptomatic periapical lesions was not statistically significant. (All comparisons have p > 0.05). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that HCMV and EBV is a frequent inhabitant of both symptomatic and asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions of endodontic origin in Turkish population. Key words:Human cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr Virus, apical periodontitis, Polymerase chain reaction method. PMID:23722135

  9. Toxic megacolon and human Cytomegalovirus in a series of severe ulcerative colitis patients.

    PubMed

    Criscuoli, Valeria; Rizzuto, Maria Rosa; Gallo, Elena; Orlando, Ambrogio; Cottone, Mario

    2015-05-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection has been reported to be a cause of refractory ulcerative colitis (UC). Toxic megacolon (TM) is a rare but severe complication of an acute attack of UC. Aim of this study is to evaluate in a case-control study the association between HCMV and TM. All patients who were admitted at Medicine Department of V. Cervello Hospital in Palermo (tertiary referral center) for a severe UC flare-up complicated by the onset of TM (diameter of the transverse colon>6 cm) between January 1990 and November 2011 were identified through the electronic database. A total of 24 consecutive patients (16 male/8 female) with TM were identified. Each case of TM were individually matched by sex, age, extent of the underlying disease to 24 severe UC controls who did not develop TM. A further non matched control population of 48 severe UC was included. Haematoxilin and eosin stain, immunohistochemical procedure and nested polymerase chain reaction were performed to detect HCMV genes and proteins on rectal biopsies or surgical specimens. Pp65 antigenemia was performed in order to diagnose any possible systemic infection. HCMV frequency was compared between patients with and without TM during follow-up, using Fisher's Exact test. HCMV was detected in histological specimens of 11 patients (46%) with TM compared to 2 (9%) severe UC matched controls (P = 0.0078) and 7 (14%) unmatched controls (p = 0,003). In severe colitis the presence of HCMV is more frequently associated with TM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Human cytomegalovirus US3 modulates destruction of MHC class I molecules.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Vanessa M; Hesse, Julia; Gardner, Thomas J; Besold, Katrin; Plachter, Bodo; Tortorella, Domenico

    2012-06-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a member of the Herpesviridae family, is proficient at establishing lifelong persistence within the host in part due to immune modulating genes that limit immune recognition. HCMV encodes at least five glycoproteins within its unique short (US) genomic region that interfere with MHC class I antigen presentation, thus hindering viral clearance by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Specifically, US3 retains class I within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), while US2 and US11 induce class I heavy chain destruction. A cooperative effect on class I down-regulation during stable expression of HCMV US2 and US3 has been established. To address the impact of US3 on US11-mediated MHC class I down-regulation, the fate of class I molecules was examined in US3/US11-expressing cells and virus infection studies. Co-expression of US3 and US11 resulted in a decrease of surface expression of class I molecules. However, the class I molecules in US3/US11 cells were mostly retained in the ER with an attenuated rate of proteasome destruction. Analysis of class I levels from virus-infected cells using HCMV variants either expressing US3 or US11 revealed efficient surface class I down-regulation upon expression of both viral proteins. Cells infected with both US3 and US11 expressing viruses demonstrate enhanced retention of MHC class I complexes within the ER. Collectively, the data suggests a paradigm where HCMV-induced surface class I down-regulation occurs by diverse mechanisms dependent on the expression of specific US genes. These results validate the commitment of HCMV to limiting the surface expression of class I levels during infection.

  11. Differential kinetics of human cytomegalovirus load and antibody responses in primary infection of the immunocompetent and immunocompromised host.

    PubMed

    Gerna, Giuseppe; Lilleri, Daniele; Fornara, Chiara; Bruno, Francesca; Gabanti, Elisa; Cane, Ilaria; Furione, Milena; Revello, M Grazia

