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Sample records for hcn2 hcn4 kcne1

  1. Structural Basis for the cAMP-dependent Gating in the Human HCN4 Channel

    SciTech Connect

    X Xu; Z Vysotskaya; Q Liu; L Zhou

    2011-12-31

    Hyperpolarization-activated cAMP-regulated (HCN) channels play important physiological roles in both cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Among the four HCN isoforms, HCN2 and HCN4 show high expression levels in the human heart, with HCN4 being the major cardiac isoform. The previously published crystal structure of the mouse HCN2 (mHCN2) C-terminal fragment, including the C-linker and the cyclic-nucleotide binding domain (CNBD), has provided many insights into cAMP-dependent gating in HCN channels. However, structures of other mammalian HCN channel isoforms have been lacking. Here we used a combination of approaches including structural biology, biochemistry, and electrophysiology to study cAMP-dependent gating in HCN4 channel. First we solved the crystal structure of the C-terminal fragment of human HCN4 (hHCN4) channel at 2.4 {angstrom}. Overall we observed a high similarity between mHCN2 and hHCN4 crystal structures. Functional comparison between two isoforms revealed that compared with mHCN2, the hHCN4 protein exhibited marked different contributions to channel function, such as a {approx}3-fold reduction in the response to cAMP. Guided by structural differences in the loop region between {beta}4 and {beta}5 strands, we identified residues that could partially account for the differences in response to cAMP between mHCN2 and hHCN4 proteins. Moreover, upon cAMP binding, the hHCN4 C-terminal protein exerts a much prolonged effect in channel deactivation that could have significant physiological contributions.

  2. KCNE1 divides the voltage sensor movement in KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels into two steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barro-Soria, Rene; Rebolledo, Santiago; Liin, Sara I.; Perez, Marta E.; Sampson, Kevin J.; Kass, Robert S.; Larsson, H. Peter

    2014-04-01

    The functional properties of KCNQ1 channels are highly dependent on associated KCNE-β subunits. Mutations in KCNQ1 or KCNE subunits can cause congenital channelopathies, such as deafness, cardiac arrhythmias and epilepsy. The mechanism by which KCNE1-β subunits slow the kinetics of KCNQ1 channels is a matter of current controversy. Here we show that KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel activation occurs in two steps: first, mutually independent voltage sensor movements in the four KCNQ1 subunits generate the main gating charge movement and underlie the initial delay in the activation time course of KCNQ1/KCNE1 currents. Second, a slower and concerted conformational change of all four voltage sensors and the gate, which opens the KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel. Our data show that KCNE1 divides the voltage sensor movement into two steps with widely different voltage dependences and kinetics. The two voltage sensor steps in KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels can be pharmacologically isolated and further separated by a disease-causing mutation.

  3. Stoichiometry of the KCNQ1 - KCNE1 ion channel complex.

    PubMed

    Nakajo, Koichi; Ulbrich, Maximilian H; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2010-11-02

    The KCNQ1 voltage-gated potassium channel and its auxiliary subunit KCNE1 play a crucial role in the regulation of the heartbeat. The stoichiometry of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 complex has been debated, with some results suggesting that the four KCNQ1 subunits that form the channel associate with two KCNE1 subunits (a 42 stoichiometry), while others have suggested that the stoichiometry may not be fixed. We applied a single molecule fluorescence bleaching method to count subunits in many individual complexes and found that the stoichiometry of the KCNQ1 - KCNE1 complex is flexible, with up to four KCNE1 subunits associating with the four KCNQ1 subunits of the channel (a 44 stoichiometry). The proportion of the various stoichiometries was found to depend on the relative expression densities of KCNQ1 and KCNE1. Strikingly, both the voltage-dependence and kinetics of gating were found to depend on the relative densities of KCNQ1 and KCNE1, suggesting the heart rhythm may be regulated by the relative expression of the auxiliary subunit and the resulting stoichiometry of the channel complex.

  4. A new spontaneous mouse mutation in the Kcne1 gene.

    PubMed

    Letts, V A; Valenzuela, A; Dunbar, C; Zheng, Q Y; Johnson, K R; Frankel, W N

    2000-10-01

    A new mouse mutant, punk rocker (allele symbol Kcne1(pkr)), arose spontaneously on a C57BL/10J inbred strain background and is characterized by a distinctive head-tossing, circling, and ataxic phenotype. It is also profoundly and bilaterally deaf. The mutation resides in the Kcne1 gene on Chromosome (Chr) 16 and has been identified as a single base change within the coding region of the third exon. The C to T nucleotide substitution causes an arginine to be altered to a termination codon at amino acid position 67, and predictably this will result in a significantly truncated protein product. The Kcne1(pkr) mutant represents the first spontaneous mouse model for the human disorder, Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome, associated with mutations in the homologous KCNE1 gene on human Chr 21.

  5. KCNE1 remodels the voltage sensor of Kv7.1 to modulate channel function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dick; Pan, Hua; Delaloye, Kelli; Cui, Jianmin

    2010-12-01

    The KCNE1 auxiliary subunit coassembles with the Kv7.1 channel and modulates its properties to generate the cardiac I(Ks) current. Recent biophysical evidence suggests that KCNE1 interacts with the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of Kv7.1. To investigate the mechanism of how KCNE1 affects the VSD to alter the voltage dependence of channel activation, we perturbed the VSD of Kv7.1 by mutagenesis and chemical modification in the absence and presence of KCNE1. Mutagenesis of S4 in Kv7.1 indicates that basic residues in the N-terminal half (S4-N) and C-terminal half (S4-C) of S4 are important for stabilizing the resting and activated states of the channel, respectively. KCNE1 disrupts electrostatic interactions involving S4-C, specifically with the lower conserved glutamate in S2 (Glu(170) or E2). Likewise, Trp scanning of S4 shows that mutations to a cluster of residues in S4-C eliminate current in the presence of KCNE1. In addition, KCNE1 affects S4-N by enhancing MTS accessibility to the top of the VSD. Consistent with the structure of Kv channels and previous studies on the KCNE1-Kv7.1 interaction, these results suggest that KCNE1 alters the interactions of S4 residues with the surrounding protein environment, possibly by changing the protein packing around S4, thereby affecting the voltage dependence of Kv7.1.

  6. How does KCNE1 regulate the Kv7.1 potassium channel? Model-structure, mutations, and dynamics of the Kv7.1-KCNE1 complex.

    PubMed

    Gofman, Yana; Shats, Simona; Attali, Bernard; Haliloglu, Turkan; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2012-08-08

    The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.1 and its auxiliary subunit KCNE1 are expressed in the heart and give rise to the major repolarization current. The interaction of Kv7.1 with the single transmembrane helix of KCNE1 considerably slows channel activation and deactivation, raises single-channel conductance, and prevents slow voltage-dependent inactivation. We built a Kv7.1-KCNE1 model-structure. The model-structure agrees with previous disulfide mapping studies and enables us to derive molecular interpretations of electrophysiological recordings that we obtained for two KCNE1 mutations. An elastic network analysis of Kv7.1 fluctuations in the presence and absence of KCNE1 suggests a mechanistic perspective on the known effects of KCNE1 on Kv7.1 function: slow deactivation is attributed to the low mobility of the voltage-sensor domains upon KCNE1 binding, abolishment of voltage-dependent inactivation could result from decreased fluctuations in the external vestibule, and amalgamation of the fluctuations in the pore region is associated with enhanced ion conductivity.

  7. Structure of KCNE1 and implications for how it modulates the KCNQ1 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Kang, Congbao; Tian, Changlin; Sönnichsen, Frank D; Smith, Jarrod A; Meiler, Jens; George, Alfred L; Vanoye, Carlos G; Kim, Hak Jun; Sanders, Charles R

    2008-08-05

    KCNE1 is a single-span membrane protein that modulates the voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1 (K V7.1) by slowing activation and enhancing channel conductance to generate the slow delayed rectifier current ( I Ks) that is critical for the repolarization phase of the cardiac action potential. Perturbation of channel function by inherited mutations in KCNE1 or KCNQ1 results in increased susceptibility to cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death with or without accompanying deafness. Here, we present the three-dimensional structure of KCNE1. The transmembrane domain (TMD) of KCNE1 is a curved alpha-helix and is flanked by intra- and extracellular domains comprised of alpha-helices joined by flexible linkers. Experimentally restrained docking of the KCNE1 TMD to a closed state model of KCNQ1 suggests that KCNE1 slows channel activation by sitting on and restricting the movement of the S4-S5 linker that connects the voltage sensor to the pore domain. We postulate that this is an adhesive interaction that must be disrupted before the channel can be opened in response to membrane depolarization. Docking to open KCNQ1 indicates that the extracellular end of the KCNE1 TMD forms an interface with an intersubunit cleft in the channel that is associated with most known gain-of-function disease mutations. Binding of KCNE1 to this "gain-of-function cleft" may explain how it increases conductance and stabilizes the open state. These working models for the KCNE1-KCNQ1 complexes may be used to formulate testable hypotheses for the molecular bases of disease phenotypes associated with the dozens of known inherited mutations in KCNE1 and KCNQ1.

  8. Structural Investigation of the Transmembrane Domain of KCNE1 in Proteoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    KCNE1 is a single-transmembrane protein of the KCNE family that modulates the function of voltage-gated potassium channels, including KCNQ1. Hereditary mutations in KCNE1 have been linked to diseases such as long QT syndrome (LQTS), atrial fibrillation, sudden infant death syndrome, and deafness. The transmembrane domain (TMD) of KCNE1 plays a key role in mediating the physical association with KCNQ1 and in subsequent modulation of channel gating kinetics and conductance. However, the mechanisms associated with these roles for the TMD remain poorly understood, highlighting a need for experimental structural studies. A previous solution NMR study of KCNE1 in LMPG micelles revealed a curved transmembrane domain, a structural feature proposed to be critical to KCNE1 function. However, this curvature potentially reflects an artifact of working in detergent micelles. Double electron electron resonance (DEER) measurements were conducted on KCNE1 in LMPG micelles, POPC/POPG proteoliposomes, and POPC/POPG lipodisq nanoparticles to directly compare the structure of the TMD in a variety of different membrane environments. Experimentally derived DEER distances coupled with simulated annealing molecular dynamic simulations were used to probe the bilayer structure of the TMD of KCNE1. The results indicate that the structure is helical in proteoliposomes and is slightly curved, which is consistent with the previously determined solution NMR structure in micelles. The evident resilience of the curvature in the KCNE1 TMD leads us to hypothesize that the curvature is likely to be maintained upon binding of the protein to the KCNQ1 channel. PMID:25234231

  9. KCNE1 and KCNE3: The yin and yang of voltage-gated K(+) channel regulation.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2016-01-15

    The human KCNE gene family comprises five genes encoding single transmembrane-spanning ion channel regulatory subunits. The primary function of KCNE subunits appears to be regulation of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, and the best-understood KCNE complexes are with the KCNQ1 Kv α subunit. Here, we review the often opposite effects of KCNE1 and KCNE3 on Kv channel biology, with an emphasis on regulation of KCNQ1. Slow-activating IKs channel complexes formed by KCNQ1 and KCNE1 are essential for human ventricular myocyte repolarization, while constitutively active KCNQ1-KCNE3 channels are important in the intestine. Inherited sequence variants in human KCNE1 and KCNE3 cause cardiac arrhythmias but by different mechanisms, and each is important for hearing in unique ways. Because of their contrasting effects on KCNQ1 function, KCNE1 and KCNE3 have proved invaluable tools in the mechanistic understanding of how channel gating can be manipulated, and each may also provide a window into novel insights and new therapeutic opportunities in K(+) channel pharmacology. Finally, findings from studies of Kcne1(-/-) and Kcne3(-/-) mouse lines serve to illustrate the complexity of KCNE biology and KCNE-linked disease states.

  10. KCNE1 induces fenestration in the Kv7.1/KCNE1 channel complex that allows for highly specific pharmacological targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, Eva; Rothenberg, Ina; Krisp, Christoph; Hundt, Franziska; Fraenzel, Benjamin; Eckey, Karina; Linders, Joannes T. M.; Gallacher, David J.; Towart, Rob; Pott, Lutz; Pusch, Michael; Yang, Tao; Roden, Dan M.; Kurata, Harley T.; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Strutz-Seebohm, Nathalie; Wolters, Dirk; Seebohm, Guiscard

    2016-10-01

    Most small-molecule inhibitors of voltage-gated ion channels display poor subtype specificity because they bind to highly conserved residues located in the channel's central cavity. Using a combined approach of scanning mutagenesis, electrophysiology, chemical ligand modification, chemical cross-linking, MS/MS-analyses and molecular modelling, we provide evidence for the binding site for adamantane derivatives and their putative access pathway in Kv7.1/KCNE1 channels. The adamantane compounds, exemplified by JNJ303, are highly potent gating modifiers that bind to fenestrations that become available when KCNE1 accessory subunits are bound to Kv7.1 channels. This mode of regulation by auxiliary subunits may facilitate the future development of potent and highly subtype-specific Kv channel inhibitors.

  11. KCNE1 induces fenestration in the Kv7.1/KCNE1 channel complex that allows for highly specific pharmacological targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Eva; Rothenberg, Ina; Krisp, Christoph; Hundt, Franziska; Fraenzel, Benjamin; Eckey, Karina; Linders, Joannes T. M.; Gallacher, David J.; Towart, Rob; Pott, Lutz; Pusch, Michael; Yang, Tao; Roden, Dan M.; Kurata, Harley T.; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Strutz-Seebohm, Nathalie; Wolters, Dirk; Seebohm, Guiscard

    2016-01-01

    Most small-molecule inhibitors of voltage-gated ion channels display poor subtype specificity because they bind to highly conserved residues located in the channel's central cavity. Using a combined approach of scanning mutagenesis, electrophysiology, chemical ligand modification, chemical cross-linking, MS/MS-analyses and molecular modelling, we provide evidence for the binding site for adamantane derivatives and their putative access pathway in Kv7.1/KCNE1 channels. The adamantane compounds, exemplified by JNJ303, are highly potent gating modifiers that bind to fenestrations that become available when KCNE1 accessory subunits are bound to Kv7.1 channels. This mode of regulation by auxiliary subunits may facilitate the future development of potent and highly subtype-specific Kv channel inhibitors. PMID:27731317

  12. The KCNE Tango - How KCNE1 Interacts with Kv7.1.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Eva; Tapken, Daniel; Seebohm, Guiscard

    2012-01-01

    The classical tango is a dance characterized by a 2/4 or 4/4 rhythm in which the partners dance in a coordinated way, allowing dynamic contact. There is a surprising similarity between the tango and how KCNE β-subunits "dance" to the fast rhythm of the cell with their partners from the Kv channel family. The five KCNE β-subunits interact with several members of the Kv channels, thereby modifying channel gating via the interaction of their single transmembrane-spanning segment, the extracellular amino terminus, and/or the intracellular carboxy terminus with the Kv α-subunit. Best studied is the molecular basis of interactions between KCNE1 and Kv7.1, which, together, supposedly form the native cardiac I(Ks) channel. Here we review the current knowledge about functional and molecular interactions of KCNE1 with Kv7.1 and try to summarize and interpret the tango of the KCNEs.

  13. The KCNE Tango – How KCNE1 Interacts with Kv7.1

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Eva; Tapken, Daniel; Seebohm, Guiscard

    2012-01-01

    The classical tango is a dance characterized by a 2/4 or 4/4 rhythm in which the partners dance in a coordinated way, allowing dynamic contact. There is a surprising similarity between the tango and how KCNE β-subunits “dance” to the fast rhythm of the cell with their partners from the Kv channel family. The five KCNE β-subunits interact with several members of the Kv channels, thereby modifying channel gating via the interaction of their single transmembrane-spanning segment, the extracellular amino terminus, and/or the intracellular carboxy terminus with the Kv α-subunit. Best studied is the molecular basis of interactions between KCNE1 and Kv7.1, which, together, supposedly form the native cardiac IKs channel. Here we review the current knowledge about functional and molecular interactions of KCNE1 with Kv7.1 and try to summarize and interpret the tango of the KCNEs. PMID:22876232

  14. KCNE1 constrains the voltage sensor of Kv7.1 K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Shamgar, Liora; Haitin, Yoni; Yisharel, Ilanit; Malka, Eti; Schottelndreier, Hella; Peretz, Asher; Paas, Yoav; Attali, Bernard

    2008-04-09

    Kv7 potassium channels whose mutations cause cardiovascular and neurological disorders are members of the superfamily of voltage-gated K(+) channels, comprising a central pore enclosed by four voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) and sharing a homologous S4 sensor sequence. The Kv7.1 pore-forming subunit can interact with various KCNE auxiliary subunits to form K(+) channels with very different gating behaviors. In an attempt to characterize the nature of the promiscuous gating of Kv7.1 channels, we performed a tryptophan-scanning mutagenesis of the S4 sensor and analyzed the mutation-induced perturbations in gating free energy. Perturbing the gating energetics of Kv7.1 bias most of the mutant channels towards the closed state, while fewer mutations stabilize the open state or the inactivated state. In the absence of auxiliary subunits, mutations of specific S4 residues mimic the gating phenotypes produced by co-assembly of Kv7.1 with either KCNE1 or KCNE3. Many S4 perturbations compromise the ability of KCNE1 to properly regulate Kv7.1 channel gating. The tryptophan-induced packing perturbations and cysteine engineering studies in S4 suggest that KCNE1 lodges at the inter-VSD S4-S1 interface between two adjacent subunits, a strategic location to exert its striking action on Kv7.1 gating functions.

  15. A distinct three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 inhibits Iks channels by interacting with the KCNE1 auxiliary subunit

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peibei; Wu, Fangming; Wen, Ming; Yang, Xingwang; Wang, Chenyang; Li, Yiming; He, Shufang; Zhang, Longhua; Zhang, Yun; Tian, Changlin

    2015-01-01

    KCNE1 is a single-span transmembrane auxiliary protein that modulates the voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1. The KCNQ1/KCNE1 complex in cardiomyocytes exhibited slow activated potassium (Iks) currents. Recently, a novel 47-residue polypeptide toxin SSD609 was purified from Scolopendra subspinipes dehaani venom and showed Iks current inhibition. Here, chemically synthesized SSD609 was shown to exert Iks inhibition in extracted guinea pig cardiomyocytes and KCNQ1/KCNE1 current attenuation in CHO cells. The K+ current attenuation of SSD609 showed decent selectivity among different auxiliary subunits. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of SSD609 revealed a distinctive three-helix conformation that was stabilized by a new disulfide bonding pattern as well as segregated surface charge distribution. Structure-activity studies demonstrated that negatively charged Glu19 in the amphipathic extracellular helix of KCNE1 was the key residue that interacted with SSD609. The distinctive three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 is known to be the first polypeptide toxin acting on channel auxiliary subunit KCNE1, which suggests a new type of pharmacological regulation for ion channels in cardiomyocytes. PMID:26307551

  16. Src Tyrosine Kinase Alters Gating of Hyperpolarization-Activated HCN4 Pacemaker Channel through Tyr531

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen-Hong; Zhang, Qi; Teng, Bunyen; Mustafa, S. Jamal; Huang, Jian-Ying; Yu, Han-Gang

    2009-01-01

    We recently discovered that the constitutively active Src tyrosine kinase can enhance the HCN4 channel activity by binding to the channel protein. To investigate the mechanism of modulation by Src of HCN channels, we studied the effects of a selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinase, PP2, on HCN4 and its mutant channels ex pressed in HEK293 cells using whole-cell patch clamp technique. We found that PP2 can inhibit HCN4 currents by negatively shifting the voltage dependence of channel activation, decreasing the whole-cell channel conductance, and slowing activation and deactivation kinetics. Screening putative tyrosine residues subject to phosphorylation yielded two candidates: Tyr531 and Tyr554. Substituting HCN4-Tyr531 with phenylalanine largely abolished the effects of PP2 on HCN4 channels. Replacing HCN4-Tyr554 by phenylalanine did not abolish the effects of PP2 on voltage-dependent activation, but did eliminate PP2-induced slowing of channel kinetics. The inhibitory effects of HCN channels associated with reduced Src tyrosine activity is confirmed in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Finally, we found that PP2 can decrease the heart rate in a mouse model. These results demonstrate that Src tyrosine kinase enhances HCN4 currents by shifting their activation to more positive potentials and increasing the whole-cell channel conductance as well as speeding the channel kinetics. The tyrosine residue that mediates most of Src actions on HCN4 channels is Tyr531. PMID:17977941

  17. HCN4 Dynamically Marks the First Heart Field and Conduction System Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lizhu; Lowe, Jennifer; Zhang, Qingquang; Bu, Lei; Chen, Yihan; Chen, Ju; Sun, Yunfu; Evans, Sylvia M.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale To date, there has been no specific marker of the first heart field to facilitate understandings of contributions of the first heart field to cardiac lineages. Cardiac arrhythmia is a leading cause of death, often resulting from abnormalities in the cardiac conduction system (CCS). Understanding origins and identifying markers of CCS lineages is an essential step toward modeling diseases of the CCS and for development of biological pacemakers. Objective To investigate HCN4 as a marker for the first heart field and for precursors of distinct components of the CCS, and gain insight into contributions of first and second heart lineages to the CCS. Methods and Results HCN4-CreERT2, -nuclear LacZ and -H2BGFP mouse lines were generated. HCN4 expression was examined by means of immunostaining with HCN4 antibody and reporter gene expression. Lineage studies were performed using HCN4CreERT2, Isl1Cre, Nkx2.5Cre, and Tbx18Cre, coupled to co-immunostaining with CCS markers. Results demonstrated that, at cardiac crescent stages, HCN4 marks the first heart field, with HCN4CreERT2 allowing assessment of cell fates adopted by first heart field myocytes. Throughout embryonic development, HCN4 expression marked distinct CCS precursors at distinct stages, marking the entire CCS by late fetal stages. We also noted expression of HCN4 in distinct subsets of endothelium at specific developmental stages. Conclusions This study provides insight into contributions of first and second heart lineages to the CCS and highlights the potential utility of HCN4 in conjunction with other markers for optimization of protocols for generation and isolation of specific conduction system precursors. PMID:23743334

  18. Blocking effect of NIP-142 on the KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel current expressed in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Namekata, Iyuki; Tsuruoka, Noriko; Tsuneoka, Yayoi; Matsuda, Tomoyuki; Takahara, Akira; Tanaka, Yoshio; Suzuki, Takeshi; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Iida-Tanaka, Naoko; Tanaka, Hikaru

    2011-01-01

    We examined the effect of NIP-142, a benzopyran compound with terminating effect on experimental atrial arrhythmia, on the KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel, which underlies the slow component of the cardiac delayed rectifier potassium channel (I(Ks)). NIP-142, as well as chromanol 293B, showed concentration-dependent blockade of the current expressed in HEK293 cells; the EC(50) value of NIP-142 and chromanol 293B for the inhibition of tail current was 13.2 µM and 4.9 µM, respectively. These results indicate that NIP-142 has blocking effect on the KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel current.

  19. HCN2 channels: a permanent open state and conductance changes.

    PubMed

    Pittoors, François; Van Bogaert, Pierre Paul

    2015-02-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in the membranes of heart and brain cells can conduct Na(+) and K(+) ions and activate between -30 and -120 mV. We express the α subunit of HCN2 channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes and are confronted with two unexpected problems. First, we observe a rise in membrane conductance at resting potential proportional to the amount of expression. On activation to hyperpolarizing potentials, the instantaneous conductance rises in proportion to the amount of activated current. CsCl reduces the observed effects. This can be explained by the expression in oocytes membranes of a fraction of permanently open HCN2 channels. Second, using TEVC technique, our data show a completely different behaviour in physiological solutions of heterogeneously expressed HCN2 currents from what is observed in wild-type currents in the absence of drugs. During pulse trains, we frequently observe (1) a fast and significant decline of the amplitude of HCN2 current during hyperpolarizing steps, (2) no recovery of this decline after a long period at resting membrane potential, (3) a different behaviour of the tail currents at depolarization with other and slower changes than during activation, (4) recovery of this decline in high K(+)/low Na(+) bath solution. The decline of the HCN2 current in physiological conditions is caused by a reduction of the conductance of the HCN2 channel presumably caused by the mere presence of sodium in the channel, in competition with potassium ions and with a limitative effect on the channel conductance.

  20. A Novel Trafficking-defective HCN4 Mutation is Associated with Early-Onset Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Michael L.; Sinner, Moritz F.; Dolmatova, Elena V.; Tucker, Nathan R.; McLellan, Micheal; Shea, Marisa A.; Milan, David J.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia, and a recent genome-wide association study identified HCN4 as a novel AF susceptibility locus. HCN4 encodes for the cardiac pacemaker channel and HCN4 mutations are associated with familial sinus bradycardia and AF. Objective To determine whether novel variants in the coding region of HCN4 contribute to the susceptibility for AF. Methods We sequenced the coding region of HCN4 for novel variants from 527 cases with early-onset AF from the Massachusetts General Hospital AF Study and 443 referents from the Framingham Heart Study. We used site-directed mutagenesis, cellular electrophysiology, immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy to functionally characterize novel variants. Results We found the frequency of novel coding HCN4 variants was 2-fold greater for individuals with AF (seven variants) compared to the referents (three variants). We determined that one, (p.Pro257Ser, located in the amino-terminus adjacent to the first transmembrane spanning domain) of the seven novel HCN4 variants in our AF cases did not traffick to cell membrane while the remaining six were not functionally different from wild type. Also, the three novel variants in our referents did not alter function compared to wild type. Co-expression studies showed that the p.Pro257Ser mutant channel failed to co-localize with the wild type HCN4 channel on the cell membrane. Conclusion Our findings are consistent with HCN4 haploinsufficiency as the likely mechanism for early-onset AF in the p.Pro257Ser carrier. PMID:24607718

  1. Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNE1 are associated with early-onset familial atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia. The potassium current IKs is essential for cardiac repolarization. Gain-of-function mutations in KV7.1, the pore-forming α-subunit of the IKs channel, have been associated with AF. We hypothesized that early-onset lone AF is associated with mutations in the IKs channel regulatory subunit KCNE1. Methods In 209 unrelated early-onset lone AF patients (< 40 years) the entire coding sequence of KCNE1 was bidirectionally sequenced. We analyzed the identified KCNE1 mutants electrophysiologically in heterologous expression systems. Results Two non-synonymous mutations G25V and G60D were found in KCNE1 that were not present in the control group (n = 432 alleles) and that have not previously been reported in any publicly available databases or in the exom variant server holding exom data from more than 10.000 alleles. Proband 1 (female, age 45, G25V) had onset of paroxysmal AF at the age of 39 years. Proband 2 (G60D) was diagnosed with lone AF at the age of 33 years. The patient has inherited the mutation from his mother, who also has AF. Both probands had no mutations in genes previously associated with AF. In heterologous expression systems, both mutants showed significant gain-of-function for IKs both with respect to steady-state current levels, kinetic parameters, and heart rate-dependent modulation. Conclusions Mutations in KV7.1 leading to gain-of-function of IKs current have previously been described in lone AF, yet this is the first time a mutation in the beta-subunit KCNE1 is associated with the disease. This finding further supports the hypothesis that increased potassium current enhances AF susceptibility. PMID:22471742

  2. Src tyrosine kinase alters gating of hyperpolarization-activated HCN4 pacemaker channel through Tyr531.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen-Hong; Zhang, Qi; Teng, Bunyen; Mustafa, S Jamal; Huang, Jian-Ying; Yu, Han-Gang

    2008-01-01

    We recently discovered that the constitutively active Src tyrosine kinase can enhance hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) 4 channel activity by binding to the channel protein. To investigate the mechanism of modulation by Src of HCN channels, we studied the effects of a selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinase, 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2), on HCN4 and its mutant channels expressed in HEK 293 cells by using a whole cell patch-clamp technique. We found that PP2 can inhibit HCN4 currents by negatively shifting the voltage dependence of channel activation, decreasing the whole cell channel conductance, and slowing activation and deactivation kinetics. Screening putative tyrosine residues subject to phosphorylation yielded two candidates: Tyr(531) and Tyr(554). Substituting HCN4-Tyr(531) with phenylalanine largely abolished the effects of PP2 on HCN4 channels. Replacing HCN4-Tyr(554) with phenylalanine did not abolish the effects of PP2 on voltage-dependent activation but did eliminate PP2-induced slowing of channel kinetics. The inhibitory effects of HCN channels associated with reduced Src tyrosine activity is confirmed in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Finally, we found that PP2 can decrease the heart rate in a mouse model. These results demonstrate that Src tyrosine kinase enhances HCN4 currents by shifting their activation to more positive potentials and increasing the whole cell channel conductance as well as speeding the channel kinetics. The tyrosine residue that mediates most of Src's actions on HCN4 channels is Tyr(531).

  3. Effects of Yiqi Tongyang on HCN4 Protein Phosphorylation in Damaged Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinfeng; Liu, Ruxiu; Peng, Jie; Wang, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel (If) is closely associated with sinoatrial node pacing function. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in pacing function improvements of damaged sinoatrial node cells and the consequent treatment effects on sick sinus syndrome (SSS) after the use of Yiqi Tongyang. HCN4 channel protein expression and phosphorylation were measured by immunoblotting and fluorescent quantitation. After ischemia-reperfusion injury (model group), the HCN4 protein and the optical density (OD) of the phosphorylated HCN4 protein as well as intracellular PKA activity in the sinoatrial node cells decreased significantly. However, the OD values and PKA activity increased to different degrees after treatment with serum containing different doses of Yiqi Tongyang; in contrast, no significant improvement was seen in the control group compared to the model group. These findings demonstrated that the use of the traditional Chinese medicine Yiqi Tongyang could increase HCN4 protein expression and phosphorylation as well as PKA activity within sinoatrial node cells damaged by ischemia-reperfusion. The HCN4 protein is involved in the If-related ion channel. Here, we speculated that these effects could be associated with upregulation of HCN4 protein phosphorylation, which consequently improved cell automaticity, increased heart rate, and had treatment effects on SSS. PMID:27069490

  4. Gating and flickery block differentially affected by rubidium in homomeric KCNQ1 and heteromeric KCNQ1/KCNE1 potassium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Pusch, M; Bertorello, L; Conti, F

    2000-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1 associates with the small KCNE1 subunit to form the cardiac IKs delayed rectifier potassium current and mutations in both genes can lead to the long QT syndrome. KCNQ1 can form functional homotetrameric channels, however with drastically different biophysical properties compared to heteromeric KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels. We analyzed gating and conductance of these channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes using the two-electrode voltage-clamp and the patch-clamp technique and high extracellular potassium (K) and rubidium (Rb) solutions. Inward tail currents of homomeric KCNQ1 channels are increased about threefold upon substitution of 100 mM potassium with 100 mM rubidium despite a smaller rubidium permeability, suggesting an effect of rubidium on gating. However, the kinetics of tail currents and the steady-state activation curve are only slightly changed in rubidium. Single-channel amplitude at negative voltages was estimated by nonstationary noise analysis, and it was found that rubidium has only a small effect on homomeric channels (1.2-fold increase) when measured at a 5-kHz bandwidth. The apparent single-channel conductance was decreased after filtering the data at lower cutoff frequencies indicative of a relatively fast "flickery/block" process. The relative conductance in rubidium compared to potassium increased at lower cutoff frequencies (about twofold at 10 Hz), suggesting that the main effect of rubidium is to decrease the probability of channel blockage leading to an increase of inward currents without large changes in gating properties. Macroscopic inward tail currents of heteromeric KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels in rubidium are reduced by about twofold and show a pronounced sigmoidal time course that develops with a delay similar to the inactivation process of homomeric KCNQ1, and is indicative of the presence of several open states. The single channel amplitude of heteromers is about twofold smaller in rubidium than in

  5. A HCN4+ cardiomyogenic progenitor derived from the first heart field and human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Später, Daniela; Abramczuk, Monika K; Buac, Kristina; Zangi, Lior; Stachel, Maxine W; Clarke, Jonathan; Sahara, Makoto; Ludwig, Andreas; Chien, Kenneth R

    2013-09-01

    Most of the mammalian heart is formed from mesodermal progenitors in the first and second heart fields (FHF and SHF), whereby the FHF gives rise to the left ventricle and parts of the atria and the SHF to the right ventricle, outflow tract and parts of the atria. Whereas SHF progenitors have been characterized in detail, using specific molecular markers, comprehensive studies on the FHF have been hampered by the lack of exclusive markers. Here, we present Hcn4 (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4) as an FHF marker. Lineage-traced Hcn4+/FHF cells delineate FHF-derived structures in the heart and primarily contribute to cardiomyogenic cell lineages, thereby identifying an early cardiomyogenic progenitor pool. As a surface marker, HCN4 also allowed the isolation of cardiomyogenic Hcn4+/FHF progenitors from human embryonic stem cells. We conclude that a primary purpose of the FHF is to generate cardiac muscle and support the contractile activity of the primitive heart tube, whereas SHF-derived progenitors contribute to heart cell lineage diversification.

  6. Unraveling Subunit Cooperativity in Homotetrameric HCN2 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Benndorf, Klaus; Thon, Susanne; Schulz, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    In a multimeric receptor protein, the binding of a ligand can modulate the binding of a succeeding ligand. This phenomenon, called cooperativity, is caused by the interaction of the receptor subunits. By using a complex Markovian model and a set of parameters determined previously, we analyzed how the successive binding of four ligands leads to a complex cooperative interaction of the subunits in homotetrameric HCN2 pacemaker channels. The individual steps in the model were characterized by Gibbs free energies for the equilibria and activation energies, specifying the affinity of the binding sites and the transition rates, respectively. Moreover, cooperative free energies were calculated for each binding step in both the closed and the open channel. We show that the cooperativity sequence positive-negative-positive determined for the binding affinity is generated by the combined effect of very different cooperativity sequences determined for the binding and unbinding rates, which are negative-negative-positive and no-negative-no, respectively. It is concluded that in the ligand-induced activation of HCN2 channels, the sequence of cooperativity based on the binding affinity is caused by two even qualitatively different sequences of cooperativity that are based on the rates of ligand binding and unbinding. PMID:23199914

  7. Long QT mutations at the interface between KCNQ1 helix C and KCNE1 disrupt I(KS) regulation by PKA and PIP₂.

    PubMed

    Dvir, Meidan; Strulovich, Roi; Sachyani, Dana; Ben-Tal Cohen, Inbal; Haitin, Yoni; Dessauer, Carmen; Pongs, Olaf; Kass, Robert; Hirsch, Joel A; Attali, Bernard

    2014-09-15

    KCNQ1 and KCNE1 co-assembly generates the I(KS) K(+) current, which is crucial to the cardiac action potential repolarization. Mutations in their corresponding genes cause long QT syndrome (LQT) and atrial fibrillation. The A-kinase anchor protein, yotiao (also known as AKAP9), brings the I(KS) channel complex together with signaling proteins to achieve regulation upon β1-adrenergic stimulation. Recently, we have shown that KCNQ1 helix C interacts with the KCNE1 distal C-terminus. We postulated that this interface is crucial for I(KS) channel modulation. Here, we examined the yet unknown molecular mechanisms of LQT mutations located at this intracellular intersubunit interface. All LQT mutations disrupted the internal KCNQ1-KCNE1 intersubunit interaction. LQT mutants in KCNQ1 helix C led to a decreased current density and a depolarizing shift of channel activation, mainly arising from impaired phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) modulation. In the KCNE1 distal C-terminus, the LQT mutation P127T suppressed yotiao-dependent cAMP-mediated upregulation of the I(KS) current, which was caused by reduced KCNQ1 phosphorylation at S27. Thus, KCNQ1 helix C is important for channel modulation by PIP2, whereas the KCNE1 distal C-terminus appears essential for the regulation of IKS by yotiao-mediated PKA phosphorylation.

  8. Unnatural amino acid photo-crosslinking of the IKs channel complex demonstrates a KCNE1:KCNQ1 stoichiometry of up to 4:4

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Christopher I; Westhoff, Maartje; Eldstrom, Jodene; Thompson, Emely; Emes, Robert; Fedida, David

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac repolarization is determined in part by the slow delayed rectifier current (IKs), through the tetrameric voltage-gated ion channel, KCNQ1, and its β-subunit, KCNE1. The stoichiometry between α and β-subunits has been controversial with studies reporting either a strict 2 KCNE1:4 KCNQ1 or a variable ratio up to 4:4. We used IKs fusion proteins linking KCNE1 to one (EQ), two (EQQ) or four (EQQQQ) KCNQ1 subunits, to reproduce compulsory 4:4, 2:4 or 1:4 stoichiometries. Whole cell and single-channel recordings showed EQQ and EQQQQ to have increasingly hyperpolarized activation, reduced conductance, and shorter first latency of opening compared to EQ - all abolished by the addition of KCNE1. As well, using a UV-crosslinking unnatural amino acid in KCNE1, we found EQQQQ and EQQ crosslinking rates to be progressively slowed compared to KCNQ1, which demonstrates that no intrinsic mechanism limits the association of up to four β-subunits within the IKs complex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11815.001 PMID:26802629

  9. Unnatural amino acid photo-crosslinking of the IKs channel complex demonstrates a KCNE1:KCNQ1 stoichiometry of up to 4:4.

    PubMed

    Murray, Christopher I; Westhoff, Maartje; Eldstrom, Jodene; Thompson, Emely; Emes, Robert; Fedida, David

    2016-01-23

    Cardiac repolarization is determined in part by the slow delayed rectifier current (IKs), through the tetrameric voltage-gated ion channel, KCNQ1, and its β-subunit, KCNE1. The stoichiometry between α and β-subunits has been controversial with studies reporting either a strict 2 KCNE1:4 KCNQ1 or a variable ratio up to 4:4. We used IKs fusion proteins linking KCNE1 to one (EQ), two (EQQ) or four (EQQQQ) KCNQ1 subunits, to reproduce compulsory 4:4, 2:4 or 1:4 stoichiometries. Whole cell and single-channel recordings showed EQQ and EQQQQ to have increasingly hyperpolarized activation, reduced conductance, and shorter first latency of opening compared to EQ - all abolished by the addition of KCNE1. As well, using a UV-crosslinking unnatural amino acid in KCNE1, we found EQQQQ and EQQ crosslinking rates to be progressively slowed compared to KCNQ1, which demonstrates that no intrinsic mechanism limits the association of up to four β-subunits within the IKs complex.

  10. A distinct three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 inhibits I(ks) channels by interacting with the KCNE1 auxiliary subunit.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peibei; Wu, Fangming; Wen, Ming; Yang, Xingwang; Wang, Chenyang; Li, Yiming; He, Shufang; Zhang, Longhua; Zhang, Yun; Tian, Changlin

    2015-08-26

    KCNE1 is a single-span transmembrane auxiliary protein that modulates the voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1. The KCNQ1/KCNE1 complex in cardiomyocytes exhibited slow activated potassium (I(ks)) currents. Recently, a novel 47-residue polypeptide toxin SSD609 was purified from Scolopendra subspinipes dehaani venom and showed I(ks) current inhibition. Here, chemically synthesized SSD609 was shown to exert I(ks) inhibition in extracted guinea pig cardiomyocytes and KCNQ1/KCNE1 current attenuation in CHO cells. The K(+) current attenuation of SSD609 showed decent selectivity among different auxiliary subunits. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of SSD609 revealed a distinctive three-helix conformation that was stabilized by a new disulfide bonding pattern as well as segregated surface charge distribution. Structure-activity studies demonstrated that negatively charged Glu19 in the amphipathic extracellular helix of KCNE1 was the key residue that interacted with SSD609. The distinctive three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 is known to be the first polypeptide toxin acting on channel auxiliary subunit KCNE1, which suggests a new type of pharmacological regulation for ion channels in cardiomyocytes.

  11. Deafness in LIMP2-deficient mice due to early loss of the potassium channel KCNQ1/KCNE1 in marginal cells of the stria vascularis.

    PubMed

    Knipper, Marlies; Claussen, Cathrin; Rüttiger, Lukas; Zimmermann, Ulrike; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Schröder, Jenny; Schwake, Michael; Saftig, Paul

    2006-10-01

    Our previous studies revealed a critical role of the lysosomal membrane protein LIMP2 in the regulation of membrane transport processes in the endocytic pathway. Here we show that LIMP2-deficient mice display a progressive high-frequency hearing loss and decreased otoacoustic emissions as early as 4 weeks of age. In temporal overlap to hearing impairment, fluorescence immunohistochemical studies revealed that the potassium channel KCNQ1 and its beta-subunit KCNE1 were almost completely lost in the luminal part of marginal cells in the stria vascularis, affecting first higher and later also lower frequency processing cochlear turns. Concomitant with this, the expression of megalin, a multiligand endocytic receptor, was reduced in luminal surfaces of marginal cells within the stria vascularis. KCNQ1/KCNE1 and megalin were also lost in the dark cells of the vestibular system. Although LIMP2 is normally expressed in all cells of the stria vascularis, in the organ of Corti and cochlear neurons, the lack of LIMP2 preferentially caused a loss of KCNQ1/KCNE1 and megalin, and structural changes were only seen months later, indicating that these proteins are highly sensitive to disturbances in the lysosomal pathway. The spatio-temporal correlation of the loss of KCNQ1/KCNE1 surface expression and loss of hearing thresholds supports the notion that the decline of functional KCNQ1/KCNE1 is likely to be the primary cause of the hearing loss. Our findings suggest an important role for LIMP2 in the control of the localization and the level of apically expressed membrane proteins such as KCNQ1, KCNE1 and megalin in the stria vascularis.

  12. HCN2 channels account for mechanical (but not heat) hyperalgesia during long-standing inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schnorr, Sabine; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Kistner, Katrin; Rajab, Hamsa; Käßer, Johannes; Hess, Andreas; Reeh, Peter; Ludwig, Andreas; Herrmann, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    There is emerging evidence that hyperpolarization-activated cation (HCN) channels are involved in the development of pathological pain, including allodynia and hyperalgesia. Mice lacking the HCN isoform 2 display reduced heat but unchanged mechanical pain behavior, as recently shown in preclinical models of acute inflammatory pain. However, the impact of HCN2 to chronic pain conditions is less clear and has not been examined so far. In this report, we study the role of HCN2 in the complete Freund's adjuvant inflammation model reflecting chronic pain conditions. We used sensory neuron-specific as well as inducible global HCN2 mutants analyzing pain behavior in persistent inflammation and complemented this by region-specific administration of an HCN channel blocker. Our results demonstrate that the absence of HCN2 in primary sensory neurons reduces tactile hypersensitivity in chronic inflammatory conditions but leaves heat hypersensitivity unaffected. This result is in remarkable contrast to the recently described role of HCN2 in acute inflammatory conditions. We show that chronic inflammation results in an increased expression of HCN2 and causes sensitization in peripheral and spinal terminals of the pain transduction pathway. The contribution of HCN2 to peripheral sensitization mechanisms was further supported by single-fiber recordings from isolated skin-nerve preparations and by conduction velocity measurements of saphenous nerve preparations. Global HCN2 mutants revealed that heat hypersensitivity-unaffected in peripheral HCN2 mutants-was diminished by the additional disruption of central HCN2 channels, suggesting that thermal hyperalgesia under chronic inflammatory conditions is mediated by HCN2 channels beyond primary sensory afferents.

  13. HCN4 subunit expression in fast-spiking interneurons of the rat spinal cord and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D I; Boyle, K A; Kinnon, C M; Bilsland, C; Quayle, J A; Callister, R J; Graham, B A

    2013-05-01

    Hyperpolarisation-activated (Ih) currents are considered important for dendritic integration, synaptic transmission, setting membrane potential and rhythmic action potential (AP) discharge in neurons of the central nervous system. Hyperpolarisation-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels underlie these currents and are composed of homo- and hetero-tetramers of HCN channel subunits (HCN1-4), which confer distinct biophysical properties on the channel. Despite understanding the structure-function relationships of HCN channels with different subunit stoichiometry, our knowledge of their expression in defined neuronal populations remains limited. Recently, we have shown that HCN subunit expression is a feature of a specific population of dorsal horn interneurons that exhibit high-frequency AP discharge. Here we expand on this observation and use neuroanatomical markers to first identify well-characterised neuronal populations in the lumbar spinal cord and hippocampus and subsequently determine whether HCN4 expression correlates with high-frequency AP discharge in these populations. In the spinal cord, HCN4 is expressed in several putative inhibitory interneuron populations including parvalbumin (PV)-expressing islet cells (84.1%; SD: ±2.87), in addition to all putative Renshaw cells and Ia inhibitory interneurons. Similarly, virtually all PV-expressing cells in the hippocampal CA1 subfield (93.5%; ±3.40) and the dentate gyrus (90.9%; ±6.38) also express HCN4. This HCN4 expression profile in inhibitory interneurons mirrors both the prevalence of Ih sub-threshold currents and high-frequency AP discharge. Our findings indicate that HCN4 subunits are expressed in several populations of spinal and hippocampal interneurons, which are known to express both Ih sub-threshold currents and exhibit high-frequency AP discharge. As HCN channel function plays a critical role in pain perception, learning and memory, and sleep as well as the pathogenesis of several

  14. HCN4 subunit expression in fast-spiking interneurons of the rat spinal cord and hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, D.I.; Boyle, K.A.; Kinnon, C.M.; Bilsland, C.; Quayle, J.A.; Callister, R.J.; Graham, B.A.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarisation-activated (Ih) currents are considered important for dendritic integration, synaptic transmission, setting membrane potential and rhythmic action potential (AP) discharge in neurons of the central nervous system. Hyperpolarisation-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels underlie these currents and are composed of homo- and hetero-tetramers of HCN channel subunits (HCN1–4), which confer distinct biophysical properties on the channel. Despite understanding the structure–function relationships of HCN channels with different subunit stoichiometry, our knowledge of their expression in defined neuronal populations remains limited. Recently, we have shown that HCN subunit expression is a feature of a specific population of dorsal horn interneurons that exhibit high-frequency AP discharge. Here we expand on this observation and use neuroanatomical markers to first identify well-characterised neuronal populations in the lumbar spinal cord and hippocampus and subsequently determine whether HCN4 expression correlates with high-frequency AP discharge in these populations. In the spinal cord, HCN4 is expressed in several putative inhibitory interneuron populations including parvalbumin (PV)-expressing islet cells (84.1%; SD: ±2.87), in addition to all putative Renshaw cells and Ia inhibitory interneurons. Similarly, virtually all PV-expressing cells in the hippocampal CA1 subfield (93.5%; ±3.40) and the dentate gyrus (90.9%; ±6.38) also express HCN4. This HCN4 expression profile in inhibitory interneurons mirrors both the prevalence of Ih sub-threshold currents and high-frequency AP discharge. Our findings indicate that HCN4 subunits are expressed in several populations of spinal and hippocampal interneurons, which are known to express both Ih sub-threshold currents and exhibit high-frequency AP discharge. As HCN channel function plays a critical role in pain perception, learning and memory, and sleep as well as the pathogenesis of several

  15. KCNE1-KCNQ1 osmoregulation by interaction of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate with Mg2+ and polyamines.

