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Sample records for hdhq150 knock-in mouse

  1. Correlations of Behavioral Deficits with Brain Pathology Assessed through Longitudinal MRI and Histopathology in the HdhQ150/Q150 Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rattray, Ivan; Smith, Edward J.; Crum, William R.; Walker, Thomas A.; Gale, Richard; Bates, Gillian P.

    2017-01-01

    A variety of mouse models have been developed that express mutant huntingtin (mHTT) leading to aggregates and inclusions that model the molecular pathology observed in Huntington’s disease. Here we show that although homozygous HdhQ150 knock-in mice developed motor impairments (rotarod, locomotor activity, grip strength) by 36 weeks of age, cognitive dysfunction (swimming T maze, fear conditioning, odor discrimination, social interaction) was not evident by 94 weeks. Concomitant to behavioral assessments, T2-weighted MRI volume measurements indicated a slower striatal growth with a significant difference between wild type (WT) and HdhQ150 mice being present even at 15 weeks. Indeed, MRI indicated significant volumetric changes prior to the emergence of the “clinical horizon” of motor impairments at 36 weeks of age. A striatal decrease of 27% was observed over 94 weeks with cortex (12%) and hippocampus (21%) also indicating significant atrophy. A hypothesis-free analysis using tensor-based morphometry highlighted further regions undergoing atrophy by contrasting brain growth and regional neurodegeneration. Histology revealed the widespread presence of mHTT aggregates and cellular inclusions. However, there was little evidence of correlations between these outcome measures, potentially indicating that other factors are important in the causal cascade linking the molecular pathology to the emergence of behavioral impairments. In conclusion, the HdhQ150 mouse model replicates many aspects of the human condition, including an extended pre-manifest period prior to the emergence of motor impairments. PMID:28099507

  2. Mitochondrial targeting of XJB-5-131 attenuates or improves pathophysiology in HdhQ150 animals with well-developed disease phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Polyzos, Aris; Holt, Amy; Brown, Christopher; Cosme, Celica; Wipf, Peter; Gomez-Marin, Alex; Castro, Maríadel R; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; McMurray, Cynthia T

    2016-05-01

    Oxidative damage to mitochondria (MT) is a major mechanism for aging and neurodegeneration. We have developed a novel synthetic antioxidant, XJB-5-131, which directly targets MT, the primary site and primary target of oxidative damage. XJB-5-131 prevents the onset of motor decline in an HdhQ(150/150) mouse model for Huntington's disease (HD) if treatment starts early. Here, we report that XJB-5-131 attenuates or reverses disease progression if treatment occurs after disease onset. In animals with well-developed pathology, XJB-5-131 promotes weight gain, prevents neuronal death, reduces oxidative damage in neurons, suppresses the decline of motor performance or improves it, and reduces a graying phenotype in treated HdhQ(150/150) animals relative to matched littermate controls. XJB-5-131 holds promise as a clinical candidate for the treatment of HD.

  3. A knock-in mouse model of congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    PubMed

    Ged, C; Mendez, M; Robert, E; Lalanne, M; Lamrissi-Garcia, I; Costet, P; Daniel, J Y; Dubus, P; Mazurier, F; Moreau-Gaudry, F; de Verneuil, H

    2006-01-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is a recessive autosomal disorder characterized by a deficiency in uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS), the fourth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway. The severity of the disease, the lack of specific treatment except for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, and the knowledge of the molecular lesions are strong arguments for gene therapy. An animal model of CEP has been designed to evaluate the feasibility of retroviral gene transfer in hematopoietic stem cells. We have previously demonstrated that the knockout of the Uros gene is lethal in mice (Uros(del) model). This work describes the achievement of a knock-in model, which reproduces a mutation of the UROS gene responsible for a severe UROS deficiency in humans (P248Q missense mutant). Homozygous mice display erythrodontia, moderate photosensitivity, hepatosplenomegaly, and hemolytic anemia. Uroporphyrin (99% type I isomer) accumulates in urine. Total porphyrins are increased in erythrocytes and feces, while Uros enzymatic activity is below 1% of the normal level in the different tissues analyzed. These pathological findings closely mimic the CEP disease in humans and demonstrate that the Uros(mut248) mouse represents a suitable model of the human disease for pathophysiological, pharmaceutical, and therapeutic purposes.

  4. Characterization of a knock-in mouse model of the homozygous p.V37I variant in Gjb2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Hu, Lingxiang; Wang, Xueling; Sun, Changling; Lin, Xin; li, Lei; Mei, Ling; Huang, Zhiwu; Yang, Tao; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The homozygous p.V37I variant in GJB2 is prevalent in East and Southeast Asians and may lead to mild-to-moderate hearing loss with reduced penetrance. To investigate the pathogenic mechanism underlying this variant, we generated a knock-in mouse model of homozygous p.V37I by an embryonic stem cell gene targeting method. Auditory brainstem response test showed that the knock-in mice developed progressive, mild-to-moderate hearing loss over the first 4–9 months. Overall no significant developmental and morphological abnormality was observed in the knock-in mouse cochlea, while confocal immunostaining and electron microscopic scanning revealed minor loss of the outer hair cells. Gene expression microarray analysis identified 105 up-regulated and 43 down-regulated genes in P5 knock-in mouse cochleae (P < 0.05 adjusted by the Benjamini & Hochberg method), among which four top candidate genes with the highest fold-changes or implication to deafness Fcer1g, Nnmt and Lars2 and Cuedc1 were verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Our study demonstrated that the homozygous p.V37I knock-in mouse modeled the hearing phenotype of the human patients and can serve as a useful animal model for further studies. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study may shed new insights into the understanding of the pathogenic mechanism and the phenotypic modification of homozygous p.V37I. PMID:27623246

  5. Generation of a tamoxifen inducible Tnnt2MerCreMer knock-in mouse model for cardiac studies.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jianyun; Sultana, Nishat; Zhang, Lu; Park, David S; Shekhar, Akshay; Hu, Jun; Bu, Lei; Cai, Chen-Leng

    2015-06-01

    Tnnt2, encoding thin-filament sarcomeric protein cardiac troponin T, plays critical roles in heart development and function in mammals. To develop an inducible genetic deletion strategy in myocardial cells, we generated a new Tnnt2:MerCreMer (Tnnt2(MerCreMer/+)) knock-in mouse. Rosa26 reporter lines were used to examine the specificity and efficiency of the inducible Cre recombinase. We found that Cre was specifically and robustly expressed in the cardiomyocytes at embryonic and adult stages following tamoxifen induction. The knock-in allele on Tnnt2 locus does not impact cardiac function. These results suggest that this new Tnnt2(MerCreMer/+) mouse could be applied towards the temporal genetic deletion of genes of interests in cardiomyocytes with Cre-LoxP technology. The Tnnt2(MerCreMer/+) mouse model also provides a useful tool to trace myocardial lineage during development and repair after cardiac injury.

  6. Generation of an estrogen receptor beta-iCre knock-in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Cacioppo, Joseph A; Koo, Yongbum; Patrick Lin, Po-Ching; Osmulski, Sarah A; Ko, Chunjoo D; Ko, CheMyong

    2015-01-01

    A novel knock-in mouse that expresses codon-improved Cre recombinase (iCre) under regulation of the estrogen receptor beta (Esr2) promoter was developed for conditional deletion of genes and for the spatial and/or temporal localization of Esr2 expression. ESR2 is one of two classical nuclear estrogen receptors and displays a spatio-temporal expression pattern and functions that are different from the other estrogen receptor, ESR1. A cassette was constructed that contained iCre, a polyadenylation sequence, and a neomycin selection marker. This construct was used to insert iCre in front of the endogenous start codon of the Esr2 gene of a C57BL/6J embryonic stem cell line via homologous recombination. Resulting Esr2-iCre mice were bred with ROSA26-lacZ and Ai9-RFP reporter mice to visualize cells of functional iCre expression. Strong expression was observed in the ovary, the pituitary, the interstitium of the testes, the head and tail but not body of the epididymis, skeletal muscle, the coagulation gland (anterior prostate), the lung, and the preputial gland. Additional diffuse or patchy expression was observed in the cerebrum, the hypothalamus, the heart, the adrenal gland, the colon, the bladder, and the pads of the paws. Overall, Esr2-iCre mice will serve as a novel line for conditionally ablating genes in Esr2-expressing tissues, identifying novel Esr2-expressing cells, and differentiating the functions of ESR2 and ESR1. PMID:26663382

  7. Systematic behavioral evaluation of Huntington’s disease transgenic and knock-in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Menalled, Liliana; El-Khodor, Bassem F.; Patry, Monica; Suarez-Farinas, Mayte; Orenstein, Samantha; Zahasky, Benjamin; Leahy, Christina; Wheeler, Vanessa; Yang, X. William; MacDonald, Marcy; Morton, Jennifer A.; Bates, Gill; Leeds, Janet; Park, Larry; Howland, David; Signer, Ethan; Tobin, Allan; Brunner, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is one of the few neurodegenerative diseases with a known genetic cause, knowledge that has enabled the creation of animal models using genetic manipulations that aim to recapitulate HD pathology. The study of behavioral and neuropathological phenotypes of these HD models, however, has been plagued by inconsistent results across laboratories stemming from the lack of standardized husbandry and testing conditions, in addition to the intrinsic differences between the models. We have compared different HD models using standardized conditions to identify the most robust phenotypic differences, best suited for preclinical therapeutic efficacy studies. With a battery of tests of sensory-motor function, such as the open field and prepulse inhibition tests, we replicate previous results showing a strong and progressive behavioral deficit in the R6/2 line with an average of 129 CAG repeats in a mixed CBA/J and C57BL/6J background. We present the first behavioral characterization of a new model, an R6/2 line with an average of 248 CAG repeats in a pure C57BL/6J background, which also showed a progressive and robust phenotype. The BACHD in a FVB/N background showed robust and progressive behavioral phenotype, while the YAC128 full-length model on either an FVB/N or a C57BL/6J background generally showed milder deficits. Finally, the HdhQ111 knock-in mouse on a CD1 background showed very mild deficits. This first extensive standardized cross-characterization of several HD animal models under standardized conditions highlights several behavioral outcomes, such as hypoactivity, amenable to standardized preclinical therapeutic drug screening. PMID:19464370

  8. A new knock-in mouse model of l-DOPA-responsive dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Samuel J.; Yu, Xin Y.; Heinzer, Ann K.; Harrast, Porter; Fan, Xueliang; Raike, Robert S.; Thompson, Valerie B.; Pare, Jean-Francois; Weinshenker, David; Smith, Yoland; Jinnah, Hyder A.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal dopamine neurotransmission is associated with many different genetic and acquired dystonic disorders. For instance, mutations in genes critical for the synthesis of dopamine, including GCH1 and TH cause l-DOPA-responsive dystonia. Despite evidence that implicates abnormal dopamine neurotransmission in dystonia, the precise nature of the pre- and postsynaptic defects that result in dystonia are not known. To better understand these defects, we generated a knock-in mouse model of l-DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD) mice that recapitulates the human p.381Q>K TH mutation (c.1141C>A). Mice homozygous for this mutation displayed the core features of the human disorder, including reduced TH activity, dystonia that worsened throughout the course of the active phase, and improvement in the dystonia in response to both l-DOPA and trihexyphenidyl. Although the gross anatomy of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons was normal in DRD mice, the microstructure of striatal synapses was affected whereby the ratio of axo-spinous to axo-dendritic corticostriatal synaptic contacts was reduced. Microinjection of l-DOPA directly into the striatum ameliorated the dystonic movements but cerebellar microinjections of l-DOPA had no effect. Surprisingly, the striatal dopamine concentration was reduced to ∼1% of normal, a concentration more typically associated with akinesia, suggesting that (mal)adaptive postsynaptic responses may also play a role in the development of dystonia. Administration of D1- or D2-like dopamine receptor agonists to enhance dopamine signalling reduced the dystonic movements, whereas administration of D1- or D2-like dopamine receptor antagonists to further reduce dopamine signalling worsened the dystonia, suggesting that both receptors mediate the abnormal movements. Further, D1-dopamine receptors were supersensitive; adenylate cyclase activity, locomotor activity and stereotypy were exaggerated in DRD mice in response to the D1-dopamine receptor agonist SKF

  9. Characterisation of a C1qtnf5 Ser163Arg knock-in mouse model of late-onset retinal macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xinhua; Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Aleman, Tomas S; Barker, Susan E; Lennon, Alan; Tulloch, Brian; Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping; Jacobson, Samuel G; Ali, Robin; Wright, Alan F

    2011-01-01

    A single founder mutation resulting in a Ser163Arg substitution in the C1QTNF5 gene product causes autosomal dominant late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORMD) in humans, which has clinical and pathological features resembling age-related macular degeneration. We generated and characterised a mouse "knock-in" model carrying the Ser163Arg mutation in the orthologous murine C1qtnf5 gene by site-directed mutagenesis and homologous recombination into mouse embryonic stem cells. Biochemical, immunological, electron microscopic, fundus autofluorescence, electroretinography and laser photocoagulation analyses were used to characterise the mouse model. Heterozygous and homozygous knock-in mice showed no significant abnormality in any of the above measures at time points up to 2 years. This result contrasts with another C1qtnf5 Ser163Arg knock-in mouse which showed most of the features of L-ORMD but differed in genetic background and targeting construct.

  10. Brain catecholamine depletion and motor impairment in a Th knock-in mouse with type B tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Korner, Germaine; Noain, Daniela; Ying, Ming; Hole, Magnus; Flydal, Marte I; Scherer, Tanja; Allegri, Gabriella; Rassi, Anahita; Fingerhut, Ralph; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia; Pillai, Samyuktha; Wueest, Stephan; Konrad, Daniel; Lauber-Biason, Anna; Baumann, Christian R; Bindoff, Laurence A; Martinez, Aurora; Thöny, Beat

    2015-10-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase catalyses the hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to l-DOPA, the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of catecholamines. Mutations in the TH gene encoding tyrosine hydroxylase are associated with the autosomal recessive disorder tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency, which manifests phenotypes varying from infantile parkinsonism and DOPA-responsive dystonia, also termed type A, to complex encephalopathy with perinatal onset, termed type B. We generated homozygous Th knock-in mice with the mutation Th-p.R203H, equivalent to the most recurrent human mutation associated with type B tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency (TH-p.R233H), often unresponsive to l-DOPA treatment. The Th knock-in mice showed normal survival and food intake, but hypotension, hypokinesia, reduced motor coordination, wide-based gate and catalepsy. This phenotype was associated with a gradual loss of central catecholamines and the serious manifestations of motor impairment presented diurnal fluctuation but did not improve with standard l-DOPA treatment. The mutant tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme was unstable and exhibited deficient stabilization by catecholamines, leading to decline of brain tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactivity in the Th knock-in mice. In fact the substantia nigra presented an almost normal level of mutant tyrosine hydroxylase protein but distinct absence of the enzyme was observed in the striatum, indicating a mutation-associated mislocalization of tyrosine hydroxylase in the nigrostriatal pathway. This hypomorphic mouse model thus provides understanding on pathomechanisms in type B tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency and a platform for the evaluation of novel therapeutics for movement disorders with loss of dopaminergic input to the striatum.

  11. VE-cadherin Y685F knock-in mouse is sensitive to vascular permeability in recurrent angiogenic organs.

    PubMed

    Sidibé, Adama; Polena, Helena; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Razanajatovo, Jeremy; Mannic, Tiphaine; Chaumontel, Nicolas; Bama, Soumalamaya; Maréchal, Irène; Huber, Philippe; Gulino-Debrac, Danielle; Bouillet, Laurence; Vilgrain, Isabelle

    2014-08-01

    Covalent modifications such as tyrosine phosphorylation are associated with the breakdown of endothelial cell junctions and increased vascular permeability. We previously showed that vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin was tyrosine phosphorylated in vivo in the mouse reproductive tract and that Y685 was a target site for Src in response to vascular endothelial growth factor in vitro. In the present study, we aimed to understand the implication of VE-cadherin phosphorylation at site Y685 in cyclic angiogenic organs. To achieve this aim, we generated a knock-in mouse carrying a tyrosine-to-phenylalanine point mutation of VE-cadherin Y685 (VE-Y685F). Although homozygous VE-Y685F mice were viable and fertile, the nulliparous knock-in female mice exhibited enlarged uteri with edema. This phenotype was observed in 30% of females between 4 to 14 mo old. Histological examination of longitudinal sections of the VE-Y685F uterus showed an extensive disorganization of myometrium and endometrium with highly edematous uterine glands, numerous areas with sparse cells, and increased accumulation of collagen fibers around blood vessels, indicating a fibrotic state. Analysis of cross section of ovaries showed the appearance of spontaneous cysts, which suggested increased vascular hyperpermeability. Electron microscopy analysis of capillaries in the ovary showed a slight but significant increase in the gap size between two adjacent endothelial cell membranes in the junctions of VE-Y685F mice (wild-type, 11.5 ± 0.3, n = 78; and VE-Y685F, 12.48 ± 0.3, n = 65; P = 0.045), as well as collagen fiber accumulation around capillaries. Miles assay revealed that either basal or vascular endothelial growth factor-stimulated permeability in the skin was increased in VE-Y685F mice. Since edema and fibrotic appearance have been identified as hallmarks of initial increased vascular permeability, we conclude that the site Y685 in VE-cadherin is involved in the physiological regulation of capillary

  12. Visualization and Quantification of Browning Using a Ucp1-2A-Luciferase Knock-in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Mao, Liufeng; Nie, Baoming; Nie, Tao; Hui, Xiaoyan; Gao, Xuefei; Lin, Xiaoliang; Liu, Xin; Xu, Yong; Tang, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Ran; Li, Kuai; Li, Peng; Ding, Ke; Wang, Yu; Xu, Aimin; Fei, Jian; Han, Weiping; Liu, Pentao; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Zhou, Zhiguang; Ding, Sheng; Wu, Donghai

    2017-02-01

    Both mammals and adult humans possess classic brown adipocytes and beige adipocytes, and the amount and activity of these adipocytes are considered key factors in combating obesity and its associated metabolic diseases. Uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) is the functional marker of both brown and beige adipocytes. To facilitate a reliable, easy, and sensitive measurement of Ucp1 expression both in vivo and in vitro, we generated a Ucp1-2A-luciferase knock-in mouse by deleting the stop codon for the mouse Ucp1 gene and replacing it with a 2A peptide. This peptide was followed by the luciferase coding sequence to recapitulate the expression of the Ucp1 gene at the transcriptional and translational levels. With this mouse, we discovered a cold-sensitive brown/beige adipose depot underneath the skin of the ears, which we named uBAT. Because of the sensitivity and high dynamic range of luciferase activity, the Ucp1-2A-luciferase mouse is useful for both in vitro quantitative determination and in vivo visualization of nonshivering thermogenesis. With the use of this model, we identified and characterized axitinib, an oral small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as an effective browning agent.

  13. Hsp90 inhibitor partially corrects nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a conditional knock-in mouse model of aquaporin-2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baoxue; Zhao, Dan; Verkman, A S

    2009-02-01

    Mutations in aquaporin-2 (AQP2) that interfere with its cellular processing can produce autosomal recessive nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Prior gene knock-in of the human NDI-causing AQP2 mutation T126M produced mutant mice that died by age 7 days. Here, we used a novel "conditional gene knock-in" strategy to generate adult, AQP2-T126M mutant mice. Mice separately heterozygous for floxed wild-type AQP2 and AQP2-T126M were bred to produce hemizygous mice, which following excision of the wild-type AQP2 gene by tamoxifen-induced Cre-recombinase gave AQP2(T126M/-) mice. AQP2(T126M/-) mice were polyuric (9-14 ml urine/day) compared to AQP2(+/+) mice (1.6 ml/day) and had reduced urine osmolality (400 vs. 1800 mosmol). Kidneys of AQP2(T126M/-) mice expressed core-glycosylated AQP2-T126M protein in an endoplasmic reticulum pattern. Screening of candidate protein folding "correctors" in AQP2-T126M-transfected kidney cells showed increased AQP2-T126M plasma membrane expression with the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG). 17-AAG increased urine osmolality in AQP2(T126M/-) mice by >300 mosmol but had no effect in AQP2(-/-) mice. Kidneys of 17-AAG-treated AQP2(T126M/-) mice showed partial rescue of defective AQP2-T126M cellular processing. Our results establish an adult mouse model of NDI and demonstrate partial restoration of urinary concentration function by a compound currently in clinical trials for other indications.

  14. A CTRP5 gene S163R mutation knock-in mouse model for late-onset retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Venkata R M; Khan, Naheed W; Cukras, Catherine A; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Jablonski, Monica M; Ayyagari, Radha

    2011-05-15

    Late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORD) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder caused by a single missense mutation (S163R) in the CTRP5/C1QTNF5 protein. Early phenotypic features of L-ORD include: dark adaptation abnormalities, nyctalopia, and drusen deposits in the peripheral macular region. Apart from posterior segment abnormalities, these patients also develop abnormally long anterior lens zonules. In the sixth decade of life the rod and cone function declines, accompanied by electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. Some patients also develop choroidal neovascularization and glaucoma. In order to understand the disease pathology and mechanisms involved in retinal dystrophy, we generated a knock-in (Ctrp5(+/-)) mouse model carrying the disease-associated mutation in the mouse Ctrp5/C1QTNF5 gene. These mice develop slower rod-b wave recovery consistent with early dark adaptation abnormalities, accumulation of hyperautofluorescence spots, retinal pigment epithelium abnormalities, drusen, Bruch's membrane abnormalities, loss of photoreceptors, and retinal vascular leakage. The Ctrp5(+/-) mice, which have most of the pathological features of age-related macular degeneration, are unique and may serve as a valuable model both to understand the molecular pathology of late-onset retinal degeneration and to evaluate therapies.

  15. A CTRP5 gene S163R mutation knock-in mouse model for late-onset retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chavali, Venkata R.M.; Khan, Naheed W.; Cukras, Catherine A.; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Jablonski, Monica M.; Ayyagari, Radha

    2011-01-01

    Late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORD) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder caused by a single missense mutation (S163R) in the CTRP5/C1QTNF5 protein. Early phenotypic features of L-ORD include: dark adaptation abnormalities, nyctalopia, and drusen deposits in the peripheral macular region. Apart from posterior segment abnormalities, these patients also develop abnormally long anterior lens zonules. In the sixth decade of life the rod and cone function declines, accompanied by electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities. Some patients also develop choroidal neovascularization and glaucoma. In order to understand the disease pathology and mechanisms involved in retinal dystrophy, we generated a knock-in (Ctrp5+/−) mouse model carrying the disease-associated mutation in the mouse Ctrp5/C1QTNF5 gene. These mice develop slower rod-b wave recovery consistent with early dark adaptation abnormalities, accumulation of hyperautofluorescence spots, retinal pigment epithelium abnormalities, drusen, Bruch's membrane abnormalities, loss of photoreceptors, and retinal vascular leakage. The Ctrp5+/−mice, which have most of the pathological features of age-related macular degeneration, are unique and may serve as a valuable model both to understand the molecular pathology of late-onset retinal degeneration and to evaluate therapies. PMID:21349921

  16. Characterisation of a C1qtnf5 Ser163Arg Knock-In Mouse Model of Late-Onset Retinal Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xinhua; Luhmann, Ulrich F. O.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Barker, Susan E.; Lennon, Alan; Tulloch, Brian; Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Ali, Robin; Wright, Alan F.

    2011-01-01

    A single founder mutation resulting in a Ser163Arg substitution in the C1QTNF5 gene product causes autosomal dominant late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORMD) in humans, which has clinical and pathological features resembling age-related macular degeneration. We generated and characterised a mouse “knock-in” model carrying the Ser163Arg mutation in the orthologous murine C1qtnf5 gene by site-directed mutagenesis and homologous recombination into mouse embryonic stem cells. Biochemical, immunological, electron microscopic, fundus autofluorescence, electroretinography and laser photocoagulation analyses were used to characterise the mouse model. Heterozygous and homozygous knock-in mice showed no significant abnormality in any of the above measures at time points up to 2 years. This result contrasts with another C1qtnf5 Ser163Arg knock-in mouse which showed most of the features of L-ORMD but differed in genetic background and targeting construct. PMID:22110650

  17. Knock-in human FGFR3 achondroplasia mutation as a mouse model for human skeletal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Ching; Song, I-Wen; Pai, Ya-Ju; Chen, Sheng-De; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2017-02-23

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common genetic dwarfism in human, is caused by a gain-of function mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). Currently, there is no effective treatment for ACH. The development of an appropriate human-relevant model is important for testing potential therapeutic interventions before human clinical trials. Here, we have generated an ACH mouse model in which the endogenous mouse Fgfr3 gene was replaced with human FGFR3(G380R) (FGFR3(ACH)) cDNA, the most common mutation in human ACH. Heterozygous (FGFR3(ACH/+)) and homozygous (FGFR3(ACH/ACH)) mice expressing human FGFR3(G380R) recapitulate the phenotypes observed in ACH patients, including growth retardation, disproportionate shortening of the limbs, round head, mid-face hypoplasia at birth, and kyphosis progression during postnatal development. We also observed premature fusion of the cranial sutures and low bone density in newborn FGFR3(G380R) mice. The severity of the disease phenotypes corresponds to the copy number of activated FGFR3(G380R), and the phenotypes become more pronounced during postnatal skeletal development. This mouse model offers a tool for assessing potential therapeutic approaches for skeletal dysplasias related to over-activation of human FGFR3, and for further studies of the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  18. Knock-in human FGFR3 achondroplasia mutation as a mouse model for human skeletal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Ching; Song, I-Wen; Pai, Ya-Ju; Chen, Sheng-De; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2017-01-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common genetic dwarfism in human, is caused by a gain-of function mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). Currently, there is no effective treatment for ACH. The development of an appropriate human-relevant model is important for testing potential therapeutic interventions before human clinical trials. Here, we have generated an ACH mouse model in which the endogenous mouse Fgfr3 gene was replaced with human FGFR3G380R (FGFR3ACH) cDNA, the most common mutation in human ACH. Heterozygous (FGFR3ACH/+) and homozygous (FGFR3ACH/ACH) mice expressing human FGFR3G380R recapitulate the phenotypes observed in ACH patients, including growth retardation, disproportionate shortening of the limbs, round head, mid-face hypoplasia at birth, and kyphosis progression during postnatal development. We also observed premature fusion of the cranial sutures and low bone density in newborn FGFR3G380R mice. The severity of the disease phenotypes corresponds to the copy number of activated FGFR3G380R, and the phenotypes become more pronounced during postnatal skeletal development. This mouse model offers a tool for assessing potential therapeutic approaches for skeletal dysplasias related to over-activation of human FGFR3, and for further studies of the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:28230213

  19. Generation of a Tlx1(CreER-Venus) knock-in mouse strain for the study of spleen development.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Ryo; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Oda, Akihisa; Nishimura, Miyuki; Murakami, Akikazu; Azuma, Takachika; Kaifu, Tomonori; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2014-11-01

    The spleen is a lymphoid organ that serves as a unique niche for immune reactions, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and the removal of aged erythrocytes from the circulation. While much is known about the immunological functions of the spleen, the mechanisms governing the development and organization of its stromal microenvironment remain poorly understood. Here we report the generation and analysis of a Tlx1(Cre) (ER) (-Venus) knock-in mouse strain engineered to simultaneously express tamoxifen-inducible CreER(T2) and Venus fluorescent protein under the control of regulatory elements of the Tlx1 gene, which encodes a transcription factor essential for spleen development. We demonstrated that Venus as well as CreER expression recapitulates endogenous Tlx1 transcription within the spleen microenvironment. When Tlx1(Cre) (ER) (-Venus) mice were crossed with the Cre-inducible reporter strain, Tlx1-expressing cells as well as their descendants were specifically labeled following tamoxifen administration. We also showed by cell lineage tracing that asplenia caused by Tlx1 deficiency is attributable to altered contribution of mesenchymal cells in the spleen anlage to the pancreatic mesenchyme. Thus, Tlx1(Cre) (ER) (-Venus) mice represent a new tool for lineage tracing and conditional gene manipulation of spleen mesenchymal cells, essential approaches for understanding the molecular mechanisms of spleen development.

  20. A Knock-in Mouse Model of Human PHD2 Gene-associated Erythrocytosis Establishes a Haploinsufficiency Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Patrick R.; Pei, Fei; Lee, Rebecca; Kerestes, Heddy; Percy, Melanie J.; Keith, Brian; Simon, M. Celeste; Lappin, Terence R. J.; Khurana, Tejvir S.; Lee, Frank S.

    2013-01-01

    The central pathway for controlling red cell mass is the PHD (prolyl hydroxylase domain protein):hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. HIF, which is negatively regulated by PHD, activates numerous genes, including ones involved in erythropoiesis, such as the ERYTHROPOIETIN (EPO) gene. Recent studies have implicated PHD2 as the key PHD isoform regulating red cell mass. Studies of humans have identified erythrocytosis-associated, heterozygous point mutations in the PHD2 gene. A key question concerns the mechanism by which human mutations lead to phenotypes. In the present report, we generated and characterized a mouse line in which a P294R knock-in mutation has been introduced into the mouse Phd2 locus to model the first reported human PHD2 mutation (P317R). Phd2P294R/+ mice display a degree of erythrocytosis equivalent to that seen in Phd2+/− mice. The Phd2P294R/+-associated erythrocytosis is reversed in a Hif2a+/−, but not a Hif1a+/− background. Additional studies using various conditional knock-outs of Phd2 reveal that erythrocytosis can be induced by homozygous and heterozygous knock-out of Phd2 in renal cortical interstitial cells using a Pax3-Cre transgene or by homozygous knock-out of Phd2 in hematopoietic progenitors driven by a Vav1-Cre transgene. These studies formally prove that a missense mutation in PHD2 is the cause of the erythrocytosis, show that this occurs through haploinsufficiency, and point to multifactorial control of red cell mass by PHD2. PMID:24121508

  1. Optimization of the production of knock-in alleles by CRISPR/Cas9 microinjection into the mouse zygote

    PubMed Central

    Raveux, Aurélien; Vandormael-Pournin, Sandrine; Cohen-Tannoudji, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Microinjection of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in zygotes is an efficient and comparatively fast method to generate genetically modified mice. So far, only few knock-in mice have been generated using this approach, and because no systematic study has been performed, parameters controlling the efficacy of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted insertion are not fully established. Here, we evaluated the effect of several parameters on knock-in efficiency changing only one variable at a time. We found that knock-in efficiency was dependent on injected Cas9 mRNA and single-guide RNA concentrations and that cytoplasmic injection resulted in more genotypic complexity compared to pronuclear injection. Our results also indicated that injection into the pronucleus compared to the cytoplasm is preferable to generate knock-in alleles with an oligonucleotide or a circular plasmid. Finally, we showed that Cas9D10A nickase variant was less efficient than wild-type Cas9 for generating knock-in alleles and caused a higher rate of mosaicism. Thus, our study provides valuable information that will help to improve the future production of precise genetic modifications in mice. PMID:28209967

  2. Optimization of the production of knock-in alleles by CRISPR/Cas9 microinjection into the mouse zygote.

    PubMed

    Raveux, Aurélien; Vandormael-Pournin, Sandrine; Cohen-Tannoudji, Michel

    2017-02-17

    Microinjection of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in zygotes is an efficient and comparatively fast method to generate genetically modified mice. So far, only few knock-in mice have been generated using this approach, and because no systematic study has been performed, parameters controlling the efficacy of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted insertion are not fully established. Here, we evaluated the effect of several parameters on knock-in efficiency changing only one variable at a time. We found that knock-in efficiency was dependent on injected Cas9 mRNA and single-guide RNA concentrations and that cytoplasmic injection resulted in more genotypic complexity compared to pronuclear injection. Our results also indicated that injection into the pronucleus compared to the cytoplasm is preferable to generate knock-in alleles with an oligonucleotide or a circular plasmid. Finally, we showed that Cas9D10A nickase variant was less efficient than wild-type Cas9 for generating knock-in alleles and caused a higher rate of mosaicism. Thus, our study provides valuable information that will help to improve the future production of precise genetic modifications in mice.

  3. Current Protocols in Mouse Biology Tissue-specific regulation of oncogene expression using Cre-inducible ROSA26 knock-in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Carofino, Brandi L.; Justice, Monica J.

    2015-01-01

    Cre-inducible mouse models are often utilized for the spatial and temporal expression of oncogenes. With the wide number of Cre recombinase lines available, inducible transgenesis represents a tractable approach to achieve discrete oncogene expression. Here, we describe a protocol for targeting Cre-inducible genes using a loxP-STOP-loxP approach to the ubiquitously expressed ROSA26 locus. Gene targeting provides several advantages over standard transgenic techniques, including a known site of integration and previously characterized pattern of expression. Historically, an inherent instability of ROSA26 targeting vectors has hampered the efficiency of developing ROSA26 knock-in lines. In this protocol, we provide individual steps for utilizing Gateway recombination for cloning, and detailed instructions for screening targeted ES cell clones. By following this protocol, one can achieve germline transmission of a ROSA26 knock-in line within several months. PMID:26069083

  4. VCP Associated Inclusion Body Myopathy and Paget Disease of Bone Knock-In Mouse Model Exhibits Tissue Pathology Typical of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Su, Hailing; Tanaja, Jasmin; Dec, Eric; Wallace, Douglas C.; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Caiozzo, Vincent; Warman, Matthew; Kimonis, Virginia E.

    2010-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP) gene cause inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). We have generated a knock-in mouse model with the common R155H mutation. Mice demonstrate progressive muscle weakness starting approximately at the age of 6 months. Histology of mutant muscle showed progressive vacuolization of myofibrils and centrally located nuclei, and immunostaining shows progressive cytoplasmic accumulation of TDP-43 and ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies in quadriceps myofibrils and brain. Increased LC3-II staining of muscle sections representing increased number of autophagosomes suggested impaired autophagy. Increased apoptosis was demonstrated by elevated caspase-3 activity and increased TUNEL-positive nuclei. X-ray microtomography (uCT) images show radiolucency of distal femurs and proximal tibiae in knock-in mice and uCT morphometrics shows decreased trabecular pattern and increased cortical wall thickness. Bone histology and bone marrow derived macrophage cultures in these mice revealed increased osteoclastogenesis observed by TRAP staining suggestive of Paget bone disease. The VCPR155H/+ knock-in mice replicate the muscle, bone and brain pathology of inclusion body myopathy, thus representing a useful model for preclinical studies. PMID:20957154

  5. The effect of sevoflurane inhalation on gabaergic neurons activation: observation on the GAD67-GFP knock-in mouse.

    PubMed

    Han, Li-Chun; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Wei; Wei, Yan-Yan; Sun, Xing-Xing; Yanagawa, Youchio; Li, Yun-Qing; Xu, Li-Xian; Wu, Sheng-Xi

    2010-12-01

    The mechanisms underlying volatile anesthesia agents are not well elucidated. Emerging researches have focused on the participation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons but there still lacks morphological evidence. To elucidate the possible activation of GABAergic neurons by sevoflurane inhalation in morphology, Fos (as neuronal activity marker) and GABA neurons double labeling were observed on the brain of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-GFP knock-in mice after sevoflurane inhalation. Twenty GAD67-GFP knock-in mice were divided into three groups: S1 group: incomplete anesthesia state induced by sevoflurane; S2 group: complete anesthesia state induced by sevoflurane; control(C) group. Sevoflurane induced a significant increase of Fos expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DM), periaqueductal grey (PAG), hippocampus (CA1, DG), paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PV), lateral septal nucleus (LS), and cingulate cortex (Cg1 and Cg2) in S1 group compared to C group, and increase of Fos expression in S2 group compared to S1 group. In S2 group, Fos was only expressed in the medial amygdaloid nucleus (MeA), Edinger-Westphal (E-W) nucleus, arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (Arc) and the ventral part of paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PaV). Double immunofluroscent staining indicated that in LS, almost all Fos were present in GABAergic neurons. In CA1, DG, DM, cg1, cg2, and PAG, Fos was expressed as well, but only few were present in GABAergic neurons. Fos expression was very high in thalamus, but no coexistence were found as no GABAergic neuron was detected in this area. Our results provided morphological evidence that GABAergic transmission in specific brain areas may participate in the sevoflurane-induced anesthesia.

  6. Longitudinal in vivo MRI in a Huntington’s disease mouse model: Global atrophy in the absence of white matter microstructural damage

    PubMed Central

    Steventon, Jessica J.; Trueman, Rebecca C.; Ma, Da; Yhnell, Emma; Bayram-Weston, Zubeyde; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, Jorge; Ourselin, Sebastian; Lythgoe, Mark; Stewart, Andrew; Rosser, Anne E.; Jones, Derek K.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a genetically-determined neurodegenerative disease. Characterising neuropathology in mouse models of HD is commonly restricted to cross-sectional ex vivo analyses, beset by tissue fixation issues. In vivo longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for disease progression to be probed non-invasively. In the HdhQ150 mouse model of HD, in vivo MRI was employed at two time points, before and after the onset of motor signs, to assess brain macrostructure and white matter microstructure. Ex vivo MRI, immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy and behavioural testing were also conducted. Global brain atrophy was found in HdhQ150 mice at both time points, with no neuropathological progression across time and a selective sparing of the cerebellum. In contrast, no white matter abnormalities were detected from the MRI images or electron microscopy images alike. The relationship between motor function and MR-based structural measurements was different for the HdhQ150 and wild-type mice, although there was no relationship between motor deficits and histopathology. Widespread neuropathology prior to symptom onset is consistent with patient studies, whereas the absence of white matter abnormalities conflicts with patient data. The myriad reasons for this inconsistency require further attention to improve the translatability from mouse models of disease. PMID:27581950

  7. The de-ubiquitinating enzyme ataxin-3 does not modulate disease progression in a knock-in mouse model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Li; Tallaksen-Greene, Sara J; Wang, Bo; Albin, Roger L; Paulson, Henry L

    2013-01-01

    Ataxin-3 is a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) that participates in ubiquitin-dependent protein quality control pathways and, based on studies in model systems, may be neuroprotective against toxic polyglutamine proteins such as the Huntington's disease (HD) protein, huntingtin (htt). HD is one of at least nine polyglutamine neurodegenerative diseases in which disease-causing proteins accumulate in ubiquitin-positive inclusions within neurons. In studies crossing mice null for ataxin-3 to an established HD knock-in mouse model (HdhQ200), we tested whether loss of ataxin-3 alters disease progression, perhaps by impairing the clearance of mutant htt or the ubiquitination of inclusions. While loss of ataxin-3 mildly exacerbated age-dependent motor deficits, it did not alter inclusion formation, ubiquitination of inclusions or levels of mutant or normal htt. Ataxin-3, itself a polyglutamine-containing protein with multiple ubiquitin binding domains, was not observed to localize to htt inclusions. Changes in neurotransmitter receptor binding known to occur in HD knock-in mice also were not altered by the loss of ataxin-3, although we unexpectedly observed increased GABAA receptor binding in the striatum of HdhQ200 mice, which has not previously been noted. Finally, we confirmed that CNS levels of hsp70 are decreased in HD mice as has been reported in other HD mouse models, regardless of the presence or absence of ataxin-3. We conclude that while ataxin-3 may participate in protein quality control pathways, it does not critically regulate the handling of mutant htt or contribute to major features of disease pathogenesis in HD.

  8. Generation of a Nkx2.2(Cre) knock-in mouse line: Analysis of cell lineages in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Jarrar, Wassan; Vauti, Franz; Arnold, Hans-Henning; Holz, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A Nkx2.2(cre) knock-in mutant mouse line was generated that on the appropriate reporter strain enables cell fate analysis of the Nkx2.2 cell lineage in the central nervous system and elsewhere. We here demonstrate that Nkx2.2 lineage-marked cells reside in the ventral p3 region along the entire length of the CNS and also in pancreas of mouse embryos. Nkx2.2(+) progenitor cells develop into V3 interneurons in spinal cord and generate the branchio-visceral motor nuclei of cranial nerves in hindbrain. Nkx2.2(+) cells in hindbrain also form serotonergic neurons and oligodendrocytes during later developmental stages. In mouse mutants lacking Nkx2.2 protein the neuronal progenitor cells in spinal cord are transformed to the distinct fate of somatic motor neurons including their axonal projections that exit the CNS ventrally and no longer cross the midline at the commissure. These data identify Nkx2.2 as key regulator to determine neuronal subtypes in the p3 domain of the central nervous system.

  9. Quantitative Electroencephalographic Analysis Provides an Early-Stage Indicator of Disease Onset and Progression in the zQ175 Knock-In Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Simon P.; Schwartz, Michael D.; Wurts-Black, Sarah; Thomas, Alexia M.; Chen, Tsui-Ming; Miller, Michael A.; Palmerston, Jeremiah B.; Kilduff, Thomas S.; Morairty, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Patients with Huntington's disease (HD) show a high prevalence of sleep disorders that typically occur prior to the onset of motoric symptoms and neurodegeneration. Our understanding of the pathophysiological alterations in premanifest HD is limited, hindering the ability to measure disease modification in response to treatment. We used a full-length knock-in HD model to determine early changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG) and sleep that may predict the onset and progression of the disease. Methods: A 10-month longitudinal study was designed to determine the effect of the HD mutation on the EEG and sleep/wake changes in heterozygous (HET) and homozygous (HOM) zQ175 mice and wild-type (WT) littermates from 8 to 48 w of age. Mice were instrumented with tethered headmounts to record EEG/electromyography signals. Telemeters were implanted to continuously measure locomotor activity (LMA) and body temperature (Tb). Sleep deprivation (SDep) was performed at 8, 12, 16, 24, 32, and 48 w of age. Results: The HD mutation disrupted the EEG field potential from 8–12 w in an age- and mutant huntington dose-dependent manner, prior to changes in sleep/wake states, LMA, and Tb. Prominent effects of the HD mutation on the EEG included a progressive reduction in low frequency power, a slowing of rapid eye movement peak theta frequency, and the emergence of state-dependent beta/gamma oscillations. There was no effect of genotype on the relative increase in nonrapid eye movement delta power or sleep time in response to SDep. Conclusions: The expression of the Huntington's disease (HD) mutation results in complex EEG alterations that occur prior to deficits in behavioral measures and are one of the earliest phenotypes uncovered in this mouse model. Despite these EEG changes, homeostatic responses to sleep loss were preserved in HET and HOM zQ175 mice. Greater insight into the localization and response of these EEG alterations to novel therapies may enable early

  10. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Decrease in Body Weight of a Transgenic Knock-in Mouse Model for TDP-43*

    PubMed Central

    Stribl, Carola; Samara, Aladin; Trümbach, Dietrich; Peis, Regina; Neumann, Manuela; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Rathkolb, Birgit; Wolf, Eckhard; Beckers, Johannes; Horsch, Marion; Neff, Frauke; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Koob, Sebastian; Reichert, Andreas S.; Hans, Wolfgang; Rozman, Jan; Klingenspor, Martin; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel Karl; Becker, Lore; Klopstock, Thomas; Glasl, Lisa; Hölter, Sabine M.; Wurst, Wolfgang; Floss, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The majority of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases as well as many patients suffering from frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusion bodies show TDP-43 pathology, the protein encoded by the TAR DNA-binding protein (Tardbp) gene. We used recombinase-mediated cassette exchange to introduce an ALS patient cDNA into the mouse Tdp-43 locus. Expression levels of human A315T TDP-43 protein were 300% elevated in heterozygotes, whereas the endogenous mouse Tdp-43 was decreased to 20% of wild type levels as a result of disturbed feedback regulation. Heterozygous TDP-43A315TKi mutants lost 10% of their body weight and developed insoluble TDP-43 protein starting as early as 3 months after birth, a pathology that was exacerbated with age. We analyzed the splicing patterns of known Tdp-43 target genes as well as genome-wide gene expression levels in different tissues that indicated mitochondrial dysfunction. In heterozygous mutant animals, we observed a relative decrease in expression of Parkin (Park2) and the fatty acid transporter CD36 along with an increase in fatty acids, HDL cholesterol, and glucose in the blood. As seen in transmission electron microscopy, neuronal cells in motor cortices of TDP-43A315TKi animals had abnormal neuronal mitochondrial cristae formation. Motor neurons were reduced to 90%, but only slight motoric impairment was detected. The observed phenotype was interpreted as a predisease model, which might be valuable for the identification of further environmental or genetic triggers of neurodegeneration. PMID:24515116

  11. Foxc2(CreERT2) knock-in mice mark stage-specific Foxc2-expressing cells during mouse organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Mohammed Badrul; Miura, Naoyuki; Uddin, Mohammad Khaja Mafij; Islam, Mohammod Johirul; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Iseki, Sachiko; Kume, Tsutomu; Trainor, Paul A; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Aoto, Kazushi

    2017-01-01

    Foxc2, a member of the winged helix transcription factor family, is essential for eye, calvarial bone, cardiovascular and kidney development in mice. Nevertheless, how Foxc2-expressing cells and their descendent cells contribute to the development of these tissues and organs has not been elucidated. Here, we generated a Foxc2 knock-in (Foxc2(CreERT2) ) mouse, in which administration of estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen induces nuclear translocation of Cre recombinase in Foxc2-expressing cells. By crossing with ROSA-LacZ reporter mice (Foxc2(CreERT2) ; R26R), the fate of Foxc2 positive (Foxc2(+) ) cells was analyzed through LacZ staining at various embryonic stages. We found Foxc2(+) cell descendants in the supraoccipital and exoccipital bone in E18.5 embryos, when tamoxifen was administered at embryonic day (E) 8.5. Furthermore, Foxc2(+) descendant cranial neural crest cells at E8-10 were restricted to the corneal mesenchyme, while Foxc2(+) cell derived cardiac neural crest cells at E6-12 were found in the aorta, pulmonary trunk and valves, and endocardial cushions. Foxc2(+) cell descendant contributions to the glomerular podocytes in the kidney were also observed following E6.5 tamoxifen treatment. Our results are consistent with previous reports of Foxc2 expression during early embryogenesis and the Foxc2(CreERT2) mouse provides a tool to investigate spatiotemporal roles of Foxc2 and contributions of Foxc2(+) expressing cells during mouse embryogenesis.

  12. Progressive gene dose-dependent disruption of the methamphetamine-sensitive circadian oscillator-driven rhythms in a knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Ouk, Koliane; Aungier, Juliet; Morton, A Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive genetic neurodegenerative disorder characterised by motor and cognitive deficits, as well as sleep and circadian abnormalities. In the R6/2 mouse, a fragment model of HD, rest-activity rhythms controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus disintegrate completely by 4months of age. Rhythms driven by a second circadian oscillator, the methamphetamine-sensitive circadian oscillator (MASCO), are disrupted even earlier, and cannot be induced after 2months of age. Here, we studied the effect of the HD mutation on the expression of MASCO-driven rhythms in a more slowly developing, genetically relevant mouse model of HD, the Q175 'knock-in' mouse. We induced expression of MASCO output by administering low dose methamphetamine (0.005%) chronically via the drinking water. We measured locomotor activity in constant darkness in wild-type and Q175 mice at 2 (presymptomatic), 6 (early symptomatic), and 12 (symptomatic) months of age. At 2months, all mice expressed MASCO-driven rhythms, regardless of genotype. At older ages, however, there was a progressive gene dose-dependent deficit in MASCO output in Q175 mice. At 6months of age, these rhythms could be observed in only 45% of heterozygous and 15% of homozygous mice. By 1year of age, 90% of homozygous mice had an impaired MASCO output. There was also an age-dependent disruption of MASCO output seen in wild-type mice. The fact that the progressive deficit in MASCO-driven rhythms in Q175 mice is HD gene dose-dependent suggests that, whatever its role in humans, abnormalities in MASCO output may contribute to the HD circadian phenotype.

  13. A knock-in mouse model reveals roles for nuclear Apc in cell proliferation, Wnt signal inhibition and tumor suppression.

    PubMed

    Zeineldin, M; Cunningham, J; McGuinness, W; Alltizer, P; Cowley, B; Blanchat, B; Xu, W; Pinson, D; Neufeld, K L

    2012-05-10

    Mutation of the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is considered an initiating step in the genesis of the vast majority of colorectal cancers. APC inhibits the Wnt-signaling pathway by targeting the proto-oncogene β-catenin for destruction by cytoplasmic proteasomes. In the presence of a Wnt signal, or in the absence of functional APC, β-catenin can serve as a transcription cofactor for genes required for cell proliferation such as cyclin-D1 and c-Myc. In cultured cells, APC shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, with nuclear APC implicated in the inhibition of Wnt target gene expression. Adopting a genetic approach to evaluate the functions of nuclear APC in the context of a whole organism, we generated a mouse model with mutations that inactivate the nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of Apc (Apc(mNLS)). Apc(mNLS/mNLS) mice are viable and fractionation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from these mice revealed a significant reduction in nuclear Apc as compared with Apc(+/+) MEFs. The levels of Apc and β-catenin protein were not significantly altered in small intestinal epithelia from Apc(mNLS/mNLS) mice. Compared with Apc(+/+) mice, Apc(mNLS/mNLS) mice showed increased proliferation in epithelial cells from the jejunum, ileum and colon. These same tissues from Apc(mNLS/mNLS) mice showed more mRNA from three genes upregulated in response to canonical Wnt signal, c-Myc, axin-2 and cyclin-D1, and less mRNA from Hath-1, which is downregulated in response to Wnt. These observations suggest a role for nuclear Apc in the inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling and the control of epithelial proliferation in intestinal tissue. Furthermore, we found Apc(Min/+) mice, which harbor a mutation that truncates Apc, to have an increased polyp size and multiplicity if they also carry the Apc(mNLS) allele. Taken together, this analysis of the novel Apc(mNLS) mouse model supports a role for nuclear Apc in the control of Wnt target genes

  14. A knock-in mouse model reveals roles for nuclear Apc in cell proliferation, Wnt signal inhibition and tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Zeineldin, Maged; Cunningham, Jamie; McGuinness, William; Alltizer, Preston; Cowley, Brett; Blanchat, Bryan; Xu, Wenhao; Pinson, David; Neufeld, Kristi L.

    2011-01-01

    Mutation of the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is considered an initiating step in the genesis of the vast majority of colorectal cancers. APC inhibits the Wnt signaling pathway by targeting proto-oncogene β-catenin for destruction by cytoplasmic proteasomes. In the presence of a Wnt signal, or in the absence of functional APC, β-catenin can serve as a transcription co-factor for genes required for cell proliferation such as cyclin D1 and c-Myc. In cultured cells, APC shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm, with nuclear APC implicated in inhibition of Wnt target gene expression. Taking a genetic approach to evaluate the functions of nuclear APC in the context of a whole organism, we generated a mouse model with mutations that inactivate the nuclear localization signals of Apc (ApcmNLS). ApcmNLS/mNLS mice are viable and fractionation of embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from these mice revealed a significant reduction in nuclear Apc compared to Apc+/+ MEFs. The levels of Apc and β-catenin protein were not significantly altered in small intestinal epithelia from ApcmNLS/mNLS mice. Compared to Apc+/+ mice, ApcmNLS/mNLS mice displayed increased proliferation in epithelial cells from the jejunum, ileum, and colon. These same tissues from ApcmNLS/mNLS mice displayed more mRNA from three genes up-regulated in response to canonical Wnt signal, c-Myc, Axin2, and Cyclin D1, and less mRNA from Hath 1 which is down-regulated in response to Wnt. These observations suggest a role for nuclear Apc in inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling and control of epithelial proliferation in intestinal tissue. Furthermore, we found ApcMin/+ mice, which harbor a mutation that truncates Apc, have increased polyp size and multiplicity if they also carry the ApcmNLS allele. Taken together, this analysis of the novel ApcmNLS mouse model supports a role for nuclear Apc in control of Wnt target genes, intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and polyp formation. PMID

  15. JAK2V617F leads to intrinsic changes in platelet formation and reactivity in a knock-in mouse model of essential thrombocythemia

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Catherine M.; Manning, Harriet; Bennett, Cavan; Vasquez, Louella; Severin, Sonia; Brain, Lauren; Mazharian, Alexandra; Guerrero, Jose A.; Li, Juan; Soranzo, Nicole; Green, Anthony R.; Watson, Steve P.

    2013-01-01

    The principal morbidity and mortality in patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) and polycythemia rubra vera (PV) stems from thrombotic events. Most patients with ET/PV harbor a JAK2V617F mutation, but its role in the thrombotic diathesis remains obscure. Platelet function studies in patients are difficult to interpret because of interindividual heterogeneity, reflecting variations in the proportion of platelets derived from the malignant clone, differences in the presence of additional mutations, and the effects of medical treatments. To circumvent these issues, we have studied a JAK2V617F knock-in mouse model of ET in which all megakaryocytes and platelets express JAK2V617F at a physiological level, equivalent to that present in human ET patients. We show that, in addition to increased differentiation, JAK2V617F-positive megakaryocytes display greater migratory ability and proplatelet formation. We demonstrate in a range of assays that platelet reactivity to agonists is enhanced, with a concomitant increase in platelet aggregation in vitro and a reduced duration of bleeding in vivo. These data suggest that JAK2V617F leads to intrinsic changes in both megakaryocyte and platelet biology beyond an increase in cell number. In support of this hypothesis, we identify multiple differentially expressed genes in JAK2V617F megakaryocytes that may underlie the observed biological differences. PMID:24085768

  16. Reduction in neuronal L-type calcium channel activity in a double knock-in mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Olivier; Pancani, Tristano; Landfield, Philip W.; Norris, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Increased function of neuronal L-type voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (L-VSCCs) is strongly linked to impaired memory and altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity in aged rats. However, no studies have directly assessed L-VSCC function in any of the common mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease where neurologic deficits are typically more robust. Here, we used cell-attached patch-clamp recording techniques to measure L-VSCC activity in CA1 pyramidal neurons of partially dissociated hippocampal “zipper” slices prepared from 14-month-old wild-type mice and memory-impaired APP/PS1 double knock-in mice. Surprisingly, the functional channel density of L-VSCCs was significantly reduced in the APP/PS1 group. No differences in voltage dependency and unitary conductance of L-VSCCs were observed. The results suggest that mechanisms for Ca2+ dysregulation can differ substantially between animal models of normal aging and models of pathological aging. PMID:22265986

  17. Distinct roles of autophagy-dependent and -independent functions of FIP200 revealed by generation and analysis of a mutant knock-in mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Song; Wang, Chenran; Yeo, Syn; Liang, Chun-Chi; Okamoto, Takako; Sun, Shaogang; Wen, Jian; Guan, Jun-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular process controlled through a set of essential autophagy genes (Atgs). However, there is increasing evidence that most, if not all, Atgs also possess functions independent of their requirement in canonical autophagy, making it difficult to distinguish the contributions of autophagy-dependent or -independent functions of a particular Atg to various biological processes. To distinguish these functions for FIP200 (FAK family-interacting protein of 200 kDa), an Atg in autophagy induction, we examined FIP200 interaction with its autophagy partner, Atg13. We found that residues 582–585 (LQFL) in FIP200 are required for interaction with Atg13, and mutation of these residues to AAAA (designated the FIP200-4A mutant) abolished its canonical autophagy function in vitro. Furthermore, we created a FIP200-4A mutant knock-in mouse model and found that specifically blocking FIP200 interaction with Atg13 abolishes autophagy in vivo, providing direct support for the essential role of the ULK1/Atg13/FIP200/Atg101 complex in the process beyond previous studies relying on the complete knockout of individual components. Analysis of the new mouse model showed that nonautophagic functions of FIP200 are sufficient to fully support embryogenesis by maintaining a protective role in TNFα-induced apoptosis. However, FIP200-mediated canonical autophagy is required to support neonatal survival and tumor cell growth. These studies provide the first genetic evidence linking an Atg's autophagy and nonautophagic functions to different biological processes in vivo. PMID:27013233

  18. TP53 mutations induced by BPDE in Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null human TP53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse embryo fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kucab, Jill E.; van Steeg, Harry; Luijten, Mirjam; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; White, Paul A.; Phillips, David H.; Arlt, Volker M.

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the tumour suppressor gene TP53 occur in more than 50% of human tumours; in some instances exposure to environmental carcinogens can be linked to characteristic mutational signatures. The Hupki (human TP53 knock-in) mouse embryo fibroblast (HUF) immortalization assay (HIMA) is a useful model for studying the impact of environmental carcinogens on TP53 mutagenesis. In an effort to increase the frequency of TP53-mutated clones achievable in the HIMA, we generated nucleotide excision repair (NER)-deficient HUFs by crossing the Hupki mouse with an Xpa-knockout (Xpa-Null) mouse. We hypothesized that carcinogen-induced DNA adducts would persist in the TP53 sequence of Xpa-Null HUFs leading to an increased propensity for mismatched base pairing and mutation during replication of adducted DNA. We found that Xpa-Null Hupki mice, and HUFs derived from them, were more sensitive to the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) than their wild-type (Xpa-WT) counterparts. Following treatment with the reactive metabolite of BaP, benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null HUF cultures were subjected to the HIMA. A significant increase in TP53 mutations on the transcribed strand was detected in Xpa-Null HUFs compared to Xpa-WT HUFs, but the TP53-mutant frequency overall was not significantly different between the two genotypes. BPDE induced mutations primarily at G:C base pairs, with approximately half occurring at CpG sites, and the predominant mutation type was G:C > T:A in both Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null cells. Further, several of the TP53 mutation hotspots identified in smokers’ lung cancer were mutated by BPDE in HUFs (codons 157, 158, 245, 248, 249, 273). Therefore, the pattern and spectrum of BPDE-induced TP53 mutations in the HIMA are consistent with TP53 mutations detected in lung tumours of smokers. While Xpa-Null HUFs exhibited increased sensitivity to BPDE-induced damage on the transcribed strand, NER-deficiency did not

  19. TP53 mutations induced by BPDE in Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null human TP53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kucab, Jill E; van Steeg, Harry; Luijten, Mirjam; Schmeiser, Heinz H; White, Paul A; Phillips, David H; Arlt, Volker M

    2015-03-01

    Somatic mutations in the tumour suppressor gene TP53 occur in more than 50% of human tumours; in some instances exposure to environmental carcinogens can be linked to characteristic mutational signatures. The Hupki (human TP53 knock-in) mouse embryo fibroblast (HUF) immortalization assay (HIMA) is a useful model for studying the impact of environmental carcinogens on TP53 mutagenesis. In an effort to increase the frequency of TP53-mutated clones achievable in the HIMA, we generated nucleotide excision repair (NER)-deficient HUFs by crossing the Hupki mouse with an Xpa-knockout (Xpa-Null) mouse. We hypothesized that carcinogen-induced DNA adducts would persist in the TP53 sequence of Xpa-Null HUFs leading to an increased propensity for mismatched base pairing and mutation during replication of adducted DNA. We found that Xpa-Null Hupki mice, and HUFs derived from them, were more sensitive to the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) than their wild-type (Xpa-WT) counterparts. Following treatment with the reactive metabolite of BaP, benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null HUF cultures were subjected to the HIMA. A significant increase in TP53 mutations on the transcribed strand was detected in Xpa-Null HUFs compared to Xpa-WT HUFs, but the TP53-mutant frequency overall was not significantly different between the two genotypes. BPDE induced mutations primarily at G:C base pairs, with approximately half occurring at CpG sites, and the predominant mutation type was G:C>T:A in both Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null cells. Further, several of the TP53 mutation hotspots identified in smokers' lung cancer were mutated by BPDE in HUFs (codons 157, 158, 245, 248, 249, 273). Therefore, the pattern and spectrum of BPDE-induced TP53 mutations in the HIMA are consistent with TP53 mutations detected in lung tumours of smokers. While Xpa-Null HUFs exhibited increased sensitivity to BPDE-induced damage on the transcribed strand, NER-deficiency did not enhance TP53

  20. Elovl4 5-bp deletion knock-in mouse model for Stargardt-like macular degeneration demonstrates accumulation of ELOVL4 and lipofuscin

    PubMed Central

    Vasireddy, Vidyullatha; Jablonski, Monica M.; Khan, Naheed W.; Wang, Xiao Fei; Sahu, Priya; Sparrow, Janet R; Ayyagari, Radha

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism underlying photoreceptor degeneration in autosomal dominant Stargardt like macular degeneration (STGD3) due to mutations in the elongation of very long chain fatty acids-4 (ELOVL4) gene is not fully understood. To evaluate the pathological events associated with STGD3, we used a mouse model that mimics the human STGD3 phenotype and studied the progression of retinal degeneration. Morphological changes in the retina of Elovl4 5 bp-deletion knock-in mice (E_mut+/− ) were evaluated at 22 months of age. The localization of ELOVL4, and the expression pattern of inner retinal tissue marker proteins, and ubiquitin were determined by immunofluorescence labeling of retinal sections. Levels of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) lipofuscin fluorophores were measured by quantitative HPLC. Morphological evaluation of the retina revealed an accumulation of RPE debris in the subretinal space. A significant increase in the amount of ELOVL4 was observed in the outer plexiform layer in E_mut +/− mice compared to controls. Apart from the accumulation of ELOVL4, E_mut +/− mice also exhibited high expression of ubiquitin in the retina. Analysis of lipofuscin fluorophores in the RPE showed a significant elevation of A2E and compounds of the all-trans- retinal dimer series in retinas from four and ten month old E_mut +/− mice compared to wild-type littermates. These observations suggest that abnormal accumulation of ELOVL4 protein and lipofuscin may lead to photoreceptor degeneration in E_mut +/− mice. PMID:19682985

  1. TP53 and lacZ mutagenesis induced by 3-nitrobenzanthrone in Xpa-deficient human TP53 knock-in mouse embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kucab, Jill E; Zwart, Edwin P; van Steeg, Harry; Luijten, Mirjam; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Phillips, David H; Arlt, Volker M

    2016-03-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a highly mutagenic compound and possible human carcinogen found in diesel exhaust. 3-NBA forms bulky DNA adducts following metabolic activation and induces predominantly G:CT:A transversions in a variety of experimental systems. Here we investigated the influence of nucleotide excision repair (NER) on 3-NBA-induced mutagenesis of the human tumour suppressor gene TP53 and the reporter gene lacZ. To this end we utilised Xpa -knockout (Xpa-Null) human TP53 knock-in (Hupki) embryo fibroblasts (HUFs). As Xpa is essential for NER of bulky DNA adducts, we hypothesized that DNA adducts induced by 3-NBA would persist in the genomes of Xpa-Null cells and lead to an increased frequency of mutation. The HUF immortalisation assay was used to select for cells harbouring TP53 mutations following mutagen exposure. We found that Xpa-Null Hupki mice and HUFs were more sensitive to 3-NBA treatment than their wild-type (Xpa-WT) counterparts. However, following 3-NBA treatment and immortalisation, a similar frequency of TP53-mutant clones arose from Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null HUF cultures. In cells from both Xpa genotypes G:CT:A transversion was the predominant TP53 mutation type and mutations exhibited bias towards the non-transcribed strand. Thirty-two percent of 3-NBA-induced TP53 mutations occurred at CpG sites, all of which are hotspots for mutation in smokers' lung cancer (codons 157, 158, 175, 245, 248, 273, 282). We also examined 3-NBA-induced mutagenesis of an integrated lacZ reporter gene in HUFs, where we again observed a similar mutant frequency in Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null cells. Our findings suggest that 3-NBA-DNA adducts may evade removal by global genomic NER; the persistence of 3-NBA adducts in DNA may be an important factor in its mutagenicity.