    2015-02-01

    The comparative long-term kinetics of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) load and HCMV-specific antibody responses in the immunocompetent and immunocompromised solid-organ transplanted host during primary HCMV infection was investigated. In total, 40 immunocompetent subjects and 17 transplanted patients were examined for viral load as well as for IgG antibody responses to HCMV glycoproteins gH/gL/pUL128L, gH/gL and gB, and neutralizing antibodies in ARPE-19 epithelial cells and human fibroblasts. In parallel, the CD4(+) and CD8(+) HCMV-specific T-cell responses were determined by cytokine flow cytometry. Transplanted patients reached significantly higher viral DNA peaks, which persisted longer than in immunocompetent subjects. The ELISA-IgG responses to the pentamer, gH/gL and gB were significantly higher in primary infections of the immunocompetent until six months after onset, with the two antibody levels then overlapping from six to 12 months. Antibody levels neutralizing infection of epithelial cells were significantly higher in transplanted patients after six months, persisting for up to a year after transplantation. This trend was not observed for antibodies neutralizing infection of human fibroblasts, which showed higher titres in the immunocompetent over the entire one-year follow-up. In conclusion, in immunocompromised patients the viral load peak was much higher, while the neutralizing antibody response exceeded that detected in the immunocompetent host starting six months after onset of follow-up, often concomitantly with a lack of specific CD4(+) T cells. In this setting, the elevated antibody response occurred in the presence of differentiated follicular helper T cells in the blood, which decreased in number as did antibody titres upon reappearance of HCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells. © 2015 The Authors.

  12. Genetic identification of cytomegaloviruses in a rural population of Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Anoh, Augustin Etile; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Pauly, Maude; Schubert, Grit; Mossoun, Arsène; Weiss, Sabrina; Leendertz, Siv Aina J; Jarvis, Michael A; Leendertz, Fabian H; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2015-10-05

    Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) are herpesviruses that infect many mammalian species, including humans. Infection generally passes undetected, but the virus can cause serious disease in individuals with impaired immune function. Human CMV (HCMV) is circulating with high seroprevalence (60-100 %) on all continents. However, little information is available on HCMV genoprevalence and genetic diversity in subsaharan Africa, especially in rural areas of West Africa that are at high risk of human-to-human HCMV transmission. In addition, there is a potential for zoonotic spillover of pathogens through bushmeat hunting and handling in these areas as shown for various retroviruses. Although HCMV and nonhuman CMVs are regarded as species-specific, potential human infection with CMVs of non-human primate (NHP) origin, shown to circulate in the local NHP population, has not been studied. Analysis of 657 human oral swabs and fecal samples collected from 518 individuals living in 8 villages of Côte d'Ivoire with generic PCR for identification of human and NHP CMVs revealed shedding of HCMV in 2.5 % of the individuals. Determination of glycoprotein B sequences showed identity with strains Towne, AD169 and Toledo, respectively. NHP CMV sequences were not detected. HCMV is actively circulating in a proportion of the rural Côte d'Ivoire human population with circulating strains being closely related to those previously identified in non-African countries. The lack of NHP CMVs in human populations in an environment conducive to cross-species infection supports zoonotic transmission of CMVs to humans being at most a rare event.

  13. Quantitative analysis of human herpesvirus-6 and human cytomegalovirus in blood and saliva from patients with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nefzi, Faten; Ben Salem, Nabil Abid; Khelif, Abderrahim; Feki, Salma; Aouni, Mahjoub; Gautheret-Dejean, Agnès

    2015-03-01

    Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNAs were quantified by real-time PCR assays in blood and saliva obtained from 50 patients with acute leukemia at the time of diagnosis (50 of each matrix), aplasia (65 of each matrix), remission (55 of each matrix), and relapse (20 of each matrix) to evaluate which biological matrix was more suitable to identify a viral reactivation, search for a possible link between HHV-6 and HCMV reactivations, and evaluate the relations between viral loads and count of different leukocyte types in blood. The median HHV-6 loads were 136; 219; 226, and 75 copies/million cells in blood at diagnosis, aplasia, remission and relapse, respectively. The HCMV loads were 193 and 317 copies/million cells in blood at diagnosis and remission. In the saliva samples, the HHV-6 loads were 22,165; 15,238; 30,214, and 17,454 copies/million cells at diagnosis, aplasia, remission, and relapse, respectively. The HCMV loads were 8,991; 1,461; 2,980, and 4,283 copies/million cells at diagnosis, aplasia, remission, and relapse, respectively. The HHV-6 load in the blood was correlated to the counts of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (R(2)  = 0.5; P < 0.0001) and lymphocytes (R(2)  = 0.4; P = 0.001) and was not correlated to the monocyte counts (R(2)  = 0.07; P = 0.7). Saliva appears to be a more sensitive biological matrix than whole blood in the detection of HHV-6 or HCMV reactivations. The HHV-6 and HCMV reactivations were linked only in saliva.