    PubMed

    Piron, Julien; Choveau, Frank S; Amarouch, Mohammed Yassine; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Charpentier, Flavien; Mérot, Jean; Baró, Isabelle; Loussouarn, Gildas

    2010-09-15

    KCNQ1 osmosensitivity is of physiological and pathophysiological relevance in epithelial and cardiac cells, but the mechanism involved remains elusive. In COS-7 cells expressing the KCNE1-KCNQ1 fusion protein, extracellular hypoosmolarity and hyperosmolarity modify the channel biophysical parameters. These changes are consistent with hypoosmolarity increasing the level of membrane phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)), which in turn upregulates KCNE1-KCNQ1 channels. We showed that increasing PIP(2) levels with a water-soluble PIP(2) analogue prevented channel upregulation in hypoosmotic condition, suggesting a variation of the channel-PIP(2) interaction during channel osmoregulation. Furthermore, we showed that polyamines and Mg(2+), already known to tonically inhibit KCNQ channels by screening PIP(2) negative charges, are involved in the osmoregulatory process. Indeed, intracellular Mg(2+) removal and polyamines chelation inhibited the channel osmoregulation. Thus, the dilution of those cations during cell swelling might decrease channel inhibition and explain the channel upregulation by hypoosmolarity. To support this idea, we quantified the role of Mg(2+) in the osmodependent channel activity. Direct measurement of intracellular [Mg(2+)] variations during osmotic changes and characterization of the channel Mg(2+) sensitivity showed that Mg(2+) participates significantly to the osmoregulation. Using intracellular solutions that mimic the variation of Mg(2+) and polyamines, we were able to recapitulate the current amplitude variations in response to extracellular osmolarity changes. Altogether, these results support the idea of a modulation of the channel-PIP(2) interactions by Mg(2+) and polyamines during cell volume changes. It is likely that this mechanism applies to other channels that are sensitive to both osmolarity and PIP(2).

  16. The residue I257 at S4–S5 linker in KCNQ1 determines KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel sensitivity to 1-alkanols

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chang; Liu, Hao-wen; Pan, Na; Ding, Jiu-ping; Yao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Aim: KCNQ1 and KCNE1 form a complex in human ventricular cardiomyocytes, which are important in maintaining a normal heart rhythm. In the present study we investigated the effects of a homologous series of 1-alkanols on KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Methods: ECG recording was made in rats injected with ethanol-containing solution (0.3 mL, ip). Human KCNQ1 channel and its auxiliary subunit KCNE1 were heterologously coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes, which were superfused with ND96 solution; 1-alkanols (ethanol, 1-butanol and 1-hexanol) were delivered through a gravity-driven perfusion device. The slow-delayed rectifier potassium currents IKs (KCNQ1/KCNE1 currents) were recorded using a two-electrode voltage clamp method. Site-directed mutations (I257A) were made in KCNQ1. Results: In ECG recordings, a low concentration of ethanol (3%, v/v) slightly increased the heart rate of rats, whereas the higher concentrations of ethanol (10%, 50%, v/v) markedly reduced it. In oocytes coexpressing KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels, ethanol, 1-butanol and 1-hexanol dose-dependently inhibited IKs currents with IC50 values of 80, 11 and 2.7 mmol/L, respectively. Furthermore, the 1-alkanols blocked the KCNQ1 channel in both open and closed states, and a four-state model could adequately explain the effects of 1-alkanols on the closed-state channel block. Moreover, the mutation of I257A at the intracellular loop between S4 and S5 in KCNQ1 greatly decreased the sensitivity to 1-alkanols; and the IC50 values of ethanol, 1-butanol and 1-hexanol were increased to 634, 414 and 7.4 mmol/L, respectively. The mutation also caused the ablation of closed-state channel block. Conclusion: These findings provide new insight into the intricate mechanisms of the blocking effects of ethanol on the KCNQ1 channel. PMID:26725740

  17. Polymorphisms in KCNE1 or KCNE3 are not associated with Ménière disease in the Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Colleen A; Della Santina, Charley C; Meyer, Nicole C; Smith, Nancy B; Myrie, Oluwaseun A; Stone, Edwin M; Fukushima, Kuni; Califano, Joseph; Carey, John P; Hansen, Marlan R; Gantz, Bruce J; Minor, Lloyd B; Smith, Richard J H

    2010-01-01

    Ménière disease (MD) is a complex disorder of unknown etiology characterized by the symptom triad of vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, and tinnitus. Its reported incidence is 1-2 per 1,000 in Caucasians and 0.03-0.37 per 1,000 in Japanese. Doi et al. [Doi et al. (2005); ORL J Otorhinolaryngol Relat Spec 67:289-293] recently reported that two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in KCNE1 and KCNE3 are associated with MD in Japanese subjects. Consistent with this possibility, these two genes encode potassium channels that are expressed in the stria vascularis and endolymphatic sac, respectively, and their role in ion transport suggests that they may be important in inner ear homeostasis. To establish whether a similar association exists in the Caucasian MD population, we sequenced the coding regions and exon-intron boundaries of both genes in 180 Caucasian persons with MD and 180 matched Caucasian controls. Neither of the two reported SNPs was significantly associated with MD when compared to the Caucasian controls (KCNE1, P = 0.55; KCNE3, P = 0.870). Comparison of allele frequencies between the Japanese MD population and our study population revealed no significant difference between groups (KCNE1, P = 0.90; KCNE3, P = 0.862), suggesting that the significant differences reported in the Japanese study arose from their control population. Six additional SNPs in both KCNE1 and KCNE3 were genotyped and none was associated with MD. Population stratification within our MD and Caucasian control population was excluded. Our data show that SNPs in KCNE1 and KCNE3 are not associated with MD in Caucasians.

  18. BACE1 modulates gating of KCNQ1 (Kv7.1) and cardiac delayed rectifier KCNQ1/KCNE1 (IKs).

    PubMed

    Agsten, Marianne; Hessler, Sabine; Lehnert, Sandra; Volk, Tilmann; Rittger, Andrea; Hartmann, Stephanie; Raab, Christian; Kim, Doo Yeon; Groemer, Teja W; Schwake, Michael; Alzheimer, Christian; Huth, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    KCNQ1 (Kv7.1) proteins form a homotetrameric channel, which produces a voltage-dependent K(+) current. Co-assembly of KCNQ1 with the auxiliary β-subunit KCNE1 strongly up-regulates this current. In cardiac myocytes, KCNQ1/E1 complexes are thought to give rise to the delayed rectifier current IKs, which contributes to cardiac action potential repolarization. We report here that the type I membrane protein BACE1 (β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1), which is best known for its detrimental role in Alzheimer's disease, but is also, as reported here, present in cardiac myocytes, serves as a novel interaction partner of KCNQ1. Using HEK293T cells as heterologous expression system to study the electrophysiological effects of BACE1 and KCNE1 on KCNQ1 in different combinations, our main findings were the following: (1) BACE1 slowed the inactivation of KCNQ1 current producing an increased initial response to depolarizing voltage steps. (2) Activation kinetics of KCNQ1/E1 currents were significantly slowed in the presence of co-expressed BACE1. (3) BACE1 impaired reconstituted cardiac IKs when cardiac action potentials were used as voltage commands, but interestingly augmented the IKs of ATP-deprived cells, suggesting that the effect of BACE1 depends on the metabolic state of the cell. (4) The electrophysiological effects of BACE1 on KCNQ1 reported here were independent of its enzymatic activity, as they were preserved when the proteolytically inactive variant BACE1 D289N was co-transfected in lieu of BACE1 or when BACE1-expressing cells were treated with the BACE1-inhibiting compound C3. (5) Co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) supported our hypothesis that BACE1 modifies the biophysical properties of IKs by physically interacting with KCNQ1 in a β-subunit-like fashion. Strongly underscoring the functional significance of this interaction, we detected BACE1 in human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and murine cardiac tissue and observed

  19. Correlation analysis between the delayed rectifier potassium channel KCNE1 (G38S) polymorphism and atrial fibrillation among the senior Uygur population in Xinjiang.

    PubMed

    Wugeti, N; Yu-Jun, G; Juan, S; Mahemuti, A

    2015-12-07

    Current resources to support genetic screening among the Uygur population in Xinjiang territory for atrial fibrillation (AF) have not been well established and large-scale epidemiological analyses are needed. Using patients from the Xinjiang Uygur population as subjects, and the delayed rectifier potassium channel KCNE1 and its associated polymorphism G38S (rs1805127) as the candidate gene, we analyzed the correlation between the G38S polymorphism and AF among the senior Uygur population in Xinjiang Province. Peripheral blood from AF Uygur patients (patient group) or non-AF Uygur patients (control group) from Xinjiang territory was collected (70 patients each). DNA was purified and tested by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism for the genotype and allelic distribution of KCNE1 (G38S). Correlation analysis between AF and multiple health-related factors was performed by logistic regression. Among patients with the KCNE1 G38S polymorphism, the genotypes AA, AG, and GG were present at frequencies of 17.14, 27.14, and 55.71%, respectively, in the patient group, compared with 24.29, 50, and 25.71%, respectively, in the control group. The difference between these two groups was shown to be statistically significant (P < 0.05), and the frequency of the G allele was significantly higher in the patient group (P < 0.05). Logistic regression showed that the GG genotype is correlated with the incidence of AF in Uygur seniors (P < 0.05). The incidence of AF among the senior Uygur population in Xinjiang territory was correlated with the KCNE1 (G38S) polymorphism, which may be an independent risk factor for Uygur AF patients.

  20. KCNQ1 Channels Do Not Undergo Concerted but Sequential Gating Transitions in Both the Absence and the Presence of KCNE1 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Meisel, Eshcar; Dvir, Meidan; Haitin, Yoni; Giladi, Moshe; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The co-assembly of KCNQ1 with KCNE1 produces IKS, a K+ current, crucial for the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. Mutations in these channel subunits lead to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. However, very little is known about the gating mechanisms underlying KCNQ1 channel activation. Shaker channels have provided a powerful tool to establish the basic gating mechanisms of voltage-dependent K+ channels, implying prior independent movement of all four voltage sensor domains (VSDs) followed by channel opening via a last concerted cooperative transition. To determine the nature of KCNQ1 channel gating, we performed a thermodynamic mutant cycle analysis by constructing a concatenated tetrameric KCNQ1 channel and by introducing separately a gain and a loss of function mutation, R231W and R243W, respectively, into the S4 helix of the VSD of one, two, three, and four subunits. The R231W mutation destabilizes channel closure and produces constitutively open channels, whereas the R243W mutation disrupts channel opening solely in the presence of KCNE1 by right-shifting the voltage dependence of activation. The linearity of the relationship between the shift in the voltage dependence of activation and the number of mutated subunits points to an independence of VSD movements, with each subunit incrementally contributing to channel gating. Contrary to Shaker channels, our work indicates that KCNQ1 channels do not experience a late cooperative concerted opening transition. Our data suggest that KCNQ1 channels in both the absence and the presence of KCNE1 undergo sequential gating transitions leading to channel opening even before all VSDs have moved. PMID:22908235

  1. KCNQ1 channels do not undergo concerted but sequential gating transitions in both the absence and the presence of KCNE1 protein.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Eshcar; Dvir, Meidan; Haitin, Yoni; Giladi, Moshe; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2012-10-05

    The co-assembly of KCNQ1 with KCNE1 produces I(KS), a K(+) current, crucial for the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. Mutations in these channel subunits lead to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. However, very little is known about the gating mechanisms underlying KCNQ1 channel activation. Shaker channels have provided a powerful tool to establish the basic gating mechanisms of voltage-dependent K(+) channels, implying prior independent movement of all four voltage sensor domains (VSDs) followed by channel opening via a last concerted cooperative transition. To determine the nature of KCNQ1 channel gating, we performed a thermodynamic mutant cycle analysis by constructing a concatenated tetrameric KCNQ1 channel and by introducing separately a gain and a loss of function mutation, R231W and R243W, respectively, into the S4 helix of the VSD of one, two, three, and four subunits. The R231W mutation destabilizes channel closure and produces constitutively open channels, whereas the R243W mutation disrupts channel opening solely in the presence of KCNE1 by right-shifting the voltage dependence of activation. The linearity of the relationship between the shift in the voltage dependence of activation and the number of mutated subunits points to an independence of VSD movements, with each subunit incrementally contributing to channel gating. Contrary to Shaker channels, our work indicates that KCNQ1 channels do not experience a late cooperative concerted opening transition. Our data suggest that KCNQ1 channels in both the absence and the presence of KCNE1 undergo sequential gating transitions leading to channel opening even before all VSDs have moved.

  2. Spatiotemporal Regulation of an Hcn4 Enhancer Defines a Role for Mef2c and HDACs in Cardiac Electrical Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Vasanth; Evangelista, Melissa; Huang, Yu; Srivastava, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Regional differences in cardiomyocyte automaticity permit the sinoatrial node (SAN) to function as the leading cardiac pacemaker and the atrioventricular (AV) junction as a subsidiary pacemaker. The regulatory mechanisms controlling the distribution of automaticity within the heart are not understood. To understand regional variation in cardiac automaticity, we carried out an in vivo analysis of cis-regulatory elements that control expression of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide gated ion channel 4 (Hcn4). Using transgenic mice, we found that spatial and temporal patterning of Hcn4 expression in the AV conduction system required cis-regulatory elements with multiple conserved fragments. One highly conserved region, which contained a myocyte enhancer factor 2C (Mef2C) binding site previously described in vitro, induced reporter expression specifically in the embryonic non-chamber myocardium and the postnatal AV bundle in a Mef2c-dependent manner in vivo. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in cultured transgenic embryos showed expansion of reporter activity to working myocardium. In adult animals, hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction, which causes translocation of HDACs out of the nucleus, resulted in ectopic activation of the Hcn4 enhancer in working myocardium, recapitulating pathological electrical remodeling. These findings reveal mechanisms that control the distribution of automaticity among cardiomyocytes during development and in response to stress. PMID:23085412

  3. HCN1 and HCN2 in Rat DRG Neurons: Levels in Nociceptors and Non-Nociceptors, NT3-Dependence and Influence of CFA-Induced Skin Inflammation on HCN2 and NT3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Cristian; McMullan, Simon; Djouhri, Laiche; Gao, Linlin; Watkins, Roger; Berry, Carol; Dempsey, Katherine; Lawson, Sally N.

    2012-01-01

    Ih, which influences neuronal excitability, has recently been measured in vivo in sensory neuron subtypes in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). However, expression levels of HCN (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated) channel proteins that underlie Ih were unknown. We therefore examined immunostaining of the most abundant isoforms in DRGs, HCN1 and HCN2 in these neuron subtypes. This immunostaining was cytoplasmic and membrane-associated (ring). Ring-staining for both isoforms was in neurofilament-rich A-fiber neurons, but not in small neurofilament-poor C-fiber neurons, although some C-neurons showed cytoplasmic HCN2 staining. We recorded intracellularly from DRG neurons in vivo, determined their sensory properties (nociceptive or low-threshold-mechanoreceptive, LTM) and conduction velocities (CVs). We then injected fluorescent dye enabling subsequent immunostaining. For each dye-injected neuron, ring- and cytoplasmic-immunointensities were determined relative to maximum ring-immunointensity. Both HCN1- and HCN2-ring-immunointensities were positively correlated with CV in both nociceptors and LTMs; they were high in Aβ-nociceptors and Aα/β-LTMs. High HCN1 and HCN2 levels in Aα/β-neurons may, via Ih, influence normal non-painful (e.g. touch and proprioceptive) sensations as well as nociception and pain. HCN2-, not HCN1-, ring-intensities were higher in muscle spindle afferents (MSAs) than in all other neurons. The previously reported very high Ih in MSAs may relate to their very high HCN2. In normal C-nociceptors, low HCN1 and HCN2 were consistent with their low/undetectable Ih. In some C-LTMs HCN2-intensities were higher than in C-nociceptors. Together, HCN1 and HCN2 expressions reflect previously reported Ih magnitudes and properties in neuronal subgroups, suggesting these isoforms underlie Ih in DRG neurons. Expression of both isoforms was NT3-dependent in cultured DRG neurons. HCN2-immunostaining in small neurons increased 1 day after cutaneous

  4. Two open states and rate-limiting gating steps revealed by intracellular Na+ block of human KCNQ1 and KCNQ1/KCNE1 K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Pusch, Michael; Ferrera, Loretta; Friedrich, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    KCNQ1, the first member of a new K+ channel family, associates with the small KCNE1 subunit to form the slow cardiac delayed rectifier current, IKs. Mutations in both genes encoding these channels lead to cardiac arrhythmia. We studied the block by intracellular Na+ of human homomeric KCNQ1 (homomers) and heteromeric KCNQ1/KCNE1 (heteromers) expressed in CHO cells (Chinese hamster ovary cell line) using whole-cell patch recording. In the nominal absence of extracellular K+ and with 65 mm intracellular K+, the replacement of 65 mm intracellular N-methyl-d-glucamine (NMDG+) by 65 mm Na+ induced a decay of outward (K+) currents through homomers after maximal activation reminiscent of an inactivation process. The decay had a time constant in the hundreds of milliseconds range. The inactivation process of homomers was, however, not directly dependent on [Na+]i, as evidenced by unaltered biphasic deactivation at negative voltages. An instantaneous voltage-dependent Na+ block of homomers was revealed using tail current protocols with activating prepulses that saturated the gating processes of the channel. The instantaneous block was partially relieved at very large positive voltages (≥ 60 mV) and in 20 mm extracellular K+. The instantaneous block of homomers was much less pronounced if the tail currents were measured after short activating prepulses, demonstrating the presence of (at least) two open states: a first, relatively [Na+]i-insensitive and a subsequent [Na+]i-sensitive open state; the current decay reflects the transition between the two open states. Heteromers exhibited a very similar instantaneous block by Nai+ independently of the prepulse duration. Heteromers did not show a Nai+-induced current decay. Our results demonstrate the presence of two open states of KCNQ1 channels with different [Na+]i sensitivities. The rate-limiting step of homomeric KCNQ1 gating at positive voltages is the transition between these two open states. The rate-limiting step of the

  5. Two open states and rate-limiting gating steps revealed by intracellular Na+ block of human KCNQ1 and KCNQ1/KCNE1 K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Pusch, M; Ferrera, L; Friedrich, T

    2001-05-15

    KCNQ1, the first member of a new K+ channel family, associates with the small KCNE1 subunit to form the slow cardiac delayed rectifier current, IKs. Mutations in both genes encoding these channels lead to cardiac arrhythmia. We studied the block by intracellular Na+ of human homomeric KCNQ1 (homomers) and heteromeric KCNQ1/KCNE1 (heteromers) expressed in CHO cells (Chinese hamster ovary cell line) using whole-cell patch recording. In the nominal absence of extracellular K+ and with 65 mM intracellular K+, the replacement of 65 mM intracellular N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG+) by 65 mM Na+ induced a decay of outward (K+) currents through homomers after maximal activation reminiscent of an inactivation process. The decay had a time constant in the hundreds of milliseconds range. The inactivation process of homomers was, however, not directly dependent on [Na+]i, as evidenced by unaltered biphasic deactivation at negative voltages. An instantaneous voltage-dependent Na+ block of homomers was revealed using tail current protocols with activating prepulses that saturated the gating processes of the channel. The instantaneous block was partially relieved at very large positive voltages (> or = 60 mV) and in 20 mM extracellular K+. The instantaneous block of homomers was much less pronounced if the tail currents were measured after short activating prepulses, demonstrating the presence of (at least) two open states: a first, relatively [Na+]i-insensitive and a subsequent [Na+]i-sensitive open state; the current decay reflects the transition between the two open states. Heteromers exhibited a very similar instantaneous block by Na+i independently of the prepulse duration. Heteromers did not show a Na+i-induced current decay. Our results demonstrate the presence of two open states of KCNQ1 channels with different [Na+]i sensitivities. The rate-limiting step of homomeric KCNQ1 gating at positive voltages is the transition between these two open states. The rate-limiting step of

  6. Electric pulse current stimulation increases electrophysiological properties of If current reconstructed in mHCN4-transfected canine mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    FENG, YUANYUAN; LUO, SHOUMING; YANG, PAN; SONG, ZHIYUAN

    2016-01-01

    The ‘funny’ current, also known as the If current, play a crucial role in the spontaneous diastolic depolarization of sinoatrial node cells. The If current is primarily induced by the protein encoded by the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4 (HCN4) gene. The functional If channel can be reconstructed in canine mesenchymal stem cells (cMSCs) transfected with mouse HCN4 (mHCN4). Biomimetic studies have shown that electric pulse current stimulation (EPCS) can promote cardiogenesis in cMSCs. However, whether EPCS is able to influence the properties of the If current reconstructed in mHCN4-transfected cMSCs remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of EPCS on the If current reconstructed in mHCN4-transfected cMSCs. The cMSCs were transfected with the lentiviral vector pLentis-mHCN4-GFP. Following transfection, these cells were divided into two groups: mHCN4-transfected cMSCs (group A), and mHCN4-transfected cMSCs induced by EPCS (group B). Using a whole cell patch-clamp technique, the If current was recorded, and group A cMSCs showed significant time and voltage dependencies and sensitivity to extracellular Cs+. The half-maximal activation (V1/2) value was −101.2±4.6 mV and the time constant of activation was 324±41 msec under −160 mV. In the group B cells the If current increased obviously and activation curve moved to right. The absolute value of V1/2 increased significantly to −92.4±4.8 mV (P<0.05), and the time constant of activation diminished under the same command voltage (251±44 vs. 324±41, P<0.05). In addition, the mRNA and protein expression levels of HCN4, connexin 43 (Cx43) and Cx45 were upregulated in group B compared with group A, as determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses. Transmission electron micrographs also confirmed the increased gap junctions in group B. Collectively, these results indicated that reconstructed If channels

  7. Electric pulse current stimulation increases electrophysiological properties of If current reconstructed in mHCN4-transfected canine mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuanyuan; Luo, Shouming; Yang, Pan; Song, Zhiyuan

    2016-04-01

    The 'funny' current, also known as the If current, play a crucial role in the spontaneous diastolic depolarization of sinoatrial node cells. The If current is primarily induced by the protein encoded by the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4 (HCN4) gene. The functional If channel can be reconstructed in canine mesenchymal stem cells (cMSCs) transfected with mouse HCN4 (mHCN4). Biomimetic studies have shown that electric pulse current stimulation (EPCS) can promote cardiogenesis in cMSCs. However, whether EPCS is able to influence the properties of the If current reconstructed in mHCN4-transfected cMSCs remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of EPCS on the If current reconstructed in mHCN4-transfected cMSCs. The cMSCs were transfected with the lentiviral vector pLentis-mHCN4-GFP. Following transfection, these cells were divided into two groups: mHCN4-transfected cMSCs (group A), and mHCN4-transfected cMSCs induced by EPCS (group B). Using a whole cell patch-clamp technique, the If current was recorded, and group A cMSCs showed significant time and voltage dependencies and sensitivity to extracellular Cs+. The half-maximal activation (V1/2) value was -101.2±4.6 mV and the time constant of activation was 324±41 msec under -160 mV. In the group B cells the If current increased obviously and activation curve moved to right. The absolute value of V1/2 increased significantly to -92.4±4.8 mV (P<0.05), and the time constant of activation diminished under the same command voltage (251±44 vs. 324±41, P<0.05). In addition, the mRNA and protein expression levels of HCN4, connexin 43 (Cx43) and Cx45 were upregulated in group B compared with group A, as determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses. Transmission electron micrographs also confirmed the increased gap junctions in group B. Collectively, these results indicated that reconstructed If channels may have a

  8. A computational investigation of HCN2+ isomeric structures: implications for the chemistry of Titan's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Antoniotti, Paola; Borocci, Stefano; Bronzolino, Nicoletta; Grandinetti, Felice

    2004-09-20

    The structure and stability of various HCN2+ isomeric structures have been investigated at the complete active space SCF (CASSCF) and multireference-configuration interaction [MR-Cl-SD(Q)] levels of theory with the 6-31G(d) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. The investigated species include the singlet (S) and triplet (T) open-chain H-N-C-N+ ions 1S, 1S', and 1T, the open-chain H-C-N-N+ ions 2S, 2S', and 2T, the HC-N2+ cyclic structures 3S and 3T, and the HN-CN+ cyclic structures 4S and 4T. All these species have been identified as true energy minima on the CASSCF(8,7)/6-31G(d) potential energy surface, and their optimised geometries, refined at the CASSCF(8,8)/6-31G(d) level of theory, have been used to perform single point calculations at the [MR-Cl-SD(Q]/6-311G(d,p) computational level. The most stable structure was the H-N-C-N+ ion 1T, whose absolute enthalpy of formation at 298.15 K has been estimated as 333.9 +/- 2 kcalmol(-1) using the Gaussian-3 (G3) procedure. The two species closest in energy to 1T are the triplet H-C-N-N+ ion 2T and the singlet diazirinyl cation 3S, whose G3 enthalpies of formation at 298.15 K are 343.5 +/- 2 and 340.6 +/- 2 kcalmol(-1), respectively. Finally, we have discussed the implications of our calculations for the detailed structure of the HCN2+ ions formed in the reaction between N3+ and HCN, experimentally observed by flowing after-glow-selected ion flow/drift tube mass spectrometry and possibly occurring in Titan's atmosphere.

  9. Pacemaker Activity of the Human Sinoatrial Node: An Update on the Effects of Mutations in HCN4 on the Hyperpolarization-Activated Current

    PubMed Central

    Verkerk, Arie O.; Wilders, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Since 2003, several loss-of-function mutations in the HCN4 gene, which encodes the HCN4 protein, have been associated with sinus node dysfunction. In human sinoatrial node (SAN), HCN4 is the most abundant of the four isoforms of the HCN family. Tetramers of HCN subunits constitute the ion channels that conduct the hyperpolarization-activated “funny” current (If), which plays an important modulating role in SAN pacemaker activity. Voltage-clamp experiments on HCN4 channels expressed in COS-7, CHO and HEK-293 cells, as well as in Xenopus oocytes have revealed changes in the expression and kinetics of mutant channels, but the extent to which especially the kinetic changes would affect If flowing during a human SAN action potential often remains unresolved. In our contribution to the Topical Collection on Human Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Disease Diagnostics, we provide an updated review of the mutation-induced changes in the expression and kinetics of HCN4 channels and provide an overview of their effects on If during the time course of a human SAN action potential, as assessed in simulated action potential clamp experiments. Future research may solve apparent inconsistencies between data from clinical studies and data from in vitro and in silico experiments. PMID:25642760

  10. Conformational Flip of Nonactivated HCN2 Channel Subunits Evoked by Cyclic Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Thon, Susanne; Schulz, Eckhard; Kusch, Jana; Benndorf, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN) channels are tetrameric proteins that evoke electrical rhythmicity in specialized neurons and cardiomyocytes. The channels are activated by hyperpolarizing voltage but are also receptors for the intracellular ligand adenosine-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) that enhances activation but is unable to activate the channels alone. Using fcAMP, a fluorescent derivative of cAMP, we analyzed the effect of ligand binding on HCN2 channels not preactivated by voltage. We identified a conformational flip of the channel as an intermediate state following the ligand binding and quantified it kinetically. Globally fitting the time courses of ligand binding and unbinding revealed modest cooperativity among the subunits in the conformational flip. The intensity of this cooperativity, however, was only moderate compared to channels preactivated by hyperpolarizing voltage. These data provide kinetic information about conformational changes proceeding in nonactivated HCN2 channels when cAMP binds. Moreover, our approach bears potential for analyzing the function of any other membrane receptor if a potent fluorescent ligand is available. PMID:26636938

  11. Genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker: Stem cells transfected with HCN2 gene and myocytes—A model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanani, S.; Pumir, A.; Krinsky, V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the successfully tested methods to design genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker cells consists in transfecting a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) with a HCN2 gene and connecting it to a myocyte. We develop and study a mathematical model, describing a myocyte connected to a hMSC transfected with a HCN2 gene. The cardiac action potential is described both with the simple Beeler Reuter model, as well as with the elaborate dynamic Luo Rudy model. The HCN2 channel is described by fitting electrophysiological records, in the spirit of Hodgkin Huxley. The model shows that oscillations can occur in a pair myocyte-stem cell, that was not observed in the experiments yet. The model predicted that: (1) HCN pacemaker channels can induce oscillations only if the number of expressed I channels is low enough. At too high an expression level of I channels, oscillations cannot be induced, no matter how many pacemaker channels are expressed. (2) At low expression levels of I channels, a large domain of values in the parameter space (n, N) exists, where oscillations should be observed. We denote N the number of expressed pacemaker channels in the stem cell, and n the number of gap junction channels coupling the stem cell and the myocyte. (3) The expression levels of I channels observed in ventricular myocytes, both in the Beeler Reuter and in the dynamic Luo Rudy models are too high to allow to observe oscillations. With expression levels below ˜1/4 of the original value, oscillations can be observed. The main consequence of this work is that in order to obtain oscillations in an experiment with a myocyte-stem cell pair, increasing the values of n, N is unlikely to be helpful, unless the expression level of I has been reduced enough. The model also allows us to explore levels of gene expression not yet achieved in experiments, and could be useful to plan new experiments, aimed at improving the robustness of the oscillations.

  12. Ischemia-induced cell depolarization: does the hyperpolarization-activated cation channel HCN2 affect the outcome after stroke in mice?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain ischemia is known to include neuronal cell death and persisting neurological deficits. A lack of oxygen and glucose are considered to be key mediators of ischemic neurodegeneration while the exact mechanisms are yet unclear. In former studies the expression of two different two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels (TASK1, TREK1) were shown to ameliorate neuronal damage due to cerebral ischemia. In neurons, TASK channels carrying hyperpolarizing K+ leak currents, and the pacemaker channel HCN2, carrying depolarizing Ih, stabilize the membrane potential by a mutual functional interaction. It is assumed that this ionic interplay between TASK and HCN2 channels enhances the resistance of neurons to insults accompanied by extracellular pH shifts. Methods In C57Bl/6 (wildtype, WT), hcn2+/+ and hcn2-/- mice we used an in vivo model of cerebral ischemia (transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO)) to depict a functional impact of HCN2 in stroke formation. Subsequent analyses comprise behavioural tests and hcn2 gene expression assays. Results After 60 min of tMCAO induction in WT mice, we collected tissue samples at 6, 12, and 24 h after reperfusion. In the infarcted neocortex, hcn2 expression analyses revealed a nominal peak of hcn2 expression 6 h after reperfusion with a tendency towards lower expression levels with longer reperfusion times. Hcn2 gene expression levels in infarcted basal ganglia did not change after 6 h and 12 h. Only at 24 h after reperfusion, hcn2 expression significantly decreases by ~55%. However, 30 min of tMCAO in hcn2-/- as well as hcn2+/+ littermates induced similar infarct volumes. Behavioural tests for global neurological function (Bederson score) and motor function/coordination (grip test) were performed at day 1 after surgery. Again, we found no differences between the groups. Conclusions Here, we hypothesized that the absence of HCN2, an important functional counter player of TASK channels, affects neuronal survival

  13. Modeling of the adrenergic response of the human IKs current (hKCNQ1/hKCNE1) stably expressed in HEK-293 cells.

    PubMed

    Imredy, John P; Penniman, Jacob R; Dech, Spencer J; Irving, Winston D; Salata, Joseph J

    2008-11-01

    Stable coexpression of human (h)KCNQ1 and hKCNE1 in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells reconstitutes a nativelike slowly activating delayed rectifier K+ current (HEK-I(Ks)), allowing beta-adrenergic modulation of the current by stimulation of endogenous receptors in the host cell line. HEK-I(Ks) was enhanced two- to fourfold by isoproterenol (EC50 = 13 nM), forskolin (10 microM), or 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (50 microM), indicating an intact cAMP-dependent ion channel-regulating pathway analogous to the PKA-dependent regulation observed in native cardiac myocytes. Activation kinetics of HEK-I(Ks) were accurately fit with a novel modified second-order Hodgkin-Huxley (H-H) gating model incorporating a fast and a slow gate, each independent of each other in scale and adrenergic response, or a "heterodimer" model. Macroscopically, beta-adrenergic enhancement shifted the current activation threshold to more negative potentials and accelerated activation kinetics while leaving deactivation kinetics relatively unaffected. Modeling of the current response using the H-H model indicated that observed changes in gating could be explained by modulation of the opening rate of the fast gate. Under control conditions at nearly physiological temperatures (35 degrees C), rate-dependent accumulation of HEK-I(Ks) was observed only at pulse frequencies exceeding 3 Hz. Rate-dependent accumulation of I(Ks) at high pulsing rate had two phases, an initial staircaselike effect followed by a slower, incremental accumulation phase. These phases are readily interpreted in the context of a heterodimeric H-H model with two independent gates with differing closing rates. In the presence of isoproterenol after normalizing for its tonic effects, rate-dependent accumulation of HEK-I(Ks) appeared at lower pulse frequencies and was slightly enhanced (approximately 25%) over control.

  14. Receptor Species-dependent Desensitization Controls KCNQ1/KCNE1 K+ Channels as Downstream Effectors of Gq Protein-coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Kienitz, Marie-Cécile; Vladimirova, Dilyana; Müller, Christian; Pott, Lutz; Rinne, Andreas

    2016-12-16

    Activation of Gq protein-coupled receptors (GqPCRs) might induce divergent cellular responses, related to receptor-specific activation of different branches of the Gq signaling pathway. Receptor-specific desensitization provides a mechanism of effector modulation by restricting the spatiotemporal activation of signaling components downstream of Gq We quantified signaling events downstream of GqPCR activation with FRET-based biosensors in CHO and HEK 293 cells. KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels (IKs) were measured as a functional readout of receptor-specific activation. Activation of muscarinic M1 receptors (M1-Rs) caused robust and reversible inhibition of IKs. In contrast, activation of α1B-adrenergic receptors (α1B-ARs) induced transient inhibition of IKs, which turned into delayed facilitation after agonist withdrawal. As a novel finding, we demonstrate that GqPCR-specific kinetics of IKs modulation are determined by receptor-specific desensitization, evident at the level of Gαq activation, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) depletion, and diacylglycerol production. Sustained IKs inhibition during M1-R stimulation is attributed to robust membrane PIP2 depletion, whereas the rapid desensitization of α1B-AR delimits PIP2 reduction and augments current activation by protein kinase C (PKC). Overexpression of Ca(2+)-independent PKCδ did not affect the time course of α1B-AR-induced diacylglycerol formation, excluding a contribution of PKCδ to α1B-AR desensitization. Pharmacological inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent PKC isoforms abolished fast α1B receptor desensitization and augmented IKs reduction, but did not affect IKs facilitation. These data indicate a contribution of Ca(2+)-dependent PKCs to α1B-AR desensitization, whereas IKs facilitation is induced by Ca(2+)-independent PKC isoforms. In contrast, neither inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent/Ca(2+)-independent isoforms nor overexpression of PKCδ induced M1 receptor desensitization, excluding a contribution of

  15. Positive selection at codon 38 of the human KCNE1 (= minK) gene and sporadic absence of 38Ser-coding mRNAs in Gly38Ser heterozygotes

    PubMed Central

    Herlyn, Holger; Zechner, Ulrich; Oswald, Franz; Pfeufer, Arne; Zischler, Hans; Haaf, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background KCNE1 represents the regulatory beta-subunit of the slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium channel (IKs). Variants of KCNE1 have repeatedly been linked to the long-QT syndrome (LQTS), a disorder which predisposes to deafness, ventricular tachyarrhythmia, syncope, and sudden cardiac death. Results We here analyze the evolution of the common Gly38Ser variant (rs1805127), using genomic DNAs, complementary DNAs, and HEK293-expressed variants of altogether 19 mammalian species. The between species comparison reveals that the human-specific Gly38Ser polymorphism evolved under strong positive Darwinian selection, probably in adaptation to specific challenges in the fine-tuning of IKs channels. The involved amino acid exchanges (Asp > Gly, Gly > Ser) are moderately radical and do not induce apparent changes in posttranslational modification. According to population genetic analyses (HapMap phase II) a heterozygote advantage accounts for the maintenance of the Gly38Ser polymorphism in humans. On the other hand, the expression of the 38Ser allele seems to be disadvantageous under certain conditions, as suggested by the sporadic deficiency of 38Ser-coding mRNAs in heterozygote Central Europeans and the depletion of homozygotes 38Ser in the Yoruban sample. Conclusion We speculate that individual differences in genomic imprinting or genomic recoding might have contributed to conflicting results of recent association studies between Gly38Ser polymorphism and QT phenotype. The findings thus highlight the relevance of mRNA data in future association studies of genotypes and clinical disorders. To the best of our knowledge, they moreover provide first time evidence for a unique pattern; i.e. coincidence of positive Darwinian selection and polymorphism with a sporadically suppressed expression of one allele. PMID:19660109

  16. Star Formation Laws in Both Galactic Massive Clumps and External Galaxies: Extensive Study with Dust Coninuum, HCN (4-3), and CS (7-6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tie; Kim, Kee-Tae; Yoo, Hyunju; Liu, Sheng-yuan; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Qin, Sheng-Li; Zhang, Qizhou; Wu, Yuefang; Wang, Ke; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Juvela, Mika; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Tóth, L. Viktor; Mardones, Diego; Garay, Guido; Bronfman, Leonardo; Cunningham, Maria R.; Li, Di; Lo, Nadia; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Schnee, Scott

    2016-10-01

    We observed 146 Galactic clumps in HCN (4-3) and CS (7-6) with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment 10 m telescope. A tight linear relationship between star formation rate and gas mass traced by dust continuum emission was found for both Galactic clumps and the high redshift (z > 1) star forming galaxies (SFGs), indicating a constant gas depletion time of ˜100 Myr for molecular gas in both Galactic clumps and high z SFGs. However, low z galaxies do not follow this relation and seem to have a longer global gas depletion time. The correlations between total infrared luminosities (L TIR) and molecular line luminosities ({L}{mol}\\prime ) of HCN (4-3) and CS (7-6) are tight and sublinear extending down to clumps with L TIR ˜ 103 L ⊙. These correlations become linear when extended to external galaxies. A bimodal behavior in the L TIR-{L}{mol}\\prime correlations was found for clumps with different dust temperature, luminosity-to-mass ratio, and σ line/σ vir. Such bimodal behavior may be due to evolutionary effects. The slopes of L TIR-L‧mol correlations become more shallow as clumps evolve. We compared our results with lower J transition lines in Wu et al. (2010). The correlations between clump masses and line luminosities are close to linear for low effective excitation density tracers but become sublinear for high effective excitation density tracers for clumps with L TIR larger than L TIR ˜ 104.5 L ⊙. High effective excitation density tracers cannot linearly trace the total clump masses, leading to a sublinear correlations for both M clump-L‧mol and L TIR-L‧mol relations.

  17. Baclofen ameliorates spatial working memory impairments induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion via up-regulation of HCN2 expression in the PFC in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pan; Chen, Cheng; Lu, Yun; Fu, TianLi; Lu, Qing; Xu, Xulin; Li, Changjun; He, Zhi; Guo, Lianjun

    2016-07-15

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) causes memory deficits and increases the risk of vascular dementia (VD) through several biologically plausible pathways. However, whether CCH causes prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent spatial working memory impairments and Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, could ameliorate the impairments is still not clear especially the mechanisms underlying the process. In this study, rats were subjected to permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO) to induce CCH. Two weeks later, rats were treated with 25mg/kg Baclofen (intraperitioneal injection, i.p.) for 3 weeks. Spatial working memory was evaluated in a Morris water maze using a modified delayed matching-to-place (DMP) procedure. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to quantify the protein levels and protein localization. Our results showed that 2VO caused striking spatial working memory impairments, accompanied with a decreased HCN2 expression in PFC, but the protein levels of protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5, a neuron specific protein), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), synaptophysin (SYP), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), parvalbumin (PV) and HCN1 were not distinguishably changed as compared with sham-operated rats. Baclofen treatment significantly improved the spatial working memory impairments caused by 2VO, accompanied with a reversion of 2VO-induced down-regulation of HCN2. Furthermore, there was a co-localization of HCN2 subunits and parvalbumin-positive neurons in PFC. Therefore, HCN2 may target inhibitory interneurons that is implicated in working memory processes, which may be a possible mechanism of the up-regulation of HCN2 by Baclofen treatment that reliefs spatial working memory deficits in rats with CCH.

  18. Probability Fluxes and Transition Paths in a Markovian Model Describing Complex Subunit Cooperativity in HCN2 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Benndorf, Klaus; Kusch, Jana; Schulz, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN) channels are voltage-gated tetrameric cation channels that generate electrical rhythmicity in neurons and cardiomyocytes. Activation can be enhanced by the binding of adenosine-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) to an intracellular cyclic nucleotide binding domain. Based on previously determined rate constants for a complex Markovian model describing the gating of homotetrameric HCN2 channels, we analyzed probability fluxes within this model, including unidirectional probability fluxes and the probability flux along transition paths. The time-dependent probability fluxes quantify the contributions of all 13 transitions of the model to channel activation. The binding of the first, third and fourth ligand evoked robust channel opening whereas the binding of the second ligand obstructed channel opening similar to the empty channel. Analysis of the net probability fluxes in terms of the transition path theory revealed pronounced hysteresis for channel activation and deactivation. These results provide quantitative insight into the complex interaction of the four structurally equal subunits, leading to non-equality in their function. PMID:23093920

  19. Niflumic Acid Alters Gating of HCN2 Pacemaker Channels by Interaction with the Outer Region of S4 Voltage Sensing Domains

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lan; Sanguinetti, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Niflumic acid, 2-{[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]amino}pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (NFA), is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that also blocks or modifies the gating of many ion channels. Here, we investigated the effects of NFA on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) pacemaker channels expressed in X. laevis oocytes using site-directed mutagenesis and the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Extracellular NFA acted rapidly and caused a slowing of activation and deactivation and a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of HCN2 channel activation (-24.5 ± 1.2 mV at 1 mM). Slowed channel gating and reduction of current magnitude was marked in oocytes treated with NFA, while clamped at 0 mV but minimal in oocytes clamped at -100 mV, indicating the drug preferentially interacts with channels in the closed state. NFA at 0.1 to 3 mM shifted the half-point for channel activation in a concentration-dependent manner, with an EC50 of 0.54 ± 0.068 mM and a predicted maximum shift of -38 mV. NFA at 1 mM also reduced maximum HCN2 conductance by ∼20%, presumably by direct block of the pore. The rapid onset and state-dependence of NFA-induced changes in channel gating suggests an interaction with the extracellular region of the S4 transmembrane helix, the primary voltage-sensing domain of HCN2. Neutralization (by mutation to Gln) of any three of the outer four basic charged residues in S4, but not single mutations, abrogated the NFA-induced shift in channel activation. We conclude that NFA alters HCN2 gating by interacting with the extracellular end of the S4 voltage sensor domains. PMID:19218366

  20. Niflumic acid alters gating of HCN2 pacemaker channels by interaction with the outer region of S4 voltage sensing domains.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lan; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2009-05-01

    Niflumic acid, 2-[[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]amino]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (NFA), is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that also blocks or modifies the gating of many ion channels. Here, we investigated the effects of NFA on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) pacemaker channels expressed in X. laevis oocytes using site-directed mutagenesis and the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Extracellular NFA acted rapidly and caused a slowing of activation and deactivation and a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of HCN2 channel activation (-24.5 +/- 1.2 mV at 1 mM). Slowed channel gating and reduction of current magnitude was marked in oocytes treated with NFA, while clamped at 0 mV but minimal in oocytes clamped at -100 mV, indicating the drug preferentially interacts with channels in the closed state. NFA at 0.1 to 3 mM shifted the half-point for channel activation in a concentration-dependent manner, with an EC(50) of 0.54 +/- 0.068 mM and a predicted maximum shift of -38 mV. NFA at 1 mM also reduced maximum HCN2 conductance by approximately 20%, presumably by direct block of the pore. The rapid onset and state-dependence of NFA-induced changes in channel gating suggests an interaction with the extracellular region of the S4 transmembrane helix, the primary voltage-sensing domain of HCN2. Neutralization (by mutation to Gln) of any three of the outer four basic charged residues in S4, but not single mutations, abrogated the NFA-induced shift in channel activation. We conclude that NFA alters HCN2 gating by interacting with the extracellular end of the S4 voltage sensor domains.