  2. Proteomic Characterization of Inhibitory Synapses Using a Novel pHluorin-tagged γ-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor, Type A (GABAA), α2 Subunit Knock-in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasuko; Morrow, Danielle H; Modgil, Amit; Huyghe, Deborah; Deeb, Tarek Z; Lumb, Michael J; Davies, Paul A; Moss, Stephen J

    2016-06-03

    The accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs) at the appropriate postsynaptic sites is critical for determining the efficacy of fast inhibitory neurotransmission. Although we know that the majority of synaptic GABAAR subtypes are assembled from α1-3, β, and γ2 subunits, our understanding of how neurons facilitate their targeting to and stabilization at inhibitory synapses is rudimentary. To address these issues, we have created knock-in mice in which the pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the Myc epitope were introduced to the extracellular domain of the mature receptor α2 subunit (pHα2). Using immunoaffinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified a stable complex of 174 proteins that were associated with pHα2, including other GABAAR subunits, and previously identified receptor-associated proteins such as gephyrin and collybistin. 149 of these proteins were novel GABAAR binding partners and included G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channel subunits, proteins that regulate trafficking and degradation, regulators of protein phosphorylation, GTPases, and a number of proteins that regulate their activity. Notably, members of the postsynaptic density family of proteins that are critical components of excitatory synapses were not associated with GABAARs. Crucially, we demonstrated for a subset of these novel proteins (including cullin1, ephexin, potassium channel tetramerization domain containing protein 12, mitofusin2, metabotropic glutamate receptor 5, p21-activated kinase 7, and Ras-related protein 5A) bind directly to the intracellular domains of GABAARs, validating our proteomic analysis. Thus, our experiments illustrate the complexity of the GABAAR proteome and enhance our understanding of the mechanisms neurons use to construct inhibitory synapses.

  3. TP53 and lacZ mutagenesis induced by 3-nitrobenzanthrone in Xpa-deficient human TP53 knock-in mouse embryo fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kucab, Jill E.; Zwart, Edwin P.; van Steeg, Harry; Luijten, Mirjam; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Phillips, David H.; Arlt, Volker M.

    2016-01-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a highly mutagenic compound and possible human carcinogen found in diesel exhaust. 3-NBA forms bulky DNA adducts following metabolic activation and induces predominantly G:C > T:A transversions in a variety of experimental systems. Here we investigated the influence of nucleotide excision repair (NER) on 3-NBA-induced mutagenesis of the human tumour suppressor gene TP53 and the reporter gene lacZ. To this end we utilised Xpa -knockout (Xpa-Null) human TP53 knock-in (Hupki) embryo fibroblasts (HUFs). As Xpa is essential for NER of bulky DNA adducts, we hypothesized that DNA adducts induced by 3-NBA would persist in the genomes of Xpa-Null cells and lead to an increased frequency of mutation. The HUF immortalisation assay was used to select for cells harbouring TP53 mutations following mutagen exposure. We found that Xpa-Null Hupki mice and HUFs were more sensitive to 3-NBA treatment than their wild-type (Xpa-WT) counterparts. However, following 3-NBA treatment and immortalisation, a similar frequency of TP53-mutant clones arose from Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null HUF cultures. In cells from both Xpa genotypes G:C > T:A transversion was the predominant TP53 mutation type and mutations exhibited bias towards the non-transcribed strand. Thirty-two percent of 3-NBA-induced TP53 mutations occurred at CpG sites, all of which are hotspots for mutation in smokers’ lung cancer (codons 157, 158, 175, 245, 248, 273, 282). We also examined 3-NBA-induced mutagenesis of an integrated lacZ reporter gene in HUFs, where we again observed a similar mutant frequency in Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null cells. Our findings suggest that 3-NBA-DNA adducts may evade removal by global genomic NER; the persistence of 3-NBA adducts in DNA may be an important factor in its mutagenicity. PMID:26723900

  4. Construction of a viral T2A-peptide based knock-in mouse model for enhanced Cre recombinase activity and fluorescent labeling of podocytes.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Sybille; Brähler, Sebastian; Braun, Fabian; Hagmann, Henning; Rinschen, Markus M; Späth, Martin R; Höhne, Martin; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Benzing, Thomas; Brinkkoetter, Paul T

    2017-02-07

    Podocyte injury is a key event in glomerular disease leading to proteinuria and opening the path toward glomerular scarring. As a consequence, glomerular research strives to discover molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways affecting podocyte health. The hNphs2.Cre mouse model has been a valuable tool to manipulate podocyte-specific genes and to label podocytes for lineage tracing and purification. Here we designed a novel podocyte-specific tricistronic Cre mouse model combining codon improved Cre expression and fluorescent cell labeling with mTomato under the control of the endogenous Nphs2 promoter using viral T2A-peptides. Independent expression of endogenous podocin, codon improved Cre, and mTomato was confirmed by immunofluorescence, fluorescent activated cell sorting and protein analyses. Nphs2(pod.T2A.ciCre.T2A.mTomato/wild-type) mice developed normally and did not show any signs of glomerular disease or off-target effects under basal conditions and in states of disease. Nphs2(pod.T2A.ciCre.T2A.mTomato/wild-type)-mediated gene recombination was superior to conventional hNphs2.Cre mice-mediated gene recombination. Last, we compared Cre efficiency in a disease model by mating Nphs2(pod.T2A.ciCre.T2A.mTomato/wild-type) and hNphs2.Cre mice to Phb2(fl/fl) mice. The podocyte-specific Phb2 knockout by Nphs2(pod.T2A.ciCre.T2A.mTomato/wild-type) mice resulted in an aggravated glomerular injury as compared to a podocyte-specific Phb2 gene deletion triggered by hNphs2.Cre. Thus, we generated the first tricistronic podocyte mouse model combining enhanced Cre recombinase efficiency and fluorescent labeling in podocytes without the need for additional matings with conventional reporter mouse lines.

  5. Mll partial tandem duplication and Flt3 internal tandem duplication in a double knock-in mouse recapitulates features of counterpart human acute myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Zorko, Nicholas A.; Bernot, Kelsie M.; Whitman, Susan P.; Siebenaler, Ronald F.; Ahmed, Elshafa H.; Marcucci, Gabriele G.; Yanes, Daniel A.; McConnell, Kathleen K.; Mao, Charlene; Kalu, Chidimma; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jarjoura, David; Dorrance, Adrienne M.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Lee, Benjamin H.; Huang, Gang; Marcucci, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The MLL-partial tandem duplication (PTD) associates with high-risk cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Concurrent presence of FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) is observed in 25% of patients with MLL-PTD AML. However, mice expressing either Mll-PTD or Flt3-ITD do not develop AML, suggesting that 2 mutations are necessary for the AML phenotype. Thus, we generated a mouse expressing both Mll-PTD and Flt3-ITD. MllPTD/WT:Flt3ITD/WT mice developed acute leukemia with 100% penetrance, at a median of 49 weeks. As in human MLL-PTD and/or the FLT3-ITD AML, mouse blasts exhibited normal cytogenetics, decreased Mll-WT-to-Mll-PTD ratio, loss of the Flt3-WT allele, and increased total Flt3. Highlighting the adverse impact of FLT3-ITD dosage on patient survival, mice with homozygous Flt3-ITD alleles, MllPTD/WT:Flt3ITD/ITD, demonstrated a nearly 30-week reduction in latency to overt AML. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that Mll-PTD contributes to leukemogenesis as a gain-of-function mutation and describe a novel murine model closely recapitulating human AML. PMID:22674806

  6. Differential loss of thalamostriatal and corticostriatal input to striatal projection neuron types prior to overt motor symptoms in the Q140 knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yun-Ping; Wong, Ting; Wan, Jim Y; Reiner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Motor slowing and forebrain white matter loss have been reported in premanifest Huntington's disease (HD) prior to substantial striatal neuron loss. These findings raise the possibility that early motor defects in HD may be related to loss of excitatory input to striatum. In a prior study, we showed that in the heterozygous Q140 knock-in mouse model of HD that loss of thalamostriatal axospinous terminals is evident by 4 months, and loss of corticostriatal axospinous terminals is evident at 12 months, before striatal projection neuron pathology. In the present study, we specifically characterized the loss of thalamostriatal and corticostriatal terminals on direct (dSPN) and indirect (iSPN) pathway striatal projection neurons, using immunolabeling to identify thalamostriatal (VGLUT2+) and corticostriatal (VGLUT1+) axospinous terminals, and D1 receptor immunolabeling to distinguish dSPN (D1+) and iSPN (D1-) synaptic targets. We found that the loss of corticostriatal terminals at 12 months of age was preferential for D1+ spines, and especially involved smaller terminals, presumptively of the intratelencephalically projecting (IT) type. By contrast, indirect pathway D1- spines showed little loss of axospinous terminals at the same age. Thalamostriatal terminal loss was comparable for D1+ and D1- spines at both 4 and 12 months. Regression analysis showed that the loss of VGLUT1+ terminals on D1+ spines was correlated with a slight decline in open field motor parameters at 12 months. Our overall results raise the possibility that differential thalamic and cortical input loss to SPNs is an early event in human HD, with cortical loss to dSPNs in particular contributing to premanifest motor slowing.

  7. Vulnerability of calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin in a transgenic/knock-in APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer disease together with disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Verdaguer, Ester; Brox, Susana; Petrov, Dmitry; Olloquequi, Jordi; Romero, Rafael; de Lemos, M Luisa; Camins, Antoni; Auladell, Carme

    2015-09-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of β-amyloid protein in the brain (in both soluble and insoluble forms) and by the presence of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), leading to neurotoxicity. The exact mechanisms whereby Aβ triggers brain alterations are unclear. However, accumulating evidence suggests that a deregulation of Ca(2+) signaling may play a major role in disease progression. Calcium-buffering proteins, including calbindin-D28K (CB), calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV), may offer neuroprotection by maintaining calcium homeostasis. Although marked reductions in these proteins have been observed in the brains of mice and humans with AD, their contribution to AD pathology remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to analyze distribution patterns of CB(+,) CR(+) and PV(+) interneurons in different areas of the hippocampus, a brain region that is severely affected in AD. A transgenic knock-in APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of familial AD was used. The data were obtained from the brains of 3- and 12-month-old animals. These ages roughly correspond to an early mature adult (prior to clinical manifestations) and a late middle-age (clinical symptoms readily detectable) phase in human AD patients. Immunostaining revealed increases in CB and PV immunoreactivity (IR) in the hippocampus of 3-month-old transgenic mice, compared to wild-type animals. Possibly, these proteins are upregulated in an attempt to control cellular homeostasis and synaptic plasticity. However, the pattern of CB-IR was reversed in 12-month-old animals, potentially indicating a loss of cellular capacity to respond to pathophysiological processes. In addition, at this age, a noticeable increase in PV-IR was observed, suggesting the presence of hippocampal network hyperactivity in older AD-like mice. Our results indicate that CaBP(+) neuronal subpopulations play a role in adult neurogenesis and in AD pathology, particularly at early disease

  8. Estrogen Receptor Alpha G525L Knock-In-Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Padilla-Banks E, Clark G, Newbold RR. Assessing estrogenic activity of phytochemicals using transcriptional activation and immature mouse...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0347 TITLE: Estrogen Receptor Alpha G525L...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Estrogen Receptor Alpha G525L Knock-In Mice 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0347 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  9. Knocking in an Internal-combustion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolik, A; Voinov, A

    1940-01-01

    The question remains open of the relation between the phenomena of knocking in the engine and the explosion wave. The solution of this problem is the object of this paper. The tests were conducted on an aircraft engine with a pyrex glass window in the cylinder head. Photographs were then taken of various combinations of fuels and conditions.

  10. Depressed Frank-Starling mechanism in the left ventricular muscle of the knock-in mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy with troponin T deletion mutation ΔK210.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takahiro; Kobirumaki-Shimozawa, Fuyu; Kagemoto, Tatsuya; Fujii, Teruyuki; Terui, Takako; Kusakari, Yoichiro; Hongo, Kenichi; Morimoto, Sachio; Ohtsuki, Iwao; Hashimoto, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Norio

    2013-10-01

    It has been reported that the Frank-Starling mechanism is coordinately regulated in cardiac muscle via thin filament "on-off" equilibrium and titin-based lattice spacing changes. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the deletion mutation ΔK210 in the cardiac troponin T gene shifts the equilibrium toward the "off" state and accordingly attenuate the sarcomere length (SL) dependence of active force production, via reduced cross-bridge formation. Confocal imaging in isolated hearts revealed that the cardiomyocytes were enlarged, especially in the longitudinal direction, in ΔK210 hearts, with striation patterns similar to those in wild type (WT) hearts, suggesting that the number of sarcomeres is increased in cardiomyocytes but the sarcomere length remains unaltered. For analysis of the SL dependence of active force, skinned muscle preparations were obtained from the left ventricle of WT and knock-in (ΔK210) mice. An increase in SL from 1.90 to 2.20μm shifted the mid-point (pCa50) of the force-pCa curve leftward by ~0.21pCa units in WT preparations. In ΔK210 muscles, Ca(2+) sensitivity was lower by ~0.37pCa units, and the SL-dependent shift of pCa50, i.e., ΔpCa50, was less pronounced (~0.11pCa units), with and without protein kinase A treatment. The rate of active force redevelopment was lower in ΔK210 preparations than in WT preparations, showing blunted thin filament cooperative activation. An increase in thin filament cooperative activation upon an increase in the fraction of strongly bound cross-bridges by MgADP increased ΔpCa50 to ~0.21pCa units. The depressed Frank-Starling mechanism in ΔK210 hearts is the result of a reduction in thin filament cooperative activation.

  11. Genetic Contributors to Intergenerational CAG Repeat Instability in Huntington’s Disease Knock-In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Neto, João Luís; Lee, Jong-Min; Afridi, Ali; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R.; Dempsey, Stephani; Lager, Brenda; Alonso, Isabel; Wheeler, Vanessa C.; Pinto, Ricardo Mouro

    2017-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Longer repeat sizes are associated with increased disease penetrance and earlier ages of onset. Intergenerationally unstable transmissions are common in HD families, partly underlying the genetic anticipation seen in this disorder. HD CAG knock-in mouse models also exhibit a propensity for intergenerational repeat size changes. In this work, we examine intergenerational instability of the CAG repeat in over 20,000 transmissions in the largest HD knock-in mouse model breeding datasets reported to date. We confirmed previous observations that parental sex drives the relative ratio of expansions and contractions. The large datasets further allowed us to distinguish effects of paternal CAG repeat length on the magnitude and frequency of expansions and contractions, as well as the identification of large repeat size jumps in the knock-in models. Distinct degrees of intergenerational instability were observed between knock-in mice of six background strains, indicating the occurrence of trans-acting genetic modifiers. We also found that lines harboring a neomycin resistance cassette upstream of Htt showed reduced expansion frequency, indicative of a contributing role for sequences in cis, with the expanded repeat as modifiers of intergenerational instability. These results provide a basis for further understanding of the mechanisms underlying intergenerational repeat instability. PMID:27913616

  12. Genetic Contributors to Intergenerational CAG Repeat Instability in Huntington's Disease Knock-In Mice.

    PubMed

    Neto, João Luís; Lee, Jong-Min; Afridi, Ali; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R; Dempsey, Stephani; Lager, Brenda; Alonso, Isabel; Wheeler, Vanessa C; Pinto, Ricardo Mouro

    2017-02-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Longer repeat sizes are associated with increased disease penetrance and earlier ages of onset. Intergenerationally unstable transmissions are common in HD families, partly underlying the genetic anticipation seen in this disorder. HD CAG knock-in mouse models also exhibit a propensity for intergenerational repeat size changes. In this work, we examine intergenerational instability of the CAG repeat in over 20,000 transmissions in the largest HD knock-in mouse model breeding datasets reported to date. We confirmed previous observations that parental sex drives the relative ratio of expansions and contractions. The large datasets further allowed us to distinguish effects of paternal CAG repeat length on the magnitude and frequency of expansions and contractions, as well as the identification of large repeat size jumps in the knock-in models. Distinct degrees of intergenerational instability were observed between knock-in mice of six background strains, indicating the occurrence of trans-acting genetic modifiers. We also found that lines harboring a neomycin resistance cassette upstream of Htt showed reduced expansion frequency, indicative of a contributing role for sequences in cis, with the expanded repeat as modifiers of intergenerational instability. These results provide a basis for further understanding of the mechanisms underlying intergenerational repeat instability.

  13. Altered chromatin architecture underlies progressive impairment of the heat shock response in mouse models of Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Labbadia, John; Cunliffe, Helen; Weiss, Andreas; Katsyuba, Elena; Sathasivam, Kirupa; Seredenina, Tamara; Woodman, Ben; Moussaoui, Saliha; Frentzel, Stefan; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Paganetti, Paolo; Bates, Gillian P.

    2011-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder for which there are no disease-modifying treatments. Previous studies have proposed that activation of the heat shock response (HSR) via the transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) may be of therapeutic benefit. However, the effect of disease progression on the HSR and the therapeutic potential of this pathway are currently unknown. Here, we used a brain-penetrating HSP90 inhibitor and physiological, molecular, and behavioral readouts to demonstrate that pharmacological activation of HSF1 improves huntingtin aggregate load, motor performance, and other HD-related phenotypes in the R6/2 mouse model of HD. However, the beneficial effects of this treatment were transient and diminished with disease progression. Molecular analyses to understand the transient nature of these effects revealed altered chromatin architecture, reduced HSF1 binding, and impaired HSR accompanied disease progression in both the R6/2 transgenic and HdhQ150 knockin mouse models of HD. Taken together, our findings reveal that the HSR, a major inducible regulator of protein homeostasis and longevity, is disrupted in HD. Consequently, pharmacological induction of HSF1 as a therapeutic approach to HD is more complex than was previously anticipated. PMID:21785217

  14. Generation of Venus reporter knock-in mice revealed MAGI-2 expression patterns in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Kan-ichiro; Nishimura, Tomoki; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Ookura, Tetsuya; Nishimori, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The membrane-associated guanylate kinase inverted 2 (MAGI-2) protein, which is known to localize at the tight junction of epithelial cells, contains multiple copies of the PDZ and WW domains in its structure. Although the expression pattern of Magi2 mRNA in representative organs has been previously published, its detailed cellular distribution at the histological level remains unknown. Such detailed information would be useful to clarify the biological function of MAGI-2. Here, we report the generation of Venus reporter knock-in mice for Magi2 in which exon 6 of the gene was substituted by the Venus-encoding sequence. We detected the expression of the Venus reporter protein in kidney podocytes from these knock-in mice. We also detected Venus reporter protein expression in spermatids within the testes and within neurons in various regions of the brain. Detection of the reporter protein from these diverse locations indicated the endogenous expression of MAGI-2 in these tissues. Our data suggested a potential function of MAGI-2 in the glomerular filtration process and sperm cell maturation. These data indicate that the Venus reporter knock-in mouse for Magi2 is a useful model for the further study of Magi2 gene function.

  15. Estrogen Receptor Alpha G525L Knock-In Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    response to endogenous estrogens. These female estrogen non-responsive ERα knock-in (ENERKI) mice had immature and hypoplastic uterine and vaginal ...developing mice as well as in adult animals with genetically induced mammary cancers through PPT administration or withdrawal. 15. SUBJECT TERMS estrogen...is a crucial therapeutic target for hormone dependent breast cancers . More effective treatment and prevention strategies are likely to emerge from

  16. 'Knock, and it shall be opened': knocking out and knocking in to reveal mechanisms of disease and novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Hacking, Douglas F

    2008-12-01

    Recent significant advances in molecular biology have generated genetically modified bacteria, yeast, nematodes, fruit flies, and fish. However, it is the genetic modification of mammalian model organisms, particularly the mouse, that has the greatest potential to shed light on human development, physiology and pathology in ways that have significant implications for neonatal and paediatric clinical practice. Here, we review some of the techniques for knocking out (inactivating), mutating and knocking in (inserting) selected genes that are important to neonatology and show how this research will lead both to a better understanding of disease and to novel therapies for infants and children.

  17. Profoundly different prion diseases in knock-in mice carrying single PrP codon substitutions associated with human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Walker S.; Borkowski, Andrew W.; Watson, Nicki E.; King, Oliver D.; Faas, Henryk; Jasanoff, Alan; Lindquist, Susan

    2013-01-01

    In man, mutations in different regions of the prion protein (PrP) are associated with infectious neurodegenerative diseases that have remarkably different clinical signs and neuropathological lesions. To explore the roots of this phenomenon, we created a knock-in mouse model carrying the mutation associated with one of these diseases [Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD)] that was exactly analogous to a previous knock-in model of a different prion disease [fatal familial insomnia (FFI)]. Together with the WT parent, this created an allelic series of three lines, each expressing the same protein with a single amino acid difference, and with all native regulatory elements intact. The previously described FFI mice develop neuronal loss and intense reactive gliosis in the thalamus, as seen in humans with FFI. In contrast, CJD mice had the hallmark features of CJD, spongiosis and proteinase K-resistant PrP aggregates, initially developing in the hippocampus and cerebellum but absent from the thalamus. A molecular transmission barrier protected the mice from any infectious prion agents that might have been present in our mouse facility and allowed us to conclude that the diseases occurred spontaneously. Importantly, both models created agents that caused a transmissible neurodegenerative disease in WT mice. We conclude that single codon differences in a single gene in an otherwise normal genome can cause remarkably different neurodegenerative diseases and are sufficient to create distinct protein-based infectious elements. PMID:23959875

  18. Spontaneous generation of prion infectivity in fatal familial insomnia knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Walker S.; Borkowski, Andrew; Faas, Henryk; Steele, Andrew; King, Oliver D.; Watson, Nicki; Jasanoff, Alan; Lindquist, Susan

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY A crucial tenet of the prion hypothesis is that misfolding of the prion protein (PrP) induced by mutations associated with familial prion disease is, in an otherwise normal mammalian brain, sufficient to generate the infectious agent. Yet this has never been demonstrated. We engineered knock-in mice to express a PrP mutation associated with a distinct human prion disease, fatal familial insomnia (FFI). An additional substitution created a strong transmission barrier against pre-existing prions. The mice spontaneously developed a disease distinct from that of other mouse prion models and highly reminiscent of FFI. Unique pathology was transmitted from FFI mice to mice expressing wild-type PrP sharing the same transmission barrier. FFI mice were highly resistant to infection by pre-existing prions, confirming infectivity did not arise from contaminating agents. Thus a single amino acid change in PrP is sufficient to induce a distinct neurodegenerative disease and the spontaneous generation of prion infectivity. PMID:19709627

  19. Analyzing the Functions of Mast Cells In Vivo Using 'Mast Cell Knock-in' Mice.

    PubMed

    Gaudenzio, Nicolas; Sibilano, Riccardo; Starkl, Philipp; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J; Reber, Laurent L

    2015-05-27

    Mast cells (MCs) are hematopoietic cells which reside in various tissues, and are especially abundant at sites exposed to the external environment, such as skin, airways and gastrointestinal tract. Best known for their detrimental role in IgE-dependent allergic reactions, MCs have also emerged as important players in host defense against venom and invading bacteria and parasites. MC phenotype and function can be influenced by microenvironmental factors that may differ according to anatomic location and/or based on the type or stage of development of immune responses. For this reason, we and others have favored in vivo approaches over in vitro methods to gain insight into MC functions. Here, we describe methods for the generation of mouse bone marrow-derived cultured MCs (BMCMCs), their adoptive transfer into genetically MC-deficient mice, and the analysis of the numbers and distribution of adoptively transferred MCs at different anatomical sites. This method, named the 'mast cell knock-in' approach, has been extensively used over the past 30 years to assess the functions of MCs and MC-derived products in vivo. We discuss the advantages and limitations of this method, in light of alternative approaches that have been developed in recent years.

  20. Immunohistochemical Detection of FLAG-Tagged Endogenous Proteins in Knock-In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Kim; Chu, Felix; Webster, Joshua D.; French, Dorothy M.

    2015-01-01

    With recent advances in immunohistochemical (IHC) techniques, immunohistochemistry now plays a more important role in research, especially in mouse models where characterization of cellular patterns of protein expression has become critical. Even with these recent advances, a paucity of IHC quality antibodies for some proteins still exists. To address this, we have developed a novel IHC assay that utilizes a commercially available goat anti-DDDDK peptide polyclonal antibody on paraffin-embedded tissues from knock-in mice expressing proteins of interest tagged with a 3×FLAG epitope at physiologically relevant levels. Focusing on two 3×FLAG-tagged proteins for which specific antibodies were available, USP48 and RIPK3, we were able to validate our anti-DDDDK assay by comparing the IHC directed against the actual proteins to the anti-DDDDK IHC assay, which recognizes the FLAG epitope. We were also able to detect a third 3×FLAG-tagged protein, BAP1, for which quality reagents were not available. This universal IHC method will enable researchers to characterize the expression patterns of proteins of interest when specific antibodies are lacking. PMID:25575566

  1. Extensive early motor and non-motor behavioral deficits are followed by striatal neuronal loss in Knock-in Huntington’s disease mice

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Miriam A.; Kosmalska, Agata; Enayati, Joseph; Cohen, Rachel; Zeitlin, Scott; Levine, Michael S.; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise

    2008-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder, caused by an elongation of CAG repeats in the huntingtin gene. Mice with an insertion of an expanded polyglutamine repeat in the mouse huntingtin gene (knock-in mice) most closely model the disease because the mutation is expressed in the proper genomic and protein context. However, few knock-in mouse lines have been extensively characterized and available data suggest marked differences in the extent and time course of their behavioral and pathological phenotype. We have previously described behavioral anomalies in the open field as early as 1 month of age, followed by the appearance at 2 months of progressive huntingtin neuropathology, in a mouse carrying a portion of human exon 1 with approximately 140 CAG repeats inserted into the mouse huntingtin gene. Here we extend these observations by showing that early behavioral anomalies exist in a wide range of motor (climbing, vertical pole, rotarod, and running wheel performance) and non-motor functions (fear conditioning and anxiety) starting at 1–4 months of age, and are followed by progressive gliosis and decrease in DARPP32 (12 months) and a loss of striatal neurons at 2 years. At this age, mice also present striking spontaneous behavioral deficits in their home cage. The data show that this line of knock-in mice reproduces canonical characteristics of Huntington’s disease, preceded by deficits which may correspond to the protracted pre-manifest phase of the disease in humans. Accordingly, they provide a useful model to elucidate early mechanisms of pathophysiology and the progression to overt neurodegeneration. PMID:18805465

  2. Periodontal Defects in the A116T Knock-in Murine Model of Odontohypophosphatasia

    PubMed Central

    Foster, B.L.; Sheen, C.R.; Hatch, N.E.; Liu, J.; Cory, E.; Narisawa, S.; Kiffer-Moreira, T.; Sah, R.L.; Whyte, M.P.; Somerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in ALPL result in hypophosphatasia (HPP), a disease causing defective skeletal mineralization. ALPL encodes tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme that promotes mineralization by reducing inorganic pyrophosphate, a mineralization inhibitor. In addition to skeletal defects, HPP causes dental defects, and a mild clinical form of HPP, odontohypophosphatasia, features only a dental phenotype. The Alpl knockout (Alpl-/-) mouse phenocopies severe infantile HPP, including profound skeletal and dental defects. However, the severity of disease in Alpl-/- mice prevents analysis at advanced ages, including studies to target rescue of dental tissues. We aimed to generate a knock-in mouse model of odontohypophosphatasia with a primarily dental phenotype, based on a mutation (c.346G>A) identified in a human kindred with autosomal dominant odontohypophosphatasia. Biochemical, skeletal, and dental analyses were performed on the resulting Alpl+/A116T mice to validate this model. Alpl+/A116T mice featured 50% reduction in plasma ALP activity compared with wild-type controls. No differences in litter size, survival, or body weight were observed in Alpl+/A116T versus wild-type mice. The postcranial skeleton of Alpl+/A116T mice was normal by radiography, with no differences in femur length, cortical/trabecular structure or mineral density, or mechanical properties. Parietal bone trabecular compartment was mildly altered. Alpl+/A116T mice featured alterations in the alveolar bone, including radiolucencies and resorptive lesions, osteoid accumulation on the alveolar bone crest, and significant differences in several bone properties measured by micro–computed tomography. Nonsignificant changes in acellular cementum did not appear to affect periodontal attachment or function, although circulating ALP activity was correlated significantly with incisor cementum thickness. The Alpl+/A116T mouse is the first model of odontohypophosphatasia, providing insights on

  3. Formation and progression of sub-retinal pigment epithelium deposits in Efemp1 mutation knock-in mice: a model for the early pathogenic course of macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marmorstein, Lihua Y; McLaughlin, Precious J; Peachey, Neal S; Sasaki, Takako; Marmorstein, Alan D

    2007-10-15

    Malattia leventinese (ML) is a dominantly inherited macular degenerative disease characterized by the presence of sub-retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) deposits. With the exception of an earlier age of onset, ML patients exhibit symptoms and histopathology compatible with the diagnosis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of incurable blindness. ML is caused by a mutation (R345W) in the gene EFEMP1 which encodes fibulin-3, a protein of unknown function. We generated a knock-in mouse carrying the disease-associated mutation in the murine Efemp1 gene. Small, isolated sub-RPE deposits developed as early as 4 months of age in both heterozygous and homozygous knock-in mice. Over time these deposits increased in size and number eventually becoming continuous sheets. In older mice membranous debris was observed within the deposits and within Bruch's membrane, and was accompanied by general RPE and choroidal abnormalities including degeneration, vacuolation, loss or disruption of the RPE basal infoldings, choroidal atrophy, and focal thickening of and invasion of cellular processes into Bruch's membrane. Fibulin-3 was found to accumulate in the sub-RPE deposits. Thus, the Efemp1 knock-in mice reconstitute the most important histopathologic symptoms of both ML and AMD. We conclude that these mice are a valuable tool for studying the primary pathogenic course of basal deposits associated with macular degeneration and for testing prevention and treatment strategies for this class of diseases.

  4. RS-1 enhances CRISPR/Cas9- and TALEN-mediated knock-in efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun; Yang, Dongshan; Xu, Jie; Zhu, Tianqing; Chen, Y. Eugene; Zhang, Jifeng

    2016-01-01

    Zinc-finger nuclease, transcription activator-like effector nuclease and CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) are becoming major tools for genome editing. Importantly, knock-in in several non-rodent species has been finally achieved thanks to these customizable nucleases; yet the rates remain to be further improved. We hypothesize that inhibiting non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or enhancing homology-directed repair (HDR) will improve the nuclease-mediated knock-in efficiency. Here we show that the in vitro application of an HDR enhancer, RS-1, increases the knock-in efficiency by two- to five-fold at different loci, whereas NHEJ inhibitor SCR7 has minimal effects. We then apply RS-1 for animal production and have achieved multifold improvement on the knock-in rates as well. Our work presents tools to nuclease-mediated knock-in animal production, and sheds light on improving gene-targeting efficiencies on pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26817820

  5. RS-1 enhances CRISPR/Cas9- and TALEN-mediated knock-in efficiency.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun; Yang, Dongshan; Xu, Jie; Zhu, Tianqing; Chen, Y Eugene; Zhang, Jifeng

    2016-01-28

    Zinc-finger nuclease, transcription activator-like effector nuclease and CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) are becoming major tools for genome editing. Importantly, knock-in in several non-rodent species has been finally achieved thanks to these customizable nucleases; yet the rates remain to be further improved. We hypothesize that inhibiting non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or enhancing homology-directed repair (HDR) will improve the nuclease-mediated knock-in efficiency. Here we show that the in vitro application of an HDR enhancer, RS-1, increases the knock-in efficiency by two- to five-fold at different loci, whereas NHEJ inhibitor SCR7 has minimal effects. We then apply RS-1 for animal production and have achieved multifold improvement on the knock-in rates as well. Our work presents tools to nuclease-mediated knock-in animal production, and sheds light on improving gene-targeting efficiencies on pluripotent stem cells.

  6. Characterization of Transgenic Gfrp Knock-In Mice: Implications for Tetrahydrobiopterin in Modulation of Normal Tissue Radiation Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rupak; Pawar, Snehalata A.; Fu, Qiang; Gupta, Prem K.; Berbée, Maaike; Garg, Sarita; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Wang, Wenze; Biju, Prabath G.; Krager, Kimberly J.; Boerma, Marjan; Ghosh, Sanchita P.; Cheema, Amrita K.; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The free radical scavenger and nitric oxide synthase cofactor, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), plays a well-documented role in many disorders associated with oxidative stress, including normal tissue radiation responses. Radiation exposure is associated with decreased BH4 levels, while BH4 supplementation attenuates aspects of radiation toxicity. The endogenous synthesis of BH4 is catalyzed by the enzyme guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH1), which is regulated by the inhibitory GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). We here report and characterize a novel, Cre-Lox-driven, transgenic mouse model that overexpresses Gfrp. Results: Compared to control littermates, transgenic mice exhibited high transgene copy numbers, increased Gfrp mRNA and GFRP expression, enhanced GFRP–GTPCH1 interaction, reduced BH4 levels, and low glutathione (GSH) levels and differential mitochondrial bioenergetic profiles. After exposure to total body irradiation, transgenic mice showed decreased BH4/7,8-dihydrobiopterin ratios, increased vascular oxidative stress, and reduced white blood cell counts compared with controls. Innovation and Conclusion: This novel Gfrp knock-in transgenic mouse model allows elucidation of the role of GFRP in the regulation of BH4 biosynthesis. This model is a valuable tool to study the involvement of BH4 in whole body and tissue-specific radiation responses and other conditions associated with oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1436–1446. PMID:23521531

  7. A broad phenotypic screen identifies novel phenotypes driven by a single mutant allele in Huntington's disease CAG knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Hölter, Sabine M; Stromberg, Mary; Kovalenko, Marina; Garrett, Lillian; Glasl, Lisa; Lopez, Edith; Guide, Jolene; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Becker, Lore; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Schrewed, Anja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Schulz, Holger; Wolf, Eckhard; Wursta, Wolfgang; Gillis, Tammy; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Seidman, Jonathan; MacDonald, Marcy E; Cotman, Susan; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Lee, Jong-Min; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the HTT gene encoding huntingtin. The disease has an insidious course, typically progressing over 10-15 years until death. Currently there is no effective disease-modifying therapy. To better understand the HD pathogenic process we have developed genetic HTT CAG knock-in mouse models that accurately recapitulate the HD mutation in man. Here, we describe results of a broad, standardized phenotypic screen in 10-46 week old heterozygous HdhQ111 knock-in mice, probing a wide range of physiological systems. The results of this screen revealed a number of behavioral abnormalities in HdhQ111/+ mice that include hypoactivity, decreased anxiety, motor learning and coordination deficits, and impaired olfactory discrimination. The screen also provided evidence supporting subtle cardiovascular, lung, and plasma metabolite alterations. Importantly, our results reveal that a single mutant HTT allele in the mouse is sufficient to elicit multiple phenotypic abnormalities, consistent with a dominant disease process in patients. These data provide a starting point for further investigation of several organ systems in HD, for the dissection of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and for the identification of reliable phenotypic endpoints for therapeutic testing.

  8. A Broad Phenotypic Screen Identifies Novel Phenotypes Driven by a Single Mutant Allele in Huntington’s Disease CAG Knock-In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Marina; Garrett, Lillian; Glasl, Lisa; Lopez, Edith; Guide, Jolene; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Becker, Lore; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Schrewed, Anja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Schulz, Holger; Wolf, Eckhard; Wursta, Wolfgang; Gillis, Tammy; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Seidman, Jonathan; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Cotman, Susan; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Lee, Jong-Min; Wheeler, Vanessa C.

    2013-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the HTT gene encoding huntingtin. The disease has an insidious course, typically progressing over 10-15 years until death. Currently there is no effective disease-modifying therapy. To better understand the HD pathogenic process we have developed genetic HTT CAG knock-in mouse models that accurately recapitulate the HD mutation in man. Here, we describe results of a broad, standardized phenotypic screen in 10-46 week old heterozygous HdhQ111 knock-in mice, probing a wide range of physiological systems. The results of this screen revealed a number of behavioral abnormalities in HdhQ111/+ mice that include hypoactivity, decreased anxiety, motor learning and coordination deficits, and impaired olfactory discrimination. The screen also provided evidence supporting subtle cardiovascular, lung, and plasma metabolite alterations. Importantly, our results reveal that a single mutant HTT allele in the mouse is sufficient to elicit multiple phenotypic abnormalities, consistent with a dominant disease process in patients. These data provide a starting point for further investigation of several organ systems in HD, for the dissection of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and for the identification of reliable phenotypic endpoints for therapeutic testing. PMID:24278347

  9. Knock-in reporter mice demonstrate that DNA repair by non-homologous end joining declines with age.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Amita; Mao, Zhiyong; Tian, Xiao; Spencer, Brianna; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2014-07-01

    Accumulation of genome rearrangements is a characteristic of aged tissues. Since genome rearrangements result from faulty repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), we hypothesized that DNA DSB repair becomes less efficient with age. The Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ) pathway repairs a majority of DSBs in vertebrates. To examine age-associated changes in NHEJ, we have generated an R26NHEJ mouse model in which a GFP-based NHEJ reporter cassette is knocked-in to the ROSA26 locus. In this model, NHEJ repair of DSBs generated by the site-specific endonuclease, I-SceI, reconstitutes a functional GFP gene. In this system NHEJ efficiency can be compared across tissues of the same mouse and in mice of different age. Using R26NHEJ mice, we found that NHEJ efficiency was higher in the skin, lung, and kidney fibroblasts, and lower in the heart fibroblasts and brain astrocytes. Furthermore, we observed that NHEJ efficiency declined with age. In the 24-month old animals compared to the 5-month old animals, NHEJ efficiency declined 1.8 to 3.8-fold, depending on the tissue, with the strongest decline observed in the skin fibroblasts. The sequence analysis of 300 independent NHEJ repair events showed that, regardless of age, mice utilize microhomology sequences at a significantly higher frequency than expected by chance. Furthermore, the frequency of microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) events increased in the heart and lung fibroblasts of old mice, suggesting that NHEJ becomes more mutagenic with age. In summary, our study provides a versatile mouse model for the analysis of NHEJ in a wide range of tissues and demonstrates that DNA repair by NHEJ declines with age in mice, which could provide a mechanism for age-related genomic instability and increased cancer incidence with age.

  10. Knock-In Mice with NOP-eGFP Receptors Identify Receptor Cellular and Regional Localization

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Akihiko; Brunori, Gloria; Mercatelli, Daniela; Wu, Jinhua; Cippitelli, Andrea; Zou, Bende; Xie, Xinmin (Simon); Williams, Melissa; Zaveri, Nurulain T.; Low, Sarah; Scherrer, Grégory; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2015-01-01

    The nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) receptor, the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, is involved in many processes common to the opioid receptors including pain and drug abuse. To better characterize receptor location and trafficking, knock-in mice were created by inserting the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) into the NOP receptor gene (Oprl1) and producing mice expressing a functional NOP-eGFP C-terminal fusion in place of the native NOP receptor. The NOP-eGFP receptor was present in brain of homozygous knock-in animals in concentrations somewhat higher than in wild-type mice and was functional when tested for stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding in vitro and in patch-clamp electrophysiology in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and hippocampal slices. Inhibition of morphine analgesia was equivalent when tested in knock-in and wild-type mice. Imaging revealed detailed neuroanatomy in brain, spinal cord, and DRG and was generally consistent with in vitro autoradiographic imaging of receptor location. Multicolor immunohistochemistry identified cells coexpressing various spinal cord and DRG cellular markers, as well as coexpression with μ-opioid receptors in DRG and brain regions. Both in tissue slices and primary cultures, the NOP-eGFP receptors appear throughout the cell body and in processes. These knock-in mice have NOP receptors that function both in vitro and in vivo and appear to be an exceptional tool to study receptor neuroanatomy and correlate with NOP receptor function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The NOP receptor, the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, is involved in pain, drug abuse, and a number of other CNS processes. The regional and cellular distribution has been difficult to determine due to lack of validated antibodies for immunohistochemical analysis. To provide a new tool for the investigation of receptor localization, we have produced knock-in mice with a fluorescent-tagged NOP receptor in place of the native

  11. P23H opsin knock-in mice reveal a novel step in retinal rod disc morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sakami, Sanae; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Retinal rod photoreceptor cells have double membrane discs located in their outer segments (ROS) that are continuously formed proximally from connecting cilia (CC) and phagocytized distally by the retinal pigmented epithelium. The major component of these rod discs, the light-sensitive visual pigment rhodopsin (Rho), consists of an opsin protein linked to 11-cis-retinal. The P23H mutation of rod opsin (P23H opsin) is the most common cause of human blinding autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). A mouse model of adRP with this mutation (RhoP23H/+) shows low levels of P23H opsin protein, partial misalignment of discs and progressive retinal degeneration. However, the impact of mutant P23H opsin on the formation of abnormal discs is unclear and it is still unknown whether this mutant pigment can mediate phototransduction. Using transretinal ERG recordings, we demonstrate that P23H mutant Rho can trigger phototransduction but RhoP23H/P23H rods are ∼17 000-fold less sensitive to light than Rho+/+ rods and produce abnormally fast photo-responses. By analyzing homozygous RhoP23H/P23H knock-in mice, we show that P23H opsin is transported to ciliary protrusions where it forms sagittally elongated discs. Transmission electron microscopy of postnatal day (PND) 14 RhoP23H/+ mouse retina revealed disordered sagittally oriented discs before the onset of retinal degeneration. Surprisingly, we also observed smaller, immature sagittally oriented discs in PND14 Rho+/− and Rho+/+ mice that were not seen in older animals. These findings provide fundamental insights into the pathogenesis of the P23H mutant opsin and reveal a novel early sagittally aligned disc formation step in normal ROS disc expansion. PMID:24214395

  12. Effects of aging and genotype on circadian rhythms, sleep, and clock gene expression in APPxPS1 knock-in mice, a model for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Marilyn J; Smith, J Tyler; Franklin, Kathleen M; Beckett, Tina L; Murphy, M Paul; St Clair, Daret K; Donohue, Kevin D; Striz, Martin; O'Hara, Bruce F

    2012-08-01

    Profound disruptions of circadian rhythms and sleep/wake cycles constitute a major cause of institutionalization of AD patients. This study investigated whether a rodent model of AD, APP(NLH/NLH)/PS-1(P264L/264L) (APPxPS1) mice, exhibits circadian alterations. The APPxPS1 mice were generated using CD-1/129 mice and Cre-lox knock-in technology to "humanize" the mouse amyloid (A)β sequence and create a presenilin-1 mutation identified in familial early-onset AD patients. APPxPS1 and WT mice of several ages (~4, 11, and 15 months) were monitored for circadian rhythms in wheel running, cage activity, and sleep:wake behavior. After rhythm assessment, the mice were euthanized at zeitgeber time (ZT) 2 or 10 (i.e., 2 or 10 h after lights-on) and brains were dissected. Amyloidβ levels were measured in cortical samples and brain sections of the hypothalamus and hippocampus were prepared and used for in situ hybridization of circadian or neuropeptide genes. The most significant effects of the APPxPS1 transgenes were phase delays of ~2 h in the onset of daytime wakefulness bouts (P<0.005) and peak wakefulness (P<0.02), potentially relevant to phase delays previously reported in AD patients. However, genotype did not affect the major activity peaks or phases of wheel running, wake, or general movement, which were bimodal with dominant dawn and dusk activity. Expression of Period 2 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus was affected by ZT (P<0.0001) with a marginal interaction effect of age, genotype, and ZT (P<0.08). A separate analysis of the old animals indicated a robust interaction between ZT and genotype, as well as main effects of these parameters. Aging also altered sleep (e.g., bout length and amount of daytime sleep) and the amount of wheel running and cage activity. In conclusion, the APPxPS1 knock-in mice exhibit some alterations in their sleep:wake rhythm and clock gene expression, but do not show robust, genotype-related changes in activity rhythms. The prominent daytime

  13. A Murine Niemann-Pick C1 I1061T Knock-In Model Recapitulates the Pathological Features of the Most Prevalent Human Disease Allele

    PubMed Central

    Praggastis, Maria; Tortelli, Brett; Zhang, Jessie; Fujiwara, Hideji; Sidhu, Rohini; Chacko, Anita; Chen, Zhouji; Chung, Chan; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Sikora, Jakub; Davidson, Cristin; Walkley, Steven U.; Pipalia, Nina H.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Schaffer, Jean E.

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C1 (NPC1) disease is a rare neurovisceral, cholesterol–sphingolipid lysosomal storage disorder characterized by ataxia, motor impairment, progressive intellectual decline, and dementia. The most prevalent mutation, NPC1I1061T, encodes a misfolded protein with a reduced half-life caused by ER-associated degradation. Therapies directed at stabilization of the mutant NPC1 protein reduce cholesterol storage in fibroblasts but have not been tested in vivo because of lack of a suitable animal model. Whereas the prominent features of human NPC1 disease are replicated in the null Npc1−/− mouse, this model is not amenable to examining proteostatic therapies. The objective of the present study was to develop an NPC1 I1061T knock-in mouse in which to test proteostatic therapies. Compared with the Npc1−/− mouse, this Npc1tm(I1061T)Dso model displays a less severe, delayed form of NPC1 disease with respect to weight loss, decreased motor coordination, Purkinje cell death, lipid storage, and premature death. The murine NPC1I1061T protein has a reduced half-life in vivo, consistent with protein misfolding and rapid ER-associated degradation, and can be stabilized by histone deacetylase inhibition. This novel mouse model faithfully recapitulates human NPC1 disease and provides a powerful tool for preclinical evaluation of therapies targeting NPC1 protein variants with compromised stability. PMID:26019327

  14. Epitope-tagged dopamine transporter knock-in mice reveal rapid endocytic trafficking and filopodia targeting of the transporter in dopaminergic axons

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Anjali; Richards, Toni L.; Simmons, Diana; Zahniser, Nancy R.; Sorkin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The plasma membrane dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) is essential for reuptake of extracellular DA. DAT function in heterologous cells is regulated by subcellular targeting, endocytosis, and intracellular trafficking, but the mechanisms regulating neuronal DAT remain poorly understood. Hence, we generated a knock-in mouse expressing a hemagglutinin (HA)-epitope-tagged DAT to study endogenous transporter trafficking. Introduction of the HA tag into the second extracellular loop of mouse DAT did not perturb its expression level, distribution pattern, or substrate uptake kinetics. Live-cell fluorescence microscopy imaging using fluorescently labeled HA-specific antibody and a quantitative HA-antibody endocytosis assay demonstrated that in axons HA-DAT was primarily located in the plasma membrane and internalized mostly in growth cones and varicosities, where synaptic vesicle markers were also concentrated. Formation of varicosities was frequently preceded or accompanied by highly dynamic filopodia-like membrane protrusions. Remarkably, HA-DAT often concentrated at the tips of these filopodia. This pool of HA-DATs exhibited low lateral membrane mobility. Thus, DAT-containing filopodia may be involved in synaptogenesis in developing DA neurons. Treatment of neurons with amphetamine increased mobility of filopodial HA-DAT and accelerated HA-DAT endocytosis in axons, suggesting that chronic amphetamine may interfere with DA synapse development. Interestingly, phorbol esters did not accelerate endocytosis of axonal DAT.—Rao, A., Richards, T. L., Simmons, D., Zahniser, N. R., Sorkin, A. Epitope-tagged dopamine transporter knock-in mice reveal rapid endocytic trafficking and filopodia targeting of the transporter in dopaminergic axons. PMID:22267337

  15. Enamel defects and ameloblast-specific expression in Enam knock-out/lacz knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jan C-C; Hu, Yuanyuan; Smith, Charles E; McKee, Marc D; Wright, J Timothy; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Papagerakis, Petros; Hunter, Graeme K; Feng, Jerry Q; Yamakoshi, Fumiko; Simmer, James P

    2008-04-18

    Enamelin is critical for proper dental enamel formation, and defects in the human enamelin gene cause autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta. We used gene targeting to generate a knock-in mouse carrying a null allele of enamelin (Enam) that has a lacZ reporter gene replacing the Enam translation initiation site and gene sequences through exon 7. Correct targeting of the transgene was confirmed by Southern blotting and PCR analyses. No enamelin protein could be detected by Western blotting in the Enam-null mice. Histochemical 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-d-galactopyranoside (X-gal) staining demonstrated ameloblast-specific expression of enamelin. The enamel of the Enam(+/-) mice was nearly normal in the maxillary incisors, but the mandibular incisors were discolored and tended to wear rapidly where they contacted the maxillary incisors. The Enam(-/-) mice showed no true enamel. Radiography, microcomputed tomography, and light and scanning electron microscopy were used to document changes in the enamel of Enam(-/-) mice but did not discern any perturbations of bone, dentin, or any other tissue besides the enamel layer. Although a thick layer of enamel proteins covered normal-appearing dentin of unerupted teeth, von Kossa staining revealed almost a complete absence of mineral formation in this protein layer. However, a thin, highly irregular, mineralized crust covered the dentin on erupted teeth, apparently arising from the formation and fusion of small mineralization foci (calcospherites) in the deeper part of the accumulated enamel protein layer. These results demonstrate ameloblast-specific expression of enamelin and reveal that enamelin is essential for proper enamel matrix organization and mineralization.

  16. Bone Marrow Transplantation Improves Autoinflammation and Inflammatory Bone Loss in SH3BP2 Knock-In Cherubism Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitaka, Teruhito; Kittaka, Mizuho; Ishida, Shu; Mizuno, Noriyoshi; Mukai, Tomoyuki; Ueki, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Cherubism (OMIM#118400) is a genetic disorder in children characterized by excessive jawbone destruction with proliferation of fibro-osseous lesions containing a large number of osteoclasts. Mutations in the SH3-domain binding protein 2 (SH3BP2) are responsible for cherubism. Analysis of the knock-in (KI) mouse model of cherubism showed that homozygous cherubism mice (Sh3bp2KI/KI) spontaneously develop systemic autoinflammation and inflammatory bone loss and that cherubism is a TNF-α-dependent hematopoietic disorder. In this study, we investigated whether bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is effective for the treatment of inflammation and bone loss in Sh3bp2KI/KI mice. Bone marrow (BM) cells from wild-type (Sh3bp2+/+) mice were transplanted to 6-week-old Sh3bp2KI/KI mice with developing inflammation and to 10-week-old Sh3bp2KI/KI mice with established inflammation. Six-week-old Sh3bp2KI/KI mice transplanted with Sh3bp2+/+ BM cells exhibited improved body weight loss, facial swelling, and survival rate. Inflammatory lesions in the liver and lung as well as bone loss in calvaria and mandibula were ameliorated at 10 weeks after BMT compared to Sh3bp2KI/KI mice transplanted with Sh3bp2KI/KI BM cells. Elevation of serum TNF-α levels was not detected after BMT. BMT was effective for up to 20 weeks in 6-week-old Sh3bp2KI/KI mice transplanted with Sh3bp2+/+ BM cells. BMT also ameliorated the inflammation and bone loss in 10-week-old Sh3bp2KI/KI mice. Thus our study demonstrates that BMT improves the inflammation and bone loss in cherubism mice. BMT may be effective for the treatment of cherubism patients. PMID:25445458

  17. A novel conditional knock-in approach defines molecular and circuit effects of the DYT1 dystonia mutation

    PubMed Central

    Weisheit, Corinne E.; Dauer, William T.

    2015-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia, the most common inherited form of primary dystonia, is a neurodevelopmental disease caused by a dominant mutation in TOR1A. This mutation (‘ΔE’) removes a single glutamic acid from the encoded protein, torsinA. The effects of this mutation, at the molecular and circuit levels, and the reasons for its neurodevelopmental onset, remain incompletely understood. To uniquely address key questions of disease pathogenesis, we generated a conditional Tor1a knock-in allele that is converted from wild-type to DYT1 mutant (‘induced’ ΔE: Tor1ai-ΔE), following Cre recombination. We used this model to perform a gene dosage study exploring the effects of the ΔE mutation at the molecular, neuropathological and organismal levels. These analyses demonstrated that ΔE-torsinA is a hypomorphic allele and showed no evidence for any gain-of-function toxic properties. The unique capabilities of this model also enabled us to test a circuit-level hypothesis of DYT1 dystonia, which predicts that expression of the DYT1 genotype (Tor1aΔE/+) selectively within hindbrain structures will produce an overtly dystonic animal. In contrast to this prediction, we find no effect of this anatomic-specific expression of the DYT1 genotype, a finding that has important implications for the interpretation of the human and mouse diffusion tensor-imaging studies upon which it is based. These studies advance understanding of the molecular effects of the ΔE mutation, challenge current concepts of the circuit dysfunction that characterize the disease and establish a powerful tool that will be valuable for future studies of disease pathophysiology. PMID:26370418

  18. GABAergic Interneuron Dysfunction Impairs Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Adult Apolipoprotein E4 Knock-in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Bien-Ly, Nga; Andrews-Zwilling, Yaisa; Xu, Qin; Bernardo, Aubrey; Ring, Karen; Halabisky, Brian; Deng, Changhui; Mahley, Robert W.; Huang, Yadong

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Apolipoprotein (apo) E has important and diverse functions in neurobiology, and apoE4 is the major known genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Here we report that adult neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs) express apoE. In apoE knockout mice, neurogenesis in the hippocampus was ~60% lower than in wildtype mice, and most newborn cells developed into astrocytes rather than into neurons as in wildtype mice. This impairment was not observed in human apoE3 knock-in mice. In apoE4 knock-in mice, however, the maturation and dendritic development of newborn hippocampal neurons was significantly impaired as a result of apoE4 and its fragment-caused GABAergic interneuron dysfunction. This impairment was fully rescued by treatment with a GABAA receptor potentiator. These findings demonstrate the importance of apoE in adult hippocampal neurogenesis and show that apoE4 inhibits hippocampal neurogenesis by impairing neuronal maturation mediated by GABA signaling. PMID:19951691

  19. CRISPR/Cas9-induced knockout and knock-in mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung-Eun; Lim, Jong-Min; Koh, Hyun Gi; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kang, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Seungjib; Kwon, Sohee; Shin, Won-Sub; Lee, Bongsoo; Hwangbo, Kwon; Kim, Jungeun; Ye, Sung Hyeok; Yun, Jae-Young; Seo, Hogyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Won-Joong; Chang, Yong Keun; Jeong, Byeong-Ryool

    2016-06-13

    Genome editing is crucial for genetic engineering of organisms for improved traits, particularly in microalgae due to the urgent necessity for the next generation biofuel production. The most advanced CRISPR/Cas9 system is simple, efficient and accurate in some organisms; however, it has proven extremely difficult in microalgae including the model alga Chlamydomonas. We solved this problem by delivering Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) comprising the Cas9 protein and sgRNAs to avoid cytotoxicity and off-targeting associated with vector-driven expression of Cas9. We obtained CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations at three loci including MAA7, CpSRP43 and ChlM, and targeted mutagenic efficiency was improved up to 100 fold compared to the first report of transgenic Cas9-induced mutagenesis. Interestingly, we found that unrelated vectors used for the selection purpose were predominantly integrated at the Cas9 cut site, indicative of NHEJ-mediated knock-in events. As expected with Cas9 RNPs, no off-targeting was found in one of the mutagenic screens. In conclusion, we improved the knockout efficiency by using Cas9 RNPs, which opens great opportunities not only for biological research but also industrial applications in Chlamydomonas and other microalgae. Findings of the NHEJ-mediated knock-in events will allow applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in microalgae, including "safe harboring" techniques shown in other organisms.

  20. CRISPR/Cas9-induced knockout and knock-in mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung-Eun; Lim, Jong-Min; Koh, Hyun Gi; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kang, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Seungjib; Kwon, Sohee; Shin, Won-Sub; Lee, Bongsoo; Hwangbo, Kwon; Kim, Jungeun; Ye, Sung Hyeok; Yun, Jae-Young; Seo, Hogyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Won-Joong; Chang, Yong Keun; Jeong, Byeong-ryool

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is crucial for genetic engineering of organisms for improved traits, particularly in microalgae due to the urgent necessity for the next generation biofuel production. The most advanced CRISPR/Cas9 system is simple, efficient and accurate in some organisms; however, it has proven extremely difficult in microalgae including the model alga Chlamydomonas. We solved this problem by delivering Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) comprising the Cas9 protein and sgRNAs to avoid cytotoxicity and off-targeting associated with vector-driven expression of Cas9. We obtained CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations at three loci including MAA7, CpSRP43 and ChlM, and targeted mutagenic efficiency was improved up to 100 fold compared to the first report of transgenic Cas9-induced mutagenesis. Interestingly, we found that unrelated vectors used for the selection purpose were predominantly integrated at the Cas9 cut site, indicative of NHEJ-mediated knock-in events. As expected with Cas9 RNPs, no off-targeting was found in one of the mutagenic screens. In conclusion, we improved the knockout efficiency by using Cas9 RNPs, which opens great opportunities not only for biological research but also industrial applications in Chlamydomonas and other microalgae. Findings of the NHEJ-mediated knock-in events will allow applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in microalgae, including “safe harboring” techniques shown in other organisms. PMID:27291619

  1. Early and brain region-specific decrease of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis in Huntington's disease: A cross-validation study in Q175 knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; Di Paolo, Eleonora; Leoni, Valerio; Caccia, Claudio; Ferrari Bardile, Costanza; Mohammed, Hussein; Di Donato, Stefano; Kwak, Seung; Marchionini, Deanna; Turner, Scott; Cattaneo, Elena; Valenza, Marta

    2017-02-01

    Cholesterol precursors and cholesterol levels are reduced in brain regions of Huntington's disease (HD) mice. Here we quantified the rate of in vivo de novo cholesterol biosynthesis in the HD brain. Samples from different brain regions and blood of the heterozygous knock-in mouse model carrying 175 CAG repeats (Q175) at different phenotypic stages were processed independently by two research units to quantify cholesterol synthesis rate by (2)H2O labeling and measure the concentrations of lathosterol, cholesterol and its brain-specific cholesterol catabolite 24-hydroxy-cholesterol (24OHC) by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The daily synthesis rate of cholesterol and the corresponding concentration of lathosterol were significantly reduced in the striatum of heterozygous Q175 mice early in the disease course. We also report that the decrease in lathosterol was inversely correlated with CAG-size at symptomatic stage, as observed in striatal samples from an allelic series of HD mice. There was also a significant correlation between the fractional synthesis rates of total cholesterol and 24OHC in brain of wild-type (WT) and Q175 mice, supporting the evidence that plasma 24OHC may reflect cholesterol synthesis in the adult brain. This comprehensive analysis demonstrates consistent cholesterol biosynthesis defects in HD mouse models and suggests that plasma 24OHC may serve as a biomarker of brain cholesterol metabolism.

  2. Inhibitory Interneuron Progenitor Transplantation Restores Normal Learning and Memory in ApoE4 Knock-In Mice without or with Aβ Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Leslie M.; Djukic, Biljana; Arnold, Christine; Gillespie, Anna K.; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Wang, Max M.; Zhang, Olivia; Knoferle, Johanna; Rubenstein, John L.R.; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory and inhibitory balance of neuronal network activity is essential for normal brain function and may be of particular importance to memory. Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 and amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, two major players in Alzheimer's disease (AD), cause inhibitory interneuron impairments and aberrant neuronal activity in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in AD-related mouse models and humans, leading to learning and memory deficits. To determine whether replacing the lost or impaired interneurons rescues neuronal signaling and behavioral deficits, we transplanted embryonic interneuron progenitors into the hippocampal hilus of aged apoE4 knock-in mice without or with Aβ accumulation. In both conditions, the transplanted cells developed into mature interneurons, functionally integrated into the hippocampal circuitry, and restored normal learning and memory. Thus, restricted hilar transplantation of inhibitory interneurons restores normal cognitive function in two widely used AD-related mouse models, highlighting the importance of interneuron impairments in AD pathogenesis and the potential of cell replacement therapy for AD. More broadly, it demonstrates that excitatory and inhibitory balance are crucial for learning and memory, and suggests an avenue for investigating the processes of learning and memory and their alterations in healthy aging and diseases. PMID:25031394

  3. Efficient gene knock-out and knock-in with transgenic Cas9 in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhaoyu; Ren, Mengda; Wu, Menghua; Dai, Junbiao; Rong, Yikang S; Gao, Guanjun

    2014-03-21

    Bacterial Cas9 nuclease induces site-specific DNA breaks using small gRNA as guides. Cas9 has been successfully introduced into Drosophila for genome editing. Here, we improve the versatility of this method by developing a transgenic system that expresses Cas9 in the Drosophila germline. Using this system, we induced inheritable knock-out mutations by injecting only the gRNA into embryos, achieved highly efficient mutagenesis by expressing gRNA from the promoter of a novel non-coding RNA gene, and recovered homologous recombination-based knock-in of a fluorescent marker at a rate of 4.5% by co-injecting gRNA with a circular DNA donor.

  4. Knock-in model of Dravet syndrome reveals a constitutive and conditional reduction in sodium current

    PubMed Central

    Schutte, Ryan J.; Schutte, Soleil S.; Algara, Jacqueline; Barragan, Eden V.; Gilligan, Jeff; Staber, Cynthia; Savva, Yiannis A.; Smith, Martin A.; Reenan, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of mutations in the SCN1A sodium channel gene confer a wide spectrum of epileptic disorders, requiring efficient model systems to study cellular mechanisms and identify potential therapeutic targets. We recently demonstrated that Drosophila knock-in flies carrying the K1270T SCN1A mutation known to cause a form of genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) exhibit a heat-induced increase in sodium current activity and seizure phenotype. To determine whether different SCN1A mutations cause distinct phenotypes in Drosophila as they do in humans, this study focuses on a knock-in line carrying a mutation that causes a more severe seizure disorder termed Dravet syndrome (DS). Introduction of the DS SCN1A mutation (S1231R) into the Drosophila sodium channel gene para results in flies that exhibit spontaneous and heat-induced seizures with distinct characteristics and lower onset temperature than the GEFS+ flies. Electrophysiological studies of GABAergic interneurons in the brains of adult DS flies reveal, for the first time in an in vivo model system, that a missense DS mutation causes a constitutive and conditional reduction in sodium current activity and repetitive firing. In addition, feeding with the serotonin precursor 5-HTP suppresses heat-induced seizures in DS but not GEFS+ flies. The distinct alterations of sodium currents in DS and GEFS+ GABAergic interneurons demonstrate that both loss- and gain-of-function alterations in sodium currents are capable of causing reduced repetitive firing and seizure phenotypes. The mutation-specific effects of 5-HTP on heat-induced seizures suggest the serotonin pathway as a potential therapeutic target for DS. PMID:24805083

  5. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E; Haliburton, Genevieve E; Ye, Chun J; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Doudna, Jennifer A; Marson, Alexander

    2015-08-18

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently "knock out" genes and "knock in" targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4(+) T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ∼40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ∼20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.