  14. Pseudoneoplastic appearance of cytomegalovirus-associated colitis in nonimmunocompromised patients: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Maiorana, Antonio; Torricelli, Pietro; Giusti, Federica; Bellini, Nicola

    2003-09-01

    Two cases of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) colitis with pseudoneoplastic appearance are described. Patients presented with abdominal pain, fever, and diarrhea. Colonoscopy revealed a stenosing lesion in one patient and a broad-based, vegetant mass in the other patient, and histopathological examination of colectomy specimens revealed exuberant inflammatory masses with infiltration of mononuclear cells and ulcers with granulation tissue. Typical intranuclear HCMV inclusions were numerous. Peculiar to both patients was the lack of any apparent causes of immunodeficiency, such as human immunodeficiency virus infection or previous organ transplantation.

  15. Human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection in inflammatory bowel disease: Need for mucosal viral load measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Racca, Francesca; Paolucci, Stefania; Campanini, Giulia; Pozzi, Lodovica; Betti, Elena; Riboni, Roberta; Vanoli, Alessandro; Baldanti, Fausto; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the best diagnostic technique and risk factors of the human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: A cohort of 40 IBD patients (17 refractory) and 40 controls underwent peripheral blood and endoscopic colonic mucosal sample harvest. Viral infection was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, and correlations with clinical and endoscopic indexes of activity, and risk factors were investigated. RESULTS: All refractory patients carried detectable levels of HCMV and/or EBV mucosal load as compared to 13/23 (56.5%) non-refractory and 13/40 (32.5%) controls. The median DNA value was significantly higher in refractory (HCMV 286 and EBV 5.440 copies/105 cells) than in non-refractory (HCMV 0 and EBV 6 copies/105 cells; P < 0.05 and < 0.001) IBD patients and controls (HCMV and EBV 0 copies/105 cells; P < 0.001 for both). Refractory patients showed DNA peak values ≥ 103 copies/105 cells in diseased mucosa in comparison to non-diseased mucosa (P < 0.0121 for HCMV and < 0.0004 for EBV), while non-refractory patients and controls invariably displayed levels below this threshold, thus allowing us to differentiate viral colitis from mucosal infection. Moreover, the mucosal load positively correlated with the values found in the peripheral blood, whilst no correlation with the number of positive cells at immunohistochemistry was found. Steroid use was identified as a significant risk factor for both HCMV (P = 0.018) and EBV (P = 0.002) colitis. Finally, a course of specific antiviral therapy with ganciclovir was successful in all refractory patients with HCMV colitis, whilst refractory patients with EBV colitis did not show any improvement despite steroid tapering and discontinuation of the other medications. CONCLUSION: Viral colitis appeared to contribute to mucosal lesions in refractory IBD, and its correct diagnosis and management require

  16. Mutual Interplay between the Human Cytomegalovirus Terminase Subunits pUL51, pUL56, and pUL89 Promotes Terminase Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Neuber, Sebastian; Wagner, Karen; Goldner, Thomas; Lischka, Peter; Steinbrueck, Lars; Messerle, Martin; Borst, Eva Maria

    2017-06-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome encapsidation requires several essential viral proteins, among them pUL56, pUL89, and the recently described pUL51, which constitute the viral terminase. To gain insight into terminase complex assembly, we investigated interactions between the individual subunits. For analysis in the viral context, HCMV bacterial artificial chromosomes carrying deletions in the open reading frames encoding the terminase proteins were used. These experiments were complemented by transient-transfection assays with plasmids expressing the terminase components. We found that if one terminase protein was missing, the levels of the other terminase proteins were markedly diminished, which could be overcome by proteasome inhibition or providing the missing subunit in trans These data imply that sequestration of the individual subunits within the terminase complex protects them from proteasomal turnover. The finding that efficient interactions among the terminase proteins occurred only when all three were present together is reminiscent of a folding-upon-binding principle leading to cooperative stability. Furthermore, whereas pUL56 was translocated into the nucleus on its own, correct nuclear localization of pUL51 and pUL89 again required all three terminase constituents. Altogether, these features point to a model of the HCMV terminase as a multiprotein complex in which the three players regulate each other concerning stability, subcellular localization, and assembly into the functional tripartite holoenzyme.IMPORTANCE HCMV is a major risk factor in immunocompromised individuals, and congenital CMV infection is the leading viral cause for long-term sequelae, including deafness and mental retardation. The current treatment of CMV disease is based on drugs sharing the same mechanism, namely, inhibiting viral DNA replication, and often results in adverse side effects and the appearance of resistant virus strains. Recently, the HCMV terminase has emerged as