  1. The change of HCN1/HCN2 mRNA expression in peripheral nerve after chronic constriction injury induced neuropathy followed by pulsed electromagnetic field therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Zhou, Jun; Gu, Lianbing; Zuo, Yunxia

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is usually defined as a chronic pain state caused by peripheral or central nerve injury as a result of acute damage or systemic diseases. It remains a difficult disease to treat. Recent studies showed that the frequency of action potentials in nociceptive afferents is affected by the activity of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels (HCN) family. In the current study, we used a neuropathy rat model induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve to evaluate the change of expression of HCN1/HCN2 mRNA in peripheral nerve and spinal cord. Rats were subjected to CCI with or without pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy. It was found that CCI induced neural cell degeneration while PEMF promoted nerve regeneration as documented by Nissl staining. CCI shortened the hind paw withdrawal latency (PWL) and hind paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) and PEMF prolonged the PWL and PWT. In addition, CCI lowers the expression of HCN1 and HCN2 mRNA and PEMF cannot restore the expression of HCN1 and HCN2 mRNA. Our results indicated that PEMF can promote nerve regeneration and could be used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:27901476

  2. Fluoxetine ameliorates cognitive impairments induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion via down-regulation of HCN2 surface expression in the hippocampal CA1 area in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pan; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Lu, Yun; Chen, Cheng; Li, Changjun; Zhou, Mei; Lu, Qing; Xu, Xulin; Shen, Guanxin; Guo, Lianjun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) causes cognitive impairments and increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD) through several biologically plausible pathways, yet the underlying neurobiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), could play a neuroprotective role against chronic cerebral hypoperfusion injury and to clarify underlying mechanisms of its efficacy. Rats were subjected to permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO). Two weeks later, rats were treated with 30 mg/kg fluoxetine (intragastric injection, i.g.) for 6 weeks. Cognitive function was evaluated by Morris water maze (MWM) and novel objects recognition (NOR) test. Long-term potentiation (LTP) was used to address the underlying synaptic mechanisms. Western blotting was used to quantify the protein levels. Our results showed that fluoxetine treatment significantly improved the cognitive impairments caused by 2VO, accompanied with a reversion of 2VO-induced inhibitory of LTP. Furthermore, 2VO caused an up-regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 2 (HCN2) surface expressions in the hippocampal CA1 area and fluoxetine also effectively recovered the disorder of HCN2 surface expressions, which may be a possible mechanism that fluoxetine treatment ameliorates cognitive impairments in rats with CCH.

  3. Increased expression of HCN2 channel protein in L4 dorsal root ganglion neurons following axotomy of L5- and inflammation of L4-spinal nerves in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, T; Al Otaibi, M; Sathish, J; Djouhri, L

    2015-06-04

    A hallmark of peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP) is chronic spontaneous pain and/or hypersensitivity to normally painful stimuli (hyperalgesia) or normally nonpainful stimuli (allodynia).This pain results partly from abnormal hyperexcitability of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We have previously shown, using a modified version of the lumbar 5 (L5)-spinal nerve ligation model of PNP (mSNA model involving L5-spinal nerve axotomy plus loose ligation of the lumbar 4 (L4)-spinal nerve with neuroinflammation-inducing chromic-gut), that L4 DRG neurons exhibit increased spontaneous activity, the key characteristic of neuronal hyperexcitability. The underlying ionic and molecular mechanisms of the hyperexcitability of L4 DRG neurons are incompletely understood, but could result from changes in expression and/or function of ion channels including hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which are active near the neuron's resting membrane potential, and which produce an excitatory inward current that depolarizes the membrane potential toward the threshold of action potential generation. Therefore, in the present study we used the mSNA model to investigate whether: (a) expression of HCN1-HCN3 channels is altered in L4 DRG neurons which, in the mSNA model, are essential for transmission of the evoked pain, and which contribute to chronic spontaneous pain, and (b) local (intraplantar) blockade of these HCN channels, with a specific blocker, ZD7288, attenuates chronic spontaneous pain and/or evoked pain in mSNA rats. We found 7days after mSNA: (1) a significant increase in HCN2-immunoreactivity in small (<30μm) DRG neurons (predominantly IB4-negative neurons), and in the proportion of small neurons expressing HCN2 (putative nociceptors); (2) no significant change in HCN1- or HCN3-immunoreactivity in all cell types; and (3) attenuation, with ZD7288 (100μM intraplantar), of chronic spontaneous pain behavior (spontaneous foot lifting) and mechanical

  4. Long-lasting spatial learning and memory impairments caused by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion associate with a dynamic change of HCN1/HCN2 expression in hippocampal CA1 region.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pan; Lu, Yun; Li, Changjun; Zhou, Mei; Chen, Cheng; Lu, Qing; Xu, Xulin; He, Zhi; Guo, Lianjun

    2015-09-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) causes learning and memory impairments and increases the risk of Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD) through several biologically plausible pathways, yet the mechanisms underlying the disease process remained unclear particularly in a temporal manner. We performed permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO) to induce CCH. To determine whether hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are altered at different stages of cognitive impairment caused by CCH, adult male SD rats were randomly distributed into sham-operated 4, 8 and 12weeks group, 2VO 4, 8 and 12weeks group. Learning and memory performance were evaluated with Morris water maze (MWM) and long-term potentiation (LTP) was used to address the underlying synaptic mechanisms. Expression of NeuN, HCN1 and HCN2 in hippocampal CA1, DG and CA3 areas was quantified by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Our data showed that CCH induced a remarkable spatial learning and memory deficits in rats of 2VO 4, 8, and 12weeks group although neuronal loss only occurred after 4weeks of 2VO surgery in CA1. In addition, a significant reduction of HCN1 surface expression in CA1 was observed in the group that suffered 4weeks ischemia but neither 8 nor 12weeks. However, HCN2 surface expression in CA1 increased throughout the ischemia time-scales (4, 8 and 12w). Our findings indicate spatial learning and memory deficits in the CCH model are associated with disturbed HCN1 and HCN2 surface expression in hippocampal CA1. The altered patterns of both HCN1 and HCN2 surface expression may be implicated in the early stage (4w) of spatial learning and memory impairments; and the stable and long-lasting impairments of spatial learning and memory may partially attribute to the up-regulated HCN2 surface expression.

  5. Multiconfiguration Self-Consistent Field Study on Formonitrile Imine and N-Substituted Nitrile Imines HCN2-R: Energy Component Analysis of the Pseudo-Jahn-Teller Effect.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Azumao; Muramatsu, Takashi; Koseki, Shiro

    2017-03-23

    Stable geometrical structures for formonitrile imine (1) and N-substituted nitrile imines HCN2-R (R = Li, BeH, BH2, CH3, CN, CCH, C6H5, NH2, OH, and F) (2-11) were examined by using the multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) method followed by second-order configuration interaction (SOCI) calculations and second-order multiconfiguration quasi-degenerate perturbation theory (MCQDPT2) calculations, together with the aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets. The results show that 1 suffers a pseudo-Jahn-Teller (JT) distortion from a linear C∞v structure to a C1 structure via a planar bent Cs structure. Each of the others is found to undergo pseudo-JT distortion from a symmetrical structure to a planar bent Cs structure for 2, 3, and 7 and to a C1 structure for 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 11. At the stationary structures of 1-11, the structural characteristics were briefly discussed in terms of allenic and propargylic. To elucidate the nature of pseudo-JT distortions, energy component analyses were carried out at the MCSCF+SOCI level of theory at all of the stationary structures for the relevant molecules. In most of the molecules examined, pseudo-JT stabilizations were classified into two groups, one in which the stability arises from a lowering of the energy of the attractive term Ven and the other in which the stability results from a lowering of the energy of the repulsive terms Vnn and Vee. In addition to the above two groups, it was also found that the following three groups are responsible for the pseudo-JT stabilizations in a certain stage of the structural changes. Namely, one is a lowering of the energy of the term Vee observed in 6, another is a lowering of the energy of the terms Vee and Ven observed in 9-11, and the other is a lowering of the energy of the terms Ven and Vnn observed in 10. These energetic behaviors were accounted in terms of an elongation or a contraction of the molecular skeleton, a migration of electrons from one part of the molecule to other parts

  6. The conduction system and expressions of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel 4 and connexin43 expressions in the hearts of fetal day 13 mice.

    PubMed

    Wen, Y; Li, B

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the development of the sinus node of the heart conduction system by localizing hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel 4 (HCN4) and connexin43 (Cx43) in the hearts of fetal day 13 mice. Horizontal serial sections of day 13 whole fetuses were stained by hematoxylin and eosin and immunofluorescence to identify myocardial cells that express HCN4, hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel 2 (HCN2) and Cx43. Expression levels of HCN4 and Cx43 were determined by quantitative RT-PCR in both fetal day 13 and adult mice. We found that both Cx43 and HCN4 expressions were located on the cell membranes in the hearts of fetal day 13 mice, but Cx43 was distributed throughout the myocardial cells. HCN4 expression was concentrated mainly in the left dorsal epicardium of the right atrium where Cx43 expression was low or absent. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that HCN4 expression was significantly higher and HCN2 expression was significantly lower in fetal day 13 mice than in adults. We found no statistically significant difference in Cx43 expression between fetal day 13 mice and adults. HCN4 stained myocardial cells in the left dorsal epicardium of the right atrium are the origin of the sinus node and the remainder of the heart conduction system.

  7. Spironolactone Regulates HCN Protein Expression Through Micro-RNA-1 in Rats With Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hua-Dong; Xia, Shuang; Zha, Cheng-Qin; Deng, Song-Bai; Du, Jian-Lin; She, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that aldosterone blockers reduced the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). However, the mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which spironolactone, a classic aldosterone blocker, regulates hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (HCN) protein expression in ischemic rat myocardium after MI. Eighteen rats surviving 24 hours after MI were randomly assigned into 3 groups: MI, spironolactone, and spironolactone + antagomir-1. Six sham-operated rats had a suture loosely tied around the left coronary artery, without ligation. The border zone of the myocardial infarct was collected from each rat at 1 week after MI. HCN2 and HCN4 protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) level were measured in addition to miRNA-1 levels. Spironolactone significantly increased miRNA-1 levels and downregulated HCN2 and HCN4 protein and mRNA levels. miRNA-1 suppression with antagomir-1 increased HCN2 and HCN4 protein levels; however, HCN2 and HCN4 mRNA levels were not affected. These results suggested that spironolactone could increase miRNA-1 expression in ischemic rat myocardium after MI and that the upregulation of miRNA-1 expression partially contributed to the posttranscriptional repression of HCN protein expression, which may contribute to the effect of spironolactone to reduce the incidence of MI-associated ventricular arrhythmias.

  8. Two pacemaker channels from human heart with profoundly different activation kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, A; Zong, X; Stieber, J; Hullin, R; Hofmann, F; Biel, M

    1999-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is produced by the slow diastolic depolarization phase of the action potential. The hyperpolarization-activated cation current (If) forms an important part of the pacemaker depolarization and consists of two kinetic components (fast and slow). Recently, three full-length cDNAs encoding hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels (HCN1-3) have been cloned from mouse brain. To elucidate the molecular identity of cardiac pacemaker channels, we screened a human heart cDNA library using a highly conserved neuronal HCN channel segment and identified two cDNAs encoding HCN channels. The hHCN2 cDNA codes for a protein of 889 amino acids. The HCN2 gene is localized on human chromosome 19p13.3 and contains eight exons spanning approximately 27 kb. The second cDNA, designated hHCN4, codes for a protein of 1203 amino acids. Northern blot and PCR analyses showed that both hHCN2 and hHCN4 are expressed in heart ventricle and atrium. When expressed in HEK 293 cells, either cDNA gives rise to hyperpolarization-activated cation currents with the hallmark features of native If. hHCN2 and hHCN4 currents differ profoundly from each other in their activation kinetics, being fast and slow, respectively. We thus conclude that hHCN2 and hHCN4 may underlie the fast and slow component of cardiac If, respectively. PMID:10228147

  9. Phylogeny and effects of anoxia on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel gene expression in the heart of a primitive chordate, the Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stoutii).

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher M; Stecyk, Jonathan A W; Couturier, Christine S; Nilsson, Göran E; Farrell, Anthony P

    2013-12-01

    The aneural heart of the Pacific hagfish, Eptatretus stoutii, varies heart rate fourfold during recovery from anoxia. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which play an important role in establishing the pacemaker rate of vertebrate hearts, were postulated to be present in this ancestral vertebrate heart, and it was also theorized that changes in hagfish heart rate with oxygen availability involved altered HCN expression. Partial gene cloning revealed six HCN isoforms in the hagfish heart. Hagfish representatives of HCN2, HCN3 and HCN4 were discovered, with HCN2 and HCN3 existing as isoforms designated as HCN2a, HCN2b, HCN3a, two paralogs of HCN3b, and HCN3c. Phylogenetic analysis revealed HCN3b and HCN3c to be ancestral, followed by HCN3a, HCN4 and HCN2. Moreover, HCN3a expression was dominant in both the atrial and ventricular chambers, suggesting that the HCN4 dominance in adult mammalian hearts appeared after hagfish divergence. HCN expression was higher in the atrium than in the ventricle, as might be expected given that atrial beating rate is known to be faster than the ventricular rate. In addition, mRNA expression under normoxic conditions was compared with that following 24 h of anoxia, and either a 2-h or 36-h recovery in normoxic water. In the ventricle, anoxia decreased HCN3a but not HCN4 expression. In contrast, atrial HCN3a expression significantly increased following 2 h of recovery, before returning to control levels following 36 h of recovery, possibly contributing to heart rate changes previously observed under these conditions.

  10. Tetramerization Dynamics of C-terminal Domain Underlies Isoform-specific cAMP Gating in Hyperpolarization-activated Cyclic Nucleotide-gated Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Lolicato, Marco; Nardini, Marco; Gazzarrini, Sabrina; Möller, Stefan; Bertinetti, Daniela; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Bolognesi, Martino; Martin, Holger; Fasolini, Marina; Bertrand, Jay A.; Arrigoni, Cristina; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are dually activated by hyperpolarization and binding of cAMP to their cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD). HCN isoforms respond differently to cAMP; binding of cAMP shifts activation of HCN2 and HCN4 by 17 mV but shifts that of HCN1 by only 2–4 mV. To explain the peculiarity of HCN1, we solved the crystal structures and performed a biochemical-biophysical characterization of the C-terminal domain (C-linker plus CNBD) of the three isoforms. Our main finding is that tetramerization of the C-terminal domain of HCN1 occurs at basal cAMP concentrations, whereas those of HCN2 and HCN4 require cAMP saturating levels. Therefore, HCN1 responds less markedly than HCN2 and HCN4 to cAMP increase because its CNBD is already partly tetrameric. This is confirmed by voltage clamp experiments showing that the right-shifted position of V½ in HCN1 is correlated with its propensity to tetramerize in vitro. These data underscore that ligand-induced CNBD tetramerization removes tonic inhibition from the pore of HCN channels. PMID:22006928

  11. Structure and Energetics of Allosteric Regulation of HCN2 Ion Channels by Cyclic Nucleotides*

    PubMed Central

    DeBerg, Hannah A.; Brzovic, Peter S.; Flynn, Galen E.; Zagotta, William N.; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels play an important role in regulating electrical activity in the heart and brain. They are gated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a conserved, intracellular cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD), which is connected to the channel pore by a C-linker region. Binding of cyclic nucleotides increases the rate and extent of channel activation and shifts it to less hyperpolarized voltages. We probed the allosteric mechanism of different cyclic nucleotides on the CNBD and on channel gating. Electrophysiology experiments showed that cAMP, cGMP, and cCMP were effective agonists of the channel and produced similar increases in the extent of channel activation. In contrast, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on the isolated CNBD indicated that the induced conformational changes and the degrees of stabilization of the active conformation differed for the three cyclic nucleotides. We explain these results with a model where different allosteric mechanisms in the CNBD all converge to have the same effect on the C-linker and render all three cyclic nucleotides similarly potent activators of the channel. PMID:26559974

  12. Shortening and intracellular Ca2+ in ventricular myocytes and expression of genes encoding cardiac muscle proteins in early onset type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Salem, K A; Adrian, T E; Qureshi, M A; Parekh, K; Oz, M; Howarth, F C

    2012-12-01

    There has been a spectacular rise in the global prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cardiovascular complications are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Contractile dysfunction, associated with disturbances in excitation-contraction coupling, has been widely demonstrated in the diabetic heart. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of cardiac muscle genes that are involved in the process of excitation-contraction coupling in the hearts of early onset (8-10 weeks of age) type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats. Gene expression was assessed in ventricular muscle with real-time RT-PCR; shortening and intracellular Ca(2+) were measured in ventricular myocytes with video edge detection and fluorescence photometry, respectively. The general characteristics of the GK rats included elevated fasting and non-fasting blood glucose and blood glucose at 120 min following a glucose challenge. Expression of genes encoding cardiac muscle proteins (Myh6/7, Mybpc3, Myl1/3, Actc1, Tnni3, Tnn2, Tpm1/2/4 and Dbi) and intercellular proteins (Gja1/4/5/7, Dsp and Cav1/3) were unaltered in GK ventricle compared with control ventricle. The expression of genes encoding some membrane pumps and exchange proteins was unaltered (Atp1a1/2, Atp1b1 and Slc8a1), whilst others were either upregulated (Atp1a3, relative expression 2.61 ± 0.69 versus 0.84 ± 0.23) or downregulated (Slc9a1, 0.62 ± 0.07 versus 1.08 ± 0.08) in GK ventricle compared with control ventricle. The expression of genes encoding some calcium (Cacna1c/1g, Cacna2d1/2d2 and Cacnb1/b2), sodium (Scn5a) and potassium channels (Kcna3/5, Kcnj3/5/8/11/12, Kchip2, Kcnab1, Kcnb1, Kcnd1/2/3, Kcne1/4, Kcnq1, Kcng2, Kcnh2, Kcnk3 and Kcnn2) were unaltered, whilst others were either upregulated (Cacna1h, 0.95 ± 0.16 versus 0.47 ± 0.09; Scn1b, 1.84 ± 0.16 versus 1.11 ± 0.11; and Hcn2, 1.55 ± 0.15 versus 1.03 ± 0.08) or downregulated (Hcn4, 0.16 ± 0.03 versus 0.37 ± 0.08; Kcna2, 0.35 ± 0

  13. Decreased expression of hyperpolarisation-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 3 in Hirschsprung’s disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Anne Marie; Coyle, David; Puri, Prem

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine if hyperpolarisation-activated nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels exist in human colon, and to investigate the expression of HCN channels in Hirschsprung’s disease. METHODS: We investigated HCN1, HCN2, HCN3 and HCN4 protein expression in pull-through specimens from patients with Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR, n = 10) using the proximal-most ganglionic segment and distal-most aganglionic segment, as well as in healthy control specimens obtained at the time of sigmoid colostomy closure in children who had undergone anorectoplasty for imperforate anus (n = 10). Fluorescent immunohistochemistry was performed to assess protein distribution, which was then visualized using confocal microscopy. RESULTS: No HCN1 channel expression was observed in any of the tissues studied. Both HCN2 and HCN4 proteins were found to be equally expressed in the aganglionic and ganglionic bowel in HSCR and controls. HCN3 channel expression was found to be markedly decreased in the aganglionic colon vs ganglionic colon and controls. HCN2-4 channels were seen to be expressed within neurons of the myenteric and submucosal plexus of the ganglionic bowel and normal controls, and also co-localised to interstitial cells of Cajal in all tissues studied. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate HCN channel expression in human colon for the first time. Reduced HCN3 expression in aganglionic bowel suggests its potential role in HSCR pathophysiology. PMID:25987789

  14. Developmental Febrile Seizures Modulate Hippocampal Gene Expression of Hyperpolarization-Activated Channels in an Isoform- and Cell-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, Amy; Bender, Roland A.; Chen, Yuncai; Dube, Celine; Eghbal-Ahmadi, Mariam; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2012-01-01

    Febrile seizures, in addition to being the most common seizure type of the developing human, may contribute to the generation of subsequent limbic epilepsy. Our previous work has demonstrated that prolonged experimental febrile seizures in the immature rat model increased hippocampal excitability long term, enhancing susceptibility to future seizures. The mechanisms for these profound proepileptogenic changes did not require cell death and were associated with long-term slowed kinetics of the hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current (IH). Here we show that these seizures modulate the expression of genes encoding this current, the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCNs): In CA1 neurons expressing multiple HCN isoforms, the seizures induced a coordinated reduction of HCN1 mRNA and enhancement of HCN2 expression, thus altering the neuronal HCN phenotype. The seizure-induced augmentation of HCN2 expression involved CA3 in addition to CA1, whereas for HCN4, mRNA expression was not changed by the seizures in either hippocampal region. This isoform- and region-specific transcriptional regulation of the HCNs required neuronal activity rather than hyperthermia alone, correlated with seizure duration, and favored the formation of slow-kinetics HCN2-encoded channels. In summary, these data demonstrate a novel, activity-dependent transcriptional regulation of HCN molecules by developmental seizures. These changes result in long-lasting alteration of the HCN phenotype of specific hippocampal neuronal populations, with profound consequences on the excitability of the hippocampal network. PMID:12040066

  15. Developmental febrile seizures modulate hippocampal gene expression of hyperpolarization-activated channels in an isoform- and cell-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Brewster, Amy; Bender, Roland A; Chen, Yuncai; Dube, Celine; Eghbal-Ahmadi, Mariam; Baram, Tallie Z

    2002-06-01

    Febrile seizures, in addition to being the most common seizure type of the developing human, may contribute to the generation of subsequent limbic epilepsy. Our previous work has demonstrated that prolonged experimental febrile seizures in the immature rat model increased hippocampal excitability long term, enhancing susceptibility to future seizures. The mechanisms for these profound proepileptogenic changes did not require cell death and were associated with long-term slowed kinetics of the hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current (I(H)). Here we show that these seizures modulate the expression of genes encoding this current, the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCNs): In CA1 neurons expressing multiple HCN isoforms, the seizures induced a coordinated reduction of HCN1 mRNA and enhancement of HCN2 expression, thus altering the neuronal HCN phenotype. The seizure-induced augmentation of HCN2 expression involved CA3 in addition to CA1, whereas for HCN4, mRNA expression was not changed by the seizures in either hippocampal region. This isoform- and region-specific transcriptional regulation of the HCNs required neuronal activity rather than hyperthermia alone, correlated with seizure duration, and favored the formation of slow-kinetics HCN2-encoded channels. In summary, these data demonstrate a novel, activity-dependent transcriptional regulation of HCN molecules by developmental seizures. These changes result in long-lasting alteration of the HCN phenotype of specific hippocampal neuronal populations, with profound consequences on the excitability of the hippocampal network.

  16. Inner activation gate in S6 contributes to the state-dependent binding of cAMP in full-length HCN2 channel

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shengjun; Gao, Weihua; Xie, Changan; Xu, Xinping; Vorvis, Christina; Marni, Farzana; Hackett, Amber R.; Liu, Qinglian

    2012-01-01

    Recently, applications of the patch-clamp fluorometry (PCF) technique in studies of cyclic nucleotide–gated (CNG) and hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide–regulated (HCN) channels have provided direct evidence for the long-held notion that ligands preferably bind to and stabilize these channels in an open state. This state-dependent ligand–channel interaction involves contributions from not only the ligand-binding domain but also other discrete structural elements within the channel protein. This insight led us to investigate whether the pore of the HCN channel plays a role in the ligand–whole channel interaction. We used three well-characterized HCN channel blockers to probe the ion-conducting passage. The PCF technique was used to simultaneously monitor channel activity and cAMP binding. Two ionic blockers, Cs+ and Mg2+, effectively block channel conductance but have no obvious effect on cAMP binding. Surprisingly, ZD7288, an open channel blocker specific for HCN channels, significantly reduces the activity-dependent increase in cAMP binding. Independent biochemical assays exclude any nonspecific interaction between ZD7288 and isolated cAMP-binding domain. Because ZD7228 interacts with the inner pore region, where the activation gate is presumably located, we did an alanine scanning of the intracellular end of S6, from T426 to A435. Mutations of three residues, T426, M430, and H434, which are located at regular intervals on the S6 α-helix, enhance cAMP binding. In contrast, mutations of two residues in close proximity, F431A and I432A, dampen the response. Our results demonstrate that movements of the structural elements near the activation gate directly affect ligand binding affinity, which is a simple mechanistic explanation that could be applied to the interpretation of ligand gating in general. PMID:22689828

  17. cAMP Control of HCN2 Channel Mg2+ Block Reveals Loose Coupling between the Cyclic Nucleotide-Gating Ring and the Pore

    PubMed Central

    Lyashchenko, Alex K.; Redd, Kacy J.; Goldstein, Peter A.; Tibbs, Gareth R.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated HCN channels underlie the Na+-K+ permeable IH pacemaker current. As with other voltage-gated members of the 6-transmembrane KV channel superfamily, opening of HCN channels involves dilation of a helical bundle formed by the intracellular ends of S6 albeit this is promoted by inward, not outward, displacement of S4. Direct agonist binding to a ring of cyclic nucleotide-binding sites, one of which lies immediately distal to each S6 helix, imparts cAMP sensitivity to HCN channel opening. At depolarized potentials, HCN channels are further modulated by intracellular Mg2+ which blocks the open channel pore and blunts the inhibitory effect of outward K+ flux. Here, we show that cAMP binding to the gating ring enhances not only channel opening but also the kinetics of Mg2+ block. A combination of experimental and simulation studies demonstrates that agonist acceleration of block is mediated via acceleration of the blocking reaction itself rather than as a secondary consequence of the cAMP enhancement of channel opening. These results suggest that the activation status of the gating ring and the open state of the pore are not coupled in an obligate manner (as required by the often invoked Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric model) but couple more loosely (as envisioned in a modular model of protein activation). Importantly, the emergence of second messenger sensitivity of open channel rectification suggests that loose coupling may have an unexpected consequence: it may endow these erstwhile “slow” channels with an ability to exert voltage and ligand-modulated control over cellular excitability on the fastest of physiologically relevant time scales. PMID:24983358

  18. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Dibattista, Michele; Mazzatenta, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca; Tirindelli, Roberto; Menini, Anna

    2008-08-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated currents (Ih) are present in several neurons of the central and peripheral nervous system. However, Ih in neurons of the vomeronasal organ (VNO) is not well characterized. We studied the properties of Ih in sensory neurons from acute slices of mouse VNO. In voltage-clamp studies, Ih was identified by the characteristic kinetics of activation, voltage dependence, and blockage by Cs+ or ZD-7288, two blockers of the Ih. Forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, shifted the activation curve for Ih to less negative potentials. A comparison of Ih properties in VNO neurons with those of heterologously expressed hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, together with RT-PCR experiments in VNO, indicate that Ih is caused by HCN2 and/or HCN4 subunits. In current-clamp recordings, blocking Ih with ZD-7288 induced a hyperpolarization of 5.1 mV, an increase in input resistance, a decrease in the sensitivity to elicit action potentials in response to small current injections, and did not modify the frequency of action potentials elicited by a large current injection. It has been shown that in VNO neurons some pheromones induce a decrease in cAMP concentration, but the physiological role of cAMP is unknown. After application of blockers of adenylyl cyclase, we measured a hyperpolarization of 5.1 mV in 11 of 14 neurons, suggesting that basal levels of cAMP could modulate the resting potential. In conclusion, these results show that mouse VNO neurons express HCN2 and/or HCN4 subunits and that Ih contributes to setting the resting membrane potential and to increase excitability at stimulus threshold.

  19. Novel blockers of hyperpolarization-activated current with isoform selectivity in recombinant cells and native tissue.

    PubMed

    Del Lungo, Martina; Melchiorre, Michele; Guandalini, Luca; Sartiani, Laura; Mugelli, Alessandro; Koncz, Istvan; Szel, Tamas; Varro, Andras; Romanelli, Maria Novella; Cerbai, Elisabetta

    2012-05-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Selective hyperpolarization activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (HCN) blockers represent an important therapeutic goal due to the wide distribution and multiple functions of these proteins, representing the molecular correlate of f- and h-current (I(f) or I(h) ). Recently, new compounds able to block differentially the homomeric HCN isoforms expressed in HEK293 have been synthesized. In the present work, the electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of these new HCN blockers were characterized and their activities evaluated on native channels. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH HEK293 cells expressing mHCN1, mHCN2 and hHCN4 isoforms were used to verify channel blockade. Selected compounds were tested on native guinea pig sinoatrial node cells and neurons from mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) by patch-clamp recordings and on dog Purkinje fibres by intracellular recordings. KEY RESULTS In HEK293 cells, EC18 was found to be significantly selective for HCN4 and MEL57A for HCN1 at physiological membrane potential. When tested on guinea pig sinoatrial node cells, EC18 (10 µM) maintained its activity, reducing I(f) by 67% at -120 mV, while MEL57A (3 µM) reduced I(f) by 18%. In contrast, in mouse DRG neurons, only MEL57A (30 and 100 µM) significantly reduced I(h) by 60% at -80 mV. In dog cardiac Purkinje fibres, EC18, but not MEL57A, reduced the amplitude and slowed the slope of the spontaneous diastolic depolarization. CONCLUSIONS Our results have identified novel and highly selective HCN isoform blockers, EC18 and MEL57A; the selectivity found in recombinant system was maintained in various tissues expressing different HCN isoforms.

  20. An N-terminal deletion variant of HCN1 in the epileptic WAG/Rij strain modulates HCN current densities.

    PubMed

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Silbernagel, Nicole; Fernandez-Orth, Juncal; Bittner, Stefan; Kiper, Aytug K; Rinné, Susanne; Netter, Michael F; Meuth, Sven G; Budde, Thomas; Decher, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Rats of the Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rij (WAG/Rij) strain show symptoms resembling human absence epilepsy. Thalamocortical neurons of WAG/Rij rats are characterized by an increased HCN1 expression, a negative shift in I h activation curve, and an altered responsiveness of I h to cAMP. We cloned HCN1 channels from rat thalamic cDNA libraries of the WAG/Rij strain and found an N-terminal deletion of 37 amino acids. In addition, WAG-HCN1 has a stretch of six amino acids, directly following the deletion, where the wild-type sequence (GNSVCF) is changed to a polyserine motif. These alterations were found solely in thalamus mRNA but not in genomic DNA. The truncated WAG-HCN1 was detected late postnatal in WAG/Rij rats and was not passed on to rats obtained from pairing WAG/Rij and non-epileptic August Copenhagen Irish rats. Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes revealed 2.2-fold increased current amplitude of WAG-HCN1 compared to rat HCN1. While WAG-HCN1 channels did not have altered current kinetics or changed regulation by protein kinases, fluorescence imaging revealed a faster and more pronounced surface expression of WAG-HCN1. Using co-expression experiments, we found that WAG-HCN1 channels suppress heteromeric HCN2 and HCN4 currents. Moreover, heteromeric channels of WAG-HCN1 with HCN2 have a reduced cAMP sensitivity. Functional studies revealed that the gain-of-function of WAG-HCN1 is not caused by the N-terminal deletion alone, thus requiring a change of the N-terminal GNSVCF motif. Our findings may help to explain previous observations in neurons of the WAG/Rij strain and indicate that WAG-HCN1 may contribute to the genesis of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats.

  1. An N-terminal deletion variant of HCN1 in the epileptic WAG/Rij strain modulates HCN current densities

    PubMed Central

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Silbernagel, Nicole; Fernandez-Orth, Juncal; Bittner, Stefan; Kiper, Aytug K.; Rinné, Susanne; Netter, Michael F.; Meuth, Sven G.; Budde, Thomas; Decher, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Rats of the Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rij (WAG/Rij) strain show symptoms resembling human absence epilepsy. Thalamocortical neurons of WAG/Rij rats are characterized by an increased HCN1 expression, a negative shift in Ih activation curve, and an altered responsiveness of Ih to cAMP. We cloned HCN1 channels from rat thalamic cDNA libraries of the WAG/Rij strain and found an N-terminal deletion of 37 amino acids. In addition, WAG-HCN1 has a stretch of six amino acids, directly following the deletion, where the wild-type sequence (GNSVCF) is changed to a polyserine motif. These alterations were found solely in thalamus mRNA but not in genomic DNA. The truncated WAG-HCN1 was detected late postnatal in WAG/Rij rats and was not passed on to rats obtained from pairing WAG/Rij and non-epileptic August Copenhagen Irish rats. Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes revealed 2.2-fold increased current amplitude of WAG-HCN1 compared to rat HCN1. While WAG-HCN1 channels did not have altered current kinetics or changed regulation by protein kinases, fluorescence imaging revealed a faster and more pronounced surface expression of WAG-HCN1. Using co-expression experiments, we found that WAG-HCN1 channels suppress heteromeric HCN2 and HCN4 currents. Moreover, heteromeric channels of WAG-HCN1 with HCN2 have a reduced cAMP sensitivity. Functional studies revealed that the gain-of-function of WAG-HCN1 is not caused by the N-terminal deletion alone, thus requiring a change of the N-terminal GNSVCF motif. Our findings may help to explain previous observations in neurons of the WAG/Rij strain and indicate that WAG-HCN1 may contribute to the genesis of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats. PMID:26578877

  2. Genetic Analysis of Arrhythmogenic Diseases in the Era of NGS: The Complexity of Clinical Decision-Making in Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Allegue, Catarina; Coll, Mònica; Mates, Jesus; Campuzano, Oscar; Iglesias, Anna; Sobrino, Beatriz; Brion, Maria; Amigo, Jorge; Carracedo, Angel; Brugada, Pedro; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of next-generation sequencing enables a rapid analysis of many genes associated with sudden cardiac death in diseases like Brugada Syndrome. Genetic variation is identified and associated with 30–35% of cases of Brugada Syndrome, with nearly 20–25% attributable to variants in SCN5A, meaning many cases remain undiagnosed genetically. To evaluate the role of genetic variants in arrhythmogenic diseases and the utility of next-generation sequencing, we applied this technology to resequence 28 main genes associated with arrhythmogenic disorders. Materials and Methods A cohort of 45 clinically diagnosed Brugada Syndrome patients classified as SCN5A-negative was analyzed using next generation sequencing. Twenty-eight genes were resequenced: AKAP9, ANK2, CACNA1C, CACNB2, CASQ2, CAV3, DSC2, DSG2, DSP, GPD1L, HCN4, JUP, KCNE1, KCNE2, KCNE3, KCNH2, KCNJ2, KCNJ5, KCNQ1, NOS1AP, PKP2, RYR2, SCN1B, SCN3B, SCN4B, SCN5A, SNTA1, and TMEM43. A total of 85 clinically evaluated relatives were also genetically analyzed to ascertain familial segregation. Results and Discussion Twenty-two patients carried 30 rare genetic variants in 12 genes, only 4 of which were previously associated with Brugada Syndrome. Neither insertion/deletion nor copy number variation were detected. We identified genetic variants in novel candidate genes potentially associated to Brugada Syndrome. These include: 4 genetic variations in AKAP9 including a de novo genetic variation in 3 positive cases; 5 genetic variations in ANK2 detected in 4 cases; variations in KCNJ2 together with CASQ2 in 1 case; genetic variations in RYR2, including a de novo genetic variation and desmosomal proteins encoding genes including DSG2, DSP and JUP, detected in 3 of the cases. Larger gene panels or whole exome sequencing should be considered to identify novel genes associated to Brugada Syndrome. However, application of approaches such as whole exome sequencing would difficult the interpretation for clinical

  3. Intracellular domains interactions and gated motions of IKS potassium channel subunits

    PubMed Central

    Haitin, Yoni; Wiener, Reuven; Shaham, Dana; Peretz, Asher; Cohen, Enbal Ben-Tal; Shamgar, Liora; Pongs, Olaf; Hirsch, Joel A; Attali, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ channels co-assemble with auxiliary β subunits to form macromolecular complexes. In heart, assembly of Kv7.1 pore-forming subunits with KCNE1 β subunits generates the repolarizing K+ current IKS. However, the detailed nature of their interface remains unknown. Mutations in either Kv7.1 or KCNE1 produce the life-threatening long or short QT syndromes. Here, we studied the interactions and voltage-dependent motions of IKS channel intracellular domains, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer combined with voltage-clamp recording and in vitro binding of purified proteins. The results indicate that the KCNE1 distal C-terminus interacts with the coiled-coil helix C of the Kv7.1 tetramerization domain. This association is important for IKS channel assembly rules as underscored by Kv7.1 current inhibition produced by a dominant-negative C-terminal domain. On channel opening, the C-termini of Kv7.1 and KCNE1 come close together. Co-expression of Kv7.1 with the KCNE1 long QT mutant D76N abolished the K+ currents and gated motions. Thus, during channel gating KCNE1 is not static. Instead, the C-termini of both subunits experience molecular motions, which are disrupted by the D76N causing disease mutation. PMID:19521339

  4. Intracellular domains interactions and gated motions of I(KS) potassium channel subunits.

    PubMed

    Haitin, Yoni; Wiener, Reuven; Shaham, Dana; Peretz, Asher; Cohen, Enbal Ben-Tal; Shamgar, Liora; Pongs, Olaf; Hirsch, Joel A; Attali, Bernard

    2009-07-22

    Voltage-gated K(+) channels co-assemble with auxiliary beta subunits to form macromolecular complexes. In heart, assembly of Kv7.1 pore-forming subunits with KCNE1 beta subunits generates the repolarizing K(+) current I(KS). However, the detailed nature of their interface remains unknown. Mutations in either Kv7.1 or KCNE1 produce the life-threatening long or short QT syndromes. Here, we studied the interactions and voltage-dependent motions of I(KS) channel intracellular domains, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer combined with voltage-clamp recording and in vitro binding of purified proteins. The results indicate that the KCNE1 distal C-terminus interacts with the coiled-coil helix C of the Kv7.1 tetramerization domain. This association is important for I(KS) channel assembly rules as underscored by Kv7.1 current inhibition produced by a dominant-negative C-terminal domain. On channel opening, the C-termini of Kv7.1 and KCNE1 come close together. Co-expression of Kv7.1 with the KCNE1 long QT mutant D76N abolished the K(+) currents and gated motions. Thus, during channel gating KCNE1 is not static. Instead, the C-termini of both subunits experience molecular motions, which are disrupted by the D76N causing disease mutation.

  5. Dendritic HCN channels shape excitatory postsynaptic potentials at the inner hair cell afferent synapse in the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Yi, Eunyoung; Roux, Isabelle; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    Synaptic transmission at the inner hair cell (IHC) afferent synapse, the first synapse in the auditory pathway, is specialized for rapid and reliable signaling. Here we investigated the properties of a hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)), expressed in the afferent dendrite of auditory nerve fibers, and its role in shaping postsynaptic activity. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings from afferent dendrites directly where they contact the IHC in excised postnatal rat cochlear turns. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) of variable amplitude (1-35 mV) were found with 10-90% rise times of about 1 ms and time constants of decay of about 5 ms at room temperature. Current-voltage relations recorded in afferent dendrites revealed I(h). The pharmacological profile and reversal potential (-45 mV) indicated that I(h) is mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels. The HCN channel subunits HCN1, HCN2, and HCN4 were found to be expressed in afferent dendrites using immunolabeling. Raising intracellular cAMP levels sped up the activation kinetics, increased the magnitude of I(h) and shifted the half activation voltage (V(half)) to more positive values (-104 +/- 3 to -91 +/- 2 mV). Blocking I(h) with 50 microM ZD7288 resulted in hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential (approximately 4 mV) and slowing the decay of the EPSP by 47%, suggesting that I(h) is active at rest and shortens EPSPs, thereby potentially improving rapid and reliable signaling at this first synapse in the auditory pathway.

  6. Immunolocalization of hyperpolarization-activated cationic HCN1 and HCN3 channels in the rat nephron: regulation of HCN3 by potassium diets.

    PubMed

    López-González, Zinaeli; Ayala-Aguilera, Cosete; Martinez-Morales, Flavio; Galicia-Cruz, Othir; Salvador-Hernández, Carolina; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Medeiros, Mara; Hernández, Ana Maria; Escobar, Laura I

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cationic and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCN) comprise four homologous subunits (HCN1-HCN4). HCN channels are found in excitable and non-excitable tissues in mammals. We have previously shown that HCN2 may transport ammonium (NH4 (+)), besides sodium (Na(+)), in the rat distal nephron. In the present work, we identified HCN1 and HCN3 in the proximal tubule (PT) and HCN3 in the thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH) of the rat kidney. Immunoblot assays detected HCN1 (130 kDa) and HCN3 (90 KDa) and their truncated proteins C-terminal HCN1 (93 KDa) and N-terminal HCN3 (65 KDa) in enriched plasma membranes from cortex (CX) and outer medulla (OM), as well as in brush-border membrane vesicles. Immunofluorescence assays confirmed apical localization of HCN1 and HCN3 in the PT. HCN3 was also found at the basolateral membrane of TALH. We evaluated chronic changes in mineral dietary on HCN3 protein abundance. Animals were fed with three different diets: sodium-deficient (SD) diet, potassium-deficient (KD) diet, and high-potassium (HK) diet. Up-regulation of HCN3 was observed in OM by KD and in CX and OM by HK; the opposite effect occurred with the N-terminal truncated HCN3 in CX (KD) and OM (HK). SD diet did not produce any change. Since HCN channels activate with membrane hyperpolarization, our results suggest that HCN channels may play a role in the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, contributing to Na(+), K(+), and acid-base homeostasis in the rat kidney.

  7. The hyperpolarization-activated non-specific cation current (In ) adjusts the membrane properties, excitability, and activity pattern of the giant cells in the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Rusznák, Zoltán; Pál, Balázs; Kőszeghy, Aron; Fu, Yuhong; Szücs, Géza; Paxinos, George

    2013-03-01

    Giant cells of the cochlear nucleus are thought to integrate multimodal sensory inputs and participate in monaural sound source localization. Our aim was to explore the significance of a hyperpolarization-activated current in determining the activity of giant neurones in slices prepared from 10 to 14-day-old rats. When subjected to hyperpolarizing stimuli, giant cells produced a 4-(N-ethyl-N-phenylamino)-1,2-dimethyl-6-(methylamino) pyridinium chloride (ZD7288)-sensitive inward current with a reversal potential and half-activation voltage of -36 and -88 mV, respectively. Consequently, the current was identified as the hyperpolarization-activated non-specific cationic current (Ih ). At the resting membrane potential, 3.5% of the maximum Ih conductance was available. Immunohistochemistry experiments suggested that hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated, cation non-selective (HCN)1, HCN2, and HCN4 subunits contribute to the assembly of the functional channels. Inhibition of Ih hyperpolarized the membrane by 6 mV and impeded spontaneous firing. The frequencies of spontaneous inhibitory and excitatory postsynaptic currents reaching the giant cell bodies were reduced but no significant change was observed when evoked postsynaptic currents were recorded. Giant cells are affected by biphasic postsynaptic currents consisting of an excitatory and a subsequent inhibitory component. Inhibition of Ih reduced the frequency of these biphasic events by 65% and increased the decay time constants of the inhibitory component. We conclude that Ih adjusts the resting membrane potential, contributes to spontaneous action potential firing, and may participate in the dendritic integration of the synaptic inputs of the giant neurones. Because its amplitude was higher in young than in adult rats, Ih of the giant cells may be especially important during the postnatal maturation of the auditory system.

  8. Human congenital long QT syndrome: more than previously thought?

    PubMed

    Attali, Bernard

    2002-06-01

    Mutations in KCNQ1 and KCNE1, the alpha- and beta-subunits of the I(KS) K+ channel, produce the cardiac long QT (LQT) syndrome. These subunits are expressed in heart and inner ear, but also in epithelial tissues such as kidney or intestine where their functional roles have remained elusive. Recent work has shown that KCNE1-deficient mice display chronic hypokalemia and hyperaldosteronism. These results have significant implications for human congenital LQT syndromes because hypokalemia increases the risk of ventricular arrhythmia and cardiac sudden death.