  6. Gene correction of a duchenne muscular dystrophy mutation by meganuclease-enhanced exon knock-in.

    PubMed

    Popplewell, Linda; Koo, Taeyoung; Leclerc, Xavier; Duclert, Aymeric; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Gouble, Agnés; Mouly, Vincent; Voit, Thomas; Pâques, Frédéric; Cédrone, Frédéric; Isman, Olga; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J; Dickson, George

    2013-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe inherited, muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Gene therapy development for DMD has concentrated on vector-based DMD minigene transfer, cell-based gene therapy using genetically modified adult muscle stem cells or healthy wild-type donor cells, and antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon-skipping therapy to restore the reading frame of the mutated DMD gene. This study is an investigation into DMD gene targeting-mediated correction of deletions in human patient myoblasts using a target-specific meganuclease (MN) and a homologous recombination repair matrix. The MN was designed to cleave within DMD intron 44, upstream of a deletion hotspot, and integration-competent lentiviral vectors expressing the nuclease (LVcMN) were generated. MN western blotting and deep gene sequencing for LVcMN-induced non-homologous end-joining InDels (microdeletions or microinsertions) confirmed efficient MN expression and activity in transduced DMD myoblasts. A homologous repair matrix carrying exons 45-52 (RM45-52) was designed and packaged into integration-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLVs; LVdRM45-52). After cotransduction of DMD myoblasts harboring a deletion of exons 45 to 52 with LVcMN and LVdRM45-52 vectors, targeted knock-in of the RM45-52 region in the correct location in DMD intron 44, and expression of full-length, correctly spliced wild-type dystrophin mRNA containing exons 45-52 were observed. This work demonstrates that genome surgery on human DMD gene mutations can be achieved by MN-induced locus-specific genome cleavage and homologous recombination knock-in of deleted exons. The feasibility of human DMD gene repair in patient myoblasts has exciting therapeutic potential.

  7. Aberrant Autophagic Response in The Muscle of A Knock-in Mouse Model of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Rusmini, Paola; Polanco, Maria Josefa; Cristofani, Riccardo; Cicardi, Maria Elena; Meroni, Marco; Galbiati, Mariarita; Piccolella, Margherita; Messi, Elio; Giorgetti, Elisa; Lieberman, Andrew P; Milioto, Carmelo; Rocchi, Anna; Aggarwal, Tanya; Pennuto, Maria; Crippa, Valeria; Poletti, Angelo

    2015-10-22

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by loss of motoneurons and sensory neurons, accompanied by atrophy of muscle cells. SBMA is due to an androgen receptor containing a polyglutamine tract (ARpolyQ) that misfolds and aggregates, thereby perturbing the protein quality control (PQC) system. Using SBMA AR113Q mice we analyzed proteotoxic stress-induced alterations of HSPB8-mediated PQC machinery promoting clearance of misfolded proteins by autophagy. In muscle of symptomatic AR113Q male mice, we found expression upregulation of Pax-7, myogenin, E2-ubiquitin ligase UBE2Q1 and acetylcholine receptor (AchR), but not of MyoD, and of two E3-ligases (MuRF-1 and Cullin3). TGFβ1 and PGC-1α were also robustly upregulated. We also found a dramatic perturbation of the autophagic response, with upregulation of most autophagic markers (Beclin-1, ATG10, p62/SQSTM1, LC3) and of the HSPB8-mediated PQC response. Both HSPB8 and its co-chaperone BAG3 were robustly upregulated together with other specific HSPB8 interactors (HSPB2 and HSPB3). Notably, the BAG3:BAG1 ratio increased in muscle suggesting preferential misfolded proteins routing to autophagy rather than to proteasome. Thus, mutant ARpolyQ induces a potent autophagic response in muscle cells. Alteration in HSPB8-based PQC machinery may represent muscle-specific biomarkers useful to assess SBMA progression in mice and patients in response to pharmacological treatments.

  8. Aberrant Autophagic Response in The Muscle of A Knock-in Mouse Model of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rusmini, Paola; Polanco, Maria Josefa; Cristofani, Riccardo; Cicardi, Maria Elena; Meroni, Marco; Galbiati, Mariarita; Piccolella, Margherita; Messi, Elio; Giorgetti, Elisa; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Milioto, Carmelo; Rocchi, Anna; Aggarwal, Tanya; Pennuto, Maria; Crippa, Valeria; Poletti, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by loss of motoneurons and sensory neurons, accompanied by atrophy of muscle cells. SBMA is due to an androgen receptor containing a polyglutamine tract (ARpolyQ) that misfolds and aggregates, thereby perturbing the protein quality control (PQC) system. Using SBMA AR113Q mice we analyzed proteotoxic stress-induced alterations of HSPB8-mediated PQC machinery promoting clearance of misfolded proteins by autophagy. In muscle of symptomatic AR113Q male mice, we found expression upregulation of Pax-7, myogenin, E2-ubiquitin ligase UBE2Q1 and acetylcholine receptor (AchR), but not of MyoD, and of two E3-ligases (MuRF-1 and Cullin3). TGFβ1 and PGC-1α were also robustly upregulated. We also found a dramatic perturbation of the autophagic response, with upregulation of most autophagic markers (Beclin-1, ATG10, p62/SQSTM1, LC3) and of the HSPB8-mediated PQC response. Both HSPB8 and its co-chaperone BAG3 were robustly upregulated together with other specific HSPB8 interactors (HSPB2 and HSPB3). Notably, the BAG3:BAG1 ratio increased in muscle suggesting preferential misfolded proteins routing to autophagy rather than to proteasome. Thus, mutant ARpolyQ induces a potent autophagic response in muscle cells. Alteration in HSPB8-based PQC machinery may represent muscle-specific biomarkers useful to assess SBMA progression in mice and patients in response to pharmacological treatments. PMID:26490709

  9. Effects of Pin1 Loss in HdhQ111 Knock-in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, Elena; Michelazzi, Silvia; Maurutto, Marta; Carnemolla, Alisia; Ciani, Yari; Vatta, Paolo; Roncaglia, Paola; Zucchelli, Silvia; Leanza, Giampiero; Mantovani, Fiamma; Gustincich, Stefano; Santoro, Claudio; Piazza, Silvano; Del Sal, Giannino; Persichetti, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a fatal, dominantly inherited, neurodegenerative disorder due to a pathological expansion of the CAG repeat in the coding region of the HTT gene. In the quest for understanding the molecular basis of neurodegeneration, we have previously demonstrated that the prolyl isomerase Pin1 plays a crucial role in mediating p53-dependent apoptosis triggered by mutant huntingtin (mHtt) in vitro. To assess the effects of the lack of Pin1 in vivo, we have bred Pin1 knock-out mice with HdhQ111 knock-in mice, a genetically precise model of HD. We show that Pin1 genetic ablation modifies a portion of HdhQ111 phenotypes in a time-dependent fashion. As an early event, Pin1 activity reduces the DNA damage response (DDR). In midlife mice, by taking advantage of next-generation sequencing technology, we show that Pin1 activity modulates a portion of the alterations triggered by mHtt, extending the role of Pin1 to two additional HdhQ111 phenotypes: the unbalance in the “synthesis/concentration of hormones”, as well as the alteration of “Wnt/β-catenin signaling”. In aging animals, Pin1 significantly increases the number of mHtt-positive nuclear inclusions while it reduces gliosis. In summary, this work provides further support for a role of Pin1 in HD pathogenesis. PMID:27199664

  10. Progressive dopaminergic alterations and mitochondrial abnormalities in LRRK2 G2019S knock in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yue, M.; Hinkle, K.; Davies, P.; Trushina, E.; Fiesel, F.; Christenson, T.; Schroeder, A.; Zhang, L.; Bowles, E.; Behrouz, B.; Lincoln, S.; Beevers, J.; Milnerwood, A.; Kurti, A.; McLean, P. J.; Fryer, J. D.; Springer, W.; Dickson, D.; Farrer, M.; Melrose, H.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 gene represent the most common genetic cause of late onset Parkinson’s disease. The physiological and pathological roles of LRRK2 are yet to be fully determined but evidence points towards LRRK2 mutations causing a gain in kinase function, impacting on neuronal maintenance, vesicular dynamics and neurotransmitter release. To explore the role of physiological levels of mutant LRRK2, we created knock in mice harboring the most common LRRK2 mutation G2019S in their own genome. We have performed comprehensive dopaminergic, behavioral and neuropathological analyses in this model up to 24 months of age. We find elevated kinase activity in the brain of both heterozygous and homozygous mice. Although normal at 6 months, by 12 months of age, basal and pharmacologically induced extracellular release of dopamine is impaired in both heterozygous and homozygous mice, corroborating previous findings in transgenic models over-expressing mutant LRRK2. Via in vivo microdialysis measurement of basal and drug- evoked extracellular release of dopamine and its metabolites, our findings indicate that exocytotic release from the vesicular pool is impaired. Furthermore, profound mitochondrial abnormalities are evident in the striatum of older homozygous G2019S mice, which are consistent with mitochondrial fission arrest. We anticipate the G2019S will be a useful pre-clinical model for further evaluation of early mechanistic events in LRRK2 pathogenesis and for second-hit approaches to model disease progression. PMID:25836420

  11. Fluorescent knock-in mice to decipher the physiopathological role of G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ceredig, Rhian A.; Massotte, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) modulate most physiological functions but are also critically involved in numerous pathological states. Approximately a third of marketed drugs target GPCRs, which places this family of receptors in the main arena of pharmacological pre-clinical and clinical research. The complexity of GPCR function demands comprehensive appraisal in native environment to collect in-depth knowledge of receptor physiopathological roles and assess the potential of therapeutic molecules. Identifying neurons expressing endogenous GPCRs is therefore essential to locate them within functional circuits whereas GPCR visualization with subcellular resolution is required to get insight into agonist-induced trafficking. Both remain frequently poorly investigated because direct visualization of endogenous receptors is often hampered by the lack of appropriate tools. Also, monitoring intracellular trafficking requires real-time visualization to gather in-depth knowledge. In this context, knock-in mice expressing a fluorescent protein or a fluorescent version of a GPCR under the control of the endogenous promoter not only help to decipher neuroanatomical circuits but also enable real-time monitoring with subcellular resolution thus providing invaluable information on their trafficking in response to a physiological or a pharmacological challenge. This review will present the animal models and discuss their contribution to the understanding of the physiopathological role of GPCRs. We will also address the drawbacks associated with this methodological approach and browse future directions. PMID:25610398

  12. Generation of knock-in mice that express nuclear enhanced green fluorescent protein and tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase in the notochord from Foxa2 and T loci.

    PubMed

    Imuta, Yu; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Jang, Chuan-Wei; Behringer, Richard R; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2013-03-01

    The node and the notochord are important embryonic signaling centers that control embryonic pattern formation. Notochord progenitor cells present in the node and later in the posterior end of the notochord move anteriorly to generate the notochord. To understand the dynamics of cell movement during notochord development and the molecular mechanisms controlling this event, analyses of cell movements using time-lapse imaging and conditional manipulation of gene activities are required. To achieve this goal, we generated two knock-in mouse lines that simultaneously express nuclear enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and tamoxifen-inducible Cre, CreER(T2) , from two notochord gene loci, Foxa2 and T (Brachury). In Foxa2(nEGFP-CreERT2/+) and T(nEGFP-CreERT2/+) embryos, nuclei of the Foxa2 or T-expressing cells, which include the node, notochord, and endoderm (Foxa2) or wide range of posterior mesoderm (T), were labeled with EGFP at intensities that can be used for live imaging. Cre activity was also induced in cells expressing Foxa2 and T 1 day after tamoxifen administration. These mice are expected to be useful tools for analyzing the mechanisms of notochord development.

  13. Specific expression of FOXP2 in cerebellum improves ultrasonic vocalization in heterozygous but not in homozygous Foxp2 (R552H) knock-in pups.

    PubMed

    Fujita-Jimbo, Eriko; Momoi, Takashi

    2014-04-30

    The R553H mutation has been found in the FOXP2 gene of patients with speech-language disorder. Foxp2(R552H) knock-in (KI) mice exhibit poor dendritic development of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum and impaired ultrasonic vocalization (USV), which is related to human speech and language; compared with wild-type mice, heterozygous Foxp2(R552H)-KI pups exhibit the reduced number of whistle-type USVs and the increased short-type ones, while homozygous pups exhibit only click-type USVs but no whistle-type or short-type ones. To make clear the relationship between the role of Foxp2 in the cerebellum and whistle-type USVs activity, we prepared transgenic (Tg) mice specifically expressing human FOXP2-myc in cerebellum (Pcp2-FOXP2-myc-Tg mice) by using purkinje cell protein-2 (Pcp2) promoter. FOXP2-myc expression in the cerebellum increased the relative numbers of whistle-type USVs in the heterozygous Foxp2(R552H)-KI pups and recovered their USVs but did not in the homozygous ones. Foxp2 in the cerebellum may pertain to the brain network engaged in whistle-type USVs activities including modification, but not their production. There may be common molecular contribution of Purkinje cells to human FOXP2-mediated speech-language and mouse Foxp2-mediated USVs.

  14. Conditional Expression of E2A-HLF Induces B-Cell Precursor Death and Myeloproliferative-Like Disease in Knock-In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duque-Afonso, Jesús; Smith, Kevin S.; Cleary, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are driver mutations of human cancers, particularly leukemias. They define disease subtypes and are used as prognostic markers, for minimal residual disease monitoring and therapeutic targets. Due to their low incidence, several translocations and their biological consequences remain poorly characterized. To address this, we engineered mouse strains that conditionally express E2A-HLF, a fusion oncogene from the translocation t(17;19) associated with 1% of pediatric B-cell precursor ALL. Conditional oncogene activation and expression were directed to the B-cell compartment by the Cre driver promoters CD19 or Mb1 (Igα, CD79a), or to the hematopoietic stem cell compartment by the Mx1 promoter. E2A-HLF expression in B-cell progenitors induced hyposplenia and lymphopenia, whereas expression in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells was embryonic lethal. Increased cell death was detected in E2A-HLF expressing cells, suggesting the need for cooperating genetic events that suppress cell death for B-cell oncogenic transformation. E2A-HLF/Mb1.Cre aged mice developed a fatal myeloproliferative-like disorder with low frequency characterized by leukocytosis, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly and organ-infiltration by mature myelocytes. In conclusion, we have developed conditional E2A-HLF knock-in mice, which provide an experimental platform to study cooperating genetic events and further elucidate translational biology in cross-species comparative studies. PMID:26588248

  15. Mouse Genome Editing Using the CRISPR/Cas System.

    PubMed

    Harms, Donald W; Quadros, Rolen M; Seruggia, Davide; Ohtsuka, Masato; Takahashi, Gou; Montoliu, Lluis; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah B

    2014-10-01

    The availability of techniques to create desired genetic mutations has enabled the laboratory mouse as an extensively used model organism in biomedical research including human genetics. A new addition to this existing technical repertoire is the CRISPR/Cas system. Specifically, this system allows editing of the mouse genome much more quickly than the previously used techniques, and, more importantly, multiple mutations can be created in a single experiment. Here we provide protocols for preparation of CRISPR/Cas reagents and microinjection into one-cell mouse embryos to create knockout or knock-in mouse models.

  16. Mouse Genome Editing using CRISPR/Cas System

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Donald W; Quadros, Rolen M; Seruggia, Davide; Ohtsuka, Masato; Takahashi, Gou

    2015-01-01

    The availability of techniques to create desired genetic mutations has enabled the laboratory mouse as an extensively used model organism in biomedical research including human genetics. A new addition to this existing technical repertoire is the CRISPR/Cas system. Specifically, this system allows editing of the mouse genome much faster than the previously used techniques and more importantly multiple mutations can be created in a single experiment. Here we provide protocols for preparation of CRISPR/Cas reagents and microinjection into one cell mouse embryos to create knockout or knock-in mouse models. PMID:25271839

  17. Detailed expression pattern of aldolase C (Aldoc) in the cerebellum, retina and other areas of the CNS studied in Aldoc-Venus knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hirofumi; Aoki, Hanako; Ajioka, Itsuki; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Oh-Nishi, Arata; Sakimura, Kenji; Sugihara, Izumi

    2014-01-01

    Aldolase C (Aldoc, also known as "zebrin II"), a brain type isozyme of a glycolysis enzyme, is expressed heterogeneously in subpopulations of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) that are arranged longitudinally in a complex striped pattern in the cerebellar cortex, a pattern which is closely related to the topography of input and output axonal projections. Here, we generated knock-in Aldoc-Venus mice in which Aldoc expression is visualized by expression of a fluorescent protein, Venus. Since there was no obvious phenotypes in general brain morphology and in the striped pattern of the cerebellum in mutants, we made detailed observation of Aldoc expression pattern in the nervous system by using Venus expression in Aldoc-Venus heterozygotes. High levels of Venus expression were observed in cerebellar PCs, cartwheel cells in the dorsal cochlear nucleus, sensory epithelium of the inner ear and in all major types of retinal cells, while moderate levels of Venus expression were observed in astrocytes and satellite cells in the dorsal root ganglion. The striped arrangement of PCs that express Venus to different degrees was carefully traced with serial section alignment analysis and mapped on the unfolded scheme of the entire cerebellar cortex to re-identify all individual Aldoc stripes. A longitudinally striped boundary of Aldoc expression was first identified in the mouse flocculus, and was correlated with the climbing fiber projection pattern and expression of another compartmental marker molecule, heat shock protein 25 (HSP25). As in the rat, the cerebellar nuclei were divided into the rostrodorsal negative and the caudoventral positive portions by distinct projections of Aldoc-positive and negative PC axons in the mouse. Identification of the cerebellar Aldoc stripes in this study, as indicated in sample coronal and horizontal sections as well as in sample surface photos of whole-mount preparations, can be referred to in future experiments.

  18. An Allosteric Potentiator of the Dopamine D1 Receptor Increases Locomotor Activity in Human D1 Knock-In Mice without Causing Stereotypy or Tachyphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Beverly A.; Schaus, John M.; Beck, James P.; Hao, Junliang; Krushinski, Joseph H.; Reinhard, Matthew R.; Cohen, Michael P.; Hellman, Sarah L.; Getman, Brian G.; Wang, Xushan; Menezes, Michelle M.; Maren, Deanna L.; Falcone, Julie F.; Anderson, Wesley H.; Wright, Rebecca A.; Morin, S. Michelle; Knopp, Kelly L.; Adams, Benjamin L.; Rogovoy, Borys; Okun, Ilya; Suter, Todd M.; Statnick, Michael A.; Gehlert, Donald R.; Nelson, David L.; Lucaites, Virginia L.; Emkey, Renee; DeLapp, Neil W.; Wiernicki, Todd R.; Cramer, Jeffrey W.; Yang, Charles R.; Bruns, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    Allosteric potentiators amplify the sensitivity of physiologic control circuits, a mode of action that could provide therapeutic advantages. This hypothesis was tested with the dopamine D1 receptor potentiator DETQ [2-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-1-((1S,3R)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-5-(2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)-1-methyl-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1H)-yl)ethan-1-one]. In human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells expressing the human D1 receptor, DETQ induced a 21-fold leftward shift in the cAMP response to dopamine, with a Kb of 26 nM. The maximum response to DETQ alone was ∼12% of the maximum response to dopamine, suggesting weak allosteric agonist activity. DETQ was ∼30-fold less potent at rat and mouse D1 receptors and was inactive at the human D5 receptor. To enable studies in rodents, an hD1 knock-in mouse was generated. DETQ (3–20 mg/kg orally) caused a robust (∼10-fold) increase in locomotor activity (LMA) in habituated hD1 mice but was inactive in wild-type mice. The LMA response to DETQ was blocked by the D1 antagonist SCH39166 and was dependent on endogenous dopamine. LMA reached a plateau at higher doses (30–240 mg/kg) even though free brain levels of DETQ continued to increase over the entire dose range. In contrast, the D1 agonists SKF 82958, A-77636, and dihydrexidine showed bell-shaped dose-response curves with a profound reduction in LMA at higher doses; video-tracking confirmed that the reduction in LMA caused by SKF 82958 was due to competing stereotyped behaviors. When dosed daily for 4 days, DETQ continued to elicit an increase in LMA, whereas the D1 agonist A-77636 showed complete tachyphylaxis by day 2. These results confirm that allosteric potentiators may have advantages compared with direct-acting agonists. PMID:27811173

  19. A Blau syndrome-associated Nod2 mutation alters expression of full length NOD2 and limits responses to muramyl dipeptide in knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dugan, Jae; Griffiths, Eric; Snow, Paige; Rosenzweig, Holly; Lee, Ellen; Brown, Brieanna; Carr, Daniel W.; Rose, Carlos; Rosenbaum, James; Davey, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The biochemical mechanism by which mutations in nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD2) cause Blau syndrome is unknown. Several studies have examined the effect of mutations associated with Blau syndrome in vitro, but none have looked at the implication of the mutations in vivo. To test the hypothesis that mutated NOD2 causes alterations in signaling pathways downstream of NOD2, we created a Nod2 knock-in mouse carrying the most common mutation seen in Blau syndrome, R314Q (corresponding to R334Q in humans). The endogenous regulatory elements of mouse Nod2 were unaltered. R314Q mice showed reduced cytokine production in response to i.p. and intravitreal muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Macrophages from R314Q mice showed reduced NF-κB and IL-6 responses, blunted phosphorylation of MAPKs, and deficient ubiquitination of receptor-interacting protein 2 in response to MDP. R314Q mice expressed a truncated 80 kDa form of NOD2 that was most likely generated by a posttranslational event since there was no evidence for a stop codon or alternative splicing event. Human macrophages from 2 patients with Blau syndrome also showed a reduction of both cytokine production and phosphorylation of p38 in response to MDP, indicating that both R314Q mice and cells from patients with Blau syndrome show reduced responses to MDP. These data indicate that the R314Q mutation when studied with the Nod2 endogenous regulatory elements left intact is associated with marked structural and biochemical changes that are significantly different from those observed from studies of the mutation using over-expression, transient transfection systems. PMID:25429073

  20. The generation of knock-in mice expressing fluorescently tagged galanin receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Niall; Holmes, Fiona E.; Hobson, Sally-Ann; Vanderplank, Penny; Leard, Alan; Balthasar, Nina; Wynick, David

    2015-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin has diverse roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems, by activating the G protein-coupled receptors Gal1, Gal2 and the less studied Gal3 (GalR1–3 gene products). There is a wealth of data on expression of Gal1–3 at the mRNA level, but not at the protein level due to the lack of specificity of currently available antibodies. Here we report the generation of knock-in mice expressing Gal1 or Gal2 receptor fluorescently tagged at the C-terminus with, respectively, mCherry or hrGFP (humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein). In dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons expressing the highest levels of Gal1-mCherry, localization to the somatic cell membrane was detected by live-cell fluorescence and immunohistochemistry, and that fluorescence decreased upon addition of galanin. In spinal cord, abundant Gal1-mCherry immunoreactive processes were detected in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn, and highly expressing intrinsic neurons of the lamina III/IV border showed both somatic cell membrane localization and outward transport of receptor from the cell body, detected as puncta within cell processes. In brain, high levels of Gal1-mCherry immunofluorescence were detected within thalamus, hypothalamus and amygdala, with a high density of nerve endings in the external zone of the median eminence, and regions with lesser immunoreactivity included the dorsal raphe nucleus. Gal2-hrGFP mRNA was detected in DRG, but live-cell fluorescence was at the limits of detection, drawing attention to both the much lower mRNA expression than to Gal1 in mice and the previously unrecognized potential for translational control by upstream open reading frames (uORFs). PMID:26292267

  1. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    DOE PAGES

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; ...

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9more » RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.« less

  2. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Marson, Alexander

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.

  3. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Marson, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ∼40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ∼20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells. PMID:26216948

  4. A novel luciferase knock-in reporter system for studying transcriptional regulation of the human Sox2 gene.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Weifeng; Li, Yan; Liu, Kuan; Zhao, Junli; Sun, Xiaohong; Shan, Linlin; Mao, Qinwen; Xia, Haibin

    2016-02-10

    Sox2 is an important transcriptional factor that has multiple functions in stem cell maintenance and tumorigenesis. To investigate the transcriptional regulation of the Sox2 gene, a luciferase knock-in reporter system was established in HEK293 cells by placing the luciferase gene in the genome under the control of the Sox2 gene promoter using a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated genome editing technique. PCR and Southern blot results confirmed the site-specific integration of a single copy of the exogenous luciferase gene into the genome. To prove the reliability and sensitivity of this novel luciferase knock-in system, a CRISPR/Cas transcription activation system for the Sox2 gene was constructed and applied to the knock-in system. The results indicated that luciferase activity was directly correlated with the activity of the Sox2 endogenous promoter. This novel system will be a useful tool to study the transcriptional regulation of Sox2, and has great potential in medical and industrial applications.

  5. A Dominant Mutation in Rpe65, D477G, Delays Dark Adaptation and Disturbs the Visual Cycle in the Mutant Knock-In Mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Younghwa; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Chakraborty, Dibyendu; Ma, Jian-Xing

    2017-03-01

    RPE65 is an indispensable component of the retinoid visual cycle in vertebrates, through which the visual chromophore 11-cis-retinal (11-cis-RAL) is generated to maintain normal vision. Various blinding conditions in humans, such as Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), are attributed to either homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in RPE65. Herein, we investigated D477G missense mutation, an unprecedented dominant-acting mutation of RPE65 identified in patients with autosomal dominant RP. We generated a D477G knock-in (KI) mouse and characterized its phenotypes. Although RPE65 protein levels were decreased in heterozygous KI mice, their scotopic, maximal, and photopic electroretinography responses were comparable to those of wild-type (WT) mice in stationary condition. As shown by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, levels of 11-cis-RAL in fully dark-adapted heterozygous KI mice were similar to that in WT mice. However, kinetics of 11-cis-RAL regeneration after light exposure were significantly slower in heterozygous KI mice compared with WT and RPE65 heterozygous knockout mice. Furthermore, heterozygous KI mice exhibited lower A-wave recovery compared with WT mice after photobleaching, suggesting a delayed dark adaptation. Taken together, these observations suggest that D477G acts as a dominant-negative mutant of RPE65 that delays chromophore regeneration. The KI mice provide a useful model for further understanding of the pathogenesis of RP associated with this RPE65 mutant and for the development of therapeutic strategies.

  6. Time-restricted feeding of rapidly digested starches causes stronger entrainment of the liver clock in PER2::LUCIFERASE knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Itokawa, Misa; Hirao, Akiko; Nagahama, Hiroki; Otsuka, Makiko; Ohtsu, Teiji; Furutani, Naoki; Hirao, Kazuko; Hatta, Tamao; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2013-02-01

    Restricting feeding to daytime can entrain circadian clocks in peripheral organs of rodents, and nutrients that rapidly increase the blood glucose level are suitable for inducing entrainment. However, dietetic issues, for example, whether or not the diet comprises heated food, have not been fully explored. We therefore hypothesized that rapidly digested starch causes stronger entrainment than slowly digested starch. The entrainment ability of the liver clock in PER2::LUCIFERASE knock-in mice, blood glucose levels, insulin levels, and acute changes in liver clock gene expression were compared between a β-starch (native)-substituted AIN-93M standard diet and an α-starch (gelatinized)-substituted diet. β-Corn and β-rice starch induced larger phase delays of the liver clock, larger blood glucose increases, and higher Per2 gene expression in the liver compared with β-potato starch. Starch granule size, as examined by electron microscopy, was larger for β-potato starch than for β-corn or β-rice starch. After heating, we obtained gelatinized α-potato, α-corn, and α-rice starch, which showed destruction of the crystal structure and a high level of gelatinization. No difference in the increase of blood glucose or insulin levels was observed between β-corn and α-corn starch, or between β-rice and α-rice starch. In contrast, α-potato starch caused higher levels of glucose and insulin compared with β-potato starch. An α-potato starch-substituted diet induced larger phase delays of the liver clock than did β-potato starch. Therefore, rapidly digested starch is appropriate for peripheral clock entrainment. Dietetic issues (heated vs unheated) are important when applying basic mouse data to humans.

  7. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Accelerates Relaxation and Ca(2+) Transient Decay and Desensitizes Myofilaments in Healthy and Mybpc3-Targeted Knock-in Cardiomyopathic Mice.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Felix W; Flenner, Frederik; Nasib, Mahtab; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Carrier, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited cardiac muscle disease with left ventricular hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction. Increased myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity could be the underlying cause of diastolic dysfunction. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), a catechin found in green tea, has been reported to decrease myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity in HCM models with troponin mutations. However, whether this is also the case for HCM-associated thick filament mutations is not known. Therefore, we evaluated whether EGCg affects the behavior of cardiomyocytes and myofilaments of an HCM mouse model carrying a gene mutation in cardiac myosin-binding protein C and exhibiting both increased myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity and diastolic dysfunction. Methods and Results: Acute effects of EGCg were tested on fractional sarcomere shortening and Ca(2+) transients in intact ventricular myocytes and on force-Ca(2+) relationship of skinned ventricular muscle strips isolated from Mybpc3-targeted knock-in (KI) and wild-type (WT) mice. Fractional sarcomere shortening and Ca(2+) transients were analyzed at 37°C under 1-Hz pacing in the absence or presence of EGCg (1.8 μM). At baseline and in the absence of Fura-2, KI cardiomyocytes displayed lower diastolic sarcomere length, higher fractional sarcomere shortening, longer time to peak shortening and time to 50% relengthening than WT cardiomyocytes. In WT and KI neither diastolic sarcomere length nor fractional sarcomere shortening were influenced by EGCg treatment, but relaxation time was reduced, to a greater extent in KI cells. EGCg shortened time to peak Ca(2+) and Ca(2+) transient decay in Fura-2-loaded WT and KI cardiomyocytes. EGCg did not influence phosphorylation of phospholamban. In skinned cardiac muscle strips, EGCg (30 μM) decreased Ca(2+) sensitivity in both groups. Conclusion: EGCg hastened relaxation and Ca(2+) transient decay to a larger extent in KI than in WT

  8. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Accelerates Relaxation and Ca2+ Transient Decay and Desensitizes Myofilaments in Healthy and Mybpc3-Targeted Knock-in Cardiomyopathic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Felix W.; Flenner, Frederik; Nasib, Mahtab; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Carrier, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited cardiac muscle disease with left ventricular hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction. Increased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity could be the underlying cause of diastolic dysfunction. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), a catechin found in green tea, has been reported to decrease myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity in HCM models with troponin mutations. However, whether this is also the case for HCM-associated thick filament mutations is not known. Therefore, we evaluated whether EGCg affects the behavior of cardiomyocytes and myofilaments of an HCM mouse model carrying a gene mutation in cardiac myosin-binding protein C and exhibiting both increased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity and diastolic dysfunction. Methods and Results: Acute effects of EGCg were tested on fractional sarcomere shortening and Ca2+ transients in intact ventricular myocytes and on force-Ca2+ relationship of skinned ventricular muscle strips isolated from Mybpc3-targeted knock-in (KI) and wild-type (WT) mice. Fractional sarcomere shortening and Ca2+ transients were analyzed at 37°C under 1-Hz pacing in the absence or presence of EGCg (1.8 μM). At baseline and in the absence of Fura-2, KI cardiomyocytes displayed lower diastolic sarcomere length, higher fractional sarcomere shortening, longer time to peak shortening and time to 50% relengthening than WT cardiomyocytes. In WT and KI neither diastolic sarcomere length nor fractional sarcomere shortening were influenced by EGCg treatment, but relaxation time was reduced, to a greater extent in KI cells. EGCg shortened time to peak Ca2+ and Ca2+ transient decay in Fura-2-loaded WT and KI cardiomyocytes. EGCg did not influence phosphorylation of phospholamban. In skinned cardiac muscle strips, EGCg (30 μM) decreased Ca2+ sensitivity in both groups. Conclusion: EGCg hastened relaxation and Ca2+ transient decay to a larger extent in KI than in WT cardiomyocytes. This

  9. TALEN-mediated knock-in via non-homologous end joining in the crustacean Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Takashi; Kato, Yasuhiko; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are versatile tools that enable the insertion of DNA into different organisms. Here, we confirmed TALEN-mediated knock-in via non-homologous end joining in the crustacean Daphnia magna, a model organism for ecological and toxicological genomics. We tested two different TALENs, ey1 TALEN and ey2 TALEN, both of which target the eyeless locus. The donor DNA plasmid, harbouring the H2B-GFP reporter gene, was designed to contain both TALEN target sites and was co-injected with each TALEN mRNA into eggs. The ey1 TALEN and ey2 TALEN constructs both resulted in H2B-GFP expression in Daphnia with a germline transmission efficiency of 3%. Of the three transgenic animals generated, two had donor DNA at the targeted genomic site, which suggested concurrent cleavage of the injected plasmid DNA and genome DNA. The availability of such tools that are capable of targeted knock-in of foreign genes will be extremely useful for advancing the knowledge of gene function and contribute to an increased understanding of functional genomics in Daphnia. PMID:27819301

  10. Efficient generation of knock-in transgenic zebrafish carrying reporter/driver genes by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yukiko; Hisano, Yu; Kawahara, Atsuo; Higashijima, Shin-ichi

    2014-10-08

    The type II bacterial CRISPR/Cas9 system is rapidly becoming popular for genome-engineering due to its simplicity, flexibility, and high efficiency. Recently, targeted knock-in of a long DNA fragment via homology-independent DNA repair has been achieved in zebrafish using CRISPR/Cas9 system. This raised the possibility that knock-in transgenic zebrafish could be efficiently generated using CRISPR/Cas9. However, how widely this method can be applied for the targeting integration of foreign genes into endogenous genomic loci is unclear. Here, we report efficient generation of knock-in transgenic zebrafish that have cell-type specific Gal4 or reporter gene expression. A donor plasmid containing a heat-shock promoter was co-injected with a short guide RNA (sgRNA) targeted for genome digestion, a sgRNA targeted for donor plasmid digestion, and Cas9 mRNA. We have succeeded in establishing stable knock-in transgenic fish with several different constructs for 4 genetic loci at a frequency being exceeding 25%. Due to its simplicity, design flexibility, and high efficiency, we propose that CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock-in will become a standard method for the generation transgenic zebrafish.

  11. Targeted gene knock-in by CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in porcine zygotes.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Eun; Powell, Anne; Sandmaier, Shelley E S; Kim, Chan-Mi; Mileham, Alan; Donovan, David M; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2017-02-14

    The domestic pig is an important "dual purpose" animal model for agricultural and biomedical applications. There is an emerging consensus in the biomedical community for the use of large animal models such as pigs to either serve as an alternative, or complement investigations from the mouse. However, the use of pig has not proven popular due to technical difficulties and time required in generating models with desired genetic modifications. In this regard, the ability to directly modify the genome in the zygote and generate edited animals is highly desirable. This report demonstrates for the first time, the generation of gene targeted animals by direct injection of Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complex and short stretches of DNA sequences into porcine zygotes. The Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes was pre-complexed with a single guide RNA targeting downstream of the ubiquitously expressed COL1A gene, and co-injected with a single-stranded repair template into porcine zygotes. Using this approach a line of pigs that carry pseudo attP sites within the COL1A locus to enable phiC31 integrase mediated introduction of transgenes has been generated. This new route for genome engineering in pigs via zygote injection should greatly enhance applications in both agriculture and biomedicine.

  12. Targeted gene knock-in by CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in porcine zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki-Eun; Powell, Anne; Sandmaier, Shelley E. S.; Kim, Chan-Mi; Mileham, Alan; Donovan, David M.; Telugu, Bhanu P.

    2017-01-01

    The domestic pig is an important “dual purpose” animal model for agricultural and biomedical applications. There is an emerging consensus in the biomedical community for the use of large animal models such as pigs to either serve as an alternative, or complement investigations from the mouse. However, the use of pig has not proven popular due to technical difficulties and time required in generating models with desired genetic modifications. In this regard, the ability to directly modify the genome in the zygote and generate edited animals is highly desirable. This report demonstrates for the first time, the generation of gene targeted animals by direct injection of Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complex and short stretches of DNA sequences into porcine zygotes. The Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes was pre-complexed with a single guide RNA targeting downstream of the ubiquitously expressed COL1A gene, and co-injected with a single-stranded repair template into porcine zygotes. Using this approach a line of pigs that carry pseudo attP sites within the COL1A locus to enable phiC31 integrase mediated introduction of transgenes has been generated. This new route for genome engineering in pigs via zygote injection should greatly enhance applications in both agriculture and biomedicine. PMID:28195163

  13. Generation of α-1,3-galactosyltransferase knocked-out transgenic cloned pigs with knocked-in five human genes.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Dae-Jin; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Hwang, In-Sul; Kim, Dong-Ern; Kim, Hyung-Joo; Kim, Jang-Seong; Lee, Kichoon; Im, Gi-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Hwang, Seongsoo

    2017-02-01

    Recent progress in genetic manipulation of pigs designated for xenotransplantation ha6s shown considerable promise on xenograft survival in primates. However, genetic modification of multiple genes in donor pigs by knock-out and knock-in technologies, aiming to enhance immunological tolerance against transplanted organs in the recipients, has not been evaluated for health issues of donor pigs. We produced transgenic Massachusetts General Hospital piglets by knocking-out the α-1,3-galactosyltransferase (GT) gene and by simultaneously knocking-in an expression cassette containing five different human genes including, DAF, CD39, TFPI, C1 inhibitor (C1-INH), and TNFAIP3 (A20) [GT(-(DAF/CD39/TFPI/C1-INH/TNFAIP3)/+)] that are connected by 2A peptide cleavage sequences to release individual proteins from a single translational product. All five individual protein products were successfully produced as determined by western blotting of umbilical cords from the newborn transgenic pigs. Although gross observation and histological examination revealed no significant pathological abnormality in transgenic piglets, hematological examination found that the transgenic piglets had abnormally low numbers of platelets and WBCs, including neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils, and lymphocytes. However, transgenic piglets had similar numbers of RBC and values of parameters related to RBC compared to the control littermate piglets. These data suggest that transgenic expression of those human genes in pigs impaired hematopoiesis except for erythropoiesis. In conclusion, our data suggest that transgenic expression of up to five different genes can be efficiently achieved and provide the basis for determining optimal dosages of transgene expression and combinations of the transgenes to warrant production of transgenic donor pigs without health issues.

  14. Absence of progeria-like disease phenotypes in knock-in mice expressing a non-farnesylated version of progerin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shao H; Chang, Sandy Y; Ren, Shuxun; Wang, Yibin; Andres, Douglas A; Spielmann, H Peter; Fong, Loren G; Young, Stephen G

    2011-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a mutant prelamin A, progerin, that terminates with a farnesylcysteine. HGPS knock-in mice (Lmna(HG/+)) develop severe progeria-like disease phenotypes. These phenotypes can be ameliorated with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI), suggesting that progerin's farnesyl lipid is important for disease pathogenesis and raising the possibility that FTIs could be useful for treating humans with HGPS. Subsequent studies showed that mice expressing non-farnesylated progerin (Lmna(nHG/+) mice, in which progerin's carboxyl-terminal -CSIM motif was changed to -SSIM) also develop severe progeria, raising doubts about whether any treatment targeting protein prenylation would be particularly effective. We suspected that those doubts might be premature and hypothesized that the persistent disease in Lmna(nHG/+) mice could be an unanticipated consequence of the cysteine-to-serine substitution that was used to eliminate farnesylation. To test this hypothesis, we generated a second knock-in allele yielding non-farnesylated progerin (Lmna(csmHG)) in which the carboxyl-terminal -CSIM motif was changed to -CSM. We then compared disease phenotypes in mice harboring the Lmna(nHG) or Lmna(csmHG) allele. As expected, Lmna(nHG/+) and Lmna(nHG/nHG) mice developed severe progeria-like disease phenotypes, including osteolytic lesions and rib fractures, osteoporosis, slow growth and reduced survival. In contrast, Lmna(csmHG/+) and Lmna(csmHG/csmHG) mice exhibited no bone disease and displayed entirely normal body weights and survival. The frequencies of misshapen cell nuclei were lower in Lmna(csmHG/+) and Lmna(csmHG/csmHG) fibroblasts. These studies show that the ability of non-farnesylated progerin to elicit disease depends on the carboxyl-terminal mutation used to eliminate protein prenylation.

  15. [BLG gene knockout and hLF gene knock-in at BLG locus in goat by TALENs].

    PubMed

    Song, Shaozheng; Zhu, Mengmin; Yuan, Yuguo; Rong, Yao; Xu, Sheng; Chen, Si; Mei, Junyan; Cheng, Yong

    2016-03-01

    To knock out β-lactoglobulin (BLG) gene and insert human lactoferrin (hLF) coding sequence at BLG locus of goat, the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) mediated recombination was used to edit the BLG gene of goat fetal fibroblast, then as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer. We designed a pair of specific plasmid TALEN-3-L/R for goat BLG exon III recognition sites, and BLC14-TK vector containing a negative selection gene HSV-TK, was used for the knock in of hLF gene. TALENs plasmids were transfected into the goat fetal fibroblast cells, and the cells were screened three days by 2 μg/mL puromycin. DNA cleavage activities of cells were verified by PCR amplification and DNA production sequencing. Then, targeting vector BLC14-TK and plasmids TALEN-3-L/R were co-transfected into goat fetal fibroblasts, both 700 μg/mL G418 and 2 μg/mL GCV were simultaneously used to screen G418-resistant cells. Detections of integration and recombination were implemented to obtain cells with hLF gene site-specific integration. We chose targeting cells as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer. The mutagenicity of TALEN-3-L/R was between 25% and 30%. A total of 335 reconstructed embryos with 6 BLG-/hLF+ targeting cell lines were transferred into 16 recipient goats. There were 9 pregnancies confirmed by ultrasound on day 30 to 35 (pregnancy rate of 39.1%), and one of 50-day-old fetus with BLG-/hLF+ was achieved. These results provide the basis for hLF gene knock-in at BLG locus of goat and cultivating transgenic goat of low allergens and rich hLF in the milk.

  16. Homologous Recombination-Independent Large Gene Cassette Knock-in in CHO Cells Using TALEN and MMEJ-Directed Donor Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Tetsushi; Takenaga, Mitsumasa; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kamihira, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Gene knock-in techniques have rapidly evolved in recent years, along with the development and maturation of genome editing technology using programmable nucleases. We recently reported a novel strategy for microhomology-mediated end-joining-dependent integration of donor DNA by using TALEN or CRISPR/Cas9 and optimized targeting vectors, named PITCh (Precise Integration into Target Chromosome) vectors. Here we describe TALEN and PITCh vector-mediated integration of long gene cassettes, including a single-chain Fv-Fc (scFv-Fc) gene, in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, with comparison of targeting and cloning efficiency among several donor design and culture conditions. We achieved 9.6-kb whole plasmid integration and 7.6-kb backbone-free integration into a defined genomic locus in CHO cells. Furthermore, we confirmed the reasonable productivity of recombinant scFv-Fc protein of the knock-in cells. Using our protocol, the knock-in cell clones could be obtained by a single transfection and a single limiting dilution using a 96-well plate, without constructing targeting vectors containing long homology arms. Thus, the study described herein provides a highly practical strategy for gene knock-in of large DNA in CHO cells, which accelerates high-throughput generation of cell lines stably producing any desired biopharmaceuticals, including huge antibody proteins. PMID:26473830

  17. Practical method for targeted disruption of cilia-related genes by using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homology-independent knock-in system.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yohei; Michisaka, Saki; Nozaki, Shohei; Funabashi, Teruki; Hirano, Tomoaki; Takei, Ryota; Nakayama, Kazuhisa

    2017-02-08

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has revolutionized genome editing in virtually all organisms. Although the CRISPR/Cas9 system enables the targeted cleavage of genomic DNA, its use for gene knock-in remains challenging because levels of homologous recombination activity vary among various cells. In contrast, the efficiency of homology-independent DNA repair is relatively high in most cell types. Therefore, the utilization of a homology-independent repair mechanism is a possible alternative for efficient genome editing. Here, we constructed a donor knock-in vector optimized for the CRISPR/Cas9 system, and developed a practical system that enables efficient disruption of target genes by exploiting homology-independent repair. Using this practical knock-in system, we successfully disrupted genes encoding proteins involved ciliary protein trafficking, including IFT88 and IFT20, in hTERT-RPE1 cells, which have low homologous recombination activity. The most critical concern using the CRISPR/Cas9 system is off-target cleavage. To reduce the off-target cleavage frequency and to increase the versatility of our knock-in system, we further constructed a universal donor vector and an expression vector containing Cas9 with enhanced specificity and tandem sgRNA expression cassettes. We demonstrated that the second version of our system has improved usability.

  18. Fluorescent protein tagging of endogenous protein in brain neurons using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock-in and in utero electroporation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Takeshi; Mori, Takuma; Kurihara, Taiga; Kawase, Shiori; Koike, Rie; Satoga, Michiru; Cao, Xueshan; Li, Xue; Yanagawa, Toru; Sakurai, Takayuki; Shindo, Takayuki; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is a powerful technique for studying gene functions. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knock-in has recently been applied to various cells and organisms. Here, we successfully knocked in an EGFP coding sequence at the site immediately after the first ATG codon of the β-actin gene in neurons in the brain by the combined use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and in utero electroporation technique, resulting in the expression of the EGFP-tagged β-actin protein in cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. We detected EGFP fluorescence signals in the soma and neurites of EGFP knock-in neurons. These signals were particularly abundant in the head of dendritic spines, corresponding to the localization of the endogenous β-actin protein. EGFP knock-in neurons showed no detectable changes in spine density and basic electrophysiological properties. In contrast, exogenously overexpressed EGFP-β-actin showed increased spine density and EPSC frequency, and changed resting membrane potential. Thus, our technique provides a potential tool to elucidate the localization of various endogenous proteins in neurons by epitope tagging without altering neuronal and synaptic functions. This technique can be also useful for introducing a specific mutation into genes to study the function of proteins and genomic elements in brain neurons. PMID:27782168

  19. HMGB1 facilitates repair of mitochondrial DNA damage and extends the lifespan of mutant ataxin-1 knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hikaru; Fujita, Kyota; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Chen, Xigui; Homma, Hidenori; Sasabe, Toshikazu; Shimizu, Jun; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Tamura, Takuya; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mutant ataxin-1 (Atxn1), which causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), binds to and impairs the function of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a crucial nuclear protein that regulates DNA architectural changes essential for DNA damage repair and transcription. In this study, we established that transgenic or virus vector-mediated complementation with HMGB1 ameliorates motor dysfunction and prolongs lifespan in mutant Atxn1 knock-in (Atxn1-KI) mice. We identified mitochondrial DNA damage repair by HMGB1 as a novel molecular basis for this effect, in addition to the mechanisms already associated with HMGB1 function, such as nuclear DNA damage repair and nuclear transcription. The dysfunction and the improvement of mitochondrial DNA damage repair functions are tightly associated with the exacerbation and rescue, respectively, of symptoms, supporting the involvement of mitochondrial DNA quality control by HMGB1 in SCA1 pathology. Moreover, we show that the rescue of Purkinje cell dendrites and dendritic spines by HMGB1 could be downstream effects. Although extracellular HMGB1 triggers inflammation mediated by Toll-like receptor and receptor for advanced glycation end products, upregulation of intracellular HMGB1 does not induce such side effects. Thus, viral delivery of HMGB1 is a candidate approach by which to modify the disease progression of SCA1 even after the onset. PMID:25510912

  20. Reciprocal knock-in mice to investigate the functional redundancy of lamin B1 and lamin B2

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John M.; Tu, Yiping; Tatar, Angelica; Wu, Daniel; Nobumori, Chika; Jung, Hea-Jin; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Coffinier, Catherine; de Jong, Pieter J.; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    Lamins B1 and B2 (B-type lamins) have very similar sequences and are expressed ubiquitously. In addition, both Lmnb1- and Lmnb2-deficient mice die soon after birth with neuronal layering abnormalities in the cerebral cortex, a consequence of defective neuronal migration. The similarities in amino acid sequences, expression patterns, and knockout phenotypes raise the question of whether the two proteins have redundant functions. To investigate this topic, we generated “reciprocal knock-in mice”—mice that make lamin B2 from the Lmnb1 locus (Lmnb1B2/B2) and mice that make lamin B1 from the Lmnb2 locus (Lmnb2B1/B1). Lmnb1B2/B2 mice produced increased amounts of lamin B2 but no lamin B1; they died soon after birth with neuronal layering abnormalities in the cerebral cortex. However, the defects in Lmnb1B2/B2 mice were less severe than those in Lmnb1-knockout mice, indicating that increased amounts of lamin B2 partially ameliorate the abnormalities associated with lamin B1 deficiency. Similarly, increased amounts of lamin B1 in Lmnb2B1/B1 mice did not prevent the neurodevelopmental defects elicited by lamin B2 deficiency. We conclude that lamins B1 and B2 have unique roles in the developing brain and that increased production of one B-type lamin does not fully complement loss of the other. PMID:24672053

  1. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV Mediated Knock-in at NRL Locus in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xianglian; Xi, Haitao; Yang, Fayu; Zhi, Xiao; Fu, Yanghua; Chen, Ding; Xu, Ren-He; Lin, Ge; Qu, Jia; Zhao, Junzhao; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Clustered interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome engineering technologies are sparking a new revolution in biological research. This technology efficiently induces DNA double strand breaks at the targeted genomic sequence and results in indel mutations by the error-prone process of nonhomologous end joining DNA repair or homologous recombination with a DNA repair template. The efficiency of genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9 alone in human embryonic stem cells is still low. Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types with maximal targeting frequencies without engineered nucleases. However, whether CRISPR/Cas9-mediated double strand breaks and AAV based donor DNA mediated homologous recombination approaches could be combined to create a novel CRISPR/Cas9-AAV genetic tool for highly specific gene editing is not clear. Here we demonstrate that using CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, we could successfully knock-in a DsRed reporter gene at the basic motifleucine zipper transcription factor (NRL) locus in human embryonic stem cells. For the first time, this study provides the proof of principle that these two technologies can be used together. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, a new genome editing tool, offers a platform for the manipulation of human genome.

  2. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV Mediated Knock-in at NRL Locus in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xianglian; Xi, Haitao; Yang, Fayu; Zhi, Xiao; Fu, Yanghua; Chen, Ding; Xu, Ren-He; Lin, Ge; Qu, Jia; Zhao, Junzhao; Gu, Feng

    2016-11-29

    Clustered interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome engineering technologies are sparking a new revolution in biological research. This technology efficiently induces DNA double strand breaks at the targeted genomic sequence and results in indel mutations by the error-prone process of nonhomologous end joining DNA repair or homologous recombination with a DNA repair template. The efficiency of genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9 alone in human embryonic stem cells is still low. Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types with maximal targeting frequencies without engineered nucleases. However, whether CRISPR/Cas9-mediated double strand breaks and AAV based donor DNA mediated homologous recombination approaches could be combined to create a novel CRISPR/Cas9-AAV genetic tool for highly specific gene editing is not clear. Here we demonstrate that using CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, we could successfully knock-in a DsRed reporter gene at the basic motifleucine zipper transcription factor (NRL) locus in human embryonic stem cells. For the first time, this study provides the proof of principle that these two technologies can be used together. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, a new genome editing tool, offers a platform for the manipulation of human genome.

  3. ssODN-mediated knock-in with CRISPR-Cas for large genomic regions in zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimi, Kazuto; Kunihiro, Yayoi; Kaneko, Takehito; Nagahora, Hitoshi; Voigt, Birger; Mashimo, Tomoji

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas system is a powerful tool for generating genetically modified animals; however, targeted knock-in (KI) via homologous recombination remains difficult in zygotes. Here we show efficient gene KI in rats by combining CRISPR-Cas with single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (ssODNs). First, a 1-kb ssODN co-injected with guide RNA (gRNA) and Cas9 messenger RNA produce GFP-KI at the rat Thy1 locus. Then, two gRNAs with two 80-bp ssODNs direct efficient integration of a 5.5-kb CAG-GFP vector into the Rosa26 locus via ssODN-mediated end joining. This protocol also achieves KI of a 200-kb BAC containing the human SIRPA locus, concomitantly knocking out the rat Sirpa gene. Finally, three gRNAs and two ssODNs replace 58-kb of the rat Cyp2d cluster with a 6.2-kb human CYP2D6 gene. These ssODN-mediated KI protocols can be applied to any target site with any donor vector without the need to construct homology arms, thus simplifying genome engineering in living organisms. PMID:26786405

  4. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV Mediated Knock-in at NRL Locus in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xianglian; Xi, Haitao; Yang, Fayu; Zhi, Xiao; Fu, Yanghua; Chen, Ding; Xu, Ren-He; Lin, Ge; Qu, Jia; Zhao, Junzhao; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Clustered interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome engineering technologies are sparking a new revolution in biological research. This technology efficiently induces DNA double strand breaks at the targeted genomic sequence and results in indel mutations by the error-prone process of nonhomologous end joining DNA repair or homologous recombination with a DNA repair template. The efficiency of genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9 alone in human embryonic stem cells is still low. Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types with maximal targeting frequencies without engineered nucleases. However, whether CRISPR/Cas9-mediated double strand breaks and AAV based donor DNA mediated homologous recombination approaches could be combined to create a novel CRISPR/Cas9-AAV genetic tool for highly specific gene editing is not clear. Here we demonstrate that using CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, we could successfully knock-in a DsRed reporter gene at the basic motifleucine zipper transcription factor (NRL) locus in human embryonic stem cells. For the first time, this study provides the proof of principle that these two technologies can be used together. CRISPR/Cas9-AAV, a new genome editing tool, offers a platform for the manipulation of human genome. PMID:27898094

  5. Deletion of the γ-secretase subunits Aph1B/C impairs memory and worsens the deficits of knock-in mice modeling the Alzheimer-like familial Danish dementia

    PubMed Central

    Biundo, Fabrizio; Ishiwari, Keita; Del Prete, Dolores; D'Adamio, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in BRI2/ITM2b genes cause Familial British and Danish Dementias (FBD and FDD), which are pathogenically similar to Familial Alzheimer Disease (FAD). BRI2 inhibits processing of Amyloid precursor protein (APP), a protein involved in FAD pathogenesis. Accumulation of a carboxyl-terminal APP metabolite –β-CTF- causes memory deficits in a knock-in mouse model of FDD, called FDDKI. We have investigated further the pathogenic function of β-CTF studying the effect of Aph1B/C deletion on FDDKI mice. This strategy is based on the evidence that deletion of Aph1B/C proteins, which are components of the γ-secretase that cleaves β-CTF, results in stabilization of β-CTF and a reduction of Aβ. We found that both the FDD mutation and the Aph1B/C deficiency mildly interfered with spatial long term memory, spatial working/short-term memory and long-term contextual fear memory. In addition, the Aph1BC deficiency induced deficits in long-term cued fear memory. Moreover, the two mutations have additive adverse effects as they compromise the accuracy of spatial long-term memory and induce spatial memory retention deficits in young mice. Overall, the data are consistent with a role for β-CTF in the genesis of memory deficits. PMID:26942869

  6. Mouse models of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Beuzard, Y

    2008-01-01

    In the absence of a natural animal model for sickle cell disease, transgenic mouse models have been generated to better understand the complex pathophysiology of the disease and to evaluate potential specific therapies. In the early nineties, the simple addition of human globin genes induced the expression of hemoglobin S (HbS) or HbS-related human hemoglobins in mice still expressing mouse hemoglobin. To increase the proportion of human hemoglobin and the severity of the mouse sickle cell syndrome, the proportion of mouse hemoglobin could be decreased by a combination of mouse alpha- and beta-thalassemic defects, leading to complex genotypes and mild disease. Following the discovery of gene targeting in the mouse embryonic stem cells (ES cells), it was made possible to knock out all mouse adult globin genes (2alpha and 2beta) and to add the human homologous genes elsewhere in the mouse genome. In addition, the human gamma gene of fetal hemoglobin was protecting the fetus from HbS polymer formation. Accordingly, the resulting adult mouse models obtained in 1997, expressing human HbS-only, had a very severe anemia (Hb=5-6 g/dL). In order to survive, these "HbS-only mice" had to reduce the HbS concentration within the red blood cells. The phenotype could be less severe by adding modified human gamma genes, still expressed in adult mice. In 2006, a last "S-only" model was obtained by homologous knock in, replacing the mouse globin genes by human genes. This array of models contributes to better understand the role of different interacting factors in the complexity of sickle cell events, such as red cell defects, changes in blood flow and vaso-occlusion, hyperhemolysis, vascular tone dysregulation, oxidations, inflammation, activation and adhesion of cells, ischemia, reperfusion... In addition, each model has an appropriate usefulness to evaluate experimental therapies in vivo and to perform preclinical studies.

  7. New Lmna knock-in mice provide a molecular mechanism for the 'segmental aging' in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hea-Jin; Tu, Yiping; Yang, Shao H; Tatar, Angelica; Nobumori, Chika; Wu, Daniel; Young, Stephen G; Fong, Loren G

    2014-03-15

    Lamins A and C (products of the LMNA gene) are found in roughly equal amounts in peripheral tissues, but the brain produces mainly lamin C and little lamin A. In HeLa cells and fibroblasts, the expression of prelamin A (the precursor to lamin A) can be reduced by miR-9, but the relevance of those cell culture studies to lamin A regulation in the brain was unclear. To address this issue, we created two new Lmna knock-in alleles, one (Lmna(PLAO-5NT)) with a 5-bp mutation in a predicted miR-9 binding site in prelamin A's 3' UTR, and a second (Lmna(PLAO-UTR)) in which prelamin A's 3' UTR was replaced with lamin C's 3' UTR. Neither allele had significant effects on lamin A levels in peripheral tissues; however, both substantially increased prelamin A transcript levels and lamin A protein levels in the cerebral cortex and the cerebellum. The increase in lamin A expression in the brain was more pronounced with the Lmna(PLAO-UTR) allele than with the Lmna(PLAO-5NT) allele. With both alleles, the increased expression of prelamin A transcripts and lamin A protein was greater in the cerebral cortex than in the cerebellum. Our studies demonstrate the in vivo importance of prelamin A's 3' UTR and its miR-9 binding site in regulating lamin A expression in the brain. The reduced expression of prelamin A in the brain likely explains why children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (a progeroid syndrome caused by a mutant form of prelamin A) are spared from neurodegenerative disease.

  8. Immune tolerance negatively regulates B cells in knock-in mice expressing broadly neutralizing HIV antibody 4E10

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Anthony B.; Ota, Takayuki; Skog, Patrick; Dawson, Phillip E.; Zwick, Michael B.; Schief, William R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Nemazee, David

    2013-01-01

    A major goal of HIV research is to develop vaccines reproducibly eliciting broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). This has proved to be challenging, however. One suggested explanation for this difficulty is that epitopes seen by bNAbs mimic self, leading to immune tolerance. We generated “knock-in” mice expressing bNAb 4E10, which recognizes the membrane proximal external region of gp41. Unlike b12 knock-in mice, described in the accompanying study, 4E10HL mice were found to undergo profound negative selection of B cells, indicating that 4E10 is, to a physiologically significant extent, autoreactive. Negative selection occurred by various mechanisms including receptor editing, clonal deletion and receptor downregulation. Despite significant deletion, small amounts of IgM and IgG anti-gp41 were found in the sera of 4E10HL mice. On a Rag1−/− background 4E10HL mice had virtually no serum immunoglobulins of any kind. These results are consistent with a model in which B cells with 4E10 specificity are counterselected, raising the question of how 4E10 was generated in the patient from whom it was isolated. This represents the second example of an MPER-directed bNAb that is apparently autoreactive in a physiological setting. The relative conservation in HIV of the 4E10 epitope might reflect the fact that it is under less intense immunological selection as a result of B cell self-tolerance. The safety and desirability of targeting this epitope by a vaccine is discussed in light of the newly-described bNAb 10E8. PMID:23940276

  9. Contractile abnormalities and altered drug response in engineered heart tissue from Mybpc3-targeted knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Andrea; Friedrich, Felix W; Flenner, Frederik; Geertz, Birgit; Eder, Alexandra; Schaaf, Sebastian; Hirt, Marc N; Uebeler, June; Schlossarek, Saskia; Carrier, Lucie; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Myosin-binding protein C (Mybpc3)-targeted knock-in mice (KI) recapitulate typical aspects of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We evaluated whether these functional alterations can be reproduced in engineered heart tissue (EHT) and yield novel mechanistic information on the function of cMyBP-C. EHTs were generated from cardiac cells of neonatal KI, heterozygous (HET) or wild-type controls (WT) and developed without apparent morphological differences. KI had 70% and HET 20% lower total cMyBP-C levels than WT, accompanied by elevated fetal gene expression. Under standard culture conditions and spontaneous beating, KI EHTs showed more frequent burst beating than WT and occasional tetanic contractions (14/96). Under electrical stimulation (6Hz, 37°C) KI EHTs exhibited shorter contraction and relaxation times and a twofold higher sensitivity to external [Ca(2+)]. Accordingly, the sensitivity to verapamil was 4-fold lower and the response to isoprenaline or the Ca(2+) sensitizer EMD 57033 2- to 4-fold smaller. The loss of EMD effect was verified in 6-week-old KI mice in vivo. HET EHTs were apparently normal under basal conditions, but showed similarly altered contractile responses to [Ca(2+)], verapamil, isoprenaline and EMD. In contrast, drug-induced changes in intracellular Ca(2+) transients (Fura-2) were essentially normal. In conclusion, the present findings in auxotonically contracting EHTs support the idea that cMyBP-C's normal role is to suppress force generation at low intracellular Ca(2+) and stabilize the power-stroke step of the cross bridge cycle. Pharmacological testing in EHT unmasked a disease phenotype in HET. The altered drug response may be clinically relevant.