  17. Human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection in inflammatory bowel disease: need for mucosal viral load measurement.

    PubMed

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Racca, Francesca; Paolucci, Stefania; Campanini, Giulia; Pozzi, Lodovica; Betti, Elena; Riboni, Roberta; Vanoli, Alessandro; Baldanti, Fausto; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2015-02-14

    To evaluate the best diagnostic technique and risk factors of the human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A cohort of 40 IBD patients (17 refractory) and 40 controls underwent peripheral blood and endoscopic colonic mucosal sample harvest. Viral infection was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, and correlations with clinical and endoscopic indexes of activity, and risk factors were investigated. All refractory patients carried detectable levels of HCMV and/or EBV mucosal load as compared to 13/23 (56.5%) non-refractory and 13/40 (32.5%) controls. The median DNA value was significantly higher in refractory (HCMV 286 and EBV 5.440 copies/10(5) cells) than in non-refractory (HCMV 0 and EBV 6 copies/10(5) cells; P < 0.05 and < 0.001) IBD patients and controls (HCMV and EBV 0 copies/10(5) cells; P < 0.001 for both). Refractory patients showed DNA peak values ≥ 10(3) copies/10(5) cells in diseased mucosa in comparison to non-diseased mucosa (P < 0.0121 for HCMV and < 0.0004 for EBV), while non-refractory patients and controls invariably displayed levels below this threshold, thus allowing us to differentiate viral colitis from mucosal infection. Moreover, the mucosal load positively correlated with the values found in the peripheral blood, whilst no correlation with the number of positive cells at immunohistochemistry was found. Steroid use was identified as a significant risk factor for both HCMV (P = 0.018) and EBV (P = 0.002) colitis. Finally, a course of specific antiviral therapy with ganciclovir was successful in all refractory patients with HCMV colitis, whilst refractory patients with EBV colitis did not show any improvement despite steroid tapering and discontinuation of the other medications. Viral colitis appeared to contribute to mucosal lesions in refractory IBD, and its correct diagnosis and management require quantitative real

  18. Human Cytomegalovirus miR-UL112-3p Targets TLR2 and Modulates the TLR2/IRAK1/NFκB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Landais, Igor; Pelton, Chantel; Streblow, Daniel; DeFilippis, Victor; McWeeney, Shannon; Nelson, Jay A.

    2015-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes multiple microRNAs (miRNAs) whose functions are just beginning to be uncovered. Using in silico approaches, we identified the Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) innate immunity pathway as a possible target of HCMV miRNAs. Luciferase reporter assay screens further identified TLR2 as a target of HCMV miR-UL112-3p. TLR2 plays a major role in innate immune response by detecting both bacterial and viral ligands, including HCMV envelope proteins gB and gH. TLR2 activates a variety of signal transduction routes including the NFκB pathway. Furthermore, TLR2 plays an important role in controlling CMV infection both in humans and in mice. Immunoblot analysis of cells transfected with a miR-UL112-3p mimic revealed that endogenous TLR2 is down-regulated by miR-UL112-3p with similar efficiency as a TLR2-targeting siRNA (siTLR2). We next found that TLR2 protein level decreases at late times during HCMV infection and correlates with miR-UL112-3p accumulation in fibroblasts and monocytic THP1 cells. Confirming direct miR-UL112-3p targeting, down-regulation of endogenous TLR2 was not observed in cells infected with HCMV mutants deficient in miR-UL112-3p expression, but transfection of miR-UL112-3p in these cells restored TLR2 down-regulation. Using a NFκB reporter cell line, we found that miR-UL112-3p transfection significantly inhibited NFκB-dependent luciferase activity with similar efficiency as siTLR2. Consistent with this observation, miR-UL112-3p transfection significantly reduced the expression of multiple cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8) upon stimulation with a TLR2 agonist. Finally, miR-UL112-3p transfection significantly inhibited the TLR2-induced post-translational activation of IRAK1, a kinase located in the upstream section of the TLR2/NFκB signaling axis. To our knowledge, this is the first identified mechanism of TLR2 modulation by HCMV and is the first report of functional targeting of TLR2 by a viral miRNA. These results provide a