  9. Anatomical, physiological and molecular properties of Martinotti cells in the somatosensory cortex of the juvenile rat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Toledo-Rodriguez, Maria; Gupta, Anirudh; Wu, Caizhi; Silberberg, Gilad; Luo, Junyi; Markram, Henry

    2004-01-01

    in these MCs were (from highest to lowest); Caβ1, Kv3.3, HCN4, Caβ4, Kv3.2, Kv3.1, Kv2.1, HCN3, Caα1G, Kv3.4, Kv4.2, Kv1.1 and HCN2. In summary, this study provides the first detailed analysis of the anatomical, electrophysiological and molecular properties of Martinotti cells located in different neocortical layers. It is proposed that MCs are crucial interneurones for feedback inhibition in and between neocortical layers and columns. PMID:15331670

  10. Prenatal Valproate Exposure Differentially Affects Parvalbumin-Expressing Neurons and Related Circuits in the Cortex and Striatum of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lauber, Emanuel; Filice, Federica; Schwaller, Beat

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) comprise a number of heterogeneous neurodevelopmental diseases characterized by core behavioral symptoms in the domains of social interaction, language/communication and repetitive or stereotyped patterns of behavior. In utero exposure to valproic acid (VPA) has evolved as a highly recognized rodent ASD model due to the robust behavioral phenotype observed in the offspring and the proven construct-, face- and predictive validity of the model. The number of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV+) GABAergic interneurons has been consistently reported to be decreased in human ASD subjects and in ASD animal models. The presumed loss of this neuron subpopulation hereafter termed Pvalb neurons and/or PV deficits were proposed to result in an excitation/inhibition imbalance often observed in ASD. Importantly, loss of Pvalb neurons and decreased/absent PV protein levels have two fundamentally different consequences. Thus, Pvalb neurons were investigated in in utero VPA-exposed male (“VPA”) mice in the striatum, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and somatosensory cortex (SSC), three ASD-associated brain regions. Unbiased stereology of PV+ neurons and Vicia Villosa Agglutinin-positive (VVA+) perineuronal nets, which specifically enwrap Pvalb neurons, was carried out. Analyses of PV protein expression and mRNA levels for Pvalb, Gad67, Kcnc1, Kcnc2, Kcns3, Hcn1, Hcn2, and Hcn4 were performed. We found a ∼15% reduction in the number of PV+ cells and decreased Pvalb mRNA and PV protein levels in the striatum of VPA mice compared to controls, while the number of VVA+ cells was unchanged, indicating that Pvalb neurons were affected at the level of the transcriptome. In selected cortical regions (mPFC, SSC) of VPA mice, no quantitative loss/decrease of PV+ cells was observed. However, expression of Kcnc1, coding for the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.1 specifically expressed in Pvalb neurons, was decreased by ∼40% in forebrain lysates of VPA mice

  11. Gating mechanisms underlying deactivation slowing by two KCNQ1 atrial fibrillation mutations

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Gary; Barro-Soria, Rene; Sampson, Kevin J.; Larsson, H. Peter; Kass, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    KCNQ1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel that is modulated by the beta-subunit KCNE1 to generate IKs, the slow delayed rectifier current, which plays a critical role in repolarizing the cardiac action potential. Two KCNQ1 gain-of-function mutations that cause a genetic form of atrial fibrillation, S140G and V141M, drastically slow IKs deactivation. However, the underlying gating alterations remain unknown. Voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) allows simultaneous measurement of voltage sensor movement and current through the channel pore. Here, we use VCF and kinetic modeling to determine the effects of mutations on channel voltage-dependent gating. We show that in the absence of KCNE1, S140G, but not V141M, directly slows voltage sensor movement, which indirectly slows current deactivation. In the presence of KCNE1, both S140G and V141M slow pore closing and alter voltage sensor-pore coupling, thereby slowing current deactivation. Our results suggest that KCNE1 can mediate changes in pore movement and voltage sensor-pore coupling to slow IKs deactivation and provide a key step toward developing mechanism-based therapies. PMID:28383569

  12. Effects of N-glycosylation on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo; Tonggu, Lige; Tang, Lan; Wang, Liguo

    2015-02-15

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization and conduct an inward cation current, which contributes to rhythmic electrical activity of neural and cardiac pacemaker cells. HCN channels have been shown to undergo N-linked glycosylation, and the N-glycosylation has been shown to be required for membrane trafficking and possibly function. In this study, recombinant wild-type (WT) and glycosylation-defective N380Q HCN2 channels were individually or co-expressed in HEK-293 cells. We demonstrate that glycosylation is required for trafficking to the plasma membrane and for the stability of HCN channels in the cell. Interestingly, the heteromeric HCN2 channels of WT and glycosylation-defective N380Q have been observed on cell membranes, indicating that not all four subunits of a tetrameric HCN2 channel need to be glycosylated for HCN2 channels to traffic to plasma membranes. Subsequently, we investigate the effect of N-glycosylation on the function of HCN2 channels. We developed a fluorescence-based flux assay, which makes it possible to establish a negative potential inside liposomes to open HCN2 channels. Using this flux assay, we demonstrate that glycosylation-defective N380Q HCN2 channels reconstituted into liposomes function similarly to WT HCN2 channels. This suggests that N-glycosylation is not required for HCN2 channels to function.

  13. Probing binding sites and mechanisms of action of an I(Ks) activator by computations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu; Wang, Yuhong; Zhang, Mei; Jiang, Min; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia; Wassenaar, Tsjerk; Tseng, Gea-Ny

    2015-01-06

    The slow delayed rectifier (IKs) channel is composed of the KCNQ1 channel and KCNE1 auxiliary subunit, and functions to repolarize action potentials in the human heart. IKs activators may provide therapeutic efficacy for treating long QT syndromes. Here, we show that a new KCNQ1 activator, ML277, can enhance IKs amplitude in adult guinea pig and canine ventricular myocytes. We probe its binding site and mechanism of action by computational analysis based on our recently reported KCNQ1 and KCNQ1/KCNE1 3D models, followed by experimental validation. Results from a pocket analysis and docking exercise suggest that ML277 binds to a side pocket in KCNQ1 and the KCNE1-free side pocket of KCNQ1/KCNE1. Molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations based on the most favorable channel/ML277 docking configurations reveal a well-defined ML277 binding space surrounded by the S2-S3 loop and S4-S5 helix on the intracellular side, and by S4-S6 transmembrane helices on the lateral sides. A detailed analysis of MD trajectories suggests two mechanisms of ML277 action. First, ML277 restricts the conformational dynamics of the KCNQ1 pore, optimizing K(+) ion coordination in the selectivity filter and increasing current amplitudes. Second, ML277 binding induces global motions in the channel, including regions critical for KCNQ1 gating transitions. We conclude that ML277 activates IKs by binding to an intersubunit space and allosterically influencing pore conductance and gating transitions. KCNE1 association protects KCNQ1 from an arrhythmogenic (constitutive current-inducing) effect of ML277, but does not preclude its current-enhancing effect.

  14. Mechanisms of disease pathogenesis in long QT syndrome type 5

    PubMed Central

    Harmer, Stephen C.; Wilson, Andrew J.; Aldridge, Robert

    2010-01-01

    KCNE1 associates with the pore-forming α-subunit KCNQ1 to generate the slow (IKs) current in cardiac myocytes. Mutations in either KCNQ1 or KCNE1 can alter the biophysical properties of IKs and mutations in KCNE1 underlie cases of long QT syndrome type 5 (LQT5). We previously investigated a mutation in KCNE1, T58P/L59P, which causes severe attenuation of IKs. However, how T58P/L59P acts to disrupt IKs has not been determined. In this study, we investigate and compare the effects of T58P/L59P with three other LQT5 mutations (G52R, S74L, and R98W) on the biophysical properties of the current, trafficking of KCNQ1, and assembly of the IKs channel. G52R and T58P/L59P produce currents that lack the kinetic behavior of IKs. In contrast, S74L and R98W both produce IKs-like currents but with rightward shifted voltage dependence of activation. All of the LQT5 mutants express protein robustly, and T58P/L59P and R98W cause modest, but significant, defects in the trafficking of KCNQ1. Despite defects in trafficking, in the presence of KCNQ1, T58P/L59P and the other LQT5 mutants are present at the plasma membrane. Interestingly, in comparison to KCNE1 and the other LQT5 mutants, T58P/L59P associates only weakly with KCNQ1. In conclusion, we identify the disease mechanisms for each mutation and reveal that T58P/L59P causes disease through a novel mechanism that involves defective IKs complex assembly. PMID:19907016

  15. Mechanisms of disease pathogenesis in long QT syndrome type 5.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Stephen C; Wilson, Andrew J; Aldridge, Robert; Tinker, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    KCNE1 associates with the pore-forming alpha-subunit KCNQ1 to generate the slow (I(Ks)) current in cardiac myocytes. Mutations in either KCNQ1 or KCNE1 can alter the biophysical properties of I(Ks) and mutations in KCNE1 underlie cases of long QT syndrome type 5 (LQT5). We previously investigated a mutation in KCNE1, T58P/L59P, which causes severe attenuation of I(Ks). However, how T58P/L59P acts to disrupt I(Ks) has not been determined. In this study, we investigate and compare the effects of T58P/L59P with three other LQT5 mutations (G52R, S74L, and R98W) on the biophysical properties of the current, trafficking of KCNQ1, and assembly of the I(Ks) channel. G52R and T58P/L59P produce currents that lack the kinetic behavior of I(Ks). In contrast, S74L and R98W both produce I(Ks)-like currents but with rightward shifted voltage dependence of activation. All of the LQT5 mutants express protein robustly, and T58P/L59P and R98W cause modest, but significant, defects in the trafficking of KCNQ1. Despite defects in trafficking, in the presence of KCNQ1, T58P/L59P and the other LQT5 mutants are present at the plasma membrane. Interestingly, in comparison to KCNE1 and the other LQT5 mutants, T58P/L59P associates only weakly with KCNQ1. In conclusion, we identify the disease mechanisms for each mutation and reveal that T58P/L59P causes disease through a novel mechanism that involves defective I(Ks) complex assembly.

  16. Recent molecular insights from mutated IKS channels in cardiac arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Dvir, Meidan; Peretz, Asher; Haitin, Yoni; Attali, Bernard

    2014-04-01

    Co-assembly of KCNQ1 with KCNE1 generates the IKS potassium current that is vital for the proper repolarization of the cardiac action potential. Mutations in either KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes lead to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias causing long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, sinus bradycardia and atrial fibrillation. Findings emerging from recent studies are beginning to provide a picture of how gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutations are associated with pleiotropic cardiac phenotypes in the clinics. In this review, we discuss recent molecular insights obtained from mutations altering different structural modules of the channel complex that are essential for proper IKS function. We present the possible molecular mechanisms underlying mutations impairing the voltage sensing functions, as well as those altering the channel regulation by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate, calmodulin and protein kinase A. We also discuss the significance of diseased IKS channels for adequate pharmacological targeting of cardiac arrhythmias.

  17. Modulation of homomeric and heteromeric KCNQ1 channels by external acidification.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Asher; Schottelndreier, Hella; Aharon-Shamgar, Liora Ben; Attali, Bernard

    2002-12-15

    The I(KS) K(+) channel plays a major role in repolarizing the cardiac action potential. It consists of an assembly of two structurally distinct alpha and beta subunits called KCNQ1 and KCNE1, respectively. Using two different expression systems, Xenopus oocytes and Chinese hamster ovary cells, we investigated the effects of external protons on homomeric and heteromeric KCNQ1 channels. External acidification (from pH 7.4 to pH 5.5) markedly decreased the homomeric KCNQ1 current amplitude and caused a positive shift (+25 mV) in the voltage dependence of activation. Low external pH (pH(o)) also slowed down the activation and deactivation kinetics and strongly reduced the KCNQ1 inactivation process. In contrast, external acidification reduced the maximum conductance and the macroscopic inactivation of the KCNQ1 mutant L273F by only a small amount. The heteromeric I(KS) channel complex was weakly affected by low pH(o), with minor effects on I(KS) current amplitude. However, substantial current inhibition was produced by protons with the N-terminal KCNE1 deletion mutant Delta11-38. Low pH(o) increased the current amplitude of the pore mutant V319C when co-expressed with KCNE1. The slowing of I(KS) deactivation produced by low pH(o) was absent in the KCNE1 mutant Delta39-43, suggesting that the residues lying at the N-terminal boundary of the transmembrane segment are involved in this process. In all, our results suggest that external acidification acts on homomeric and heteromeric KCNQ1 channels via multiple mechanisms to affect gating and maximum conductance. The external pH effects on I(Kr) versus I(KS) may be important determinants of arrhythmogenicity under conditions of cardiac ischaemia and reperfusion.

  18. Calmodulin is essential for cardiac IKS channel gating and assembly: impaired function in long-QT mutations.

    PubMed

    Shamgar, Liora; Ma, Lijuan; Schmitt, Nicole; Haitin, Yoni; Peretz, Asher; Wiener, Reuven; Hirsch, Joel; Pongs, Olaf; Attali, Bernard

    2006-04-28

    The slow IKS K+ channel plays a major role in repolarizing the cardiac action potential and consists of the assembly of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 subunits. Mutations in either KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes produce the long-QT syndrome, a life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia. Here, we show that long-QT mutations located in the KCNQ1 C terminus impair calmodulin (CaM) binding, which affects both channel gating and assembly. The mutations produce a voltage-dependent macroscopic inactivation and dramatically alter channel assembly. KCNE1 forms a ternary complex with wild-type KCNQ1 and Ca(2+)-CaM that prevents inactivation, facilitates channel assembly, and mediates a Ca(2+)-sensitive increase of IKS-current, with a considerable Ca(2+)-dependent left-shift of the voltage-dependence of activation. Coexpression of KCNQ1 or IKS channels with a Ca(2+)-insensitive CaM mutant markedly suppresses the currents and produces a right shift in the voltage-dependence of channel activation. KCNE1 association to KCNQ1 long-QT mutants significantly improves mutant channel expression and prevents macroscopic inactivation. However, the marked right shift in channel activation and the subsequent decrease in current amplitude cannot restore normal levels of IKS channel activity. Our data indicate that in healthy individuals, CaM binding to KCNQ1 is essential for correct channel folding and assembly and for conferring Ca(2+)-sensitive IKS-current stimulation, which increases the cardiac repolarization reserve and hence prevents the risk of ventricular arrhythmias.

  19. In vitro characterization of HCN channel kinetics and frequency dependence in myocytes predicts biological pacemaker functionality

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Bucchi, Annalisa; Oren, Ronit V; Kryukova, Yelena; Dun, Wen; Clancy, Colleen E; Robinson, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    The pacemaker current, mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, contributes to the initiation and regulation of cardiac rhythm. Previous experiments creating HCN-based biological pacemakers in vivo found that an engineered HCN2/HCN1 chimeric channel (HCN212) resulted in significantly faster rates than HCN2, interrupted by 1–5 s pauses. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the differences in HCN212 and HCN2 in vivo functionality as biological pacemakers, we studied newborn rat ventricular myocytes over-expressing either HCN2 or HCN212 channels. The HCN2- and HCN212-over-expressing myocytes manifest similar voltage dependence, current density and sensitivity to saturating cAMP concentrations, but HCN212 has faster activation/deactivation kinetics. Compared with HCN2, myocytes expressing HCN212 exhibit a faster spontaneous rate and greater incidence of irregular rhythms (i.e. periods of rapid spontaneous rate followed by pauses). To explore these rhythm differences further, we imposed consecutive pacing and found that activation kinetics of the two channels are slower at faster pacing frequencies. As a result, time-dependent HCN current flowing during diastole decreases for both constructs during a train of stimuli at a rapid frequency, with the effect more pronounced for HCN2. In addition, the slower deactivation kinetics of HCN2 contributes to more pronounced instantaneous current at a slower frequency. As a result of the frequency dependence of both instantaneous and time-dependent current, HCN2 exhibits more robust negative feedback than HCN212, contributing to the maintenance of a stable pacing rhythm. These results illustrate the benefit of screening HCN constructs in spontaneously active myocyte cultures and may provide the basis for future optimization of HCN-based biological pacemakers. PMID:19171659

  20. Tight coupling of rubidium conductance and inactivation in human KCNQ1 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Seebohm, Guiscard; Sanguinetti, Michael C; Pusch, Michael

    2003-10-15

    KCNQ1 K+ channels in humans are important for repolarization of cardiac action potentials and for K+ secretion in the inner ear. The pore-forming channel subunits form heteromeric complexes with small regulatory subunits of the KCNE family, in particular with KCNE1 to form channels that conduct a slow delayed rectifier K+ current, IKs. This association leads to alteration of biophysical properties, including a slowing of activation, a suppression of inactivation and an increase of the apparent single-channel conductance. In addition, inward Rb+ currents conducted by homomeric KCNQ1 channels are about threefold larger than K+ currents, whereas heteromeric KCNQ1-KCNE1 channels have smaller inward Rb+ currents compared to K+ currents. We determined inactivation properties and compared K+ vs. Rb+ inward currents for channels formed by co-assembly of KCNQ1 with KCNE1, KCNE3 and KCNE5, and for homomeric KCNQ1 channels with point mutations in the pore helix S5 or S6 transmembrane domains. Several of the channels with point mutations eliminated the apparent inactivation of KCNQ1, as described previously (Seebohm et al. 2001). We found that the extent of inactivation and the ratio of Rb+/K+ currents were positively correlated. Since the effect of Rb+ on the current size has been shown previously to be related to a fast 'flickery' process, our results suggest that inactivation of KCNQ1 channels is related to a fast flicker of the open channel. A kinetic model incorporating two open states, no explicit inactivated state and a fast flicker that is different for the two open states is able to account for the apparent inactivation and the correlation of inactivation and large Rb+ currents. We conclude that an association between KCNQ1 and KCNE subunits or removal of inactivation by mutation of KCNQ1 stabilizes the open conformation of the pore principally by altering an interaction between the pore helix and the selectivity filter and with S5/S6 domains.

  1. SUMOylation of the Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channel 2 Increases Surface Expression and the Maximal Conductance of the Hyperpolarization-Activated Current

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Anna R.; Welch, Meghyn A.; Forster, Lori A.; Tasneem, Sarah M.; Dubhashi, Janhavi A.; Baro, Deborah J.

    2017-01-01

    Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) is a ∼10 kDa peptide that can be post-translationally added to a lysine (K) on a target protein to facilitate protein–protein interactions. Recent studies have found that SUMOylation can be regulated in an activity-dependent manner and that ion channel SUMOylation can alter the biophysical properties and surface expression of the channel. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel surface expression can be regulated in an activity-dependent manner through unknown processes. We hypothesized that SUMOylation might influence the surface expression of HCN2 channels. In this manuscript, we show that HCN2 channels are SUMOylated in the mouse brain. Baseline levels of SUMOylation were also observed for a GFP-tagged HCN2 channel stably expressed in Human embryonic kidney (Hek) cells. Elevating GFP-HCN2 channel SUMOylation above baseline in Hek cells led to an increase in surface expression that augmented the hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) mediated by these channels. Increased SUMOylation did not alter Ih voltage-dependence or kinetics of activation. There are five predicted intracellular SUMOylation sites on HCN2. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that more than one K on the GFP-HCN2 channel was SUMOylated. Enhancing SUMOylation at one of the five predicted sites, K669, led to the increase in surface expression and Ih Gmax. The role of SUMOylation at additional sites is currently unknown. The SUMOylation site at K669 is also conserved in HCN1 channels. Aberrant SUMOylation has been linked to neurological diseases that also display alterations in HCN1 and HCN2 channel expression, such as seizures and Parkinson’s disease. This work is the first report that HCN channels can be SUMOylated and that this can regulate surface expression and Ih. PMID:28127275

  2. Nitric oxide selectively suppresses IH currents mediated by HCN1-containing channels

    PubMed Central

    Kopp-Scheinpflug, Cornelia; Pigott, Beatrice M; Forsythe, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    Key points The superior olivary complex (SOC) exhibits a spectrum of HCN1 and HCN2 subunit expression, which generate IH currents with fast and slow kinetics, respectively. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) was broadly distributed across the SOC. NO hyperpolarizes the half-activation voltage of HCN1-mediated currents and caused a slowing of the IH current kinetics in the respective nuclei (medial and lateral superior olives and superior paraolivary nucleus). This signalling was independent of cGMP. NO also caused a depolarizing shift in the half-activation voltage of HCN2-mediated IH currents, increasing activation at resting potentials; this was cGMP-dependent. Thus, NO signalling suppressed fast HCN1-mediated currents and potentiated slow HCN2-mediated currents, modulating the overall kinetics and magnitude of the endogenous IH. Abstract Hyperpolarization-activated non-specific cation-permeable channels (HCN) mediate IH currents, which are modulated by cGMP and cAMP and by nitric oxide (NO) signalling. Channel properties depend upon subunit composition (HCN1–4 and accessory subunits) as demonstrated in expression systems, but physiological relevance requires investigation in native neurons with intact intracellular signalling. Here we use the superior olivary complex (SOC), which exhibits a distinctive pattern of HCN1 and HCN2 expression, to investigate NO modulation of the respective IH currents, and compare properties in wild-type and HCN1 knockout mice. The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) expresses HCN2 subunits exclusively, and sends inhibitory projections to the medial and lateral superior olives (MSO, LSO) and the superior paraolivary nucleus (SPN). In contrast to the MNTB, these target nuclei possess an IH with fast kinetics, and they express HCN1 subunits. NO is generated in the SOC following synaptic activity and here we show that NO selectively suppresses HCN1, while enhancing IH mediated by HCN2 subunits. NO hyperpolarizes the half

  3. Functional Characterization of HCN Channels in Rat Pancreatic β Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Yunfeng; Qu, Jihong; Hardy, Alexandre; Zhang, Nina; Diao, Jingyu; Strijbos, Paul J.; Tsushima, Robert; Robinson, Richard B.; Gaisano, Herbert Y.; Wang, Qinghua; Wheeler, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels regulate pacemaker activity in some cardiac cells and neurons. In the present study, we have identified the presence of HCN channels in pancreatic β-cells. We then examined the functional characterization of these channels in β-cells via modulating HCN channel activity genetically and pharmacologically. Voltage-clamp experiments showed that over-expression of HCN2 in rat β-cells significantly increased HCN current (Ih), whereas expression of dominant-negative HCN2 (HCN2-AYA) completely suppressed endogenous Ih. Compared to control β-cells, over-expression of Ih increased insulin secretion at 2.8 mmol/l glucose. However, suppression of Ih did not affect insulin secretion at both 2.8 mmol/l and 11.1 mmol/l glucose. Current-clamp measurements revealed that HCN2 over-expression significantly reduced β-cell membrane input resistance (Rin), and resulted in a less hyperpolarizing membrane response to the currents injected into the cell. Conversely, dominant negative HCN2-AYA expression led to a substantial increase of Rin, which was associated with a more hyperpolarizing membrane response to the currents injected. Remarkably, under low extracellular potassium conditions (2.5mmol/l K+), suppression of Ih resulted in increased membrane hyperpolarization and decreased insulin secretion. We conclude that Ih in β-cells possess the potential to modulate β-cell membrane potential and insulin secretion under hypokalemic conditions. PMID:19654142

  4. Polyunsaturated fatty acid analogs act antiarrhythmically on the cardiac IKs channel.

    PubMed

    Liin, Sara I; Silverå Ejneby, Malin; Barro-Soria, Rene; Skarsfeldt, Mark Alexander; Larsson, Johan E; Starck Härlin, Frida; Parkkari, Teija; Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Schmitt, Nicole; Larsson, H Peter; Elinder, Fredrik

    2015-05-05

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) affect cardiac excitability. Kv7.1 and the β-subunit KCNE1 form the cardiac IKs channel that is central for cardiac repolarization. In this study, we explore the prospects of PUFAs as IKs channel modulators. We report that PUFAs open Kv7.1 via an electrostatic mechanism. Both the polyunsaturated acyl tail and the negatively charged carboxyl head group are required for PUFAs to open Kv7.1. We further show that KCNE1 coexpression abolishes the PUFA effect on Kv7.1 by promoting PUFA protonation. PUFA analogs with a decreased pKa value, to preserve their negative charge at neutral pH, restore the sensitivity to open IKs channels. PUFA analogs with a positively charged head group inhibit IKs channels. These different PUFA analogs could be developed into drugs to treat cardiac arrhythmias. In support of this possibility, we show that PUFA analogs act antiarrhythmically in embryonic rat cardiomyocytes and in isolated perfused hearts from guinea pig.

  5. WTC deafness Kyoto (dfk): a rat model for extensive investigations of Kcnq1 functions.

    PubMed

    Gohma, Hiroshi; Kuramoto, Takashi; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Okajima, Ryoko; Tanimoto, Noriaki; Yamasaki, Ken-ichi; Nakanishi, Satoshi; Kitada, Kazuhiro; Makiyama, Takeru; Akao, Masaharu; Kita, Toru; Sasa, Masashi; Serikawa, Tadao

    2006-02-14

    KCNQ1 forms K+ channels by assembly with regulatory subunit KCNE proteins and plays a key role in the K+ homeostasis in a variety of tissues. In the heart, KCNQ1 is coassembled with KCNE1 to produce a cardiac delayed rectifier K+ current. In the inner ear, the KCNQ1/KCNE1 complex maintains the high concentration of K+ in the endolymph. In the stomach, KCNQ1 is coassembled with KCNE2 to form the K+ exflux channel that is essential for gastric acid secretion. In the colon and small intestine, KCNQ1 is coassembled with KCNE3 to play an important role in transepithelial cAMP-stimulated Cl- secretion. For further understanding of Kcnq1 function in vivo, an animal model has been required. Here we reported the identification of a coisogenic Kcnq1 mutant rat, named deafness Kyoto (dfk), and the characterization of its phenotypes. WTC-dfk rats carried intragenic deletion at the Kcnq1 gene and showed impaired gain of weight, deafness, and imbalance resulting from the marked reduction of endolymph, prolonged QT interval in the electrocardiogram (ECG), and gastric achlorhydria associated with hypertrophic gastric mucosa. Surprisingly, WTC-dfk rats showed hypertension, which suggested that Kcnq1 might be involved in the regulation of blood pressure. These findings suggest that WTC-dfk rats could represent a powerful tool for studying the physiological functions of KCNQ1 and for the establishment of new therapeutic procedures for Kcnq1-related diseases.

  6. Crizotinib Inhibits Hyperpolarization-activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channel 4 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhushan; Huang, Tai-Qin; Nepliouev, Igor; Zhang, Hengtao; Barnett, Adam S.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Ou, Sai-Hong I.; Stiber, Jonathan A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Sinus bradycardia is frequently observed in patients treated with crizotinib, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor used for the treatment of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We investigated whether crizotinib could influence heart rate (HR) through direct cardiac effects. Methods The direct effect of crizotinib on HR was studied using ECG analysis of Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts. The whole-cell patch clamp technique was used to measure the effects of crizotinib on the hyperpolarization-activated funny current, If, in mouse sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4 (HCN4) activity in HEK-293 cells stably expressing human HCN4. Results Crizotinib resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in HR in isolated intact mouse hearts with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.7 ± 0.4 μmol/L. Because ECG analysis revealed that crizotinib (0–5 μmol/L) resulted in significant reductions in HR in isolated mouse hearts without changes in PR, QRS, or QT intervals, we performed whole-cell patch clamp recordings of SANCs which showed that crizotinib inhibited If which regulates cardiac pacemaker activity. Crizotinib resulted in diminished current density of HCN4, the major molecular determinant of If, with an IC50 of 1.4 ± 0.3 μmol/L. Crizotinib also slowed HCN4 activation and shifted the activation curve to the left towards more hyperpolarized potentials. Conclusions Our results suggest that crizotinib’s effects on HCN4 channels play a significant role in mediating its observed effects on HR. PMID:28217366

  7. Age-dependent down-regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4 causes deterioration of canine sinoatrial node function.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianlin; Deng, Songbai; Pu, Di; Liu, Yajie; Xiao, Jun; She, Qiang

    2017-03-23

    The activity of pacemaker cells in the sinoatrial node (SAN) is an indicator of normal sinus rhythm. Clinical studies have revealed that the dysfunction of the SAN progressively increases with aging. In this study, we determined the changes in hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4 (HCN4) expression and the relationship between aging and canine SAN dysfunction. The results of cardiac electrophysiological determination revealed that the intrinsic heart rate decreased from 168 ± 11 beats min-1 in young canines to 120 ± 9 beats min-1 in adults and to 88 ± 9 beats min-1 in aged canines. The sinus node recovery time (SNRT) increased from 412 ± 32 ms in young canines to 620 ± 56 ms in adults and to 838 ± 120 ms in aged canines. Corrected SNRT (CSNRT) increased from 55 ± 12 ms in young canines to 117 ± 27 ms in adults and to 171 ± 37 ms in aged canines. These results indicated that SAN function deteriorated with aging in the canine heart. However, histological staining illustrated that fibrosis was not significantly increased with aging in canine SAN. Real-time polymerase chain reaction indicated that the expression of HCN4 mRNA was downregulated in the elderly canine SAN. Similarly, we also verified that HCN4 protein expression within the SAN declined with aging via immunofluorescence staining and western blot analysis. Taken together, our data show that electrical remodeling, related to the down-regulation of HCN4, is responsible for the gradually increased incidence of SAN dysfunction with aging. Our results provide further evidence for explaining the mechanisms of age-related deterioration in the SAN.

  8. Sudden cardiac arrest during anesthesia in a 30-month-old boy with syndactyly: a case of genetically proven Timothy syndrome.

    PubMed

    An, Hyo Soon; Choi, Eun Young; Kwon, Bo Sang; Kim, Gi Beom; Bae, Eun Jung; Noh, Chung Il; Choi, Jung Yun; Park, Sung Sup

    2013-05-01

    Timothy syndrome, long QT syndrome type 8, is highly malignant with ventricular tachyarrhythmia. A 30-month-old boy had sudden cardiac arrest during anesthesia induction before plastic surgery for bilateral cutaneous syndactyly. After successful resuscitation, prolonged QT interval (QTc, 0.58-0.60 sec) and T-wave alternans were found in his electrocardiogram. Starting β-blocker to prevent further tachycardia and collapse event, then there were no more arrhythmic events. The genes KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNE1 and 2, and SCN5A were negative for long QT syndrome. The mutation p.Gly406Arg was confirmed in CACNA1C, which maintains L-type calcium channel depolarization in the heart and other systems.

  9. Delayed rectifier K(+) currents and cardiac repolarization.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Flavien; Mérot, Jean; Loussouarn, Gildas; Baró, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    The two components of the cardiac delayed rectifier current have been the subject of numerous studies since firstly described. This current controls the action potential duration and is highly regulated. After identification of the channel subunits underlying IKs, KCNQ1 associated with KCNE1, and IKr, HERG, their involvement in human cardiac channelopathies have provided various models allowing the description of the molecular mechanisms of the KCNQ1 and HERG channels trafficking, activity and regulation. More recently, studies have been focusing on the unveiling of different partners of the pore-forming proteins that contribute to their maturation, trafficking, activity and/or degradation, on one side, and on their respective expression in the heterogeneous cardiac tissue, on the other side. The aim of this review is to report and discuss the major works on IKs and IKr and the most recent ones that help to understand the precise function of these currents in the heart.

  10. Analysis of gene polymorphisms associated with K ion circulation in the inner ear of patients susceptible and resistant to noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Pawelczyk, Malgorzata; Van Laer, Lut; Fransen, Erik; Rajkowska, Elzbieta; Konings, Annelies; Carlsson, Per-Inge; Borg, Erik; Van Camp, Guy; Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2009-07-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the leading occupational health risks in industrialized countries. It results from an interaction between environmental and genetic factors, however the nature of the genetic factors contributing to NIHL has not yet been clarified. Here, we investigated whether genetic variations in 10 genes putatively involved in the potassium recycling pathway in the inner ear may influence susceptibility to noise. 99 SNPs were genotyped in Polish noise-exposed workers, categorized into susceptible and resistant subjects. The most interesting results were obtained for KCNE1 and KCNQ4 as we replicated associations that were previously reported in a Swedish sample set, hence confirming that they are NIHL susceptibility genes. Additionally we report significant associations in GJB1, GJB2, GJB4, KCNJ10 and KCNQ1, however due to the lack of replication in the Swedish sample set, these results should be seen as suggestive.

  11. Rescue of a trafficking defective human pacemaker channel via a novel mechanism: roles of Src, Fyn, and Yes tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Chang; Huang, Jianying; Kan, Hong; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Yu, Han-Gang

    2009-10-30

    Therapeutic strategies such as using channel blockers and reducing culture temperature have been used to rescue some long QT-associated voltage-gated potassium Kv trafficking defective mutant channels. A hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated HCN4 pacemaker channel mutant (D553N) has been recently found in a patient associated with cardiac arrhythmias including long QT. D553N showed the defective trafficking to the cell surface, leading to little ionic current expression (loss-of-function). We show in this report that enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation mediated by Src, Fyn, and Yes kinases was able to restore the surface expression of D553N for normal current expression. Src or Yes, but not Fyn, significantly increased the current density and surface expression of D553N. Fyn accelerated the activation kinetics of the rescued D553N. Co-expression of D553N with Yes exhibited the slowest activation kinetics of D553N. Src, Fyn, and Yes significantly enhanced the tyrosine phosphorylation of D553N. A combination of Src, Fyn, and Yes rescued the current expression and the gating of D553N comparable with those of wild-type HCN4. In conclusion, we demonstrate a novel mechanism using three endogenous Src kinases to rescue a trafficking defective HCN4 mutant channel (D553N) by enhancing the tyrosine phosphorylation of the mutant channel protein.

  12. Molecular basis of voltage-dependent potassium currents in porcine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Mason, Diane E; Mitchell, Kathy E; Li, Yan; Finley, Melissa R; Freeman, Lisa C

    2002-01-01

    The major objective of this study was to elucidate the molecular bases for K(+) current diversity in porcine granulosa cells (GC). Two delayed rectifier K(+) currents with distinct electrophysiological and pharmacological properties were recorded from porcine GC by using whole-cell patch clamp: 1) a slowly activating, noninactivating current (I(Ks)) antagonized by clofilium, 293B, L-735,821, and L-768,673; and 2) an ultrarapidly activating, slowly inactivating current (I(Kur)) antagonized completely by clofilium and 4-aminopyridine and partially by tetraethylammonium, charybdotoxin, dendrotoxin, and kaliotoxin. The molecular identity of the K(+) channel genes underlying I(Ks) and I(Kur) was examined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting to detect K(+) channel transcripts and proteins. We found that GC could express multiple voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channel subunits, including KCNQ1, KCNE1, Kv1.1, Kv1.2, Kv1.3, Kv1.4, Kv1.5, Kv1.6, Kvbeta1.3, and Kvbeta2. Coimmunoprecipitation was used to establish the hetero-oligomeric nature of granulosa cell Kv channels. KCNE1 and KCNQ1 were coassociated in GC, and their expression coincided with the expression of I(Ks). Extensive coassociation of the various Kv alpha- and beta-subunits was also documented, suggesting that the diverse electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of I(Kur) currents may reflect variation in the composition and stoichiometry of the channel assemblies, as well as differences in post-translational modification of contributing Kv channel subunits. Our findings provide an essential background for experimental definition of granulosa K(+) channel function(s). It will be critical to define the functional roles of specific GC K(+) channels, because these proteins may represent either novel targets for assisted reproduction or potential sites of drug toxicity.

  13. Allitridi Inhibits Multiple Cardiac Potassium Channels Expressed in HEK 293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan-Hui; Wu, Wei; Chen, Kui-Hao; Liu, Yi; Deng, Chun-Yu; Yu, Xi-Yong; Jin, Man-Wen; Li, Gui-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Allitridi (diallyl trisulfide) is an active compound (volatile oil) from garlic. The previous studies reported that allitridi had anti-arrhythmic effect. The potential ionic mechanisms are, however, not understood. The present study was designed to determine the effects of allitridi on cardiac potassium channels expressed in HEK 293 cells using a whole-cell patch voltage-clamp technique and mutagenesis. It was found that allitridi inhibited hKv4.3 channels (IC50 = 11.4 µM) by binding to the open channel, shifting availability potential to hyperpolarization, and accelerating closed-state inactivation of the channel. The hKv4.3 mutants T366A, T367A, V392A, and I395A showed a reduced response to allitridi with IC50s of 35.5 µM, 44.7 µM, 23.7 µM, and 42.4 µM. In addition, allitridi decreased hKv1.5, hERG, hKCNQ1/hKCNE1 channels stably expressed in HEK 293 cells with IC50s of 40.2 µM, 19.6 µM and 17.7 µM. However, it slightly inhibited hKir2.1 current (100 µM, inhibited by 9.8% at −120 mV). Our results demonstrate for the first time that allitridi preferably blocks hKv4.3 current by binding to the open channel at T366 and T367 of P-loop helix, and at V392 and I395 of S6 domain. It has a weak inhibition of hKv1.5, hERG, and hKCNQ1/hKCNE1 currents. These effects may account for its anti-arrhythmic effect observed in experimental animal models. PMID:23272117

  14. Novel expression and regulation of voltage-dependent potassium channels in placentas from women with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Hiten D; McCallum, Laura A; Kurlak, Lesia O; Greenwood, Iain A; Broughton Pipkin, Fiona; Tribe, Rachel M

    2011-09-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with structural/functional alterations in placental and maternal vasculature. Voltage-dependant potassium channels encoded by KCNQ1-5 genes have been detected in several types of blood vessels where they promote vascular relaxation. Voltage-dependant potassium channel function can be modulated by KCNE1-5-encoded accessory proteins. The aim of this study was to determine whether KCNQ and KCNE genes are differentially expressed in placentas from women with preeclampsia compared with normotensive controls and to examine any differences in those who delivered preterm (<37 weeks) or term. Placental biopsies (from midway between the cord and periphery) were obtained, with consent, from white European control (n=24; term) and preeclamptic (n=22; of whom 8 delivered before 37 weeks' gestation) women. KCNQ/KCNE and GAPDH mRNA expressions were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Protein expression/localization was assessed using immunohistochemistry. KCNQ3 and KCNE5 mRNA expressions were significantly upregulated in preeclampsia (median [interquartile range]: 1.942 [0.905 to 3.379]) versus controls (0.159 [0.088 to 0.288]; P=0.001) and exhibited a strong positive correlation with each other (P<0.001), suggesting a novel heterodimer. Enhanced protein expression of KCNQ3 and KCNE5 in preeclampsia was confirmed with localization mainly restricted to the syncytiotrophoblast. KCNQ4 and KCNE1 isoforms were suppressed in placentas from term preeclamptic women versus controls (P≤0.05). KCNQ1 mRNA expression was increased and KCNQ5 decreased in the preterm preeclamptic group versus controls (P<0.05). In summary, voltage-dependant potassium channels are expressed and markedly modulated in placentas from preeclamptic women. Differential expression of isoforms may lead to altered cell proliferation. The correlation between KCNQ3 and KCNE5 expression is indicative of a novel channel complex and warrants further investigation.

  15. Competition of calcified calmodulin N lobe and PIP2 to an LQT mutation site in Kv7.1 channel.

    PubMed

    Tobelaim, William Sam; Dvir, Meidan; Lebel, Guy; Cui, Meng; Buki, Tal; Peretz, Asher; Marom, Milit; Haitin, Yoni; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Hirsch, Joel Alan; Attali, Bernard

    2017-01-31

    Voltage-gated potassium 7.1 (Kv7.1) channel and KCNE1 protein coassembly forms the slow potassium current IKS that repolarizes the cardiac action potential. The physiological importance of the IKS channel is underscored by the existence of mutations in human Kv7.1 and KCNE1 genes, which cause cardiac arrhythmias, such as the long-QT syndrome (LQT) and atrial fibrillation. The proximal Kv7.1 C terminus (CT) binds calmodulin (CaM) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), but the role of CaM in channel function is still unclear, and its possible interaction with PIP2 is unknown. Our recent crystallographic study showed that CaM embraces helices A and B with the apo C lobe and calcified N lobe, respectively. Here, we reveal the competition of PIP2 and the calcified CaM N lobe to a previously unidentified site in Kv7.1 helix B, also known to harbor an LQT mutation. Protein pulldown, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and patch-clamp recordings indicate that residues K526 and K527 in Kv7.1 helix B form a critical site where CaM competes with PIP2 to stabilize the channel open state. Data indicate that both PIP2 and Ca(2+)-CaM perform the same function on IKS channel gating by producing a left shift in the voltage dependence of activation. The LQT mutant K526E revealed a severely impaired channel function with a right shift in the voltage dependence of activation, a reduced current density, and insensitivity to gating modulation by Ca(2+)-CaM. The results suggest that, after receptor-mediated PIP2 depletion and increased cytosolic Ca(2+), calcified CaM N lobe interacts with helix B in place of PIP2 to limit excessive IKS current inhibition.

  16. Genetic predictors of depressive symptoms in the Look AHEAD Trial

    PubMed Central

    McCaffery, Jeanne M.; Papandonatos, George D.; Faulconbridge, Lucy F.; Erar, Bahar; Peter, Inga; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Pajewski, Nicholas M.; Anderson, Andrea; Wadden, Thomas A.; Wing, Rena R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Numerous studies find elevated depressive symptoms among individuals with type 2 diabetes, yet the mechanisms remain unclear. We examined whether genetic loci previously associated with depressive symptoms predict depressive symptoms among overweight/obese individuals with type 2 diabetes or change in depressive symptoms during behavioral weight loss. Methods The Illumina CARe iSelect (IBC) chip and Cardiometabochip were characterized in 2,118 overweight or obese participants with type 2 diabetes from Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes), a randomized trial to determine the effects of intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) and Diabetes Support and Education (DSE) on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Primary analyses focused on baseline Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores and depressive symptom change at one year. Results Of eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in six loci, three a priori SNPs in two loci (Chr5: rs60271; LBR: rs2230419, rs1011319) were associated with baseline BDI scores, but in the opposite direction of prior research. In joint analysis of 90,003 IBC and Cardiometabochip SNPs, rs1543654 in the region of KCNE1 predicted change in BDI scores at year 1 in DSE (beta= −1.05, SE=0.21, p=6.9 × 10−7) at the level of chip-wide significance, while also showing a nominal association with baseline BDI (beta=0.35, SE=0.16, p=0.026). Adjustment for antidepressant medication and/or limiting analyses to Non-Hispanic White individuals did not meaningfully alter results. Conclusions Previously reported genetic associations with depressive symptoms did not replicate in this cohort of overweight/obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. We identified KCNE1 as a potential novel locus associated with depressive symptoms. PMID:26489030

  17. Autonomic control of cardiac action potentials: role of potassium channel kinetics in response to sympathetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Terrenoire, Cecile; Clancy, Colleen E; Cormier, Joseph W; Sampson, Kevin J; Kass, Robert S

    2005-03-18

    I(Ks), the slowly activating component of the delayed rectifier current, plays a major role in repolarization of the cardiac action potential (AP). Genetic mutations in the alpha- (KCNQ1) and beta- (KCNE1) subunits of I(Ks) underlie Long QT Syndrome type 1 and 5 (LQT-1 and LQT-5), respectively, and predispose carriers to the development of polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. beta-adrenergic stimulation increases I(Ks) and results in rate dependent AP shortening, a control system that can be disrupted by some mutations linked to LQT-1 and LQT-5. The mechanisms by which I(Ks) regulates action potential duration (APD) during beta-adrenergic stimulation at different heart rates are not known, nor are the consequences of mutation induced disruption of this regulation. Here we develop a complementary experimental and theoretical approach to address these questions. We reconstituted I(Ks) in CHO cells (ie, KCNQ1 coexpressed with KCNE1 and the adaptator protein Yotiao) and quantitatively examined the effects of beta-adrenergic stimulation on channel kinetics. We then developed theoretical models of I(Ks) in the absence and presence of beta-adrenergic stimulation. We simulated the effects of sympathetic stimulation on channel activation (speeding) and deactivation (slowing) kinetics on the whole cell action potential under different pacing conditions. The model suggests these kinetic effects are critically important in rate-dependent control of action potential duration. We also investigate the effects of two LQT-5 mutations that alter kinetics and impair sympathetic stimulation of I(Ks) and show the likely mechanism by which they lead to tachyarrhythmias and indicate a distinct role of I(KS) kinetics in this electrical dysfunction. The full text of this article is available online at http://circres.ahajournals.org.