  10. A possible aid in targeted insertion of large DNA elements by CRISPR/Cas in mouse zygotes.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Harumi; Harada, Takeshi; Nakao, Kazuki; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Inoue, Kenichi; Furuta, Yasuhide; Aiba, Atsu

    2016-02-01

    The CRISPR/Cas system has rapidly emerged recently as a new tool for genome engineering, and is expected to allow for controlled manipulation of specific genomic elements in a variety of species. A number of recent studies have reported the use of CRISPR/Cas for gene disruption (knockout) or targeted insertion of foreign DNA elements (knock-in). Despite the ease of simple gene knockout and small insertions or nucleotide substitutions in mouse zygotes by the CRISPR/Cas system, targeted insertion of large DNA elements remains an apparent challenge. Here the generation of knock-in mice with successful targeted insertion of large donor DNA elements ranged from 3.0 to 7.1 kb at the ROSA26 locus using the CRISPR/Cas system was achieved. Multiple independent knock-in founder mice were obtained by injection of hCas9 mRNA/sgRNA/donor vector mixtures into the cytoplasm of C57BL/6N zygotes when the injected zygotes were treated with an inhibitor of actin polymerization, cytochalasin. Successful germ line transmission of three of these knock-in alleles was also confirmed. The results suggested that treatment of zygotes with actin polymerization inhibitors following microinjection could be a viable method to facilitate targeted insertion of large DNA elements by the CRISPR/Cas system, enabling targeted knock-in readily attainable in zygotes.

  11. Testing the silence of mutations: Transcriptomic and behavioral studies of GABA(A) receptor α1 and α2 subunit knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, R A; Osterndorff-Kahanek, E; Ponomarev, I; Homanics, G E; Blednov, Y A

    2011-01-13

    Knock-in mice were constructed with mutations in the α1 (H(270), A(277)) and α2 (H(270), A(277)) subunits of the GABAA receptor, which resulted in receptors that lacked modulation by ethanol but retained normal responses to GABA in vitro. A key question is whether these mutant receptors also function normally in vivo. Perturbation of brain function was evaluated by gene expression profiling in the cerebral cortex and by behavioral pharmacology experiments with GABAergic drugs. Analysis of individual transcripts found only six transcripts that were changed in α1 knock-in mice and three in the α2 mutants (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). Two transcripts that are sensitive to neuronal activity, Arc and Fos, increased about 250% in the α2 mutants, and about 50% in the α1 mutants. Behavioral effects (loss of righting reflex, rotarod) of flurazepam and pentobarbital were not different between α2 mutants and wild-type, but they were enhanced for α1 knock-in mice. These results indicate that introduction of these mutations in the α2 subunit of the GABAA receptor does not produce marked perturbation of brain function, as measured by gene expression and GABAergic behavioral responses, but the same mutations in the α1 subunit produce more pronounced changes, especially in GABAergic function.

  12. Dynamic regulation of c-Myc proto-oncogene expression during lymphocyte development revealed by a GFP-c-Myc knock-in mouse.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Yu; Bredemeyer, Andrea L; Walker, Laura M; Bassing, Craig H; Sleckman, Barry P

    2008-02-01

    c-Myc induces widely varying cellular effects, including cell proliferation and cell death. These different cellular effects are determined, in part, by c-Myc protein expression levels, which are regulated through several transcriptional and post-transcriptional pathways. c-Myc transcripts can be detected in cells at all stages of B and T lymphocyte development. However, little is known about c-Myc protein expression, and how it varies, in developing lymphocytes. Here mice have been generated in which the endogenous c-Myc locus has been modified (c-Myc(G)) so that it encodes a GFP-c-Myc fusion protein. c-Myc(G/G) mice are viable, appear normal and exhibit grossly normal lymphocyte development. Flow cytometric analyses revealed significant heterogeneity in c-Myc protein expression levels in developing c-Myc(G/G) B and T lymphocytes. GFP-c-Myc expression levels were highest in proliferating lymphocytes, suggesting that c-Myc up-regulation is important for promoting lymphocyte cell division, and demonstrating that GFP-c-Myc expression is a marker of proliferating lymphocytes in vivo.

  13. Non-coding-regulatory regions of human brain genes delineated by bacterial artificial chromosome knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The next big challenge in human genetics is understanding the 98% of the genome that comprises non-coding DNA. Hidden in this DNA are sequences critical for gene regulation, and new experimental strategies are needed to understand the functional role of gene-regulation sequences in health and disease. In this study, we build upon our HuGX ('high-throughput human genes on the X chromosome’) strategy to expand our understanding of human gene regulation in vivo. Results In all, ten human genes known to express in therapeutically important brain regions were chosen for study. For eight of these genes, human bacterial artificial chromosome clones were identified, retrofitted with a reporter, knocked single-copy into the Hprt locus in mouse embryonic stem cells, and mouse strains derived. Five of these human genes expressed in mouse, and all expressed in the adult brain region for which they were chosen. This defined the boundaries of the genomic DNA sufficient for brain expression, and refined our knowledge regarding the complexity of gene regulation. We also characterized for the first time the expression of human MAOA and NR2F2, two genes for which the mouse homologs have been extensively studied in the central nervous system (CNS), and AMOTL1 and NOV, for which roles in CNS have been unclear. Conclusions We have demonstrated the use of the HuGX strategy to functionally delineate non-coding-regulatory regions of therapeutically important human brain genes. Our results also show that a careful investigation, using publicly available resources and bioinformatics, can lead to accurate predictions of gene expression. PMID:24124870

  14. A universal vector for high-efficiency multi-fragment recombineering of BACs and knock-in constructs.

    PubMed

    Dolt, Karamjit Singh; Lawrence, Melanie L; Miller-Hodges, Eve; Slight, Joan; Thornburn, Anna; Devenney, Paul S; Hohenstein, Peter

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing need for more efficient generation of transgenic constructs. Here we present a universal multi-site Gateway vector for use in recombineering reactions. Using transgenic mouse models, we show its use for the generation of BAC transgenics and targeting vectors. The modular nature of the vector allows for rapid modification of constructs to generate different versions of the same construct. As such it will help streamline the generation of series of related transgenic models.

  15. Deletion of Stat3 enhances myeloid cell expansion and increases the severity of myeloproliferative neoplasms in Jak2V617F knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongqing; Jobe, Fatoumata; Hutchison, Robert E.; Mohi, Golam

    2015-01-01

    The JAK2V617F mutation commonly found in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) induces constitutive phosphorylation/activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3). However, the contribution of Stat3 in MPN evoked by JAK2V617F remains unknown. To determine the role of Stat3 in JAK2V617F-induced MPN, we generated Stat3-deficient Jak2V617F-expressing mice. Whereas expression of Jak2V617F resulted in a PV-like disease characterized by increased red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit, neutrophils and platelets in the peripheral blood of Jak2V617F knock-in mice, deletion of Stat3 slightly reduced RBC, and hematocrit parameters and modestly increased platelet numbers in Jak2V617F knock-in mice. Moreover, deletion of Stat3 significantly increased the neutrophil counts/percentages and markedly reduced the survival of mice expressing Jak2V617F. These phenotypic manifestations were reproduced upon bone marrow transplantation into wild-type animals. Flow cytometric analysis showed increased hematopoietic stem cell and granulocyte-macrophage progenitor populations in the bone marrow and spleens of Stat3-deficient Jak2V617F mice. Stat3 deficiency also caused a marked expansion of Gr-1+/Mac-1+ myeloid cells in Jak2V617F knock-in mice. Histopathologic analysis revealed marked increase in granulocytes in the bone marrow, spleens and livers of Stat3-deficient Jak2V617F-expressing mice. Together, these results suggest that deletion of Stat3 increases the severity of MPN induced by Jak2V617F. PMID:26044284

  16. Retigabine, a Kv7.2/Kv7.3-Channel Opener, Attenuates Drug-Induced Seizures in Knock-In Mice Harboring Kcnq2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Yukiko; Tomonoh, Yuko; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Zhang, Bo; Uchida, Taku; Ishii, Atsushi; Hirose, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The hetero-tetrameric voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.2/Kv7.3, which is encoded by KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, plays an important role in limiting network excitability in the neonatal brain. Kv7.2/Kv7.3 dysfunction resulting from KCNQ2 mutations predominantly causes self-limited or benign epilepsy in neonates, but also causes early onset epileptic encephalopathy. Retigabine (RTG), a Kv7.2/ Kv7.3-channel opener, seems to be a rational antiepileptic drug for epilepsies caused by KCNQ2 mutations. We therefore evaluated the effects of RTG on seizures in two strains of knock-in mice harboring different Kcnq2 mutations, in comparison to the effects of phenobarbital (PB), which is the first-line antiepileptic drug for seizures in neonates. The subjects were heterozygous knock-in mice (Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+) bearing the Y284C or A306T Kcnq2 mutation, respectively, and their wild-type (WT) littermates, at 63–100 days of age. Seizures induced by intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA, 12mg/kg) were recorded using a video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring system. Effects of RTG on KA-induced seizures of both strains of knock-in mice were assessed using seizure scores from a modified Racine’s scale and compared with those of PB. The number and total duration of spike bursts on EEG and behaviors monitored by video recording were also used to evaluate the effects of RTG and PB. Both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice showed significantly more KA-induced seizures than WT mice. RTG significantly attenuated KA-induced seizure activities in both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice, and more markedly than PB. This is the first reported evidence of RTG ameliorating KA-induced seizures in knock-in mice bearing mutations of Kcnq2, with more marked effects than those observed with PB. RTG or other Kv7.2-channel openers may be considered as first-line antiepileptic treatments for epilepsies resulting from KCNQ2 mutations. PMID:26910900

  17. Knock-in Mutation of the Distal Four Tyrosines of Linker for Activation of T Cells Blocks Murine T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Connie L.; Menon, Rashmi K.; Grinberg, Alexander; Zhang, Weiguo; Samelson, Lawrence E.; Love, Paul E.

    2001-01-01

    The integral membrane adapter protein linker for activation of T cells (LAT) performs a critical function in T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signal transduction by coupling the TCR to downstream signaling pathways. After TCR engagement, LAT is tyrosine phosphorylated by ZAP-70 creating docking sites for multiple src homology 2–containing effector proteins. In the Jurkat T cell line, the distal four tyrosines of LAT bind PLCγ-1, Grb2, and Gads. Mutation of these four tyrosine residues to phenylalanine (4YF) blocked TCR-mediated calcium mobilization, Erk activation, and nuclear factor (NF)-AT activation. In this study, we examined whether these four tyrosine residues were essential for T cell development by generating LAT “knock-in” mutant mice that express the 4YF mutant protein under the control of endogenous LAT regulatory sequences. Significantly, the phenotype of 4YF knock-in mice was identical to LAT−/− (null) mice; thymocyte development was arrested at the immature CD4−CD8− stage and no mature T cells were present. Knock-in mice expressing wild-type LAT protein, generated by a similar strategy, displayed a normal T cell developmental profile. These results demonstrate that the distal four tyrosine residues of LAT are essential for preTCR signaling and T cell development in vivo. PMID:11457888

  18. Nuclear domain 'knock-in' screen for the evaluation and identification of small molecule enhancers of CRISPR-based genome editing.

    PubMed

    Pinder, Jordan; Salsman, Jayme; Dellaire, Graham

    2015-10-30

    CRISPR is a genome-editing platform that makes use of the bacterially-derived endonuclease Cas9 to introduce DNA double-strand breaks at precise locations in the genome using complementary guide RNAs. We developed a nuclear domain knock-in screen, whereby the insertion of a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein variant Clover is inserted by Cas9-mediated homology directed repair (HDR) within the first exon of genes that are required for the structural integrity of subnuclear domains such as the nuclear lamina and promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs). Using this approach, we compared strategies for enhancing CRISPR-mediated HDR, focusing on known genes and small molecules that impact non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Ultimately, we identified the small molecule RS-1 as a potent enhancer of CRISPR-based genome editing, enhancing HDR 3- to 6-fold depending on the locus and transfection method. We also characterized U2OS human osteosarcoma cells expressing Clover-tagged PML and demonstrate that this strategy generates cell lines with PML NBs that are structurally and functionally similar to bodies in the parental cell line. Thus, the nuclear domain knock-in screen that we describe provides a simple means of rapidly evaluating methods and small molecules that have the potential to enhance Cas9-mediated HDR.

  19. Characterization of an unusual transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in goat by transmission in knock-in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rona; King, Declan; Hunter, Nora; Goldmann, Wilfred; Barron, Rona M

    2013-08-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder of cattle, and its transmission to humans through contaminated food is thought to be the cause of the variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. BSE is believed to have spread from the recycling in cattle of ruminant tissue in meat and bone meal (MBM). However, during this time, sheep and goats were also exposed to BSE-contaminated MBM. Both sheep and goats are experimentally susceptible to BSE, and while there have been no reported natural BSE cases in sheep, two goat BSE field cases have been documented. While cases of BSE are rare in small ruminants, the existence of scrapie in both sheep and goats is well established. In the UK, during 2006-2007, a serious outbreak of clinical scrapie was detected in a large dairy goat herd. Subsequently, 200 goats were selected for post-mortem examination, one of which showed biochemical and immunohistochemical features of the disease-associated prion protein (PrP(TSE)) which differed from all other infected goats. In the present study, we investigated this unusual case by performing transmission bioassays into a panel of mouse lines. Following characterization, we found that strain properties such as the ability to transmit to different mouse lines, lesion profile pattern, degree of PrP deposition in the brain and biochemical features of this unusual goat case were neither consistent with goat BSE nor with a goat scrapie herdmate control. However, our results suggest that this unusual case has BSE-like properties and highlights the need for continued surveillance.

  20. Mouse models for the study of colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Daniel W.; Giardina, Charles; Tanaka, Takuji

    2009-01-01

    The study of experimental colon carcinogenesis in rodents has a long history, dating back almost 80 years. There are many advantages to studying the pathogenesis of carcinogen-induced colon cancer in mouse models, including rapid and reproducible tumor induction and the recapitulation of the adenoma–carcinoma sequence that occurs in humans. The availability of recombinant inbred mouse panels and the existence of transgenic, knock-out and knock-in genetic models further increase the value of these studies. In this review, we discuss the general mechanisms of tumor initiation elicited by commonly used chemical carcinogens and how genetic background influences the extent of disease. We will also describe the general features of lesions formed in response to carcinogen treatment, including the underlying molecular aberrations and how these changes may relate to the pathogenesis of human colorectal cancer. PMID:19037092

  1. Mice carrying a knock-in mutation of Aicda resulting in a defect in somatic hypermutation have impaired gut homeostasis and compromised mucosal defense.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Shinkura, Reiko; Doi, Yasuko; Maruya, Mikako; Fagarasan, Sidonia; Honjo, Tasuku

    2011-03-01

    To elucidate the specific role of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in mucosal immunity, we generated mice carrying a knock-in point mutation in Aicda, which encodes activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an enzyme essential to SHM and class-switch recombination (CSR). These mutant AID(G23S) mice had much less SHM but had normal amounts of immunoglobulin in both serum and intestinal secretions. AID(G23S) mice developed hyperplasia of germinal center B cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissues, accompanied by expansion of microflora in the small intestine. Moreover, AID(G23S) mice had more translocation of Yersinia enterocolitica into mesenteric lymph nodes and were more susceptible than wild-type mice to oral challenge with cholera toxin. Together our results indicate that SHM is critical in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and efficient mucosal defense.

  2. Increased vulnerability of hippocampal neurons from presenilin-1 mutant knock-in mice to amyloid beta-peptide toxicity: central roles of superoxide production and caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q; Sebastian, L; Sopher, B L; Miller, M W; Ware, C B; Martin, G M; Mattson, M P

    1999-03-01

    Many cases of early-onset inherited Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by mutations in the presenilin-1 (PS1) gene. Overexpression of PS1 mutations in cultured PC12 cells increases their vulnerability to apoptosis-induced trophic factor withdrawal and oxidative insults. We now report that primary hippocampal neurons from PS1 mutant knock-in mice, which express the human PS1M146V mutation at normal levels, exhibit increased vulnerability to amyloid beta-peptide toxicity. The endangering action of mutant PS1 was associated with increased superoxide production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and caspase activation. The peroxynitrite-scavenging antioxidant uric acid and the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone protected hippocampal neurons expressing mutant PS1 against cell death induced by amyloid beta-peptide. Increased oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenic action of PS1 mutations, and antioxidants may counteract the adverse property of such AD-linked mutations.

  3. Kv1.1 knock-in ataxic mice exhibit spontaneous myokymic activity exacerbated by fatigue, ischemia and low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Orazio; Imbrici, Paola; Botti, Fabio Massimo; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico; D'Adamo, Maria Cristina; Valentino, Mario; Zammit, Christian; Mora, Marina; Gibertini, Sara; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Muscat, Richard; Pessia, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) is an autosomal dominant neurological disorder characterized by myokymia and attacks of ataxic gait often precipitated by stress. Several genetic mutations have been identified in the Shaker-like K+ channel Kv1.1 (KCNA1) of EA1 individuals, including V408A, which result in remarkable channel dysfunction. By inserting the heterozygous V408A, mutation in one Kv1.1 allele, a mouse model of EA1 has been generated (Kv1.1V408A/+). Here, we investigated the neuromuscular transmission of Kv1.1V408A/+ ataxic mice and their susceptibility to physiologically relevant stressors. By using in vivo preparations of lateral gastrocnemius (LG) nerve–muscle from Kv1.1+/+ and Kv1.1V408A/+ mice, we show that the mutant animals exhibit spontaneous myokymic discharges consisting of repeated singlets, duplets or multiplets, despite motor nerve axotomy. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy from the motor nerve, ex vivo, revealed spontaneous Ca2 + signals that occurred abnormally only in preparations dissected from Kv1.1V408A/+ mice. Spontaneous bursting activity, as well as that evoked by sciatic nerve stimulation, was exacerbated by muscle fatigue, ischemia and low temperatures. These stressors also increased the amplitude of compound muscle action potential. Such abnormal neuromuscular transmission did not alter fiber type composition, neuromuscular junction and vascularization of LG muscle, analyzed by light and electron microscopy. Taken together these findings provide direct evidence that identifies the motor nerve as an important generator of myokymic activity, that dysfunction of Kv1.1 channels alters Ca2 + homeostasis in motor axons, and also strongly suggest that muscle fatigue contributes more than PNS fatigue to exacerbate the myokymia/neuromyotonia phenotype. More broadly, this study points out that juxtaparanodal K+ channels composed of Kv1.1 subunits exert an important role in dampening the excitability of motor nerve axons during fatigue or

  4. Knock-In of the Recurrent R368X Mutation of PRKAR1A that Represses cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase A Activation: A Model of Type 1 Acrodysostosis.

    PubMed

    Le Stunff, Catherine; Tilotta, Francoise; Sadoine, Jérémy; Le Denmat, Dominique; Briet, Claire; Motte, Emmanuelle; Clauser, Eric; Bougnères, Pierre; Chaussain, Catherine; Silve, Caroline

    2017-02-01

    In humans, activating mutations in the PRKAR1A gene cause acrodysostosis 1 (ACRDYS1). These mutations result in a reduction in PKA activation caused by an impaired ability of cAMP to dissociate mutant PRKAR1A from catalytic PKA subunits. Two striking features of this rare developmental disease are renal resistance to PTH and chondrodysplasia resulting from the constitutive inhibition of PTHR1/Gsa/AC/cAMP/PKA signaling. We developed a knock-in of the recurrent ACRDYS1 R368X PRKAR1A mutation in the mouse. No litters were obtained from [R368X]/[+] females (thus no homozygous [R368X]/[R368X] mice). In [R368X]/[+] mice, Western blot analysis confirmed mutant allele heterozygous expression. Growth retardation, peripheral acrodysostosis (including brachydactyly affecting all digits), and facial dysostosis were shown in [R368X]/[+] mice by weight curves and skeletal measurements (μCT scan) as a function of time. [R368X]/[+] male and female mice were similarly affected. Unexpected, however, whole-mount skeletal preparations revealed a striking delay in mineralization in newborn mutant mice, accompanied by a decrease in the height of terminal hypertrophic chondrocyte layer, an increase in the height of columnar proliferative prehypertrophic chondrocyte layer, and changes in the number and spatial arrangement of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive chondrocytes. Plasma PTH and basal urinary cAMP were significantly higher in [R368X]/[+] compared to WT mice. PTH injection increased urinary cAMP similarly in [R368X]/[+] and WT mice. PRKACA expression was regulated in a tissue (kidney not bone and liver) manner. This model, the first describing the germline expression of a PRKAR1A mutation causing dominant repression of cAMP-dependent PKA, reproduced the main features of ACRDYS1 in humans. It should help decipher the specificity of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway, crucial for numerous stimuli. In addition, our results indicate that PRKAR1A, by tempering

  5. Disruption of Protein Processing in the Endoplasmic Reticulum of DYT1 Knock-in Mice Implicates Novel Pathways in Dystonia Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Beauvais, Genevieve; Bode, Nicole M.; Watson, Jaime L.; Wen, Hsiang; Glenn, Kevin A.; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Harata, N. Charles; Ehrlich, Michelle E.

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia type 1 (DYT1) is a dominantly inherited neurological disease caused by mutations in TOR1A, the gene encoding the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident protein torsinA. Previous work mostly completed in cell-based systems suggests that mutant torsinA alters protein processing in the secretory pathway. We hypothesized that inducing ER stress in the mammalian brain in vivo would trigger or exacerbate mutant torsinA-induced dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, we crossed DYT1 knock-in with p58(IPK)-null mice. The ER co-chaperone p58(IPK) interacts with BiP and assists in protein maturation by helping to fold ER cargo. Its deletion increases the cellular sensitivity to ER stress. We found a lower generation of DYT1 knock-in/p58 knock-out mice than expected from this cross, suggesting a developmental interaction that influences viability. However, surviving animals did not exhibit abnormal motor function. Analysis of brain tissue uncovered dysregulation of eiF2α and Akt/mTOR translational control pathways in the DYT1 brain, a finding confirmed in a second rodent model and in human brain. Finally, an unbiased proteomic analysis identified relevant changes in the neuronal protein landscape suggesting abnormal ER protein metabolism and calcium dysregulation. Functional studies confirmed the interaction between the DYT1 genotype and neuronal calcium dynamics. Overall, these findings advance our knowledge on dystonia, linking translational control pathways and calcium physiology to dystonia pathogenesis and identifying potential new pharmacological targets. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dystonia type 1 (DYT1) is one of the different forms of inherited dystonia, a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary, disabling movements. DYT1 is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident protein torsinA. How mutant torsinA causes neuronal dysfunction remains unknown. Here, we show the behavioral and molecular consequences of stressing

  6. Fluorescent labeling of both GABAergic and glycinergic neurons in vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT)-venus transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Kakizaki, T; Sakagami, H; Saito, K; Ebihara, S; Kato, M; Hirabayashi, M; Saito, Y; Furuya, N; Yanagawa, Y

    2009-12-15

    Inhibitory neurons play important roles in a number of brain functions. They are composed of GABAergic neurons and glycinergic neurons, and vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) is specifically expressed in these neurons. Since the inhibitory neurons are scattered around in the CNS, it is difficult to identify these cells in living brain preparations. The glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) 67-GFP knock-in mouse has been widely used for the identification of GABAergic neurons, but their GAD67 expression was decreased compared to the wild-type mice. To overcome such a problem and to highlight the function and morphology of inhibitory neurons, we generated four lines of VGAT-Venus transgenic mice (lines #04, #29, #39 and #49) expressing Venus fluorescent protein under the control of mouse VGAT promoter. We found higher expression level of Venus transcripts and proteins as well as brighter fluorescent signal in line #39 mouse brains, compared to brains of other lines examined. By Western blots and spectrofluorometric measurements of forebrain, the line #39 mouse showed stronger GFP immunoreactivity and brighter fluorescent intensity than the GAD67-GFP knock-in mouse. In addition, Venus was present not only in somata, but also in neurites in the line #39 mouse by histological studies. In situ hybridization analysis showed that the expression pattern of Venus in the line #39 mouse was similar to that of endogenous VGAT. Double immunostaining analysis in line #39 mouse showed that Venus-expressing cells are primarily immunoreactive for GABA in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellar cortex and for GABA or glycine in dorsal cochlear nucleus. These results demonstrate that the VGAT-Venus line #39 mouse should be useful for studies on function and morphology of inhibitory neurons in the CNS.

  7. Mouse genome engineering using designer nucleases.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Mario; Cermak, Tomas; Voytas, Daniel F; Pelczar, Pawel

    2014-04-02

    Transgenic mice carrying site-specific genome modifications (knockout, knock-in) are of vital importance for dissecting complex biological systems as well as for modeling human diseases and testing therapeutic strategies. Recent advances in the use of designer nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 system for site-specific genome engineering open the possibility to perform rapid targeted genome modification in virtually any laboratory species without the need to rely on embryonic stem (ES) cell technology. A genome editing experiment typically starts with identification of designer nuclease target sites within a gene of interest followed by construction of custom DNA-binding domains to direct nuclease activity to the investigator-defined genomic locus. Designer nuclease plasmids are in vitro transcribed to generate mRNA for microinjection of fertilized mouse oocytes. Here, we provide a protocol for achieving targeted genome modification by direct injection of TALEN mRNA into fertilized mouse oocytes.

  8. B cells from knock-in mice expressing broadly neutralizing HIV antibody b12 carry an innocuous B cell receptor responsive to HIV vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Ota, Takayuki; Doyle-Cooper, Colleen; Cooper, Anthony B; Doores, Katherine J; Aoki-Ota, Miyo; Le, Khoa; Schief, William R; Wyatt, Richard T; Burton, Dennis R; Nemazee, David

    2013-09-15

    Broadly neutralizing Abs against HIV protect from infection, but their routine elicitation by vaccination has not been achieved. To generate small animal models to test vaccine candidates, we have generated targeted transgenic ("knock-in") mice expressing, in the physiological Ig H and L chain loci, two well-studied broadly neutralizing Abs: 4E10, which interacts with the membrane proximal external region of gp41, and b12, which binds to the CD4 binding site on gp120. 4E10HL mice are described in the companion article (Doyle-Cooper et al., J. Immunol. 191: 3186-3191). In this article, we describe b12 mice. B cells in b12HL mice, in contrast to the case in 4E10 mice, were abundant and essentially monoclonal, retaining the b12 specificity. In cell culture, b12HL B cells responded avidly to HIV envelope gp140 trimers and to BCR ligands. Upon transfer to wild-type recipients, b12HL B cells responded robustly to vaccination with gp140 trimers. Vaccinated b12H mice, although generating abundant precursors and Abs with affinity for Env, were unable to rapidly generate neutralizing Abs, highlighting the importance of developing Ag forms that better focus responses to neutralizing epitopes. The b12HL and b12H mice should be useful in optimizing HIV vaccine candidates to elicit a neutralizing response while avoiding nonprotective specificities.

  9. Generation of Knock-In Pigs Carrying Oct4-tdTomato Reporter through CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Lai, Sisi; Wei, Shu; Zhao, Bentian; Ouyang, Zhen; Zhang, Quanjun; Fan, Nana; Liu, Zhaoming; Zhao, Yu; Yan, Quanmei; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Li, Li; Xin, Jige; Zeng, Yangzhi; Lai, Liangxue; Zou, Qingjian

    2016-01-01

    The porcine pluripotent cells that can generate germline chimeras have not been developed. The Oct4 promoter-based fluorescent reporter system, which can be used to monitor pluripotency, is an important tool to generate authentic porcine pluripotent cells. In this study, we established a porcine Oct4 reporter system, wherein the endogenous Oct4 promoter directly controls red fluorescent protein (RFP). 2A-tdTomato sequence was inserted to replace the stop codon of the porcine Oct4 gene by homogenous recombination (HR). Thus, the fluorescence can accurately show the activation of endogenous Oct4. Porcine fetal fibroblast (PFF) lines with knock-in (KI) of the tdTomato gene in the downstream of endogenous Oct4 promoter were achieved using the CRISPR/CAS9 system. Transgenic PFFs were used as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Strong RFP expression was detected in the blastocysts and genital ridges of SCNT fetuses but not in other tissues. Two viable transgenic piglets were also produced by SCNT. Reprogramming of fibroblasts from the fetuses and piglets by another round of SCNT resulted in tdTomato reactivation in reconstructed blastocysts. Result indicated that a KI porcine reporter system to monitor the pluripotent status of cells was successfully developed.

  10. Micro RNA-214 contributes to proteasome independent downregulation of beta catenin in Huntington's disease knock-in striatal cell model STHdhQ111/Q111.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Supratim; Raha, Sanghamitra

    2015-04-10

    Role of beta catenin in Huntington's disease (HD) is not clear. Previous studies on HD reported varied levels of beta catenin. In the present study we showed that beta catenin is post transcriptionally down-regulated in mutant huntingtin knock-in cell model STHdhQ111/Q111. This in turn leads to decreased level of wnt/beta catenin responsive genes. We observed that Gsk3beta or Gsk3beta (phospho Ser 9) is unaltered in HD and this down-regulation of beta catenin is independent of proteasomal degradation. Finally, we showed that the overexpression of miR-214 leads to the down-regulation of beta catenin at protein level only and reduces its transcriptional activity. We concluded that, miR-214 contributes to the processes that result in proteasome independent post transcriptional down-regulation of beta catenin in STHdhQ111/Q111, probably through inhibition of protein synthesis from beta catenin mRNA.

  11. FAAH genetic variation enhances fronto-amygdala function in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Dincheva, Iva; Drysdale, Andrew T; Hartley, Catherine A; Johnson, David C; Jing, Deqiang; King, Elizabeth C; Ra, Stephen; Gray, J Megan; Yang, Ruirong; DeGruccio, Ann Marie; Huang, Chienchun; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Glatt, Charles E; Hill, Matthew N; Casey, B J; Lee, Francis S

    2015-03-03

    Cross-species studies enable rapid translational discovery and produce the broadest impact when both mechanism and phenotype are consistent across organisms. We developed a knock-in mouse that biologically recapitulates a common human mutation in the gene for fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) (C385A; rs324420), the primary catabolic enzyme for the endocannabinoid anandamide. This common polymorphism impacts the expression and activity of FAAH, thereby increasing anandamide levels. Here, we show that the genetic knock-in mouse and human variant allele carriers exhibit parallel alterations in biochemisty, neurocircuitry and behaviour. Specifically, there is reduced FAAH expression associated with the variant allele that selectively enhances fronto-amygdala connectivity and fear extinction learning, and decreases anxiety-like behaviours. These results suggest a gain of function in fear regulation and may indicate for whom and for what anxiety symptoms FAAH inhibitors or exposure-based therapies will be most efficacious, bridging an important translational gap between the mouse and human.

  12. FAAH genetic variation enhances fronto-amygdala function in mouse and human

    PubMed Central

    Dincheva, Iva; Drysdale, Andrew T.; Hartley, Catherine A.; Johnson, David C.; Jing, Deqiang; King, Elizabeth C.; Ra, Stephen; Gray, Megan; Yang, Ruirong; DeGruccio, Ann Marie; Huang, Chienchun; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Glatt, Charles E.; Hill, Matthew N.; Casey, B. J.; Lee, Francis S.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-species studies enable rapid translational discovery and produce the broadest impact when both mechanism and phenotype are consistent across organisms. We developed a knock-in mouse that biologically recapitulates a common human mutation in the gene for fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) (C385A; rs324420), the primary catabolic enzyme for the endocannabinoid anandamide. This common polymorphism impacts the expression and activity of FAAH, thereby increasing anandamide levels. Here, we show that the genetic knock-in mouse and human variant allele carriers exhibit parallel alterations in biochemisty, neurocircuitry, and behavior. Specifically, there is reduced FAAH expression associated with the variant allele that selectively enhances fronto-amygdala connectivity and fear extinction learning, and decreases anxiety-like behaviors. These results suggest a gain-of-function in fear regulation and may indicate for whom and for what anxiety symptoms FAAH inhibitors or exposure-based therapies will be most efficacious, bridging an important translational gap between the mouse and human. PMID:25731744

  13. Endogenous Mouse Dicer Is an Exclusively Cytoplasmic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Much, Christian; Pavlinic, Dinko; Buness, Andreas; Rappsilber, Juri; Benes, Vladimir; Allshire, Robin; O’Carroll, Dónal

    2016-01-01

    Dicer is a large multi-domain protein responsible for the ultimate step of microRNA and short-interfering RNA biogenesis. In human and mouse cell lines, Dicer has been shown to be important in the nuclear clearance of dsRNA as well as the establishment of chromatin modifications. Here we set out to unambiguously define the cellular localization of Dicer in mice to understand if this is a conserved feature of mammalian Dicer in vivo. To this end, we utilized an endogenously epitope tagged Dicer knock-in mouse allele. From primary mouse cell lines and adult tissues, we determined with certainty by biochemical fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy that endogenous Dicer is exclusively cytoplasmic. We ruled out the possibility that a fraction of Dicer shuttles to and from the nucleus as well as that FGF or DNA damage signaling induce Dicer nuclear translocation. We also explored Dicer localization during the dynamic and developmental context of embryogenesis, where Dicer is ubiquitously expressed and strictly cytoplasmic in all three germ layers as well as extraembryonic tissues. Our data exclude a direct role for Dicer in the nuclear RNA processing in the mouse. PMID:27254021

  14. Visualization of RelB expression and activation at the single-cell level during dendritic cell maturation in Relb-Venus knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Seki, Takao; Yamamoto, Mami; Taguchi, Yuu; Miyauchi, Maki; Akiyama, Nobuko; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Gohda, Jin; Akiyama, Taishin; Inoue, Jun-ichiro

    2015-12-01

    RelB is activated by the non-canonical NF-κB pathway, which is crucial for immunity by establishing lymphoid organogenesis and B-cell and dendritic cell (DC) maturation. To elucidate the mechanism of the RelB-mediated immune cell maturation, a precise understanding of the relationship between cell maturation and RelB expression and activation at the single-cell level is required. Therefore, we generated knock-in mice expressing a fusion protein between RelB and fluorescent protein (RelB-Venus) from the Relb locus. The Relb(Venus/Venus) mice developed without any abnormalities observed in the Relb(-/-) mice, allowing us to monitor RelB-Venus expression and nuclear localization as RelB expression and activation. Relb(Venus/Venus) DC analyses revealed that DCs consist of RelB(-), RelB(low) and RelB(high) populations. The RelB(high) population, which included mature DCs with projections, displayed RelB nuclear localization, whereas RelB in the RelB(low) population was in the cytoplasm. Although both the RelB(low) and RelB(-) populations barely showed projections, MHC II and co-stimulatory molecule expression were higher in the RelB(low) than in the RelB(-) splenic conventional DCs. Taken together, our results identify the RelB(low) population as a possible novel intermediate maturation stage of cDCs and the Relb(Venus/Venus) mice as a useful tool to analyse the dynamic regulation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway.

  15. Developmental regulation of GABAergic signalling in the hippocampus of neuroligin 3 R451C knock-in mice: an animal model of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Pizzarelli, Rocco; Cherubini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) comprise an heterogeneous group of neuro-developmental abnormalities, mainly of genetic origin, characterized by impaired social interactions, communications deficits, and stereotyped behaviors. In a small percentage of cases, ASDs have been found to be associated with single mutations in genes involved in synaptic function. One of these involves the postsynaptic cell adhesion molecule neuroligin (NL) 3. NLs interact with presynaptic neurexins (Nrxs) to ensure a correct cross talk between post and presynaptic specializations. Here, transgenic mice carrying the human R451C mutation of Nlgn3, were used to study GABAergic signaling in the hippocampus early in postnatal life. Whole cell recordings from CA3 pyramidal neurons in slices from NL3R451C knock-in mice revealed an enhanced frequency of Giant Depolarizing Potentials (GDPs), as compared to controls. This effect was probably dependent on an increased GABAergic drive to principal cells as demonstrated by the enhanced frequency of miniature GABAA-mediated (GPSCs), but not AMPA-mediated postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Changes in frequency of mGPSCs were associated with an acceleration of their decay kinetics, in the absence of any change in unitary synaptic conductance or in the number of GABAA receptor channels, as assessed by peak scaled non-stationary fluctuation analysis. The enhanced GABAergic but not glutamatergic transmission early in postnatal life may change the excitatory/inhibitory balance known to play a key role in the construction and refinement of neuronal circuits during postnatal development. This may lead to behavioral deficits reminiscent of those observed in ASDs patients. PMID:23761734

  16. Characterization of GABAergic neurons in rapid-eye-movement sleep controlling regions of the brainstem reticular formation in GAD67-green fluorescent protein knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ritchie E; McKenna, James T; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Thakkar, Mahesh M; McCarley, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    Recent experiments suggest that brainstem GABAergic neurons may control rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. However, understanding their pharmacology/physiology has been hindered by difficulty in identification. Here we report that mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the GAD67 promoter (GAD67-GFP knock-in mice) exhibit numerous GFP-positive neurons in the central gray and reticular formation, allowing on-line identification in vitro. Small (10-15 microm) or medium-sized (15-25 microm) GFP-positive perikarya surrounded larger serotonergic, noradrenergic, cholinergic and reticular neurons, and > 96% of neurons were double-labeled for GFP and GABA, confirming that GFP-positive neurons are GABAergic. Whole-cell recordings in brainstem regions important for promoting REM sleep [subcoeruleus (SubC) or pontine nucleus oralis (PnO) regions] revealed that GFP-positive neurons were spontaneously active at 3-12 Hz, fired tonically, and possessed a medium-sized depolarizing sag during hyperpolarizing steps. Many neurons also exhibited a small, low-threshold calcium spike. GFP-positive neurons were tested with pharmacological agents known to promote (carbachol) or inhibit (orexin A) REM sleep. SubC GFP-positive neurons were excited by the cholinergic agonist carbachol, whereas those in the PnO were either inhibited or excited. GFP-positive neurons in both areas were excited by orexins/hypocretins. These data are congruent with the hypothesis that carbachol-inhibited GABAergic PnO neurons project to, and inhibit, REM-on SubC reticular neurons during waking, whereas carbachol-excited SubC and PnO GABAergic neurons are involved in silencing locus coeruleus and dorsal raphe aminergic neurons during REM sleep. Orexinergic suppression of REM during waking is probably mediated in part via excitation of acetylcholine-inhibited GABAergic neurons.

  17. Gain of Function in FHM-1 Cav2.1 Knock-In Mice Is Related to the Shape of the Action Potential

    PubMed Central

    Inchauspe, Carlota González; Urbano, Francisco J.; Di Guilmi, Mariano N.; Forsythe, Ian D.; Ferrari, Michel D.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 FHM-1 is caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the α1A pore-forming subunit of CaV2.1 Ca2+ channels. We used knock-in (KI) transgenic mice harboring the pathogenic FHM-1 mutation R192Q to study neurotransmission at the calyx of Held synapse and cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal cells (PCs). Using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in brain stem slices, we confirmed that KI CaV2.1 Ca2+ channels activated at more hyperpolarizing potentials. However, calyceal presynaptic calcium currents (IpCa) evoked by presynaptic action potentials (APs) were similar in amplitude, kinetic parameters, and neurotransmitter release. CaV2.1 Ca2+ channels in cortical layer 2/3 PCs from KI mice also showed a negative shift in their activation voltage. PCs had APs with longer durations and smaller amplitudes than the calyx of Held. AP-evoked Ca2+ currents (ICa) from PCs were larger in KI compared with wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, when ICawas evoked in PCs by calyx of Held AP waveforms, we observed no amplitude differences between WT and KI mice. In the same way, Ca2+ currents evoked at the presynaptic terminals (IpCa)of the calyx of Held by the AP waveforms of the PCs had larger amplitudes in R192Q KI mice that in WT. These results suggest that longer time courses of pyramidal APs were a key factor for the expression of a synaptic gain of function in the KI mice. In addition, our results indicate that consequences of FHM-1 mutations might vary according to the shape of APs in charge of triggering synaptic transmission (neurons in the calyx of Held vs. excitatory/inhibitory neurons in the cortex), adding to the complexity of the pathophysiology of migraine. PMID:20484531

  18. Human SOD1 ALS Mutations in a Drosophila Knock-In Model Cause Severe Phenotypes and Reveal Dosage-Sensitive Gain- and Loss-of-Function Components.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Aslı; Held, Aaron; Bredvik, Kirsten; Major, Paxton; Achilli, Toni-Marie; Kerson, Abigail G; Wharton, Kristi; Stilwell, Geoff; Reenan, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease and familial forms can be caused by numerous dominant mutations of the copper-zinc superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene. Substantial efforts have been invested in studying SOD1-ALS transgenic animal models; yet, the molecular mechanisms by which ALS-mutant SOD1 protein acquires toxicity are not well understood. ALS-like phenotypes in animal models are highly dependent on transgene dosage. Thus, issues of whether the ALS-like phenotypes of these models stem from overexpression of mutant alleles or from aspects of the SOD1 mutation itself are not easily deconvolved. To address concerns about levels of mutant SOD1 in disease pathogenesis, we have genetically engineered four human ALS-causing SOD1 point mutations (G37R, H48R, H71Y, and G85R) into the endogenous locus of Drosophila SOD1 (dsod) via ends-out homologous recombination and analyzed the resulting molecular, biochemical, and behavioral phenotypes. Contrary to previous transgenic models, we have recapitulated ALS-like phenotypes without overexpression of the mutant protein. Drosophila carrying homozygous mutations rendering SOD1 protein enzymatically inactive (G85R, H48R, and H71Y) exhibited neurodegeneration, locomotor deficits, and shortened life span. The mutation retaining enzymatic activity (G37R) was phenotypically indistinguishable from controls. While the observed mutant dsod phenotypes were recessive, a gain-of-function component was uncovered through dosage studies and comparisons with age-matched dsod null animals, which failed to show severe locomotor defects or nerve degeneration. We conclude that the Drosophila knock-in model captures important aspects of human SOD1-based ALS and provides a powerful and useful tool for further genetic studies.

  19. Expression and Dendritic Trafficking of BDNF-6 Splice Variant are Impaired in Knock-In Mice Carrying Human BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Baj, Gabriele; Ieraci, Alessandro; Corna, Stefano; Musazzi, Laura; Lee, Francis S.; Tongiorgi, Enrico; Popoli, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Background: The human Val66Met polymorphism in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key factor in neuroplasticity, synaptic function, and cognition, has been implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. BDNF is encoded by multiple transcripts with distinct regulation and localization, but the impact of the Val66Met polymorphism on BDNF regulation remains unclear. Methods: In BDNF Val66Met knock-in mice, which recapitulate the phenotypic hallmarks of individuals carrying the BDNFMet allele, we measured expression levels, epigenetic changes at promoters, and dendritic trafficking of distinct BDNF transcripts using quantitative PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and in situ hybridization. Results: BDNF-4 and BDNF-6 transcripts were reduced in BDNFMet/Met mice, compared with BDNFVal/Val mice. ChIP for acetyl-histone H3, a marker of active gene transcription, and trimethyl-histone-H3-Lys27 (H3K27me3), a marker of gene repression, showed higher H3K27me3 binding to exon 5, 6, and 8 promoters in BDNFMet/Met. The H3K27 methyltransferase enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is involved in epigenetic regulation of BDNF expression, because in neuroblastoma cells BDNF expression was increased both by short interference RNA for EZH2 and incubation with 3-deazaneplanocin A, an inhibitor of EZH2. In situ hybridization for BDNF-2, BDNF-4, and BDNF-6 after pilocarpine treatment showed that BDNF-6 transcript was virtually absent from distal dendrites of the CA1 and CA3 regions in BDNFMet/Met mice, while no changes were found for BDNF-2 and BDNF-4. Conclusions: Impaired BDNF expression and dendritic targeting in BDNFMet/Met mice may contribute to reduced regulated secretion of BDNF at synapses, and may be a specific correlate of pathology in individuals carrying the Met allele. PMID:26108221

  20. Decreased dopamine receptor 1 activity and impaired motor-skill transfer in Dyt1 ΔGAG heterozygous knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Fumiaki; Dang, Mai T.; Liu, Jun; Gandre, Jason R.; Kwon, Kelly; Yuen, Robert; Li, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia is a movement disorder caused by a trinucleotide deletion (ΔGAG) in DYT1 (TOR1A), corresponding to a glutamic acid loss in the C-terminal region of torsinA. Functional alterations in the basal ganglia circuits have been reported in both DYT1 dystonia patients and rodent models. Dyt1 ΔGAG heterozygous knock-in (KI) mice exhibit motor deficits and decreased striatal dopamine receptor 2 (D2R) binding activity, suggesting a malfunction of the indirect pathway. However, the role of the direct pathway in pathogenesis of dystonia is not yet clear. Here, we report that Dyt1 KI mice exhibit significantly decreased striatal dopamine receptor 1 (D1R) binding activity and D1R protein levels, suggesting the alteration of the direct pathway. The decreased D1R may be caused by translational or post-translational processes since Dyt1 KI mice had normal levels of striatal D1R mRNA and a normal number of striatal neurons expressing D1R. Levels of striatal ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits, dopamine transporter, acetylcholine muscarinic M4 receptor and adenosine A2A receptor were not altered suggesting a specificity of affected polytopic membrane-associated proteins. Contribution of the direct pathway to motor-skill learning has been suggested in another pharmacological rat model injected with a D1R antagonist. In the present study, we developed a novel motor skill transfer test for mice and found deficits in Dyt1 KI mice. Further characterization of both the direct and the indirect pathways in Dyt1 KI mice will aid the development of novel therapeutic drugs. PMID:25451552

  1. Translational Mouse Models of Autism: Advancing Toward Pharmacological Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kazdoba, Tatiana M; Leach, Prescott T; Yang, Mu; Silverman, Jill L; Solomon, Marjorie; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    Animal models provide preclinical tools to investigate the causal role of genetic mutations and environmental factors in the etiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Knockout and humanized knock-in mice, and more recently knockout rats, have been generated for many of the de novo single gene mutations and copy number variants (CNVs) detected in ASD and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders. Mouse models incorporating genetic and environmental manipulations have been employed for preclinical testing of hypothesis-driven pharmacological targets, to begin to develop treatments for the diagnostic and associated symptoms of autism. In this review, we summarize rodent behavioral assays relevant to the core features of autism, preclinical and clinical evaluations of pharmacological interventions, and strategies to improve the translational value of rodent models of autism.

  2. Translational Mouse Models of Autism: Advancing Toward Pharmacological Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kazdoba, Tatiana M.; Leach, Prescott T.; Yang, Mu; Silverman, Jill L.; Solomon, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Animal models provide preclinical tools to investigate the causal role of genetic mutations and environmental factors in the etiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Knockout and humanized knock-in mice, and more recently knockout rats, have been generated for many of the de novo single gene mutations and copy number variants (CNVs) detected in ASD and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders. Mouse models incorporating genetic and environmental manipulations have been employed for preclinical testing of hypothesis-driven pharmacological targets, to begin to develop treatments for the diagnostic and associated symptoms of autism. In this review, we summarize rodent behavioral assays relevant to the core features of autism, preclinical and clinical evaluations of pharmacological interventions, and strategies to improve the translational value of rodent models of autism. PMID:27305922

  3. Maternal Supply of Cas9 to Zygotes Facilitates the Efficient Generation of Site-Specific Mutant Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Cebrian-Serrano, Alberto; Zha, Shijun; Hanssen, Lars; Biggs, Daniel; Preece, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Genome manipulation in the mouse via microinjection of CRISPR/Cas9 site-specific nucleases has allowed the production time for genetically modified mouse models to be significantly reduced. Successful genome manipulation in the mouse has already been reported using Cas9 supplied by microinjection of a DNA construct, in vitro transcribed mRNA and recombinant protein. Recently the use of transgenic strains of mice overexpressing Cas9 has been shown to facilitate site-specific mutagenesis via maternal supply to zygotes and this route may provide an alternative to exogenous supply. We have investigated the feasibility of supplying Cas9 genetically in more detail and for this purpose we report the generation of a transgenic mice which overexpress Cas9 ubiquitously, via a CAG-Cas9 transgene targeted to the Gt(ROSA26)Sor locus. We show that zygotes prepared from female mice harbouring this transgene are sufficiently loaded with maternally contributed Cas9 for efficient production of embryos and mice harbouring indel, genomic deletion and knock-in alleles by microinjection of guide RNAs and templates alone. We compare the mutagenesis rates and efficacy of mutagenesis using this genetic supply with exogenous Cas9 supply by either mRNA or protein microinjection. In general, we report increased generation rates of knock-in alleles and show that the levels of mutagenesis at certain genome target sites are significantly higher and more consistent when Cas9 is supplied genetically relative to exogenous supply. PMID:28081254

  4. Functional mutations in mouse norepinephrine transporter reduce sensitivity to cocaine inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Hill, Erik R; Gu, Howard H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The transporters of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin are molecular targets of cocaine, amphetamine, and therapeutic antidepressants. The residues involved in binding these drugs are unknown. We have performed several rounds of random and site-directed mutagenesis in the mouse norepinephrine transporter and screened for mutants with altered sensitivity to cocaine inhibition of substrate uptake. We have identified a triple mutation that retains close to wild-type transport function but displays a 37-fold decrease in cocaine sensitivity and 24-fold decrease in desipramine sensitivity. In contrast, the mutant’s sensitivities to amphetamine, methamphetamine, and methylphenidate are only slightly changed. Our data reveal critical residues contributing to the potent uptake inhibitions by these important drugs. Furthermore, this drug-resistant triple mutant can be used to generate a unique knock-in mouse line to study the role of norepinephrine transporter in the addictive effects of cocaine and the therapeutic effects of desipramine. PMID:18824182

  5. Novel NG2-CreERT2 knock-in mice demonstrate heterogeneous differentiation potential of NG2 glia during development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenhui; Zhao, Na; Bai, Xianshu; Karram, Khalad; Trotter, Jacqueline; Goebbels, Sandra; Scheller, Anja; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2014-06-01

    NG2 (nerve/glia antigen-2) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein and also known as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4. In the parenchyma of the central nervous system, NG2-expressing (NG2(+) ) cells have been identified as a novel type of glia with a strong potential to generate oligodendrocytes (OLs) in the developing white matter. However, the differentiation potential of NG2 glia remained controversial, largely attributable to shortcomings of transgenic mouse models used for fate mapping. To minimize these restrictions and to more faithfully mimic the endogenous NG2 expression in vivo, we generated a mouse line in which the open reading frame of the tamoxifen-inducible form of the Cre DNA recombinase (CreERT2) was inserted into the NG2 locus by homologous recombination. Results from this novel mouse line demonstrate that at different developmental stages of the brain, NG2(+) cells either stayed as NG2 glia or differentiated into OLs during the whole life span. Interestingly, when Cre activity was induced at embryonic stages, a significant number of reporter(+) astrocytes could be detected in the gray matter after birth. However, in other brain regions, such as olfactory bulb, brain stem, and cerebellum, all of the NG2 glia was restricted to the OL lineage. In addition, tamoxifen-sensitive and NG2 gene locus-dependent gene recombination could be detected in a small, but persistent population of cortical NeuN(+) neurons starting from the second postnatal week.

  6. [Genetically engineered mice: mouse models for cancer research].

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Hanna

    2007-10-26

    Genetically engineered mice (GEM) have been extensively used to model human cancer. Mouse models mimic the morphology, histopathology, phenotype, and genotype of the corresponding cancer in humans. GEM mice are created by random integration of a transgene into the genome, which results in gene overexpression (transgenic mice); gene deletion (knock-out mice); or targeted insertion of the transgene in a selected locus (knock-in mice). Knock-out may be constitutive, i.e. total inactivation of the gene of interest in any cell, or conditional, i.e. tissue-specific inactivation of the gene. Gene knock-down (RNAi) and humanization of the mouse are more sophisticated models of GEM mice. RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism in which double-stranded RNAs inhibits the respective gene expression by inducing degradation of its mRNA. Humanization is based on replacing a mouse gene by its human counterpart. The alterations in genes in GEM have to be heritable. The opportunities provided by employing GEM cancer models are: analysis of the role of specific cancer genes and modifier genes, evaluation of conventional cancer therapies and new drugs, identification of cancer markers of tumor growth, analysis of the influence of the tumor's microenvironment on tumor formation, and the definition of the pre-clinical, discrete steps of tumorigenesis. The validation of mouse models of human cancer is the task of the MMHCC (Mouse Models of Human Cancer Consortium). The GEM models of breast, pancreatic, intestinal and colon, and prostate cancer are the most actively explored. In contrast, the models of brain tumors and ovary, cervical, and skin cancer are in the early stage of investigation.

  7. Rax-CreERT2 knock-in mice: a tool for selective and conditional gene deletion in progenitor cells and radial glia of the retina and hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Pak, Thomas; Yoo, Sooyeon; Miranda-Angulo, Ana L; Miranda-Angulo, Ana M; Wang, Hong; Blackshaw, Seth

    2014-01-01

    To study gene function in neural progenitors and radial glia of the retina and hypothalamus, we developed a Rax-CreERT2 mouse line in which a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase is inserted into the endogenous Rax locus. By crossing Rax-CreER(T2) with the Cre-dependent Ai9 reporter line, we demonstrate that tamoxifen-induced Cre activity recapitulates the endogenous Rax mRNA expression pattern. During embryonic development, Cre recombinase activity in Rax-CreER(T2) is confined to retinal and hypothalamic progenitor cells, as well as progenitor cells of the posterior pituitary. At postnatal time points, selective Cre recombinase activity is seen in radial glial-like cell types in these organs--specifically Müller glia and tanycytes--as well as pituicytes. We anticipate that this line will prove useful for cell lineage analysis and investigation of gene function in the developing and mature retina, hypothalamus and pituitary.

  8. Corticofugal GABAergic projection neurons in the mouse frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Ryohei; Sakimura, Kenji; Yanagawa, Yuchio

    2015-01-01

    Cortical projection neurons are classified by hodology in corticocortical, commissural and corticofugal subtypes. Although cortical projection neurons had been regarded as only glutamatergic neurons, recently corticocortical GABAergic projection neurons has been also reported in several species. Here, we demonstrate corticofugal GABAergic projection neurons in the mouse frontal cortex. We employed viral-vector-mediated anterograde tracing, classical retrograde tracing, and immunohistochemistry to characterize neocortical GABAergic projection neurons. Injections of the Cre-dependent adeno-associated virus into glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67)-Cre knock-in mice revealed neocortical GABAergic projections widely to the forebrain, including the cerebral cortices, caudate putamen (CPu), ventral pallidum (VP), lateral globus pallidus (LGP), nucleus accumbens, and olfactory tubercle (Tu). Minor GABAergic projections were also found in the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, diagonal band of Broca, medial globus pallidus, substantial nigra, and dorsal raphe nucleus. Retrograde tracing studies also demonstrated corticofugal GABAergic projection neurons in the mouse frontal cortex. Further immunohistochemical screening with neurochemical markers revealed the majority of corticostriatal GABAergic projection neurons were positive for somatostatin (SS)-immunoreactivity. In contrast, corticothalamic GABAergic projection neurons were not identified by representative neurochemical markers for GABAergic neurons. These findings suggest that corticofugal GABAergic projection neurons are heterogeneous in terms of their neurochemical properties and target nuclei, and provide axonal innervations mainly to the nuclei in the basal ganglia. PMID:26578895

  9. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  10. Building a Brainier Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsien, Joe Z.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a genetic engineering project to build an intelligent mouse. Cites understanding the molecular basis of learning and memory as a very important step. Concludes that while science will never create a genius mouse that plays the stock market, it can turn a mouse into a quick learner with a better memory. (YDS)

  11. Pharmacological Amelioration of Cone Survival and Vision in a Mouse Model for Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songhua; Samardzija, Marijana; Yang, Zhihui; Grimm, Christian

    2016-01-01

    RPE65, an abundant membrane-associate protein in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), is a key retinoid isomerase of the visual cycle necessary for generating 11-cis-retinal that functions not only as a molecular switch for activating cone and rod visual pigments in response to light stimulation, but also as a chaperone for normal trafficking of cone opsins to the outer segments. Many mutations in RPE65 are associated with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). A R91W substitution, the most frequent LCA-associated mutation, results in a severe decrease in protein level and enzymatic activity of RPE65, causing cone opsin mislocalization and early cone degeneration in the mutation knock-in mouse model of LCA. Here we show that R91W RPE65 undergoes ubiquitination-dependent proteasomal degradation in the knock-in mouse RPE due to misfolding. The 26S proteasome non-ATPase regulatory subunit 13 mediated degradation specifically of misfolded R91W RPE65. The mutation disrupted membrane-association and colocalization of RPE65 with lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) that provides the hydrophobic substrate for RPE65. Systemic administration of sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA), a chemical chaperone, increased protein stability, enzymatic activity, membrane-association, and colocalization of R91W RPE65 with LRAT. This rescue effect increased synthesis of 11-cis-retinal and 9-cis-retinal, a functional iso-chromophore of the visual pigments, led to alleviation of S-opsin mislocalization and cone degeneration in the knock-in mice. Importantly, PBA-treatment also improved cone-mediated vision in the mutant mice. These results indicate that PBA, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved safe oral medication, may provide a noninvasive therapeutic intervention that delays daylight vision loss in patients with RPE65 mutations. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT LCA is a severe early onset retinal dystrophy. Recent clinical trials of gene therapy have implicated the need of an alternative or

  12. Identification and developmental analysis of endothelin receptor type-A expressing cells in the mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Taro; Sato, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Koichi; Asai, Rieko; Arima, Yuichiro; Uchijima, Yasunobu; Kurihara, Yukiko; Kurihara, Hiroki

    2011-10-01

    The endothelin (Edn) system plays pleiotropic roles in renal function and various disease processes through two distinct G protein-coupled receptors, Edn receptors type-A (Ednra) and type-B (Ednrb). However, difficulties in the accurate identification of receptor-expressing cells in situ have made it difficult to dissect their diverse action in renal (patho)physiology. We have recently established mouse lines in which lacZ and EGFP are 'knocked-in' to the Ednra locus to faithfully mark Ednra-expressing cells. Here we analyzed these mice for their expression in the kidney to characterize Ednra-expressing cells. Ednra expression was first observed in undifferentiated mesenchymal cells around the ureteric bud at E12.5. Thereafter, Ednra expression was widely observed in vascular smooth muscle cells, JG cells and mesenchymal cells in the interstitium. After growth, the expression became confined to vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes and renin-producing JG cells. By contrast, most cells in the nephron and vascular endothelial cells did not express Ednra. These results indicate that Ednra expression may be linked with non-epithelial fate determination and differentiation of metanephric mesenchyme. Ednra-lacZ/EGFP knock-in mice may serve as a useful tool in studies on renal function and pathophysiology of various renal diseases.

  13. A Longitudinal Motor Characterisation of the HdhQ111 Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yhnell, Emma; Dunnett, Stephen B.; Brooks, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Huntington’s disease (HD) is a rare, incurable neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG trinucleotide expansion with the first exon of the huntingtin gene. Numerous knock-in mouse models are currently available for modelling HD. However, before their use in scientific research, these models must be characterised to determine their face and predictive validity as models of the disease and their reliability in recapitulating HD symptoms. Objective: Manifest HD is currently diagnosed upon the onset of motor symptoms, thus we sought to longitudinally characterise the progression and severity of motor signs in the HdhQ111 knock-in mouse model of HD, in heterozygous mice. Methods: An extensive battery of motor tests including: rotarod, inverted lid test, balance beam, spontaneous locomotor activity and gait analysis were applied longitudinally to a cohort of HdhQ111 heterozygous mice in order to progressively assess motor function. Results: A progressive failure to gain body weight was demonstrated from 11 months of age and motor problems in all measures of balance beam performance were shown in HdhQ111 heterozygous animals in comparison to wild type control animals from 9 months of age. A decreased latency to fall from the rotarod was demonstrated in HdhQ111 heterozygous animals in comparison to wild type animals, although this was not progressive with time. No genotype specific differences were demonstrated in any of the other motor tests included in the test battery. Conclusions: The HdhQ111 heterozygous mouse demonstrates a subtle and progressive motor phenotype that begins at 9 months of age. This mouse model represents an early disease stage and would be ideal for testing therapeutic strategies that require elongated lead-in times, such as viral gene therapies or striatal transplantation. PMID:27258586

  14. Muscle weakness in Ryr1I4895T/WT knock-in mice as a result of reduced ryanodine receptor Ca2+ ion permeation and release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Loy, Ryan E.; Orynbayev, Murat; Xu, Le; Andronache, Zoita; Apostol, Simona; Zvaritch, Elena; MacLennan, David H.; Meissner, Gerhard; Melzer, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The type 1 isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RYR1) is the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) that is activated during skeletal muscle excitation–contraction (EC) coupling. Mutations in the RYR1 gene cause several rare inherited skeletal muscle disorders, including malignant hyperthermia and central core disease (CCD). The human RYR1I4898T mutation is one of the most common CCD mutations. To elucidate the mechanism by which RYR1 function is altered by this mutation, we characterized in vivo muscle strength, EC coupling, SR Ca2+ content, and RYR1 Ca2+ release channel function using adult heterozygous Ryr1I4895T/+ knock-in mice (IT/+). Compared with age-matched wild-type (WT) mice, IT/+ mice exhibited significantly reduced upper body and grip strength. In spite of normal total SR Ca2+ content, both electrically evoked and 4-chloro-m-cresol–induced Ca2+ release were significantly reduced and slowed in single intact flexor digitorum brevis fibers isolated from 4–6-mo-old IT/+ mice. The sensitivity of the SR Ca2+ release mechanism to activation was not enhanced in fibers of IT/+ mice. Single-channel measurements of purified recombinant channels incorporated in planar lipid bilayers revealed that Ca2+ permeation was abolished for homotetrameric IT channels and significantly reduced for heterotetrameric WT:IT channels. Collectively, these findings indicate that in vivo muscle weakness observed in IT/+ knock-in mice arises from a reduction in the magnitude and rate of RYR1 Ca2+ release during EC coupling that results from the mutation producing a dominant-negative suppression of RYR1 channel Ca2+ ion permeation. PMID:21149547

  15. Muscle weakness in Ryr1I4895T/WT knock-in mice as a result of reduced ryanodine receptor Ca2+ ion permeation and release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Loy, Ryan E; Orynbayev, Murat; Xu, Le; Andronache, Zoita; Apostol, Simona; Zvaritch, Elena; MacLennan, David H; Meissner, Gerhard; Melzer, Werner; Dirksen, Robert T

    2011-01-01

    The type 1 isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RYR1) is the Ca(2+) release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) that is activated during skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. Mutations in the RYR1 gene cause several rare inherited skeletal muscle disorders, including malignant hyperthermia and central core disease (CCD). The human RYR1(I4898T) mutation is one of the most common CCD mutations. To elucidate the mechanism by which RYR1 function is altered by this mutation, we characterized in vivo muscle strength, EC coupling, SR Ca(2+) content, and RYR1 Ca(2+) release channel function using adult heterozygous Ryr1(I4895T/+) knock-in mice (IT/+). Compared with age-matched wild-type (WT) mice, IT/+ mice exhibited significantly reduced upper body and grip strength. In spite of normal total SR Ca(2+) content, both electrically evoked and 4-chloro-m-cresol-induced Ca(2+) release were significantly reduced and slowed in single intact flexor digitorum brevis fibers isolated from 4-6-mo-old IT/+ mice. The sensitivity of the SR Ca(2+) release mechanism to activation was not enhanced in fibers of IT/+ mice. Single-channel measurements of purified recombinant channels incorporated in planar lipid bilayers revealed that Ca(2+) permeation was abolished for homotetrameric IT channels and significantly reduced for heterotetrameric WT:IT channels. Collectively, these findings indicate that in vivo muscle weakness observed in IT/+ knock-in mice arises from a reduction in the magnitude and rate of RYR1 Ca(2+) release during EC coupling that results from the mutation producing a dominant-negative suppression of RYR1 channel Ca(2+) ion permeation.