  19. Detection of Human Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in Coronary Atherosclerotic Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Imbronito, Ana Vitória; Marcelino, Silvia Linardi; Grande, Sabrina Rosa; Nunes, Fabio Daumas; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that patients with atherosclerosis are predominantly infected by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), but rarely infected by type 1 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-1). In this study, atheromas of 30 patients who underwent aortocoronary bypass surgery with coronary endartherectomy were tested for the presence of these two viruses. HCMV occurred in 93.3% of the samples and EBV-1 was present in 50% of them. Concurrent presence of both pathogens was detected in 43.3% of the samples. PMID:24031529

  20. Human cytomegalovirus maturational proteinase: expression in Escherichia coli, purification, and enzymatic characterization by using peptide substrate mimics of natural cleavage sites.

    PubMed Central

    Burck, P J; Berg, D H; Luk, T P; Sassmannshausen, L M; Wakulchik, M; Smith, D P; Hsiung, H M; Becker, G W; Gibson, W; Villarreal, E C

    1994-01-01

    The proteolytic processing of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) assembly protein, resulting in truncation of its C terminus, is an essential step in virion maturation. The proteinase responsible for this cleavage is the amino-terminal half of the protein encoded by the UL80a open reading fame. We have obtained high expression levels of this 256-amino-acid HCMV proteinase, assemblin, in Escherichia coli. In addition to the 28-kDa proteinase, a 15-kDa protein comprising the first 143 amino acids and a 13-kDa protein comprising the last 113 amino acids of the 28-kDa HCMV proteinase were present. Both the 28-kDa proteinase and the 15-kDa protein were purified by a two-step chromatographic procedure utilizing anion exchange in urea and dithiothreitol and size exclusion in NaSCN and dithiothreitol. Activation of the purified 28-kDa proteinase required denaturation in urea as well as complete reduction of all five cysteine residues in the molecule. Removal of the urea by dialysis with retention of the reducing agent yielded an active proteinase. Addition of glycerol to 50% enhanced the activity. The HCMV proteinase cleaved the peptides RGVVNASSRLAK and SYVKASVSPE, which are mimics of the maturational (M)- and release (R)-site sequences, respectively, in the UL80a-encoded protein. The cleavage site in the peptides was at the same Ala-Ser scissile bond as observed in the UL80a protein. The Km value for the cleavage of RGVVNASSRLAK (M-site mimic) by the proteinase was similar to that for SYVKASVSPE (R-site mimic), but the turnover (kcat) of the M-site peptide mimic substrate by the proteinase was six to eight times faster. The peptide homologs of the herpes simplex virus type 1 M- and R-site sequences in the UL26-encoded protein were also cleaved by the HCMV proteinase, although at rates slower than those for the HCMV substrates. The HCMV proteinase was inhibited by Zn2+ and by alkylating agents, but only at very high inhibitor concentrations. The purified 15-kDa protein

  1. Synthesis and Antiviral Activity Evaluation of 2',5',5'-Trifluoro-Apiosyl Nucleoside Phosphonic Acid Analogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunae; Hong, Joon Hee

    2016-01-01

    Racemic synthesis of novel 2',5',5'-trifluoro-apiose nucleoside phosphonic acid analogs were performed as potent antiviral agents. Phosphonation was performed by direct displacement of triflate intermediate with diethyl (lithiodifluoromethyl) phosphonate to give the corresponding (α,α-difluoroalkyl) phosphonate. Condensation successfully proceeded from a glycosyl donor with persilylated bases to yield the nucleoside phosphonate analogs. Deprotection of diethyl phosphonates provided the target nucleoside analogs. An antiviral evaluation of the synthesized compounds against various viruses such as HIV, HSV-1, HSV-2, and HCMV revealed that the pyrimidine analogues have significant anti-HCMV activity.