  18. Drosophila KCNQ Channel Displays Evolutionarily Conserved Electrophysiology and Pharmacology with Mammalian KCNQ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Cavaliere, Sonia; Hodge, James J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Of the five human KCNQ (Kv7) channels, KCNQ1 with auxiliary subunit KCNE1 mediates the native cardiac IKs current with mutations causing short and long QT cardiac arrhythmias. KCNQ4 mutations cause deafness. KCNQ2/3 channels form the native M-current controlling excitability of most neurons, with mutations causing benign neonatal febrile convulsions. Drosophila contains a single KCNQ (dKCNQ) that appears to serve alone the functions of all the duplicated mammalian neuronal and cardiac KCNQ channels sharing roughly 50–60% amino acid identity therefore offering a route to investigate these channels. Current information about the functional properties of dKCNQ is lacking therefore we have investigated these properties here. Using whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology we compare the biophysical and pharmacological properties of dKCNQ with the mammalian neuronal and cardiac KCNQ channels expressed in HEK cells. We show that Drosophila KCNQ (dKCNQ) is a slowly activating and slowly-deactivating K+ current open at sub-threshold potentials that has similar properties to neuronal KCNQ2/3 with some features of the cardiac KCNQ1/KCNE1 accompanied by conserved sensitivity to a number of clinically relevant KCNQ blockers (chromanol 293B, XE991, linopirdine) and opener (zinc pyrithione). We also investigate the molecular basis of the differential selectivity of KCNQ channels to the opener retigabine and show a single amino acid substitution (M217W) can confer sensitivity to dKCNQ. We show dKCNQ has similar electrophysiological and pharmacological properties as the mammalian KCNQ channels, allowing future study of physiological and pathological roles of KCNQ in Drosophila and whole organism screening for new modulators of KCNQ channelopathies. PMID:21915266

  19. Mutations in Danish patients with long QT syndrome and the identification of a large founder family with p.F29L in KCNH2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac ion channelopathy which presents clinically with palpitations, syncope or sudden death. More than 700 LQTS-causing mutations have been identified in 13 genes, all of which encode proteins involved in the execution of the cardiac action potential. The most frequently affected genes, covering > 90% of cases, are KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A. Methods We describe 64 different mutations in 70 unrelated Danish families using a routine five-gene screen, comprising KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A as well as KCNE1 and KCNE2. Results Twenty-two mutations were found in KCNQ1, 28 in KCNH2, 9 in SCN5A, 3 in KCNE1 and 2 in KCNE2. Twenty-six of these have only been described in the Danish population and 18 are novel. One double heterozygote (1.4% of families) was found. A founder mutation, p.F29L in KCNH2, was identified in 5 “unrelated” families. Disease association, in 31.2% of cases, was based on the type of mutation identified (nonsense, insertion/deletion, frameshift or splice-site). Functional data was available for 22.7% of the missense mutations. None of the mutations were found in 364 Danish alleles and only three, all functionally characterised, were recorded in the Exome Variation Server, albeit at a frequency of < 1:1000. Conclusion The genetic etiology of LQTS in Denmark is similar to that found in other populations. A large founder family with p.F29L in KCNH2 was identified. In 48.4% of the mutations disease causation was based on mutation type or functional analysis. PMID:24606995

  20. Characterization of the Minimum Energy Path for the Reaction of Singlet Methylene with N2: The Role of Singlet Methylene in Prompt NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1995-01-01

    We report calculations of the minimum energy pathways connecting CH2 + N2 to diazomethane and diazirine, for the rearrangement of diazirine to diazomethane, for the dissociation of diazirine to HCN2+H, and of diazomethane to CH2N+N. The calculations use Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) derivative methods to characterize the stationary points and Internally Contracted Configuration Interaction (ICCI) to determine the energetics. The calculations suggest a potential new source of prompt NO from the reaction CH2 with N2 to give diazirine, and subsequent reaction of diazirine with hydrogen abstracters to form doublet HCN2, which leads to HCN+N(S-4) on the previously studied CH+N2 surface. The calculations also predict accurate 0 K heats of formation of 77.7 kcal/mol and 68.0 kcal/mol for diazirine and diazomethane, respectively.

  1. Characterization of the Minimum Energy Path for the Reaction of Singlet Methylene with N2: The Role of Singlet Methylene in Prompt NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1995-01-01

    We report calculations of the minimum energy pathways connecting (1)CH2+N2 to diazomethane and diazirine, for the rearrangement of diazirine to diazomethane, for the dissociation of diazirine to HCN2+H, and of diazomethane to CH2N+N. The calculations use complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) derivative methods to characterize the stationary points and internally contracted configuration interaction (ICCI) to determine the energetics. The calculations suggest a potential new source of prompt NO from the reaction of (1)CH2 with N2 to give diazirine, and subsequent reaction of diazirine with hydrogen abstracters to form doublet HCN2, which leads to HCN+N(S-4) on the previously studied CH+N2 Surface. The calculations also predict accurate 0 K heats of formation of 77.7 kcal/mol and 68.0 kcal/mol for diazirine and diazomethane, respectively.

  2. Calmodulin kinase II is required for fight or flight sinoatrial node physiology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuejin; Gao, Zhan; Chen, Biyi; Koval, Olha M; Singh, Madhu V; Guan, Xiaoqun; Hund, Thomas J; Kutschke, William; Sarma, Satyam; Grumbach, Isabella M; Wehrens, Xander H T; Mohler, Peter J; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2009-04-07

    The best understood "fight or flight" mechanism for increasing heart rate (HR) involves activation of a cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel (HCN4) by beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) agonist stimulation. HCN4 conducts an inward "pacemaker" current (I(f)) that increases the sinoatrial nodal (SAN) cell membrane diastolic depolarization rate (DDR), leading to faster SAN action potential generation. Surprisingly, HCN4 knockout mice were recently shown to retain physiological HR increases with isoproterenol (ISO), suggesting that other I(f)-independent pathways are critical to SAN fight or flight responses. The multifunctional Ca(2+) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a downstream signal in the betaAR pathway that activates Ca(2+) homeostatic proteins in ventricular myocardium. Mice with genetic, myocardial and SAN cell CaMKII inhibition have significantly slower HRs than controls during stress, leading us to hypothesize that CaMKII actions on SAN Ca(2+) homeostasis are critical for betaAR agonist responses in SAN. Here we show that CaMKII mediates ISO HR increases by targeting SAN cell Ca(2+) homeostasis. CaMKII inhibition prevents ISO effects on SAN Ca(2+) uptake and release from intracellular sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stores that are necessary for increasing DDR. CaMKII inhibition has no effect on the ISO response in SAN cells when SR Ca(2+) release is disabled and CaMKII inhibition is only effective at slowing HRs during betaAR stimulation. These studies show the tightly coupled, but previously unanticipated, relationship of CaMKII to the betaAR pathway in fight or flight physiology and establish CaMKII as a critical signaling molecule for physiological HR responses to catecholamines.

  3. Same-Single-Cell Analysis of Pacemaker-Specific Markers in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocyte Subtypes Classified by Electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Yechikov, Sergey; Copaciu, Raul; Gluck, Jessica M; Deng, Wenbin; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Chan, James W; Lieu, Deborah K

    2016-07-19

    Insights into the expression of pacemaker-specific markers in human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocyte subtypes can facilitate the enrichment and track differentiation and maturation of hiPSC-derived pacemaker-like cardiomyocytes. To date, no study has directly assessed gene expression in each pacemaker-, atria-, and ventricular-like cardiomyocyte subtype derived from hiPSCs since currently the subtypes of these immature cardiomyocytes can only be identified by action potential profiles. Traditional acquisition of action potentials using patch-clamp recordings renders the cells unviable for subsequent analysis. We circumvented these issues by acquiring the action potential profile of a single cell optically followed by assessment of protein expression through immunostaining in that same cell. Our same-single-cell analysis for the first time revealed expression of proposed pacemaker-specific markers-hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN)4 channel and Islet (Isl)1-at the protein level in all three hiPSC-derived cardiomyocyte subtypes. HCN4 expression was found to be higher in pacemaker-like hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes than atrial- and ventricular-like subtypes but its downregulation over time in all subtypes diminished the differences. Isl1 expression in pacemaker-like hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes was initially not statistically different than the contractile subtypes but did become statistically higher than ventricular-like cells with time. Our observations suggest that although HCN4 and Isl1 are differentially expressed in hiPSC-derived pacemaker-like relative to ventricular-like cardiomyocytes, these markers alone are insufficient in identifying hiPSC-derived pacemaker-like cardiomyocytes. Stem Cells 2016.

  4. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUBMILLIMETER DENSE MOLECULAR GAS TRACERS IN THE LUMINOUS TYPE-1 ACTIVE NUCLEUS OF NGC 7469

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, Takuma; Kohno, Kotaro; Ikarashi, Soh; Aalto, Susanne; Doi, Akihiro; Espada, Daniel; Fathi, Kambiz; Harada, Nanase; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Matsushita, Satoki; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hattori, Takashi; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Iono, Daisuke; Ishizuki, Sumio; Nagai, Hiroshi; Krips, Melanie; Martín, Sergio; Meier, David S.; Nakai, Naomasa; and others

    2015-09-20

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 1 observations of the central kiloparsec region of the luminous type 1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 7469 with unprecedented high resolution (0.″5 ×0.″4 = 165 × 132 pc) at submillimeter wavelengths. Utilizing the wide bandwidth of ALMA, we simultaneously obtained HCN(4–3), HCO{sup +}(4–3), CS(7–6), and partially CO(3–2) line maps, as well as the 860 μm continuum. The region consists of the central ∼1″ component and the surrounding starburst ring with a radius of ∼1.″5–2.″5. Several structures connect these components. Except for CO(3–2), these dense gas tracers are significantly concentrated toward the central ∼1″, suggesting their suitability to probe the nuclear regions of galaxies. Their spatial distribution resembles well those of centimeter and mid-infrared continuum emissions, but it is anticorrelated with the optical one, indicating the existence of dust-obscured star formation. The integrated intensity ratios of HCN(4–3)/HCO{sup +}(4–3) and HCN(4–3)/CS(7–6) are higher at the active galactic nucleus (AGN) position than at the starburst ring, which is consistent with our previous findings (submillimeter-HCN enhancement). However, the HCN(4–3)/HCO{sup +}(4–3) ratio at the AGN position of NGC 7469 (1.11 ± 0.06) is almost half of the corresponding value of the low-luminosity type 1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 1097 (2.0 ± 0.2), despite the more than two orders of magnitude higher X-ray luminosity of NGC 7469. But the ratio is comparable to that of the close vicinity of the AGN of NGC 1068 (∼1.5). Based on these results, we speculate that some heating mechanisms other than X-ray (e.g., mechanical heating due to an AGN jet) can contribute significantly for shaping the chemical composition in NGC 1097.

  5. The Antibody Targeting the E314 Peptide of Human Kv1.3 Pore Region Serves as a Novel, Potent and Specific Channel Blocker

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Cheng, Long-Xian; Liu, Jin-Ping; Wang, Yan-Fu; Gao, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Hua; Wang, Min; Zeng, Qiu-Tang; Liu, Kun

    2012-01-01

    Selective blockade of Kv1.3 channels in effector memory T (TEM) cells was validated to ameliorate autoimmune or autoimmune-associated diseases. We generated the antibody directed against one peptide of human Kv1.3 (hKv1.3) extracellular loop as a novel and possible Kv1.3 blocker. One peptide of hKv1.3 extracellular loop E3 containing 14 amino acids (E314) was chosen as an antigenic determinant to generate the E314 antibody. The E314 antibody specifically recognized 63.8KD protein stably expressed in hKv1.3-HEK 293 cell lines, whereas it did not recognize or cross-react to human Kv1.1(hKv1.1), Kv1.2(hKv1.2), Kv1.4(hKv1.4), Kv1.5(hKv1.5), KCa3.1(hKCa3.1), HERG, hKCNQ1/hKCNE1, Nav1.5 and Cav1.2 proteins stably expressed in HEK 293 cell lines or in human atrial or ventricular myocytes by Western blotting analysis and immunostaining detection. By the technique of whole-cell patch clamp, the E314 antibody was shown to have a directly inhibitory effect on hKv1.3 currents expressed in HEK 293 or Jurkat T cells and the inhibition showed a concentration-dependence. However, it exerted no significant difference on hKv1.1, hKv1.2, hKv1.4, hKv1.5, hKCa3.1, HERG, hKCNQ1/hKCNE1, L-type Ca2+ or voltage-gated Na+ currents. The present study demonstrates that the antibody targeting the E314 peptide of hKv1.3 pore region could be a novel, potent and specific hKv1.3 blocker without affecting a variety of closely related Kv1 channels, KCa3.1 channels and functional cardiac ion channels underlying central nervous systerm (CNS) disorders or drug-acquired arrhythmias, which is required as a safe clinic-promising channel blocker. PMID:22558454

  6. The sinus venosus myocardium contributes to the atrioventricular canal: potential role during atrioventricular node development?

    PubMed

    Kelder, Tim P; Vicente-Steijn, Rebecca; Harryvan, Tom J; Kosmidis, Georgios; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; Poelmann, Rob E; Schalij, Martin J; DeRuiter, Marco C; Jongbloed, Monique R M

    2015-06-01

    The presence of distinct electrophysiological pathways within the atrioventricular node (AVN) is a prerequisite for atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia to occur. In this study, the different cell contributions that may account for the anatomical and functional heterogeneity of the AVN were investigated. To study the temporal development of the AVN, the expression pattern of ISL1, expressed in cardiac progenitor cells, was studied in sequential stages performing co-staining with myocardial markers (TNNI2 and NKX2-5) and HCN4 (cardiac conduction system marker). An ISL1+/TNNI2+/HCN4+ continuity between the myocardium of the sinus venosus and atrioventricular canal was identified in the region of the putative AVN, which showed a pacemaker-like phenotype based on single cell patch-clamp experiments. Furthermore, qPCR analysis showed that even during early development, different cell populations can be identified in the region of the putative AVN. Fate mapping was performed by in ovo vital dye microinjection. Embryos were harvested and analysed 24 and 48 hrs post-injection. These experiments showed incorporation of sinus venosus myocardium in the posterior region of the atrioventricular canal. The myocardium of the sinus venosus contributes to the atrioventricular canal. It is postulated that the myocardium of the sinus venosus contributes to nodal extensions or transitional cells of the AVN since these cells are located in the posterior region of the AVN. This finding may help to understand the origin of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia.

  7. Expression of connexin 43, ion channels and Ca2+-handling proteins in rat pulmonary vein cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yaqiong; Cai, Xue; Atkinson, Andrew; Logantha, Sunil Jit; Boyett, Mark; Dobrzynski, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. AF is thought to be triggered by ectopic beats, originating primarily in the myocardial sleeves surrounding the pulmonary veins (PVs). The mechanisms underlying these cardiac arrhythmias remain unclear. To investigate this, frozen sections of heart and lung tissue from adult rats without arrhythmia were obtained in different planes, stained with Masson's trichrome, and immunolabeled for connexin 43 (Cx43), caveolin-3 (Cav3), hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4 (HCN4), Nav1.5, Kir2.1, and the calcium handling proteins sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase 2a (SERCA2a) and ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2). Transverse sections offered the best view of the majority of the PVs in the tissue samples. Cx43 was observed to be expressed throughout the atria, excluding the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes, and in the myocardial sleeves of the PVs. In contrast, HCN4 was only expressed in the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes. The immunodensity of Cav3, Nav1.5, Kir2.1, SERCA2a and RyR2 in the PVs imaged was similar to that in atria. The results suggest that in the absence of arrhythmia, the investigated molecular properties of the ion channels of rat PV cardiomyocytes resemble those of the working myocardium. This indicates that ectopic beats originating in the myocardial sleeves of the PVs occur only under pathological conditions. PMID:27882143

  8. Altered Left Ventricular Ion Channel Transcriptome in a High-Fat-Fed Rat Model of Obesity: Insight into Obesity-Induced Arrhythmogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Reza; Yon, Marianne; Pickavance, Lucy; Yanni Gerges, Joseph; Davis, Gershan; Wilding, John; Jian, Kun; Zhang, Henggui; Hart, George; Boyett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Obesity is increasingly common and is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias. The aim of this study was to see whether in obesity there is proarrhythmic gene expression of ventricular ion channels and related molecules. Methods and Results. Rats were fed on a high-fat diet and compared to control rats on a normal diet (n = 8). After 8 weeks, rats on the high-fat diet showed significantly greater weight gain and higher adiposity. Left ventricle samples were removed at 8 weeks and mRNA expression of ion channels and other molecules was measured using qPCR. Obese rats had significant upregulation of Cav1.2, HCN4, Kir2.1, RYR2, NCX1, SERCA2a, and RYR2 mRNA and downregulation of ERG mRNA. In the case of HCN4, it was confirmed that there was a significant increase in protein expression. The potential effects of the mRNA changes on the ventricular action potential and intracellular Ca(2+) transient were predicted using computer modelling. Modelling predicted prolongation of the ventricular action potential and an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) transient, both of which would be expected to be arrhythmogenic. Conclusion. High-fat diet causing obesity results in arrhythmogenic cardiac gene expression of ion channels and related molecules.

  9. Persistent Noggin arrests cardiomyocyte morphogenesis and results in early in utero lethality

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Olga; Snider, Paige; Wang, Jain; Schwartz, Robert J.; Chen, YiPing; Conway, Simon J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple BMP genes are expressed in the developing heart from the initiation to late-differentiation stages, and play pivotal roles in cardiovascular development. In this study, we investigated the requirement of BMP activity in heart development by transgenic over-expression of extracellular BMP antagonist Noggin. Results Using Nkx2.5-Cre to drive lineage-restricted Noggin within cardiomyocyte progenitors, we show persistent Noggin arrests cardiac development at the linear heart stage. This is coupled with a significantly reduced cell proliferation rate, subsequent cardiomyocyte programmed cell death and reduction of downstream intracellular pSMAD1/5/8 expression. Noggin mutants exhibit reduced heartbeat which likely results in subsequent fully penetrant in utero lethality. Significantly, confocal and electron micrographic examination revealed considerably fewer contractile elements, as well as a lack of maturation of actin-myosin microfilaments. Molecular analysis demonstrated that ectopic Noggin-expressing regions in the early heart’s pacemaker region, failed to express the potassium/sodium hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4 (Hcn4), resulting in an overall decrease in Hcn4 levels. Conclusions Combined, our results reveal a novel role for BMP signaling in the progression of heart development from the tubular heart stage to the looped stage via regulation of proliferation and promotion of maturation of the in utero heart’s contractile apparatus and pacemaker. PMID:25428115

  10. Vibrationally Excited HCN around AFGL 2591: A Probe of Protostellar Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veach, Todd J.; Groppi, Christopher E.; Hedden, Abigail

    2013-03-01

    Vibrationally excited molecules with submillimeter rotational transitions are potentially excellent probes of physical conditions near protostars. This study uses observations of the v = 1 and v = 2 ro-vibrational modes of HCN (4-3) to probe this environment. The presence or absence and relative strengths of these ro-vibrational lines probe the gas excitation mechanism and physical conditions in warm, dense material associated with protostellar disks. We present pilot observations from the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope and follow-up observations from the Submillimeter Array. All vibrationally excited HCN (4-3) v = 0, v = 1, and v = 2 lines were observed. The existence of the three v = 2 lines at approximately equal intensity imply collisional excitation with a density of greater than (1010 cm-3) and a temperature of >1000 K for the emitting gas. This warm, high-density material should directly trace structures formed in the protostellar envelope and disk environment. Further, the line shapes of the v = 2 emission may suggest a Keplerian disk. This Letter demonstrates the utility of this technique which is of particular interest due to the recent inauguration of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array.

  11. Altered Left Ventricular Ion Channel Transcriptome in a High-Fat-Fed Rat Model of Obesity: Insight into Obesity-Induced Arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yon, Marianne; Pickavance, Lucy; Yanni Gerges, Joseph; Davis, Gershan; Wilding, John; Jian, Kun; Hart, George; Boyett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Obesity is increasingly common and is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias. The aim of this study was to see whether in obesity there is proarrhythmic gene expression of ventricular ion channels and related molecules. Methods and Results. Rats were fed on a high-fat diet and compared to control rats on a normal diet (n = 8). After 8 weeks, rats on the high-fat diet showed significantly greater weight gain and higher adiposity. Left ventricle samples were removed at 8 weeks and mRNA expression of ion channels and other molecules was measured using qPCR. Obese rats had significant upregulation of Cav1.2, HCN4, Kir2.1, RYR2, NCX1, SERCA2a, and RYR2 mRNA and downregulation of ERG mRNA. In the case of HCN4, it was confirmed that there was a significant increase in protein expression. The potential effects of the mRNA changes on the ventricular action potential and intracellular Ca2+ transient were predicted using computer modelling. Modelling predicted prolongation of the ventricular action potential and an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ transient, both of which would be expected to be arrhythmogenic. Conclusion. High-fat diet causing obesity results in arrhythmogenic cardiac gene expression of ion channels and related molecules. PMID:27747100

  12. Targeting SGK1 in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Görlach, Agnes; Vallon, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Compelling evidence is accumulating pointing to a pathophysiological role of the serum-and-glucocorticoid-inducible-kinase-1 (SGK1) in the development and complications of diabetes. SGK1 is ubiquitously expressed with exquisitely high transcriptional volatility. Stimulators of SGK1 expression include hyperglycemia, cell shrinkage, ischemia, glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids. SGK1 is activated by insulin and growth factors via phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, 3-phosphoinositide dependent kinase PDK1 and mTOR. SGK1 activates ion channels (including ENaC, TRPV5, ROMK, KCNE1/KCNQ1 and CLCKa/Barttin), carriers (including NCC, NKCC, NHE3, SGLT1 and EAAT3), and the Na+/K+-ATPase. It regulates the activity of several enzymes (e.g. glycogen-synthase-kinase-3, ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4-2, phosphomannose-mutase-2), and transcription factors (e.g. forkhead-transcription-factor FOXO3a, β-catenin, nuclear-factor-kappa-B NFκB). A common SGK1 gene variant (~3–5% prevalence in Caucasians, ~10% in Africans) is associated with increased blood pressure, obesity and type 2 diabetes. In patients suffering from type 2 diabetes, SGK1 presumably contributes to fluid retention and hypertension, enhanced coagulation, and increased deposition of matrix proteins leading to tissue fibrosis such as diabetic nephropathy. Accordingly, targeting SGK1 may favourably influence occurrence and course of type 2 diabetes. PMID:19764891

  13. Effects of I(Ks) channel inhibitors in insulin-secreting INS-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Susanne; Su, Jiping; Ranta, Felicia; Wittekindt, Oliver H; Ris, Frederic; Rösler, Martin; Gerlach, Uwe; Heitzmann, Dirk; Warth, Richard; Lang, Florian

    2005-12-01

    Potassium channels regulate insulin secretion. The closure of K(ATP) channels leads to membrane depolarisation, which triggers Ca(2+) influx and stimulates insulin secretion. The subsequent activation of K(+) channels terminates secretion. We examined whether KCNQ1 channels are expressed in pancreatic beta-cells and analysed their functional role. Using RT/PCR cellular mRNA of KCNQ1 but not of KCNE1 channels was detected in INS-1 cells. Effects of two sulfonamide analogues, 293B and HMR1556, inhibitors of KCNQ1 channels, were examined on voltage-activated outwardly rectifying K(+) currents using the patch-clamp method. It was found that 293B inhibited 60% of whole-cell outward currents induced by voltage pulses from -70 to +50 mV with a concentration for half-maximal inhibition (IC(50)) of 37 microM. The other sulfonamide analogue HMR1556 inhibited 48% of the outward current with an IC(50) of 7 microM. The chromanol 293B had no effect on tolbutamide-sensitive K(ATP) channels. Action potentials induced by current injections were broadened and after-repolarisation was attenuated by 293B. Insulin secretion in the presence but not in the absence of tolbutamide was significantly increased by 293B. These results suggest that 293B- and HMR1556-sensitive channels, probably in concert with other voltage-activated K(+) channels, influence action potential duration and frequency and thus insulin secretion.

  14. Serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 in the regulation of renal and extrarenal potassium transport.

    PubMed

    Lang, Florian; Vallon, Volker

    2012-02-01

    Serum- and glucocorticoid inducible-kinase 1 (SGK1) is an early gene transcriptionally upregulated by cell stress such as cell shrinkage and hypoxia and several hormones including gluco- and mineralocorticoids. It is activated by insulin and growth factors. SGK1 is a powerful regulator of a wide variety of channels and transporters. The present review describes the role of SGK1 in the regulation of potassium (K(+)) channels, K(+) transporters and K(+) homeostasis. SGK1-regulated K(+) channels include renal outer medullary K+ channel, Kv1.3, Kv1.5, KCNE1/KCNQ1, KCNQ4 and, via regulation of calcium (Ca(2+)) entry, Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels. SGK1-sensitive transporters include sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 and sodium/potassium-adenosine triphosphatase. SGK1-dependent regulation of K(+) channels and K(+) transport contributes to the stimulation of renal K(+) excretion following high K(+) intake, to insulin-induced cellular K(+) uptake and hypokalemia, to inhibition of insulin release by glucocorticoids, to stimulation of mast cell degranulation and gastric acid secretion, and to cardiac repolarization. Thus, SGK1 has a profound effect on K(+) homeostasis and on a multitude of K(+)-sensitive cellular functions.

  15. Genotype–phenotype correlation in long QT syndrome families

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Sameera Fatima; Ali, Altaf; Venkateshwari, Ananthapur; Rao, Hygriv; Jayakrishnan, M.P.; Narasimhan, Calambur; Shenthar, Jayaprakash; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Nallari, Pratibha

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity in clinical manifestations is a well-known feature in Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). The extent of this phenomenon became evident in families wherein both symptomatic and asymptomatic family members are reported. The study hence warrants genetic testing and/or screening of family members of LQTS probands for risk stratification and prediction. Of the 46 families screened, 18 probands revealed novel variations/compound heterozygosity in the gene/s screened. Families 1–4 revealed probands carrying novel variations in KCNQ1 gene along with compound heterozygosity of risk genotypes of the SCN5A, KCNE1 and NPPA gene/s polymorphisms screened. It was also observed that families- 5, 6 and 7 were typical cases of “anticipation” in which both mother and child were diagnosed with congenital LQTS (cLQTS). Families- 16 and 17 represented aLQTS probands with variations in IKs and INa encoding genes. First degree relatives (FDRs) carrying the same haplotype as the proband were also identified which may help in predictive testing and management of LQTS. Most of the probands exhibiting a family history were found to be genetic compounds which clearly points to the role of cardiac genes and their modifiers in a recessive fashion in LQTS manifestation. PMID:27479201

  16. High-risk Long QT Syndrome Mutations in the Kv7.1 (KCNQ1) Pore Disrupt the Molecular Basis for Rapid K+ Permeation

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Don E.; Bartos, Daniel C.; Reloj, Allison R.; Campbell, Kenneth S.; Johnson, Jonathan N.; Tester, David J.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Fressart, Véronique; Denjoy, Isabelle; Guicheney, Pascale; Moss, Arthur J.; Ohno, Seiko; Horie, Minoru; Delisle, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 long QT syndrome (LQT1) syndrome is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the KCNQ1, which encodes the K+ channel (Kv7.1) that underlies the slowly activating delayed rectifier K+ current in the heart. Intragenic risk stratification suggests LQT1 mutations that disrupt conserved amino acid residues in the pore are an independent risk factor for LQT1-related cardiac events. The purpose of this study is to determine possible molecular mechanisms that underlie the loss-of-function for these high-risk mutations. Extensive genotype-phenotype analyses of LQT1 patients showed that T322M-, T322A-, or G325R-Kv7.1 confer a high risk for LQT1-related cardiac events. Heterologous expression of these mutations with KCNE1 revealed they generated non-functional channels and caused dominant negative suppression of WT-Kv7.1 current. Molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) of analogous mutations in KcsA (T85M-, T85A-, and G88R-KcsA) demonstrated that they disrupted the symmetrical distribution of the carbonyl oxygen atoms in the selectivity filter, which upset the balance between the strong attractive and K+-K+ repulsive forces required for rapid K+ permeation. We conclude high-risk LQT1 mutations in the pore likely disrupt the architectural and physical properties of the K+ channel selectivity filter. PMID:23092362

  17. Cotranslational association of mRNA encoding subunits of heteromeric ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Jones, David K.; de Lange, Willem J.; Robertson, Gail A.

    2016-01-01

    Oligomers of homomeric voltage-gated potassium channels associate early in biogenesis as the nascent proteins emerge from the polysome. Less is known about how proteins emerging from different polysomes associate to form hetero-oligomeric channels. Here, we report that alternate mRNA transcripts encoding human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) 1a and 1b subunits, which assemble to produce ion channels mediating cardiac repolarization, are physically associated during translation. We show that shRNA specifically targeting either hERG 1a or 1b transcripts reduced levels of both transcripts, but only when they were coexpressed heterologously. Both transcripts could be copurified with an Ab against the nascent hERG 1a N terminus. This interaction occurred even when translation of 1b was prevented, indicating the transcripts associate independent of their encoded proteins. The association was also demonstrated in cardiomyocytes, where levels of both hERG transcripts were reduced by either 1a or 1b shRNA, but native KCNE1 and ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2) transcripts were unaffected. Changes in protein levels and membrane currents mirrored changes in transcript levels, indicating the targeted transcripts were undergoing translation. The physical association of transcripts encoding different subunits provides the spatial proximity required for nascent proteins to interact during biogenesis, and may represent a general mechanism facilitating assembly of heteromeric protein complexes involved in a range of biological processes. PMID:27078096

  18. Update on the slow delayed rectifier potassium current (I(Ks)): role in modulating cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2012-01-01

    The slow delayed rectifier current (I(Ks)) is the slow component of cardiac delayed rectifier current and is critical for the late phase repolarization of cardiac action potential. This current is also an important target for Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS) to regulate the cardiac electivity to accommodate to heart rate alterations in response to exercise or emotional stress and can be up-regulated by β- adrenergic or other signal molecules. I(Ks) channel is originated by the co-assembly of pore-forming KCNQ1 α-subunit and accessory KCNE1 β-subunit. Mutations in any subunit can bring about severe long QT syndrome (LQT-1, LQT-5) as characterized by deliquium, seizures and sudden death. This review summarizes the normal physiological functions and molecular basis of I(Ks) channels, as well as illustrates up-to-date development on its blockers and activators. Therefore, the current extensive survey should generate fundamental understanding of the role of I(Ks) channel in modulating cardiac function and donate some instructions to the progression of I(Ks) blockers and activators as potential antiarrhythmic agents or pharmacological tools to determine the physiological and pathological function of I(Ks).

  19. Altered Gene Expression by Low-Dose Arsenic Exposure in Humans and Cultured Cardiomyocytes: Assessment by Real-Time PCR Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Jinyao; Xia, Yajuan; Wade, Timothy J.; DeMarini, David M.; Davidson, Mercy; Mumford, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure results in higher risk of skin, lung, and bladder cancer, as well as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on expression of selected genes in the blood lymphocytes from 159 people exposed chronically to arsenic in their drinking water using a novel RT-PCR TaqMan low-density array (TLDA). We found that expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which activates both inflammation and NF-κB-dependent survival pathways, was strongly associated with water and urinary arsenic levels. Expression of KCNA5, which encodes a potassium ion channel protein, was positively associated with water and toe nail arsenic levels. Expression of 2 and 11 genes were positively associated with nail and urinary arsenic, respectively. Because arsenic exposure has been reported to be associated with long QT intervals and vascular disease in humans, we also used this TLDA for analysis of gene expression in human cardiomyocytes exposed to arsenic in vitro. Expression of the ion-channel genes CACNA1, KCNH2, KCNQ1 and KCNE1 were down-regulated by 1-μM arsenic. Alteration of some common pathways, including those involved in oxidative stress, inflammatory signaling, and ion-channel function, may underlay the seemingly disparate array of arsenic-associated diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. PMID:21776218

  20. Molecular bases of K+ secretory cells in the inner ear: shared and distinct features between birds and mammals

    PubMed Central

    Wilms, Viviane; Köppl, Christine; Söffgen, Chris; Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2016-01-01

    In the cochlea, mammals maintain a uniquely high endolymphatic potential (EP), which is not observed in other vertebrate groups. However, a high [K+] is always present in the inner ear endolymph. Here, we show that Kir4.1, which is required in the mammalian stria vascularis to generate the highly positive EP, is absent in the functionally equivalent avian tegmentum vasculosum. In contrast, the molecular repertoire required for K+ secretion, specifically NKCC1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, BSND and CLC-K, is shared between the tegmentum vasculosum, the vestibular dark cells and the marginal cells of the stria vascularis. We further show that in barn owls, the tegmentum vasculosum is enlarged and a higher EP (~+34 mV) maintained, compared to other birds. Our data suggest that both the tegmentum vasculosum and the stratified stria vascularis evolved from an ancestral vestibular epithelium that already featured the major cell types of the auditory epithelia. Genetic recruitment of Kir4.1 specifically to strial melanocytes was then a crucial step in mammalian evolution enabling an increase in the cochlear EP. An increased EP may be related to high-frequency hearing, as this is a hallmark of barn owls among birds and mammals among amniotes. PMID:27680950

  1. Confirmed rare copy number variants implicate novel genes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tam, Gloria W C; van de Lagemaat, Louie N; Redon, Richard; Strathdee, Karen E; Croning, Mike D R; Malloy, Mary P; Muir, Walter J; Pickard, Ben S; Deary, Ian J; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Carter, Nigel P; Grant, Seth G N

    2010-04-01

    Understanding how cognitive processes including learning, memory, decision making and ideation are encoded by the genome is a key question in biology. Identification of sets of genes underlying human mental disorders is a path towards this objective. Schizophrenia is a common disease with cognitive symptoms, high heritability and complex genetics. We have identified genes involved with schizophrenia by measuring differences in DNA copy number across the entire genome in 91 schizophrenia cases and 92 controls in the Scottish population. Our data reproduce rare and common variants observed in public domain data from >3000 schizophrenia cases, confirming known disease loci as well as identifying novel loci. We found copy number variants in PDE10A (phosphodiesterase 10A), CYFIP1 [cytoplasmic FMR1 (Fragile X mental retardation 1)-interacting protein 1], K(+) channel genes KCNE1 and KCNE2, the Down's syndrome critical region 1 gene RCAN1 (regulator of calcineurin 1), cell-recognition protein CHL1 (cell adhesion molecule with homology with L1CAM), the transcription factor SP4 (specificity protein 4) and histone deacetylase HDAC9, among others (see http://www.genes2cognition.org/SCZ-CNV). Integrating the function of these many genes into a coherent model of schizophrenia and cognition is a major unanswered challenge.

  2. Functional presynaptic HCN channels in the rat globus pallidus.

    PubMed

    Boyes, Justin; Bolam, J Paul; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Stanford, Ian M

    2007-04-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels are expressed postsynaptically in the rodent globus pallidus (GP), where they play several important roles in controlling GP neuronal activity. To further elucidate the role of HCN channels in the GP, immunocytochemical and electrophysiological approaches were used to test the hypothesis that HCN channels are also expressed presynaptically on the local axon collaterals of GP neurons. At the electron microscopic level, immunoperoxidase labelling for HCN1 and HCN2 was localized in GP somata and dendritic processes, myelinated and unmyelinated axons, and axon terminals. One population of labelled terminals formed symmetric synapses with somata and proximal dendrites and were immunoreactive for parvalbumin, consistent with the axon collaterals of GABAergic GP projection neurons. In addition, labelling for HCN2 and, to a lesser degree, HCN1 was observed in axon terminals that formed asymmetric synapses and were immunoreactive for the vesicular glutamate transporter 2. Immunogold labelling demonstrated that HCN1 and HCN2 were located predominantly at extrasynaptic sites along the plasma membrane of both types of terminal. To determine the function of presynaptic HCN channels in the GP, we performed whole-cell recordings from GP neurons in vitro. Bath application of the HCN channel blocker ZD7288 resulted in an increase in the frequency of mIPSCs but had no effect on their amplitude, implying that HCN channels tonically regulate the release of GABA. Their presence, and predicted role in modulating transmitter release, represents a hitherto unidentified mechanism whereby HCN channels influence the activity of GP neurons.

  3. Processing of Retinal Signals in Normal and HCN Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Antonella; Ludwig, Andreas; Cervetto, Luigi; Gargini, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the role of two different HCN channel isoforms in the light response of the outer retina. Taking advantage of HCN-deficient mice models and of in vitro (patch-clamp) and in vivo (ERG) recordings of retinal activity we show that HCN1 and HCN2 channels are expressed at distinct retinal sites and serve different functions. Specifically, HCN1 operate mainly at the level of the photoreceptor inner segment from where, together with other voltage sensitive channels, they control the time course of the response to bright light. Conversely, HCN2 channels are mainly expressed on the dendrites of bipolar cells and affect the response to dim lights. Single cell recordings in HCN1−/− mice or during a pharmacological blockade of Ih show that, contrary to previous reports, Ikx alone is able to generate the fast initial transient in the rod bright flash response. Here we demonstrate that the relative contribution of Ih and Ikx to the rods' temporal tuning depends on the membrane potential. This is the first instance in which the light response of normal and HCN1- or HCN2-deficient mice is analyzed in single cells in retinal slice preparations and in integrated full field ERG responses from intact animals. This comparison reveals a high degree of correlation between single cell current clamp data and ERG measurements. A novel picture emerges showing that the temporal profile of the visual response to dim and bright luminance changes is separately determined by the coordinated gating of distinct voltage dependent conductances in photoreceptors and bipolar cells. PMID:22279546

  4. Deuterium in comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp): detection of DCN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, R.; Owen, T. C.; Jewitt, D. C.; Matthews, H. E.; Senay, M.; Biver, N.; Bockel e-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Gautier, D.

    1998-01-01

    Deuterated hydrogen cyanide (DCN) was detected in a comet, C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), with the use of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The inferred deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratio in hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is (D/H)HCN = (2.3 +/- 0.4) x 10(-3). This ratio is higher than the D/H ratio found in cometary water and supports the interstellar origin of cometary ices. The observed values of D/H in water and HCN imply a kinetic temperature >/=30 +/- 10 K in the fragment of interstellar cloud that formed the solar system.

  5. Coadsorption Chemistry of H2 and C2N2 on Pt(111): A Common Intermediate in the Hydrogenation of Cyanogen and the Dehydrogenation of Ethylenediamine on Pt(111).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    CHARTI NATIONAL BUREA OF STANOARDS-963-A SEC JR:" Z’ASS ZN 09 T- AAS **.o :eta ,,*, REPORT DOCUmENTAT ION PAGE EZ:sc ; 4. ITI-,c and au1~e -YO -;r ME...studies of the bonding and chemistry of organic cyanides on the surfaces of a varie-v of single crystal metals ; CH 3CN (10) , CH 3NC (10) , HCN (2,3...of C N2 , the cca_- sorption chemistry of H2 and C2N2, and the deczmpos:- ion of ethylenediamine on Pt(l1l

  6. Deuterium in comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp): detection of DCN.

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Owen, T C; Jewitt, D C; Matthews, H E; Senay, M; Biver, N; Bockel e-Morvan, D; Crovisier, J; Gautier, D

    1998-03-13

    Deuterated hydrogen cyanide (DCN) was detected in a comet, C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), with the use of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The inferred deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratio in hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is (D/H)HCN = (2.3 +/- 0.4) x 10(-3). This ratio is higher than the D/H ratio found in cometary water and supports the interstellar origin of cometary ices. The observed values of D/H in water and HCN imply a kinetic temperature >/=30 +/- 10 K in the fragment of interstellar cloud that formed the solar system.

  7. Water, methanol and dense gas tracers in the local ULIRG Arp 220: results from the new SEPIA Band 5 Science Verification campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galametz, M.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Immer, K.; Humphreys, E.; Aladro, R.; De Breuck, C.; Ginsburg, A.; Madden, S. C.; Møller, P.; Arumugam, V.

    2016-10-01

    We present a line survey of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220, taken with the newly installed SEPIA (Swedish-European Southern Observatory PI receiver for APEX) Band 5 instrument on APEX (Atacama Pathfinder Experiment). We illustrate the capacity of SEPIA to detect the 183.3 GHz H2O 31,3-22,0 line against the atmospheric H2O absorption feature. We confirm the previous detection of the HCN(2-1) line, and detect new transitions of standard dense gas tracers such as HNC(2-1), HCO+(2-1), CS(4-3), C34S(4-3) and HC3N(20-19). We also detect HCN(2-1) v2 = 1 and the 193.5 GHz methanol (4-3) group for the first time. The absence of time variations in the megamaser water line compared to previous observations seems to rule out an AGN nuclear origin for the line. It could, on the contrary, favour a thermal origin instead, but also possibly be a sign that the megamaser emission is associated with star-forming cores washed out in the beam. We finally discuss how the new transitions of HCN, HNC and HCO+ refine our knowledge of the interstellar medium physical conditions in Arp 220.

  8. Rare-earth alkyl complexes supported by formamidinate ligands: synthesis, structure, and catalytic activity for isoprene polymerization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liping; Zhu, Xiancui; Zhou, Shuangliu; Mu, Xiaolong; Wei, Yun; Wang, Shaowu; Feng, Zhijun; Zhang, Guangchao; Deng, Baojia

    2014-05-14

    A series of rare-earth metal monoalkyl complexes supported by N,N'-di(2,6-dialkylphenyl)formamidinate ligand (L)2RECH2SiMe3·thf [L(1) = HC(N-2,6-Me2C6H3)2, RE = Y (1), L(2) = HC(N-2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)2, RE = Y (2), Er (3), Dy (4), Sm (5), and Nd (6)] were synthesized by alkyl elimination reaction or by salt metathesis reaction in good yields. All complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction. In combination with [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4] and alkylaluminium, these complexes displayed a good activity towards isoprene polymerization to give polyisoprenes with high molecular weight (M(n) > 10(4)) and narrow molecular distribution (PDI < 2.0). The influence of alkylaluminium, central metal, temperature, sequence of addition of alkylaluminium and [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4] on the polymerization of isoprene was studied. It was interesting to find that addition of the cocatalysts sequence has a great influence on the regioselectivity of the polymerization. High 1,4-regioselectivity polymerizations of isoprene (as high as 98%) were observed when the catalysts were added in the order [RE]/[alkylaluminum]/[borate].

  9. Mechanisms of seizure-induced ‘transcriptional channelopathy’ of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN) channels

    PubMed Central

    Richichi, Cristina; Brewster, Amy L.; Bender, Roland A.; Simeone, Timothy A.; Zha, Qinqin; Yin, Hong Z.; Weiss, John H.; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy may result from abnormal function of ion channels, such as those caused by genetic mutations. Recently, pathological alterations of the expression or localization of normal channels have been implicated in epilepsy generation, and termed ‘acquired channelopathies’. Altered expression levels of the HCN channels--that conduct the hyperpolarization-activated current, Ih--have been demonstrated in hippocampus of patients with severe temporal lobe epilepsy as well as in animal models of temporal lobe and absence epilepsies. Here we probe the mechanisms for the altered expression of HCN channels which is provoked by seizures. In organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, seizure-like events selectively reduced HCN type 1 channel expression and increased HCN2 mRNA levels, as occurs in vivo. The mechanisms for HCN1 reduction involved Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors-mediated Ca2+ influx, and subsequent activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. In contrast, upregulation of HCN2 expression was independent of these processes. The data demonstrate an orchestrated program for seizure-evoked transcriptional channelopathy involving the HCN channels, that may contribute to certain epilepsies. PMID:17964174

  10. Structural insights into conformational changes of a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in solution from Mesorhizobium loti K1 channel

    PubMed Central

    Schünke, Sven; Stoldt, Matthias; Lecher, Justin; Kaupp, U. Benjamin; Willbold, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-sensitive ion channels, known as HCN and CNG channels, are activated by binding of ligands to a domain (CNBD) located on the cytoplasmic side of the channel. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood. To elucidate the gating mechanism, structures of both the ligand-free and -bound CNBD are required. Several crystal structures of the CNBD from HCN2 and a bacterial CNG channel (MloK1) have been solved. However, for HCN2, the cAMP-free and -bound state did not reveal substantial structural rearrangements. For MloK1, structural information for the cAMP-free state has only been gained from mutant CNBDs. Moreover, in the crystal, the CNBD molecules form an interface between dimers, proposed to be important for allosteric channel gating. Here, we have determined the solution structure by NMR spectroscopy of the cAMP-free wild-type CNBD of MloK1. A comparison of the solution structure of cAMP-free and -bound states reveals large conformational rearrangement on ligand binding. The two structures provide insights on a unique set of conformational events that accompany gating within the ligand-binding site. PMID:21430265

  11. Bitopic Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 3 (S1P3) Antagonist Rescue from Complete Heart Block: Pharmacological and Genetic Evidence for Direct S1P3 Regulation of Mouse Cardiac Conduction

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, M. Germana; Vincent, Kevin P.; Repetto, Emanuela; Nguyen, Nhan; Brown, Steven J.; Abgaryan, Lusine; Riley, Sean W.; Leaf, Nora B.; Cahalan, Stuart M.; Kiosses, William B.; Kohno, Yasushi; Brown, Joan Heller; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular pharmacology of the G protein–coupled receptors for sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) provides important insight into established and new therapeutic targets. A new, potent bitopic S1P3 antagonist, SPM-354, with in vivo activity, has been used, together with S1P3-knockin and S1P3-knockout mice to define the spatial and functional properties of S1P3 in regulating cardiac conduction. We show that S1P3 is a key direct regulator of cardiac rhythm both in vivo and in isolated perfused hearts. 2-Amino-2-[2-(4-octylphenyl)ethyl]propane-1,3-diol in vivo and S1P in isolated hearts induced a spectrum of cardiac effects, ranging from sinus bradycardia to complete heart block, as measured by a surface electrocardiogram in anesthetized mice and in volume-conducted Langendorff preparations. The agonist effects on complete heart block are absent in S1P3-knockout mice and are reversed in wild-type mice with SPM-354, as characterized and described here. Homologous knockin of S1P3-mCherry is fully functional pharmacologically and is strongly expressed by immunohistochemistry confocal microscopy in Hyperpolarization Activated Cyclic Nucleotide Gated Potassium Channel 4 (HCN4)-positive atrioventricular node and His-Purkinje fibers, with relative less expression in the HCN4-positive sinoatrial node. In Langendorff studies, at constant pressure, SPM-354 restored sinus rhythm in S1P-induced complete heart block and fully reversed S1P-mediated bradycardia. S1P3 distribution and function in the mouse ventricular cardiac conduction system suggest a direct mechanism for heart block risk that should be further studied in humans. A richer understanding of receptor and ligand usage in the pacemaker cells of the cardiac system is likely to be useful in understanding ventricular conduction in health, disease, and pharmacology. PMID:26494861

  12. Specific inhibition of HCN channels slows rhythm differently in atria, ventricle and outflow tract and stabilizes conduction in the anoxic-reoxygenated embryonic heart model.