  16. Multiple phenotypes in Huntington disease mouse neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ritch, James J; Valencia, Antonio; Alexander, Jonathan; Sapp, Ellen; Gatune, Leah; Sangrey, Gavin R; Sinha, Saurabh; Scherber, Cally M; Zeitlin, Scott; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Irimia, Daniel; Difiglia, Marian; Kegel, Kimberly B

    2012-05-01

    Neural stem (NS) cells are a limitless resource, and thus superior to primary neurons for drug discovery provided they exhibit appropriate disease phenotypes. Here we established NS cells for cellular studies of Huntington's disease (HD). HD is a heritable neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation resulting in an increased number of glutamines (Q) within a polyglutamine tract in Huntingtin (Htt). NS cells were isolated from embryonic wild-type (Htt(7Q/7Q)) and "knock-in" HD (Htt(140Q/140Q)) mice expressing full-length endogenous normal or mutant Htt. NS cells were also developed from mouse embryonic stem cells that were devoid of Htt (Htt(-/-)), or knock-in cells containing human exon1 with an N-terminal FLAG epitope tag and with 7Q or 140Q inserted into one of the mouse alleles (Htt(F7Q/7Q) and Htt(F140Q/7Q)). Compared to Htt(7Q/7Q) NS cells, HD Htt(140Q/140Q) NS cells showed significantly reduced levels of cholesterol, increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and impaired motility. The heterozygous Htt(F140Q/7Q) NS cells had increased ROS and decreased motility compared to Htt(F7Q/7Q). These phenotypes of HD NS cells replicate those seen in HD patients or in primary cell or in vivo models of HD. Huntingtin "knock-out" NS cells (Htt(-/-)) also had impaired motility, but in contrast to HD cells had increased cholesterol. In addition, Htt(140Q/140Q) NS cells had higher phospho-AKT/AKT ratios than Htt(7Q/7Q) NS cells in resting conditions and after BDNF stimulation, suggesting mutant htt affects AKT dependent growth factor signaling. Upon differentiation, the Htt(7Q/7Q) and Htt(140Q/140Q) generated numerous Beta(III)-Tubulin- and GABA-positive neurons; however, after 15 days the cellular architecture of the differentiated Htt(140Q/140Q) cultures changed compared to Htt(7Q/7Q) cultures and included a marked increase of GFAP-positive cells. Our findings suggest that NS cells expressing endogenous mutant Htt will be useful for study of mechanisms of HD

  17. Characterization of Optically and Electrically Evoked Dopamine Release in Striatal Slices from Digenic Knock-in Mice with DAT-Driven Expression of Channelrhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FCV) is an established method to monitor increases in extracellular dopamine (DA) concentration ([DA]o) in the striatum, which is densely innervated by DA axons. Ex vivo brain slice preparations provide an opportunity to identify endogenous modulators of DA release. For these experiments, local electrical stimulation is often used to elicit release of DA, as well as other transmitters, in the striatal microcircuitry; changes in evoked increases in [DA]o after application of a pharmacological agent (e.g., a receptor antagonist) indicate a regulatory role for the transmitter system interrogated. Optogenetic methods that allow specific stimulation of DA axons provide a complementary, bottom-up approach for elucidating factors that regulate DA release. To this end, we have characterized DA release evoked by local electrical and optical stimulation in striatal slices from mice that genetically express a variant of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). Evoked increases in [DA]o in the dorsal and ventral striatum (dStr and vStr) were examined in a cross of a Cre-dependent ChR2 line (“Ai32” mice) with a DAT::Cre mouse line. In dStr, repeated optical pulse-train stimulation at the same recording site resulted in rundown of evoked [DA]o using heterozygous mice, which contrasted with the stability seen with electrical stimulation. Similar rundown was seen in the presence of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist, implicating the absence of concurrent nAChR activation in DA release instability in slices. Rundown with optical stimulation in dStr could be circumvented by recording from a population of sites, each stimulated only once. Same-site rundown was less pronounced with single-pulse stimulation, and a stable baseline could be attained. In vStr, stable optically evoked increases in [DA]o at single sites could be achieved using heterozygous mice, although with relatively low peak [DA]o. Low release could be overcome by using mice with a

  18. The roles of a ribosomal protein S19 polymer in a mouse model of carrageenan-induced acute pleurisy.

    PubMed

    Yamanegi, Koji; Kawakami, Toru; Yamada, Naoko; Kumanishi, Shunsuke; Futani, Hiroyuki; Nakasho, Keiji; Nishiura, Hiroshi

    2017-02-07

    C5-deficient mice usually present moderate neutrophil activation during the initiation phase of acute inflammation. Conversely, C5a receptor (C5aR)-deficient mice show unusually excessive activation of neutrophils. We identified the ribosomal protein S19 (RP S19) polymer, which is cross-linked at Lys122 and Gln137 by transglutaminases in apoptotic neutrophils, as a second C5aR ligand during the resolution phase of acute inflammation. The RP S19 polymer promotes apoptosis via the neutrophil C5aR and phagocytosis via the macrophage C5aR. To confirm the roles of the RP S19 polymer, we employed a carrageenan-induced acute pleurisy mouse model using C57BL/6J mice with a knock-in of the Gln137Glu mutant RP S19 gene and replaced the RP S19 polymer with either an S-tagged C5a/RP S19 recombinant protein or the RP S19(122-145) peptide monomer and dimer (as functional C5aR agonists/antagonists) and the RP S19(122-145) peptide trimer (as a functional C5aR antagonist). Neutrophils and macrophages were still present in the thoracic cavities of the knock-in mice at 24h and 7days after carrageenan injection, respectively. Knock-in mice showed structural organization and severe hemorrhaging from the surrounding small vessels of the alveolar walls in the lung parenchyma. In contrast to the RP S19(122-145) peptide monomer and trimer, the simultaneous presence of S-tagged C5a/RP S19 and the RP S19(122-145) peptide dimer completely improved the physiological and pathological acute inflammatory cues. The RP S19 polymer, especially the dimer, appears to play a role at the resolution phase of carrageenan-induced acute pleurisy in C57BL/6J model mice.

  19. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    PubMed

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  20. A Longitudinal Operant Assessment of Cognitive and Behavioural Changes in the HdhQ111 Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dunnett, Stephen B.; Brooks, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is characterised by motor symptoms which are often preceded by cognitive and behavioural changes, that can significantly contribute to disease burden for people living with HD. Numerous knock-in mouse models of HD are currently available for scientific research. However, before their use, they must be behaviourally characterised to determine their suitability in recapitulating the symptoms of the human condition. Thus, we sought to longitudinally characterise the nature, severity and time course of cognitive and behavioural changes observed in HdhQ111 heterozygous knock-in mice.To determine changes in cognition and behaviour an extensive battery of operant tests including: fixed ratio, progressive ratio, the five choice serial reaction time task and the serial implicit learning task, were applied longitudinally to HdhQ111 and wild type mice. The operant test battery was conducted at 6, 12 and 18 months of age. Significant deficits were observed in HdhQ111 animals in comparison to wild type animals in all operant tests indicating altered cognition (attentional and executive function) and motivation. However, the cognitive and behavioural deficits observed were not shown to be progressive over time in the longitudinal testing paradigm that was utilised. The results therefore demonstrate that the HdhQ111 mouse model of HD reflects some features of the cognitive and behavioural changes shown in the human condition of HD. Although, the cognitive and behavioural deficits demonstrated were not shown to be progressive over time. PMID:27701442

  1. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  2. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-04

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data.

  3. Glutamate-system defects behind psychiatric manifestations in a familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 disease-mutation mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bøttger, Pernille; Glerup, Simon; Gesslein, Bodil; Illarionova, Nina B.; Isaksen, Toke J.; Heuck, Anders; Clausen, Bettina H.; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Gramsbergen, Jan B.; Gunnarson, Eli; Aperia, Anita; Lauritzen, Martin; Lambertsen, Kate L.; Nissen, Poul; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a complex brain disorder, and understanding the complexity of this prevalent disease could improve quality of life for millions of people. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 2 (FHM2) is a subtype of migraine with aura and co-morbidities like epilepsy/seizures, cognitive impairments and psychiatric manifestations, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). FHM2 disease-mutations locate to the ATP1A2 gene encoding the astrocyte-located α2-isoform of the sodium-potassium pump (α2Na+/K+-ATPase). We show that knock-in mice heterozygous for the FHM2-associated G301R-mutation (α2+/G301R) phenocopy several FHM2-relevant disease traits e.g., by mimicking mood depression and OCD. In vitro studies showed impaired glutamate uptake in hippocampal mixed astrocyte-neuron cultures from α2G301R/G301R E17 embryonic mice, and moreover, induction of cortical spreading depression (CSD) resulted in reduced recovery in α2+/G301R male mice. Moreover, NMDA-type glutamate receptor antagonists or progestin-only treatment reverted specific α2+/G301R behavioral phenotypes. Our findings demonstrate that studies of an in vivo relevant FHM2 disease knock-in mouse model provide a link between the female sex hormone cycle and the glutamate system and a link to co-morbid psychiatric manifestations of FHM2. PMID:26911348

  4. Glutamate-system defects behind psychiatric manifestations in a familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 disease-mutation mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bøttger, Pernille; Glerup, Simon; Gesslein, Bodil; Illarionova, Nina B; Isaksen, Toke J; Heuck, Anders; Clausen, Bettina H; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Gramsbergen, Jan B; Gunnarson, Eli; Aperia, Anita; Lauritzen, Martin; Lambertsen, Kate L; Nissen, Poul; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2016-02-25

    Migraine is a complex brain disorder, and understanding the complexity of this prevalent disease could improve quality of life for millions of people. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 2 (FHM2) is a subtype of migraine with aura and co-morbidities like epilepsy/seizures, cognitive impairments and psychiatric manifestations, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). FHM2 disease-mutations locate to the ATP1A2 gene encoding the astrocyte-located α2-isoform of the sodium-potassium pump (α2Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase). We show that knock-in mice heterozygous for the FHM2-associated G301R-mutation (α2(+/G301R)) phenocopy several FHM2-relevant disease traits e.g., by mimicking mood depression and OCD. In vitro studies showed impaired glutamate uptake in hippocampal mixed astrocyte-neuron cultures from α2(G301R/G301R) E17 embryonic mice, and moreover, induction of cortical spreading depression (CSD) resulted in reduced recovery in α2(+/G301R) male mice. Moreover, NMDA-type glutamate receptor antagonists or progestin-only treatment reverted specific α2(+/G301R) behavioral phenotypes. Our findings demonstrate that studies of an in vivo relevant FHM2 disease knock-in mouse model provide a link between the female sex hormone cycle and the glutamate system and a link to co-morbid psychiatric manifestations of FHM2.

  5. Translation of the prion protein mRNA is robust in astrocytes but does not amplify during reactive astrocytosis in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Walker S; Krost, Clemens; Borkowski, Andrew W; Kaczmarczyk, Lech

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases induce neurodegeneration in specific brain areas for undetermined reasons. A thorough understanding of the localization of the disease-causing molecule, the prion protein (PrP), could inform on this issue but previous studies have generated conflicting conclusions. One of the more intriguing disagreements is whether PrP is synthesized by astrocytes. We developed a knock-in reporter mouse line in which the coding sequence of the PrP expressing gene (Prnp), was replaced with that for green fluorescent protein (GFP). Native GFP fluorescence intensity varied between and within brain regions. GFP was present in astrocytes but did not increase during reactive gliosis induced by scrapie prion infection. Therefore, reactive gliosis associated with prion diseases does not cause an acceleration of local PrP production. In addition to aiding in Prnp gene activity studies, this reporter mouse line will likely prove useful for analysis of chimeric animals produced by stem cell and tissue transplantation experiments.

  6. Insulin and IGF-1 improve mitochondrial function in a PI-3K/Akt-dependent manner and reduce mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species in Huntington's disease knock-in striatal cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Márcio; Rosenstock, Tatiana R; Oliveira, Ana M; Oliveira, Catarina R; Rego, A Cristina

    2014-09-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been described in Huntington's disease, a disorder caused by expression of mutant huntingtin (mHtt). IGF-1 was previously shown to protect HD cells, whereas insulin prevented neuronal oxidative stress. In this work we analyzed the role of insulin and IGF-1 in striatal cells derived from HD knock-in mice on mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and related antioxidant and signaling pathways influencing mitochondrial function. Insulin and IGF-1 decreased mitochondrial ROS induced by mHtt and normalized mitochondrial SOD activity, without affecting intracellular glutathione levels. IGF-1 and insulin promoted Akt phosphorylation without changing the nuclear levels of phosphorylated Nrf2 or Nrf2/ARE activity. Insulin and IGF-1 treatment also decreased mitochondrial Drp1 phosphorylation, suggesting reduced mitochondrial fragmentation, and ameliorated mitochondrial function in HD cells in a PI-3K/Akt-dependent manner. This was accompanied by increased total and phosphorylated Akt, Tfam, and mitochondrial-encoded cytochrome c oxidase II, as well as Tom20 and Tom40 in mitochondria of insulin- and IGF-1-treated mutant striatal cells. Concomitantly, insulin/IGF-1-treated mutant cells showed reduced apoptotic features. Hence, insulin and IGF-1 improve mitochondrial function and reduce mitochondrial ROS caused by mHtt by activating the PI-3K/Akt signaling pathway, in a process independent of Nrf2 transcriptional activity, but involving enhanced mitochondrial levels of Akt and mitochondrial-encoded complex IV subunit.

  7. [Echocardiography in mouse].

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A

    2008-06-01

    Assessing cardiac phenotype requires invasive or noninvasive techniques in mouse. Echocardiography is a noninvasive technique for evaluating cardiac function. The purpose of this paper is to underline echocardiography modalities and new tools Doppler applications like tissue Doppler imaging.

  8. Mouse Cleaning Apparatus and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The method of using the mouse pad cleaning apparatus is disclosed and claimed. The method comprises the steps of uncovering the mouse cleaning surface, applying the mouse and ball of the mouse to the cleaning surface, moving the mouse in a rotational pattern on the mouse cleaning surface, removing the mouse form the mouse cleaning surface, washing the cleaning surface, and covering the mouse cleaning surface. A mouse pad cleaning apparatus comprising a plurality of substrates, each said substrate having adhesive thereon, said plurality of substrates residing in and affixed to a receptacle. A single substrate having adhesive, which may be washable or non-washable, thereon may be employed. The washable adhesive may be an organopolysiloxane or gelatinous elastomer.

  9. Practical Application of Microelectroporation into Developing Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogori, Tomomi; Ogawa, Masaharu

    One key approach toward understanding the genetic mechanisms underlying embryonic development involves the overexpression or misexpression of target genes in specific regions and at specific time points. The mouse gene-knockout system has been used extensively for loss-of-function studies due to the availability of a large number of mutant lines and the technical advantages of this system. In contrast, gain-of-function analyses have been performed through the production of knock-in and transgenic animals and with the use of various viruses (Cornetta 2006; Jakobsson et al., 2003; Hashimoto and Mikoshiba, 2004). However, it is not always possible to express or suppress genes in a spatially and temporally restricted manner, and the generation of genetically modified mice and recombinant viruses is time consuming and labor intensive. With the aim of solving these problems, many attempts have been made to apply the electroporation technique in research on developmental biology. Due to the accessibility of the avian embryo, it has been used as a classic model system for the study of developmental events in vertebrates. A novel technique for successful gene delivery into chick embryos has been established; this technique is known as in ovo electroporation and appears to be an excellent method, permitting quick and direct examination of the function of the delivered genes (Muramatsu et al., 1997; Itasaki et al., 1999; Momose et al., 1999; Nakamura et al., 2000; Yasuda et al., 2000). It seems that this technique can be adapted to the mouse embryo and would permit more rapid functional analysis of genes than is achieved by the generation of knockout or transgenic mouse lines. However, the inaccessibility of embryos in the mammalian uterus renders in utero manipulations targeting precise regions difficult or impossible at most stages of development. Efforts have been undertaken by various researchers to establish an in utero electroporation system, and there have been several

  10. 4-aminopyridine reverses ataxia and cerebellar firing deficiency in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    PubMed Central

    Jayabal, Sriram; Chang, Hui Ho Vanessa; Cullen, Kathleen E.; Watt, Alanna J.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is a devastating midlife-onset autosomal dominant motor control disease with no known treatment. Using a hyper-expanded polyglutamine (84Q) knock-in mouse, we found that cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision was degraded in heterozygous (SCA684Q/+) mice at 19 months when motor deficits are observed. Similar alterations in firing precision and motor control were observed at disease onset at 7 months in homozygous (SCA684Q/84Q) mice, as well as a reduction in firing rate. We further found that chronic administration of the FDA-approved drug 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), which targets potassium channels, alleviated motor coordination deficits and restored cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision to wildtype (WT) levels in SCA684Q/84Q mice both in acute slices and in vivo. These results provide a novel therapeutic approach for treating ataxic symptoms associated with SCA6. PMID:27381005

  11. Knocking in the Otto-cycle Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinhart, H

    1939-01-01

    Engine knock is, as is known, preceded by normal burning of the first part of the charge, and only the part burned last (residual charge), knocks. The aim of the present measurements was, first, to reexamine the combustion form in this residual charge, because of the absence of uniform and frequently contradictory results in the very extensive literature on the subject. On top of that, an attempt was to be made to gain a deeper insight into the mechanism accompanying the combustion process, by means of the electrical test equipment perfected in recent years.

  12. Motor Dysfunctions and Neuropathology in Mouse Models of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Cruzeiro, João M. Da Conceição; Mendonça, Liliana; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Nóbrega, Clévio

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant ataxia caused by an expansion of CAG repeats in the exon 1 of the gene ATXN2, conferring a gain of toxic function that triggers the appearance of the disease phenotype. SCA2 is characterized by several symptoms including progressive gait ataxia and dysarthria, slow saccadic eye movements, sleep disturbances, cognitive impairments, and psychological dysfunctions such as insomnia and depression, among others. The available treatments rely on palliative care, which mitigate some of the major symptoms but ultimately fail to block the disease progression. This persistent lack of effective therapies led to the development of several models in yeast, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, and mice to serve as platforms for testing new therapeutic strategies and to accelerate the research on the complex disease mechanisms. In this work, we review 4 transgenic and 1 knock-in mouse that exhibit a SCA2-related phenotype and discuss their usefulness in addressing different scientific problems. The knock-in mice are extremely faithful to the human disease, with late onset of symptoms and physiological levels of mutant ataxin-2, while the other transgenic possess robust and well-characterized motor impairments and neuropathological features. Furthermore, a new BAC model of SCA2 shows promise to study the recently explored role of non-coding RNAs as a major pathogenic mechanism in this devastating disorder. Focusing on specific aspects of the behavior and neuropathology, as well as technical aspects, we provide a highly practical description and comparison of all the models with the purpose of creating a useful resource for SCA2 researchers worldwide. PMID:28018166

  13. Motor Dysfunctions and Neuropathology in Mouse Models of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Alves-Cruzeiro, João M Da Conceição; Mendonça, Liliana; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Nóbrega, Clévio

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant ataxia caused by an expansion of CAG repeats in the exon 1 of the gene ATXN2, conferring a gain of toxic function that triggers the appearance of the disease phenotype. SCA2 is characterized by several symptoms including progressive gait ataxia and dysarthria, slow saccadic eye movements, sleep disturbances, cognitive impairments, and psychological dysfunctions such as insomnia and depression, among others. The available treatments rely on palliative care, which mitigate some of the major symptoms but ultimately fail to block the disease progression. This persistent lack of effective therapies led to the development of several models in yeast, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, and mice to serve as platforms for testing new therapeutic strategies and to accelerate the research on the complex disease mechanisms. In this work, we review 4 transgenic and 1 knock-in mouse that exhibit a SCA2-related phenotype and discuss their usefulness in addressing different scientific problems. The knock-in mice are extremely faithful to the human disease, with late onset of symptoms and physiological levels of mutant ataxin-2, while the other transgenic possess robust and well-characterized motor impairments and neuropathological features. Furthermore, a new BAC model of SCA2 shows promise to study the recently explored role of non-coding RNAs as a major pathogenic mechanism in this devastating disorder. Focusing on specific aspects of the behavior and neuropathology, as well as technical aspects, we provide a highly practical description and comparison of all the models with the purpose of creating a useful resource for SCA2 researchers worldwide.

  14. TALEN/CRISPR-Mediated eGFP Knock-In Add-On at the OCT4 Locus Does Not Impact Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells towards Endoderm

    PubMed Central

    Krentz, Nicole A. J.; Nian, Cuilan; Lynn, Francis C.

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have great promise as a source of unlimited transplantable cells for regenerative medicine. However, current progress on producing the desired cell type for disease treatment has been limited due to an insufficient understanding of the developmental processes that govern their differentiation, as well as a paucity of tools to systematically study differentiation in the lab. In order to overcome these limitations, cell-type reporter hESC lines will be required. Here we outline two strategies using Transcription Activator Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-Associated protein (Cas) to create OCT4-eGFP knock-in add-on hESC lines. Thirty-one and forty-seven percent of clones were correctly modified using the TALEN and CRISPR-Cas9 systems, respectively. Further analysis of three correctly targeted clones demonstrated that the insertion of eGFP in-frame with OCT4 neither significantly impacted expression from the wild type allele nor did the fusion protein have a dramatically different biological stability. Importantly, the OCT4-eGFP fusion was easily detected using microscopy, flow cytometry and western blotting. The OCT4 reporter lines remained equally competent at producing CXCR4+ definitive endoderm that expressed a panel of endodermal genes. Moreover, the genomic modification did not impact the formation of NKX6.1+/SOX9+ pancreatic progenitor cells following directed differentiation. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate for the first time that CRISPR-Cas9 can be used to modify OCT4 and highlight the feasibility of creating cell-type specific reporter hESC lines utilizing genome-editing tools that facilitate homologous recombination. PMID:25474420

  15. A retrograde signal from RyR1 alters DHP receptor inactivation and limits window Ca2+ release in muscle fibers of Y522S RyR1 knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Andronache, Zoita; Hamilton, Susan L; Dirksen, Robert T; Melzer, Werner

    2009-03-17

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a life-threatening hypermetabolic condition caused by dysfunctional Ca(2+) homeostasis in skeletal muscle, which primarily originates from genetic alterations in the Ca(2+) release channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR1) of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Owing to its physical interaction with the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), RyR1 is controlled by the electrical potential across the transverse tubular (TT) membrane. The DHPR exhibits both voltage-dependent activation and inactivation. Here we determined the impact of an MH mutation in RyR1 (Y522S) on these processes in adult muscle fibers isolated from heterozygous RyR1(Y522S)-knock-in mice. The voltage dependence of DHPR-triggered Ca(2+) release flux was left-shifted by approximately 8 mV. As a consequence, the voltage window for steady-state Ca(2+) release extended to more negative holding potentials in muscle fibers of the RyR1(Y522S)-mice. A rise in temperature from 20 degrees to 30 degrees C caused a further shift to more negative potentials of this window (by approximately 20 mV). The activation of the DHPR-mediated Ca(2+) current was minimally changed by the mutation. However, surprisingly, the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation of DHPR-mediated calcium conductance and release were also shifted by approximately 10 mV to more negative potentials, indicating a retrograde action of the RyR1 mutation on DHPR inactivation that limits window Ca(2+) release. This effect serves as a compensatory response to the lowered voltage threshold for Ca(2+) release caused by the Y522S mutation and represents a novel mechanism to counteract excessive Ca(2+) leak and store depletion in MH-susceptible muscle.

  16. Are osteoclasts needed for the bone anabolic response to parathyroid hormone? A study of intermittent parathyroid hormone with denosumab or alendronate in knock-in mice expressing humanized RANKL.

    PubMed

    Pierroz, Dominique D; Bonnet, Nicolas; Baldock, Paul A; Ominsky, Michael S; Stolina, Marina; Kostenuik, Paul J; Ferrari, Serge L

    2010-09-03

    PTH stimulates osteoblastic cells to form new bone and to produce osteoblast-osteoclast coupling factors such as RANKL. Whether osteoclasts or their activity are needed for PTH anabolism remains uncertain. We treated ovariectomized huRANKL knock-in mice with a human RANKL inhibitor denosumab (DMAb), alendronate (Aln), or vehicle for 4 weeks, followed by co-treatment with intermittent PTH for 4 weeks. Loss of bone mass and microarchitecture was prevented by Aln and further significantly improved by DMAb. PTH improved bone mass, microstructure, and strength, and was additive to Aln but not to DMAb. Aln inhibited biochemical and histomorphometrical indices of bone turnover,--i.e. osteocalcin and bone formation rate (BFR) on cancellous bone surfaces-, and Dmab inhibited them further. However Aln increased whereas Dmab suppressed osteoclast number and surfaces. PTH significantly increased osteocalcin and bone formation indices, in the absence or presence of either antiresorptive, although BFR remained lower in presence of Dmab. To further evaluate PTH effects in the complete absence of osteoclasts, high dose PTH was administered to RANK(-/-) mice. PTH increased osteocalcin similarly in RANK(-/-) and WT mice. It also increased BMD in RANK(-/-) mice, although less than in WT. These results further indicate that osteoclasts are not strictly required for PTH anabolism, which presumably still occurs via stimulation of modeling-based bone formation. However the magnitude of PTH anabolic effects on the skeleton, in particular its additive effects with antiresorptives, depends on the extent of the remodeling space, as determined by the number and activity of osteoclasts on bone surfaces.

  17. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  18. CRISPRtools: a flexible computational platform for performing CRISPR/Cas9 experiments in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kevin A; Beane, Glen L; Goodwin, Leslie O; Kutny, Peter M; Reinholdt, Laura G; Murray, Stephen A

    2017-03-09

    Genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided endonuclease system has rapidly become a driving force for discovery in modern biomedical research. This simple yet elegant system has been widely used to generate both loss-of-function alleles and precision knock-in mutations using single-stranded donor oligonucleotides. Our CRISPRtools platform supports both of these applications in order to facilitate the use of CRISPR/Cas9. While there are several tools that facilitate CRISPR/Cas9 design and screen for potential off-target sites, the process is typically performed sequentially on single genes, limiting scalability for large-scale programs. Here, the design principle underlying gene ablation is based upon using paired guides flanking a critical region/exon of interest to create deletions. Guide pairs are rank ordered based upon published efficiency scores and off-target analyses, and reported in a concise format for downstream implementation. The exon deletion strategy simplifies characterization of founder animals and is the strategy employed for the majority of knockouts in the mouse. In proof-of-principle experiments, the effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated using microinjection and electroporation to introduce CRISPR/Cas9 components into mouse zygotes to delete critical exons.

  19. Role of FGF/FGFR signaling in skeletal development and homeostasis: learning from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Su, Nan; Jin, Min; Chen, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling plays essential roles in bone development and diseases. Missense mutations in FGFs and FGFRs in humans can cause various congenital bone diseases, including chondrodysplasia syndromes, craniosynostosis syndromes and syndromes with dysregulated phosphate metabolism. FGF/FGFR signaling is also an important pathway involved in the maintenance of adult bone homeostasis. Multiple kinds of mouse models, mimicking human skeleton diseases caused by missense mutations in FGFs and FGFRs, have been established by knock-in/out and transgenic technologies. These genetically modified mice provide good models for studying the role of FGF/FGFR signaling in skeleton development and homeostasis. In this review, we summarize the mouse models of FGF signaling-related skeleton diseases and recent progresses regarding the molecular mechanisms, underlying the role of FGFs/FGFRs in the regulation of bone development and homeostasis. This review also provides a perspective view on future works to explore the roles of FGF signaling in skeletal development and homeostasis. PMID:26273516

  20. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF.

  1. Mechanism and treatment for learning and memory deficits in mouse models of Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Seok; Ehninger, Dan; Zhou, Miou; Oh, Jun-Young; Kang, Minkyung; Kwak, Chuljung; Ryu, Hyun-Hee; Butz, Delana; Araki, Toshiyuki; Cai, Ying; Balaji, J; Sano, Yoshitake; Nam, Christine I; Kim, Hyong Kyu; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Burger, Corinna; Neel, Benjamin G; Silva, Alcino J

    2014-12-01

    In Noonan syndrome (NS) 30-50% of subjects show cognitive deficits of unknown etiology and with no known treatment. Here, we report that knock-in mice expressing either of two NS-associated mutations in Ptpn11, which encodes the nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2, show hippocampal-dependent impairments in spatial learning and deficits in hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). In addition, viral overexpression of an NS-associated allele PTPN11(D61G) in adult mouse hippocampus results in increased baseline excitatory synaptic function and deficits in LTP and spatial learning, which can be reversed by a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor. Furthermore, brief treatment with lovastatin reduces activation of the GTPase Ras-extracellular signal-related kinase (Erk) pathway in the brain and normalizes deficits in LTP and learning in adult Ptpn11(D61G/+) mice. Our results demonstrate that increased basal Erk activity and corresponding baseline increases in excitatory synaptic function are responsible for the LTP impairments and, consequently, the learning deficits in mouse models of NS. These data also suggest that lovastatin or MEK inhibitors may be useful for treating the cognitive deficits in NS.

  2. Expression of the Norrie disease gene (Ndp) in developing and adult mouse eye, ear, and brain

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin; Smallwood, Philip; Nathans, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    The Norrie disease gene (Ndp) codes for a secreted protein, Norrin, that activates canonical Wnt signaling by binding to its receptor, Frizzled-4. This signaling system is required for normal vascular development in the retina and for vascular survival in the cochlea. In mammals, the pattern of Ndp expression beyond the retina is poorly defined due to the low abundance of Norrin mRNA and protein. Here we characterize Ndp expression during mouse development by studying a knock-in mouse that carries the coding sequence of human placental alkaline phosphatase (AP) inserted at the Ndp locus (NdpAP). In the CNS, NdpAP expression is apparent by E10.5 and is dynamic and complex. The anatomically delimited regions of NdpAP expression observed prenatally in the CNS are replaced postnatally by widespread expression in astrocytes in the forebrain and midbrain, Bergman glia in the cerebellum, and Müller glia in the retina. In the developing and adult cochlea, NdpAP expression is closely associated with two densely vascularized regions, the stria vascularis and a capillary plexus between the organ of Corti and the spiral ganglion. These observations suggest the possibility that Norrin may have developmental and/or homeostatic functions beyond the retina and cochlea. PMID:21055480

  3. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  4. Distinct functions and regulation of epithelial progesterone receptor in the mouse cervix, vagina, and uterus.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Fabiola F; Son, Jieun; Hewitt, Sylvia C; Jang, Eunjung; Lydon, John P; Korach, Kenneth S; Chung, Sang-Hyuk

    2016-04-05

    While the function of progesterone receptor (PR) has been studied in the mouse vagina and uterus, its regulation and function in the cervix has not been described. We selectively deleted epithelial PR in the female reproductive tracts using the Cre/LoxP recombination system. We found that epithelial PR was required for induction of apoptosis and suppression of cell proliferation by progesterone (P4) in the cervical and vaginal epithelium. We also found that epithelial PR was dispensable for P4 to suppress apoptosis and proliferation in the uterine epithelium. PR is encoded by the Pgr gene, which is regulated by estrogen receptor α (ERα) in the female reproductive tracts. Using knock-in mouse models expressing ERα mutants, we determined that the DNA-binding domain (DBD) and AF2 domain of ERα were required for upregulation of Pgr in the cervix and vagina as well as the uterine stroma. The ERα AF1 domain was required for upregulation of Pgr in the vaginal stroma and epithelium and cervical epithelium, but not in the uterine and cervical stroma. ERα DBD, AF1, and AF2 were required for suppression of Pgr in the uterine epithelium, which was mediated by stromal ERα. Epithelial ERα was responsible for upregulation of epithelial Pgr in the cervix and vagina. Our results indicate that regulation and functions of epithelial PR are different in the cervix, vagina, and uterus.

  5. Nicotine-induced dystonic arousal complex in a mouse line harboring a human autosomal-dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy mutation.

    PubMed

    Teper, Yaroslav; Whyte, Douglas; Cahir, Elizabeth; Lester, Henry A; Grady, Sharon R; Marks, Michael J; Cohen, Bruce N; Fonck, Carlos; McClure-Begley, Tristan; McIntosh, J Michael; Labarca, Cesar; Lawrence, Andrew; Chen, Feng; Gantois, Ilse; Davies, Philip J; Petrou, Steven; Murphy, Mark; Waddington, John; Horne, Malcolm K; Berkovic, Samuel F; Drago, John

    2007-09-19

    We generated a mouse line harboring an autosomal-dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) mutation: the alpha4 nicotinic receptor S248F knock-in strain. In this mouse, modest nicotine doses (1-2 mg/kg) elicit a novel behavior termed the dystonic arousal complex (DAC). The DAC includes stereotypical head movements, body jerking, and forelimb dystonia; these behaviors resemble some core features of ADNFLE. A marked Straub tail is an additional component of the DAC. Similar to attacks in ADNFLE, the DAC can be partially suppressed by the sodium channel blocker carbamazepine or by pre-exposure to a very low dose of nicotine (0.1 mg/kg). The DAC is centrally mediated, genetically highly penetrant, and, surprisingly, not associated with overt ictal electrical activity as assessed by (1) epidural or frontal lobe depth-electrode electroencephalography or (2) hippocampal c-fos-regulated gene expression. Heterozygous knock-in mice are partially protected from nicotine-induced seizures. The noncompetitive antagonist mecamylamine does not suppress the DAC, although it suppresses high-dose nicotine-induced wild-type-like seizures. Experiments on agonist-induced 86Rb+ and neurotransmitter efflux from synaptosomes and on alpha4S248Fbeta2 receptors expressed in oocytes confirm that the S248F mutation confers resistance to mecamylamine blockade. Genetic background, gender, and mutant gene expression levels modulate expression of the DAC phenotype in mice. The S248F mouse thus appears to provide a model for the paroxysmal dystonic element of ADNFLE semiology. Our model complements what is seen in other ADNFLE animal models. Together, these mice cover the spectrum of behavioral and electrographic events seen in the human condition.

  6. Researchers Create Artificial Mouse 'Embryo'

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163881.html Researchers Create Artificial Mouse 'Embryo' Experiment used two types of gene-modified stem ... they've created a kind of artificial mouse embryo using stem cells, which can be coaxed to ...

  7. LBH589, A Hydroxamic Acid-Derived HDAC Inhibitor, is Neuroprotective in Mouse Models of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Vanita; Quinti, Luisa; Khanna, Prarthana; Paganetti, Paolo; Kuhn, Rainer; Young, Anne B.; Kazantsev, Aleksey G.; Hersch, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Background: Modulation of gene transcription by HDAC inhibitors has been shown repeatedly to be neuroprotective in cellular, invertebrate, and rodent models of Huntington’s disease (HD). It has been difficult to translate these treatments to the clinic, however, because existing compounds have limited potency or brain bioavailability. Objective: In the present study, we assessed the therapeutic potential of LBH589, an orally bioavailable hydroxamic acid-derived nonselective HDAC inhibitor in mouse models of HD. Method: The efficacy of LBH589 is tested in two HD mouse models using various biochemical, behavioral and neuropathological outcome measures. Results: We show that LBH589 crosses the blood brain barrier; induces histone hyperacetylation and prevents striatal neuronal shrinkage in R6/2 HD mice. In full-length knock-in HD mice LBH589-treatment improves motor performance and reduces neuronal atrophy. Conclusions: Our efficacious results of LBH589 in fragment and full-length mouse models of HD suggest that LBH589 is a promising candidate for clinical assessment in HD patients and provides confirmation that non-selective HDAC inhibitors can be viable clinical candidates. PMID:27983565

  8. The Mouse That Soared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    Astronomers have used an X-ray image to make the first detailed study of the behavior of high-energy particles around a fast moving pulsar. The image, from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, shows the shock wave created as a pulsar plows supersonically through interstellar space. These results will provide insight into theories for the production of powerful winds of matter and antimatter by pulsars. Chandra's image of the glowing cloud, known as the Mouse, shows a stubby bright column of high-energy particles, about four light years in length, swept back by the pulsar's interaction with interstellar gas. The intense source at the head of the X-ray column is the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. VLA Radio Image of the Mouse, Full Field VLA Radio Image of the Mouse, Full Field A cone-shaped cloud of radio-wave-emitting particles envelopes the X-ray column. The Mouse, a.k.a. G359.23-0.82, was discovered in 1987 by radio astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. It gets its name from its appearance in radio images that show a compact snout, a bulbous body, and a remarkable long, narrow, tail that extends for about 55 light years. "A few dozen pulsar wind nebulae are known, including the spectacular Crab Nebula, but none have the Mouse's combination of relatively young age and incredibly rapid motion through interstellar space," said Bryan Gaensler of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and lead author of a paper on the Mouse that will appear in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "We effectively are seeing a supersonic cosmic wind tunnel, in which we can study the effects of a pulsar's motion on its pulsar wind nebula, and test current theories." Illustration of the Mouse System Illustration of the Mouse System Pulsars are known to be rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron stars -- objects so dense that a mass equal to that of the Sun is packed into a

  9. RIKEN mouse genome encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We have been working to establish the comprehensive mouse full-length cDNA collection and sequence database to cover as many genes as we can, named Riken mouse genome encyclopedia. Recently we are constructing higher-level annotation (Functional ANnoTation Of Mouse cDNA; FANTOM) not only with homology search based annotation but also with expression data profile, mapping information and protein-protein database. More than 1,000,000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced to classify into 159,789 clusters and 60,770 representative clones were fully sequenced. As a conclusion, the 60,770 sequences contained 33,409 unique. The next generation of life science is clearly based on all of the genome information and resources. Based on our cDNA clones we developed the additional system to explore gene function. We developed cDNA microarray system to print all of these cDNA clones, protein-protein interaction screening system, protein-DNA interaction screening system and so on. The integrated database of all the information is very useful not only for analysis of gene transcriptional network and for the connection of gene to phenotype to facilitate positional candidate approach. In this talk, the prospect of the application of these genome resourced should be discussed. More information is available at the web page: http://genome.gsc.riken.go.jp/.

  10. Mouse models in oncoimmunology.

    PubMed

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Pitt, Jonathan M; Daillère, Romain; Smyth, Mark J; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental cancer research and the development of efficacious antineoplastic treatments both rely on experimental systems in which the relationship between malignant cells and immune cells can be studied. Mouse models of transplantable, carcinogen-induced or genetically engineered malignancies - each with their specific advantages and difficulties - have laid the foundations of oncoimmunology. These models have guided the immunosurveillance theory that postulates that evasion from immune control is an essential feature of cancer, the concept that the long-term effects of conventional cancer treatments mostly rely on the reinstatement of anticancer immune responses and the preclinical development of immunotherapies, including currently approved immune checkpoint blockers. Specific aspects of pharmacological development, as well as attempts to personalize cancer treatments using patient-derived xenografts, require the development of mouse models in which murine genes and cells are replaced with their human equivalents. Such 'humanized' mouse models are being progressively refined to characterize the leukocyte subpopulations that belong to the innate and acquired arms of the immune system as they infiltrate human cancers that are subjected to experimental therapies. We surmise that the ever-advancing refinement of murine preclinical models will accelerate the pace of therapeutic optimization in patients.

  11. Reduced number of axonal mitochondria and tau hypophosphorylation in mouse P301L tau knockin neurons.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Pooler, Amy M; Lau, Dawn H W; Mórotz, Gábor M; De Vos, Kurt J; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P; Hanger, Diane P

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the frontotemporal dementia-related tau mutation, P301L, at physiological levels in adult mouse brain (KI-P301L mice) results in overt hypophosphorylation of tau and age-dependent alterations in axonal mitochondrial transport in peripheral nerves. To determine the effects of P301L tau expression in the central nervous system, we examined the kinetics of mitochondrial axonal transport and tau phosphorylation in primary cortical neurons from P301L knock-in (KI-P301L) mice. We observed a significant 50% reduction in the number of mitochondria in the axons of cortical neurons cultured from KI-P301L mice compared to wild-type neurons. Expression of murine P301L tau did not change the speed, direction of travel or likelihood of movement of mitochondria. Notably, the angle that defines the orientation of the mitochondria in the axon, and the volume of individual moving mitochondria, were significantly increased in neurons expressing P301L tau. We found that murine tau phosphorylation in KI-P301L mouse neurons was diminished and the ability of P301L tau to bind to microtubules was also reduced compared to tau in wild-type neurons. The P301L mutation did not influence the ability of murine tau to associate with membranes in cortical neurons or in adult mouse brain. We conclude that P301L tau is associated with mitochondrial changes and causes an early reduction in murine tau phosphorylation in neurons coupled with impaired microtubule binding of tau. These results support the association of mutant tau with detrimental effects on mitochondria and will be of significance for the pathogenesis of tauopathies.

  12. Manipulation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells for Knockout Mouse Production

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Advait; Hall, Bradford; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2009-01-01

    The establishment of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell liness has allowed for the generation of the knockout mouse. ES cells that are genetically altered in culture can then be manipulated to derive a whole mouse containing the desired mutation. To successfully generate a knockout mouse, however, the ES cells must be carefully cultivated in a pluripotent state throughout the gene targeting experiment. This unit describes detailed step-by-step protocols, reagents, equipment, and strategies needed for the successful generation of gene knockout embryonic stem cells using homologous recombination technologies. PMID:19731225

  13. Mouse genetics: catalogue and scissors.

    PubMed

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-12-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics.

  14. Mechanistically Distinct Mouse Models for CRX-Associated Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Nicholas M.; Zhang, Alan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Huecker, Julie B.; Hennig, Anne K.; Chen, Shiming

    2014-01-01

    Cone-rod homeobox (CRX) protein is a “paired-like” homeodomain transcription factor that is essential for regulating rod and cone photoreceptor transcription. Mutations in human CRX are associated with the dominant retinopathies Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), Cone-Rod Dystrophy (CoRD) and Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), with variable severity. Heterozygous Crx Knock-Out (KO) mice (“+/−”) have normal vision as adults and fail to model the dominant human disease. To investigate how different mutant CRX proteins produce distinct disease pathologies, we generated two Crx Knock-IN (K-IN) mouse models: CrxE168d2 (“E168d2”) and CrxR90W (“R90W”). E168d2 mice carry a frameshift mutation in the CRX activation domain, Glu168del2, which is associated with severe dominant CoRD or LCA in humans. R90W mice carry a substitution mutation in the CRX homeodomain, Arg90Trp, which is associated with dominant mild late-onset CoRD and recessive LCA. As seen in human patients, heterozygous E168d2 (“E168d2/+”) but not R90W (“R90W/+”) mice show severely impaired retinal function, while mice homozygous for either mutation are blind and undergo rapid photoreceptor degeneration. E168d2/+ mice also display abnormal rod/cone morphology, greater impairment of CRX target gene expression than R90W/+ or +/− mice, and undergo progressive photoreceptor degeneration. Surprisingly, E168d2/+ mice express more mutant CRX protein than wild-type CRX. E168d2neo/+, a subline of E168d2 with reduced mutant allele expression, displays a much milder retinal phenotype, demonstrating the impact of Crx expression level on disease severity. Both CRX[E168d2] and CRX[R90W] proteins fail to activate transcription in vitro, but CRX[E168d2] interferes more strongly with the function of wild type (WT) CRX, supporting an antimorphic mechanism. E168d2 and R90W are mechanistically distinct mouse models for CRX-associated disease that will allow the elucidation of molecular mechanisms and testing of

  15. Chandra Catches the `Mouse'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronomers have used an x-ray image to make the first detailed study of the behavior of high-energy particles around a fast moving pulsar. This image, from NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), shows the shock wave created as a pulsar plows supersonically through interstellar space. These results will provide insight into theories for the production of powerful winds of matter and antimatter by pulsars. Chandra's image of the glowing cloud, known as the Mouse, shows a stubby bright column of high-energy particles, about four light years in length, swept back by the pulsar's interaction with interstellar gas. The intense source at the head of the X-ray column is the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. A cone-shaped cloud of radio-wave-emitting particles envelopes the x-ray column. The Mouse, a.k.a. G359.23-0.82, was discovered in 1987 by radio astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. G359.23-0.82 gets its name from its appearance in radio images that show a compact snout, a bulbous body, and a remarkable long, narrow, tail that extends for about 55 light years. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama manages the Chandler program.

  16. Dominant Cone-Rod Dystrophy: A Mouse Model Generated by Gene Targeting of the GCAP1/Guca1a Gene

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Prateek K.; Mihelec, Marija; Cottrill, Phillippa; Wilkie, Susan E.; Pearson, Rachael A.; Duran, Yanai; West, Emma L.; Michaelides, Michel; Ali, Robin R.; Hunt, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Cone dystrophy 3 (COD3) is a severe dominantly inherited retinal degeneration caused by missense mutations in GUCA1A, the gene encoding Guanylate Cyclase Activating Protein 1 (GCAP1). The role of GCAP1 in controlling cyclic nucleotide levels in photoreceptors has largely been elucidated using knock-out mice, but the disease pathology in these mice cannot be extrapolated directly to COD3 as this involves altered, rather than loss of, GCAP1 function. Therefore, in order to evaluate the pathology of this dominant disorder, we have introduced a point mutation into the murine Guca1a gene that causes an E155G amino acid substitution; this is one of the disease-causing mutations found in COD3 patients. Disease progression in this novel mouse model of cone dystrophy was determined by a variety of techniques including electroretinography (ERG), retinal histology, immunohistochemistry and measurement of cGMP levels. It was established that although retinal development was normal up to 3 months of age, there was a subsequent progressive decline in retinal function, with a far greater alteration in cone than rod responses, associated with a corresponding loss of photoreceptors. In addition, we have demonstrated that accumulation of cyclic GMP precedes the observed retinal degeneration and is likely to contribute to the disease mechanism. Importantly, this knock-in mutant mouse has many features in common with the human disease, thereby making it an excellent model to further probe disease pathogenesis and investigate therapeutic interventions. PMID:21464903

  17. Mouse models for neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Hafezparast, Majid; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Wood, Nicholas W; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2002-08-01

    The mouse has many advantages over human beings for the study of genetics, including the unique property that genetic manipulation can be routinely carried out in the mouse genome. Most importantly, mice and human beings share the same mammalian genes, have many similar biochemical pathways, and have the same diseases. In the minority of cases where these features do not apply, we can still often gain new insights into mouse and human biology. In addition to existing mouse models, several major programmes have been set up to generate new mouse models of disease. Alongside these efforts are new initiatives for the clinical, behavioural, and physiological testing of mice. Molecular genetics has had a major influence on our understanding of the causes of neurological disorders in human beings, and much of this has come from work in mice.

  18. Early dysfunction and progressive degeneration of the subthalamic nucleus in mouse models of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Jeremy F; McIver, Eileen L; Mullen, Matthew RM; Wokosin, David L; Surmeier, D James; Bevan, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an element of cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuitry critical for action suppression. In Huntington's disease (HD) action suppression is impaired, resembling the effects of STN lesioning or inactivation. To explore this potential linkage, the STN was studied in BAC transgenic and Q175 knock-in mouse models of HD. At <2 and 6 months of age autonomous STN activity was impaired due to activation of KATP channels. STN neurons exhibited prolonged NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents, caused by a deficit in glutamate uptake, and elevated mitochondrial oxidant stress, which was ameliorated by NMDA receptor antagonism. STN activity was rescued by NMDA receptor antagonism or the break down of hydrogen peroxide. At 12 months of age approximately 30% of STN neurons had been lost, as in HD. Together, these data argue that dysfunction within the STN is an early feature of HD that may contribute to its expression and course. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21616.001 PMID:27995895

  19. Widespread expression of the Supv3L1 mitochondrial RNA helicase in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Erin; Kielbasinski, Marissa; Sedivy, John M.; Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos; Khanna, Hemant; Klysik, Jan E.

    2009-01-01

    Supv3L1 is an evolutionarily conserved helicase that plays a critical role in the mitochondrial RNA surveillance and degradation machinery. Conditional ablation of Supv3L1 in adult mice leads to premature aging phenotypes including loss of muscle mass and adipose tissue and severe skin abnormalities. To get insights into the spatial and temporal expression of Supv3L1 in the mouse, we generated knock-in and transgenic strains in which an EGFP reporter was placed under control of the Supv3L1 native promoter. During development, expression of Supv3L1 begins at the blastocyst stage, becomes widespread and strong in all fetal tissues and cell types, and continues during postnatal growth. In mature animals reporter expression is only slightly diminished in most tissues and continues to be highly expressed in the brain, peripheral sensory organs, and testis. Together, these data confirm that Supv3L1 is an important developmentally regulated gene, which continues to be expressed in all mature tissues, particularly the rapidly proliferating cells of testes, but also in the brain and sensory organs. The transgenic mice and cell lines derived from them constitute a valuable tool for the examination of the spatial and temporal aspects of Supv3L1 promoter activity, and should facilitate future screens for small molecules that regulate Supv3L1 expression. PMID:19937380

  20. The gene expression database for mouse development (GXD): putting developmental expression information at your fingertips.

    PubMed

    Smith, Constance M; Finger, Jacqueline H; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Ringwald, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Because molecular mechanisms of development are extraordinarily complex, the understanding of these processes requires the integration of pertinent research data. Using the Gene Expression Database for Mouse Development (GXD) as an example, we illustrate the progress made toward this goal, and discuss relevant issues that apply to developmental databases and developmental research in general. Since its first release in 1998, GXD has served the scientific community by integrating multiple types of expression data from publications and electronic submissions and by making these data freely and widely available. Focusing on endogenous gene expression in wild-type and mutant mice and covering data from RNA in situ hybridization, in situ reporter (knock-in), immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Northern blot, and Western blot experiments, the database has grown tremendously over the years in terms of data content and search utilities. Currently, GXD includes over 1.4 million annotated expression results and over 260,000 images. All these data and images are readily accessible to many types of database searches. Here we describe the data and search tools of GXD; explain how to use the database most effectively; discuss how we acquire, curate, and integrate developmental expression information; and describe how the research community can help in this process.

  1. A PTH-responsive circadian clock operates in ex vivo mouse femur fracture healing site.

    PubMed

    Kunimoto, Tatsuya; Okubo, Naoki; Minami, Yoichi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Hosokawa, Toshihiro; Asada, Maki; Oda, Ryo; Kubo, Toshikazu; Yagita, Kazuhiro

    2016-02-29

    The circadian clock contains clock genes including Bmal1 and Period2, and it maintains an interval rhythm of approximately 24 hours (the circadian rhythm) in various organs including growth plate and articular cartilage. As endochondral ossification is involved not only in growth plate but also in fracture healing, we investigated the circadian clock functions in fracture sites undergoing healing. Our fracture models using external fixation involved femurs of Period2::Luciferase knock-in mice which enables the monitoring of endogenous circadian clock state via bioluminescence. Organ culture was performed by collecting femurs, and fracture sites were observed using bioluminescence imaging systems. Clear bioluminescence rhythms of 24-hour intervals were revealed in fracture healing sites. When parathyroid hormone (PTH) was administered to fractured femurs in organ culture, peak time of Period2::Luciferase activity in fracture sites and growth plates changed, indicating that PTH-responsive circadian clock functions in the mouse femur fracture healing site. While PTH is widely used in treating osteoporosis, many studies have reported that it contributes to improvement of fracture healing. Future studies of the role of this local clock in wound healing may reveal a novel function of the circadian timing mechanism in skeletal cells.

  2. Mouse δ opioid receptors are located on presynaptic afferents to hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Rezaï, Xavier; Faget, Lauren; Bednarek, Ewa; Schwab, Yannick; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Massotte, Dominique

    2012-05-01

    Delta opioid receptors participate in the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data have also identified their implication in drug-context associations pointing to a modulatory role on hippocampal activity. We used fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta opioid receptor fused at its carboxy terminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor to investigate the receptor neuroanatomical distribution in this structure. Fine mapping of the pyramidal layer was performed in hippocampal acute brain slices and organotypic cultures using fluorescence confocal imaging, co-localization with pre- and postsynaptic markers and correlative light-electron microscopy. The different approaches concurred to identify delta opioid receptors on presynaptic afferents to glutamatergic principal cells. In the latter, only scarce receptors were detected that were confined within the Golgi or vesicular intracellular compartments with no receptor present at the cell surface. In the mouse hippocampus, expression of functional delta opioid receptors is therefore mostly associated with interneurons emphasizing a presynaptic modulatory effect on the pyramidal cell firing rate.

  3. A mouse model for a partially inactive obesity-associated human MC3R variant

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bonggi; Koo, Jashin; Yun Jun, Joo; Gavrilova, Oksana; Lee, Yongjun; Seo, Arnold Y.; Taylor-Douglas, Dezmond C.; Adler-Wailes, Diane C.; Chen, Faye; Gardner, Ryan; Koutzoumis, Dimitri; Sherafat Kazemzadeh, Roya; Roberson, Robin B.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported children homozygous for two MC3R sequence variants (C17A+G241A) have greater fat mass than controls. Here we show, using homozygous knock-in mouse models in which we replace murine Mc3r with wild-type human (MC3RhWT/hWT) and double-mutant (C17A+G241A) human (MC3RhDM/hDM) MC3R, that MC3RhDM/hDM have greater weight and fat mass, increased energy intake and feeding efficiency, but reduced length and fat-free mass compared with MC3RhWT/hWT. MC3RhDM/hDM mice do not have increased adipose tissue inflammatory cell infiltration or greater expression of inflammatory markers despite their greater fat mass. Serum adiponectin levels are increased in MC3RhDM/hDM mice and MC3RhDM/hDM human subjects. MC3RhDM/hDM bone- and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into adipocytes that accumulate more triglyceride than MC3RhWT/hWT MSCs. MC3RhDM/hDM impacts nutrient partitioning to generate increased adipose tissue that appears metabolically healthy. These data confirm the importance of MC3R signalling in human metabolism and suggest a previously-unrecognized role for the MC3R in adipose tissue development. PMID:26818770

  4. Catchup: a mouse model for imaging-based tracking and modulation of neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Hasenberg, Anja; Hasenberg, Mike; Männ, Linda; Neumann, Franziska; Borkenstein, Lars; Stecher, Manuel; Kraus, Andreas; Engel, Daniel R; Klingberg, Anika; Seddigh, Pegah; Abdullah, Zeinab; Klebow, Sabrina; Engelmann, Swen; Reinhold, Annegret; Brandau, Sven; Seeling, Michaela; Waisman, Ari; Schraven, Burkhart; Göthert, Joachim R; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Gunzer, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    Neutrophil granulocyte biology is a central issue of immunological research, but the lack of animal models that allow for neutrophil-selective genetic manipulation has delayed progress. By modulating the neutrophil-specific locus Ly6G with a knock-in allele expressing Cre recombinase and the fluorescent protein tdTomato, we generated a mouse model termed Catchup that exhibits strong neutrophil specificity. Transgene activity was found only in very few eosinophils and basophils and was undetectable in bone marrow precursors, including granulomonocytic progenitors (GMPs). Cre-mediated reporter-gene activation allowed for intravital two-photon microscopy of neutrophils without adoptive transfer. Homozygous animals were Ly6G deficient but showed normal leukocyte cellularity in all measured organs. Ly6G-deficient neutrophils were functionally normal in vitro and in multiple models of sterile or infectious inflammation in vivo. However, Cre-mediated deletion of FcγRIV in neutrophils reduced the cells' recruitment to immune-complex-mediated peritonitis, suggesting a cell-intrinsic role for activating Fc receptors in neutrophil trafficking.

  5. Loss of Axin2 Causes Ocular Defects During Mouse Eye Development

    PubMed Central

    Alldredge, Ashley; Fuhrmann, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The scaffold protein Axin2 is an antagonist and universal target of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Disruption of Axin2 may lead to developmental eye defects; however, this has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Axin2 during ocular and extraocular development in mouse. Methods Animals heterozygous and homozygous for a Axin2lacZ knock-in allele were analyzed at different developmental stages for reporter expression, morphology as well as for the presence of ocular and extraocular markers using histologic and immunohistochemical techniques. Results During early eye development, the Axin2lacZ reporter was expressed in the periocular mesenchyme, RPE, and optic stalk. In the developing retina, Axin2lacZ reporter expression was initiated in ganglion cells at late embryonic stages and robustly expressed in subpopulations of amacrine and horizontal cells postnatally. Activation of the Axin2lacZ reporter overlapped with labeling of POU4F1, PAX6, and Calbindin. Germline deletion of Axin2 led to variable ocular phenotypes ranging from normal to severely defective eyes exhibiting microphthalmia, coloboma, lens defects, and expanded ciliary margin. These defects were correlated with abnormal tissue patterning in individual affected tissues, such as the optic fissure margins in the ventral optic cup and in the expanded ciliary margin. Conclusions Our results reveal a critical role for Axin2 during ocular development, likely by restricting the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:27701636

  6. A novel mouse model that recapitulates adult-onset glycogenosis type 4

    PubMed Central

    Orhan Akman, H.; Emmanuele, Valentina; Kurt, Yasemin Gülcan; Kurt, Bülent; Sheiko, Tatiana; DiMauro, Salvatore; Craigen, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen-branching enzyme (GBE). The diagnostic hallmark of the disease is the accumulation of a poorly branched form of glycogen known as polyglucosan (PG). The disease is clinically heterogeneous, with variable tissue involvement and age at onset. Complete loss of enzyme activity is lethal in utero or in infancy and affects primarily the muscle and the liver. However, residual enzyme activity as low as 5–20% leads to juvenile or adult onset of a disorder that primarily affects the central and peripheral nervous system and muscles and in the latter is termed adult polyglucosan body disease (APBD). Here, we describe a mouse model of GSD IV that reflects this spectrum of disease. Homologous recombination was used to knock in the most common GBE1 mutation p.Y329S c.986A > C found in APBD patients of Ashkenazi Jewish decent. Mice homozygous for this allele (Gbe1ys/ys) exhibit a phenotype similar to APBD, with widespread accumulation of PG. Adult mice exhibit progressive neuromuscular dysfunction and die prematurely. While the onset of symptoms is limited to adult mice, PG accumulates in tissues of newborn mice but is initially absent from the cerebral cortex and heart muscle. Thus, PG is well tolerated in most tissues, but the eventual accumulation in neurons and their axons causes neuropathy that leads to hind limb spasticity and premature death. This mouse model mimics the pathology and pathophysiologic features of human adult-onset branching enzyme deficiency. PMID:26385640

  7. Oncogenic and tumor-suppressive mouse models for breast cancer engaging HER2/neu.

    PubMed

    Fry, Elizabeth A; Taneja, Pankaj; Inoue, Kazushi

    2017-02-01

    The human c-ErbB2 (HER2) gene is amplified in ∼20% of human breast cancers (BCs), but the protein is overexpressed in ∼30% of the cases indicating that multiple different mechanisms contribute to HER2 overexpression in tumors. It has long been used as a molecular marker of BC for subcategorization for the prediction of prognosis and determination of therapeutic strategies. In comparison to ER(+) BCs, HER2-positive BCs are more invasive, but the patients respond to monoclonal antibody therapy with trastuzumab or tyrosine kinase inhibitors at least at early stages. To understand the pathophysiology of HER2-driven carcinogenesis and test HER2-targeting therapeutic agents in vivo, numerous mouse models have been created that faithfully reproduce HER2(+) BCs in mice. They include MMTV-neu (active mutant or wild type, rat neu or HER2) models, neu promoter-driven neuNT-transgenic mice, neuNT-knock-in mice at the neu locus and doxycycline-inducible neuNT-transgenic models. HER2/neu activates the Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-AKT-NF-κB pathway to stimulate the mitogenic cyclin D1/Cdk4-Rb-E2F pathway. Of note, overexpression of HER2 also stimulates the cell autonomous Dmp1-Arf-p53 tumor suppressor pathway to quench oncogenic signals to prevent the emergence of cancer cells. Hence tumor development by MMTV-neu mice was dramatically accelerated in mice that lack Dmp1, Arf or p53 with invasion and metastasis. Expressions of neuNT under the endogenous promoter underwent gene amplification, closely recapitulating human HER2(+) BCs. MMTV-HER2 models have been shown to be useful to test humanized monoclonal antibodies to HER2. These mouse models will be useful for the screening of novel therapeutic agents against BCs with HER2 overexpression.