  2. Effects of Jinye Baidu Granule on fetal growth and development with maternal active human cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Chen, Su-hua; Wen, Liang-zhen

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of Jinye Baidu Granule ( JYBDG), a traditional Chinese medicine compound prescription, on fetal growth and development with maternal active human cytomegalovirus infection. A prospective, randomized and controlled trial was adopted during January 1996 to June 2002. From the pregnant women with an abnormal pregnant history, 240 cases were screened to be infected by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). They were assigned according to the random number table to two groups. The 122 cases in the treatment group were administrated with JYBDG, one package each time, three times a day for two continuous weeks, while the other 118 in the control group did not receive any treatment. The negative conversion rate of both HCMV-IgM and HCMV late mRNA, the positive rate of HCMV-DNA in placenta and the intrauterine transmission rate between the two groups were compared, and fetal growth and development in partial fetuses were also observed. The negative conversion rate of both HCMV-lgM and HCMV late mRNA, the positive rate of HCMV-DNA in placenta and the intrauterine transmission rate in the treatment group were 77. 05% (94/122), 48. 98% (48/98) and 21.74% (10/46) respectively, while those in the control group were 38. 14% (45/118), 67.50% (54/80) and 52.63% (20/38) respectively, all showing significant difference between the two groups (P<0. 01). Totally 35 normal infants and 11 abnormal infants were born in the treatment group, and the number in the control group was 20 and 18 respectively, and comparison between the two groups showed significant difference (P<0.01). Six months of child birth, the scores of both mental development index (MDI) and psychomotor development index (PDI) of infants were higher in the treatment group (20 cases) than those in the control group (20 cases), but there was no significant difference between the two groups (P>0

  3. The DNA damage response induced by infection with human cytomegalovirus and other viruses.

    PubMed

    Xiaofei, E; Kowalik, Timothy F

    2014-05-23

    Viruses use different strategies to overcome the host defense system. Recent studies have shown that viruses can induce DNA damage response (DDR). Many of these viruses use DDR signaling to benefit their replication, while other viruses block or inactivate DDR signaling. This review focuses on the effects of DDR and DNA repair on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication. Here, we review the DDR induced by HCMV infection and its similarities and differences to DDR induced by other viruses. As DDR signaling pathways are critical for the replication of many viruses, blocking these pathways may represent novel therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of certain infectious diseases. Lastly, future perspectives in the field are discussed.

  4. Loss of FMRP Impaired Hippocampal Long-Term Plasticity and Spatial Learning in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yonglu; Yang, Chaojuan; Shang, Shujiang; Cai, Yijun; Deng, Xiaofei; Zhang, Jian; Shao, Feng; Zhu, Desheng; Liu, Yunbo; Chen, Guiquan; Liang, Jing; Sun, Qiang; Qiu, Zilong; Zhang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the FMR1 gene that inactivate expression of the gene product, the fragile X mental retardation 1 protein (FMRP). In this study, we used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) technology to generate Fmr1 knockout (KO) rats by disruption of the fourth exon of the Fmr1 gene. Western blotting analysis confirmed that the FMRP was absent from the brains of the Fmr1 KO rats (Fmr1(exon4-KO) ). Electrophysiological analysis revealed that the theta-burst stimulation (TBS)-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) and the low-frequency stimulus (LFS)-induced long-term depression (LTD) were decreased in the hippocampal Schaffer collateral pathway of the Fmr1(exon4-KO) rats. Short-term plasticity, measured as the paired-pulse ratio, remained normal in the KO rats. The synaptic strength mediated by the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) was also impaired. Consistent with previous reports, the Fmr1(exon4-KO) rats demonstrated an enhanced 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG)-induced LTD in the present study, and this enhancement is insensitive to protein translation. In addition, the Fmr1(exon4-KO) rats showed deficits in the probe trial in the Morris water maze test. These results demonstrate that deletion of the Fmr1 gene in rats specifically impairs long-term synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent learning in a manner resembling the key symptoms of FXS. Furthermore, the Fmr1(exon4-KO) rats displayed impaired social interaction and macroorchidism, the results consistent with those observed in patients with FXS. Thus, Fmr1(exon4-KO) rats constitute a novel rat model of FXS that complements existing mouse models.