    PubMed

    Sarre, Alexandre; Pedretti, Sarah; Gardier, Stephany; Raddatz, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are expressed in pacemaker cells very early during cardiogenesis. This work aimed at determining to what extent these channels are implicated in the electromechanical disturbances induced by a transient oxygen lack which may occur in utero. Spontaneously beating hearts or isolated ventricles and outflow tracts dissected from 4-day-old chick embryos were exposed to a selective inhibitor of HCN channels (ivabradine 0.1-10microM) to establish a dose-response relationship. The effects of ivabradine on electrocardiogram, excitation-contraction coupling and contractility of hearts submitted to anoxia (30min) and reoxygenation (60min) were also determined. The distribution of the predominant channel isoform, HCN4, was established in atria, ventricle and outflow tract by immunoblotting. Intrinsic beating rate of atria, ventricle and outflow tract was 164+/-22 (n=10), 78+/-24 (n=8) and 40+/-12bpm (n=23, mean+/-SD), respectively. In the whole heart, ivabradine (0.3microM) slowed the firing rate of atria by 16% and stabilized PR interval. These effects persisted throughout anoxia-reoxygenation, whereas the variations of QT duration, excitation-contraction coupling and contractility, as well as the types and duration of arrhythmias were not altered. Ivabradine (10microM) reduced the intrinsic rate of atria and isolated ventricle by 27% and 52%, respectively, whereas it abolished activity of the isolated outflow tract. Protein expression of HCN4 channels was higher in atria and ventricle than in the outflow tract. Thus, HCN channels are specifically distributed and control finely atrial, ventricular and outflow tract pacemakers as well as conduction in the embryonic heart under normoxia and throughout anoxia-reoxygenation.

  13. SUBMILLIMETER-HCN DIAGRAM FOR ENERGY DIAGNOSTICS IN THE CENTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, Takuma; Kohno, Kotaro; Aalto, Susanne; Espada, Daniel; Martín, Sergio; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Fathi, Kambiz; Harada, Nanase; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Matsushita, Satoki; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Krips, Melanie; Meier, David S.; Nakai, Naomasa; Schinnerer, Eva; Sheth, Kartik; Terashima, Yuichi; Turner, Jean L.

    2016-02-10

    Compiling data from literature and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array archive, we show enhanced HCN(4–3)/HCO{sup +}(4–3) and/or HCN(4–3)/CS(7–6) integrated intensity ratios in circumnuclear molecular gas around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) compared to those in starburst (SB) galaxies (submillimeter HCN enhancement). The number of sample galaxies is significantly increased from our previous work. We expect that this feature could potentially be an extinction-free energy diagnostic tool of nuclear regions of galaxies. Non-LTE radiative transfer modelings of the above molecular emission lines involving both collisional and radiative excitation, as well as a photon trapping effect, were conducted to investigate the cause of the high line ratios in AGNs. As a result, we found that enhanced abundance ratios of HCN to HCO{sup +} and HCN to CS in AGNs as compared to SB galaxies by a factor of a few to even ≳10 are a plausible explanation for the submillimeter HCN enhancement. However, a counterargument of a systematically higher gas density in AGNs than in SB galaxies can also be a plausible scenario. Although we cannot fully distinguish these two scenarios at this moment owing to an insufficient amount of multi-transition, multi-species data, the former scenario is indicative of abnormal chemical composition in AGNs. Regarding the actual mechanism to realize the composition, we suggest that it is difficult with conventional gas-phase X-ray-dominated region ionization models to reproduce the observed high line ratios. We might have to take into account other mechanisms such as neutral–neutral reactions that are efficiently activated in high-temperature environments and/or mechanically heated regions to further understand the high line ratios in AGNs.

  14. Simulating the Distance Distribution between Spin-Labels Attached to Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    EPR/DEER spectroscopy is playing an increasingly important role in the characterization of the conformational states of proteins. In this study, force field parameters for the bifunctional spin-label (RX) used in EPR/DEER are parametrized and tested with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The dihedral angles connecting the Cα atom of the backbone to the nitroxide ring moiety of the RX spin-label attached to i and i + 4 positions in a polyalanine α-helix agree very well with those observed in the X-ray crystallography. Both RXi,i+4 and RXi,i+3 are more rigid than the monofunctional spin-label (R1) commonly used in EPR/DEER, while RXi,i+4 is more rigid and causes less distortion in a protein backbone than RXi,i+3. Simplified dummy spin-label models with a single effective particle representing the RXi,i+3 and RXi,i+4 are also developed and parametrized from the all-atom simulations. MD simulations with dummy spin-labels (MDDS) provide distance distributions that can be directly compared to distance distributions obtained from EPR/DEER to rapidly assess if a hypothetical three-dimensional (3D) structural model is consistent with experiment. The dummy spin-labels can also be used in the restrained-ensemble MD (re-MD) simulations to carry out structural refinement of 3D models. Applications of this methodology to T4 lysozyme, KCNE1, and LeuT are shown to provide important insights about their conformational dynamics. PMID:25645890

  15. Recessive cardiac phenotypes in induced pluripotent stem cell models of Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome: disease mechanisms and pharmacological rescue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; D'Aniello, Cristina; Verkerk, Arie O; Wrobel, Eva; Frank, Stefan; Ward-van Oostwaard, Dorien; Piccini, Ilaria; Freund, Christian; Rao, Jyoti; Seebohm, Guiscard; Atsma, Douwe E; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Mummery, Christine L; Greber, Boris; Bellin, Milena

    2014-12-16

    Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS) is one of the most severe life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Patients display delayed cardiac repolarization, associated high risk of sudden death due to ventricular tachycardia, and congenital bilateral deafness. In contrast to the autosomal dominant forms of long QT syndrome, JLNS is a recessive trait, resulting from homozygous (or compound heterozygous) mutations in KCNQ1 or KCNE1. These genes encode the α and β subunits, respectively, of the ion channel conducting the slow component of the delayed rectifier K(+) current, IKs. We used complementary approaches, reprogramming patient cells and genetic engineering, to generate human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) models of JLNS, covering splice site (c.478-2A>T) and missense (c.1781G>A) mutations, the two major classes of JLNS-causing defects in KCNQ1. Electrophysiological comparison of hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) from homozygous JLNS, heterozygous, and wild-type lines recapitulated the typical and severe features of JLNS, including pronounced action and field potential prolongation and severe reduction or absence of IKs. We show that this phenotype had distinct underlying molecular mechanisms in the two sets of cell lines: the previously unidentified c.478-2A>T mutation was amorphic and gave rise to a strictly recessive phenotype in JLNS-CMs, whereas the missense c.1781G>A lesion caused a gene dosage-dependent channel reduction at the cell membrane. Moreover, adrenergic stimulation caused action potential prolongation specifically in JLNS-CMs. Furthermore, sensitivity to proarrhythmic drugs was strongly enhanced in JLNS-CMs but could be pharmacologically corrected. Our data provide mechanistic insight into distinct classes of JLNS-causing mutations and demonstrate the potential of hiPSC-CMs in drug evaluation.

  16. Comparison of the Transcriptomes of Mouse Skin Derived Precursors (SKPs) and SKP-Derived Fibroblasts (SFBs) by RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yujie; Xiong, Lidan; Wang, Siyu; Zhong, Jianqiao; Zhou, Rongying; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Skin-derived precursors (SKPs) from dermis possess the capacities of self-renewal and multipotency. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that they can differentiate into fibroblasts. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of the differentiation of SKPs into fibroblasts. Here we compare the transcriptomes of mouse SKPs and SKP-derived fibroblasts (SFBs) by RNA-Seq analysis, trying to find differences in gene expression between the two kinds of cells and then elucidate the candidate genes that may play important roles in the differentiation of SKPs into fibroblasts. A total of 1971 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by RNA-Seq, which provided abundant data for further analysis. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis revealed that genes related to cell differentiation, cell proliferation, protein binding, transporter activity and membrane were significantly enriched. The most significantly up-regulated genes Wnt4, Wisp2 and Tsp-1 and down-regulated genes Slitrk1, Klk6, Agtr2, Ivl, Msx1, IL15, Atp6v0d2, Kcne1l and Thbs4 may play important roles in the differentiation of SKPs into fibroblasts. KEGG analysis showed that DEGs were significantly enriched in the TGF-β signaling pathway, Wnt signaling pathway and Notch signaling pathway, which have been previously proven to regulate the differentiation and self-renewal of various stem cells. These identified DEGs and pathways could facilitate further investigations of the detailed molecular mechanisms, making it possible to take advantage of the potential therapeutic applications of SKPs in skin regeneration in the future. PMID:25719759

  17. Augmented potassium current is a shared phenotype for two genetic defects associated with familial atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Robert L; Yang, Tao; Blair, Marcia; Roden, Dan M; Darbar, Dawood

    2009-01-01

    Background Mutations in multiple genes have been implicated in familial atrial fibrillation (AF), but the underlying mechanisms, and thus implications for therapy, remain ill-defined. Methods and Results Among 231 participants in the Vanderbilt AF Registry, we found a mutation in KCNQ1 (encoding the α-subunit of slow delayed rectifier potassium current [IKs]) and separately a mutation in natriuretic peptide precursor A (NPPA) gene (encoding atrial natriuretic peptide, ANP), both segregating with early-onset lone AF in different kindreds. The functional effects of these mutations yielded strikingly similar IKs “gain of function.” In Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, coexpression of mutant KCNQ1 with its ancillary subunit KCNE1 generated ~3-fold larger currents that activated much faster than wild-type (WT)-IKs. Application of the WT NPPA peptide fragment produced similar changes in WT-IKs, and these were exaggerated with the mutant NPPA S64R peptide fragment. Anantin, a competitive ANP receptor antagonist, completely inhibited the changes in IKs gating observed with NPPA-S64R. Computational simulations identified accelerated transitions into open states as the mechanism for variant IKs gating. Incorporating these IKs changes into computed human atrial action potentials (AP) resulted in 37% shortening (120 vs. 192 ms at 300 ms cycle length), reflecting loss of the phase II dome which is dependent on L-type calcium channel current. Conclusions We found striking functional similarities due to mutations in KCNQ1 and NPPA genes which led to IKs “gain of function”, atrial AP shortening, and consequent altered calcium current as a common mechanism between diverse familial AF syndromes. PMID:19646991

  18. Regulation of transport across cell membranes by the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1.

    PubMed

    Lang, Florian; Stournaras, Christos; Alesutan, Ioana

    2014-02-01

    The serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) is genomically upregulated by cell stress including energy depletion and hyperosmotic shock as well as a variety of hormones including glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids and TGFβ. SGK1 is activated by insulin, growth factors and oxidative stress via phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase PDK1 and mTOR. SGK1 is a powerful stimulator of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, carriers (e.g., NCC, NKCC, NHE1, NHE3, SGLT1, several amino acid transporters) and ion channels (e.g., ENaC, SCN5A, TRPV4-6, ORAI1/STIM1, ROMK, KCNE1/KCNQ1, GluR6, CFTR). Mechanisms employed by SGK1 in transport regulation include direct phosphorylation of target transport proteins, phosphorylation and thus activation of other transport regulating kinases, stabilization of membrane proteins by phosphorylation and thus inactivation of the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2, as well as stimulation of transport protein expression by upregulation transcription factors (e.g., nuclear factor kappa-B [NFκB]) and by fostering of protein translation. SGK1 sensitivity of pump, carrier and channel activities participate in the regulation of epithelial transport, cardiac and neuronal excitability, degranulation, platelet function, migration, cell proliferation and apoptosis. SGK1-sensitive functions do not require the presence of SGK1 but are markedly upregulated by SGK1. Accordingly, the phenotype of SGK1 knockout mice is mild. The mice are, however, less sensitive to excessive activation of transport by glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids, insulin and inflammation. Moreover, excessive SGK1 activity contributes to the pathophysiology of hypertension, obesity, diabetes, thrombosis, stroke, inflammation, autoimmune disease, fibrosis and tumor growth.

  19. JPH-2 INTERACTS WITH Cai-HANDLING PROTEINS AND ION CHANNELS IN DYADS: CONTRIBUTION TO PREMATURE VENTRICULAR CONTRACTION-INDUCED CARDIOMYOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Min; Zhang, Mei; Howren, Maureen; Wang, Yuhong; Tan, Alex; Balijepalli, Ravi C.; Huizar, Jose F.; Tseng, Gea-Ny

    2015-01-01

    Background In a canine model of premature ventricular contraction-induced cardiomyopathy (PVC-CM), Cav1.2 is downregulated and misplaced from t-tubules. Junctophilin-2 (JPH-2) is also downregulated. Objective To understand the role of JPH-2 in PVC-CM, and to probe changes in other proteins involved in dyad structure and function. Methods We quantify t-tubule contents (di-8-ANEPPS fluorescence in live myocytes), examine myocyte ultra-structures (electron microscopy), probe JPH-2 interacting proteins (co-immunoprecipitation), quantify dyad and non-dyad protein levels (immunoblotting), and examine subcellular distributions of dyad proteins (immunofluorescence/confocal microscopy). We also test direct JPH-2 modulation of channel function (vs indirect modulation through dyad formation) using heterologous expression. Results PVC myocytes have reduced t-tubule contents but otherwise normal ultra-structures. Among nineteen proteins examined, only JPH-2, bridging-integrator-1 (BIN-1) and Cav1.2 are highly downregulated in PVC hearts. However, statistical analysis indicates a general reduction of dyad protein levels when JPH-2 is downregulated. Furthermore, several dyad proteins, including Na/Ca exchanger, are missing or shifted from dyads to peripheral surface in PVC myocytes. JPH-2 directly or indirectly interacts with Cai-handling proteins, Cav1.2 and KCNQ1, although not BIN-1 or other scaffolding proteins tested. Expression in mammalian cells, that do not have dyads, confirms direct JPH-2 modulation of ICaL (Cav1.2/Cavβ2) and IKs (KCNQ1/KCNE1). Conclusion JPH-2 is more than a ‘dyad glue’: it can modulate Cai-handling and ion channel function in the dyad region. Downregulation of JPH-2, BIN-1 and Cav1.2 plays a deterministic role in PVC-CM. Dissecting the hierarchical relationship among the three is necessary for the design of therapeutic interventions to prevent the progression of PVC-CM. PMID:26538326

  20. Electrical remodeling in a canine model of ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-Sheng; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Mei; Tang, Daniel; Clemo, Henry F; Higgins, Robert S D; Tseng, Gea-Ny

    2007-01-01

    The nature of electrical remodeling in a canine model of ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM; induced by repetitive intracoronary microembolizations) that exhibits spontaneous ventricular tachycardia is not entirely clear. We used the patch-clamp technique to record action potentials and ionic currents of left ventricular myocytes isolated from the region affected by microembolizations. We also used the immunoblot technique to examine channel subunit expression in adjacent affected tissue. Ventricular myocytes and tissue isolated from the corresponding region of normal hearts served as control. ICM myocytes had prolonged action potential duration (APD) and more pronounced APD dispersion. Slow delayed rectifier current (I(Ks)) was reduced at voltages positive to 0 mV, along with a negative shift in its voltage dependence of activation. Immunoblots showed that there was no change in KCNQ1.1 (I(Ks) pore-forming or alpha-subunit), but KCNE1 (I(Ks) auxiliary or beta-subunit) was reduced, and KCNQ1.2 (a truncated KCNQ1 splice variant with a dominant-negative effect on I(Ks)) was increased. Transient outward current (I(to)) was reduced, along with an acceleration of the slow phase of recovery from inactivation. Immunoblots showed that there was no change in Kv4.3 (alpha-subunit of fast-recovering I(to) component), but KChIP2 (beta-subunit of fast-recovering component) and Kv1.4 (alpha-subunit of slow-recovering component) were reduced. Inward rectifier current was reduced. L-type Ca current was unaltered. The immunoblot data provide mechanistic insights into the observed changes in current amplitude and gating kinetics of I(Ks) and I(to). We suggest that these changes, along with the decrease in inward rectifier current, contribute to APD prolongation in ICM hearts.

  1. Pharmacology of cardiac potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Tamargo, Juan; Caballero, Ricardo; Gómez, Ricardo; Valenzuela, Carmen; Delpón, Eva

    2004-04-01

    Cardiac K+ channels are membrane-spanning proteins that allow the passive movement of K+ ions across the cell membrane along its electrochemical gradient. They regulate the resting membrane potential, the frequency of pacemaker cells and the shape and duration of the cardiac action potential. Additionally, they have been recognized as potential targets for the actions of neurotransmitters and hormones and class III antiarrhythmic drugs that prolong the action potential duration (APD) and refractoriness and have been found effective to prevent/suppress cardiac arrhythmias. In the human heart, K+ channels include voltage-gated channels, such as the rapidly activating and inactivating transient outward current (Ito1), the ultrarapid (IKur), rapid (IKr) and slow (IKs) components of the delayed rectifier current and the inward rectifier current (IK1), the ligand-gated channels, including the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive (IKATP) and the acetylcholine-activated (IKAch) currents and the leak channels. Changes in the expression of K+ channels explain the regional variations in the morphology and duration of the cardiac action potential among different cardiac regions and are influenced by heart rate, intracellular signalling pathways, drugs and cardiovascular disorders. A progressive number of cardiac and noncardiac drugs block cardiac K+ channels and can cause a marked prolongation of the action potential duration (i.e. an acquired long QT syndrome, LQTS) and a distinct polymorphic ventricular tachycardia termed torsades de pointes. In addition, mutations in the genes encoding IKr (KCNH2/KCNE2) and IKs (KCNQ1/KCNE1) channels have been identified in some types of the congenital long QT syndrome. This review concentrates on the function, molecular determinants, regulation and, particularly, on the mechanism of action of drugs modulating the K+ channels present in the sarcolemma of human cardiac myocytes that contribute to the different phases of the cardiac action

  2. SKF-96365 blocks human ether-à-go-go-related gene potassium channels stably expressed in HEK 293 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Yang, Lei; Chen, Kui-Hao; Sun, Hai-Ying; Jin, Man-Wen; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Yan; Li, Gui-Rong

    2016-02-01

    SKF-96365 is a TRPC channel antagonist commonly used to characterize the potential functions of TRPC channels in different systems, which was recently reported to induce QTc prolongation on ECG by inhibiting TRPC channels. The present study investigates whether the blockade of cardiac repolarization currents would be involved in the increase of QTc interval. Cardiac repolarization currents were recorded in HEK 293 cells stably expressing human ether-à-go-go-related gene potassium (hERG or hKv11.1) channels, hKCNQ1/hKCNE1 channels (IKs) or hKir2.1 channels and cardiac action potentials were recorded in guinea pig ventricular myocytes using a whole-cell patch technique. The potential effect of SKF-96365 on QT interval was evaluated in ex vivo guinea pig hearts. It was found that SKF-96365 inhibited hERG current in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50, 3.4μM). The hERG mutants S631A in the pore helix and F656V of the S6 region reduced the inhibitory sensitivity with IC50s of 27.4μM and 11.0μM, suggesting a channel pore blocker. In addition, this compound inhibited IKs and hKir2.1currents with IC50s of 10.8 and 8.7μM. SKF-96365 (10μM) significantly prolonged ventricular APD90 in guinea pig ventricular myocytes and QTc interval in ex vivo guinea pig hearts. These results indicate that the TRPC channel antagonist SKF-96365 exerts blocking effects on hERG, IKs, and hKir2.1 channels. Prolongation of ventricular APD and QT interval is related to the inhibition of multiple repolarization potassium currents, especially hERG channels.

  3. Genetic analysis, in silico prediction, and family segregation in long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Riuró, Helena; Campuzano, Oscar; Berne, Paola; Arbelo, Elena; Iglesias, Anna; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Coll-Vidal, Mònica; Partemi, Sara; Mademont-Soler, Irene; Picó, Ferran; Allegue, Catarina; Oliva, Antonio; Gerstenfeld, Edward; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Castro-Urda, Víctor; Fernández-Lozano, Ignacio; Mont, Lluís; Brugada, Josep; Scornik, Fabiana S; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The heritable cardiovascular disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS), characterized by prolongation of the QT interval on electrocardiogram, carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. We sought to add new data to the existing knowledge of genetic mutations contributing to LQTS to both expand our understanding of its genetic basis and assess the value of genetic testing in clinical decision-making. Direct sequencing of the five major contributing genes, KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2, was performed in a cohort of 115 non-related LQTS patients. Pathogenicity of the variants was analyzed using family segregation, allele frequency from public databases, conservation analysis, and Condel and Provean in silico predictors. Phenotype-genotype correlations were analyzed statistically. Sequencing identified 36 previously described and 18 novel mutations. In 51.3% of the index cases, mutations were found, mostly in KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A; 5.2% of cases had multiple mutations. Pathogenicity analysis revealed 39 mutations as likely pathogenic, 12 as VUS, and 3 as non-pathogenic. Clinical analysis revealed that 75.6% of patients with QTc≥500 ms were genetically confirmed. Our results support the use of genetic testing of KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A as part of the diagnosis of LQTS and to help identify relatives at risk of SCD. Further, the genetic tools appear more valuable as disease severity increases. However, the identification of genetic variations in the clinical investigation of single patients using bioinformatic tools can produce erroneous conclusions regarding pathogenicity. Therefore segregation studies are key to determining causality.

  4. Genetic analysis, in silico prediction, and family segregation in long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Riuró, Helena; Campuzano, Oscar; Berne, Paola; Arbelo, Elena; Iglesias, Anna; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Coll-Vidal, Mònica; Partemi, Sara; Mademont-Soler, Irene; Picó, Ferran; Allegue, Catarina; Oliva, Antonio; Gerstenfeld, Edward; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Castro-Urda, Víctor; Fernández-Lozano, Ignacio; Mont, Lluís; Brugada, Josep; Scornik, Fabiana S; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The heritable cardiovascular disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS), characterized by prolongation of the QT interval on electrocardiogram, carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. We sought to add new data to the existing knowledge of genetic mutations contributing to LQTS to both expand our understanding of its genetic basis and assess the value of genetic testing in clinical decision-making. Direct sequencing of the five major contributing genes, KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2, was performed in a cohort of 115 non-related LQTS patients. Pathogenicity of the variants was analyzed using family segregation, allele frequency from public databases, conservation analysis, and Condel and Provean in silico predictors. Phenotype-genotype correlations were analyzed statistically. Sequencing identified 36 previously described and 18 novel mutations. In 51.3% of the index cases, mutations were found, mostly in KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A; 5.2% of cases had multiple mutations. Pathogenicity analysis revealed 39 mutations as likely pathogenic, 12 as VUS, and 3 as non-pathogenic. Clinical analysis revealed that 75.6% of patients with QTc≥500 ms were genetically confirmed. Our results support the use of genetic testing of KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A as part of the diagnosis of LQTS and to help identify relatives at risk of SCD. Further, the genetic tools appear more valuable as disease severity increases. However, the identification of genetic variations in the clinical investigation of single patients using bioinformatic tools can produce erroneous conclusions regarding pathogenicity. Therefore segregation studies are key to determining causality. PMID:24667783

  5. Cellular mechanisms underlying the increased disease severity seen for patients with long QT syndrome caused by compound mutations in KCNQ1.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Stephen C; Mohal, Jagdeep S; Royal, Alice A; McKenna, William J; Lambiase, Pier D; Tinker, Andrew

    2014-08-15

    The KCNQ1 (potassium voltage-gated channel, KQT-like subfamily, member 1) gene encodes the Kv7.1 potassium channel which forms a complex with KCNE1 (potassium voltage-gated channel Isk-related family member 1) in the human heart to produce the repolarizing IKs (slow delayed rectifier potassium current). Mutations in KCNQ1 can perturb IKs function and cause LQT1 (long QT syndrome type 1). In LQT1, compound mutations are relatively common and are associated with increased disease severity. LQT1 compound mutations have been shown to increase channel dysfunction, but whether other disease mechanisms, such as defective channel trafficking, contribute to the increase in arrhythmic risk has not been determined. Using an imaging-based assay we investigated the effects of four compound heterozygous mutations (V310I/R594Q, A341V/P127T, T391I/Q530X and A525T/R518X), one homozygous mutation (W248F) and one novel compound heterozygous mutation (A178T/K422fs39X) (where fs denotes frameshift) on channel trafficking. By analysing the effects in the equivalent of a homozygous, heterozygous and compound heterozygous condition, we identify three different types of behaviour. A341V/P127T and W248F/W248F had no effect, whereas V310I/R594Q had a moderate, but not compound, effect on channel trafficking. In contrast, T391I/Q530X, A525T/R518X and A178T/K422fs39X severely disrupted channel trafficking when expressed in compound form. In conclusion, we have characterized the disease mechanisms for six LQT1 compound mutations and report that, for four of these, defective channel trafficking underlies the severe clinical phenotype.

  6. Cardiac Channel Molecular Autopsy: Insights From 173 Consecutive Cases of Autopsy-Negative Sudden Unexplained Death Referred for Postmortem Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Tester, David J.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Will, Melissa L.; Haglund, Carla M.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To perform long QT syndrome and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia cardiac channel postmortem genetic testing (molecular autopsy) for a large cohort of cases of autopsy-negative sudden unexplained death (SUD). Methods From September 1, 1998, through October 31, 2010, 173 cases of SUD (106 males; mean ± SD age, 18.4±12.9 years; age range, 1-69 years; 89% white) were referred by medical examiners or coroners for a cardiac channel molecular autopsy. Using polymerase chain reaction, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, and DNA sequencing, a comprehensive mutational analysis of the long QT syndrome susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2) and a targeted analysis of the catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia type 1–associated gene (RYR2) were conducted. Results Overall, 45 putative pathogenic mutations absent in 400 to 700 controls were identified in 45 autopsy-negative SUD cases (26.0%). Females had a higher yield (26/67 [38.8%]) than males (19/106 [17.9%]; P<.005). Among SUD cases with exercise-induced death, the yield trended higher among the 1- to 10-year-olds (8/12 [66.7%]) compared with the 11- to 20-year-olds (4/27 [14.8%]; P=.002). In contrast, for those who died during a period of sleep, the 11- to 20-year-olds had a higher yield (9/25 [36.0%]) than the 1- to 10-year-olds (1/24 [4.2%]; P=.01). Conclusion Cardiac channel molecular autopsy should be considered in the evaluation of autopsy-negative SUD. Several interesting genotype-phenotype observations may provide insight into the expected yields of postmortem genetic testing for SUD and assist in selecting cases with the greatest potential for mutation discovery and directing genetic testing efforts. PMID:22677073

  7. Expression and properties of hyperpolarization-activated current in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons with known sensory function

    PubMed Central

    Gao, L L; McMullan, S; Djouhri, L; Acosta, C; Harper, A A; Lawson, S N

    2012-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) has been implicated in nociception/pain, but its expression levels in nociceptors remained unknown. We recorded Ih magnitude and properties by voltage clamp from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in vivo, after classifying them as nociceptive or low-threshold-mechanoreceptors (LTMs) and as having C-, Aδ- or Aα/β-conduction velocities (CVs). For both nociceptors and LTMs, Ih amplitude and Ih density (at −100 mV) were significantly positively correlated with CV. Median Ih magnitudes and Ih density in neuronal subgroups were respectively: muscle spindle afferents (MSAs): −4.6 nA, −33 pA pF−1; cutaneous Aα/β LTMs: −2.2 nA, −20 pA pF−1; Aβ-nociceptors: −2.6 nA, −21 pA pF−1; both Aδ-LTMs and nociceptors: −1.3 nA, ∼−14 pA pF−1; C-LTMs: −0.4 nA, −7.6 pA pF−1; and C-nociceptors: −0.26 nA, −5 pA pF−1. Ih activation slow time constants (slow τ values) were strongly correlated with fast τ values; both were shortest in MSAs. Most neurons had τ values consistent with HCN1-related Ih; others had τ values closer to HCN1+HCN2 channels, or HCN2 in the presence of cAMP. In contrast, median half-activation voltages (V0.5) of −80 to −86 mV for neuronal subgroups suggest contributions of HCN2 to Ih. τ values were unrelated to CV but were inversely correlated with Ih and Ih density for all non-MSA LTMs, and for Aδ-nociceptors. From activation curves ∼2–7% of Ih would be activated at normal membrane potentials. The high Ih may be important for excitability of A-nociceptors (responsible for sharp/pricking-type pain) and Aα/β-LTMs (tactile sensations and proprioception). Underlying HCN expression in these subgroups therefore needs to be determined. Altered Ih expression and/or properties (e.g. in chronic/pathological pain states) may influence both nociceptor and LTM excitability. PMID:22753545

  8. Structural mechanism for the regulation of HCN ion channels by the accessory protein TRIP8b

    PubMed Central

    DeBerg, Hannah A.; Bankston, John R.; Rosenbaum, Joel C.; Brzovic, Peter S.; Zagotta, William N.; Stoll, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels underlie the cationic Ih current present in many neurons. The direct binding of cAMP to HCN channels increases the rate and extent of channel opening and results in a depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of activation. TRIP8b is an accessory protein that regulates the cell surface expression and dendritic localization of HCN channels and reduces the cyclic nucleotide dependence of these channels. Here we use electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to show that TRIP8b binds to the apo state of the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) of HCN2 channels without changing the overall domain structure. With EPR and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), we locate TRIP8b relative to the HCN channel and identify the binding interface on the CNBD. These data provide a structural framework for understanding how TRIP8b regulates the cyclic nucleotide dependence of HCN channels. PMID:25800552

  9. VOLTAGE-DEPENDENT OPENING OF HCN CHANNELS: FACILITATION OR INHIBITION BY THE PHYTOESTROGEN, GENISTEIN, IS DETERMINED BY THE ACTIVATION STATUS OF THE CYCLIC NUCLEOTIDE GATING RING

    PubMed Central

    Rozario, Anjali. O.; Turbendian, Harma K.; Fogle, Keri J.; Olivier, Nelson B.; Tibbs, Gareth R.

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of the mechanistic bases and physiological importance of cAMP regulation of HCN channels has exploited an arginine to glutamate mutation in the nucleotide-binding fold, an approach critically dependent on the mutation selectively lowering the channel’s nucleotide affinity. In apparent conflict with this, in intact Xenopus oocytes, HCN and HCN-RE channels exhibit qualitatively and quantitatively distinct responses to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein – the estrogenic isoflavonoid strongly depolarizes the activation midpoint of HCN1-R538E, but not HCN1 channels (+9.8 mV ± 0.9 versus +2.2 mV ± 0.6) and hyperpolarizes gating of HCN2 (−4.8 mV ± 1.0) but depolarizes gating of HCN2-R591E (+13.2 mV ± 2.1). However, excised patch recording, X-ray crystallography and modeling reveal this is not due to either a fundamental effect of the mutation on channel gating per se or of genistein acting as a mutation-sensitive partial agonist at the cAMP site. Rather, we find that genistein equivalently moves both HCN and HCN-RE channels closer to the open state (rendering the channels inherently easier to open but at a cost of decreasing the coupling energy of cAMP) and that the anomaly reflects a balance of these energetic effects with the isoform specific inhibition of activation by the nucleotide gating ring and relief of this by endogenous cAMP. These findings have specific implications with regard to findings based on HCN-RE channels and kinase antagonists and general implications with respect to interpretation of drug effects in mutant channel backgrounds. PMID:19524546

  10. Involvement of HCN Channel in Muscarinic Inhibitory Action on Tonic Firing of Dorsolateral Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhe; Zhang, Kang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yan, Haitao; Ma, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Shuzhuo; Zheng, Jianquan; Wang, Liyun; Wei, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    The striatum is the most prominent nucleus in the basal ganglia and plays an important role in motor movement regulation. The cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) in striatum are involved in the motion regulation by releasing acetylcholine (ACh) and modulating the output of striatal projection neurons. Here, we report that muscarinic ACh receptor (M receptor) agonists, ACh and Oxotremorine (OXO-M), decreased the firing frequency of ChIs by blocking the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. Scopolamine (SCO), a nonselective antagonist of M receptors, abolished the inhibition. OXO-M exerted its function by activating the Gi/o cAMP signaling cascade. The single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (scRT-PCR) revealed that all the five subtypes of M receptors and four subtypes of HCN channels were expressed on ChIs. Among them, M2 receptors and HCN2 channels were the most dominant ones and expressed in every single studied cholinergic interneuron (ChI).Our results suggest that ACh regulates not only the output of striatal projection neurons, but also the firing activity of ChIs themselves by activating presynaptic M receptors in the dorsal striatum. The activation of M2 receptors and blockage of HCN2 channels may play an important role in ACh inhibition on the excitability of ChIs. This finding adds a new G-protein coupled receptor mediated regulation on ChIs and provides a cellular mechanism for control of cholinergic activity and ACh release in the dorsal striatum. PMID:27047336

  11. Hyperpolarization-activated current Ih in mouse trigeminal sensory neurons in a transgenic mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1.

    PubMed

    Eroli, Francesca; Vilotti, Sandra; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Nistri, Andrea

    2017-03-29

    Transgenic knock-in (KI) mice that express CaV2.1 channels containing an R192Q gain-of-function mutation in the α1A subunit known to cause familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 in patients, exhibit key disease characteristics and provide a useful tool to investigate pathophysiological mechanisms of pain transduction. Previously, KI trigeminal sensory neurons were shown to exhibit constitutive hyperexcitability due to up-regulation of ATP-gated P2X3 receptors that trigger spike activity at a more negative threshold. This implies that intrinsic neuronal conductances may shape action potential generation in response to ATP, which could act as a mediator of migraine headache. Here we investigated whether the hyperpolarization-activated conductance Ih, mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (HCN) channels, contributes to sub-threshold behavior and firing in wild-type (WT) and KI trigeminal ganglia (TG) neurons. Whereas most WT and KI trigeminal neurons expressed Ih current, blocked by the specific inhibitor ZD7288, it was smaller in KI neurons despite similar activation and deactivation kinetics. HCN1 and HCN2 were the most abundantly expressed subunits in TG, both in situ and in culture. In KI TG neurons, HCN2 subunits were predominantly present in the cytoplasm, not at the plasma membrane, likely accounting for the smaller Ih of such cells. ZD7288 hyperpolarized the membrane potential, thereby raising the firing threshold, and prolonging the spike trajectory to generate fewer spikes due to P2X3 receptor activation. The low amplitude of Ih in KI TG neurons suggests that down-regulation of Ih current in sub-threshold behavior acts as a compensatory mechanism to limit sensory hyperexcitability, manifested under certain stressful stimuli.

  12. Effect of dronedarone on Na+, Ca2+ and HCN channels.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Roman; Goegelein, Heinz; Ruetten, Hartmut

    2011-04-01

    Previous studies showed that amiodarone causes state-dependent inhibition of Na(+) channels thereby mediating an atrial-selective drug effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of the new antiarrhythmic compound dronedarone on Na(+), Ca(2+) and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels. Monophasic action potentials (MAP) and effective refractory period (ERP) were studied in arterially perfused left atria and ventricular wedge preparations of the pig. Fast Na(+) and Ca(2+) currents in isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes as well as human HCN4 channels expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were investigated with the patch-clamp technique. In left atrial epicardial tissue, dronedarone (3 μM) had no effect on the MAP duration, but the drug caused a significant prolongation of the ERP from 145 ± 9 to 184 ± 17 ms (n = 6; p < 0.05). In guinea pig ventricular myocytes, dronedarone exhibited a state-dependent inhibition of the fast Na(+) channel current with an IC(50) of 0.7 ± 0.1 μM, when the holding potential (V (hold)) was -80 mV. The maximal block at the highest concentration used was 77 ± 8%. In contrast, when V (hold) was -100 mV, inhibition with 10 μM dronedarone was only 9 ± 3% (n = 7). Dronedarone blocked Ca(2+) currents elicited by rectangular pulses at V (hold) = -40 mV with an IC(50) value of 0.4 ± 0.1 μM (maximal block by 10 μM dronedarone, 80 ± 6%), whereas at V (hold) = -80 mV, 10 μM dronedarone blocked only 20 ± 6% (n = 4) of the current. Applying an action potential clamp (V (hold) = -80 mV) yielded an IC(50) of 0.4 ± 0.3 μM. Human HCN4 channels expressed in CHO cells were blocked by dronedarone with an IC(50) of 1.0 ± 0.1 μM. Inhibition of fast Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels by dronedarone depends on the cell's resting membrane potential (state-dependent block) favouring an atrial-selective mode of

  13. Significant Association Between CAV1 Variant rs3807989 on 7p31 and Atrial Fibrillation in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Wang, Chuchu; Wang, Xiaojing; Xu, Chengqi; Wu, Manman; Wang, Pengxia; Tu, Xin; Wang, Qing K

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in European ancestry populations revealed several genomic loci for atrial fibrillation (AF). We previously replicated the 4q25 locus (PITX2) and 16q22 locus (ZFHX3) in the Chinese population, but not the KCNN3 locus on 1q21. With single-nucleotide polymorphism rs3807989 in CAV1 encoding caveolin-1, however, controversial results were reported in 2 Chinese replication studies. Methods and Results Six remaining AF genetic loci from GWAS, including rs3807989/CAV1, rs593479/PRRX1, rs6479562/C9orf3, rs10824026/SYNPO2L, rs1152591/SYNE2, and rs7164883/HCN4, were analyzed in a Chinese Han population with 941 cases and 562 controls. Only rs3807989 showed significant association with AF (Padj=4.77×10−5), and the finding was replicated in 2 other independent populations with 709 cases and 2175 controls, 463 cases and 644 controls, and the combined population with a total of 2113 cases and 3381 controls (Padj=2.20×10−9; odds ratio [OR]=1.34 for major allele G). Meta-analysis, together with data from previous reports in Chinese and Japanese populations, also showed a significant association between rs3807989 and AF (P=3.40×10−4; OR=1.24 for allele G). We also found that rs3807989 showed a significant association with lone AF in 3 independent populations and in the combined population (Padj=3.85×10−8; OR=1.43 for major allele G). Conclusions The data in this study revealed a significant association between rs3807989 and AF in the Chinese Han population. Together with the findings that caveolin-1 interacts with potassium channels Kir2.1, KCNH2, and HCN4 and sodium channels Nav1.5 and Nav1.8, CAV1 becomes a strong candidate susceptibility gene for AF across different ethnic populations. This study is the first to show a significant association between rs3807989 and lone AF. PMID:25953654

  14. ALMA reveals the feeding of the Seyfert 1 nucleus in NGC 1566

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, F.; García-Burillo, S.; Casasola, V.; Hunt, L. K.; Krips, M.; Baker, A. J.; Boone, F.; Eckart, A.; Marquez, I.; Neri, R.; Schinnerer, E.; Tacconi, L. J.

    2014-05-01

    We report ALMA observations of CO(3-2) emission in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 1566, at a spatial resolution of 25 pc. Our aim is to investigate the morphology and dynamics of the gas inside the central kpc, and to probe nuclear fueling and feedback phenomena. NGC 1566 has a nuclear bar of 1.7 kpc radius and a conspicuous grand design spiral starting from this radius. The ALMA field of view, of diameter 0.9 kpc, lies well inside the nuclear bar and reveals a molecular trailing spiral structure from 50 to 300 pc in size, which is contributing to fuel the nucleus, according to its negative gravity torques. The spiral starts with a large pitch angle from the center and then winds up in a pseudo-ring at the inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) of the nuclear bar. This is the first time that a trailing spiral structure is clearly seen driving the gas inwards inside the ILR ring of the nuclear bar. This phenomenon shows that the massive central black hole has a significant dynamical influence on the gas, triggering its fueling. The gaseous spiral is well correlated with the dusty spiral seen through extinction in HST images, and also with a spiral feature emitting 0.87 mm continuum. This continuum emission must come essentially from cold dust heated by the interstellar radiation field. The HCN(4-3) and HCO+(4-3) lines were simultaneously mapped and detected in the nuclear spiral. The HCO+(4-3) line is 3 times stronger than the HCN(4-3), as expected when star formation excitation dominates over active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. The CO(3-2)/HCO+(4-3) integrated intensity ratio is ~100. The molecular gas is in remarkably regular rotation, with only slight non-circular motions at the periphery of the nuclear spiral arms. These perturbations are quite small, and no outflow nor AGN feedback is detected. Based on observations carried out with ALMA in cycle 0.

  15. A Quantitative Survey of Gravity Receptor Function in Mutant Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Yu, Heping; Erway, Lawrence C.; Alagramam, Kumar N.; Pollak, Natasha; Jones, Timothy A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify vestibular deficits in mice using linear vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEP thresholds, peak latencies, and peak amplitudes from 24 strains with known genetic mutations and 6 inbred background strains have been analyzed and descriptive statistics generated for each strain. Response parameters from mutant homozygotes were compared with heterozygote and/or background controls, and all strain averages were contrasted to normative ranges. Previous work established average values for normal screening VsEP parameters at +6 dB re: 1.0 g/ms: P1 = 1.3 ms, P2 = 2.2 ms, P3 = 2.8 ms; P1/N1 = 2 μV; P2/N2 = 1.6 μV. Normal thresholds averaged −8 dB re: 1.0 g/ms. Homozygotes of the following recessive mutations had absent VsEPs at the ages tested: Espnje, Atp2b2dfw-2J, Spnb4qv-lnd2J, Spnb4qv-3J, Myo7ash1, Tmiesr, Myo6sv, jc, Pcdh15av-J, Pcdh15av-2J, Pcdh15av-3J, Cdh23v-2J, Sansjs, hr, Kcne1pkr, and Pou3f4del. These results suggest profound gravity receptor deficits for these homozygotes, which is consistent with the structural deficits that have been documented for many of these strains. Homozygotes of Catna2cdf, Grid2ho4J, Wnt1sw, qk, and Mbpshi strains and heterozygotes of Grid2lc had measurable VsEPs, but one or more response parameters differed from the respective control group (heterozygote or background strain) or were outside normal ranges. For example, qk and Mbpshi homozygotes showed significantly prolonged latencies consistent with the abnormal myelin that has been described for these strains. Prolonged latencies may suggest deficits in neural conduction; elevated thresholds suggest reduced sensitivity, and reduced amplitudes may be suggestive for reduced neural synchrony. One mutation, Otx1jv, had all VsEP response parameters within normal limits, an expected finding because the abnormality in Otx1jv is presumably restricted to the lateral semicircular canal. Interestingly, some heterozygote groups also

  16. WNK3, a kinase related to genes mutated in hereditary hypertension with hyperkalaemia, regulates the K+ channel ROMK1 (Kir1.1)

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Qiang; Kahle, Kristopher T; Rinehart, Jesse; MacGregor, Gordon G; Wilson, Frederick H; Canessa, Cecilia M; Lifton, Richard P; Hebert, Steven C

    2006-01-01

    The serine–threonine kinase WNK3 modulates Cl− transport into and out of cells through its regulation of SLC12A cation–Cl− cotransporters, implicating it as (one of) the long-sought Cl−/volume-sensitive kinase(s). Integrators in homeostatic systems regulate structurally diverse but functionally coupled elements. For example, the related kinase WNK4 regulates the Na+–Cl− cotransporter (NCC), paracellular Cl− flux, and the K+ channel ROMK1 (Kir1.1) to maintain renal NaCl and K+ homeostasis; mutations in PRKWNK4, encoding WNK4, cause a Mendelian disease featuring hypertension and hyperkalaemia. It is known that WNK3 is expressed in the nephron's distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and stimulates NCC activity. Here, we show that WNK3 is also expressed in cortical and outer medullary collecting duct principal cells. Accordingly, we tested WNK3's effect on the mediators of NaCl and K+ handling in these nephron segments – the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), paracellular Cl− flux, and ROMK1 – using established model systems. WNK3 did not alter paracellular Cl− flux in tetracycline-responsive MDCK II cells, nor affect amiloride-sensitive currents when coexpressed with ENaC in Xenopus laevis oocytes. However, additional coexpression studies in oocytes revealed WNK3 inhibited the renal-specific K+ channel ROMK1 activity greater than 5.5-fold (P < 0.0001) by altering its plasmalemmal surface expression; WNK3 did not affect ROMK1's conductance or open/closed probability. In contrast, WNK3 had no effect on the activity of the cardiac long-QT syndrome K+ channel KCNQ1/KCNE1 when coexpressed in oocytes. Inhibition of ROMK1 is independent of WNK3's catalytic activity and is mediated by WNK3's carboxyl terminus – a mechanism distinct from its known kinase-dependent activation of NCC. A kinase-inactivating point mutation or a missense mutation homologous to one in WNK4 that causes disease produced a gain-of-function effect, enhancing WNK3's inhibition of ROMK1

  17. Enhanced cardiac TBC1D10C expression lowers heart rate and enhances exercise capacity and survival

    PubMed Central

    Volland, Cornelia; Bremer, Sebastian; Hellenkamp, Kristian; Hartmann, Nico; Dybkova, Nataliya; Khadjeh, Sara; Kutschenko, Anna; Liebetanz, David; Wagner, Stefan; Unsöld, Bernhard; Didié, Michael; Toischer, Karl; Sossalla, Samuel; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Seidler, Tim

    2016-01-01

    TBC1D10C is a protein previously demonstrated to bind and inhibit Ras and Calcineurin. In cardiomyocytes, also CaMKII is inhibited and all three targeted enzymes are known to promote maladaptive cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Here, in accordance with lack of Calcineurin inhibition in vivo, we did not observe a relevant anti-hypertrophic effect despite inhibition of Ras and CaMKII. However, cardiomyocyte-specific TBC1D10C overexpressing transgenic mice exhibited enhanced longevity. Ejection fraction and exercise capacity were enhanced in transgenic mice, but shortening of isolated cardiomyocytes was not increased. This suggests longevity resulted from enhanced cardiac performance but independent of cardiomyocyte contractile force. In further search for mechanisms, a transcriptome-wide analysis revealed expressional changes in several genes pertinent to control of heart rate (HR) including Hcn4, Scn10a, Sema3a and Cacna2d2. Indeed, telemetric holter recordings demonstrated slower atrial conduction and significantly lower HR. Pharmacological reduction of HR was previously demonstrated to enhance survival in mice. Thus, in addition to inhibition of stress signaling, TBC1D10C economizes generation of cardiac output via HR reduction, enhancing exercise capacity and survival. TBC1D10C may be a new target for HR reduction and longevity. PMID:27667030

  18. Cardiac sodium channel regulator MOG1 regulates cardiac morphogenesis and rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juan; Wang, Longfei; Zuo, Mengxia; Wang, Xiaojing; Ahmed, Abu Shufian Ishtiaq; Chen, Qiuyun; Wang, Qing K.