  8. Alterations in Cortical Excitation and Inhibition in Genetic Mouse Models of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Damian M.; André, Véronique M.; Uzgil, Besim O.; Gee, Steven M.; Fisher, Yvette E.; Cepeda, Carlos; Levine, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we identified progressive alterations in spontaneous excitatory (EPSCs) and inhibitory (IPSCs) postsynaptic currents in the striatum of the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington’s disease (HD). Medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) from these mice displayed a lower frequency of EPSCs and a population of cells exhibited an increased frequency of IPSCs beginning at about 40 days, a time point when the overt behavioral phenotype begins. The cortex provides the major excitatory drive to the striatum and is affected during disease progression. We examined spontaneous EPSCs and IPSCs of somatosensory cortical pyramidal neurons in layers II/III in slices from three different mouse models of HD, the R6/2, the YAC128 and the CAG140 knock-in. Results revealed that spontaneous EPSCs occurred at a higher frequency and evoked EPSCs were larger in behaviorally phenotypic mice while spontaneous IPSCs were initially increased in frequency in all models and subsequently decreased in R6/2 mice after they displayed the typical R6/2 overt behavioral phenotype. Changes in miniature IPSCs and evoked IPSC paired-pulse ratios suggested altered probability of GABA release. Also, in R6/2 mice, blockade of GABAA receptors induced complex discharges in slices and seizures in vivo at all ages. In conclusion, altered excitatory and inhibitory inputs to pyramidal neurons in the cortex in HD appear to be a prevailing deficit throughout the development of the disease. Furthermore, the differences between synaptic phenotypes in cortex and striatum are important for the development of future therapeutic approaches, which may need to be targeted early in the development of the phenotype. PMID:19692612

  9. Phenotype consequences of myophosphorylase dysfunction: insights from the McArdle mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Brull, Astrid; de Luna, Noemí; Blanco-Grau, Albert; Lucia, Alejandro; Martin, Miguel Angel; Arenas, Joaquin; Martí, Ramon; Andreu, Antoni L; Pinós, Tomàs

    2015-01-01

    McArdle disease, caused by inherited deficiency of the enzyme muscle glycogen phosphorylase (GP-MM), is arguably the paradigm of exercise intolerance. The recent knock-in (p.R50X/p.R50X) mouse disease model allows an investigation of the phenotypic consequences of muscle glycogen unavailability and the physiopathology of exercise intolerance. We analysed, in 2-month-old mice [wild-type (wt/wt), heterozygous (p.R50X/wt) and p.R50X/p.R50X)], maximal endurance exercise capacity and the molecular consequences of an absence of GP-MM in the main glycogen metabolism regulatory enzymes: glycogen synthase, glycogen branching enzyme and glycogen debranching enzyme, as well as glycogen content in slow-twitch (soleus), intermediate (gastrocnemius) and glycolytic/fast-twitch (extensor digitorum longus; EDL) muscles. Compared with wt/wt, exercise capacity (measured in a treadmill test) was impaired in p.R50X/p.R50X (∼48%) and p.R50X/wt mice (∼18%). p.R50X/p.R50X mice showed an absence of GP-MM in the three muscles. GP-MM was reduced in p.R50X/wt mice, especially in the soleus, suggesting that the function of ‘slow-twitch’ muscles is less dependent on glycogen catabolism. p.R50X/p.R50X mice showed increased glycogen debranching enzyme in the soleus, increased glycogen branching enzyme in the gastrocnemius and EDL, as well as reduced levels of mucle glycogen synthase protein in the three muscles (mean ∼70%), reflecting a protective mechanism for preventing deleterious glycogen accumulation. Additionally, glycogen content was highest in the EDL of p.R50X/p.R50X mice. Amongst other findings, the present study shows that the expression of the main muscle glycogen regulatory enzymes differs depending on the muscle phenotype (slow- vs. fast-twitch) and that even partial GP-MM deficiency affects maximal endurance capacity. Our knock-in model might help to provide insights into the importance of glycogen on muscle function. PMID:25873271

  10. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  11. Mouse genetics: Catalogue and scissors

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics. [BMB Reports 2012; 45(12): 686-692] PMID:23261053

  12. Engagement of TLR2 Does not Reverse the Suppressor Function of Mouse Regulatory T Cells, but Promotes Their Survival1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Davidson, Todd S.; Huter, Eva N.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2009-01-01

    TLRs are a class of conserved pattern recognition receptors that are used by cells of the innate immune system. Recent studies have demonstrated the expression of TLRs on both human and mouse T cells raising the possibility that TLRs play a direct role in adaptive immunity. TLR2 is activated primarily by bacterial wall components including peptidoglycan and lipoproteins. Several studies have shown that mouse regulatory T (Treg) express TLR2 and claimed that engagement of TLR2 by synthetic ligands reversed their suppressive function. In contrary, enhancement of Treg function was observed following engagement of TLR2 on human Treg. We have re-examined the expression and function of TLR2 on mouse Treg purified from Foxp3-GFP knock in mice. TLR2 ligation by TLR2 agonist, the synthetic bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) Pam3CSK4, enhanced the proliferative responses of both conventional T cells and Treg in response to TLR stimulation in the absence of APC. Treatment of Foxp3+ Treg with Pam3CSK4 did not alter their suppressive function in vitro or in vivo and did not reduce their level of Foxp3 expression. An additional effect of TLR2 stimulation of Treg was induction of Bcl-xL resulting in enhanced survival in vitro. Treatment of mice with the TLR2 agonist enhanced the antigen-driven proliferation of Treg in vivo, but did not abolish their ability to suppress the development of EAE. Development of methods to selectively stimulate TLR2 on Treg may lead to a novel approaches for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:19748987

  13. Engagement of TLR2 does not reverse the suppressor function of mouse regulatory T cells, but promotes their survival.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Davidson, Todd S; Huter, Eva N; Shevach, Ethan M

    2009-10-01

    TLRs are a class of conserved pattern recognition receptors that are used by cells of the innate immune system. Recent studies have demonstrated the expression of TLRs on both human and mouse T cells raising the possibility that TLRs play a direct role in adaptive immunity. TLR2 is activated primarily by bacterial wall components including peptidoglycan and lipoproteins. Several studies have shown that mouse regulatory T (Treg) cells express TLR2 and claimed that engagement of TLR2 by synthetic ligands reversed their suppressive function. In contrary, enhancement of Treg function was observed following engagement of TLR2 on human Treg. We have reexamined the expression and function of TLR2 on mouse Treg purified from Foxp3-GFP knock-in mice. TLR2 ligation by TLR2 agonist, the synthetic bacterial lipoprotein Pam3CSK4, enhanced the proliferative responses of both conventional T cells and Treg in response to TLR stimulation in the absence of APC. Treatment of Foxp3+ Treg with Pam3CSK4 did not alter their suppressive function in vitro or in vivo and did not reduce their level of Foxp3 expression. An additional effect of TLR2 stimulation of Treg was induction of Bcl-x(L) resulting in enhanced survival in vitro. Treatment of mice with the TLR2 agonist enhanced the Ag-driven proliferation of Treg in vivo, but did not abolish their ability to suppress the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Development of methods to selectively stimulate TLR2 on Treg may lead to a novel approaches for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  14. Mouse models for graft arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lingfeng; Yu, Luyang; Min, Wang

    2013-05-14

    Graft arteriosclerois (GA), also called allograft vasculopathy, is a pathologic lesion that develops over months to years in transplanted organs characterized by diffuse, circumferential stenosis of the entire graft vascular tree. The most critical component of GA pathogenesis is the proliferation of smooth muscle-like cells within the intima. When a human coronary artery segment is interposed into the infra-renal aortae of immunodeficient mice, the intimas could be expand in response to adoptively transferred human T cells allogeneic to the artery donor or exogenous human IFN-γ in the absence of human T cells. Interposition of a mouse aorta from one strain into another mouse strain recipient is limited as a model for chronic rejection in humans because the acute cell-mediated rejection response in this mouse model completely eliminates all donor-derived vascular cells from the graft within two-three weeks. We have recently developed two new mouse models to circumvent these problems. The first model involves interposition of a vessel segment from a male mouse into a female recipient of the same inbred strain (C57BL/6J). Graft rejection in this case is directed only against minor histocompatibility antigens encoded by the Y chromosome (present in the male but not the female) and the rejection response that ensues is sufficiently indolent to preserve donor-derived smooth muscle cells for several weeks. The second model involves interposing an artery segment from a wild type C57BL/6J mouse donor into a host mouse of the same strain and gender that lacks the receptor for IFN-γ followed by administration of mouse IFN-γ (delivered via infection of the mouse liver with an adenoviral vector. There is no rejection in this case as both donor and recipient mice are of the same strain and gender but donor smooth muscle cells proliferate in response to the cytokine while host-derived cells, lacking receptor for this cytokine, are unresponsive. By backcrossing additional

  15. Roles of taurine-mediated tonic GABAA receptor activation in the radial migration of neurons in the fetal mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Tomonori; Yamada, Junko; Akita, Tenpei; Matsushima, Yoshitaka; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) depolarizes embryonic cerebrocortical neurons and continuous activation of the GABAA receptor (GABAAR) contributes to their tonic depolarization. Although multiple reports have demonstrated a role of GABAAR activation in neocortical development, including in migration, most of these studies have used pharmacological blockers. Herein, we performed in utero electroporation in GABA synthesis-lacking homozygous GAD67-GFP knock-in mice (GAD67(GFP/GFP)) to label neurons born in the ventricular zone. Three days after electroporation, there were no differences in the distribution of labeled cells between the genotypes. The dose-response properties of labeled cells to GABA were equivalent among genotypes. However, continuous blockade of GABAAR with the GABAAR antagonist SR95531 accelerated radial migration. This effect of GABAAR blockade in GAD67(GFP/GFP) mice suggested a role for alternative endogenous GABAAR agonists. Thus, we tested the role of taurine, which is derived from maternal blood but is abundant in the fetal brain. The taurine-evoked currents in labeled cells were mediated by GABAAR. Taurine uptake was blocked by a taurine transporter inhibitor, 2-(guanidino)ethanesulfonic acid (GES), and taurine release was blocked by a volume-sensitive anion channel blocker, 4-(2-butyl-6,7-dichlor-2-cyclopentylindan-1-on-5-yl) oxobutyric acid, as examined through high-performance liquid chromatography. GES increased the extracellular taurine concentration and induced an inward shift of the holding current, which was reversed by SR95531. In a taurine-deficient mouse model, the GABAAR-mediated tonic currents were greatly reduced, and radial migration was accelerated. As the tonic currents were equivalent among the genotypes of GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, taurine, rather than GABA, might play a major role as an endogenous agonist of embryonic tonic GABAAR conductance, regulating the radial migration of neurons in the developing neocortex.

  16. Humanized H19/Igf2 locus reveals diverged imprinting mechanism between mouse and human and reflects Silver–Russell syndrome phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Stella K.; Freschi, Andrea; Ideraabdullah, Folami; Thorvaldsen, Joanne L.; Luense, Lacey J.; Weller, Angela H.; Berger, Shelley L.; Cerrato, Flavia; Riccio, Andrea; Bartolomei, Marisa S.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting affects a subset of genes in mammals, such that they are expressed in a monoallelic, parent-of-origin–specific manner. These genes are regulated by imprinting control regions (ICRs), cis-regulatory elements that exhibit allele-specific differential DNA methylation. Although genomic imprinting is conserved in mammals, ICRs are genetically divergent across species. This raises the fundamental question of whether the ICR plays a species-specific role in regulating imprinting at a given locus. We addressed this question at the H19/insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2) imprinted locus, the misregulation of which is associated with the human imprinting disorders Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) and Silver–Russell syndrome (SRS). We generated a knock-in mouse in which the endogenous H19/Igf2 ICR (mIC1) is replaced by the orthologous human ICR (hIC1) sequence, designated H19hIC1. We show that hIC1 can functionally replace mIC1 on the maternal allele. In contrast, paternally transmitted hIC1 leads to growth restriction, abnormal hIC1 methylation, and loss of H19 and Igf2 imprinted expression. Imprint establishment at hIC1 is impaired in the male germ line, which is associated with an abnormal composition of histone posttranslational modifications compared with mIC1. Overall, this study reveals evolutionarily divergent paternal imprinting at IC1 between mice and humans. The conserved maternal imprinting mechanism and function at IC1 demonstrates the possibility of modeling maternal transmission of hIC1 mutations associated with BWS in mice. In addition, we propose that further analyses in the paternal knock-in H19+/hIC1 mice will elucidate the molecular mechanisms that may underlie SRS. PMID:27621468

  17. Roles of taurine-mediated tonic GABAA receptor activation in the radial migration of neurons in the fetal mouse cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Tomonori; Yamada, Junko; Akita, Tenpei; Matsushima, Yoshitaka; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) depolarizes embryonic cerebrocortical neurons and continuous activation of the GABAA receptor (GABAAR) contributes to their tonic depolarization. Although multiple reports have demonstrated a role of GABAAR activation in neocortical development, including in migration, most of these studies have used pharmacological blockers. Herein, we performed in utero electroporation in GABA synthesis-lacking homozygous GAD67-GFP knock-in mice (GAD67GFP/GFP) to label neurons born in the ventricular zone. Three days after electroporation, there were no differences in the distribution of labeled cells between the genotypes. The dose–response properties of labeled cells to GABA were equivalent among genotypes. However, continuous blockade of GABAAR with the GABAAR antagonist SR95531 accelerated radial migration. This effect of GABAAR blockade in GAD67GFP/GFP mice suggested a role for alternative endogenous GABAAR agonists. Thus, we tested the role of taurine, which is derived from maternal blood but is abundant in the fetal brain. The taurine-evoked currents in labeled cells were mediated by GABAAR. Taurine uptake was blocked by a taurine transporter inhibitor, 2-(guanidino)ethanesulfonic acid (GES), and taurine release was blocked by a volume-sensitive anion channel blocker, 4-(2-butyl-6,7-dichlor-2-cyclopentylindan-1-on-5-yl) oxobutyric acid, as examined through high-performance liquid chromatography. GES increased the extracellular taurine concentration and induced an inward shift of the holding current, which was reversed by SR95531. In a taurine-deficient mouse model, the GABAAR-mediated tonic currents were greatly reduced, and radial migration was accelerated. As the tonic currents were equivalent among the genotypes of GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, taurine, rather than GABA, might play a major role as an endogenous agonist of embryonic tonic GABAAR conductance, regulating the radial migration of neurons in the developing neocortex. PMID:24734001

  18. Effect of Sarizotan, a 5-HT1a and D2-Like Receptor Agonist, on Respiration in Three Mouse Models of Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abdala, Ana P.; Lioy, Daniel T.; Garg, Saurabh K.; Knopp, Sharon J.; Paton, Julian F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances in respiration are common and debilitating features of Rett syndrome (RTT). A previous study showed that the 5-HT1a receptor agonist (R)-(+)-8-hydroxy-dipropyl-2-aminotetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) significantly reduced the incidence of apnea and the irregular breathing pattern in a mouse model of the disorder. 8-OH-DPAT, however, is not available for clinical practice. Sarizotan, a full 5-HT1a agonist and a dopamine D2–like agonist/partial agonist, has been used in clinical trials for the treatment of l-dopa–induced dyskinesia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of sarizotan on respiration and locomotion in mouse models of RTT. Studies were performed in Bird and Jaenisch strains of methyl-CpG–binding protein 2-–deficient heterozygous female and Jaenisch strain Mecp2 null male mice and in knock-in heterozygous female mice of a common nonsense mutation (R168X). Respiratory pattern was determined with body plethysmography, and locomotion was determined with open-field recording. Sarizotan or vehicle was administered 20 minutes before a 30-minute recording of respiratory pattern or motor behavior. In separate studies, a crossover design was used to administer the drug for 7 and for 14 days. Sarizotan reduced the incidence of apnea in all three RTT mouse models to approximately 15% of their pretreatment levels. The irregular breathing pattern was corrected to that of wild-type littermates. When administered for 7 or 14 days, apnea decreased to 25 to 33% of the incidence seen with vehicle. This study indicates that the clinically approved drug sarizotan is an effective treatment for respiratory disorders in mouse models of RTT. PMID:24351104

  19. Effect of Sarizotan, a 5-HT1a and D2-like receptor agonist, on respiration in three mouse models of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdala, Ana P; Lioy, Daniel T; Garg, Saurabh K; Knopp, Sharon J; Paton, Julian F R; Bissonnette, John M

    2014-06-01

    Disturbances in respiration are common and debilitating features of Rett syndrome (RTT). A previous study showed that the 5-HT1a receptor agonist (R)-(+)-8-hydroxy-dipropyl-2-aminotetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) significantly reduced the incidence of apnea and the irregular breathing pattern in a mouse model of the disorder. 8-OH-DPAT, however, is not available for clinical practice. Sarizotan, a full 5-HT1a agonist and a dopamine D2-like agonist/partial agonist, has been used in clinical trials for the treatment of l-dopa-induced dyskinesia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of sarizotan on respiration and locomotion in mouse models of RTT. Studies were performed in Bird and Jaenisch strains of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2--deficient heterozygous female and Jaenisch strain Mecp2 null male mice and in knock-in heterozygous female mice of a common nonsense mutation (R168X). Respiratory pattern was determined with body plethysmography, and locomotion was determined with open-field recording. Sarizotan or vehicle was administered 20 minutes before a 30-minute recording of respiratory pattern or motor behavior. In separate studies, a crossover design was used to administer the drug for 7 and for 14 days. Sarizotan reduced the incidence of apnea in all three RTT mouse models to approximately 15% of their pretreatment levels. The irregular breathing pattern was corrected to that of wild-type littermates. When administered for 7 or 14 days, apnea decreased to 25 to 33% of the incidence seen with vehicle. This study indicates that the clinically approved drug sarizotan is an effective treatment for respiratory disorders in mouse models of RTT.

  20. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  1. Beneficial effects of bumetanide in a CaV1.1-R528H mouse model of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Cannon, Stephen C

    2013-12-01

    Transient attacks of weakness in hypokalaemic periodic paralysis are caused by reduced fibre excitability from paradoxical depolarization of the resting potential in low potassium. Mutations of calcium channel and sodium channel genes have been identified as the underlying molecular defects that cause instability of the resting potential. Despite these scientific advances, therapeutic options remain limited. In a mouse model of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis from a sodium channel mutation (NaV1.4-R669H), we recently showed that inhibition of chloride influx with bumetanide reduced the susceptibility to attacks of weakness, in vitro. The R528H mutation in the calcium channel gene (CACNA1S encoding CaV1.1) is the most common cause of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. We developed a CaV1.1-R528H knock-in mouse model of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis and show herein that bumetanide protects against both muscle weakness from low K+ challenge in vitro and loss of muscle excitability in vivo from a glucose plus insulin infusion. This work demonstrates the critical role of the chloride gradient in modulating the susceptibility to ictal weakness and establishes bumetanide as a potential therapy for hypokalaemic periodic paralysis arising from either NaV1.4 or CaV1.1 mutations.

  2. Generation and characterization of a novel neural crest marker allele, Inka1-LacZ, reveals a role for Inka1 in mouse neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Bethany S.; Sargent, Thomas D.; Williams, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies identified Inka1 as a gene regulated by AP-2α in the neural crest required for craniofacial morphogenesis in fish and frog. Here, we extend the analysis of Inka1 function and regulation to the mouse by generating a LacZ knock-in allele. Inka1-LacZ allele expression occurs in the cephalic mesenchyme, heart, and paraxial mesoderm prior to E8.5. Subsequently, expression is observed in the migratory neural crest cells and their derivatives. Consistent with expression of Inka1 in tissues of the developing head during neurulation, a low percentage of Inka1−/− mice show exencephaly while the remainder are viable and fertile. Further studies indicate that AP-2α is not required for Inka1 expression in the mouse, and suggest that there is no significant genetic interaction between these two factors during embryogenesis. Together, these data demonstrate that while the expression domain of Inka1 is conserved among vertebrates, its function and regulation are not. PMID:20175189

  3. Muscle and heart function restoration in a limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I) mouse model by systemic FKRP gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chunping; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Zhao, Chunxia; Lu, Peijuan; Awano, Hiroyuki; Xiao, Bin; Li, Jianbin; Yuan, Zhenhua; Dai, Yi; Martin, Carrie Bette; Li, Juan; Lu, Qilong; Xiao, Xiao

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene cause a wide spectrum of disease phenotypes including the mild limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I), the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome, and muscle-eye-brain disease. FKRP deficiency results in α-dystroglycan (α-DG) hypoglycosylation in the muscle and heart, which is a biochemical hallmark of dystroglycanopathies. To study gene replacement therapy, we generated and characterized a new mouse model of LGMD2I harboring the human mutation leucine 276 to isoleucine (L276I) in the mouse alleles. The homozygous knock-in mice (L276I(KI)) mimic the classic late onset phenotype of LGMD2I in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Systemic delivery of human FKRP gene by AAV9 vector in the L276I(KI) mice, at either neonatal age or at the age of 9 months, rendered body wide FKRP expression and restored glycosylation of α-DG in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. FKRP gene therapy ameliorated dystrophic pathology and cardiomyopathy such as muscle degeneration, fibrosis, and myofiber membrane leakage, resulting in restoration of muscle and heart contractile functions. Thus, these results demonstrated that the treatment based on FKRP gene replacement was effective.

  4. Translation of the Prion Protein mRNA Is Robust in Astrocytes but Does Not Amplify during Reactive Astrocytosis in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Walker S.; Krost, Clemens; Borkowski, Andrew W.; Kaczmarczyk, Lech

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases induce neurodegeneration in specific brain areas for undetermined reasons. A thorough understanding of the localization of the disease-causing molecule, the prion protein (PrP), could inform on this issue but previous studies have generated conflicting conclusions. One of the more intriguing disagreements is whether PrP is synthesized by astrocytes. We developed a knock-in reporter mouse line in which the coding sequence of the PrP expressing gene (Prnp), was replaced with that for green fluorescent protein (GFP). Native GFP fluorescence intensity varied between and within brain regions. GFP was present in astrocytes but did not increase during reactive gliosis induced by scrapie prion infection. Therefore, reactive gliosis associated with prion diseases does not cause an acceleration of local PrP production. In addition to aiding in Prnp gene activity studies, this reporter mouse line will likely prove useful for analysis of chimeric animals produced by stem cell and tissue transplantation experiments. PMID:24752288

  5. A mouse model for human deafness DFNB22 reveals that hearing impairment is due to a loss of inner hair cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lukashkin, Andrei N; Legan, P Kevin; Weddell, Thomas D; Lukashkina, Victoria A; Goodyear, Richard J; Welstead, Lindsey J; Petit, Christine; Russell, Ian J; Richardson, Guy P

    2012-11-20

    The gene causative for the human nonsyndromic recessive form of deafness DFNB22 encodes otoancorin, a 120-kDa inner ear-specific protein that is expressed on the surface of the spiral limbus in the cochlea. Gene targeting in ES cells was used to create an EGFP knock-in, otoancorin KO (Otoa(EGFP/EGFP)) mouse. In the Otoa(EGFP/EGFP) mouse, the tectorial membrane (TM), a ribbon-like strip of ECM that is normally anchored by one edge to the spiral limbus and lies over the organ of Corti, retains its general form, and remains in close proximity to the organ of Corti, but is detached from the limbal surface. Measurements of cochlear microphonic potentials, distortion product otoacoustic emissions, and basilar membrane motion indicate that the TM remains functionally attached to the electromotile, sensorimotor outer hair cells of the organ of Corti, and that the amplification and frequency tuning of the basilar membrane responses to sounds are almost normal. The compound action potential masker tuning curves, a measure of the tuning of the sensory inner hair cells, are also sharply tuned, but the thresholds of the compound action potentials, a measure of inner hair cell sensitivity, are significantly elevated. These results indicate that the hearing loss in patients with Otoa mutations is caused by a defect in inner hair cell stimulation, and reveal the limbal attachment of the TM plays a critical role in this process.

  6. A reporter model to visualize imprinting stability at the Dlk1 locus during mouse development and in pluripotent cells

    PubMed Central

    Swanzey, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting results in the monoallelic expression of genes that encode important regulators of growth and proliferation. Dysregulation of imprinted genes, such as those within the Dlk1-Dio3 locus, is associated with developmental syndromes and specific diseases. Our ability to interrogate causes of imprinting instability has been hindered by the absence of suitable model systems. Here, we describe a Dlk1 knock-in reporter mouse that enables single-cell visualization of allele-specific expression and prospective isolation of cells, simultaneously. We show that this ‘imprinting reporter mouse’ can be used to detect tissue-specific Dlk1 expression patterns in developing embryos. We also apply this system to pluripotent cell culture and demonstrate that it faithfully indicates DNA methylation changes induced upon cellular reprogramming. Finally, the reporter system reveals the role of elevated oxygen levels in eroding imprinted Dlk1 expression during prolonged culture and in vitro differentiation. The possibility to study allele-specific expression in different contexts makes our reporter system a useful tool to dissect the regulation of genomic imprinting in normal development and disease. PMID:27729406

  7. Loss of androgen receptor binding to selective androgen response elements causes a reproductive phenotype in a knockin mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Schauwaers, Kris; De Gendt, Karel; Saunders, Philippa T. K.; Atanassova, Nina; Haelens, Annemie; Callewaert, Leen; Moehren, Udo; Swinnen, Johannes V.; Verhoeven, Guido; Verrijdt, Guy; Claessens, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Androgens influence transcription of their target genes through the activation of the androgen receptor (AR) that subsequently interacts with specific DNA motifs in these genes. These DNA motifs, called androgen response elements (AREs), can be classified in two classes: the classical AREs, which are also recognized by the other steroid hormone receptors; and the AR-selective AREs, which display selectivity for the AR. For in vitro interaction with the selective AREs, the androgen receptor DNA-binding domain is dependent on specific residues in its second zinc-finger. To evaluate the physiological relevance of these selective elements, we generated a germ-line knockin mouse model, termed SPARKI (SPecificity-affecting AR KnockIn), in which the second zinc-finger of the AR was replaced with that of the glucocorticoid receptor, resulting in a chimeric protein that retains its ability to bind classical AREs but is unable to bind selective AREs. The reproductive organs of SPARKI males are smaller compared with wild-type animals, and they are also subfertile. Intriguingly, however, they do not display any anabolic phenotype. The expression of two testis-specific, androgen-responsive genes is differentially affected by the SPARKI mutation, which is correlated with the involvement of different types of response elements in their androgen responsiveness. In this report, we present the first in vivo evidence of the existence of two functionally different types of AREs and demonstrate that AR-regulated gene expression can be targeted based on this distinction. PMID:17360365

  8. Progressive developmental restriction, acquisition of left-right identity and cell growth behavior during lobe formation in mouse liver development.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Mary C; Le Garrec, Jean-Francois; Coqueran, Sabrina; Strick-Marchand, Helene; Buckingham, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    To identify cell-based decisions implicated in morphogenesis of the mammalian liver, we performed clonal analysis of hepatocytes/hepatoblasts in mouse liver development, using a knock-in allele of Hnf4a/laacZ This transgene randomly undergoes a low frequency of recombination that generates a functional lacZ gene that produces β-galactosidase in tissues in which Hnf4a is expressed. Two types of β-galactosidase-positive clones were found. Most have undergone three to eight cell divisions and result from independent events (Luria-Delbrück fluctuation test); we calculate that they arose between E8.5 and E13.5. A second class was mega-clones derived from early endoderm progenitors, generating many descendants. Some originated from multi-potential founder cells, with labeled cells in the liver, pancreas and/or intestine. A few mega-clones populate only one side of the liver, indicating hepatic cell chirality. The patterns of labeled cells indicate cohesive and often oriented growth, notably in broad radial stripes, potentially implicated in the formation of liver lobes. This retrospective clonal analysis gives novel insights into clonal origins, cell behavior of progenitors and distinct properties of endoderm cells that underlie the formation and morphogenesis of the liver.

  9. S113R mutation in SLC33A1 leads to neurodegeneration and augmented BMP signaling in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pingting; Jiang, Baichun; Ma, Jian; Lin, Pengfei; Zhang, Yinshuai; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The S113R mutation (c.339T>G) (MIM #603690.0001) in SLC33A1 (MIM #603690), an ER membrane acetyl-CoA transporter, has been previously identified in individuals with hereditary spastic paraplegia type 42 (SPG42; MIM #612539). SLC33A1 has also been shown to inhibit the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway in zebrafish. To better understand the function of SLC33A1, we generated and characterized Slc33a1S113R knock-in mice. Homozygous Slc33a1S113R mutant mice were embryonic lethal, whereas heterozygous Slc33a1 mutant mice (Slc33a1wt/mut) exhibited behavioral abnormalities and central neurodegeneration, which is consistent with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) phenotypes. Importantly, we found an upregulation of BMP signaling in the nervous system and mouse embryonic fibroblasts of Slc33a1wt/mut mice. Using a sciatic nerve crush injury model in vivo and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) culture in vitro we showed that injury-induced axonal regeneration in Slc33a1wt/mut mice was accelerated and mediated by upregulated BMP signaling. Exogenous addition of BMP signaling antagonist, noggin, could efficiently alleviate the accelerated injury-induced axonal regrowth. These results indicate that SLC33A1 can negatively regulate BMP signaling in mice, further supporting the notion that upregulation of BMP signaling is a common mechanism of a subset of hereditary spastic paraplegias. PMID:27935820

  10. Progressive age-related changes in sleep and EEG profiles in the PLB1Triple mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jyoti, Amar; Plano, Andrea; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2015-10-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and now assumed to contribute to disease onset and progression. Here, we investigated whether activity, sleep/wake pattern, and electroencephalogram (EEG) profiles are altered in the knock-in PLB1Triple mouse model from 5 to 21 months of age. PLB1Triple mice displayed a progressive increase in wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement sleep fragmentation from 9 months onward, whereas PLB1WT wild type controls showed such deterioration only at 21 months. Impaired habituation to spatial novelty was also detected in PLB1Triple mice. Hippocampal power spectra of transgenic mice revealed progressive, vigilance stage-, brain region-, and age-specific changes. Age had an impact on EEG spectra in both cohorts but led to accelerated genotype-dependent differences, ultimately affecting all bands at 21 months. Overall, although PLB1Triple animals display only subtle amyloid and tau pathologies, robust sleep-wake and EEG abnormalities emerged. We hypothesize that such endophenotypes are sensitive, noninvasive, and reliable biomarker to identify onset and progression of AD.

  11. Characterization of the BAC Id3-enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse line for in vivo imaging of astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lamantia, Cassandra; Tremblay, Marie-Eve; Majewska, Ania

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Astrocytes are highly ramified glial cells with critical roles in brain physiology and pathology. Recently, breakthroughs in imaging technology have expanded our understanding of astrocyte function in vivo. The in vivo study of astrocytic dynamics, however, is limited by the tools available to label astrocytes and their processes. Here, we characterize the bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic Id3-EGFP knock-in mouse to establish its usefulness for in vivo imaging of astrocyte processes. Using fixed brain sections, we observed enhanced green fluorescent protein expression in astrocytes and blood vessel walls throughout the brain, although the extent and cell type specificity of expression depended on the brain area and developmental age. Using in vivo two-photon imaging, we visualized astrocytes in cortical layers 1–3 in both thin skull and window preparations. In adult animals, astrocytic cell bodies and fine processes could be followed over many hours. Our results suggest that Id3 mice could be used for in vivo imaging of astrocytes and blood vessels in development and adulthood. PMID:26157970

  12. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  13. APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis in Whole Mouse Ovaries
    Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27711.

  14. Mouse models of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ban, Joanne; Phillips, William D

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a muscle weakness disease characterized by autoantibodies that target components of the neuromuscular junction, impairing synaptic transmission. The most common form of myasthenia gravis involves antibodies that bind the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the postsynaptic membrane. Many of the remaining cases are due to antibodies against muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Recently, autoantibodies against LRP4 (another component of the MuSK signaling complex in the postsynaptic membrane) were identified as the likely cause of myasthenia gravis in some patients. Fatiguing weakness is the common symptom in all forms of myasthenia gravis, but muscles of the body are differentially affected, for reasons that are not fully understood. Much of what we have learnt about the immunological and neurobiological aspects of the pathogenesis derives from mouse models. The most widely used mouse models involve either passive transfer of autoantibodies, or active immunization of the mouse with acetylcholine receptors or MuSK protein. These models can provide a robust replication of many of the features of the human disease. Depending upon the protocol, acute fatiguing weakness develops 2 - 14 days after the start of autoantibody injections (passive transfer) or might require repeated immunizations over several weeks (active models). Here we review mouse models of myasthenia gravis, including what they have contributed to current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and their current application to the testing of therapeutics.

  15. High-throughput mouse phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Gates, Hilary; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2011-04-01

    Comprehensive phenotyping will be required to reveal the pleiotropic functions of a gene and to uncover the wider role of genetic loci within diverse biological systems. The challenge will be to devise phenotyping approaches to characterise the thousands of mutants that are being generated as part of international efforts to acquire a mutant for every gene in the mouse genome. In order to acquire robust datasets of broad based phenotypes from mouse mutants it is necessary to design and implement pipelines that incorporate standardised phenotyping platforms that are validated across diverse mouse genetics centres or mouse clinics. We describe here the rationale and methodology behind one phenotyping pipeline, EMPReSSslim, that was designed as part of the work of the EUMORPHIA and EUMODIC consortia, and which exemplifies some of the challenges facing large-scale phenotyping. EMPReSSslim captures a broad range of data on diverse biological systems, from biochemical to physiological amongst others. Data capture and dissemination is pivotal to the operation of large-scale phenotyping pipelines, including the definition of parameters integral to each phenotyping test and the associated ontological descriptions. EMPReSSslim data is displayed within the EuroPhenome database, where a variety of tools are available to allow the user to search for interesting biological or clinical phenotypes.

  16. Diversity and overlap of parvalbumin and somatostatin expressing interneurons in mouse presubiculum.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Mérie; Simonnet, Jean; Lofredi, Roxanne; Cohen, Ivan; Savary, Etienne; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Miles, Richard; Fricker, Desdemona

    2015-01-01

    The presubiculum, located between hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, plays a fundamental role in representing spatial information, notably head direction. Little is known about GABAergic interneurons of this region. Here, we used three transgenic mouse lines, Pvalb-Cre, Sst-Cre, and X98, to examine distinct interneurons labeled with tdTomato or green fluorescent protein. The distribution of interneurons in presubicular lamina for each animal line was compared to that in the GAD67-GFP knock-in animal line. Labeling was specific in the Pvalb-Cre line with 87% of labeled interneurons immunopositive for parvalbumin (PV). Immunostaining for somatostatin (SOM) revealed good specificity in the X98 line with 89% of fluorescent cells, but a lesser specificity in Sst-Cre animals where only 71% of labeled cells were immunopositive. A minority of ∼6% of interneurons co-expressed PV and SOM in the presubiculum of Sst-Cre animals. The electrophysiological and morphological properties of fluorescent interneurons from Pvalb-Cre, Sst-Cre, and X98 mice differed. Distinct physiological groups of presubicular interneurons were resolved by unsupervised cluster analysis of parameters describing passive properties, firing patterns and AP shapes. One group consisted of SOM-positive, Martinotti type neurons with a low firing threshold (cluster 1). Fast spiking basket cells, mainly from the Pvalb-Cre line, formed a distinct group (cluster 3). Another group (cluster 2) contained interneurons of intermediate electrical properties and basket-cell like morphologies. These labeled neurons were recorded from both Sst-Cre and Pvalb-Cre animals. Thus, our results reveal a wide variation in anatomical and physiological properties for these interneurons, a real overlap of interneurons immuno-positive for both PV and SOM as well as an off-target recombination in the Sst-Cre line, possibly linked to maternal cre inheritance.

  17. Distribution and Intrinsic Membrane Properties of Basal Forebrain GABAergic and Parvalbumin Neurons in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, James T.; Yang, Chun; Franciosi, Serena; Winston, Stuart; Abarr, Kathleen K.; Rigby, Matthew S.; Yanagawa, Yuchio; McCarley, Robert W.; Brown, Ritchie E.

    2013-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) strongly regulates cortical activation, sleep homeostasis, and attention. Many BF neurons involved in these processes are GABAergic, including a subpopulation of projection neurons containing the calcium-binding protein, parvalbumin (PV). However, technical difficulties in identification have prevented a precise mapping of the distribution of GABAergic and GABA/PV+ neurons in the mouse or a determination of their intrinsic membrane properties. Here we used mice expressing fluorescent proteins in GABAergic (GAD67-GFP knock-in mice) or PV+ neurons (PV-Tomato mice) to study these neurons. Immunohistochemical staining for GABA in GAD67-GFP mice confirmed that GFP selectively labeled BF GABAergic neurons. GFP+ neurons and fibers were distributed throughout the BF, with the highest density in the magnocellular preoptic area (MCPO). Immunohistochemistry for PV indicated that the majority of PV+ neurons in the BF were large (>20 μm) or medium-sized (15–20 μm) GFP+ neurons. Most medium and large-sized BF GFP+ neurons, including those retrogradely labeled from the neocortex, were fast-firing and spontaneously active in vitro. They exhibited prominent hyperpolarization-activated inward currents and subthreshold “spikelets,” suggestive of electrical coupling. PV+ neurons recorded in PV-Tomato mice had similar properties but had significantly narrower action potentials and a higher maximal firing frequency. Another population of smaller GFP+ neurons had properties similar to striatal projection neurons. The fast firing and electrical coupling of BF GABA/PV+ neurons, together with their projections to cortical interneurons and the thalamic reticular nucleus, suggest a strong and synchronous control of the neocortical fast rhythms typical of wakefulness and REM sleep. PMID:23254904

  18. Ciliopathy is differentially distributed in the brain of a Bardet-Biedl syndrome mouse model.

    PubMed

    Agassandian, Khristofor; Patel, Milan; Agassandian, Marianna; Steren, Karina E; Rahmouni, Kamal; Sheffield, Val C; Card, J Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous inherited human disorder displaying a pleotropic phenotype. Many of the symptoms characterized in the human disease have been reproduced in animal models carrying deletions or knock-in mutations of genes causal for the disorder. Thinning of the cerebral cortex, enlargement of the lateral and third ventricles, and structural changes in cilia are among the pathologies documented in these animal models. Ciliopathy is of particular interest in light of recent studies that have implicated primary neuronal cilia (PNC) in neuronal signal transduction. In the present investigation, we tested the hypothesis that areas of the brain responsible for learning and memory formation would differentially exhibit PNC abnormalities in animals carrying a deletion of the Bbs4 gene (Bbs4-/-). Immunohistochemical localization of adenylyl cyclase-III (ACIII), a marker restricted to PNC, revealed dramatic alterations in PNC morphology and a statistically significant reduction in number of immunopositive cilia in the hippocampus and amygdala of Bbs4-/- mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. Western blot analysis confirmed the decrease of ACIII levels in the hippocampus and amygdala of Bbs4-/- mice, and electron microscopy demonstrated pathological alterations of PNC in the hippocampus and amygdala. Importantly, no neuronal loss was found within the subregions of amygdala and hippocampus sampled in Bbs4-/- mice and there were no statistically significant alterations of ACIII immunopositive cilia in other areas of the brain not known to contribute to the BBS phenotype. Considered with data documenting a role of cilia in signal transduction these findings support the conclusion that alterations in cilia structure or neurochemical phenotypes may contribute to the cognitive deficits observed in the Bbs4-/- mouse mode.

  19. Calcium homeostasis alterations in a mouse model of the Dynamin 2-related centronuclear myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fraysse, Bodvaël; Guicheney, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by centrally located nuclei in muscle fibers. CNM results from mutations in the gene encoding dynamin 2 (DNM2), a large GTPase involved in endocytosis, intracellular membrane trafficking, and cytoskeleton regulation. We developed a knock-in mouse model expressing the most frequent DNM2-CNM mutation; i.e. the KI-Dnm2R465W model. Heterozygous (HTZ) KI-Dnm2 mice progressively develop muscle atrophy, impairment of contractile properties, histopathological abnormalities, and elevated cytosolic calcium concentration. Here, we aim at better characterizing the calcium homeostasis impairment in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles from adult HTZ KI-Dnm2 mice. We demonstrate abnormal contractile properties and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in EDL but not soleus muscles showing that calcium impairment is correlated with muscle weakness and might be a determinant factor of the spatial muscle involvement. In addition, the elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in EDL muscles is associated with an increased sarcolemmal permeability to Ca2+ and releasable Ca2+ content from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. However, amplitude and kinetics characteristics of the calcium transient appear unchanged. This suggests that calcium defect is probably not a primary cause of decreased force generation by compromised sarcomere shortening but may be involved in long-term deleterious consequences on muscle physiology. Our results highlight the first pathomechanism which may explain the spatial muscle involvement occurring in DNM2-related CNM and open the way toward development of a therapeutic approach to normalize calcium content. PMID:27870637

  20. Diversity and overlap of parvalbumin and somatostatin expressing interneurons in mouse presubiculum

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Mérie; Simonnet, Jean; Lofredi, Roxanne; Cohen, Ivan; Savary, Etienne; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Miles, Richard; Fricker, Desdemona

    2015-01-01

    The presubiculum, located between hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, plays a fundamental role in representing spatial information, notably head direction. Little is known about GABAergic interneurons of this region. Here, we used three transgenic mouse lines, Pvalb-Cre, Sst-Cre, and X98, to examine distinct interneurons labeled with tdTomato or green fluorescent protein. The distribution of interneurons in presubicular lamina for each animal line was compared to that in the GAD67-GFP knock-in animal line. Labeling was specific in the Pvalb-Cre line with 87% of labeled interneurons immunopositive for parvalbumin (PV). Immunostaining for somatostatin (SOM) revealed good specificity in the X98 line with 89% of fluorescent cells, but a lesser specificity in Sst-Cre animals where only 71% of labeled cells were immunopositive. A minority of ∼6% of interneurons co-expressed PV and SOM in the presubiculum of Sst-Cre animals. The electrophysiological and morphological properties of fluorescent interneurons from Pvalb-Cre, Sst-Cre, and X98 mice differed. Distinct physiological groups of presubicular interneurons were resolved by unsupervised cluster analysis of parameters describing passive properties, firing patterns and AP shapes. One group consisted of SOM-positive, Martinotti type neurons with a low firing threshold (cluster 1). Fast spiking basket cells, mainly from the Pvalb-Cre line, formed a distinct group (cluster 3). Another group (cluster 2) contained interneurons of intermediate electrical properties and basket-cell like morphologies. These labeled neurons were recorded from both Sst-Cre and Pvalb-Cre animals. Thus, our results reveal a wide variation in anatomical and physiological properties for these interneurons, a real overlap of interneurons immuno-positive for both PV and SOM as well as an off-target recombination in the Sst-Cre line, possibly linked to maternal cre inheritance. PMID:26005406

  1. Epigenetic dysregulation of leukaemic HOX code in MLL-rearranged leukaemia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ray Kit; Kong, Cheuk Ting; So, Chi Chiu; Lui, Wing Chi; Chan, Yuen Fan; Leung, Ka Chun; So, Kam Chung; Tsang, Ho Man; Chan, Li Chong; Sham, Mai Har

    2014-01-01

    HOX genes are frequently dysregulated in human leukaemia with the gene rearrangement between mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL) and partner genes. The resultant MLL fusion proteins are known to mediate leukaemia through disruption of the normal epigenetic regulation at the target gene loci. To elucidate the pathogenic role of MLL fusion proteins in HOX dysregulation in leukaemia, we generated a novel haematopoietic lineage-specific Mll-Een knock-in mouse model using a Cre-mediated inversion strategy. The Mll(Een) (/+) invertor mice developed acute myeloid leukaemia, with organomegaly of the spleen, liver and mesenteric lymph nodes caused by infiltration of blast cells. Using Mll-Een-expressing leukaemic cell lines derived from bone marrow of Mll(Een) (/+) mutant mice, we showed that induction of Hox genes in leukaemic cells was associated with hypomethylated promoter regions and an aberrant active chromatin state at the Hox loci. Knock-down of Prmt1 was insufficient to reverse the active chromatin status and the hypomethylated Hox loci, suggesting that Prmt1-mediated histone arginine methylation was only partially involved in the maintenance of Hox expression in leukaemic cells. Furthermore, in vivo analysis of bone marrow cells of Mll(Een) (/+) mice revealed a Hox expression profile similar to that of wild-type haematopoietic stem cells. The leukaemic Hox profile was highly correlated with aberrant hypomethylation of Hox promoters in the mutant mice, which highlights the importance of DNA methylation in leukaemogenic mechanisms induced by MLL fusion proteins. Our results point to the involvement of dynamic epigenetic regulations in the maintenance of the stem cell-like HOX code that initiates leukaemic stem cells in MLL-rearranged leukaemia. This provides insights for the development of alternative strategies for leukaemia treatment.

  2. Measuring discrimination- and reversal learning in mouse models within 4 days and without prior food deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Smit, August B.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological and psychiatric disorders are characterized by deficits in cognitive flexibility. Modeling cognitive flexibility in mice enables the investigation of mechanisms underlying these deficits. The majority of currently available behavioral tests targeting this cognitive domain are reversal learning tasks that require scheduled food restriction, extended training periods and labor-intensive, and stress-inducing animal handling. Here, we describe a novel 4-day (4-d) continuously running task measuring discrimination- and reversal learning in an automated home cage (CognitionWall DL/RL task) that largely eliminates these limitations. In this task, mice can earn unlimited number of food rewards by passing through the correct hole of the three-holed CognitionWall. To assess the validity and sensitivity of this novel task, the performance of C57BL/6J mice, amyloid precursor protein/presenilin1 transgenic (APP/PS1) mice, α-calmodulin kinase-II (αCaMKII) T305D knock-in mice, and mice with an orbitofrontal cortex lesion were examined. We found that C57BL/6J mice reach stable performance levels within the 4 d of the task, while experiencing only slight reductions in weight and no major effects on circadian rhythm. The task detected learning deficits in APP/PS1 transgenic and αCaMKII T305D mutant mice. Additionally, we established that the orbitofrontal cortex underlies reversal learning performance in our task. Because of its short duration and the absence of food deprivation and concurrent weight loss, this novel automated home-cage task substantially improves comprehensive preclinical assessment of cognitive functions in mouse models of psychiatric and neurological disorders and also enables analysis during specific developmental stages. PMID:27918287

  3. Measuring discrimination- and reversal learning in mouse models within 4 days and without prior food deprivation.

    PubMed

    Remmelink, Esther; Smit, August B; Verhage, Matthijs; Loos, Maarten

    2016-11-01

    Many neurological and psychiatric disorders are characterized by deficits in cognitive flexibility. Modeling cognitive flexibility in mice enables the investigation of mechanisms underlying these deficits. The majority of currently available behavioral tests targeting this cognitive domain are reversal learning tasks that require scheduled food restriction, extended training periods and labor-intensive, and stress-inducing animal handling. Here, we describe a novel 4-day (4-d) continuously running task measuring discrimination- and reversal learning in an automated home cage (CognitionWall DL/RL task) that largely eliminates these limitations. In this task, mice can earn unlimited number of food rewards by passing through the correct hole of the three-holed CognitionWall. To assess the validity and sensitivity of this novel task, the performance of C57BL/6J mice, amyloid precursor protein/presenilin1 transgenic (APP/PS1) mice, α-calmodulin kinase-II (αCaMKII) T305D knock-in mice, and mice with an orbitofrontal cortex lesion were examined. We found that C57BL/6J mice reach stable performance levels within the 4 d of the task, while experiencing only slight reductions in weight and no major effects on circadian rhythm. The task detected learning deficits in APP/PS1 transgenic and αCaMKII T305D mutant mice. Additionally, we established that the orbitofrontal cortex underlies reversal learning performance in our task. Because of its short duration and the absence of food deprivation and concurrent weight loss, this novel automated home-cage task substantially improves comprehensive preclinical assessment of cognitive functions in mouse models of psychiatric and neurological disorders and also enables analysis during specific developmental stages.

  4. Five choice serial reaction time performance in the HdhQ92 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Trueman, R C; Dunnett, S B; Jones, L; Brooks, S P

    2012-06-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder, with motor, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. To date there is no cure. In order to understand better this disease and to develop novel treatments, many genetically modified animal models of Huntington's disease have been created. However, to utilize these models fully, appropriate functional assays need to be developed for behavioural assessments of the mice. Various facets of attention have been reported to be affected in Huntington's disease patients, and the Hdh(Q92/Q92) mice have been shown to have deficits on operant tasks which have attentional components. In the present study, the Hdh(Q92/Q92) mouse model is assessed on a well established test of attentional function, the operant 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRT), in which the mice must respond with a nose poke to light stimuli presented randomly across a 5 hole light array to receive a reward. In the present paper, the Hdh(Q92/Q92) mice exhibited deficits on the 5-CSRT when pseudorandomly presented with stimuli of different durations. However, alterations in the pacing of the task, therefore requiring an increase in sustained attention, did not affect the Hdh(Q92/Q92) mice more than their wildtype littermates. This study indicates that the Hdh(Q92/Q92) mice may have deficits in aspects of attentional function, in particular disruption in the ability to maintain attention in the visuospatial domain, suggesting that this knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease may be a relevant model of the disease for the testing of novel therapeutic interventions.

  5. A novel mouse model of conditional IRAK-M deficiency in myeloid cells: application in lung Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Di; Matsuda, Jennifer; Berman, Reena; Schaefer, Niccolette; Stevenson, Connor; Gross, James; Zhang, Bicheng; Sanchez, Amelia; Li, Liwu; Chu, Hong Wei

    2017-02-01

    Myeloid cells such as macrophages are critical to innate defense against infection. IL-1 receptor-associated kinase M (IRAK-M) is a negative regulator of TLR signaling during bacterial infection, but the role of myeloid cell IRAK-M in bacterial infection is unclear. Our goal was to generate a novel conditional knockout mouse model to define the role of myeloid cell IRAK-M during bacterial infection. Myeloid cell-specific IRAK-M knockout mice were generated by crossing IRAK-M floxed mice with LysM-Cre knock-in mice. The resulting LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) and control (LysM-Cre(-)/IRAK-M(fl/wt)) mice were intranasally infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). IRAK-M deletion, inflammation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and PA load were measured in leukocytes, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lungs. PA killing assay with BAL fluid was performed to determine mechanisms of IRAK-M-mediated host defense. IRAK-M mRNA and protein levels in alveolar and lung macrophages were significantly reduced in LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) mice compared with control mice. Following PA infection, LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) mice have enhanced lung neutrophilic inflammation, including MPO activity, but reduced PA load. The increased lung MPO activity in LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) mouse BAL fluid reduced PA load. Generation of IRAK-M conditional knockout mice will enable investigators to determine precisely the function of IRAK-M in myeloid cells and other types of cells during infection and inflammation.

  6. Mouse Models of Human Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Shedlovsky, A.; McDonald, J. D.; Symula, D.; Dove, W. F.

    1993-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) results from a deficiency in phenylalanine hydroxylase, the enzyme catalyzing the conversion of phenylalanine (PHE) to tyrosine. Although this inborn error of metabolism was among the first in humans to be understood biochemically and genetically, little is known of the mechanism(s) involved in the pathology of PKU. We have combined mouse germline mutagenesis with screens for hyperphenylalaninemia to isolate three mutants deficient in phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) activity and cross-reactive protein. Two of these have reduced PAH mRNA and display characteristics of untreated human PKU patients. A low PHE diet partially reverses these abnormalities. Our success in using high frequency random germline point mutagenesis to obtain appropriate disease models illustrates how such mutagenesis can complement the emergent power of targeted mutagenesis in the mouse. The mutants now can be used as models in studying both maternal PKU and somatic gene therapy. PMID:8375656

  7. Aging Research Using Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Anderson, Laura C; Sheehan, Susan; Hill, Warren G; Chang, Bo; Churchill, Gary A; Chesler, Elissa J; Korstanje, Ron; Peters, Luanne L

    2015-06-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in human lifespan over the past century, there remains pronounced variability in "health-span," or the period of time in which one is generally healthy and free of disease. Much of the variability in health-span and lifespan is thought to be genetic in origin. Understanding the genetic mechanisms of aging and identifying ways to boost longevity is a primary goal in aging research. Here, we describe a pipeline of phenotypic assays for assessing mouse models of aging. This pipeline includes behavior/cognition testing, body composition analysis, and tests of kidney function, hematopoiesis, and immune function, as well as physical parameters. We also describe study design methods for assessing lifespan and health-span, and other important considerations when conducting aging research in the laboratory mouse. The tools and assays provided can assist researchers with understanding the correlative relationships between age-associated phenotypes and, ultimately, the role of specific genes in the aging process.

  8. Aging Research Using Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Anderson, Laura; Sheehan, Susan; Hill, Warren G.; Chang, Bo; Churchill, Gary A.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Korstanje, Ron; Peters, Luanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in human lifespan over the past century, there remains pronounced variability in “health-span”, or the period of time in which one is generally healthy and free of disease. Much of the variability in health-span and lifespan is thought to be genetic in origin. Understanding the genetic mechanisms of aging and identifying ways to boost longevity is a primary goal in aging research. Here, we describe a pipeline of phenotypic assays for assessing mouse models of aging. This pipeline includes behavior/cognition testing, body composition analysis, and tests of kidney function, hematopoiesis, immune function and physical parameters. We also describe study design methods for assessing lifespan and health-span, and other important considerations when conducting aging research in the laboratory mouse. The tools and assays provided can assist researchers with understanding the correlative relationships between age-associated phenotypes and, ultimately, the role of specific genes in the aging process. PMID:26069080

  9. Comparison of motor performance, brain biochemistry and histology of two A30P α-synuclein transgenic mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Piltonen, M; Savolainen, M; Patrikainen, S; Baekelandt, V; Myöhänen, T T; Männistö, P T

    2013-02-12

    Three point mutations in the SNCA gene encoding α-synuclein (aSyn) have been associated with autosomal dominant forms of Parkinson's disease. To better understand the role of the A30P mutant aSyn, we compared two transgenic mouse strains: a knock-in mouse with an introduced A30P point mutation in the wild-type (WT) gene (Snca(tm(A30P))) and a transgenic (Tg) mouse overexpressing the human A30P aSyn gene under the prion promoter [tg(Prnp-SNCA A30P)]. The brain aSyn load, motor performance, brain dopamine (DA) and sensitivity to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) were studied in these mice. aSyn was evidently accumulating with age in all mice, particularly in tg(Prnp-SNCA A30P) Tg mice. There were no robust changes in basal locomotor activities of the mice of either line at 6 months, but after 1 year, tg(Prnp-SNCA A30P) Tg mice developed severe problems with vertical movements. However, the younger Tg mice had a reduced locomotor response to 1mg/kg of d-amphetamine. Snca(tm(A30P)) mice with the targeted mutation (Tm) were slightly hyperactive at all ages. Less 6-OHDA was required in tg(Prnp-SNCA A30P) Tg (1 μg) than in WT (3μg) mice for an ipsilateral rotational bias by d-amphetamine. That was not seen with the Snca(tm(A30P)) strain. A small dose of 6-OHDA (0.33 μg) led to contralateral rotations and elevated striatal DA in Tg/Tm mice of both lines but otherwise 6-OHDA-induced striatal DA depletion was similar in all mice, indicating no A30P-aSyn-related toxin sensitivity. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/DA-ratio was elevated in tg(Prnp-SNCA A30P) mice, suggesting an enhanced DA turnover. This ratio and homovanillic acid/DA-ratio were declined in Snca(tm(A30P)) mice. Our results demonstrate that the two differently constructed A30P-aSyn mouse strains have distinct behavioral and biochemical characteristics, some of which are opposite. Since the two lines with the same background were not identically produced, the deviations found may be partially caused by factors other

  10. Retinofugal projections in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Morin, Lawrence P; Studholme, Keith M

    2014-11-01

    The laboratory mouse is increasingly a subject for visual system investigation, but there has been no comprehensive evaluation of this species' visual projections. Here, projections were visualized and mapped following intraocular injection of cholera toxin B subunit. Tissue was processed using standard procedures applied to 30 μm free-floating sections with diaminobenzidine as the chromogen. The mouse retina projects to ~46 brain regions, including 14 not previously described in this species. These include two amygdaloid nuclei, the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, several visual thalamic nuclei, the paranigral nucleus, several pretectal nuclei, and the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus. Dense retinal patches were also observed in a narrow portion of the ipsilateral intermediate layer of the superior colliculus. The superior fasciculus of the accessory optic tract, which innervates the medial terminal nucleus, was also determined to be a terminal zone throughout its length. The results are compared with previous descriptions of projections from mouse intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells, and with data from the hamster, Nile grass rat, and laboratory rat. The retinal projection patterns are similar in all four species, although there are many differences with respect to the details. The specific visual functions of most retinorecipient areas are unknown, but there is substantial convergence of retinal projections onto regions concerned with olfaction and audition.

  11. Retinofugal Projections in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Lawrence P.; Studholme, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is increasingly a subject for visual system investigation, but there has been no comprehensive evaluation of this species’ visual projections. Here, projections were visualized and mapped following intraocular injection of cholera toxin B subunit. Tissue was processed using standard procedures applied to 30 Am free floating sections with diaminobenzidine as the chromogen. The mouse retina projects to approximately 46 brain regions, including 14 not previously described in this species. These include two amygdaloid nuclei, the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, several visual thalamic nuclei, the paranigral nucleus, several pretectal nuclei, and the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus. Dense retinal patches were also observed in a narrow portion of the ipsilateral intermediate layer of the superior colliculus. The superior fasciculus of the accessory optic tract, which innervates the medial terminal nucleus, was also determined to be a terminal zone throughout its length. The results are compared with previous descriptions of projections from mouse intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells, and with data from the hamster, Nile grass rat and laboratory rat. The retinal projection patterns are similar in all four species, although there are many differences with respect to the details. The specific visual functions of most retinorecipient areas are unknown, but there is substantial convergence of retinal projections onto regions concerned with olfaction and audition. PMID:24889098

  12. Mouse Models for Methylmalonic Aciduria

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Heidi L.; Pitt, James J.; Wood, Leonie R.; Hamilton, Natasha J.; Sarsero, Joseph P.; Buck, Nicole E.

    2012-01-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) is a disorder of organic acid metabolism resulting from a functional defect of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM). MMA is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, thus therapies are necessary to help improve quality of life and prevent renal and neurological complications. Transgenic mice carrying an intact human MCM locus have been produced. Four separate transgenic lines were established and characterised as carrying two, four, five or six copies of the transgene in a single integration site. Transgenic mice from the 2-copy line were crossed with heterozygous knockout MCM mice to generate mice hemizygous for the human transgene on a homozygous knockout background. Partial rescue of the uniform neonatal lethality seen in homozygous knockout mice was observed. These rescued mice were significantly smaller than control littermates (mice with mouse MCM gene). Biochemically, these partial rescue mice exhibited elevated methylmalonic acid levels in urine, plasma, kidney, liver and brain tissue. Acylcarnitine analysis of blood spots revealed elevated propionylcarnitine levels. Analysis of mRNA expression confirms the human transgene is expressed at higher levels than observed for the wild type, with highest expression in the kidney followed closely by brain and liver. Partial rescue mouse fibroblast cultures had only 20% of the wild type MCM enzyme activity. It is anticipated that this humanised partial rescue mouse model of MMA will enable evaluation of long-term pathophysiological effects of elevated methylmalonic acid levels and be a valuable model for the investigation of therapeutic strategies, such as cell transplantation. PMID:22792386

  13. A Balanced Diet Is Necessary for Proper Entrainment Signals of the Mouse Liver Clock

    PubMed Central

    Hirao, Akiko; Tahara, Yu; Kimura, Ichiro; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2009-01-01

    Background The peripheral circadian clock in mice is entrained not only by light-dark cycles but also by daily restricted feeding schedules. Behavioral and cell culture experiments suggest an increase in glucose level as a factor in such feeding-induced entrainment. For application of feeding-induced entrainment in humans, nutrient content and dietary variations should be considered. Principal Finding To elucidate the food composition necessary for dietary entrainment, we examined whether complete or partial substitution of dietary nutrients affected phase shifts in liver clocks of mice. Compared with fasting mice or ad libitum fed mice, the liver bioluminescence rhythm advanced by 3–4 h on the middle day in Per2::luciferase knock-in mice that were administered a standard mouse diet, i.e. AIN-93M formula [0.6–0.85 g/10 g mouse BW] (composition: 14% casein, 47% cornstarch, 15% gelatinized cornstarch, 10% sugar, 4% soybean oil, and 10% other [fiber, vitamins, minerals, etc.]), for 2 days. When each nutrient was tested alone (100% nutrient), an insignificant weak phase advance was found to be induced by cornstarch and soybean oil, but almost no phase advance was induced by gelatinized cornstarch, high-amylose cornstarch, glucose, sucrose, or casein. A combination of glucose and casein without oil, vitamin, or fiber caused a significant phase advance. When cornstarch in AIN-93M was substituted with glucose, sucrose, fructose, polydextrose, high-amylose cornstarch, or gelatinized cornstarch, the amplitude of phase advance paralleled the increase in blood glucose concentration. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest the following: (1) balanced diets containing carbohydrates/sugars and proteins are good for restricted feeding-induced entrainment of the peripheral circadian clock and (2) a balanced diet that increases blood glucose, but not by sugar alone, is suitable for entrainment. These findings may assist in the development of dietary recommendations for on

  14. Neural stem cell transplantation in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jean-Pyo; McKercher, Scott; Muller, Franz-Josef; Snyder, Evan Y

    2008-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are the most primordial, least committed cells of the nervous system, and transplantation of these multipotent cells holds the promise of regenerative therapy for many central nervous system (CNS) diseases. This unit describes methods for NSC transplantation into neonatal mouse pups, embryonic mouse brain, and adult mouse brain. A description of options for detection of labeled donor cells in engrafted mouse brain is provided along with an example protocol for detecting lacZ-expressing cells in situ. Also included is a protocol for preparing NSCs for transplantation.

  15. Mouse models of human thalassemia

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.F.; Martinell, J.; Whitney, J.B. III; Popp, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The group of diseases called the thalassemias is the largest single-gene health problem in the world according the World Health Organization. The thalassemias are lethal hereditary anemias in which the infants cannot make their own blood. Three mouse mutants are shown to be models of the human disease ..cap alpha..-thalassemia. However, since an additional gene is affected, these mutants represent a particularly severe condition in which death occurs in the homozygous embryo even before globin genes are activated. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics are described. (ACR)

  16. [Psoriasis SCID-mouse model].

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, J; Kaufmann, R; Boehncke, W-H

    2006-07-01

    Psoriasis is characterized by a complex phenotype and pathogenesis along with polygenic determination. Several psoriasis animal models have only been able to incompletely reproduce the disease. A xenogeneic transplantation approach, grafting skin from psoriatic patients onto mice with a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), was the first to meet the criteria for a psoriasis model. During the last 10 years, this psoriasis SCID-mouse model not only allowed telling experiments focusing on pathogenetic aspects, but also proved being a powerful tool for drug discovery with a good predictive value.

  17. Feds come knocking in search of home-care fraud.

    PubMed

    Burns, J

    1995-06-05

    Home care has become a target for federal investigators looking for ways to reduce the amount of money Medicare doles out to fraudulent providers. Companies and executives in the multibillion-dollar industry are facing charges ranging from filing bogus claims to money laundering.

  18. Characteristics of Knock in Hydrogen-Oxygen-Argon SI Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Killingsworth, N; Rapp, V; Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Chen, J; Dibble, R

    2010-02-23

    A promising approach for improving the efficiency of internal combustion engines is to employ a working fluid with a high specific heat ratio such as the noble gas argon. Moreover, all harmful emissions are eliminated when the intake charge is composed of oxygen, nonreactive argon, and hydrogen fuel. Previous research demonstrated indicated thermal efficiencies greater than 45% at 5.5 compression ratio in engines operating with hydrogen, oxygen, and argon. However, knock limits spark advance and increasing the efficiency further. Conditions under which knock occurs in such engines differs from typical gasoline fueled engines. In-cylinder temperatures using hydrogen-oxygen-argon are higher due to the high specific heat ratio and pressures are lower because of the low compression ratio. Better understanding of knock under these conditions can lead to operating strategies that inhibit knock and allow operation closer to the knock limit. In this work we compare knock with a hydrogen, oxygen, and argon mixture to that of air-gasoline mixtures in a variable compression ratio cooperative fuels research (CFR) engine. The focus is on stability of knocking phenomena, as well as, amplitude and frequency of the resulting pressure waves.

  19. Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Esquerda-Canals, Gisela; Montoliu-Gaya, Laia; Güell-Bosch, Jofre; Villegas, Sandra

    2017-03-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that nowadays affects more than 40 million people worldwide and it is predicted to exponentially increase in the coming decades. Because no curative treatment exists, research on the pathophysiology of the disease, as well as the testing of new drugs, are mandatory. For these purposes, animal models constitute a valuable, although perfectible tool. This review takes a tour through several aspects of mouse models of AD, such as the generation of transgenic models, the relevance of the promoter driving the expression of the transgenes, and the concrete transgenes used to simulate AD pathophysiology. Then, transgenic mouse lines harboring mutated human genes at several loci such as APP, PSEN1, APOEɛ4, and ob (leptin) are reviewed. Therefore, not only the accumulation of the Aβ peptide is emulated but also cholesterol and insulin metabolism. Further novel information about the disease will allow for the development of more accurate animal models, which in turn will undoubtedly be helpful for bringing preclinical research closer to clinical trials in humans.