  5. Human Cytomegalovirus Secretome Contains Factors That Induce Angiogenesis and Wound Healing

    SciTech Connect

    Dumortier, Jerome; Streblow, Daniel N.; Moses, Ashlee V.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Kreklywich, Craig N.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Orloff, Susan L.; Nelson, Jay

    2008-07-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is implicated in the acceleration of a number of vascular diseases including transplant vascular sclerosis (TVS), the lesion associated with chronic rejection (CR) of solid organ transplants. Although the virus persists in the allograft throughout the course of disease, few cells are directly infected by CMV. This observation is in contrast to the global effects that CMV has on the acceleration of TVS/CR, suggesting that CMV infection indirectly promotes the vascular disease process. Recent transcriptome analysis of CMV-infected heart allografts indicates that the virus induces cytokines and growth factors associated with angiogenesis (AG) and wound healing (WH), suggesting that CMV may accelerate TVS/CR through the induction and secretion of AG/WH factors from infected cells. We analyzed virus-free supernatants from HCMV-infected cells (HCMV secretomes) for growth factors, by mass spectrometry and immunoassays, and found that the HCMV secretome contains over 1,000 cellular proteins, many of which are involved in AG/WH. Importantly, functional assays demonstrated that CMV but not herpes simplex virus secretomes not only induce AG/WH but also promote neovessel stabilization and endothelial cell survival for 2 weeks. These findings suggest that CMV acceleration of TVS occurs through virus-induced growth factors and cytokines in the CMV secretome.

  6. Frequencies of memory T cells specific for varicella-zoster virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus by intracellular detection of cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, H; Sharp, M; Maecker, H T; Maino, V C; Arvin, A M

    2000-03-01

    Memory T cells specific for varicella-zoster virus (VZV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) were compared in immune adults by intracellular cytokine (ICC) detection. The mean percentages of CD4+ T cells were 0.11% for VZV and 0.22% for HSV by interferon (IFN)-gamma production; the frequency for HCMV was significantly higher at 1.21%. Percentages of VZV-, HSV-, and HCMV-specific CD4+ T cells were similar by use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. HCMV-stimulated CD8+ T cells produced IFN-gamma (1.11%) and TNF-alpha (1.71%); VZV- and HSV-specific CD8+ T cells were not detectable. VZV CD4+ T cell numbers were similar in young adults with natural or vaccine-induced immunity. VZV CD4+ T cells were significantly less frequent in older adults. Secondary varicella immunization did not increase VZV-specific CD4+ T cell frequencies by ICC assay. Numbers of memory T cells specific for herpesviruses may vary with sites of viral latency and with host age.

  7. [Detection of DNA human cytomegalovirus of a molecular methods: hybrid capture DNA CMV by immunocompromised].

    PubMed

    Mhiri, Leila; Arrouji, Zakia; Slim, Amine; Ben Redjeb, Saida

    2006-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a member of the beta-virus herpes family, is a ubiquitous human pathogen. After a primary infection, HCMV establishes life latency. HCMV rarely causes symptomatic disease in an immunocompetent host, however, it is a major cause of infectious morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals and developing fetuses. The HCMV genome consists of 240 kbp of double stranded DNA. Early diagnosis molecular of CMV infection is important. The objective of this study was to develop a molecular methods: Quantitative Hybrid capture for the detection of DNA CMV. We present results for 200 immunocompromised collected from 1999 to 2003 (122 men and 78 women, whom mean age was 35 years). Our results showed that 25% of women and 36% of men were positif for hybrid capture DNA CMV. This simple test (cold probe) provide quantitative and fast results. Also the efficacity of anti-CMV therapy can be followed. More over, in contrary with pp65-antigenemia assay and CMV PCR, this test can be managed on biopsy sample.