    2016-01-01

    MOG1 was initially identified as a protein that interacts with the small GTPase Ran involved in transport of macromolecules into and out of the nucleus. In addition, we have established that MOG1 interacts with the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5 and regulates cell surface trafficking of Nav1.5. Here we used zebrafish as a model system to study the in vivo physiological role of MOG1. Knockdown of mog1 expression in zebrafish embryos significantly decreased the heart rate (HR). Consistently, the HR increases in embryos with over-expression of human MOG1. Compared with wild type MOG1 or control EGFP, mutant MOG1 with mutation E83D associated with Brugada syndrome significantly decreases the HR. Interestingly, knockdown of mog1 resulted in abnormal cardiac looping during embryogenesis. Mechanistically, knockdown of mog1 decreases expression of hcn4 involved in the regulation of the HR, and reduces expression of nkx2.5, gata4 and hand2 involved in cardiac morphogenesis. These data for the first time revealed a novel role that MOG1, a nucleocytoplasmic transport protein, plays in cardiac physiology and development. PMID:26903377

  19. Gene-gene Interaction Analyses for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Honghuang; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, Albert V.; Arking, Dan E.; Barnard, John; Bartz, Traci M.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lohman, Kurt; Kleber, Marcus E.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Geelhoed, Bastiaan; Trompet, Stella; Niemeijer, Maartje N.; Kacprowski, Tim; Chasman, Daniel I.; Klarin, Derek; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Meitinger, Thomas; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Chen, Lin Y.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Van Wagoner, David R.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Xie, Zhijun; Hendricks, Audrey E.; Ding, Jingzhong; Delgado, Graciela E.; Verweij, Niek; van der Harst, Pim; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Ford, Ian; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André; Heeringa, Jan; Franco, Oscar H.; Kors, Jan A.; Weiss, Stefan; Völzke, Henry; Rose, Lynda M.; Natarajan, Pradeep; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kääb, Stefan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Alonso, Alvaro; Chung, Mina K.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Liu, Yongmei; März, Winfried; Rienstra, Michiel; Jukema, J. Wouter; Stricker, Bruno H.; Dörr, Marcus; Albert, Christine M.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a heritable disease that affects more than thirty million individuals worldwide. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the study of genetic determinants of AF. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of gene-gene interaction on AF susceptibility. We performed a large-scale association analysis of gene-gene interactions with AF in 8,173 AF cases, and 65,237 AF-free referents collected from 15 studies for discovery. We examined putative interactions between genome-wide SNPs and 17 known AF-related SNPs. The top interactions were then tested for association in an independent cohort for replication, which included more than 2,363 AF cases and 114,746 AF-free referents. One interaction, between rs7164883 at the HCN4 locus and rs4980345 at the SLC28A1 locus, was found to be significantly associated with AF in the discovery cohorts (interaction OR = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.27–1.65, P = 4.3 × 10–8). Eight additional gene-gene interactions were also marginally significant (P < 5 × 10–7). However, none of the top interactions were replicated. In summary, we did not find significant interactions that were associated with AF susceptibility. Future increases in sample size and denser genotyping might facilitate the identification of gene-gene interactions associated with AF. PMID:27824142

  20. Complete Atrial-Specific Knockout of Sodium-Calcium Exchange Eliminates Sinoatrial Node Pacemaker Activity

    PubMed Central

    Groenke, Sabine; Larson, Eric D.; Alber, Sarah; Zhang, Rui; Lamp, Scott T.; Ren, Xiaoyan; Nakano, Haruko; Jordan, Maria C.; Karagueuzian, Hrayr S.; Roos, Kenneth P.; Nakano, Atsushi; Proenza, Catherine; Philipson, Kenneth D.; Goldhaber, Joshua I.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of sinoatrial node (SAN) pacemaker activity in the heart is controversial. The leading candidates are diastolic depolarization by “funny” current (If) through HCN4 channels (the “Membrane Clock“ hypothesis), depolarization by cardiac Na-Ca exchange (NCX1) in response to intracellular Ca cycling (the "Calcium Clock" hypothesis), and a combination of the two (“Coupled Clock”). To address this controversy, we used Cre/loxP technology to generate atrial-specific NCX1 KO mice. NCX1 protein was undetectable in KO atrial tissue, including the SAN. Surface ECG and intracardiac electrograms showed no atrial depolarization and a slow junctional escape rhythm in KO that responded appropriately to β-adrenergic and muscarinic stimulation. Although KO atria were quiescent they could be stimulated by external pacing suggesting that electrical coupling between cells remained intact. Despite normal electrophysiological properties of If in isolated patch clamped KO SAN cells, pacemaker activity was absent. Recurring Ca sparks were present in all KO SAN cells, suggesting that Ca cycling persists but is uncoupled from the sarcolemma. We conclude that NCX1 is required for normal pacemaker activity in murine SAN. PMID:24278453

  1. Interferometric Imaging of the Outburst of Comet 17P/Holmes with the Submillimter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Chunhua; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Jewitt, D.; Gurwell, M. A.; Wilner, D. J.; Williams, J. P.

    2010-10-01

    We present high angular resolution (2" or 2400 km) Submillimeter Array observations of the Jupiter-family comet 17P/Holmes during its huge outburst from October 26 through October 31 2007, including detections of CO 3-2, HCN 4-3, H13CN 4-3, CS 7-6, H2CO 31,2-21,1 and H2S 22,0-21,1, and associated dust continuum at 221 and 351 GHz. We find two components from the molecular emissions: one from isotropic outgassing and the other from gas jets. The emissions of CO, CS, H2S and H2CO are much stronger in the gas jet component. Using a molecular excitation code that accounts for the effects of collisions with water and electrons, we determine distinctly different CO/HCN ratios: within the isotropic outgassing component we find CO/HCN < 25, while in the gas jet component, CO/HCN > 100. This difference might reflect the volatile nature of the nucleus material brought out by the outburst.

  2. Emerging role of ivabradine for rate control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Turley, Sarah L; Francis, Kerry E; Lowe, Denise K; Cahoon, William D

    2016-12-01

    Control of ventricular rate is recommended for patients with paroxysmal, persistent, or permanent atrial fibrillation (AF). Existing rate-control options, including beta-blockers, nondihydropyridine calcium channel blockers, and digoxin, are limited by adverse hemodynamic effects and their ability to attain target heart rate (HR). Ivabradine, a novel HR-controlling agent, decreases HR through deceleration of conduction through If ('funny') channels, and is approved for HR reduction in heart failure patients with ejection fraction less than 35% and elevated HR, despite optimal pharmacological treatment. Because If channels were thought to be expressed solely in sinoatrial (SA) nodal tissue, ivabradine was not investigated in heart failure patients with concomitant AF. Subsequent identification of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel 4 (HCN4), the primary gene responsible for If current expression throughout the myocardium, stimulated interest in the potential role of ivabradine for ventricular rate control in AF. Preclinical studies of ivabradine in animal models with induced AF demonstrated a reduction in HR, with no significant worsening of QT interval or mean arterial pressure. Preliminary human data suggest that ivabradine provides HR reduction without associated hemodynamic complications in patients with AF. Questions remain regarding efficacy, safety, optimal dosing, and length of therapy in these patients. Prospective, randomized studies are needed to determine if ivabradine has a role as a rate-control treatment in patients with AF.

  3. The expression of hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN) channels in the rat ovary are dependent on the type of cell and the reproductive age of the animal: a laboratory investigation

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, John; Kim, Beom Su; Gaines, Larry; Peresie, Jennifer; Page, Carly; Arroyo, Armando

    2008-01-01

    Background Aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that levels of hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide gated channels 1 to 4 (HCN1-4) are linked to the reproductive age of the ovary. Methods Young, adult, and reproductively aged ovaries were collected from Sprague-Dawley rats. RT-PCR and western blot analysis of ovaries was performed to investigate the presence of mRNA and total protein for HCN1-4. Immunohistochemistry with semiquantitative H score analysis was performed using whole ovarian histologic sections. Results RT-PCR analysis showed the presence of mRNA for HCN1-4. Western blot analysis revealed HCN1-3 proteins in all ages of ovarian tissues. Immunohistochemistry with H score analysis demonstrated distinct age-related changes in patterns of HCN1-3 in the oocytes, granulosa cells, theca cells, and corpora lutea. HCN4 was present only in the oocytes, with declining levels during the reproduction lifespan. Conclusion The evidence presented here demonstrates cell-type and developmental age patterns of HCN1-4 channel expression in rat ovaries. Based on this, we hypothesize that HCN channels have functional significance in rat ovaries and may have changing roles in reproductive aging. PMID:18710573

  4. ALMA FOLLOWS STREAMING OF DENSE GAS DOWN TO 40 pc FROM THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE IN NGC 1097

    SciTech Connect

    Fathi, Kambiz; Pinol-Ferrer, Nuria; Lundgren, Andreas A.; Wiklind, Tommy; Kohno, Kotaro; Izumi, Takuma; Martin, Sergio; Espada, Daniel; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Krips, Melanie; Matsushita, Satoki; Meier, David S.; Nakai, Naomasa; Sheth, Kartik; Turner, Jean; Van de Ven, Glenn

    2013-06-20

    We present a kinematic analysis of the dense molecular gas in the central 200 pc of the nearby galaxy NGC 1097, based on Cycle 0 observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We use the HCN(4-3) line to trace the densest interstellar molecular gas (n{sub H{sub 2}}{approx}10{sup 8} cm{sup -3}), and quantify its kinematics, and estimate an inflow rate for the molecular gas. We find a striking similarity between the ALMA kinematic data and the analytic spiral inflow model that we have previously constructed based on ionized gas velocity fields on larger scales. We are able to follow dense gas streaming down to 40 pc distance from the supermassive black hole in this Seyfert 1 galaxy. In order to fulfill marginal stability, we deduce that the dense gas is confined to a very thin disk, and we derive a dense gas inflow rate of 0.09 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} at 40 pc radius. Combined with previous values from the H{alpha} and CO gas, we calculate a combined molecular and ionized gas inflow rate of {approx}0.2 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} at 40 pc distance from the central supermassive black hole of NGC 1097.

  5. Chaos in the classical mechanics of bound and quasi-bound HX-4He complexes with X = F, Cl, Br, CN.

    PubMed

    Gamboa, Antonio; Hernández, Henar; Ramilowski, Jordan A; Losada, J C; Benito, R M; Borondo, F; Farrelly, David

    2009-10-01

    The classical dynamics of weakly bound floppy van der Waals complexes have been extensively studied in the past except for the weakest of all, i.e., those involving He atoms. These complexes are of considerable current interest in light of recent experimental work focussed on the study of molecules trapped in small droplets of the quantum solvent (4)He. Despite a number of quantum investigations, details on the dynamics of how quantum solvation occurs remain unclear. In this paper, the classical rotational dynamics of a series of van der Waals complexes, HX-(4)He with X = F, Cl, Br, CN, are studied. In all cases, the ground state dynamics are found to be almost entirely chaotic, in sharp contrast to other floppy complexes, such as HCl-Ar, for which chaos sets in only at relatively high energies. The consequences of this result for quantum solvation are discussed. We also investigate rotationally excited states with J = 1 which, except for HCN-(4)He, are actually resonances that decay by rotational pre-dissociation.

  6. Bipolar cells of the ground squirrel retina.

    PubMed

    Puller, Christian; Ondreka, Katharina; Haverkamp, Silke

    2011-03-01

    Parallel processing of an image projected onto the retina starts at the first synapse, the cone pedicle, and each cone feeds its light signal into a minimum of eight different bipolar cell types. Hence, the morphological classification of bipolar cells is a prerequisite for analyzing retinal circuitry. Here we applied common bipolar cell markers to the cone-dominated ground squirrel retina, studied the labeling by confocal microscopy and electron microscopy, and compared the resulting bipolar cell types with those of the mouse (rod dominated) and primate retina. Eight different cone bipolar cell types (three OFF and five ON) and one rod bipolar cell were distinguished. The major criteria for classifying the cells were their immunocytochemical identity, their dendritic branching pattern, and the shape and stratification level of their axons in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Immunostaining with antibodies against Gγ13, a marker for ON bipolar cells, made it possible to separate OFF and ON bipolars. Recoverin-positive OFF bipolar cells partly overlapped with ON bipolar axon terminals at the ON/OFF border of the IPL. Antibodies against HCN4 labeled the S-cone selective (bb) bipolar cell. The calcium-binding protein CaB5 was expressed in two OFF and two ON cone bipolar cell types, and CD15 labeled a widefield ON cone bipolar cell comparable to the DB6 in primate.

  7. HCN Channels Modulators: The Need for Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli, Maria Novella; Sartiani, Laura; Masi, Alessio; Mannaioni, Guido; Manetti, Dina; Mugelli, Alessandro; Cerbai, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, the molecular correlate of the hyperpolarization-activated current (If/Ih), are membrane proteins which play an important role in several physiological processes and various pathological conditions. In the Sino Atrial Node (SAN) HCN4 is the target of ivabradine, a bradycardic agent that is, at the moment, the only drug which specifically blocks If. Nevertheless, several other pharmacological agents have been shown to modulate HCN channels, a property that may contribute to their therapeutic activity and/or to their side effects. HCN channels are considered potential targets for developing drugs to treat several important pathologies, but a major issue in this field is the discovery of isoform-selective compounds, owing to the wide distribution of these proteins into the central and peripheral nervous systems, heart and other peripheral tissues. This survey is focused on the compounds that have been shown, or have been designed, to interact with HCN channels and on their binding sites, with the aim to summarize current knowledge and possibly to unveil useful information to design new potent and selective modulators. PMID:26975509

  8. The Molecular Gas Outflow of NGC 1068 Imaged by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Burillo, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have used the ALMA array to map the emission of a set of dense molecular gas tracers (CO(3-2), CO(6-5), HCN(4-3), HCO+(4-3), and CS(7-6)) in the central r˜2 kpc of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 with spatial resolutions ˜0.3″-0.5″ (˜20-35 pc). The sensitivity and spatial resolution of ALMA give a detailed view of the distribution and kinematics of the dense molecular gas. The gas kinematics from r˜50 pc out to r˜400 pc reveal a massive outflow in all molecular tracers. The tight correlation between the ionized gas outflow, the radio jet, and the occurrence of outward motions in the disk suggests that the outflow is AGN driven. The outflow rate estimated in the CND, M/dt˜63+21-37 M⊙ yr-1, is an order of magnitude higher than the star formation rate at these radii. The molecular outflow could quench star formation in the inner r˜400 pc of the galaxy on short timescales of ≤1 Myr and regulate gas accretion in the CND.

  9. Structural basis for the mutual antagonism of cAMP and TRIP8b in regulating HCN channel function.

    PubMed

    Saponaro, Andrea; Pauleta, Sofia R; Cantini, Francesca; Matzapetakis, Manolis; Hammann, Christian; Donadoni, Chiara; Hu, Lei; Thiel, Gerhard; Banci, Lucia; Santoro, Bina; Moroni, Anna

    2014-10-07

    cAMP signaling in the brain mediates several higher order neural processes. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels directly bind cAMP through their cytoplasmic cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD), thus playing a unique role in brain function. Neuronal HCN channels are also regulated by tetratricopeptide repeat-containing Rab8b interacting protein (TRIP8b), an auxiliary subunit that antagonizes the effects of cAMP by interacting with the channel CNBD. To unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the dual regulation of HCN channel activity by cAMP/TRIP8b, we determined the NMR solution structure of the HCN2 channel CNBD in the cAMP-free form and mapped on it the TRIP8b interaction site. We reconstruct here the full conformational changes induced by cAMP binding to the HCN channel CNBD. Our results show that TRIP8b does not compete with cAMP for the same binding region; rather, it exerts its inhibitory action through an allosteric mechanism, preventing the cAMP-induced conformational changes in the HCN channel CNBD.

  10. GATING OF HCN CHANNELS BY CYCLIC NUCLEOTIDES: RESIDUE CONTACTS THAT UNDERLIE LIGAND BINDING, SELECTIVITY AND EFFICACY

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Siegelbaum, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cyclic nucleotides regulate the activity of various proteins by interacting with a conserved cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). Although X-ray crystallographic studies have revealed the structures of several CNBDs, the residues responsible for generating the high efficacy with which ligand binding leads to protein activation remain unknown. Here we combine molecular dynamics simulations with mutagenesis to identify ligand contacts important for the regulation of the hyperpolarization-activated HCN2 channel by cyclic nucleotides. Surprisingly, out of seven residues that make strong contacts with ligand, only R632 in the C-helix of the CNBD is essential for high ligand efficacy, due to its selective stabilization of cNMP binding to the open state of the channel. Principle component analysis suggests that a local movement of the C-helix upon ligand binding propagates through the CNBD of one subunit to the C-linker of a neighboring subunit to apply force to the gate of the channel. PMID:17562313

  11. Cortical HCN channels: function, trafficking and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mala M

    2014-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels belong to the superfamily of voltage-gated potassium ion channels. They are, however, activated by hyperpolarizing potentials and are permeable to cations. Four HCN subunits have been cloned, of which HCN1 and HCN2 subunits are predominantly expressed in the cortex. These subunits are principally located in pyramidal cell dendrites, although they are also found at lower concentrations in the somata of pyramidal neurons as well as other neuron subtypes. HCN channels are actively trafficked to dendrites by binding to the chaperone protein TRIP8b. Somato-dendritic HCN channels in pyramidal neurons modulate spike firing and synaptic potential integration by influencing the membrane resistance and resting membrane potential. Intriguingly, HCN channels are present in certain cortical axons and synaptic terminals too. Here, they regulate synaptic transmission but the underlying mechanisms appear to vary considerably amongst different synaptic terminals. In conclusion, HCN channels are expressed in multiple neuronal subcellular compartments in the cortex, where they have a diverse and complex effect on neuronal excitability. PMID:24756635

  12. Seizure-induced plasticity of h channels in entorhinal cortical layer III pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mala M; Anderson, Anne E; Leung, Victor; Lin, Xiaodi; Johnston, Daniel

    2004-10-28

    The entorhinal cortex (EC) provides the predominant excitatory drive to the hippocampal CA1 and subicular neurons in chronic epilepsy. Discerning the mechanisms underlying signal integration within EC neurons is essential for understanding network excitability alterations involving the hippocampus during epilepsy. Twenty-four hours following a single seizure episode when there were no behavioral or electrographic seizures, we found enhanced spontaneous activity still present in the rat EC in vivo and in vitro. The increased excitability was accompanied by a profound reduction in I(h) in EC layer III neurons and a significant decline in HCN1 and HCN2 subunits that encode for h channels. Consequently, dendritic excitability was enhanced, resulting in increased neuronal firing despite hyperpolarized membrane potentials. The loss of I(h) and the increased neuronal excitability persisted for 1 week following seizures. Our results suggest that dendritic I(h) plays an important role in determining the excitability of EC layer III neurons and their associated neural networks.

  13. Enhancement of dorsal hippocampal activity by knockdown of HCN1 channels leads to anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung Sub; Chang, Payne Y; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-08-09

    The hippocampus is an integral brain region for affective disorders. TRIP8b knockout mice lacking functional HCN channels as well as both HCN1 and HCN2 knockout mice have been shown to display antidepressant-like behaviors. The mechanisms or brain regions involved in these alterations in behavior, however, are not clear. We developed a lentiviral shRNA system to examine whether knockdown of HCN1 protein in the dorsal hippocampal CA1 region is sufficient to produce antidepressant-like effects. We found that knockdown of HCN1 channels increased cellular excitability and resulted in physiological changes consistent with a reduction of I(h). Rats infused with lentiviral shRNA-HCN1 in the dorsal hippocampal CA1 region displayed antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like behaviors associated with widespread enhancement of hippocampal activity and upregulation of BDNF-mTOR signaling pathways. Our results suggest that HCN1 protein could be a potential target for treatment of anxiety and depression disorders.

  14. Inflammatory and neuropathic pain are rapidly suppressed by peripheral block of hyperpolarisation-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Young, Gareth T; Emery, Edward C; Mooney, Elizabeth R; Tsantoulas, Christoforos; McNaughton, Peter A

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that hyperpolarisation-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN)-2 ion channels regulate the firing frequency of nociceptive sensory neurons and thus play a central role in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain conditions. Here we use ivabradine, a clinically approved anti-anginal agent that blocks all HCN channel isoforms approximately equally, to investigate the effect on inflammatory and neuropathic pain of HCN ion channel block. We show that ivabradine does not have major off-target effects on a sample group of Na, Ca, and K ion channels, and that it is peripherally restricted because it is a substrate for the P-glycoprotein (PgP) multidrug transporter that is expressed in the blood-brain barrier. Its effects are therefore likely to be due to an action on HCN ion channels in peripheral sensory neurons. Using patch clamp electrophysiology, we found that ivabradine was a use-dependent blocker of native HCN channels expressed in small sensory neurons. Ivabradine suppressed the action potential firing that is induced in nociceptive neurons by elevation of intracellular cAMP. In the formalin model of inflammatory pain, ivabradine reduced pain behaviour only in the second (inflammatory) phase. In nerve injury and chemotherapy models of neuropathic pain, we observed rapid and effective analgesia as effective as that with gabapentin. We conclude that both inflammatory and neuropathic pain are rapidly inhibited by blocking HCN-dependent repetitive firing in peripheral nociceptive neurons.

  15. Bringing the light to high throughput screening: use of optogenetic tools for the development of recombinant cellular assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agus, Viviana; Di Silvio, Alberto; Rolland, Jean Francois; Mondini, Anna; Tremolada, Sara; Montag, Katharina; Scarabottolo, Lia; Redaelli, Loredana; Lohmer, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The use of light-activated proteins represents a powerful tool to control biological processes with high spatial and temporal precision. These so called "optogenetic" technologies have been successfully validated in many recombinant systems, and have been widely applied to the study of cellular mechanisms in intact tissues or behaving animals; to do that, complex, high-intensity, often home-made instrumentations were developed to achieve the optimal power and precision of light stimulation. In our study we sought to determine if this optical modulation can be obtained also in a miniaturized format, such as a 384-well plate, using the instrumentations normally dedicated to fluorescence analysis in High Throughput Screening (HTS) activities, such as for example the FLIPR (Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader) instrument. We successfully generated optogenetic assays for the study of different ion channel targets: the CaV1.3 calcium channel was modulated by the light-activated Channelrhodopsin-2, the HCN2 cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channel was modulated by the light activated bPAC adenylyl cyclase, and finally the genetically encoded voltage indicator ArcLight was efficiently used to measure potassium, sodium or chloride channel activity. Our results showed that stable, robust and miniaturized cellular assays can be developed using different optogenetic tools, and efficiently modulated by the FLIPR instrument LEDs in a 384-well format. The spatial and temporal resolution delivered by this technology might enormously advantage the early stages of drug discovery, leading to the identification of more physiological and effective drug molecules.

  16. Spatiotemporal Stability of Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocyte Monolayers Spontaneous Activity Is Dependent on the Culture Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau-Béland, Jonathan; Duverger, James Elber; Petitjean, Estelle; Maguy, Ange; Ledoux, Jonathan; Comtois, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In native conditions, cardiac cells must continuously comply with diverse stimuli necessitating a perpetual adaptation. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is commonly used in cell culture to study cellular response to changes in the mechanical environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of using PDMS substrates on the properties of spontaneous activity of cardiomyocyte monolayer cultures. We compared PDMS to the gold standard normally used in culture: a glass substrate. Although mean frequency of spontaneous activity remained unaltered, incidence of reentrant activity was significantly higher in samples cultured on glass compared to PDMS substrates. Higher spatial and temporal instability of the spontaneous rate activation was found when cardiomyocytes were cultured on PDMS, and correlated with decreased connexin-43 and increased CaV3.1 and HCN2 mRNA levels. Compared to cultures on glass, cultures on PDMS were associated with the strongest response to isoproterenol and acetylcholine. These results reveal the importance of carefully selecting the culture substrate for studies involving mechanical stimulation, especially for tissue engineering or pharmacological high-throughput screening of cardiac tissue analog. PMID:26035822

  17. Functional Characterization of Cnidarian HCN Channels Points to an Early Evolution of Ih

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Emma C.; Layden, Michael J.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Kamel, Bishoy; Medina, Monica; Simpson, Eboni; Jegla, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    HCN channels play a unique role in bilaterian physiology as the only hyperpolarization-gated cation channels. Their voltage-gating is regulated by cyclic nucleotides and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Activation of HCN channels provides the depolarizing current in response to hyperpolarization that is critical for intrinsic rhythmicity in neurons and the sinoatrial node. Additionally, HCN channels regulate dendritic excitability in a wide variety of neurons. Little is known about the early functional evolution of HCN channels, but the presence of HCN sequences in basal metazoan phyla and choanoflagellates, a protozoan sister group to the metazoans, indicate that the gene family predates metazoan emergence. We functionally characterized two HCN channel orthologs from Nematostella vectensis (Cnidaria, Anthozoa) to determine which properties of HCN channels were established prior to the emergence of bilaterians. We find Nematostella HCN channels share all the major functional features of bilaterian HCNs, including reversed voltage-dependence, activation by cAMP and PIP2, and block by extracellular Cs+. Thus bilaterian-like HCN channels were already present in the common parahoxozoan ancestor of bilaterians and cnidarians, at a time when the functional diversity of voltage-gated K+ channels was rapidly expanding. NvHCN1 and NvHCN2 are expressed broadly in planulae and in both the endoderm and ectoderm of juvenile polyps. PMID:26555239

  18. Bima Array Detections of HCN in Comets Linear (C/2002 T7) and Neat (C/2001 Q4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedel, D. N.; Remijan, A.; Snyder, L. E.; AHearn, M. F.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; dePater, Imke; Dickel, H. R.; Forster, J. R.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    We present interferometric detections of HCN in comets LINEAR (C/2002 T7) and NEAT (C/2001 Q4) with the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) Array in its D-configuration cross-correlation mode. We detected the HCN J = 1 - 0 emission line in both comets. With a 25".4 x 20".3 synthesized beam around Comet LINEAR, we found a total beam averaged HCN column density (assuming a rotation temperature of 146 K) of < N(sub T) > = 2.1(11)x 10(sup 13) cm(exp -2), and a HCN production rate of Q(HCN)=2.8(15)x 10(sup 27) s(exp -1). With a 21".3 x 17".5 synthesized beam around Comet NEAT, we found a total beam averaged HCN column density (assuming a rotation temperature of 107 K) of < N(sub T) > = 5.7(30) x 10(sup l2) cm(exp -2), and a HCN production rate of Q(HCN)=8.3(44) x 10(sup 26) s(exp -l) giving a production rate of HCN relative to H2O of approximately 0.09(5)%. The production rates relative to H2O and spatial extent of HCN are similar to previous comet observations.

  19. The Effects of Acupuncture on Bladder Interstitial Cells of Cajal Excitability in Rats with Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qi-fan; Hou, Yuen-hao; Hou, Wen-guang; Lin, Zhi-xian; Tang, Kang-min; Chen, Yue-lai

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that acupuncture treatment has an effect on patients with an overactive bladder, but the mechanism of its action remains to be clarified. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of acupuncture on bladder overactivity, and the excitability of interstitial cells of Cajal of the bladder in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction. Electroacupuncture (continuous wave, 30 Hz, 1 mA) was applied to stimulate the Ciliao point (BL32) and the Huiyang point (BL35) of rats for 20 min, 3 days. Results showed that acupuncture suppressed detrusor unstable contraction frequency and decreased detrusor maximum pressure in the bladder filling period. Compared with the normal control rats, HCN2 mRNA and protein expression within the bladder were upregulated and were reversed by electroacupuncture in overactive bladder rats as determined by RT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, in-vitro cell-cultured OAB rats bladder interstitial cells of Cajal intracellular Ca2+ concentration were higher than normal control rats, which were lowered after acupuncture treatment. These findings suggest that acupuncture stimulation can suppress bladder overactivity, and regulate the excitability of bladder interstitial cells of Cajal in treatment of overactive bladder myogenic mechanism. PMID:24194780

  20. Reduced Hyperpolarization-Activated Current Contributes to Enhanced Intrinsic Excitability in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons from PrP−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Stemkowski, Patrick L.; Gandini, Maria A.; Black, Stefanie A.; Zhang, Zizhen; Souza, Ivana A.; Chen, Lina; Zamponi, Gerald W.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic ablation of cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been linked to increased neuronal excitability and synaptic activity in the hippocampus. We have previously shown that synaptic activity in hippocampi of PrP-null mice is increased due to enhanced N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function. Here, we focused on the effect of PRNP gene knock-out (KO) on intrinsic neuronal excitability, and in particular, the underlying ionic mechanism in hippocampal neurons cultured from P0 mouse pups. We found that the absence of PrPC profoundly affected the firing properties of cultured hippocampal neurons in the presence of synaptic blockers. The membrane impedance was greater in PrP-null neurons, and this difference was abolished by the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker ZD7288 (100 μM). HCN channel activity appeared to be functionally regulated by PrPC. The amplitude of voltage sag, a characteristic of activating HCN channel current (Ih), was decreased in null mice. Moreover, Ih peak current was reduced, along with a hyperpolarizing shift in activation gating and slower kinetics. However, neither HCN1 nor HCN2 formed a biochemical complex with PrPC. These results suggest that the absence of PrP downregulates the activity of HCN channels through activation of a cell signaling pathway rather than through direct interactions. This in turn contributes to an increase in membrane impedance to potentiate neuronal excitability. PMID:27047338

  1. Patch-clamp fluorometry–based channel counting to determine HCN channel conductance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Xie, Changan; Grant, Khade; Su, Zhuocheng; Gao, Weihua; Liu, Qinglian

    2016-01-01

    Counting ion channels on cell membranes is of fundamental importance for the study of channel biophysics. Channel counting has thus far been tackled by classical approaches, such as radioactive labeling of ion channels with blockers, gating current measurements, and nonstationary noise analysis. Here, we develop a counting method based on patch-clamp fluorometry (PCF), which enables simultaneous electrical and optical recordings, and apply it to EGFP-tagged, hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic nucleotide–regulated (HCN) channels. We use a well-characterized and homologous cyclic nucleotide–gated (CNG) channel to establish the relationship between macroscopic fluorescence intensity and the total number of channels. Subsequently, based on our estimate of the total number of HCN channels, we determine the single-channel conductance of HCN1 and HCN2 to be 0.46 and 1.71 pS, respectively. Such a small conductance would present a technical challenge for traditional electrophysiology. This PCF-based technique provides an alternative method for counting particles on cell membranes, which could be applied to biophysical studies of other membrane proteins. PMID:27353446

  2. Delivery of a protein transduction domain-mediated Prdx6 protein ameliorates oxidative stress-induced injury in human and mouse neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shatrunjai P.; Chhunchha, Bhavana; Fatma, Nigar; Kubo, Eri; Singh, Sanjay P.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress or reduced expression of naturally occurring antioxidants during aging has been identified as a major culprit in neuronal cell/tissue degeneration. Peroxiredoxin (Prdx) 6, a protective protein with GSH peroxidase and acidic calcium-independent phospholipase A2 activities, acts as a rheostat in regulating cellular physiology by clearing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and thereby optimizing gene regulation. We found that under stress, the neuronal cells displayed reduced expression of Prdx6 protein and mRNA with increased levels of ROS, and the cells subsequently underwent apoptosis. Using Prdx6 fused to TAT transduction domain, we showed evidence that Prdx6 was internalized in human brain cortical neuronal cells, HCN-2, and mouse hippocampal cells, HT22. The cells transduced with Prdx6 conferred resistance against the oxidative stress inducers paraquat, H2O2, and glutamate. Furthermore, Prdx6 delivery ameliorated damage to neuronal cells by optimizing ROS levels and overstimulation of NF-κB. Intriguingly, transduction of Prdx6 increased the expression of endogenous Prdx6, suggesting that protection against oxidative stress was mediated by both extrinsic and intrinsic Prdx6. The results demonstrate that Prdx6 expression is critical to protecting oxidative stress-evoked neuronal cell death. We propose that local or systemic application of Prdx6 can be an effective means of delaying/postponing neuronal degeneration. PMID:26447207

  3. Impaired Dendritic Expression and fmr1−/y Plasticity of h-Channels in the Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brager, Darrin H.; Akhavan, Arvin R.; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite extensive research into both synaptic and morphological changes, surprisingly little is known about dendritic function in fragile X syndrome (FXS). We found that the dendritic input resistance of CA1 neurons was significantly lower in fmr1−/y versus wild-type mice. Consistent with elevated dendritic Ih, voltage sag, rebound, and resonance frequency were significantly higher and temporal fmr1−/y summation was lower in the dendrites of mice. Dendritic expression of the h-channel subunit HCN1, but not HCN2, was higher in the CA1 region of fmr1−/y mice. Interestingly, whereas mGluR-mediated persistent decreases in Ih occurred in both wild-type and fmr1−/y mice, persistent increases in Ih that occurred after LTP induction in wild-type mice were absent in fmr1−/y mice. Thus, chronic upregulation of dendritic Ih in conjunction with impairment of homeostatic h-channel plasticity represents a dendritic channelopathy in this model of mental retardation and may provide a mechanism for the cognitive impairment associated with FXS. PMID:22662315

  4. A secondary structural transition in the C-helix promotes gating of cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Puljung, Michael C; Zagotta, William N

    2013-05-03

    Cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels bind second messengers like cAMP to a C-terminal domain, consisting of a β-roll, followed by two α-helices (B- and C-helices). We monitored the cAMP-dependent changes in the structure of the C-helix of a C-terminal fragment of HCN2 channels using transition metal ion FRET between fluorophores on the C-helix and metal ions bound between histidine pairs on the same helix. cAMP induced a change in the dimensions of the C-helix and an increase in the metal binding affinity of the histidine pair. cAMP also caused an increase in the distance between a fluorophore on the C-helix and metal ions bound to the B-helix. Stabilizing the C-helix of intact CNGA1 channels by metal binding to a pair of histidines promoted channel opening. These data suggest that ordering of the C-helix is part of the gating conformational change in cyclic nucleotide-regulated channels.

  5. A Leucine Zipper Motif Essential for Gating of Hyperpolarization-activated Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Silbernagel, Nicole; Marzian, Stefanie; Netter, Michael F.; Rinné, Susanne; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Decher, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are pacemakers in cardiac myocytes and neurons. Although their membrane topology closely resembles that of voltage-gated K+ channels, the mechanism of their unique gating behavior in response to hyperpolarization is still poorly understood. We have identified a highly conserved leucine zipper motif in the S5 segment of HCN family members. In order to study the role of this motif for channel function, the leucine residues of the zipper were individually mutated to alanine, arginine, or glutamine residues. Leucine zipper mutants traffic to the plasma membrane, but the channels lose their sensitivity to open upon hyperpolarization. Thus, our data indicate that the leucine zipper is an important molecular determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating. Residues of the leucine zipper interact with the adjacent S6 segment of the channel. This interaction is essential for voltage-dependent gating of the channel. The lower part of the leucine zipper, at the intracellular mouth of the channel, is important for stabilizing the closed state. Mutations at these sites increase current amplitudes or result in channels with deficient closing and increased min-Po. Our data are further supported by homology models of the open and closed state of the HCN2 channel pore. Thus, we conclude that the leucine zipper of HCN channels is a major determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating. PMID:23048023

  6. Electron Irradiation of Kuiper Belt Surface Ices: Ternary N2-CH4-CO Mixtures as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Kaiser, R. I.

    2012-10-01

    The space weathering of icy Kuiper Belt Objects was investigated in this case study by exposing methane (CH4) and carbon monoxide (CO) doped nitrogen (N2) ices at 10 K to ionizing radiation in the form of energetic electrons. Online and in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was utilized to monitor the radiation-induced chemical processing of these ices. Along with isocyanic acid (HNCO), the products could be mainly derived from those formed in irradiated binary ices of the N2-CH4 and CO-CH4 systems: nitrogen-bearing products were found in the form of hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), diazomethane (CH2N2), and its radical fragment (HCN2); oxygen-bearing products were of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), formyl radical (HCO), and formaldehyde (H2CO). As in the pure ices, the methyl radical (CH3) and ethane (C2H6) were also detected, as were carbon dioxide (CO2) and the azide radical (N3). Based on the temporal evolution of the newly formed products, kinetic reaction schemes were then developed to fit the temporal profiles of the newly formed species, resulting in numerical sets of rate constants. The current study highlights important constraints on the preferential formation of isocyanic acid (HNCO) over hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), thus guiding the astrobiological and chemical evolution of those distant bodies.

  7. The Dense Molecular Gas and Nuclear Activity in the ULIRG IRAS 13120–5453

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privon, G. C.; Aalto, S.; Falstad, N.; Muller, S.; González-Alfonso, E.; Sliwa, K.; Treister, E.; Costagliola, F.; Armus, L.; Evans, A. S.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Izumi, T.; Sakamoto, K.; van der Werf, P.; Chu, J. K.

    2017-02-01

    We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array Band 7 (∼340 GHz) observations of the dense gas tracers HCN, HCO+, and CS in the local, single-nucleus, ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS 13120–5453. We find centrally enhanced HCN (4–3) emission, relative to HCO+ (4–3), but do not find evidence for radiative pumping of HCN. Considering the size of the starburst (0.5 kpc) and the estimated supernovae rate of ∼1.2 yr‑1, the high HCN/HCO+ ratio can be explained by an enhanced HCN abundance as a result of mechanical heating by the supernovae, though the active galactic nucleus and winds may also contribute additional mechanical heating. The starburst size implies a high ΣIR of 4.7 × 1012 L⊙ kpc‑2, slightly below predictions of radiation-pressure limited starbursts. The HCN line profile has low-level wings, which we tentatively interpret as evidence for outflowing dense molecular gas. However, the dense molecular outflow seen in the HCN line wings is unlikely to escape the Galaxy and is destined to return to the nucleus and fuel future star formation. We also present modeling of Herschel observations of the H2O lines and find a nuclear dust temperature of ∼40 K. IRAS 13120–5453 has a lower dust temperature and ΣIR than is inferred for the systems termed “compact obscured nuclei (CONs)” (such as Arp 220 and Mrk 231). If IRAS 13120–5453 has undergone a CON phase, we are likely witnessing it at a time when the feedback has already inflated the nuclear ISM and diluted star formation in the starburst/active galactic nucleus core.

  8. BK channels regulate sinoatrial node firing rate and cardiac pacing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Michael H.; Wu, Yuejin; Gao, Zhan; Anderson, Mark E.; Dalziel, Julie E.

    2014-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channels play prominent roles in shaping muscle and neuronal excitability. In the cardiovascular system, BK channels promote vascular relaxation and protect against ischemic injury. Recently, inhibition of BK channels has been shown to lower heart rate in intact rodents and isolated hearts, suggesting a novel role in heart function. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we recorded ECGs from mice injected with paxilline (PAX), a membrane-permeable BK channel antagonist, and examined changes in cardiac conduction. ECGs revealed a 19 ± 4% PAX-induced reduction in heart rate in wild-type but not BK channel knockout (Kcnma1−/−) mice. The heart rate decrease was associated with slowed cardiac pacing due to elongation of the sinus interval. Action potential firing recorded from isolated sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) was reduced by 55 ± 15% and 28 ± 9% by application of PAX (3 μM) and iberiotoxin (230 nM), respectively. Furthermore, baseline firing rates from Kcnma1−/− SANCs were 33% lower than wild-type SANCs. The slowed firing upon BK current inhibition or genetic deletion was due to lengthening of the diastolic depolarization phase of the SANC action potential. Finally, BK channel immunoreactivity and PAX-sensitive currents were identified in SANCs with HCN4 expression and pacemaker current, respectively, and BK channels cloned from SANCs recapitulated similar activation as the PAX-sensitive current. Together, these data localize BK channels to SANCs and demonstrate that loss of BK current decreases SANC automaticity, consistent with slowed sinus pacing after PAX injection in vivo. Furthermore, these findings suggest BK channels are potential therapeutic targets for disorders of heart rate. PMID:25172903

  9. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liangrong; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Yang, Chuanchun; Zhang, Fengting; Hu, Yue; Yue, Hongni; Ning, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs), which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques. PMID:27218255

  10. A common Shox2-Nkx2-5 antagonistic mechanism primes the pacemaker cell fate in the pulmonary vein myocardium and sinoatrial node.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenduo; Wang, Jun; Song, Yingnan; Yu, Diankun; Sun, Cheng; Liu, Chao; Chen, Fading; Zhang, Yanding; Wang, Fen; Harvey, Richard P; Schrader, Laura; Martin, James F; Chen, YiPing

    2015-07-15

    In humans, atrial fibrillation is often triggered by ectopic pacemaking activity in the myocardium sleeves of the pulmonary vein (PV) and systemic venous return. The genetic programs that abnormally reinforce pacemaker properties at these sites and how this relates to normal sinoatrial node (SAN) development remain uncharacterized. It was noted previously that Nkx2-5, which is expressed in the PV myocardium and reinforces a chamber-like myocardial identity in the PV, is lacking in the SAN. Here we present evidence that in mice Shox2 antagonizes the transcriptional output of Nkx2-5 in the PV myocardium and in a functional Nkx2-5(+) domain within the SAN to determine cell fate. Shox2 deletion in the Nkx2-5(+) domain of the SAN caused sick sinus syndrome, associated with the loss of the pacemaker program. Explanted Shox2(+) cells from the embryonic PV myocardium exhibited pacemaker characteristics including node-like electrophysiological properties and the capability to pace surrounding Shox2(-) cells. Shox2 deletion led to Hcn4 ablation in the developing PV myocardium. Nkx2-5 hypomorphism rescued the requirement for Shox2 for the expression of genes essential for SAN development in Shox2 mutants. Similarly, the pacemaker-like phenotype induced in the PV myocardium in Nkx2-5 hypomorphs reverted back to a working myocardial phenotype when Shox2 was simultaneously deleted. A similar mechanism is also adopted in differentiated embryoid bodies. We found that Shox2 interacts with Nkx2-5 directly, and discovered a substantial genome-wide co-occupancy of Shox2, Nkx2-5 and Tbx5, further supporting a pivotal role for Shox2 in the core myogenic program orchestrating venous pole and pacemaker development.

  11. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Michael V; Fung, Lianna; Jensen, Ember; Oh, Frances; Cung, Katherine; McCarthy, Linda A; Tran, Christine K; Hoang, Van; Hakim, Simin A; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10) with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85%) located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51%) variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies <1% for family studies. The results identified LMNA c.357-2A>G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency.

  12. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Michael V.; Fung, Lianna; Jensen, Ember; Oh, Frances; Cung, Katherine; McCarthy, Linda A.; Tran, Christine K.; Hoang, Van; Hakim, Simin A.; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10) with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85%) located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51%) variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies <1% for family studies. The results identified LMNA c.357-2A>G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency. PMID:27182706

  13. ION AND NEUTRAL MOLECULES IN THE W43-MM1(G30.79 FIR 10) INFALLING CLUMP

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes, Paulo C.

    2011-12-20

    The high-mass star-forming clump W43-MM1 has been mapped in N{sub 2}H{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), C{sup 18}O(3 {yields} 2), SiO(8 {yields} 7), and in a single pointing in DCO{sup +}(5 {yields} 4) toward the center of the clump. Column densities from these observations as well as previous HCO{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), HCN(4 {yields} 3), H{sup 13}CN(4 {yields} 3), and CS(7 {yields} 6) data have been derived using the RADEX code; results later have been used to derive chemical abundances at selected points in the MM1 main axis. We compare with chemical models to estimate an evolutionary age of 10{sup 4} years for a remarkable warm hot core inside MM1. We also proposed that the dust temperature derived from the spectral energy distribution fitting in MM1 is not representative of the gas temperature deep inside the clump because dust emission may have become optically thick. By deriving a deuterium fractionation of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, we estimate an electron fraction of X(e) = 6.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}. Thus, the coupling between the neutral gas and the magnetic field is estimated by computing the ambipolar diffusion Reynolds number R{sub m} = 18 and the wave coupling number W = 110. Considering that the infalling speed is slightly supersonic (M = 1.1) but sub-Alfvenic, we conclude that the MM1 clump has recently been or is in the process of decoupling the field from the neutral fluid. Thus, the MM1 clump appears to be in an intermediate stage of evolution in which a hot core has developed while the envelope is still infalling and not fully decoupled from the ambient magnetic field.