  20. Mouse models of the laminopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Colin L. . E-mail: stewartc@ncifcrf.gov; Kozlov, Serguei; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G. . E-mail: sgyoung@mednet.ucla.edu

    2007-06-10

    The A and B type lamins are nuclear intermediate filament proteins that comprise the bulk of the nuclear lamina, a thin proteinaceous structure underlying the inner nuclear membrane. The A type lamins are encoded by the lamin A gene (LMNA). Mutations in this gene have been linked to at least nine diseases, including the progeroid diseases Hutchinson-Gilford progeria and atypical Werner's syndromes, striated muscle diseases including muscular dystrophies and dilated cardiomyopathies, lipodystrophies affecting adipose tissue deposition, diseases affecting skeletal development, and a peripheral neuropathy. To understand how different diseases arise from different mutations in the same gene, mouse lines carrying some of the same mutations found in the human diseases have been established. We, and others have generated mice with different mutations that result in progeria, muscular dystrophy, and dilated cardiomyopathy. To further our understanding of the functions of the lamins, we also created mice lacking lamin B1, as well as mice expressing only one of the A type lamins. These mouse lines are providing insights into the functions of the lamina and how changes to the lamina affect the mechanical integrity of the nucleus as well as signaling pathways that, when disrupted, may contribute to the disease.

  1. Mouse Models of Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Loi, Sherene; Thomas, David; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is now evolving into a major therapeutic option for cancer patients. Such clinical advances also promote massive interest in the search for novel immunotherapy targets, and to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs. It is projected that a series of novel immunotherapy agents will be developed and assessed for their therapeutic activity. In light of this, in vivo experimental mouse models that recapitulate human malignancies serve as valuable tools to validate the efficacy and safety profile of immunotherapy agents, before their transition into clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss the major classes of experimental mouse models of cancer commonly used for immunotherapy assessment and provide examples to guide the selection of appropriate models. We present some new data concerning the utility of a carcinogen-induced tumor model for comparing immunotherapies and combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. We will also highlight some recent advances in experimental modeling of human malignancies in mice that are leading towards personalized therapy in patients.

  2. Genetic mouse models of depression.

    PubMed

    Barkus, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the use of genetically modified mice in investigating the neurobiology of depressive behaviour. First, the behavioural tests commonly used as a model of depressive-like behaviour in rodents are described. These tests include those sensitive to antidepressant treatment such as the forced swim test and the tail suspension test, as well as other tests that encompass the wider symptomatology of a depressive episode. A selection of example mutant mouse lines is then presented to illustrate the use of these tests. As our understanding of depression increases, an expanding list of candidate genes is being investigated using mutant mice. Here, mice relevant to the monoamine and corticotrophin-releasing factor hypotheses of depression are covered as well as those relating to the more recent candidate, brain-derived neurotrophic factor. This selection provides interesting examples of the use of complimentary lines, such as those that have genetic removal or overexpression, and also opposing behavioural changes seen following manipulation of closely related genes. Finally, factors such as the issue of background strain and influence of environmental factors are reflected upon, before considering what can realistically be expected of a mouse model of this complex psychiatric disorder.

  3. Mouse Auditory Brainstem Response Testing

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Omar; Oursler, A. E.; Fan, Kevin; Lustig, Lawrence R.

    2016-01-01

    The auditory brainstem response (ABR) test provides information about the inner ear (cochlea) and the central pathways for hearing. The ABR reflects the electrical responses of both the cochlear ganglion neurons and the nuclei of the central auditory pathway to sound stimulation (Zhou et al., 2006; Burkard et al., 2007). The ABR contains 5 identifiable wave forms, labeled as I-V. Wave I represents the summated response from the spiral ganglion and auditory nerve while waves II-V represent responses from the ascending auditory pathway. The ABR is recorded via electrodes placed on the scalp of an anesthetized animal. ABR thresholds refer to the lowest sound pressure level (SPL) that can generate identifiable electrical response waves. This protocol describes the process of measuring the ABR of small rodents (mouse, rat, guinea pig, etc.), including anesthetizing the mouse, placing the electrodes on the scalp, recording click and tone burst stimuli and reading the obtained waveforms for ABR threshold values. As technology continues to evolve, ABR will likely provide more qualitative and quantitative information regarding the function of the auditory nerve and brainstem pathways involved in hearing.

  4. Measuring Viscoelastic Deformation with an Optical Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of using an optical mouse to track the viscoelastic deformation of low-density polyethylene films that have a fixed attached load is presented. It is seen that using an optical mouse and with rudimentary experiment paraphernalia and arrangement, it is possible to get good measurements of viscoelastic deformation.

  5. Mouse Behavior: Conjectures about Adaptations for Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rop, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Presents an experiment on mouse behavior in which students learn to observe, pay attention to details, record field notes, and ask questions about their observations. Uses a white mouse to eliminate the risk of disease that a wild rodent might carry. Lists materials, set up, and procedure. (YDS)

  6. Aberrant lung remodeling in a mouse model of surfactant dysregulation induced by modulation of the Abca3 gene.

    PubMed

    Beers, Michael F; Knudsen, Lars; Tomer, Yaniv; Maronn, Julian; Zhao, Ming; Ochs, Matthias; Mulugeta, Surafel

    2017-03-01

    The lipid transporter, ATP binding cassette class A3 (ABCA3), plays a critical role in the biogenesis of alveolar type 2 (AT2) cell lamellar bodies (LBs). A relatively large number of mutations in the ABCA3 gene have been identified in association with diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD), the most common of which is a missense mutation (valine substitution for lysine at residue 292 (ABCA3(E292V))) that leads to functional impairment of the transporter in vitro. The consequences of ABCA3(E292)(V) gene expression in vivo are unknown. To address this question, we developed mouse models expressing ABCA3(E292V) knocked-in to the endogenous mouse locus. The parental (F1) mouse line (mAbca3(E292)(V)) that retained an intronic pgk-Neo selection cassette (inserted in reverse orientation) (mAbca3(E292)(V)-rNeo) demonstrated an allele dependent extracellular surfactant phospholipid (PL) deficiency. We hypothesize that this PL deficiency leads to aberrant parenchymal remodeling contributing to the pathophysiology of the DPLD phenotype. Compared to wild type littermates, baseline studies of mice homozygous for the pgk-Neo insert (mAbca3(E292)(V)-rNeo(+/)(+)) revealed nearly 50% reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) PL content that was accompanied by quantitative reduction in AT2 LB size with a compensatory increase in LB number. The phenotypic alteration in surfactant lipid homeostasis resulted in an early macrophage predominant alveolitis which peaked at 8 weeks of age. This was followed by age-dependent development of histological DPLD characterized initially by peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration and culminating in both an emphysema-like phenotype (which included stereologically quantifiable reductions in both alveolar septal surface area and volume of septal wall tissue) plus foci of trichrome-positive collagen deposition together with substantial proliferation of hyperplastic AT2 cells. In addition to spontaneous lung remodeling, mABCA3(E292V)-rNeo mice

  7. A physical map of the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Simon G; Sekhon, Mandeep; Schein, Jacqueline; Zhao, Shaying; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Scott, Carol E; Evans, Richard S; Burridge, Paul W; Cox, Tony V; Fox, Christopher A; Hutton, Richard D; Mullenger, Ian R; Phillips, Kimbly J; Smith, James; Stalker, Jim; Threadgold, Glen J; Birney, Ewan; Wylie, Kristine; Chinwalla, Asif; Wallis, John; Hillier, LaDeana; Carter, Jason; Gaige, Tony; Jaeger, Sara; Kremitzki, Colin; Layman, Dan; Maas, Jason; McGrane, Rebecca; Mead, Kelly; Walker, Rebecca; Jones, Steven; Smith, Michael; Asano, Jennifer; Bosdet, Ian; Chan, Susanna; Chittaranjan, Suganthi; Chiu, Readman; Fjell, Chris; Fuhrmann, Dan; Girn, Noreen; Gray, Catharine; Guin, Ran; Hsiao, Letticia; Krzywinski, Martin; Kutsche, Reta; Lee, Soo Sen; Mathewson, Carrie; McLeavy, Candice; Messervier, Steve; Ness, Steven; Pandoh, Pawan; Prabhu, Anna-Liisa; Saeedi, Parvaneh; Smailus, Duane; Spence, Lorraine; Stott, Jeff; Taylor, Sheryl; Terpstra, Wesley; Tsai, Miranda; Vardy, Jill; Wye, Natasja; Yang, George; Shatsman, Sofiya; Ayodeji, Bola; Geer, Keita; Tsegaye, Getahun; Shvartsbeyn, Alla; Gebregeorgis, Elizabeth; Krol, Margaret; Russell, Daniel; Overton, Larry; Malek, Joel A; Holmes, Mike; Heaney, Michael; Shetty, Jyoti; Feldblyum, Tamara; Nierman, William C; Catanese, Joseph J; Hubbard, Tim; Waterston, Robert H; Rogers, Jane; de Jong, Pieter J; Fraser, Claire M; Marra, Marco; McPherson, John D; Bentley, David R

    2002-08-15

    A physical map of a genome is an essential guide for navigation, allowing the location of any gene or other landmark in the chromosomal DNA. We have constructed a physical map of the mouse genome that contains 296 contigs of overlapping bacterial clones and 16,992 unique markers. The mouse contigs were aligned to the human genome sequence on the basis of 51,486 homology matches, thus enabling use of the conserved synteny (correspondence between chromosome blocks) of the two genomes to accelerate construction of the mouse map. The map provides a framework for assembly of whole-genome shotgun sequence data, and a tile path of clones for generation of the reference sequence. Definition of the human-mouse alignment at this level of resolution enables identification of a mouse clone that corresponds to almost any position in the human genome. The human sequence may be used to facilitate construction of other mammalian genome maps using the same strategy.

  8. Characterization of HTT inclusion size, location, and timing in the zQ175 mouse model of Huntington's disease: an in vivo high-content imaging study.

    PubMed

    Carty, Nikisha; Berson, Nadège; Tillack, Karsten; Thiede, Christina; Scholz, Diana; Kottig, Karsten; Sedaghat, Yalda; Gabrysiak, Christina; Yohrling, George; von der Kammer, Heinz; Ebneth, Andreas; Mack, Volker; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Kwak, Seung

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. Major pathological hallmarks of HD include inclusions of mutant huntingtin (mHTT) protein, loss of neurons predominantly in the caudate nucleus, and atrophy of multiple brain regions. However, the early sequence of histological events that manifest in region- and cell-specific manner has not been well characterized. Here we use a high-content histological approach to precisely monitor changes in HTT expression and characterize deposition dynamics of mHTT protein inclusion bodies in the recently characterized zQ175 knock-in mouse line. We carried out an automated multi-parameter quantitative analysis of individual cortical and striatal cells in tissue slices from mice aged 2-12 months and confirmed biochemical reports of an age-associated increase in mHTT inclusions in this model. We also found distinct regional and subregional dynamics for inclusion number, size and distribution with subcellular resolution. We used viral-mediated suppression of total HTT in the striatum of zQ175 mice as an example of a therapeutically-relevant but heterogeneously transducing strategy to demonstrate successful application of this platform to quantitatively assess target engagement and outcome on a cellular basis.

  9. Shape-based tracking allows functional discrimination of two immune cell subsets expressing the same fluorescent tag in mouse lung explant.

    PubMed

    Fiole, Daniel; Touvrey, Cédric; Quesnel-Hellmann, Anne; Douady, Julien; Tournier, Jean-Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic Cells (DC) represent a key lung immune cell population, which play a critical role in the antigen presenting process and initiation of the adaptive immune response. The study of DCs has largely benefited from the joint development of fluorescence microscopy and knock-in technology, leading to several mouse strains with constitutively labeled DC subsets. However, in the lung most transgenic mice do express fluorescent protein not only in DCs, but also in closely related cell lineages such as monocytes and macrophages. As an example, in the lungs of CX(3)CR1(+/gfp) mice the green fluorescent protein is expressed mostly by both CD11b conventional DCs and resident monocytes. Despite this non-specific staining, we show that a shape criterion can discriminate these two particular subsets. Implemented in a cell tracking code, this quantified criterion allows us to analyze the specific behavior of DCs under inflammatory conditions mediated by lipopolysaccharide on lung explants. Compared to monocytes, we show that DCs move slower and are more confined, while both populations do not have any chemotactism-associated movement. We could generalize from these results that DCs can be automatically discriminated from other round-shaped cells expressing the same fluorescent protein in various lung inflammation models.

  10. Shape-Based Tracking Allows Functional Discrimination of Two Immune Cell Subsets Expressing the Same Fluorescent Tag in Mouse Lung Explant

    PubMed Central

    Fiole, Daniel; Touvrey, Cédric; Quesnel-Hellmann, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic Cells (DC) represent a key lung immune cell population, which play a critical role in the antigen presenting process and initiation of the adaptive immune response. The study of DCs has largely benefited from the joint development of fluorescence microscopy and knock-in technology, leading to several mouse strains with constitutively labeled DC subsets. However, in the lung most transgenic mice do express fluorescent protein not only in DCs, but also in closely related cell lineages such as monocytes and macrophages. As an example, in the lungs of CX3CR1+/gfp mice the green fluorescent protein is expressed mostly by both CD11b conventional DCs and resident monocytes. Despite this non-specific staining, we show that a shape criterion can discriminate these two particular subsets. Implemented in a cell tracking code, this quantified criterion allows us to analyze the specific behavior of DCs under inflammatory conditions mediated by lipopolysaccharide on lung explants. Compared to monocytes, we show that DCs move slower and are more confined, while both populations do not have any chemotactism-associated movement. We could generalize from these results that DCs can be automatically discriminated from other round-shaped cells expressing the same fluorescent protein in various lung inflammation models. PMID:22745831

  11. Mouse models of adrenocortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Basham, Kaitlin J.; Hung, Holly A.; Lerario, Antonio M.; Hammer, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of the organogenesis, homeostasis, and tumorigenesis of the adrenal cortex has been the subject of intense study for many decades. Specifically, characterization of tumor predisposition syndromes with adrenocortical manifestations and molecular profiling of sporadic adrenocortical tumors have led to the discovery of key molecular pathways that promote pathological adrenal growth. However, given the observational nature of such studies, several important questions regarding the molecular pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors have remained. This review will summarize naturally occurring and genetically engineered mouse models that have provided novel tools to explore the molecular and cellular underpinnings of adrenocortical tumors. New paradigms of cancer initiation, maintenance, and progression that have emerged from this work will be discussed. PMID:26678830

  12. The Mouse Forced Swim Test

    PubMed Central

    Can, Adem; Dao, David T.; Arad, Michal; Terrillion, Chantelle E.; Piantadosi, Sean C.; Gould, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    The forced swim test is a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of antidepressant drugs, antidepressant efficacy of new compounds, and experimental manipulations that are aimed at rendering or preventing depressive-like states. Mice are placed in an inescapable transparent tank that is filled with water and their escape related mobility behavior is measured. The forced swim test is straightforward to conduct reliably and it requires minimal specialized equipment. Successful implementation of the forced swim test requires adherence to certain procedural details and minimization of unwarranted stress to the mice. In the protocol description and the accompanying video, we explain how to conduct the mouse version of this test with emphasis on potential pitfalls that may be detrimental to interpretation of results and how to avoid them. Additionally, we explain how the behaviors manifested in the test are assessed. PMID:22314943

  13. The mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Can, Adem; Dao, David T; Arad, Michal; Terrillion, Chantelle E; Piantadosi, Sean C; Gould, Todd D

    2012-01-29

    The forced swim test is a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of antidepressant drugs, antidepressant efficacy of new compounds, and experimental manipulations that are aimed at rendering or preventing depressive-like states. Mice are placed in an inescapable transparent tank that is filled with water and their escape related mobility behavior is measured. The forced swim test is straightforward to conduct reliably and it requires minimal specialized equipment. Successful implementation of the forced swim test requires adherence to certain procedural details and minimization of unwarranted stress to the mice. In the protocol description and the accompanying video, we explain how to conduct the mouse version of this test with emphasis on potential pitfalls that may be detrimental to interpretation of results and how to avoid them. Additionally, we explain how the behaviors manifested in the test are assessed.

  14. Bioenergetic characterization of mouse podocytes.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yoshifusa; Sakairi, Toru; Kajiyama, Hiroshi; Shrivastav, Shashi; Beeson, Craig; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2010-08-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to podocyte injury, but normal podocyte bioenergetics have not been characterized. We measured oxygen consumption rates (OCR) and extracellular acidification rates (ECAR), using a transformed mouse podocyte cell line and the Seahorse Bioscience XF24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer. Basal OCR and ECAR were 55.2 +/- 9.9 pmol/min and 3.1 +/- 1.9 milli-pH units/min, respectively. The complex V inhibitor oligomycin reduced OCR to approximately 45% of baseline rates, indicating that approximately 55% of cellular oxygen consumption was coupled to ATP synthesis. Rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, reduced OCR to approximately 25% of the baseline rates, suggesting that mitochondrial respiration accounted for approximately 75% of the total cellular respiration. Thus approximately 75% of mitochondrial respiration was coupled to ATP synthesis and approximately 25% was accounted for by proton leak. Carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), which uncouples electron transport from ATP generation, increased OCR and ECAR to approximately 360% and 840% of control levels. FCCP plus rotenone reduced ATP content by 60%, the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose reduced ATP by 35%, and 2-deoxyglucose in combination with FCCP or rotenone reduced ATP by >85%. The lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor oxamate and 2-deoxyglucose did not reduce ECAR, and 2-deoxyglucose had no effect on OCR, although 2-deoxyglucose reduced ATP content by 25%. Mitochondrial uncoupling induced by FCCP was associated with increased OCR with certain substrates, including lactate, glucose, pyruvate, and palmitate. Replication of these experiments in primary mouse podocytes yielded similar data. We conclude that mitochondria play the primary role in maintaining podocyte energy homeostasis, while glycolysis makes a lesser contribution.

  15. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse cardiovascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2001-05-01

    The mouse is the preferred animal model for studying mammalian cardiovascular development and many human congenital heart diseases. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), utilizing high-frequency (40-50-MHz) ultrasound, is uniquely capable of providing in vivo, real-time microimaging and Doppler blood velocity measurements in mouse embryos and neonates. UBM analyses of normal and abnormal mouse cardiovascular function will be described to illustrate the power of this microimaging approach. In particular, real-time UBM images have been used to analyze dimensional changes in the mouse heart from embryonic to neonatal stages. UBM-Doppler has been used recently to examine the precise timing of onset of a functional circulation in early-stage mouse embryos, from the first detectable cardiac contractions. In other experiments, blood velocity waveforms have been analyzed to characterize the functional phenotype of mutant mouse embryos having defects in cardiac valve formation. Finally, UBM has been developed for real-time, in utero image-guided injection of mouse embryos, enabling cell transplantation and genetic gain-of-function experiments with transfected cells and retroviruses. In summary, UBM provides a unique and powerful approach for in vivo analysis and image-guided manipulation in normal and genetically engineered mice, over a wide range of embryonic to neonatal developmental stages.

  16. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse cardiovascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2004-05-01

    The mouse is the preferred animal model for studying mammalian cardiovascular development and many human congenital heart diseases. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), utilizing high-frequency (40-50-MHz) ultrasound, is uniquely capable of providing in vivo, real-time microimaging and Doppler blood velocity measurements in mouse embryos and neonates. UBM analyses of normal and abnormal mouse cardiovascular function will be described to illustrate the power of this microimaging approach. In particular, real-time UBM images have been used to analyze dimensional changes in the mouse heart from embryonic to neonatal stages. UBM-Doppler has been used recently to examine the precise timing of onset of a functional circulation in early-stage mouse embryos, from the first detectable cardiac contractions. In other experiments, blood velocity waveforms have been analyzed to characterize the functional phenotype of mutant mouse embryos having defects in cardiac valve formation. Finally, UBM has been developed for real-time, in utero image-guided injection of mouse embryos, enabling cell transplantation and genetic gain-of-function experiments with transfected cells and retroviruses. In summary, UBM provides a unique and powerful approach for in vivo analysis and image-guided manipulation in normal and genetically engineered mice, over a wide range of embryonic to neonatal developmental stages.

  17. The expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene as target for therapeutic RNA modulation throughout the HD mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Datson, Nicole A.; González-Barriga, Anchel; Kourkouta, Eleni; Weij, Rudie; van de Giessen, Jeroen; Mulders, Susan; Kontkanen, Outi; Heikkinen, Taneli; Lehtimäki, Kimmo; van Deutekom, Judith C. T.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of these studies was to demonstrate the therapeutic capacity of an antisense oligonucleotide with the sequence (CUG)7 targeting the expanded CAG repeat in huntingtin (HTT) mRNA in vivo in the R6/2 N-terminal fragment and Q175 knock-in Huntington’s disease (HD) mouse models. In a first study, R6/2 mice received six weekly intracerebroventricular infusions with a low and high dose of (CUG)7 and were sacrificed 2 weeks later. A 15–60% reduction of both soluble and aggregated mutant HTT protein was observed in striatum, hippocampus and cortex of (CUG)7-treated mice. This correction at the molecular level resulted in an improvement of performance in multiple motor tasks, increased whole brain and cortical volume, reduced levels of the gliosis marker myo-inositol, increased levels of the neuronal integrity marker N-aceyl aspartate and increased mRNA levels of the striatal marker Darpp-32. These neuroanatomical and neurochemical changes, together with the improved motor performance, suggest that treatment with (CUG)7 ameliorates basal ganglia dysfunction. The HTT-lowering was confirmed by an independent study in Q175 mice using a similar (CUG)7 AON dosing regimen, further demonstrating a lasting reduction of mutant HTT protein in striatum, hippocampus and cortex for up to 18 weeks post last infusion along with an increase in motor activity. Based on these encouraging results, (CUG)7 may thus offer an interesting alternative HTT-lowering strategy for HD. PMID:28182673

  18. Accelerated activation of SOCE current in myotubes from two mouse models of anesthetic- and heat-induced sudden death.

    PubMed

    Yarotskyy, Viktor; Protasi, Feliciano; Dirksen, Robert T

    2013-01-01

    Store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) channels play an important role in Ca(2+) signaling. Recently, excessive SOCE was proposed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of malignant hyperthermia (MH), a pharmacogenic disorder of skeletal muscle. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing SOCE current (ISkCRAC) magnitude, voltage dependence, and rate of activation in myotubes derived from two mouse models of anesthetic- and heat-induced sudden death: 1) type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) knock-in mice (Y524S/+) and 2) calsequestrin 1 and 2 double knock-out (dCasq-null) mice. ISkCRAC voltage dependence and magnitude at -80 mV were not significantly different in myotubes derived from wild type (WT), Y524S/+ and dCasq-null mice. However, the rate of ISkCRAC activation upon repetitive depolarization was significantly faster at room temperature in myotubes from Y524S/+ and dCasq-null mice. In addition, the maximum rate of ISkCRAC activation in dCasq-null myotubes was also faster than WT at more physiological temperatures (35-37°C). Azumolene (50 µM), a more water-soluble analog of dantrolene that is used to reverse MH crises, failed to alter ISkCRAC density or rate of activation. Together, these results indicate that while an increased rate of ISkCRAC activation is a common characteristic of myotubes derived from Y524S/+ and dCasq-null mice and that the protective effects of azumolene are not due to a direct inhibition of SOCE channels.

  19. Mouse model of human RPE65 P25L hypomorph resembles wild type under normal light rearing but is fully resistant to acute light damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Yu, Shirley; Duncan, Todd; Li, Yichao; Liu, Pinghu; Gene, Erelda; Cortes-Pena, Yoel; Qian, Haohua; Dong, Lijin; Redmond, T. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Human RPE65 mutations cause a spectrum of blinding retinal dystrophies from severe early-onset disease to milder manifestations. The RPE65 P25L missense mutation, though having <10% of wild-type (WT) activity, causes relatively mild retinal degeneration. To better understand these mild forms of RPE65-related retinal degeneration, and their effect on cone photoreceptor survival, we generated an Rpe65/P25L knock-in (KI/KI) mouse model. We found that, when subject to the low-light regime (∼100 lux) of regular mouse housing, homozygous Rpe65/P25L KI/KI mice are morphologically and functionally very similar to WT siblings. While mutant protein expression is decreased by over 80%, KI/KI mice retinae retain comparable 11-cis-retinal levels with WT. Consistently, the scotopic and photopic electroretinographic (ERG) responses to single-flash stimuli also show no difference between KI/KI and WT mice. However, the recovery of a-wave response following moderate visual pigment bleach is delayed in KI/KI mice. Importantly, KI/KI mice show significantly increased resistance to high-intensity (20 000 lux for 30 min) light-induced retinal damage (LIRD) as compared with WT, indicating impaired rhodopsin regeneration in KI/KI. Taken together, the Rpe65/P25L mutant produces sufficient chromophore under normal conditions to keep opsins replete and thus manifests a minimal phenotype. Only when exposed to intensive light is this hypomorphic mutation manifested physiologically, as its reduced expression and catalytic activity protects against the successive cycles of opsin regeneration underlying LIRD. These data also help define minimal requirements of chromophore for photoreceptor survival in vivo and may be useful in assessing a beneficial therapeutic dose for RPE65 gene therapy in humans. PMID:25972377

  20. Augmented Computer Mouse Would Measure Applied Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Larry C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed computer mouse measures force of contact applied by user. Adds another dimension to two-dimensional-position-measuring capability of conventional computer mouse; force measurement designated to represent any desired continuously variable function of time and position, such as control force, acceleration, velocity, or position along axis perpendicular to computer video display. Proposed mouse enhances sense of realism and intuition in interaction between operator and computer. Useful in such applications as three-dimensional computer graphics, computer games, and mathematical modeling of dynamics.

  1. Humanization of the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Wronski, A; Arendt, L M; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Although mouse models have provided invaluable information on the mechanisms of mammary gland development, anatomical and developmental differences between human and mice limit full understanding of this fundamental process. Humanization of the mouse mammary gland by injecting immortalized human breast stromal cells into the cleared murine mammary fat pad enables the growth and development of human mammary epithelial cells or tissue. This facilitates the characterization of human mammary gland development or tumorigenesis by utilizing the mouse mammary fat pad. Here we describe the process of isolating human mammary stromal and epithelial cells as well as their introduction into the mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice.

  2. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse-human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human-Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene-phenotype-disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community.

  3. Integration of Mouse Phenome Data Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, John M; Adams, Neils; Aidinis, Vassilis; Blake, Judith A; Bogue, Molly; Brown, Steve D M; Chesler, Elissa J; Davidson, Duncan; Duran, Christopher; Eppig, Janan T; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Greenaway, Simon; Angelis, Martin Hrabe de; Kollias, George; Leblanc, Sophie; Lee, Kirsty; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Masuya, Hiroshi; Melvin, David; Muller, Werner; Parkinson, Helen; Proctor, Glenn; Reuveni, Eli; Schofield, Paul; Shukla, Aadya; Smith, Cynthia; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Vasseur, Laurent; Wakana, Shigeharu; Walling, Alison; White, Jacqui; Wood, Joe; Zouberakis, Michalis

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the functions encoded in the mouse genome will be central to an understanding of the genetic basis of human disease. To achieve this it will be essential to be able to characterise the phenotypic consequences of variation and alterations in individual genes. Data on the phenotypes of mouse strains are currently held in a number of different forms (detailed descriptions of mouse lines, first line phenotyping data on novel mutations, data on the normal features of inbred lines, etc.) at many sites worldwide. For the most efficient use of these data sets, we have set in train a process to develop standards for the description of phenotypes (using ontologies), and file formats for the description of phenotyping protocols and phenotype data sets. This process is ongoing, and needs to be supported by the wider mouse genetics and phenotyping communities to succeed. We invite interested parties to contact us as we develop this process further.

  4. Melatonin receptors: latest insights from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Tosini, Gianluca; Owino, Sharon; Guillame, Jean-Luc; Jockers, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Summary Melatonin, the neuro-hormone synthesized during the night, has recently seen an unexpected extension of its functional implications towards type 2 diabetes development, visual functions, sleep disturbances and depression. Transgenic mouse models were instrumental for the establishment of the link between melatonin and these major human diseases. Most of the actions of melatonin are mediated by two types of G protein-coupled receptors, named MT1 and MT2, which are expressed in many different organs and tissues. Understanding the pharmacology and function of mouse MT1 and MT2 receptors, including MT1/MT2 heteromers, will be of crucial importance to evaluate the relevance of these mouse models for future therapeutic developments. This review will critically discuss these aspects, and give some perspectives including the generation of new mouse models. PMID:24903552

  5. Effects of endotoxin on the lactating mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of endogenous mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) sequences in trans by a host gene, the Lps locus on mouse chromosome 4, was suspected from a genetic linkage analysis. The Lps locus mediates the mouse's response to the injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the responder mouse while mice with the deficient allele are incapable of responding. Others have found that endotoxin exposure reduces milk production in lactating animals. This observation was confirmed in mice and extended by examining /sup 125/I-prolactin binding to liver membranes of lactating mice. Endotoxin treatment of responder mice increases liver prolactin binding within 15 minutes, followed by a decline over 6 hours. Scatchard analysis shows that the immediate increase comes from both increased affinity and abundance of the prolactin receptor. No such change in prolactin binding is seen in the non-responder following endotoxin treatment nor in /sup 125/I-insulin binding in responders.

  6. Aging, Breast Cancer and the Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Presenescent or senescent hBF (1.2 or 18x×10 4/well, respectively) [M, Stampfer , P. Yaswen, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory wdre suspended in 60 l cold...2.8 1 2.8 Inducing a human-like senescent phenotype in mouse fibroblasts Jean-Philihoo Copp , Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher K. Patil...MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELL PROLIFERATION AND TUMORIGENESIS: A MOUSE MODEL FOR HUMAN AGING. Jean-Philippe Coppe, Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher

  7. Mouse homologues of human hereditary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Searle, A G; Edwards, J H; Hall, J G

    1994-01-01

    Details are given of 214 loci known to be associated with human hereditary disease, which have been mapped on both human and mouse chromosomes. Forty two of these have pathological variants in both species; in general the mouse variants are similar in their effects to the corresponding human ones, but exceptions include the Dmd/DMD and Hprt/HPRT mutations which cause little, if any, harm in mice. Possible reasons for phenotypic differences are discussed. In most pathological variants the gene product seems to be absent or greatly reduced in both species. The extensive data on conserved segments between human and mouse chromosomes are used to predict locations in the mouse of over 50 loci of medical interest which are mapped so far only on human chromosomes. In about 80% of these a fairly confident prediction can be made. Some likely homologies between mapped mouse loci and unmapped human ones are also given. Sixty six human and mouse proto-oncogene and growth factor gene homologies are also listed; those of confirmed location are all in known conserved segments. A survey of 18 mapped human disease loci and chromosome regions in which the manifestation or severity of pathological effects is thought to be the result of genomic imprinting shows that most of the homologous regions in the mouse are also associated with imprinting, especially those with homologues on human chromosomes 11p and 15q. Useful methods of accelerating the production of mouse models of human hereditary disease include (1) use of a supermutagen, such as ethylnitrosourea (ENU), (2) targeted mutagenesis involving ES cells, and (3) use of gene transfer techniques, with production of 'knockout mutations'. PMID:8151633

  8. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    cause hereditary pancreatitis in humans. Previous attempts to introduce these mutant forms of human trypsinogen into mice have failed to produce...mutations in mouse trypsinogen isoform T7. Under this aim, we had two major tasks in our SOW: Major Task 1 was the design and construction of mutant forms...of the T7 mouse trypsinogen gene and expression and purification of these mutant enzymes. Major Task 2 was to analyze autoactivation of the T7

  9. Mouse models of intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Emeto, Theophilus I; Lee, James; Marshman, Laurence; Moran, Corey; Seto, Sai-wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is a highly lethal medical condition. Current management strategies for unruptured intracranial aneurysms involve radiological surveillance and neurosurgical or endovascular interventions. There is no pharmacological treatment available to decrease the risk of aneurysm rupture and subsequent subarachnoid hemorrhage. There is growing interest in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysm focused on the development of drug therapies to decrease the incidence of aneurysm rupture. The study of rodent models of intracranial aneurysms has the potential to improve our understanding of intracranial aneurysm development and progression. This review summarizes current mouse models of intact and ruptured intracranial aneurysms and discusses the relevance of these models to human intracranial aneurysms. The article also reviews the importance of these models in investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in the disease. Finally, potential pharmaceutical targets for intracranial aneurysm suggested by previous studies are discussed. Examples of potential drug targets include matrix metalloproteinases, stromal cell-derived factor-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, the renin-angiotensin system and the β-estrogen receptor. An agreed clear, precise and reproducible definition of what constitutes an aneurysm in the models would assist in their use to better understand the pathology of intracranial aneurysm and applying findings to patients.

  10. Mouse behavioral endophenotypes for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Amann, Laura C; Gandal, Michael J; Halene, Tobias B; Ehrlichman, Richard S; White, Samantha L; McCarren, Hilary S; Siegel, Steven J

    2010-09-30

    An endophenotype is a heritable trait that is generally considered to be more highly, associated with a gene-based neurological deficit than a disease phenotype itself. Such, endophenotypic deficits may therefore be observed in the non-affected relatives of disease patients. Once endophenotypes have been established for a given illness, such as schizophrenia, mechanisms of, action may then be established and treatment options developed in order to target such measures. The, current paper describes and assesses the merits and limitations of utilizing behavioral and, electrophysiological endophenotypes of schizophrenia in mice. Such endophenotypic deficits include: decreased auditory event related potential (ERP) amplitude and gating (specifically, that of the P20, N40, P80 and P120); impaired mismatch negativity (MMN); changes in theta and gamma frequency, analyses; decreased pre-pulse inhibition (PPI); impaired working and episodic memories (for instance, novel object recognition [NOR], contextual and cued fear conditioning, latent inhibition, Morris and, radial arm maze identification and nose poke); sociability; and locomotor activity. A variety of, pharmacological treatments, including ketamine, MK-801 and phencyclidine (PCP) can be used to, induce some of the deficits described above, and numerous transgenic mouse strains have been, developed to address the mechanisms responsible for such endophenotypic differences. We also, address the viability and validity of using such measures regarding their potential clinical implications, and suggest several practices that could increase the translatability of preclinical data.

  11. Mouse Models for Filovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bradfute, Steven B.; Warfield, Kelly L.; Bray, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The filoviruses marburg- and ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans and nonhuman primates. Because many cases have occurred in geographical areas lacking a medical research infrastructure, most studies of the pathogenesis of filoviral HF, and all efforts to develop drugs and vaccines, have been carried out in biocontainment laboratories in non-endemic countries, using nonhuman primates (NHPs), guinea pigs and mice as animal models. NHPs appear to closely mirror filoviral HF in humans (based on limited clinical data), but only small numbers may be used in carefully regulated experiments; much research is therefore done in rodents. Because of their availability in large numbers and the existence of a wealth of reagents for biochemical and immunological testing, mice have become the preferred small animal model for filovirus research. Since the first experiments following the initial 1967 marburgvirus outbreak, wild-type or mouse-adapted viruses have been tested in immunocompetent or immunodeficient mice. In this paper, we review how these types of studies have been used to investigate the pathogenesis of filoviral disease, identify immune responses to infection and evaluate antiviral drugs and vaccines. We also discuss the strengths and weaknesses of murine models for filovirus research, and identify important questions for further study. PMID:23170168

  12. Optical mouse acting as biospeckle sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Michel Melo; Nozela, Jose Roberto de Almeida; Chaves, Marcio Jose; Alves Braga, Roberto; Rabal, Hector Jorge

    2011-04-01

    In this work we propose some experiments with the use of optical computer mouse, associated to low cost lasers that can be used to perform several measurements with applications in industry and in human health monitoring. The mouse was used to grab the movements produced by speckle pattern changes and to get information through the adaptation of its structure. We measured displacements in wood samples under strain, variations of the diameter of an artery due to heart beat and, through a hardware simulation, the movement of an eye, an experiment that could be of low cost help for communication to severely handicapped motor patients. Those measurements were done in spite of the fact that the CCD sensor of the mice is monolithically included into an integrated circuit so that the raw image cannot be accessed. If, as was the case with primitive optical mouse, that signal could be accessed, the quality and usefulness of the measurements could be significantly increased. As it was not possible, a webcam sensor was used for measuring the drying of paint, a standard phenomenon for testing biospeckle techniques, in order to prove the usefulness of the mouse design. The results showed that the use of the mouse associated to a laser pointer could be the way to get metrological information from many phenomena involving the whole field spatial displacement, as well as the use of the mouse as in its prime version allowed to get images of the speckle patterns and to analyze them.

  13. Neurogenesis in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tsu Tshen

    2010-10-01

    The brains of the adult mouse and human possess neural stem cells (NSCs) that retain the capacity to generate new neurons through the process of neurogenesis. They share the same anatomical locations of stem cell niches in the brain, as well as the prominent feature of rostral migratory stream formed by neuroblasts migrating from the lateral ventricles towards the olfactory bulb. Therefore the mouse possesses some fundamental features that may qualify it as a relevant model for adult human neurogenesis. Adult born young hippocampal neurons in the mouse display the unique property of enhanced plasticity, and can integrate physically and functionally into existing neural circuits in the brain. Such crucial properties of neurogenesis may at least partially underlie the improved learning and memory functions observed in the mouse when hippocampal neurogenesis is augmented, leading to the suggestion that neurogenesis induction may be a novel therapeutic approach for diseases with cognitive impairments such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Research towards this goal has benefited significantly from the use of AD mouse models to facilitate the understanding in the impact of AD pathology on neurogenesis. The present article reviews the growing body of controversial data on altered neurogenesis in mouse models of AD and attempts to assess their relative relevance to humans.

  14. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Bult, Carol J.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse–human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human–Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene–phenotype–disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community. PMID:25348401

  15. Ceramide metabolism in mouse tissue.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Susanne; Birod, Kerstin; Männich, Julia; Eberle, Max; Wegner, Marthe-Susanna; Wanger, Ruth; Hartmann, Daniela; Ferreiros, Nerea; Geisslinger, Gerd; Grösch, Sabine

    2013-08-01

    Ceramides with different N-acyl chains can act as second messengers in various signaling pathways. They are involved in cell processes such as apoptosis, differentiation and inflammation. Ceramide synthases (CerS) are key enzymes in the biosynthesis of ceramides and dihydroceramides. Six isoenzymes (CerS1-6) catalyze the N-acylation of the sphingoid bases, albeit with strictly acyl-Coenzyme A (CoA) chain length specificity. We analyzed the mRNA expression, the protein expression, the specific activity of the CerS, and acyl-CoA, dihydroceramide and ceramide levels in different tissues by LC-MS/MS. Our data indicate that each tissue express a distinct composition of CerS, whereby the CerS mRNA expression levels do not correlate with the respective protein expression levels in the tissues. Furthermore, we found a highly significant negative correlation between the protein expression level of CerS6 and the C16:0-acyl-CoA amounts as well as between the protein expression of CerS2 and C24:0-acyl-CoA amounts. These data indicate that in mouse tissues low substrate availability is compensated by higher CerS protein expression level and vice versa. Apart from the expression level and the specific activity of the CerS, other enzymes of the sphingolipid pathway also influence the composition of ceramides with distinct chain lengths in each cell. Acyl-CoA availability seems to be less important for ceramide composition and might be compensated for by CerS expression/activity.

  16. Surfing the internet with a BCI mouse.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianyou; Li, Yuanqing; Long, Jinyi; Gu, Zhenghui

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present a new web browser based on a two-dimensional (2D) brain-computer interface (BCI) mouse, where our major concern is the selection of an intended target in a multi-target web page. A real-world web page may contain tens or even hundreds of targets, including hyperlinks, input elements, buttons, etc. In this case, a target filter designed in our system can be used to exclude most of those targets of no interest. Specifically, the user filters the targets of no interest out by inputting keywords with a P300-based speller, while keeps those containing the keywords. Such filtering largely facilitates the target selection task based on our BCI mouse. When there are only several targets in a web page (either an original sparse page or a target-filtered page), the user moves the mouse toward the target of interest using his/her electroencephalographic signal. The horizontal movement and vertical movement are controlled by motor imagery and P300 potential, respectively. If the mouse encounters a target of no interest, the user rejects it and continues to move the mouse. Otherwise the user selects the target and activates it. With the collaboration of the target filtering and a series of mouse movements and target selections/rejections, the user can select an intended target in a web page. Based on our browser system, common navigation functions, including history rolling forward and backward, hyperlink selection, page scrolling, text input, etc, are available. The system has been tested on seven subjects. Experimental results not only validated the efficacy of the proposed method, but also showed that free internet surfing with a BCI mouse is feasible.

  17. In amnio MRI of mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Thomas A; Norris, Francesca C; Carnaghan, Helen; Savery, Dawn; Wells, Jack A; Siow, Bernard; Scambler, Peter J; Pierro, Agostino; De Coppi, Paolo; Eaton, Simon; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2014-01-01

    Mouse embryo imaging is conventionally carried out on ex vivo embryos excised from the amniotic sac, omitting vital structures and abnormalities external to the body. Here, we present an in amnio MR imaging methodology in which the mouse embryo is retained in the amniotic sac and demonstrate how important embryonic structures can be visualised in 3D with high spatial resolution (100 µm/px). To illustrate the utility of in amnio imaging, we subsequently apply the technique to examine abnormal mouse embryos with abdominal wall defects. Mouse embryos at E17.5 were imaged and compared, including three normal phenotype embryos, an abnormal embryo with a clear exomphalos defect, and one with a suspected gastroschisis phenotype. Embryos were excised from the mother ensuring the amnion remained intact and stereo microscopy was performed. Embryos were next embedded in agarose for 3D, high resolution MRI on a 9.4T scanner. Identification of the abnormal embryo phenotypes was not possible using stereo microscopy or conventional ex vivo MRI. Using in amnio MRI, we determined that the abnormal embryos had an exomphalos phenotype with varying severities. In amnio MRI is ideally suited to investigate the complex relationship between embryo and amnion, together with screening for other abnormalities located outside of the mouse embryo, providing a valuable complement to histology and existing imaging methods available to the phenotyping community.

  18. The morphology of the mouse masticatory musculature

    PubMed Central

    Baverstock, Hester; Jeffery, Nathan S; Cobb, Samuel N

    2013-01-01

    The mouse has been the dominant model organism in studies on the development, genetics and evolution of the mammalian skull and associated soft-tissue for decades. There is the potential to take advantage of this well studied model and the range of mutant, knockin and knockout organisms with diverse craniofacial phenotypes to investigate the functional significance of variation and the role of mechanical forces on the development of the integrated craniofacial skeleton and musculature by using computational mechanical modelling methods (e.g. finite element and multibody dynamic modelling). Currently, there are no detailed published data of the mouse masticatory musculature available. Here, using a combination of micro-dissection and non-invasive segmentation of iodine-enhanced micro-computed tomography, we document the anatomy, architecture and proportions of the mouse masticatory muscles. We report on the superficial masseter (muscle, tendon and pars reflecta), deep masseter, zygomaticomandibularis (anterior, posterior, infraorbital and tendinous parts), temporalis (lateral and medial parts), external and internal pterygoid muscles. Additionally, we report a lateral expansion of the attachment of the temporalis onto the zygomatic arch, which may play a role in stabilising this bone during downwards loading. The data presented in this paper now provide a detailed reference for phenotypic comparison in mouse models and allow the mouse to be used as a model organism in biomechanical and functional modelling and simulation studies of the craniofacial skeleton and particularly the masticatory system. PMID:23692055

  19. Mouse models in tendon and ligament research.

    PubMed

    Mienaltowski, Michael J; Birk, David E

    2014-01-01

    Mutant mouse models are valuable resources for the study of tendon and ligament biology. Many mutant mouse models are used because their manifested phenotypes mimic clinical pathobiology for several heritable disorders, such as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and Osteogenesis Imperfecta. Moreover, these models are helpful for discerning roles of specific genes in the development, maturation, and repair of musculoskeletal tissues. There are several categories of genes with essential roles in the synthesis and maintenance of tendon and ligament structures. The form and function of these tissues depend highly upon fibril-forming collagens, the primary extracellular macromolecules of tendons and ligaments. Models for these fibril-forming collagens, as well as for regulatory molecules like FACITs and SLRPs, are important for studying fibril assembly, growth, and maturation. Additionally, mouse models for growth factors and transcription factors are useful for defining regulation of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and cues that stimulate matrix synthesis. Models for membrane-bound proteins assess the roles of cell-cell communication and cell-matrix interaction. In some cases, special considerations need to be given to spatio-temporal control of a gene in a model. Thus, conditional and inducible mouse models allow for specific regulation of genes of interest. Advances in mouse models have provided valuable tools for gaining insight into the form and function of tendons and ligaments.

  20. Biotransformation in Egyptian spiny mouse Acomys cahirinus.

    PubMed

    Watkins, J B; LaFollette, J W; Sanders, R A

    1995-01-01

    The activities of several representative biotransformation enzymes were determined in male and female spiny mouse tissues. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity toward benzo(a)pyrene was significantly greater in female spiny mouse intestine than in males. Activity toward benzphetamine in both sexes was high in the liver, with little activity in the kidney and intestine. Sulfotransferase activity was high in kidney and intestine of female spiny mice but undetectable in the same tissues in males. Hepatic glutathione S-transferase activity towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in females was significantly higher than in males. UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase activity toward 1-naphthol in both sexes in the kidney was significantly higher than hepatic and intestinal activity. Intestinal N-acetyltransferase activity towards 2-aminofluorene and beta-naphthylamine was significantly greater in females than males. No consistent relation appeared to exist between biotransformation activities in spiny mouse and those in other related rodent species.

  1. OCT guided microinjections for mouse embryonic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Kirill V.; Syed, Saba H.; Coughlin, Andrew J.; Wang, Shang; West, Jennifer L.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larina, Irina V.

    2013-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is gaining popularity as live imaging tool for embryonic research in animal models. Recently we have demonstrated that OCT can be used for live imaging of cultured early mouse embryos (E7.5-E10) as well as later stage mouse embryos in utero (E12.5 to the end of gestation). Targeted delivery of signaling molecules, drugs, and cells is a powerful approach to study normal and abnormal development, and image guidance is highly important for such manipulations. Here we demonstrate that OCT can be used to guide microinjections of gold nanoshell suspensions in live mouse embryos. This approach can potentially be used for variety of applications such as guided injections of contrast agents, signaling molecules, pharmacological agents, cell transplantation and extraction, as well as other image-guided micromanipulations. Our studies also reveal novel potential for gold nanoshells in embryonic research.

  2. Tetracycline-regulated mouse models of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Elizabeth S; Vernon-Grey, Ann; Martin, Heather; Chodosh, Lewis A

    2014-10-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) have proven essential to the study of mammalian gene function in both development and disease. However, traditional constitutive transgenic mouse model systems are limited by the temporal and spatial characteristics of the experimental promoter used to drive transgene expression. To address this limitation, considerable effort has been dedicated to developing conditional and inducible mouse model systems. Although a number of approaches to generating inducible GEMMs have been pursued, several have been restricted by toxic or undesired physiological side effects of the compounds used to activate gene expression. The development of tetracycline (tet)-dependent regulatory systems has allowed for circumvention of these issues resulting in the widespread adoption of these systems as an invaluable tool for modeling the complex nature of cancer progression.

  3. Mouse behavioural analysis in systems biology

    PubMed Central

    van Meer, Peter; Raber, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    Molecular techniques allowing in vivo modulation of gene expression have provided unique opportunities and challenges for behavioural studies aimed at understanding the function of particular genes or biological systems under physiological or pathological conditions. Although various animal models are available, the laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) has unique features and is therefore a preferred animal model. The mouse shares a remarkable genetic resemblance and aspects of behaviour with humans. In this review, first we describe common mouse models for behavioural analyses. As both genetic and environmental factors influence behavioural performance and need to be carefully evaluated in behavioural experiments, considerations for designing and interpretations of these experiments are subsequently discussed. Finally, common behavioural tests used to assess brain function are reviewed, and it is illustrated how behavioural tests are used to increase our understanding of the role of histaminergic neurotransmission in brain function. PMID:16035954

  4. Sphingolipid metabolism in organotypic mouse keratinocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, K.C.; Swartzendruber, D.C.; Wertz, P.W.; Downing, D.T. )

    1990-12-01

    Ceramides are the dominant component of the stratum corneum intercellular lipid lamellae, which constitute the epidermal permeability barrier. Only pig and human epidermal ceramides have been extensively characterized and the structures of the ceramides of cultured keratinocytes have not been previously investigated. In the present studies, we have characterized the ceramides synthesized by organotypic lifted mouse keratinocyte cultures for the first time and compared them to the ceramides of intact mouse epidermis. Both mouse epidermis and cultures contained five ceramides, ceramide 1 being the least polar and ceramide 5 the most polar. Ceramide 1 was a group of acylceramides, i.e., very-long-chain omega-hydroxyceramides with an ester-linked nonhydroxy fatty acid. Ceramide 2 contained medium-length saturated nonhydroxy fatty acids. (In culture, the ceramide 2 band was split into two parts with the slightly more polar ceramide 2' containing short-chain saturated nonhydroxy fatty acids.) Ceramide 5 contained short-chain alpha-hydroxy fatty acids. The structures of ceramides 1, 2, and 5 were analagous to those of pig and human epidermis. Mouse epidermal ceramide 3 was quite unusual, containing beta-hydroxy fatty acids, a structure not previously identified among mammalian ceramides. In contrast, culture ceramide 3 was composed of omega-hydroxy fatty acids with a chain-length distribution similar to that of ceramide 1. Mouse ceramide 4 was composed of fatty acids with chromatographic mobility similar to hydroxy fatty acids but with different chemical reactivity; it remains only partially characterized. Culture ceramide 4 was present in quantities too small for analysis. All ceramides in mouse epidermis and cultures contained only sphingosine bases, whereas pig and human ceramides also contain phytosphingosine.

  5. The Riken mouse genome encyclopedia project.

    PubMed

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    The Riken mouse genome encyclopedia a comprehensive full-length cDNA collection and sequence database. High-level functional annotation is based on sequence homology search, expression profiling, mapping and protein-protein interactions. More than 1000000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced and classified into 128000 clusters, and 60000 representative clones were fully sequenced representing 24000 clear protein-encoding genes. The application of the mouse genome database for positional cloning and gene network regulation analysis is reported.

  6. Mouse Mammary Cancer Models - Mechanisms and Markers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    Wipl knockout mouse model and have shown defects in cell cycle control in cells derived from Wipl null animals. We are crossing these mice to mammary...compartment of the testes (13,14). Mice lacking Wipl are viable, but males show a reduced longevity and frequent runting (14). Wipl null males also show...predominates and thus the other TG/p53 mouse . Wnt-1 TG mice contain several copies nontumor components should not obscure any strong of a germline Wnt-1

  7. Effects of alphafetoprotein on isolated mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J C; Seralini, G E; Stora, C; Vallette, G; Vranckx, R; Nunez, E A

    1986-01-01

    The supposition of an effect of alphafetoprotein (AFP) on female germinal cells is put forward. The spontaneous in vitro maturation of adult mouse oocytes is significantly inhibited when mouse AFP replaces albumin in culture medium. Furthermore, the very unusual degenerative appearance of the cells subjected to AFP seems to indicate that this meiotic inhibition is linked to a premature degeneration of the oocytes rather than to a blockage of the cells at an earlier stage of maturation. Accordingly AFP, perhaps through its ligands, may play a role in reducing the number of gonocytes during fetal and immediate post-natal life rather than in stopping oocyte meiosis at the diplotene stage.

  8. Mouse polyoma virus and adenovirus replication in mouse cells temperature-sensitive in DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sheinin, R; Fabbro, J; Dubsky, M

    1985-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus multiplies, apparently without impediment, in temperature-inactivated ts A1S9, tsC1 and ts2 mouse fibroblasts. Thus, the DNA of mouse adenovirus can replicate in the absence of functional DNA topoisomerase II, a DNA-chain-elongation factor, and a protein required for traverse of the G1/S interface, respectively, encoded in the ts A1S9, tsC1 and ts2 genetic loci. These results are compared with those obtained with polyoma virus.

  9. Evidence for behavioral benefits of early dietary supplementation with CoEnzymeQ10 in a slowly progressing mouse model of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Miriam A; Zhu, Chunni; Medvedeva, Vera; Franich, Nicholas R; Levine, Michael S.; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise

    2012-01-01

    Controversies surround the usefulness of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in Huntington’s disease (HD), an autosomal dominant, fatal, neurodegenerative disease with no cure or disease modifying treatment. CoQ10, an endogenous substrate for electron transport and an anti-oxidant, has been shown in some but not all studies to improve symptoms and survival in mouse models of HD. Previous studies have been conducted in fast progressing models that better mimic the juvenile forms of HD than the much more common middle-age onset form, possibly accounting for mixed results. Establishing the usefulness of CoQ10 to alter HD disease course in a model that better recapitulates the progressive features of the human disorder is important because clinical trials of CoQ10, which is safe and well tolerated, are being planned in patients. The CAG140 knock-in (KI) mouse model of HD in which an expanded (approximately 120) CAG repeat is inserted in the mouse gene provides a model of the mutation in the proper genomic and protein context. These mice display progressive motor, cognitive and emotional anomalies, transcriptional disturbances and late striatal degeneration. Homozygote mutant CAG140 KI mice and wild-type littermates were fed CoQ10 (0.2%, 0.6%) in chow, and behavioral and pathological markers of disease were examined. CoQ10 improved early behavioral deficits and normalized some transcriptional deficits without altering huntingtin aggregates in striatum. The lower dose (0.2%) was more beneficial than 0.6%. Similar to previous studies, this low dose also induced deleterious effects in open field and rotarod in WT mice, however these effects are of unclear clinical significance in view of the excellent safety profile of CoQ10 in humans. These data confirm that CoQ10 may be beneficial in HD but suggest that maximum benefit may be observed when treatment is begun at early stages of the disease and that dosage may be critical. PMID:22044764

  10. 9 CFR 113.33 - Mouse safety tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mouse safety tests. 113.33 Section 113... Procedures § 113.33 Mouse safety tests. One of the mouse safety tests provided in this section shall be... or more ingredients makes the biological product lethal or toxic for mice but not lethal or toxic...

  11. 9 CFR 113.33 - Mouse safety tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mouse safety tests. 113.33 Section 113... Procedures § 113.33 Mouse safety tests. One of the mouse safety tests provided in this section shall be... or more ingredients makes the biological product lethal or toxic for mice but not lethal or toxic...

  12. 9 CFR 113.33 - Mouse safety tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mouse safety tests. 113.33 Section 113... Procedures § 113.33 Mouse safety tests. One of the mouse safety tests provided in this section shall be... or more ingredients makes the biological product lethal or toxic for mice but not lethal or toxic...

  13. 9 CFR 113.33 - Mouse safety tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mouse safety tests. 113.33 Section 113... Procedures § 113.33 Mouse safety tests. One of the mouse safety tests provided in this section shall be... or more ingredients makes the biological product lethal or toxic for mice but not lethal or toxic...

  14. 9 CFR 113.33 - Mouse safety tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mouse safety tests. 113.33 Section 113... Procedures § 113.33 Mouse safety tests. One of the mouse safety tests provided in this section shall be... or more ingredients makes the biological product lethal or toxic for mice but not lethal or toxic...

  15. Effects of verbenalin on prostatitis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Mingsan; Guo, Lin; Yan, Xiaoli; Wang, Tan; Li, Zuming

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the treatment characteristics of verbenalin on a prostatitis mouse model. Give Xiaozhiling injection in the prostate locally to make a prostatitis mouse model. High, medium and low doses of verbenalin were each given to different mouse groups. The amount of water was determined in 14th, 28th. The number of white cells and lecithin corpuscle density in prostatic fluid were determined. Morphological changes in the prostate, testis, epididymis and kidney were detected. Compared with the model control group, the mice treated with high, medium and low doses of verbenalin had significantly increased amounts of water, and prostate white blood cell count and prostate volume density (Vv) were decreased significantly, the density of lecithin corpuscle score increased, and pathologic prostatitis changes were significantly reduced. Pathological change in the testis was significantly reduced and the change in the epididymis was obviously reduced. The thymic cortex thickness and the number of lymphocytes increased significantly and could reduce the renal pathological changes in potential. Verbenalin has a good therapeutic effect on the prostatitis mouse model. PMID:26858560

  16. Pressure volume analysis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, DeWayne

    2017-01-01

    SHORT ABSTRACT This manuscript describes a detailed protocol for the collection of pressure-volume data from the mouse. LONG ABSTRACT Understanding the causes and progression of heart disease presents a significant challenge to the biomedical community. The genetic flexibility of the mouse provides great potential to explore cardiac function at the molecular level. The mouse’s small size does present some challenges in regards to performing detailed cardiac phenotyping. Miniaturization and other advancements in technology have made many methods of cardiac assessment possible in the mouse. Of these, the simultaneous collection of pressure and volume data provides a detailed picture of cardiac function that is not available through any other modality. Here a detailed procedure for the collection of pressure-volume loop data is described. Included is a discussion of the principles underlying the measurements and the potential sources of error. Anesthetic management and surgical approaches are discussed in great detail as they are both critical to obtaining high quality hemodynamic measurements from the mouse. The principles of hemodynamic protocol development and relevant aspects of data analysis are also addressed. PMID:27166576

  17. Mouse Driven Window Graphics for Network Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makinson, G. J.; And Others

    Computer enhanced teaching of computational mathematics on a network system driving graphics terminals is being redeveloped for a mouse-driven, high resolution, windowed environment of a UNIX work station. Preservation of the features of networked access by heterogeneous terminals is provided by the use of the X Window environment. A dmonstrator…

  18. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in the Mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since “Dolly,” the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories.

  19. Having Fun with a Cordless Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, John

    2016-01-01

    A cordless mouse with an added reed switch is used as a wireless data logger to record every time the wheel of a trolley completes a revolution. The limitations of the system in terms of maximum clicking rate and spatial resolution are considered and data obtained from the descent of a trolley down a ramp at various different angles is analysed in…

  20. Optical properties of the mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ying; Schery, Lee Anne; Sharma, Robin; Dubra, Alfredo; Ahmad, Kamran; Libby, Richard T.; Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS) spots upon which ocular aberration measurements depend have poor quality in mice due to light reflected from multiple retinal layers. We have designed and implemented a SHWS that can favor light from a specific retinal layer and measured monochromatic aberrations in 20 eyes from 10 anesthetized C57BL/6J mice. Using this instrument, we show that mice are myopic, not hyperopic as is frequently reported. We have also measured longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) of the mouse eye and found that it follows predictions of the water-filled schematic mouse eye. Results indicate that the optical quality of the mouse eye assessed by measurement of its aberrations is remarkably good, better for retinal imaging than the human eye. The dilated mouse eye has a much larger numerical aperture (NA) than that of the dilated human eye (0.5 NA vs. 0.2 NA), but it has a similar amount of root mean square (RMS) higher order aberrations compared to the dilated human eye. These measurements predict that adaptive optics based on this method of wavefront sensing will provide improvements in retinal image quality and potentially two times higher lateral resolution than that in the human eye. PMID:21483598

  1. Morphological properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Coombs, J; van der List, D; Wang, G-Y; Chalupa, L M

    2006-06-19

    The mouse retina offers an increasingly valuable model for vision research given the possibilities for genetic manipulation. Here we assess how the structural properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells relate to the stratification pattern of the dendrites of these neurons within the inner plexiform layer. For this purpose, we used 14 morphological measures to classify mouse retinal ganglion cells parametrically into different clusters. Retinal ganglion cells were labeled in one of three ways: Lucifer Yellow injection, 'DiOlistics' or transgenic expression of yellow fluorescent protein. The resulting analysis of 182 cells revealed 10 clusters of monostratified cells, with dendrites confined to either On or Off sublaminae of the inner plexiform layer, and four clusters of bistratified cells, dendrites spanning the On and Off sublaminae. We also sought to establish how these parametrically identified retinal ganglion cell clusters relate to cell types identified previously on the basis of immunocytochemical staining and the expression of yellow fluorescent protein. Cells labeled with an antibody against melanopsin were found to be located within a single cluster, while those labeled with the SMI-32 antibody were in four different clusters. Yellow fluorescent protein expressing cells were distributed within 13 of the 14 clusters identified here, which demonstrates that yellow fluorescent protein expression is a useful method for labeling virtually the entire population of mouse retinal ganglion cells. Collectively, these findings provide a valuable baseline for future studies dealing with the effects of genetic mutations on the morphological development of these neurons.

  2. Mouse Polyomavirus: Propagation, Purification, Quantification, and Storage.

    PubMed

    Horníková, Lenka; Žíla, Vojtěch; Španielová, Hana; Forstová, Jitka

    2015-08-03

    Mouse polyomavirus (MPyV) is a member of the Polyomaviridae family, which comprises non-enveloped tumorigenic viruses infecting various vertebrates including humans and causing different pathogenic responses in the infected organisms. Despite the variations in host tropism and pathogenicity, the structure of the virions of these viruses is similar. The capsid, with icosahedral symmetry (ø, 45 nm, T = 7d), is composed of a shell of 72 capsomeres of structural proteins, arranged around the nucleocore containing approximately 5-kbp-long circular dsDNA in complex with cellular histones. MPyV has been one of the most studied polyomaviruses and serves as a model virus for studies of the mechanisms of cell transformation and virus trafficking, and for use in nanotechnology. It can be propagated in primary mouse cells (e.g., in whole mouse embryo cells) or in mouse epithelial or fibroblast cell lines. In this unit, propagation, purification, quantification, and storage of MPyV virions are presented.

  3. A mouse model for too much TV?

    PubMed

    Bilimoria, Parizad M; Hensch, Takao K; Bavelier, Daphne

    2012-11-01

    In a new study published in Scientific Reports, Christakis and colleagues investigate a mouse model for technology-induced overstimulation. We review their findings, discuss the challenges of defining overstimulation, and consider the resemblance of the phenotypes observed in Christakis et al. to those noted in genetic models of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

  4. Myc mouse and anti-ageing therapy.

    PubMed

    Alic, Nazif; Partridge, Linda

    2015-04-01

    Reduction in the expression and activity of a well-known proto-oncogene, Myc, has a beneficial effect on mouse health and survival to old age, in part independently of cancer impact, a recent study reveals. Is this new anti-ageing intervention pointing a way towards new treatments for age-related diseases?