  8. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus and human cytomegalovirus in blood and oral samples: comparison of three sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Imbronito, Ana V; Grande, Sabrina R; Freitas, Nivea M de; Okuda, Osmar; Lotufo, Roberto F M; Nunes, Fabio D

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and compare the presence of HCMV and EBV-1 in subgingival plaque, unstimulated saliva and peripheral blood of patients with chronic periodontitis. Forty patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis (mean age, 41.7 years) were recruited. Unstimulated saliva, subgingival plaque and peripheral blood were collected from each patient and the DNA of each sample was isolated. The viruses were detected using the nested PCR technique. The detection frequency of EBV-1 in subgingival plaque, saliva and peripheral blood was 45%, 37.5% and 25%, respectively. HCMV was detected in 82.5% of subgingival plaque samples and peripheral blood and in 75% of salivary samples. The sensitivity for detecting EBV-1 in saliva and peripheral blood when EBV-1 was detected in subgingival plaque samples was low (22% and 27.7%, respectively) and the sensitivity for detecting HCMV in saliva and peripheral blood when compared to subgingival plaque was high (81.8% and 87.8%, respectively). There is a high agreement among the three sampling methods in detection of HCMV, but the detection of EBV-1 would require a combination of saliva and subgingival plaque sampling to avoid false negative results.

  9. Detection and quantification of herpesviruses in Kostmann syndrome periodontitis using real-time polymerase chain reaction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, S; Yapar, M; Kubar, A

    2006-04-01

    Kostmann syndrome, or severe congenital neutropenia, is an autosomal recessive disease of neutrophil production and is associated with severe periodontal pathology. The aim of this study was to determine whether human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) contribute to the pathogenesis of Kostmann syndrome periodontitis. Supragingival plaque and saliva samples were taken from a 6-year-old boy and his 3-year-old sister suffering from Kostmann syndrome, and from two age- and gender-matched healthy children serving as controls. The samples were taken before and 24 months after periodontal treatment. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (TaqMan Real-Time PCR) assay was used to quantify HCMV and EBV DNA. EBV was detected in baseline samples from the Kostmann syndrome patients but not in samples from the healthy control subjects. HCMV was only detected in the saliva of the boy with Kostman syndrome at baseline. Herpesviruses numbers decreased dramatically in the post-treatment samples. EBV and HCMV were detected in the two subjects with Kostmann syndrome periodontitis. The results of the study indicate that nonsurgical treatment of Kostmann syndrome periodontitis can reduce supragingival and salivary herpes viral loads.

  10. Low prevalence of subgingival viruses in periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Nibali, Luigi; Atkinson, Claire; Griffiths, Paul; Darbar, Ulpee; Rakmanee, Thanasak; Suvan, Jeanie; Donos, Nikos

    2009-11-01

    Viruses such as Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) have been proposed to be periodontal pathogens. The aim of this study was to analyse the presence of herpesvirus DNA in subgingival plaque samples of patients with different forms of periodontitis and in healthy periodontia. A total of 140 ethnically mixed (prevalently Caucasian) subjects took part in the study. Sixteen were affected by localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), 64 by generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), 20 by chronic periodontitis (CP) and 40 were periodontally healthy. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses were performed to detect HCMV and EBV. Sera were tested for anti-HCMV and EBV IgG antibodies. PCRs for herpes simplex (HSV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) were performed in subgingival samples from a subset of 20 AgP subjects. HCMV DNA was not detected in any plaque samples. EBV DNA was detected in four LAgP (25%), two GAgP (3%) subjects and four healthy individuals (10%). HSV DNA and VZV DNA were not detected in the subset of studied individuals. This study challenges the previously reported high prevalence of herpesvirus DNA in subgingival samples from periodontitis patients and so questions whether they act as pathogens in such patients.

  11. Human Cytomegalovirus DNA Quantification and Gene Expression in Gliomas of Different Grades.

    PubMed

    Stangherlin, Lucas Matheus; Castro, Fabiane Lucy Ferreira; Medeiros, Raphael Salles Scortegagna; Guerra, Juliana Mariotti; Kimura, Lidia Midori; Shirata, Neuza Kazumi; Nonogaki, Suely; Dos Santos, Claudia Januário; Carlan Silva, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumors. The most aggressive type, Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is one of the deadliest human diseases, with an average survival at diagnosis of about 1 year. Previous evidence suggests a link between human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and gliomas.