  14. TBX18 gene induces adipose-derived stem cells to differentiate into pacemaker-like cells in the myocardial microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei; Zhang, Ge-Ge; Wang, Teng; Wang, Xi; Tang, Yan-Hong; Huang, He; Barajas-Martinez, Hector; Hu, Dan; Huang, Cong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    T-box 18 (TBX18) plays a crucial role in the formation and development of the head of the sinoatrial node. The objective of this study was to induce adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) to produce pacemaker-like cells by transfection with the TBX18 gene. A recombinant adenovirus vector carrying the human TBX18 gene was constructed to transfect ADSCs. The ADSCs transfected with TBX18 were considered the TBX18-ADSCs. The control group was the GFP-ADSCs. The transfected cells were co-cultured with neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVMs). The results showed that the mRNA expression of TBX18 in TBX18-ADSCs was significantly higher than in the control group after 48 h and 7 days. After 7 days of co-culturing with NRVMs, there was no significant difference in the expression of the myocardial marker cardiac troponin I (cTnI) between the two groups. RT-qPCR and western blot analysis showed that the expression of HCN4 was higher in the TBX18-ADSCs than in the GFP-ADSCs. The If current was detected using the whole cell patch clamp technique and was blocked by the specific blocker CsCl. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSCMs) showed approximately twice the current density compared with the ADSCs. Our study indicated that the TBX18 gene induces ADSCs to differentiate into pacemaker-like cells in the cardiac microenvironment. Although further experiments are required in order to assess safety and efficacy prior to implementation in clinical practice, this technique may provide new avenues for the clinical therapy of bradycardia. PMID:27632938

  15. Distribution of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) and hyperpolarization-activated (HCN) channels in sensory afferent fibers in the rat carotid body

    PubMed Central

    Buniel, Maria; Glazebrook, Patricia A.; Ramirez-Navarro, Angelina; Kunze, Diana L.

    2008-01-01

    The chemosensory glomus cells of the carotid body (CB) detect changes in O2-tension. Carotid sinus nerve fibers, which originate from peripheral sensory neurons located within the petrosal ganglion, innervate the CB. Release of transmitter from glomus cells activates the sensory afferent fibers to transmit information to the nucleus of the solitary tract in the brainstem. The ion channels expressed within the sensory nerve terminals play an essential role in the ability of the terminal to initiate action potentials in response to transmitter-evoked depolarization. However, with a few exceptions, the identity of ion channels expressed in these peripheral nerve fibers is unknown. This study addresses the expression of voltage-gated channels in the sensory fibers with a focus on channels that set the resting membrane potential and regulate discharge patterns. Using immunohistochemistry and fluorescence confocal microscopy, potassium channel subunits and HCN (hyperpolarization-activated) family members were localized both in petrosal neurons that expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, and the CSN axons within the carotid body. Channels contributing to resting membrane potential including HCN2, responsible in part for Ih current, and the KCNQ2 and KCNQ5 subunits thought to underlie the neuronal “M current” were identified in the sensory neurons and their axons innervating the carotid body. In addition, the results presented here demonstrate expression of several potassium channels that shape the action potential and the frequency of discharge including Kv1.4, Kv1.5, Kv4.3, KCa (BK). The role of these channels should be considered in interpretation of the fiber discharge in response to perturbation of the carotid body environment. PMID:18668683

  16. Deletion of the HCN channel auxiliary subunit TRIP8b impairs hippocampal Ih localization and function and promotes antidepressant behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Alan S.; Vaidya, Sachin P.; Blaiss, Cory A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Stoub, Travis R.; Brager, Darrin H.; Chen, Xiangdong; Bender, Roland A.; Estep, Chad M.; Popov, Andrey B.; Kang, Catherine E.; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Nicholson, Daniel A.; Powell, Craig M.; Johnston, Daniel; Chetkovich, Dane M.

    2011-01-01

    Output properties of neurons are greatly shaped by voltage-gated ion channels, whose biophysical properties and localization within axodendritic compartments serve to significantly transform the original input. The hyperpolarization-activated current, Ih, is mediated by HCN channels and plays a fundamental role in influencing neuronal excitability by regulating both membrane potential and input resistance. In neurons such as cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons, the subcellular localization of HCN channels plays critical functional role, yet mechanisms controlling HCN channel trafficking are not fully understood. Because ion channel function and localization are often influenced by interacting proteins, we generated a knockout mouse lacking the HCN channel auxiliary subunit, TRIP8b. Eliminating expression of TRIP8b dramatically reduced Ih expression in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Loss of Ih-dependent membrane voltage properties was attributable to reduction of HCN channels on the neuronal surface, and there was a striking disruption of the normal expression pattern of HCN channels in pyramidal neuron dendrites. In heterologous cells and neurons, absence of TRIP8b increased HCN subunit targeting to and degradation by lysosomes. Mice lacking TRIP8b demonstrated motor learning deficits and enhanced resistance to multiple tasks of behavioral despair with high predictive validity for antidepressant efficacy. We observed similar resistance to behavioral despair in distinct mutant mice lacking HCN1 or HCN2. These data demonstrate that interaction with the auxiliary subunit TRIP8b is a major mechanism underlying proper expression of HCN channels and Ih in vivo, and suggest that targeting Ih may provide a novel approach to treatment of depression. PMID:21593326

  17. Microtubule-disrupting chemotherapeutics result in enhanced proteasome-mediated degradation and disappearance of tubulin in neural cells.

    PubMed

    Huff, Lyn M; Sackett, Dan L; Poruchynsky, Marianne S; Fojo, Tito

    2010-07-15

    We sought to examine the effects of microtubule-targeting agents (MTA) on neural cells to better understand the problem of neurotoxicity, their principal side effect, and to possibly develop a model of clinical toxicity. Studies showed that microtubule-depolymerizing agents (MDA) not only disassembled microtubules in neural HCN2 cells but also led to rapid disappearance of tubulin, and that this was specific for MDAs. Tubulin levels decreased to 20% as early as 8 hours after adding vincristine, and to 1% to 30% (mean, 9.8 +/- 7.6%; median of 7%) after 100 nmol/L vincristine for 24 hours. This disappearance was reversible. An increase in both glu-terminated and acetylated tubulin, markers of stable tubulin, preceded reaccumulation of soluble tubulin, suggesting a priority for stabilizing tubulin first as microtubules before replenishing the soluble pool. Similar results were shown with other MDAs. Furthermore, microtubule reassembly did not arise from a central focus but instead appeared to involve dispersed nucleation, as evidenced by the appearance of small, stable microtubule stubs throughout the cytoplasm. In contrast, experiments with four nonneural "normal" cell lines and four cancer cell lines resulted in microtubule destabilization but only modest tubulin degradation. Evidence for proteasome-mediated degradation was obtained by demonstrating that adding a proteasome inhibitor before vincristine prevented tubulin disappearance. In summary, MDAs lead to rapid disappearance of tubulin in neural but not in other normal or cancer cells. These results underscore the fine control that occurs in neural cells and may further our understanding of neurotoxicity following MDAs.

  18. Facile Approaches to Phosphorescent Bis(cyclometalated) pentafluorophenyl PtIV Complexes. Photophysics and Computational Studies.

    PubMed

    Lalinde, Elena; Moreno, Teresa; Lara, Rebeca; Giménez, Nora

    2017-03-08

    A convenient and general strategy to synthetize stable bis(cyclometalated) pentafluorophenyl PtIV complexes fac-[Pt(C^N)2(C6F5)Cl] (3a-3f) and mer-[Pt(C^N)2(C6F5)(CN)] (4c, 4d) has been developed. Complexes 3 are selectively generated by low temperature oxidation of the cyclometalated PtII complexes [Pt(C^N)(HC^N)(C6F5)] 2 [prepared from cis-[Pt(C6F5)2(HC^N)2] (1) intermediates] with PhICl2 and subsequent metalation of the pendant HC^N ligand. Complexes 3a and 3b are also alternatively generated by irradiation (Hg lamp, 400 W) of complexes 2a and 2b in CH2Cl2. This later reaction proceeds through hydride PtIV species cis-[Pt(C^N)2(C6F5)H] detected as the only intermediate species. The molecular structures of 1a,d, 2a and 3a,b,d,e have been confirmed by X-ray. Substitution reaction of Cl- by CN- in fac-[Pt(C^N)2(C6F5)Cl] [C^N = (2-phenyl)benzothiazol 3c, 2-(4-bromophenyl)benzothiazol 3d] evolves with isomerization giving rise to the isomers (OC-6-42)-[Pt(C^N)2(C6F5)(CN)] (4c, 4d) having a mer disposition for the cyclometalated and C6F5 groups (X ray, 4c). All complexes are luminescent and their electronic spectra are compared and interpreted with the aid of TD-DFT calculations.

  19. The origin of proteins: Heteropolypeptides from hydrogen cyanide and water.

    PubMed

    Matthews, C N

    1975-01-01

    Evidence from laboratory and extraterrestrial chemistry is presented consistent with the hypothesis that the original heteropolypeptides on Earth were synthesized spontaneously from hydrogen cyanide and water without the intervening formation of chi-amino acids, a key step being the direct polymerization of atmospheric hydrogen cyanide to polyaminomalononitrile (IV) via dimeric HCN. Molecular orbital calculations (INDO) show that the most probable structure for (HCN)2 is azacyclopropenylidenimine. Successive reactions of hydrogen cyanide with the reactive nitrile side chains of IV then yield heteropolyamidines which are converted by water to heteropolypeptides. To study this postulated modification of a homopolymer to a heteropolymer, poly-chi-cyanoglycine (IX) was prepared from the N-carboxyanhydride of chi-cyanoglycine. Hydrolysis of IX, a polyamide analog of the polyamidine IV, yielded glycine. However, when IX was hydrolysed after being treated with hydrogen cyanide, other chi-amino acids were also obtained including alanine, serine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid, suggesting that the nitrile groups of IX (and therfore of IV) are indeed readily attacked by hydrogen cyanide as predicted. Further theoretical and experimental studies support the view that hydrogen cyanide polymerization along these lines is a universal process that accounts not only for the past formation of primitive proteins on Earth, but also for the yellow-brown-orange colors of Jupiter today and for the presence of water-soluble compounds hydrolyzable to chi-amino acids in materials obtained from environments as diverse as the moon, carbonaceous chondrites and the reaction chambers used to simulate organic synthesis in planetary atmospheres.

  20. Methamphetamine blunts Ca2+ currents and excitatory synaptic transmission through D1/5 receptor-mediated mechanisms in the mouse medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    González, Betina; Rivero-Echeto, Celeste; Muñiz, Javier A.; Cadet, Jean Lud; García-Rill, Edgar; Urbano, Francisco J.; Bisagno, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulant addiction is associated with dysfunctions in frontal cortex. Previous data demonstrated that repeated exposure to methamphetamine (METH) can alter prefrontal cortex (PFC) dependent functions. Here, we show that withdrawal from repetitive non-contingent METH administration (7 days, 1mg/kg) depressed voltage-dependent calcium currents (ICa) and increased IH amplitude and the paired-pulse ratio of evoked EPSCs in deep-layer pyramidal mPFC neurons. Most of these effects were blocked by systemic co-administration of the D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0.5 and 0.05 mg/kg). In vitro METH (i.e bath-applied to slices from naïve-treated animals) was able to emulate its systemic effects on ICa and evoked EPSCs paired-pulse ratio. We also provide evidence of altered mRNA expression of i) voltage-gated calcium channels P/Q-type Cacna1a (Cav2.1), N-type Cacna1b (Cav2.2), T-type Cav3.1 Cacna1g, Cav3.2 Cacna1h, Cav3.3 Cacna1i and the auxiliary subunit Cacna2d1 (α2δ1), ii) hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels Hcn1 and Hcn2 and iii) glutamate receptors subunits AMPA-type Gria1, NMDA-type Grin1 and metabotropic Grm1 in the mouse mPFC after repeated METH treatment. Moreover, we show that some of these changes in mRNA expression were sensitive D1/5 receptor blockade. Altogether these altered mechanisms affecting synaptic physiology and transcriptional regulation may underlie prefrontal cortex functional alterations that could lead to PFC impairments observed in METH-addicted individuals. PMID:25871318

  1. A Termolecular Reaction Mechanism for Nitrogen Incorporation in Aerosol Produced by Far UV Irradiation of CH4-N2 Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, R. K.; Trainer, M. G.; Jimenez, J. L.; Yung, Y. L.; Toon, O. B.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Results from the Aerosol Collector and Pyrolyser located onboard the Huygens lander reveal the presence of carbon and nitrogen in Titan's aerosols. Nitrogen incorporation is thought to be initiated by energy sources strong enough to break the N-N triple bond of molecular nitrogen (9.8eV). Such energy sources include extreme UV photons (λ <120 nm) and electrons from Saturn's magnetosphere. Less energetic photons in the far UV (120-200 nm) penetrate to the stratosphere of Titan and are only expected to affect hydrocarbon photochemistry there. However, recent results from our laboratory indicate a surprising amount of nitrogen incorporation- up to 16% by mass- in Titan aerosol analog produced by photochemistry initiated by far UV irradiation of CH4/N2 mixtures. The termolecular reaction CH + N2 + M --> HCN2 has been proposed to account for this observation. Here, we test this hypothesis by using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) to measure the mass loading and chemical composition of aerosol produced at a range of pressures from roughly 0.1 to 1 atm. Even though these gas mixtures spanned an order of magnitude in pressure, they experienced the same residence time in the photochemical chamber and had the same methane optical depth. We report a 150% increase in aerosol mass loading across the range of pressures studied, indicating that the mechanism controlling the total mass produced depends on pressure. We also report an overall increase with pressure in the ratio of nitrogen-bearing organic species to hydrocarbon-only species. These observations support the hypothesis that the termolecular reaction above is responsible for the incorporation of nitrogen into Titan aerosol analog produced from CH4/N2 gas mixtures irradiated in the far UV. These findings have implications for our understanding of the evolution of Titan's atmosphere, and the atmospheric synthesis of biologically relevant N-containing molecules.

  2. Flowing Afterglow Studies of Temperature Dependencies for Electron Dissociative Recombination of HCNH+, CH3CNH+ and CH3CH2CNH+ and Their Symmetrical Proton Bound Dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLain, J. L.; Adams, N. G.

    2009-12-01

    A study has been made using a variable temperature flowing afterglow Langmuir probe technique (VT-FALP) to determine the equilibrium temperature dependencies of the dissociative electron-ion recombination of the protonated cyanide ions (RCNH+, where R = H, CH3 and C2H5) and their symmetrical proton bound dimers (RCNH+NCR). The power law temperature dependencies of the recombination coefficients, αe, over the temperature range 180 to 600 K for the protonated ions are αe(T)(cm3s-1) = 3.5±0.5×10-7 (300/T)1.38 for HCNH+, αe(T)= 3.4±0.5×10-7 (300/T)1.03 for CH3CNH+, and αe(T)= 4.6×10-7(300/T)0.81 for CH3CH2CNH+. The equivalent values for the proton bound dimers are αe(T)(cm3s-1) = 2.4±0.4×10-6(300/T)0.5 for (HCN)2H+, αe(T)= 2.8±0.4×10-6(300/T)0.5 for (CH3CN)2H+, and αe(T)= 2.3±0.3×10-6(300/T)0.5 for (CH3CH2CN)2H+. The relevance of these data to molecular synthesis in the Titan ionosphere are discussed.

  3. Flowing afterglow studies of temperature dependencies for electron dissociative recombination of HCNH +, CH 3CNH + and CH 3CH 2CNH + and their symmetrical proton-bound dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLain, J. L.; Adams, N. G.

    2009-11-01

    A study has been made using a variable temperature flowing afterglow Langmuir probe technique (VT-FALP) to determine the equilibrium temperature dependencies of the dissociative electron-ion recombination of the protonated cyanide ions (RCNH +, where R=H, CH 3 and C 2H 5) and their symmetrical proton-bound dimers (RCNH +NCR). The power law temperature dependencies of the recombination coefficients, αe, over the temperature range 180 to 600 K for the protonated ions are αe( T)(cm 3 s -1)=3.5±0.5×10 -7 (300/ T) 1.38 for HCNH +, αe( T)=3.4±0.5×10 -7 (300/ T) 1.03 for CH 3CNH +, and αe( T)=4.6±0.7×10 -7 (300/ T) 0.81 for CH 3CH 2CNH +. The equivalent values for the proton-bound dimers are αe( T)(cm 3 s -1)=2.4±0.4×10 -6(300/ T) 0.5 for (HCN) 2H + to αe( T)=2.8±0.4×10 -6(300/ T) 0.5 for (CH 3CN) 2H +, and αe( T)=2.3±0.3×10 -6(300/ T) 0.5 for (CH 3CH 2CN) 2H +. The relevance of these data to molecular synthesis in the interstellar medium and the Titan ionosphere are discussed.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of CNS immediately before and after the detection of PrP(Sc) in SSBP/1 sheep scrapie.

    PubMed

    Gossner, Anton G; Hopkins, John

    2014-10-10

    Sheep scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), progressive and fatal neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) linked to the accumulation of misfolded prion protein, PrP(Sc). New Zealand Cheviot sheep, homozygous for the VRQ genotype of the PRNP gene are most susceptible with an incubation period of 193 days with SSBP/1 scrapie. However, the earliest time point that PrP(Sc) can be detected in the CNS is 125 days (D125). The aim of this study was to quantify changes to the transcriptome of the thalamus and obex (medulla) at times immediately before (D75) and after (D125) PrP(Sc) was detected. Affymetrix gene arrays were used to quantify gene expression in the thalamus and Illumina DGE-tag profiling for obex. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was used to help describe the biological processes of scrapie pathology. Neurological disease and Cancer were common Bio Functions in each tissue at D75; inflammation and cell death were major processes at D125. Several neurological receptors were significantly increased at D75 (e.g. CHRNA6, GRM1, HCN2), which might be clues to the molecular basis of psychiatric changes associated with TSEs. No genes were significantly differentially expressed at both D75 and D125 and there was no progression of events from earlier to later time points. This implies that there is no simple linear progression of pathological or molecular events. There seems to be a step-change between D75 and D125, correlating with the detection of PrP(Sc), resulting in the involvement of different pathological processes in later TSE disease.

  5. Characteristics and physiological role of hyperpolarization activated currents in mouse cold thermoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Orio, Patricio; Madrid, Rodolfo; de la Peña, Elvira; Parra, Andrés; Meseguer, Víctor; Bayliss, Douglas A; Belmonte, Carlos; Viana, Félix

    2009-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated currents (Ih) are mediated by the expression of combinations of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel subunits (HCN1–4). These cation currents are key regulators of cellular excitability in the heart and many neurons in the nervous system. Subunit composition determines the gating properties and cAMP sensitivity of native Ih currents. We investigated the functional properties of Ih in adult mouse cold thermoreceptor neurons from the trigeminal ganglion, identified by their high sensitivity to moderate cooling and responsiveness to menthol. All cultured cold-sensitive (CS) neurons expressed a fast activating Ih, which was fully blocked by extracellular Cs+ or ZD7288 and had biophysical properties consistent with those of heteromeric HCN1–HCN2 channels. In CS neurons from HCN1(−/−) animals, Ih was greatly reduced but not abolished. We find that Ih activity is not essential for the transduction of cold stimuli in CS neurons. Nevertheless, Ih has the potential to shape the excitability of CS neurons. First, Ih blockade caused a membrane hyperpolarization in CS neurons of about 5 mV. Furthermore, impedance power analysis showed that all CS neurons had a prominent subthreshold membrane resonance in the 5–7 Hz range, completely abolished upon blockade of Ih and absent in HCN1 null mice. This frequency range matches the spontaneous firing frequency of cold thermoreceptor terminals in vivo. Behavioural responses to cooling were reduced in HCN1 null mice and after peripheral pharmacological blockade of Ih with ZD7288, suggesting that Ih plays an important role in peripheral sensitivity to cold. PMID:19273581

  6. Dysfunctional HCN ion channels in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    DiFrancesco, Jacopo C; DiFrancesco, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are expressed as four different isoforms (HCN1-4) in the heart and in the central and peripheral nervous systems. HCN channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization at voltages close to resting membrane potentials and carry the hyperpolarization-activated current, dubbed If (funny current) in heart and Ih in neurons. HCN channels contribute in several ways to neuronal activity and are responsible for many important cellular functions, including cellular excitability, generation, and modulation of rhythmic activity, dendritic integration, transmission of synaptic potentials, and plasticity phenomena. Because of their role, defective HCN channels are natural candidates in the search for potential causes of neurological disorders in humans. Several data, including growing evidence that some forms of epilepsy are associated with HCN mutations, support the notion of an involvement of dysfunctional HCN channels in different experimental models of the disease. Additionally, some anti-epileptic drugs are known to modify the activity of the Ih current. HCN channels are widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and recent evidence has highlighted the importance of the HCN2 isoform in the transmission of pain. HCN channels are also present in the midbrain system, where they finely regulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, and a potential role of these channels in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease has recently emerged. The function of HCN channels is regulated by specific accessory proteins, which control the correct expression and modulation of the neuronal Ih current. Alteration of these proteins can severely interfere with the physiological channel function, potentially predisposing to pathological conditions. In this review we address the present knowledge of the association between HCN dysfunctions and neurological diseases, including clinical, genetic, and physiopathological

  7. DENSE MOLECULAR GAS EXCITATION IN NUCLEAR STARBURSTS AT HIGH REDSHIFT: HCN, HNC, AND HCO{sup +}(J = 6{yields}5) EMISSION IN THE z = 3.91 QUASAR HOST OF APM 08279+5255

    SciTech Connect

    Riechers, Dominik A.; Weiss, Axel; Walter, Fabian; Wagg, Jeff

    2010-12-10

    We report the detection of surprisingly strong HCN(J = 6{yields}5), HNC(J = 6{yields}5), and HCO{sup +}(J = 6{yields}5) emission in the host galaxy of the z = 3.91 quasar APM 08279+5255 through observations with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. HCN, HNC, and HCO{sup +} are typically used as star formation indicators, tracing dense molecular hydrogen gas [n(H{sub 2}) >10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}] within star-forming molecular clouds. However, the strength of their respective line emission in the J = 6{yields}5 transitions in APM 08279+5255 is extremely high, suggesting that they are excited by another mechanism besides collisions in the dense molecular gas phase alone. We derive J = 6{yields}5 line luminosities of L'{sub HCN} = (4.9 {+-} 0.6), L'{sub HNC} = (2.4 {+-} 0.7), and L{sup '}{sub HCO}{sup +}= (3.0{+-}0.6)x10{sup 10} {mu}{sup -1}{sub L} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2} (where {mu}{sub L} is the lensing magnification factor), corresponding to L' ratios of {approx}0.23-0.46 relative to CO(J = 1{yields}0). Such high line ratios would be unusual even in the respective ground-state (J = 1{yields}0) transitions, and indicate exceptional, collisionally and radiatively driven excitation conditions in the dense, star-forming molecular gas in APM 08279+5255. Through an expansion of our previous modeling of the HCN line excitation in this source, we show that the high rotational line fluxes are caused by substantial infrared pumping at moderate opacities in a {approx}220 K warm gas and dust component. This implies that standard M{sub dense}/L' conversion factors would substantially overpredict the dense molecular gas mass M{sub dense}. We also find a HCN(J = 6{yields}5)/HCN(J = 5{yields}4) L' ratio greater than 1 (1.36 {+-} 0.31)-however, our models show that the excitation is likely not 'super-thermal', but that the high line ratio is due to a rising optical depth between both transitions. These findings are consistent with the picture that the bulk of

  8. PECULIAR NEAR-NUCLEUS OUTGASSING OF COMET 17P/HOLMES DURING ITS 2007 OUTBURST

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Chunhua; Gurwell, Mark A.; Wilner, David J.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Jewitt, David

    2015-01-20

    We present high angular resolution Submillimeter Array observations of the outbursting Jupiter family comet 17P/Holmes on 2007 October 26-29, achieving a spatial resolution of 2.''5, or ∼3000 km at the comet distance. The observations resulted in detections of the rotational lines CO 3-2, HCN 4-3, H{sup 13}CN 4-3, CS 7-6, H{sub 2}CO 3{sub 1,} {sub 2}-2{sub 1,} {sub 1}, H{sub 2}S 2{sub 2,} {sub 0}-2{sub 1,} {sub 1}, and multiple CH{sub 3}OH lines, along with the associated dust continuum at 221 and 349 GHz. The continuum has a spectral index of 2.7 ± 0.3, slightly steeper than blackbody emission from large dust particles. From the imaging data, we identify two components in the molecular emission. One component is characterized by a relatively broad line width (∼1 km s{sup –1} FWHM) exhibiting a symmetric outgassing pattern with respect to the nucleus position. The second component has a narrower line width (<0.5 km s{sup –1} FWHM) with the line center redshifted by 0.1-0.2 km s{sup –1} (cometocentric frame), and shows a velocity shift across the nucleus position with the position angle gradually changing from 66° to 30° within the four days of observations. We determine distinctly different CO/HCN ratios for each of the components. For the broad-line component we find CO/HCN < 7, while in the narrow-line component, CO/HCN = 40 ± 5. We hypothesize that the narrow-line component originates from the ice grain halo found in near-nucleus photometry, believed to be created by sublimating recently released ice grains around the nucleus during the outburst. In this interpretation, the high CO/HCN ratio of this component reflects the more pristine volatile composition of nucleus material released in the outburst.

  9. SPATIALLY RESOLVING SUBSTRUCTURES WITHIN THE MASSIVE ENVELOPE AROUND AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS PROTOSTAR: MMS 6/OMC-3

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Saigo, Kazuya; Tomida, Kengo

    2012-06-10

    With the Submillimeter Array, the brightest (sub)millimeter continuum source in the Orion Molecular Cloud-2/3 region, MMS 6, has been observed in the 850 {mu}m continuum emission with approximately 10 times better angular resolution than previous studies ( Almost-Equal-To 0.''3, Almost-Equal-To 120 AU at Orion). The deconvolved size, the mass, and the column density of MMS 6-main are estimated to be 0.''32 Multiplication-Sign 0.''29 (132 AU Multiplication-Sign 120 AU), 0.29 M{sub Sun }, and 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} cm{sup -2}, respectively. The estimated extremely high mean number density, 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}, suggests that MMS 6-main is likely optically thick at 850 {mu}m. We compare our observational data with three theoretical core models: prestellar core, protostellar core + disk-like structure, and first adiabatic core. These comparisons clearly show that the observational data cannot be modeled as a simple prestellar core with a gas temperature of 20 K. A self-luminous source is necessary to explain the observed flux density in the (sub)millimeter wavelengths. Our recent detection of a very compact and energetic outflow in the CO (3-2) and HCN (4-3) lines supports the presence of a protostar. We suggest that MMS 6 is one of the first cases of an intermediate-mass protostellar core at an extremely young stage. In addition to the MMS 6-main peak, we have also spatially resolved a number of spiky structures and sub-clumps, distributed over the central 1000 AU. The masses of these sub-clumps are estimated to be 0.066-0.073 M{sub Sun }, which are on the order of brown dwarf masses. Higher angular resolution and higher sensitivity observations with ALMA and EVLA will reveal the origin and nature of these structures such as whether they are originated from fragmentations, spiral arms, or inhomogeneity within the disk-like structures/envelope.

  10. The Puzzle of HCN in Comets: Is it both a Product and a Primary Species?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Gibb, Erika L.; Magee-Sauer, Karen; Paganini, Lucas; Villanueva, Geronimo L.

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen cyanide has long been regarded as a primary volatile in comets, stemming from its presence in dense molecular cloud cores and its supposed storage in the cometary nucleus. Here, we examine the observational evidence for and against that hypothesis, and argue that HCN may also result from near-nucleus chemical reactions in the coma. The distinction (product vs. primary species) is important for multiple reasons: 1. HCN is often used as a proxy for water when the dominant species (H2O) is not available for simultaneous measurement, as at radio wavelengths. 2. HCN is one of the few volatile carriers of nitrogen accessible to remote sensing. If HCN is mainly a product species, its precursor becomes the more important metric for compiling a taxonomic classification based on nitrogen chemistry. 3. The stereoisomer HNC is now confirmed as a product species. Could reaction of a primary precursor (X-CN) with a hydrocarbon co-produce both HNC and HCN? 4. The production rate for CN greatly exceeds that of HCN in some comets, demonstrating the presence of another (more important) precursor of CN. Several puzzling lines of evidence raise issues about the origin of HCN: a. The production rates of HCN measured through rotational (radio) and vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy agree in some comets - in others the infrared rate exceeds the radio rate substantially. b. With its strong dipole moment and H-bonding character, HCN should be linked more strongly in the nuclear ice to other molecules with similar properties (H2O, CH3OH), but instead its spatial release in some comets seems strongly coupled to volatiles that lack a dipole moment and thus do not form H-bonds (methane, ethane). c. The nucleus-centered rotational temperatures measured for H2O and other species (C2H6, CH3OH) usually agree within error, but those for HCN are often slightly smaller. d. In comet ISON, ALMA maps of HCN and the dust continuum show a slight displacement 80 km) in the centroids. We will

  11. Luminescent imidazolium carboxylate supported aggregate and infinite coordination networks of copper and zinc.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Paladugu; Radhakrishnan, Soumya; Naga Babu, Chatla; Sathyanarayana, Arruri; Sampath, Natarajan; Prabusankar, Ganesan

    2013-08-14

    The new copper dimer [LCu(DMF)]2(NO3)4(H2O)(DMF)2 (4), where L = [{1,1'-(CH2)2-C14H8)-3,3'-(CH2CO2)2}{(HCN)2CH}], and porous coordination polymers [{L2Cu(OH2)2}2Br2]x (5) and [{L2Zn(OH2)2}2Br2]x (6) have been isolated from reactions of luminescent imidazolium carboxylate ligand, LH2Br2 (3) and the corresponding metal precursors. The reaction between Cu(NO3)2·3H2O and LH2Br2 (3) in DMF at 100 °C yielded bluish green crystals of tetracationic discrete copper dimer 4, the structure of which contains a rare tetracationic [(DMF)Cu(ii)]2 dimer unit that is bridged by four carboxylates of two L in a "paddle-wheel" structure. When the reaction was carried out in the presence of a water-ethanol-methanol mixture, light green crystals of 5 were obtained. Molecule 5 comprises two-dimensional (2D) porous coordination polymeric sheets consisting of unique symmetrical dinuclear [(C(O)O)Cu(OH2)2(O(O)C)2]2 building blocks, which are connected by imidazolium anthracene spacers. The infinite 2D porous coordination polymeric sheets are further linked by significant intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions by bromide anions to form a three-dimensional supramolecular framework. Interestingly, the reaction between zinc dust and LH2Br2 (3) in H2O at room temperature gave similar structural features to those in 5, though they differ in terms of C-O bond distances and M-O-C angles. The solution-state UV-visible absorption spectra of 2-6 in water exhibits the comparable absorption pattern with decrease in the intensity of absorption from 5, 4, 3, 6 and 2, while the solid-state UV-visible absorption spectra of 2-6 are significantly different from the solution-state UV-visible absorption spectra. The considerable change in the fluorescent emission was observed upon complexation of 3 with corresponding metal precursors and the fluorescent emission was shifted towards the red region in the order of 2, 3, 6, 4 and 5 in water.

  12. Deep-space glycine formation via Strecker-type reactions activated by ice water dust mantles. A computational approach.

    PubMed

    Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona; Ugliengo, Piero

    2010-01-01

    A Strecker-type synthesis of glycine by reacting NH(3), H(2)C=O and HCN in presence of ice water (H(2)O-ice) as a catalyst has been theoretically studied at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level within a cluster approach in order to mimic reactions occurring in the interstellar and circumstellar medium (ICM). Results indicate that, despite the exoergonic character of the considered reactions occurring at the H(2)O-ice surface, the kinetics are slow due to relatively high electronic energy barriers (ΔU(0)(≠)=15-45 kcal mol(-1)). Reactions occurring within H(2)O-ice cavities, in which ice bulk effects have been modeled by assuming a dielectric continuum (ε=78), show energy barriers low enough to allow NH(2)CH(2)OH formation but not NH=CH2 (ΔU(0)(≠)= 2 and 21 kcal mol(-1), respectively) thus hindering the NH(2)CH(2)CN formation, i.e. the precursor of glycine, through Strecker channels. Moreover, hydrolysis of NH(2)CH(2)CN to give glycine is characterized by high electronic energy barriers (ΔU(0)(≠)=27-34 kcal mol(-1)) and cannot readily occur at cryogenic temperatures. Nevertheless, the facts that NH=CH(2) formation can readily be achieved through the radical-radical HCN+2H - NH−−>CH2 reaction [D. E. Woon, Astrophys. J., 2002, 571, L177-L180], and that present results indicate that the Strecker step of NH=CH(2)+HCN−−>NH(2)CH(2)CN exhibits a relative low energy barrier (ΔU(0)(≠)=8–9 kcal mol(-1)), suggest that a combination of these two mechanisms allows for the formation of NH(2)CH(2)CN in the ICM. These results strengthen the thesis that NH(2)CH(2)CN could have been formed and protected by icy dust particles, and then delivered through micro-bombardments onto the early Earth, leading to glycine formation upon contact with the primordial ocean.

  13. Detection of CO and HCN in Pluto's atmosphere with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lellouch, E.; Gurwell, M.; Butler, B.; Fouchet, T.; Lavvas, P.; Strobel, D. F.; Sicardy, B.; Moullet, A.; Moreno, R.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Biver, N.; Young, L.; Lis, D.; Stansberry, J.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H.; Young, E.; Zhu, X.; Boissier, J.

    2017-04-01

    Observations of the Pluto-Charon system, acquired with the ALMA interferometer on June 12-13, 2015, have led to the detection of the CO(3-2) and HCN(4-3) rotational transitions from Pluto (including the hyperfine structure of HCN), providing a strong confirmation of the presence of CO, and the first observation of HCN in Pluto's atmosphere. The CO and HCN lines probe Pluto's atmosphere up to ∼450 km and ∼900 km altitude, respectively, with a large contribution due to limb emission. The CO detection yields (i) a much improved determination of the CO mole fraction, as 515 ± 40 ppm for a 12 μbar surface pressure (ii) strong constraints on Pluto's mean atmospheric dayside temperature profile over ∼50-400 km, with clear evidence for a well-marked temperature decrease (i.e., mesosphere) above the 30-50 km stratopause and a best-determined temperature of 70 ± 2 K at 300 km, somewhat lower than previously estimated from stellar occultations (81 ± 6 K), and in agreement with recent inferences from New Horizons / Alice solar occultation data. The HCN line shape implies a high abundance of this species in the upper atmosphere, with a mole fraction >1.5 × 10-5 above 450 km and a value of 4 × 10-5 near 800 km. Assuming HCN at saturation, this would require a warm (>92 K) upper atmosphere layer; while this is not ruled out by the CO emission, it is inconsistent with the Alice-measured CH4 and N2 line-of-sight column densities. Taken together, the large HCN abundance and the cold upper atmosphere imply supersaturation of HCN to a degree (7-8 orders of magnitude) hitherto unseen in planetary atmospheres, probably due to a lack of condensation nuclei above the haze region and the slow kinetics of condensation at the low pressure and temperature conditions of Pluto's upper atmosphere. HCN is also present in the bottom ∼100 km of the atmosphere, with a 10-8-10-7 mole fraction; this implies either HCN saturation or undersaturation there, depending on the precise

  14. NATURE OF W51e2: MASSIVE CORES AT DIFFERENT PHASES OF STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Hui; Han, J. L.; Zhao Junhui E-mail: hjl@nao.cas.c

    2010-02-10

    We present high-resolution continuum images of the W51e2 complex processed from archival data of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 0.85 and 1.3 mm and the Very Large Array at 7 and 13 mm. We also made line images and profiles of W51e2 for three hydrogen radio recombination lines (RRLs; H26alpha, H53alpha, and H66alpha) and absorption of two molecular lines of HCN(4-3) and CO(2-1). At least four distinct continuum components have been detected in the 3'' region of W51e2 from the SMA continuum images at 0.85 and 1.3 mm with resolutions of 0.''3 x 0.''2 and 1.''4 x 0.''7, respectively. The west component, W51e2-W, coincides with the ultracompact H II region reported from previous radio observations. The H26alpha line observation reveals an unresolved hyper-compact ionized core (<0.''06 or <310 AU) with a high electron temperature of 1.2 x 10{sup 4} K, with the corresponding emission measure EM>7 x 10{sup 10} pc cm{sup -6} and the electron density N{sub e} >7 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}. The inferred Lyman continuum flux implies that the H II region W51e2-W requires a newly formed massive star, an O8 star or a cluster of B-type stars, to maintain the ionization. W51e2-E, the brightest component at 0.85 mm, is located 0.''9 east from the hyper-compact ionized core. It has a total mass of {approx}140 M{sub sun} according to our spectral energy distribution analysis and a large infall rate of >1.3 x 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} inferred from the absorption of HCN. W51e2-E appears to be the accretion center in W51e2. Given the fact that no free-free emission and no RRLs have been detected, the massive core of W51e2-E appears to host one or more growing massive proto-stars. Located 2'' northwest from W51e2-E, W51e2-NW is detected in the continuum emission at 0.85 and 1.3 mm. No continuum emission has been detected at lambda>= 7 mm. Along with the maser activities previously observed, our analysis suggests that W51e2-NW is at an earlier phase of star formation. W51e2-N is

  15. Molecular line emission in NGC 1068 imaged with ALMA. I. An AGN-driven outflow in the dense molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Burillo, S.; Combes, F.; Usero, A.; Aalto, S.; Krips, M.; Viti, S.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hunt, L. K.; Schinnerer, E.; Baker, A. J.; Boone, F.; Casasola, V.; Colina, L.; Costagliola, F.; Eckart, A.; Fuente, A.; Henkel, C.; Labiano, A.; Martín, S.; Márquez, I.; Muller, S.; Planesas, P.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Spaans, M.; Tacconi, L. J.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We investigate the fueling and the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity in NGC 1068, a nearby (D = 14 Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy, by analyzing the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas in the disk. We aim to understand if and how gas accretion can self-regulate. Methods: We have used the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to map the emission of a set of dense molecular gas (n(H2) ≃ 105 - 6 cm-3) tracers (CO(3-2), CO(6-5), HCN(4-3), HCO+(4-3), and CS(7-6)) and their underlying continuum emission in the central r ~ 2 kpc of NGC 1068 with spatial resolutions ~0.3″ - 0.5″ (~20-35 pc for the assumed distance of D = 14 Mpc). Results: The sensitivity and spatial resolution of ALMA give an unprecedented detailed view of the distribution and kinematics of the dense molecular gas (n(H2) ≥ 105 - 6cm-3) in NGC 1068. Molecular line and dust continuum emissions are detected from a r ~ 200 pc off-centered circumnuclear disk (CND), from the 2.6 kpc-diameter bar region, and from the r ~ 1.3 kpc starburst (SB) ring. Most of the emission in HCO+, HCN, and CS stems from the CND. Molecular line ratios show dramatic order-of-magnitude changes inside the CND that are correlated with the UV/X-ray illumination by the active galactic nucleus (AGN), betraying ongoing feedback. We used the dust continuum fluxes measured by ALMA together with NIR/MIR data to constrain the properties of the putative torus using CLUMPY models and found a torus radius of 20+6-10pc. The Fourier decomposition of the gas velocity field indicates that rotation is perturbed by an inward radial flow in the SB ring and the bar region. However, the gas kinematics from r ~ 50 pc out to r ~ 400 pc reveal a massive (Mmol~ 2.7+0.9-1.2 × 107 M⊙) outflow in all molecular tracers. The tight correlation between the ionized gas outflow, the radio jet, and the occurrence of outward motions in the disk suggests that the outflow is AGN driven. Conclusions: The molecular outflow is likely

  16. Nitrogen isotopic fractionation during plasma synthesis of Titan's aerosols analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuga, M.; Carrasco, N.; Marty, B.; Marrocchi, Y.; Bernard, S.; Rigaudier, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission recently provided measurements of the abundance of nitrogen isotopes in Titan's atmosphere. The 14N/15N ratio in the two most abundant N-bearing molecules in Titan's atmosphere was found to be 183×5 for N2 [1] and 56×8 for HCN [2]. Those two molecules are greatly enriched in the heavier isotope 15N compared to our terrestrial atmosphere and Titan's HCN is about three times richer in 15N than its potential photochemical precursor N2. This implies an important fractionation process in the HCN production chain, which is tentatively attributed to an isotopic selectivity of the photodissociation of N2 in Titan's ionosphere [3-4]. The organic aerosols, forming the Titan's orange characteristic haze layers, also contain large amounts of nitrogen [5], and thus represent a third important nitrogen reservoir in Titan's atmosphere. These organic aerosols are presumably produced in the upper atmosphere by chemical reactions between N2 and CH4 induced by solar radiation and electron bombardment from Saturn's magnetosphere. As HCN is a possible precursor for aerosol polymerization [6-7], the 15N enrichment observed in HCN may be linked to the polymerization process. Unfortunately, no data exists on the isotopic nitrogen abundance in Titan's aerosols, and this question remains open. To address this issue, laboratory aerosols analogues have been produced in a N2-CH4 plasma and their nitrogen isotopic composition have been investigated. In this study, the experimental aerosols, called " tholins ", have been synthetized in the PAMPRE reactor (LATMOS, France). This setup is dedicated to simulate chemical processes occurring in Titan's atmosphere and consists in an RF plasma discharge initiated in a N2-CH4 gas mixture at room temperature [8-9]. For our purpose, tholins were produced at different initial CH4 percentages (1, 2, 5, 10%), representative of the variation of the CH4 concentration in Titan's atmosphere. 15N/14N ratio of the N2 gas used in the

  17. Mechanistic Studies of Planetary Haze Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Raea Kay

    2015-10-01

    Planetary atmospheres can be thought of as global-scale reactors capable of synthesizing large, complex molecules from small gases such as methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and nitrogen (N2). The atmosphere of Titan, the largest moon of Saturn covered by a thick organic haze, contains trace amounts (2%) of CH4 in an atmosphere of N2 at a surface pressure of 1.5 bar. This is similar to the Earth's Archaean atmosphere, which possibly contained trace amounts of CH4 and CO2 (˜1,000 ppmv each) in an N2 -dominant atmosphere before the rise of biogenic oxygen. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric chemistry on Titan and the early Earth have shown that these atmospheres are capable of generating biologically-relevant molecules that condense to form particles which can then settle to the surface of the planetary body, possibly providing the molecules required for the emergence of life. The work presented here examines the mechanisms by which FUV photochemistry initiates incorporation of N atoms into Titan aerosol analogs, and C atoms into early Earth aerosol analogs. Results from the Aerosol Collector and Pyrolyser onboard the Huygens lander reveal the presence of nitrogen in Titan's aerosols. This nitrogen incorporation is thought to occur primarily by extreme-UV photons or energetic electrons. However, recent results from our laboratory indicate a surprising amount of nitrogen incorporation- up to 16% by mass- in Titan aerosol analogs produced by photochemistry initiated by FUV irradiation of CH4/N 2 mixtures. The termolecular reaction CH+N2 +M → HCN2 has been proposed to account for this observation. Here, we test this hypothesis by using a high- resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) to measure the mass loading and chemical composition of aerosol produced at a range of pressures from roughly 0.1 to 1 atm. We report a 10-fold increase in aerosol mass loading across the range of pressures studied, indicating that the mechanism

  18. Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE): emissions of trace gases and light-absorbing carbon from wood and dung cooking fires, garbage and crop residue burning, brick kilns, and other sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockwell, Chelsea E.; Christian, Ted J.; Goetz, J. Douglas; Jayarathne, Thilina; Bhave, Prakash V.; Praveen, Puppala S.; Adhikari, Sagar; Maharjan, Rashmi; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Saikawa, Eri; Blake, Donald R.; Simpson, Isobel J.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Panday, Arnico K.

    2016-09-01

    The Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE) campaign took place in and around the Kathmandu Valley and in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) of southern Nepal during April 2015. The source characterization phase targeted numerous important but undersampled (and often inefficient) combustion sources that are widespread in the developing world such as cooking with a variety of stoves and solid fuels, brick kilns, open burning of municipal solid waste (a.k.a. trash or garbage burning), crop residue burning, generators, irrigation pumps, and motorcycles. NAMaSTE produced the first, or rare, measurements of aerosol optical properties, aerosol mass, and detailed trace gas chemistry for the emissions from many of the sources. This paper reports the trace gas and aerosol measurements obtained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, whole-air sampling (WAS), and photoacoustic extinctiometers (PAX; 405 and 870 nm) based on field work with a moveable lab sampling authentic sources. The primary aerosol optical properties reported include emission factors (EFs) for scattering and absorption coefficients (EF Bscat, EF Babs, in m2 kg-1 fuel burned), single scattering albedos (SSAs), and absorption Ångström exponents (AAEs). From these data we estimate black and brown carbon (BC, BrC) emission factors (g kg-1 fuel burned). The trace gas measurements provide EFs (g kg-1) for CO2, CO, CH4, selected non-methane hydrocarbons up to C10, a large suite of oxygenated organic compounds, NH3, HCN, NOx, SO2, HCl, HF, etc. (up to ˜ 80 gases in all). The emissions varied significantly by source, and light absorption by both BrC and BC was important for many sources. The AAE for dung-fuel cooking fires (4.63 ± 0.68) was significantly higher than for wood-fuel cooking fires (3.01 ± 0.10). Dung-fuel cooking fires also emitted high levels of NH3 (3.00 ± 1.33 g kg-1), organic acids (7.66 ± 6.90 g kg-1), and HCN (2.01 ± 1.25 g kg-1), where the latter could