  5. Mouse Activity across Time Scales: Fractal Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Lima, G. Z. dos Santos; Lobão-Soares, B.; do Nascimento, G. C.; França, Arthur S. C.; Muratori, L.; Ribeiro, S.; Corso, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we devise a classification of mouse activity patterns based on accelerometer data using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis. We use two characteristic mouse behavioural states as benchmarks in this study: waking in free activity and slow-wave sleep (SWS). In both situations we find roughly the same pattern: for short time intervals we observe high correlation in activity - a typical 1/f complex pattern - while for large time intervals there is anti-correlation. High correlation of short intervals ( to : waking state and to : SWS) is related to highly coordinated muscle activity. In the waking state we associate high correlation both to muscle activity and to mouse stereotyped movements (grooming, waking, etc.). On the other side, the observed anti-correlation over large time scales ( to : waking state and to : SWS) during SWS appears related to a feedback autonomic response. The transition from correlated regime at short scales to an anti-correlated regime at large scales during SWS is given by the respiratory cycle interval, while during the waking state this transition occurs at the time scale corresponding to the duration of the stereotyped mouse movements. Furthermore, we find that the waking state is characterized by longer time scales than SWS and by a softer transition from correlation to anti-correlation. Moreover, this soft transition in the waking state encompass a behavioural time scale window that gives rise to a multifractal pattern. We believe that the observed multifractality in mouse activity is formed by the integration of several stereotyped movements each one with a characteristic time correlation. Finally, we compare scaling properties of body acceleration fluctuation time series during sleep and wake periods for healthy mice. Interestingly, differences between sleep and wake in the scaling exponents are comparable to previous works regarding human heartbeat. Complementarily, the nature of these sleep-wake dynamics could lead to a better

  6. Criteria for Validating Mouse Models of Psychiatric Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chadman, Kathryn K.; Yang, Mu; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2010-01-01

    Animal models of human diseases are in widespread use for biomedical research. Mouse models with a mutation in a single gene or multiple genes are excellent research tools for understanding the role of a specific gene in the etiology of a human genetic disease. Ideally, the mouse phenotypes will recapitulate the human phenotypes exactly. However, exact matches are rare, particularly in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders. This article summarizes the current strategies for optimizing the validity of a mouse model of a human brain dysfunction. We address the common question raised by molecular geneticists and clinical researchers in psychiatry, “what is a ‘good enough’ mouse model”? PMID:18484083

  7. Regulation of gene expression by 17β-estradiol in the arcuate nucleus of the mouse through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jennifer A; Mamounis, Kyle J; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A

    2016-03-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) modulates gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) to control homeostatic functions. In the ARC, estrogen receptor (ER) α is highly expressed and is an important contributor to E2's actions, controlling gene expression through estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The objective of this study was to determine if known E2-regulated genes are regulated through these mechanisms. The selected genes have been shown to regulate homeostasis and have been separated into three subsections: channels, receptors, and neuropeptides. To determine if ERE-dependent or ERE-independent mechanisms regulate gene expression, two transgenic mouse models, an ERα knock-out (ERKO) and an ERα knock-in/knock-out (KIKO), which lacks a functional ERE binding domain, were used in addition to their wild-type littermates. Females of all genotypes were ovariectomized and injected with oil or estradiol benzoate (E2B). Our results suggest that E2B regulates multiple genes through these mechanisms. Of note, Cacna1g and Kcnmb1 channel expression was increased by E2B in WT females only, suggesting an ERE-dependent regulation. Furthermore, the NKB receptor, Tac3r, was suppressed by E2B in WT and KIKO females but not ERKO females, suggesting that ERα-dependent, ERE-independent signaling is necessary for Tac3r regulation. The adrenergic receptor Adra1b was suppressed by E2B in all genotypes indicating that ERα is not the primary receptor for E2B's actions. The neuropeptide Tac2 was suppressed by E2B through ERE-dependent mechanisms. These results indicate that E2B activates both ERα-dependent and independent signaling in the ARC through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms to control gene expression.

  8. Preprotachykinin A is expressed by a distinct population of excitatory neurons in the mouse superficial spinal dorsal horn including cells that respond to noxious and pruritic stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mecinas, Maria; Bell, Andrew M.; Marin, Alina; Taylor, Rebecca; Boyle, Kieran A.; Furuta, Takahiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Polgár, Erika; Todd, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The superficial dorsal horn, which is the main target for nociceptive and pruritoceptive primary afferents, contains a high density of excitatory interneurons. Our understanding of their roles in somatosensory processing has been restricted by the difficulty of distinguishing functional populations among these cells. We recently defined 3 nonoverlapping populations among the excitatory neurons, based on the expression of neurotensin, neurokinin B, and gastrin-releasing peptide. Here we identify and characterise another population: neurons that express the tachykinin peptide substance P. We show with immunocytochemistry that its precursor protein (preprotachykinin A, PPTA) can be detected in ∼14% of lamina I-II neurons, and these are concentrated in the outer part of lamina II. Over 80% of the PPTA-positive cells lack the transcription factor Pax2 (which determines an inhibitory phenotype), and these account for ∼15% of the excitatory neurons in this region. They are different from the neurotensin, neurokinin B, or gastrin-releasing peptide neurons, although many of them contain somatostatin, which is widely expressed among superficial dorsal horn excitatory interneurons. We show that many of these cells respond to noxious thermal and mechanical stimuli and to intradermal injection of pruritogens. Finally, we demonstrate that these cells can also be identified in a knock-in Cre mouse line (Tac1Cre), although our findings suggest that there is an additional population of neurons that transiently express PPTA. This population of substance P–expressing excitatory neurons is likely to play an important role in the transmission of signals that are perceived as pain and itch. PMID:27902570

  9. Ethanol inhibits histaminergic neurons in mouse tuberomammillary nucleus slices via potentiating GABAergic transmission onto the neurons at both pre- and postsynaptic sites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Jiang, Shi-yu; Ni, Jian; Luo, Yan-jia; Chen, Chang-rui; Hong, Zong-yuan; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Qu, Wei-min; Wang, Lu; Huang, Zhi-li

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Ethanol, one of the most frequently used and abused substances in our society, has a profound impact on sedation. However, the neuronal mechanisms underlying its sedative effect remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of ethanol on histaminergic neurons in the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN), a brain region thought to be critical for wakefulness. Methods: Coronal brain slices (250 μm thick) containing the TMN were prepared from GAD67-GFP knock-in mice. GAD67-GFP was used to identify histaminergic neurons in the TMN. The spontaneous firing and membrane potential of histaminergic neurons, and GABAergic transmission onto these neurons were recorded using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Drugs were applied through superfusion. Results: Histaminergic and GAD67-expressing neurons in the TMN of GAD67-GFP mice were highly co-localized. TMN GFP-positive neurons exhibited a regular spontaneous discharge at a rate of 2–4 Hz without burst firing. Brief superfusion of ethanol (64, 190, and 560 mmol/L) dose-dependently and reversibly suppressed the spontaneous firing of the neurons in the TMN; when synaptic transmission was blocked by tetrodotoxin (1 μmol/L), ethanol caused hyperpolarization of the membrane potential. Furthermore, superfusion of ethanol markedly increased the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs and mIPSCs), which were abolished in the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (20 μmol/L). Finally, ethanol-mediated enhancement of sIPSCs and mIPSCs was significantly attenuated when the slices were pretreated with the GABAB agonist baclofen (30 μmol/L). Conclusion: Ethanol inhibits the excitability of histaminergic neurons in mouse TMN slices, possibly via potentiating GABAergic transmission onto the neurons at both pre- and postsynaptic sites. PMID:27498778

  10. Deficits in odor-guided behaviors in the transgenic 3xTg-AD female mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Coronas-Sámano, G; Portillo, W; Beltrán Campos, V; Medina-Aguirre, G I; Paredes, R G; Diaz-Cintra, S

    2014-07-14

    Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) is characterized by a number of alterations including those in cognition and olfaction. An early symptom of AD is decreased olfactory ability, which may affect odor-guided behaviors. To test this possibility we evaluated alterations in sexual incentive motivation, sexual olfactory preference, sexual olfactory discrimination, nursing-relevant olfactory preference and olfactory discrimination in female mice. We tested 3xTg-AD (a triple transgenic model, which is a "knock in" of PS1M146V, APPSwe, and tauP300L) and wild type (WT) female mice when receptive (estrous) and non-receptive (anestrous). Subjects were divided into three groups of different ages: (1) 4-5 months, (2) 10-11 months, and (3) 16-18 months. In the sexual incentive motivation task, the receptive 3xTg-AD females showed no preference for a sexually active male at any age studied, in contrast to the WT females. In the sexual olfactory preference test, the receptive WT females were able to identify sexually active male secretions at all ages, but the oldest (16-18 months old) 3xTg-AD females could not. In addition, the oldest 3xTg-AD females showed no preference for nursing-relevant odors in dam secretions and were unable to discriminate between cinnamon and strawberry odors, indicating olfactory alterations. Thus, the present study suggests that the olfactory deficits in this mouse model are associated with changes in sexual incentive motivation and discrimination of food-related odors.

  11. Regulation of gene expression by 17β-estradiol in the arcuate nucleus of the mouse through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jennifer A.; Mamounis, Kyle J.; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A.

    2016-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) modulates gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) to control homeostatic functions. In the ARC, estrogen receptor (ER) α is highly expressed and is an important contributor to E2’s actions, controlling gene expression through estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The objective of this study was to determine if known E2-regulated genes are regulated through these mechanisms. The selected genes have been shown to regulate homeostasis and have been separated into three subsections: channels, receptors, and neuropeptides. To determine if ERE-dependent or ERE-independent mechanisms regulate gene expression, two transgenic mouse models, an ERα knock-out (ERKO) and an ERα knock-in/knock-out (KIKO), which lacks a functional ERE binding domain, were used in addition to their wild-type littermates. Females of all genotypes were ovariectomized and injected with oil or estradiol benzoate (E2B). Our results suggest that E2B regulates multiple genes through these mechanisms. Of note, Cacna1g and Kcnmb1 channel expression was increased by E2B in WT females only, suggesting an ERE-dependent regulation. Furthermore, the NKB receptor, Tac3r, was suppressed by E2B in WT and KIKO females but not ERKO females, suggesting that ERα-dependent, ERE-independent signaling is necessary for Tac3r regulation. The adrenergic receptor Adra1b was suppressed by E2B in all genotypes indicating that ERα is not the primary receptor for E2B’s actions. The neuropeptide Tac2 was suppressed by E2B through ERE-dependent mechanisms. These results indicate that E2B activates both ERα-dependent and independent signaling in the ARC through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms to control gene expression. PMID:26768413

  12. Fibrosis and inflammation are greater in muscles of beta-sarcoglycan-null mouse than mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Gibertini, Sara; Zanotti, Simona; Savadori, Paolo; Curcio, Maurizio; Saredi, Simona; Salerno, Franco; Andreetta, Francesca; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato; Mora, Marina

    2014-05-01

    The Sgcb-null mouse, with knocked-down β-sarcoglycan, develops severe muscular dystrophy as in type 2E human limb girdle muscular dystrophy. The mdx mouse, lacking dystrophin, is the most used model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Unlike DMD, the mdx mouse has mild clinical features and shows little fibrosis in limb muscles. To characterize ECM protein deposition and the progression of muscle fibrosis, we evaluated protein and transcript levels of collagens I, III and VI, decorin, and TGF-β1, in quadriceps and diaphragm, at 2, 4, 8, 12, 26, and 52 weeks in Sgcb-null mice, and protein levels at 12, 26, and 52 weeks in mdx mice. In Sgcb-null mice, severe morphological disruption was present from 4 weeks in both quadriceps and diaphragm, and included conspicuous deposition of extracellular matrix components. Histopathological features of Sgcb-null mouse muscles were similar to those of age-matched mdx muscles at all ages examined, but, in the Sgcb-null mouse, the extent of connective tissue deposition was generally greater than mdx. Furthermore, in the Sgcb-null mouse, the amount of all three collagen isoforms increased steadily, while, in the mdx, they remained stable. We also found that, at 12 weeks, macrophages were significantly more numerous in mildly inflamed areas of Sgcb-null quadriceps compared to mdx quadriceps (but not in highly inflamed regions), while, in the diaphragm, macrophages did not differ significantly between the two models, in either region. Osteopontin mRNA was also significantly greater at 12 weeks in laser-dissected highly inflamed areas of the Sgcb-null quadriceps compared to the mdx quadriceps. TGF-β1 was present in areas of degeneration-regeneration, but levels were highly variable and in general did not differ significantly between the two models and controls. The roles of the various subtypes of macrophages in muscle repair and fibrosis in the two models require further study. The Sgcb-null mouse, which develops early fibrosis

  13. Random cloning of genes from mouse chromosome 17.

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, M; Figueroa, F; Klein, J

    1987-01-01

    We describe a method for isolating cosmid clones randomly from mouse chromosome 17. A cosmid library was constructed from the mouse-Chinese hamster cell line R4 4-1 that contains a limited amount of mouse DNA (chromosomes 17 and 18 and some other unidentified material) on a Chinese hamster background. The library was screened with the murine repetitive sequence probe pMBA14, which selectively hybridizes with mouse DNA. The mouse-derived cosmid clones thus identified were individually hybridized with DNA from the mouse-Syrian hamster cell line JS17 containing all mouse chromosomes except chromosome 17 on a Syrian hamster background. We deduced that the cosmid clones that contained sequences absent in JS17 were derived from mouse chromosome 17. One of the chromosome 17-derived cosmid clones, 3-4-1 (located proximal to the T122/T66C segment) was found to be highly polymorphic among European wild-mouse populations and may be a useful probe to elucidate the evolution and migration of Mus species. The randomly isolated mouse-derived cosmid clones can also be screened for the presence of functional genes. Using testicular cDNA as a probe, a testis-specific gene was cloned from mouse chromosome 17. Images PMID:3472212

  14. MouseMine: a new data warehouse for MGI.

    PubMed

    Motenko, H; Neuhauser, S B; O'Keefe, M; Richardson, J E

    2015-08-01

    MouseMine (www.mousemine.org) is a new data warehouse for accessing mouse data from Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI). Based on the InterMine software framework, MouseMine supports powerful query, reporting, and analysis capabilities, the ability to save and combine results from different queries, easy integration into larger workflows, and a comprehensive Web Services layer. Through MouseMine, users can access a significant portion of MGI data in new and useful ways. Importantly, MouseMine is also a member of a growing community of online data resources based on InterMine, including those established by other model organism databases. Adopting common interfaces and collaborating on data representation standards are critical to fostering cross-species data analysis. This paper presents a general introduction to MouseMine, presents examples of its use, and discusses the potential for further integration into the MGI interface.

  15. Mouse models of otitis media: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Mahmood Fazal

    2012-10-01

    There has been a rapid rise in the use of the mouse to investigate pathobiology of otitis media. This is for good reason, including easy husbandry, but also capacity for genetic manipulation of the mouse. Insights into human disease have been gleaned from mouse models, but there are limitations of the mouse-to-man approach. First, important differences exist between mouse and man, particularly in immune function. Second, functional equivalence of genes in the 2 species is not ensured. Third, laboratory mice of a uniform genetic background and environment are an inadequate model of the plethora of factors affecting complex disease in humans. Finally, gene function in mouse models is often obliterated using gene knockout technology, but this is a poor mimic of normal gene variation in man. These drawbacks of the mouse may in the future limit its usefulness in otitis media research.

  16. Elemental profiles in Emory mouse lens

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, M.; Emanuel, K. )

    1991-01-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray microprobe analysis was used to determine the distribution of chloride, potassium, phosphorus and sulfur in the epithelial cells of the lenses obtained from 3 to 7 month old Emory mice and 7 month old cataract resistant strain of Emory mice. Rapidly frozen lenses were fractured in the frozen state and lyophilized. The anterior epithelial cells were analyzed from equator to equator. The results show that the epithelial cells of the 7 month old Emory mouse lens have considerably higher amounts of chloride, sulfur, potassium and phosphorus. Presence of increased amount of potassium in the epithelial cells is intriguing. The data obtained from these experiments show that the changes in the elemental levels of epithelial cells are similar to observed alteration found in the lens fiber mass of 7 month old Emory mouse.

  17. Regulation of mouse satellite DNA replication time.

    PubMed

    Selig, S; Ariel, M; Goitein, R; Marcus, M; Cedar, H

    1988-02-01

    The satellite DNA sequences located near the centromeric regions of mouse chromosomes replicate very late in S in both fibroblast and lymphocyte cells and are heavily methylated at CpG residues. F9 teratocarcinoma cells, on the other hand, contain satellite sequences which are undermethylated and replicate much earlier in S. DNA methylation probably plays some role in the control of satellite replication time since 5-azacytidine treatment of RAG fibroblasts causes a dramatic temporal shift of replication to mid S. In contrast to similar changes accompanying the inactivation of the X-chromosome, early replication of satellite DNA is not associated with an increase in local chromosomal DNase I sensitivity. Fusion of F9 with mouse lymphocytes caused a dramatic early shift in the timing of the normally late replicating lymphocyte satellite heterochromatin, suggesting that trans-activating factors may be responsible for the regulation of replication timing.

  18. Having fun with a cordless mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, John

    2016-07-01

    A cordless mouse with an added reed switch is used as a wireless data logger to record every time the wheel of a trolley completes a revolution. The limitations of the system in terms of maximum clicking rate and spatial resolution are considered and data obtained from the descent of a trolley down a ramp at various different angles is analysed in different ways. The data is analysed to obtain initial accelerations (down the ramp) and subsequent decelerations (on the flat), as well as maximum velocities, and these results are used to compare the actual performance of the trolley (with friction) with the theoretical expectation. An agreement of better than 2% on the value of gravity is obtained. Encouraging agreement on frictional forces (and accelerations) is also obtained by considering the maximum kinetic energies reached at the bottom of the ramp. This paper includes the free provision of custom software to record the time history of the clicking of a mouse.

  19. Mouse brain imaging using photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yang; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) provides structural and functional information when used in small animal brain imaging. Acoustic distortion caused by bone structures largely limits the deep brain image quality. In our work, we present ex vivo PACT images of freshly excised mouse brain, intending that can serve as a gold standard for future PACT in vivo studies on small animal brain imaging. Our results show that structures such as the striatum, hippocampus, ventricles, and cerebellum can be clearly di erentiated. An artery feature called the Circle of Willis, located at the bottom of the brain, can also be seen. These results indicate that if acoustic distortion can be accurately accounted for, PACT should be able to image the entire mouse brain with rich structural information.

  20. Identification of structural variation in mouse genomes

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Thomas M.; Wong, Kim; Adams, David J.; Flint, Jonathan; Reymond, Alexandre; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2014-01-01

    Structural variation is variation in structure of DNA regions affecting DNA sequence length and/or orientation. It generally includes deletions, insertions, copy-number gains, inversions, and transposable elements. Traditionally, the identification of structural variation in genomes has been challenging. However, with the recent advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing and paired-end mapping (PEM) methods, the ability to identify structural variation and their respective association to human diseases has improved considerably. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of structural variation in the mouse, one of the prime model systems for studying human diseases and mammalian biology. We further present the evolutionary implications of structural variation on transposable elements. We conclude with future directions on the study of structural variation in mouse genomes that will increase our understanding of molecular architecture and functional consequences of structural variation. PMID:25071822

  1. Refined structures of mouse P-glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingzhi; Jaimes, Kimberly F; Aller, Stephen G

    2014-01-01

    The recently determined C. elegans P-glycoprotein (Pgp) structure revealed significant deviations compared to the original mouse Pgp structure, which suggested possible misinterpretations in the latter model. To address this concern, we generated an experimental electron density map from single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing of an original mouse Pgp dataset to 3.8 Å resolution. The map exhibited significantly more detail compared to the original MAD map and revealed several regions of the structure that required de novo model building. The improved drug-free structure was refined to 3.8 Å resolution with a 9.4 and 8.1% decrease in Rwork and Rfree, respectively, (Rwork = 21.2%, Rfree = 26.6%) and a significant improvement in protein geometry. The improved mouse Pgp model contains ∼95% of residues in the favorable Ramachandran region compared to only 57% for the original model. The registry of six transmembrane helices was corrected, revealing amino acid residues involved in drug binding that were previously unrecognized. Registry shifts (rotations and translations) for three transmembrane (TM)4 and TM5 and the addition of three N-terminal residues were necessary, and were validated with new mercury labeling and anomalous Fourier density. The corrected position of TM4, which forms the frame of a portal for drug entry, had backbone atoms shifted >6 Å from their original positions. The drug translocation pathway of mouse Pgp is 96% identical to human Pgp and is enriched in aromatic residues that likely play a collective role in allowing a high degree of polyspecific substrate recognition. PMID:24155053

  2. Development of amnesia in different mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Sinovyev, D R; Dubrovina, N I; Kulikov, A V

    2009-05-01

    We studied passive avoidance retrieval after amnestic stimulation (arrest in unsafe section of the experimental setup) in C57Bl/6J, BALB/c, CBA/Lac, AKR/J, DBA/2J, C3H/HeJ, and ASC/Icg mice. We demonstrated resistance to amnestic stimulation in mice with high predisposition to freezing reaction (ASC/Icg) and memory deficit in other mouse strains.

  3. Generation Of A Mouse Model For Schwannomatosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    tumor virus (MMTV)-Cre, the whey acidic protein (WAP)-Cre, and the β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-Cre lines. We showed that merlin plays an important role...Cre lines, the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-Cre, the whey acidic protein (WAP)-Cre, and the β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-Cre lines. We showed that the...cycles, consequently leading to decreased milk production and malnourishment of the offspring by the second lactation. Immunostaining analysis revealed

  4. Imaging of mouse aorta using OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateasik, Anton; Uherek, Frantisek; Chorvat, Dusan, Jr.; Tazka, D.; Kyselovic, J.

    2001-05-01

    There are many fields in medicine and biology where optical coherence tomography (OCT) is starting to be used for diagnostics imaging. In our work, OCT imaging has been applied to obtain 3D structure and geometry of mouse aorta and atherosclerotic plaques in it. Differences in plaque formation have been detected between mice fed with cholesterol rich food, and mice kept on special diet. The results of OCT measurements have been confirmed with optical microscopy.

  5. mouseTube – a database to collaboratively unravel mouse ultrasonic communication

    PubMed Central

    Torquet, Nicolas; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Faure, Philippe; Bourgeron, Thomas; Ey, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic vocalisation is a broadly used proxy to evaluate social communication in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders. The efficacy and robustness of testing these models suffer from limited knowledge of the structure and functions of these vocalisations as well as of the way to analyse the data. We created mouseTube, an open database with a web interface, to facilitate sharing and comparison of ultrasonic vocalisations data and metadata attached to a recording file. Metadata describe 1) the acquisition procedure, e.g., hardware, software, sampling frequency, bit depth; 2) the biological protocol used to elicit ultrasonic vocalisations; 3) the characteristics of the individual emitting ultrasonic vocalisations ( e.g., strain, sex, age). To promote open science and enable reproducibility, data are made freely available. The website provides searching functions to facilitate the retrieval of recording files of interest. It is designed to enable comparisons of ultrasonic vocalisation emission between strains, protocols or laboratories, as well as to test different analysis algorithms and to search for protocols established to elicit mouse ultrasonic vocalisations. Over the long term, users will be able to download and compare different analysis results for each data file. Such application will boost the knowledge on mouse ultrasonic communication and stimulate sharing and comparison of automatic analysis methods to refine phenotyping techniques in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27830061

  6. Isolation of the mouse homologue of BRCA1 and genetic mapping to mouse chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, L.M.; Haugen-Strano, A.; Cochran, C.

    1995-10-10

    The BRCA1 gene is in large part responsible for hereditary human breast and ovarian cancer. Here we report the isolation of the murine Brca1 homologue cDNA clones. In addition, we identified genomic P1 clones that contain most, if not all, of the mouse Brca1 locus. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the mouse and human coding regions are 75% identical at the nucleotide level while the predicted amino acid identity is only 58%. A DNA sequence variant in the Brcal locus was identified and used to map this gene on a (Mus m. musculus Czech II x C57BL/KsJ)F1 x C57BL/KsJ intersubspecific backcross to distal mouse chromosome 11. The mapping of this gene to a region highly syntenic with human chromosome 17, coupled with Southern and Northern analyses, confirms that we isolated the murine Brcal homologue rather than a related RING finger gene. The isolation of the mouse Brca1 homologue will facilitate the creation of mouse models for germline BRCA1 defects. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Methylation of DNA in mouse early embryos, teratocarcinoma cells and adult tissues of mouse and rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, J; Roberts-Ems, J; Luthardt, F W; Riggs, A D

    1979-01-01

    The distribution and amount of 5-methylcytosine (5-MeCyt) in DNA was measured for early embryos of mouse strain CF1 (2 to 4 cell stage to blastocyst) and mouse teratocarcinoma cells. In each case, the pattern of methylation was examined by use of the restriction enzymes Hha I and HPA II HPA II, which cut DNA at the sites 5'GCGC and 5'CCGG respectively, when the cytosines at these sites are not methylated. Mouse embryo DNA was found to have the same level of methylation as adult mouse tissues, and no changes in methylation were seen during differentiation of the teratocarcinoma cells. The ratio of 5-MeCyt/Cyt in DNA was measured by high performance liquid chromatography for the differentiating teratocarcinoma cells and for several adult mouse and rabbit tissues. The variation between tissues or between teratocarcinoma cells at different stages of differentiation was less than 10 percent. These results are discussed in view of proposals that 5-MeCyt plays a role in differentiation. Images PMID:523320

  8. Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB): a database of mouse models for human cancer.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Krupke, Debra M; Begley, Dale A; Richardson, Joel E; Neuhauser, Steven B; Sundberg, John P; Eppig, Janan T

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) database is a unique online compendium of mouse models for human cancer. MTB provides online access to expertly curated information on diverse mouse models for human cancer and interfaces for searching and visualizing data associated with these models. The information in MTB is designed to facilitate the selection of strains for cancer research and is a platform for mining data on tumor development and patterns of metastases. MTB curators acquire data through manual curation of peer-reviewed scientific literature and from direct submissions by researchers. Data in MTB are also obtained from other bioinformatics resources including PathBase, the Gene Expression Omnibus and ArrayExpress. Recent enhancements to MTB improve the association between mouse models and human genes commonly mutated in a variety of cancers as identified in large-scale cancer genomics studies, provide new interfaces for exploring regions of the mouse genome associated with cancer phenotypes and incorporate data and information related to Patient-Derived Xenograft models of human cancers.

  9. A non-transgenic mouse model (icv-STZ mouse) of Alzheimer's disease: similarities to and differences from the transgenic model (3xTg-AD mouse).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanxing; Liang, Zhihou; Blanchard, Julie; Dai, Chun-Ling; Sun, Shenggang; Lee, Moon H; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be divided into sporadic AD (SAD) and familial AD (FAD). Most AD cases are sporadic and result from multiple etiologic factors, including environmental, genetic, and metabolic factors, whereas FAD is caused by mutations in the presenilins or amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) genes. A commonly used animal model for AD is the 3xTg-AD transgenic mouse model, which harbors mutated presenilin 1, APP, and tau genes and thus represents a model of FAD. There is an unmet need in the field to characterize animal models representing different AD mechanisms, so that potential drugs for SAD can be evaluated preclinically in these animal models. A mouse model generated by intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of streptozocin (STZ), the icv-STZ mouse, shows many aspects of SAD. In this study, we compared the non-cognitive and cognitive behaviors as well as biochemical and immunohistochemical alterations between the icv-STZ mouse and the 3xTg-AD mouse. We found that both mouse models showed increased exploratory activity as well as impaired learning and spatial memory. Both models also demonstrated neuroinflammation, altered synaptic proteins and insulin/IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) signaling, and increased hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain. The most prominent brain abnormality in the icv-STZ mouse was neuroinflammation, and in the 3xTg-AD mouse it was elevation of hyperphosphorylated tau. These observations demonstrate the behavioral and neuropathological similarities and differences between the icv-STZ mouse and the 3xTg-AD mouse models and will help guide future studies using these two mouse models for the development of AD drugs.

  10. Mouse models for neural tube closure defects.

    PubMed

    Juriloff, D M; Harris, M J

    2000-04-12

    Neural tube closure defects (NTDs), in particular anencephaly and spina bifida, are common human birth defects (1 in 1000), their genetics is complex and their risk is reduced by periconceptional maternal folic acid supplementation. There are > 60 mouse mutants and strains with NTDs, many reported within the past 2 years. Not only are NTD mutations at loci widely heterogeneous in function, but also most of the mutants demonstrate variable low penetrance and some show complex inheritance patterns (e.g. SELH/Bc, Abl / Arg, Mena / Profilin1 ). In most of these mouse models, the NTDs are exencephaly (equivalent to anencephaly) or spina bifida or both, reflecting failure of neural fold elevation in well defined, mechanistically distinct elevation zones. NTD risk is reduced in various models by different maternal nutrient supplements, including folic acid ( Pax3, Cart1, Cd mutants), inositol ( ct ) and methionine ( Axd ). Lack of de novo methylation in embryos ( Dnmt3b -null) leads to NTD risk, and we suggest a potential link between methylation and the observed female excess among cranial NTDs in several models. Some surprising NTD mutants ( Gadd45a, Terc, Trp53 ) suggest that genes with a basic mitotic function also have a function specific to neural fold elevation. The genes mutated in several mouse NTD models involve actin regulation ( Abl/Arg, Macs, Mena/Profilin1, Mlp, Shrm, Vcl ), support the postulated key role of actin in neural fold elevation, and may be a good candidate pathway to search for human NTD genes.

  11. Experimental photoallergic contact dermatitis: a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, H.C. Jr.; Kaidbey, K.

    1982-09-01

    We have induced photoallergic contact dermatitis in mice to 3,3',4',5 tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCSA), chlorpromazine and 6-methylcoumarin. These compounds are known to produce photoallergic contact dermatitis in humans. The photoallergic contact dermatitis reaction in the mouse is immunologically specific viz. mice photosensitized to TCSA react, by photochallenge, to that compound and not to chlorpromazine, and conversely. The reaction requires UVA at both sensitization and challenge. It appears to be T-cell mediated in that it can be passively transferred to syngeneic mice by lymph node cells from actively sensitized mice, the histology of the reactions resembles that of classic allergic contact dermatitis in mice, challenge reactions are seen at 24 but not at 4 hr, and photoallergic contact dermatitis can be induced in B-cell deficient mice. The availability of a mouse model for the study of photo-ACD will facilitate the identification of pertinent control mechanisms and may aid in the management of the disease. It is likely that a bioassay for photoallergens of humans can be based on this mouse model.

  12. Transplantation Into the Mouse Ovarian Fat Pad

    PubMed Central

    Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Harlan, Blaine A.; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Orthotopic transplantation assays in mice are invaluable for studies of cell regeneration and neoplastic transformation. Common approaches for orthotopic transplantation of ovarian surface and tubal epithelia include intraperitoneal and intrabursal administration of cells. The respective limitations of these methods include poorly defined location of injected cells and limited space volume. Furthermore, they are poorly suited for long-term structural preservation of transplanted organs. To address these challenges, we have developed an alternative approach, which is based on the introduction of cells and tissue fragments into the mouse fat pad. The mouse ovarian fat pad is located in the immediate vicinity of the ovary and uterine tube (aka oviduct, fallopian tube), and provides a familiar microenvironment for cells and tissues of these organs. In our approach fluorescence-labeled mouse and human cells, and fragments of the uterine tube are engrafted by using minimally traumatic dorsal incision surgery. Transplanted cells and their outgrowths are easily located in the ovarian fat pad for over 40 days. Long-term transplantation of the entire uterine tube allows correct preservation of all principle tissue components, and does not result in adverse side effects, such as fibrosis and inflammation. Our approach should be uniquely applicable for answering important biological questions such as differentiation, regenerative and neoplastic potential of specific cell populations. Furthermore, it should be suitable for studies of microenvironmental factors in normal development and cancer. PMID:27684746

  13. Structure of mouse IP-10, a chemokine

    SciTech Connect

    Jabeen, Talat; Leonard, Philip; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2008-06-01

    The structure of mouse IP-10 shows a novel tetrameric association. Interferon-γ-inducible protein (IP-10) belongs to the CXC class of chemokines and plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of various immune and inflammatory responses. It is also a potent angiostatic factor with antifibrotic properties. The biological activities of IP-10 are exerted by interactions with the G-protein-coupled receptor CXCR3 expressed on Th1 lymphocytes. IP-10 thus forms an attractive target for structure-based rational drug design of anti-inflammatory molecules. The crystal structure of mouse IP-10 has been determined and reveals a novel tetrameric association. In the tetramer, two conventional CXC chemokine dimers are associated through their N-terminal regions to form a 12-stranded elongated β-sheet of ∼90 Å in length. This association differs significantly from the previously studied tetramers of human IP-10, platelet factor 4 and neutrophil-activating peptide-2. In addition, heparin- and receptor-binding residues were mapped on the surface of IP-10 tetramer. Two heparin-binding sites were observed on the surface and were present at the interface of each of the two β-sheet dimers. The structure supports the formation of higher order oligomers of IP-10, as observed in recent in vivo studies with mouse IP-10, which will have functional relevance.

  14. Biological characteristics of mouse skin melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhanquan; Ji, Kaiyuan; Yang, Shanshan; Zhang, Junzhen; Yao, Jianbo; Dong, Changsheng; Fan, Ruiwen

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the optimal passage number according to the biological characteristics of mouse skin melanocytes from different passages. Skin punch biopsies harvested from the dorsal region of 2-day old mice were used to establish melanocyte cultures. The cells from passage 4, 7, 10 and 13 were collected and evaluated for their melanogenic activity. Histochemical staining for tyrosinase (TYR) activity and immunostaining for the melanocyte specific markers including S-100 antigen, TYR, tyrosinase related protein 1 (TYRP1), tyrosinase related protein 2 (TYRP2) and micropthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF) confirmed purity and melanogenic capacity of melanocytes from different passages, with better melanogenic activity of passage 10 and 13 cells being observed. Treatment of passage 13 melanocytes with α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) showed increased expression of MITF, TYR and TYRP2 mRNA. However, considering the TYR mRNA dramatically high expression which is the characteristics of melanoma cells, melanocytes from passage 10 was the optimal passage number for the further research. Our results demonstrate culture of pure populations of mouse melanocytes to at least 10 passages and illustrate the potential utility of passage 10 cells for studies of intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of genes controlling pigmentation and coat color in mouse.

  15. The Mouse Isolated Perfused Kidney Technique.

    PubMed

    Czogalla, Jan; Schweda, Frank; Loffing, Johannes

    2016-11-17

    The mouse isolated perfused kidney (MIPK) is a technique for keeping a mouse kidney under ex vivo conditions perfused and functional for 1 hr. This is a prerequisite for studying the physiology of the isolated organ and for many innovative applications that may be possible in the future, including perfusion decellularization for kidney bioengineering or the administration of anti-rejection or genome-editing drugs in high doses to prime the kidney for transplantation. During the time of the perfusion, the kidney can be manipulated, renal function can be assessed, and various pharmaceuticals administered. After the procedure, the kidney can be transplanted or processed for molecular biology, biochemical analysis, or microscopy. This paper describes the perfusate and the surgical technique needed for the ex vivo perfusion of mouse kidneys. Details of the perfusion apparatus are given and data are presented showing the viability of the kidney's preparation: renal blood flow, vascular resistance, and urine data as functional, transmission electron micrographs of different nephron segments as morphological readouts, and western blots of transport proteins of different nephron segments as molecular readout.

  16. Murine cytomegalovirus infection of cultured mouse embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Y.; Naruse, I.

    1987-01-01

    Isolated mouse whole embryos of 7.5 days' gestation were infected with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and cultured in pure rat serum. Although the MCMV infection had little effect on the survival and development of the embryos during 3 days of cultivation, immunohistochemical analysis of their serial sections using monoclonal antibody showed MCMV-infected cells in various portions of the embryos. This monoclonal antibody, when tested with the use of infected cultured mouse fibroblasts, reacted with nuclear antigen within 2 hours after infection and also reacted with nuclear inclusions in the late phase of infection. The viral antigen-positive cells detected by the monoclonal antibody were present in almost all of the ectoplacental cone and the yolk sac and in about 82% of the embryos. In the embryos, antigen-positive cells were frequently observed in the epithelium of the digestive tracts, endothelial cells of the blood vessels, and the mesodermal cells. In some of the embryos, viral antigen-positive cells were clearly observed in a small percentage of the blood cells. These findings indicate that blood cells, in addition to cell migration during embryogenesis, may play an important role in transmission of infectious virus into the embryos. Mouse whole embryo culture infected with MCMV can provide a model for the study of cellular tropism related to congenital infection by cytomegalovirus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3034066

  17. A Mouse Model for Osseous Heteroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Michael T.; Vowell, Kate; Hough, Tertius A.; Jones, Lynn; Pathak, Paras; Tyrer, Hayley E.; Kelly, Michelle; Cox, Roger; Warren, Madhuri V.; Peters, Jo

    2012-01-01

    GNAS/Gnas encodes Gsα that is mainly biallelically expressed but shows imprinted expression in some tissues. In Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) heterozygous loss of function mutations of GNAS can result in ectopic ossification that tends to be superficial and attributable to haploinsufficiency of biallelically expressed Gsα. Oed-Sml is a point missense mutation in exon 6 of the orthologous mouse locus Gnas. We report here both the late onset ossification and occurrence of benign cutaneous fibroepithelial polyps in Oed-Sml. These phenotypes are seen on both maternal and paternal inheritance of the mutant allele and are therefore due to an effect on biallelically expressed Gsα. The ossification is confined to subcutaneous tissues and so resembles the ossification observed with AHO. Our mouse model is the first with both subcutaneous ossification and fibroepithelial polyps related to Gsα deficiency. It is also the first mouse model described with a clinically relevant phenotype associated with a point mutation in Gsα and may be useful in investigations of the mechanisms of heterotopic bone formation. Together with earlier results, our findings indicate that Gsα signalling pathways play a vital role in repressing ectopic bone formation. PMID:23284784

  18. Reduced neuronal size and mTOR pathway activity in the Mecp2 A140V Rett syndrome mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rangasamy, Sampathkumar; Olfers, Shannon; Gerald, Brittany; Hilbert, Alex; Svejda, Sean; Narayanan, Vinodh

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutation in the X-linked MECP2 gene, encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2. We have created a mouse model ( Mecp2 A140V "knock-in" mutant) expressing the recurrent human MECP2 A140V mutation linked to an X-linked mental retardation/Rett syndrome phenotype. Morphological analyses focused on quantifying soma and nucleus size were performed on primary hippocampus and cerebellum granule neuron (CGN) cultures from mutant ( Mecp2(A140V/y)) and wild type ( Mecp2(+/y)) male mice. Cultured hippocampus and cerebellar granule neurons from mutant animals were significantly smaller than neurons from wild type animals. We also examined soma size in hippocampus neurons from individual female transgenic mice that express both a mutant  (maternal allele) and a wild type Mecp2 gene linked to an eGFP transgene (paternal allele). In cultures from such doubly heterozygous female mice, the size of neurons expressing the mutant (A140V) allele also showed a significant reduction compared to neurons expressing wild type MeCP2, supporting a cell-autonomous role for MeCP2 in neuronal development. IGF-1 (insulin growth factor-1) treatment of neuronal cells from Mecp2 mutant mice rescued the soma size phenotype. We also found that Mecp2  mutation leads to down-regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway, known to be involved in neuronal size regulation. Our results suggest that i) reduced neuronal size is an important in vitro cellular phenotype of Mecp2 mutation in mice, and ii) MeCP2 might play a critical role in the maintenance of neuronal structure by modulation of the mTOR pathway. The definition of a quantifiable cellular phenotype supports using neuronal size as a biomarker in the development of a high-throughput, in vitro assay to screen for compounds that rescue small neuronal phenotype ("phenotypic assay").

  19. Multistep Ion Channel Remodeling and Lethal Arrhythmia Precede Heart Failure in a Mouse Model of Inherited Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takeshi; Shioya, Takao; Murayama, Takashi; Sugihara, Masami; Odagiri, Fuminori; Nakazato, Yuji; Nishizawa, Hiroto; Chugun, Akihito; Sakurai, Takashi; Daida, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Sachio; Kurebayashi, Nagomi

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) frequently die with severe heart failure (HF) or die suddenly with arrhythmias, although these symptoms are not always observed at birth. It remains unclear how and when HF and arrhythmogenic changes develop in these DCM mutation carriers. In order to address this issue, properties of the myocardium and underlying gene expressions were studied using a knock-in mouse model of human inherited DCM caused by a deletion mutation ΔK210 in cardiac troponinT. Methodology/Principal Findings By 1 month, DCM mice had already enlarged hearts, but showed no symptoms of HF and a much lower mortality than at 2 months or later. At around 2 months, some would die suddenly with no clear symptoms of HF, whereas at 3 months, many of the survivors showed evident symptoms of HF. In isolated left ventricular myocardium (LV) from 2 month-mice, spontaneous activity frequently occurred and action potential duration (APD) was prolonged. Transient outward (Ito) and ultrarapid delayed rectifier K+ (IKur) currents were significantly reduced in DCM myocytes. Correspondingly, down-regulation of Kv4.2, Kv1.5 and KChIP2 was evident in mRNA and protein levels. In LVs at 3-months, more frequent spontaneous activity, greater prolongation of APD and further down-regulation in above K+ channels were observed. At 1 month, in contrast, infrequent spontaneous activity and down-regulation of Kv4.2, but not Kv1.5 or KChIP2, were observed. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that at least three steps of electrical remodeling occur in the hearts of DCM model mice, and that the combined down-regulation of Kv4.2, Kv1.5 and KChIP2 prior to the onset of HF may play an important role in the premature sudden death in this DCM model. DCM mice at 1 month or before, on the contrary, are associated with low risk of death in spite of inborn disorder and enlarged heart. PMID:22514734

  20. Mouse Genome Database (MGD)-2017: community knowledge resource for the laboratory mouse

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Judith A.; Eppig, Janan T.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Bult, Carol J.

    2017-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD: http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community data resource for the laboratory mouse. It provides a highly integrated and highly curated system offering a comprehensive view of current knowledge about mouse genes, genetic markers and genomic features as well as the associations of those features with sequence, phenotypes, functional and comparative information, and their relationships to human diseases. MGD continues to enhance access to these data, to extend the scope of data content and visualizations, and to provide infrastructure and user support that ensures effective and efficient use of MGD in the advancement of scientific knowledge. Here, we report on recent enhancements made to the resource and new features. PMID:27899570

  1. A flexible mouse-on-mouse immunohistochemical staining technique adaptable to biotin-free reagents, immunofluorescence, and multiple antibody staining.

    PubMed

    Goodpaster, Tracy; Randolph-Habecker, Julie

    2014-03-01

    Immunohistochemistry on mouse tissue utilizing mouse monoclonal antibodies presents a challenge. Secondary antibodies directed against the mouse monoclonal primary antibody of interest will also detect endogenous mouse immunoglobulin in the tissue. This can lead to significant spurious staining. Therefore, a "mouse-on-mouse" staining strategy is needed to yield credible data. This paper presents a method that is easy to use and highly flexible to accommodate both an avidin-biotin detection system as well as a biotin-free polymer detection system. The mouse primary antibody is first combined with an Fab fragment of an anti-mouse antibody in a tube and allowed sufficient time to form an antibody complex. Any non-complexed secondary antibody is bound up with mouse serum. The mixture is then applied to the tissue. The flexibility of this method is confirmed with the use of different anti-mouse antibodies followed by a variety of detection reagents. These techniques can be used for immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunofluorescence (IF), as well as staining with multiple primary antibodies. This method has also been adapted to other models, such as using human antibodies on human tissue and using multiple rabbit antibodies in dual immunofluorescence.

  2. Structure of the mouse IL-10 gene and chromosomal localization of the mouse and human genes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.M.; Khan, T.A.; Moore, K.W. ); Brannan, C.I.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A. )

    1992-06-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 7.2-kb segment containing the mouse IL-10 (mIL-10) gene was determined. Comparison to the mIL-10 cDNA sequence revealed the presence of five exons that span [approximately]5.1 kb of genomic DNA. The noncoding regions of the mIL-10 gene contain sequences that have been associated with transcriptional regulation of several cytokine genes. The mIL-10 gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 1 and the human IL-10 gene was also mapped to human chromosome 1. 35 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models for Studying Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Takahito; Himuro, Hidetomo; Okada, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition that is mediated by very complex mechanisms controlled by genetic, immune, and environmental factors. More than 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse strains have been established since 1993 for studying IBD. Although mouse models cannot fully reflect human IBD, they have provided significant contributions for not only understanding the mechanism, but also developing new therapeutic means for IBD. Indeed, 20 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models carry the susceptibility genes identified in human IBD, and the functions of some other IBD susceptibility genes have also been dissected out using mouse models. Cutting-edge technologies such as cell-specific and inducible knockout systems, which were recently employed to mouse IBD models, have further enhanced the ability of investigators to provide important and unexpected rationales for developing new therapeutic strategies for IBD. In this review article, we briefly introduce 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models that spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. PMID:26387641

  4. A report from the Sixth International Mouse Genome Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.

    1992-12-31

    The Sixth Annual Mouse Genome Conference was held in October, 1992 at Buffalo, USA. The mouse is one of the primary model organisms in the Human Genome Project. Through the use of gene targeting studies the mouse has become a powerful biological model for the study of gene function and, in addition, the comparison of the many homologous mutations identified in human and mouse have widened our understanding of the biology of these two organisms. A primary goal in the mouse genome program has been to create a genetic map of STSs of high resolution (<1cM) that would form the basis for the physical mapping of the whole mouse genome. Buffalo saw substantial new progress towards the goal of a very high density genetic map and the beginnings of substantive efforts towards physical mapping in chromosome regions with a high density of genetic markers.

  5. Comparative anatomy of mouse and human nail units.

    PubMed

    Fleckman, Philip; Jaeger, Karin; Silva, Kathleen A; Sundberg, John P

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies of mice with hair defects have resulted in major contributions to the understanding of hair disorders. To use mouse models as a tool to study nail diseases, a basic understanding of the similarities and differences between the human and mouse nail unit is required. In this study we compare the human and mouse nail unit at the macroscopic and microscopic level and use immunohistochemistry to determine the keratin expression patterns in the mouse nail unit. Both species have a proximal nail fold, cuticle, nail matrix, nail bed, nail plate, and hyponychium. Distinguishing features are the shape of the nail and the presence of an extended hyponychium in the mouse. Expression patterns of most keratins are similar. These findings indicate that the mouse nail unit shares major characteristics with the human nail unit and overall represents a very similar structure, useful for the investigation of nail diseases and nail biology.

  6. Mouse models for the study of human hair loss.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, J P; King, L E

    1996-10-01

    A comparison has been presented to illustrate many of the similarities in patterns of disease between mouse and human hair follicle diseases and how various mouse mutations can be used as research tools to investigate these observations. The powerful genetic tools available for investigating mouse mutations and human homologues will continue to result in many breakthroughs in the understanding of hair follicle biology and pathology. Many more mouse mutations are available than are described here. Information on these mutations fills books and computer databases, providing an unlimited resource.

  7. Finding Mouse Models of Human Lymphomas and Leukemia’s using The Jackson Laboratory Mouse Tumor Biology Database

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Dale A.; Sundberg, John P.; Krupke, Debra M.; Neuhauser, Steven B.; Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ward, Jerrold M.

    2015-01-01

    Many mouse models have been created to study hematopoietic cancer types. There are over thirty hematopoietic tumor types and subtypes, both human and mouse, with various origins, characteristics and clinical prognoses. Determining the specific type of hematopoietic lesion produced in a mouse model and identifying mouse models that correspond to the human subtypes of these lesions has been a continuing challenge for the scientific community. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) is designed to facilitate use of mouse models of human cancer by providing detailed histopathologic and molecular information on lymphoma subtypes, including expertly annotated, on line, whole slide scans, and providing a repository for storing information on and querying these data for specific lymphoma models. PMID:26302176

  8. A Reverse Stroop Task with Mouse Tracking.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T

    2016-01-01

    In a reverse Stroop task, observers respond to the meaning of a color word irrespective of the color in which the word is printed-for example, the word red may be printed in the congruent color (red), an incongruent color (e.g., blue), or a neutral color (e.g., white). Although reading of color words in this task is often thought to be neither facilitated by congruent print colors nor interfered with incongruent print colors, this interference has been detected by using a response method that does not give any bias in favor of processing of word meanings or processing of print colors. On the other hand, evidence for the presence of facilitation in this task has been scarce, even though this facilitation is theoretically possible. By modifying the task such that participants respond to a stimulus color word by pointing to a corresponding response word on a computer screen with a mouse, the present study investigated the possibility that not only interference but also facilitation would take place in a reverse Stroop task. Importantly, in this study, participants' responses were dynamically tracked by recording the entire trajectories of the mouse. Arguably, this method provided richer information about participants' performance than traditional measures such as reaction time and accuracy, allowing for more detailed (and thus potentially more sensitive) investigation of facilitation and interference in the reverse Stroop task. These trajectories showed that the mouse's approach toward correct response words was significantly delayed by incongruent print colors but not affected by congruent print colors, demonstrating that only interference, not facilitation, was present in the current task. Implications of these findings are discussed within a theoretical framework in which the strength of association between a task and its response method plays a critical role in determining how word meanings and print colors interact in reverse Stroop tasks.

  9. Mouse Model of Coxiella burnetii Aerosolization

    PubMed Central

    Melenotte, Cléa; Lepidi, Hubert; Nappez, Claude; Bechah, Yassina; Audoly, Gilles; Terras, Jérôme; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is mainly transmitted by aerosols and is responsible for multiple-organ lesions. Animal models have shown C. burnetii pathogenicity, but long-term outcomes still need to be clarified. We used a whole-body aerosol inhalation exposure system to mimic the natural route of infection in immunocompetent (BALB/c) and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. After an initial lung inoculum of 104 C. burnetii cells/lung, the outcome, serological response, hematological disorders, and deep organ lesions were described up to 3 months postinfection. C. burnetii-specific PCR, anti-C. burnetii immunohistochemistry, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) targeting C. burnetii-specific 16S rRNA completed the detection of the bacterium in the tissues. In BALB/c mice, a thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia were first observed, prior to evidence of C. burnetii replication. In all SCID mouse organs, DNA copies increased to higher levels over time than in BALB/c ones. Clinical signs of discomfort appeared in SCID mice, so follow-up had to be shortened to 2 months in this group. At this stage, all animals presented bone, cervical, and heart lesions. The presence of C. burnetii could be attested in situ for all organs sampled using immunohistochemistry and FISH. This mouse model described C. burnetii Nine Mile strain spread using aerosolization in a way that corroborates the pathogenicity of Q fever described in humans and completes previously published data in mouse models. C. burnetii infection occurring after aerosolization in mice thus seems to be a useful tool to compare the pathogenicity of different strains of C. burnetii. PMID:27160294

  10. Neutron issues in the JANUS mouse program

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, B.A.; Grahn, D.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, the JANUS program in the Biological and Medical Research Division at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has compiled a database on the response of both sexes of an F{sub 1} hybrid mouse, the B6CF{sub 1} (C57BL/6 x BALB/c), to external whole- body irradiation by {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays and fission neutrons. Three basic patterns of exposure for both neutrons and {gamma}-rays have been investigated: single exposures, 24 equal once-weekly exposures, and 60 equal once-weekly exposures. All irradiations were terminated at predetermined total doses, with dose calculated in centigrays at the midline of the mouse. Three endpoints will be discussed in this paper: (1) life shortening, (2) a point estimate for cumulative mortality, and (3) the hazard function. Life shortening is used as an analysis endpoint because it summarizes, in a single index, the integrated effect of all injuries accumulated by an organism. Histopathological analyses of the mice used in the ANL studies have indicated that 85% of the deaths were caused by neoplasms. Connective tissue tumors were the dominant tumor in the B6CF{sub 1} mouse, with tumors of lymphoreticular origin accounting for approximately 80% of this class. The latter two endpoints will therefore be used to describe the life table experience of mice dying from the lymphoreticular class of tumors. Dose-response models will be applied to the three endpoints in order to describe the response function for neutron exposures, evaluate the effect of dose range and pattern of exposure on the response function for neutrons, and provide a set of neutron relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of the ANL database. 25 refs.

  11. A humanoid mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Takumi, Toru

    2010-10-01

    Even now fruit of the human genome project is available, we have difficulties to approach neuropsychiatric disorders at the molecular level. Autism is a complex psychiatric illness but has received considerable attention as a developmental brain disorder not only from basic researchers but also from society. Substantial evidence suggests that chromosomal abnormalities contribute to autism risk. The duplication of human chromosome 15q11-13 is known to be the most frequent cytogenetic abnormality in autism. We succeeded to generate mice with a 6.3-Mb-wide interstitial duplication in mouse chromosome 7c that is highly syntenic to human 15q11-13 by using a Cre-loxP-based chromosome-engineering technique. The only paternally duplicated mice display autistic behavioral features such as poor social interaction and stereotypical behavior, and exhibit a developmental abnormality in ultrasonic vocalizations as well as anxiety. The detailed analysis focusing on a non-coding small nucleolar RNA, MBII52, within the duplicated region, revealed that the paternally duplicated mice alter the editing ratio of serotonin (5-HT) 2c receptor pre-mRNA and intracellular calcium responses by a 5-HT2c receptor specific agonist are changed in neurons. This result may explain one of molecular mechanisms of abnormal behaviors in the paternal duplicated mice. The first chromosome-engineered mouse model for human chromosome 15q11-13 duplication fulfills not only face validity of human autistic phenotypes but also construct validity based on human chromosome abnormality. This model will be a founder mouse for forward genetics of autistic disease and an invaluable tool for its therapeutic development.

  12. Significant determinants of mouse pain behaviour.

    PubMed

    Minett, Michael S; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Wood, John N

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic mouse behavioural analysis has furthered our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying damage sensing and pain. However, it is not unusual for conflicting data on the pain phenotypes of knockout mice to be generated by reputable groups. Here we focus on some technical aspects of measuring mouse pain behaviour that are often overlooked, which may help explain discrepancies in the pain literature. We examined touch perception using von Frey hairs and mechanical pain thresholds using the Randall-Selitto test. Thermal pain thresholds were measured using the Hargreaves apparatus and a thermal place preference test. Sodium channel Nav1.7 knockout mice show a mechanical deficit in the hairy skin, but not the paw, whilst shaving the abdominal hair abolished this phenotype. Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 knockout mice show deficits in noxious mechanosensation in the tail, but not the paw. TRPA1 knockout mice, however, have a loss of noxious mechanosensation in the paw but not the tail. Studies of heat and cold sensitivity also show variability depending on the intensity of the stimulus. Deleting Nav1.7, Nav1.8 or Nav1.9 in Nav1.8-positive sensory neurons attenuates responses to slow noxious heat ramps, whilst responses to fast noxious heat ramps are only reduced when Nav1.7 is lost in large diameter sensory neurons. Deleting Nav1.7 from all sensory neurons attenuates responses to noxious cooling but not extreme cold. Finally, circadian rhythms dramatically influence behavioural outcome measures such as von Frey responses, which change by 80% over the day. These observations demonstrate that fully characterising the phenotype of a transgenic mouse strain requires a range of behavioural pain models. Failure to conduct behavioural tests at different anatomical locations, stimulus intensities, and at different points in the circadian cycle may lead to a pain behavioural phenotype being misinterpreted, or missed altogether.

  13. Functional connectivity hubs of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Liska, Adam; Galbusera, Alberto; Schwarz, Adam J; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2015-07-15

    Recent advances in functional connectivity methods have made it possible to identify brain hubs - a set of highly connected regions serving as integrators of distributed neuronal activity. The integrative role of hub nodes makes these areas points of high vulnerability to dysfunction in brain disorders, and abnormal hub connectivity profiles have been described for several neuropsychiatric disorders. The identification of analogous functional connectivity hubs in preclinical species like the mouse may provide critical insight into the elusive biological underpinnings of these connectional alterations. To spatially locate functional connectivity hubs in the mouse brain, here we applied a fully-weighted network analysis to map whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity (i.e., the functional connectome) at a high-resolution voxel-scale. Analysis of a large resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) dataset revealed the presence of six distinct functional modules related to known large-scale functional partitions of the brain, including a default-mode network (DMN). Consistent with human studies, highly-connected functional hubs were identified in several sub-regions of the DMN, including the anterior and posterior cingulate and prefrontal cortices, in the thalamus, and in small foci within well-known integrative cortical structures such as the insular and temporal association cortices. According to their integrative role, the identified hubs exhibited mutual preferential interconnections. These findings highlight the presence of evolutionarily-conserved, mutually-interconnected functional hubs in the mouse brain, and may guide future investigations of the biological foundations of aberrant rsfMRI hub connectivity associated with brain pathological states.

  14. Mouse hypospadias: A critical examination and definition.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Adriane Watkins; Cao, Mei; Shen, Joel; Cooke, Paul; Risbridger, Gail; Baskin, Laurence; Cunha, Gerald R

    2016-12-01

    Hypospadias is a common malformation whose etiology is based upon perturbation of normal penile development. The mouse has been previously used as a model of hypospadias, despite an unacceptably wide range of definitions for this malformation. The current paper presents objective criteria and a definition of mouse hypospadias. Accordingly, diethylstilbestrol (DES) induced penile malformations were examined at 60 days postnatal (P60) in mice treated with DES over the age range of 12 days embryonic to 20 days postnatal (E12-P20). DES-induced hypospadias involves malformation of the urethral meatus, which is most severe in DES E12-P10, DES P0-P10 and DES P5-P15 groups, and less so or absent in the other treatment groups. A frenulum-like ventral tether between the penis and the prepuce was seen in the most severely affected DES-treated mice. Internal penile morphology was also altered in the DES E12-P10, DES P0-P10 and DES P5-P15 groups (with little effect in the other DES treatment groups). Thus, adverse effects of DES are a function of the period of DES treatment and most severe in the P0-P10 period. In "estrogen mutant mice" (NERKI, βERKO, αERKO and AROM+) hypospadias was only seen in AROM+ male mice having genetically-engineered elevation is serum estrogen. Significantly, mouse hypospadias was only seen distally at and near the urethral meatus where epithelial fusion events are known to take place and never in the penile midshaft, where urethral formation occurs via an entirely different morphogenetic process.

  15. TracMouse: A computer aided movement analysis script for the mouse inverted horizontal grid test

    PubMed Central

    Niewiadomski, W.; Palasz, E.; Skupinska, M.; Zylinski, M.; Steczkowska, M.; Gasiorowska, A.; Niewiadomska, G.; Riedel, G.

    2016-01-01

    In rodents, detection and quantification of motor impairments is difficult. The traction test (inverted grid with mice clinging to the underside) currently has no objective rating system. We here developed and validated the semi-automatic MATLAB script TracMouse for unbiased detection of video-recorded movement patterns. High precision videos were analyzed by: (i) principal identification of anatomical paw details frame-by-frame by an experimentally blinded rater; (ii) automatic retrieval of proxies by TracMouse for individual paws. The basic states of Hold and Step were discriminated as duration and frequency, and these principle parameters were converted into static and dynamic endpoints and their discriminating power assessed in a dopaminergic lesion model. Relative to hind paws, forepaws performed ~4 times more steps, they were ~20% longer, and Hold duration was ~5 times shorter in normal C57Bl/6 mice. Thus, forepaw steps were classified as exploratory, hind paw movement as locomotive. Multiple novel features pertaining to paw sequence, step lengths and exploratory touches were accessible through TracMouse and revealed subtle Parkinsonian phenotypes. Novel proxies using TracMouse revealed previously unidentified features of movement and may aid the understanding of (i) brain circuits related to motor planning and execution, and (ii) phenotype detection in experimental models of movement disorders. PMID:27982134

  16. Phospholipid epitopes for mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, S

    1987-01-01

    The reactivity of mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes (BrMRBC) with phospholipid epitopes was assessed by ELISA, using four clones of monoclonal anti-BrMRBC antibodies that had idiotypes distinct from one another. The four antibodies could bind to low-density lipoproteins (LDL) from human and chicken, but not to LDL from mouse and rat. As to liposomes of natural phospholipids, all the clones reacted with liposomes of phosphatidylcholine, and some of them could react with liposomes of sphingomyelin, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylic acid or cardiolipin. For liposomes of synthetic phosphatidylcholine with different fatty acids, the length of carbon chains and the number of unsaturated carbon chains of the fatty acids markedly affected the binding of each monoclonal antibody to the liposomes. The addition of dicetyl phosphate or stearylamine to phosphatidylcholine liposomes changed the reactivity of the liposomes. These results support the view that mouse anti-BrMRBC antibodies can recognize appropriately spaced phosphorylcholine residues on the surface of phospholipid liposomes, LDL and cells. The four clones had similar capacities for binding to LDL as well as to BrMRBC, but they had obviously different capacities for binding to phospholipid liposomes; the epitopes on phospholipid liposomes used in the present study were not so perfect as to react well with every anti-BrMRBC antibody. PMID:2443446

  17. Immune Activity of BCG Infected Mouse Macrophages Treated with a Novel Recombinant Mouse Lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Kelly M; Hwang, Shen-An; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin has been investigated for its adjuvant action to boost the BCG vaccine. Previous studies demonstrated that lactoferrin (LF) enhanced efficacy of the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine to protect mice against the virulent Erdman Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. The studies here investigate the hypothesis that a novel CHO-derived recombinant mouse LF can modify cytokine production and antigen presentation molecules on macrophages. The mouse LF (rmLF) was examined for effects on bone marrow derived macrophage (BMM) activities when cultured with BCG. Comparisons were made to CHO-derived recombinant human LF (rhLF). Inflammatory cytokine responses were investigated, as were antigen presentation and associated co-stimulatory molecules. Cytokine responses were subsequently measured when these cells were co-cultured with naïve or BCG sensitized CD4+ lymphocytes. While overall responses were similar between mouse, human, and bovine forms, the homologous rmLF treated infected BMMs showed unique activation patterns of cytokine production. These results indicate that species-specific LF can have different effects on mouse macrophages exposed to BCG, thus potentially affecting adjuvant activity when used in models of vaccination in mice.

  18. TracMouse: A computer aided movement analysis script for the mouse inverted horizontal grid test.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomski, W; Palasz, E; Skupinska, M; Zylinski, M; Steczkowska, M; Gasiorowska, A; Niewiadomska, G; Riedel, G

    2016-12-16

    In rodents, detection and quantification of motor impairments is difficult. The traction test (inverted grid with mice clinging to the underside) currently has no objective rating system. We here developed and validated the semi-automatic MATLAB script TracMouse for unbiased detection of video-recorded movement patterns. High precision videos were analyzed by: (i) principal identification of anatomical paw details frame-by-frame by an experimentally blinded rater; (ii) automatic retrieval of proxies by TracMouse for individual paws. The basic states of Hold and Step were discriminated as duration and frequency, and these principle parameters were converted into static and dynamic endpoints and their discriminating power assessed in a dopaminergic lesion model. Relative to hind paws, forepaws performed ~4 times more steps, they were ~20% longer, and Hold duration was ~5 times shorter in normal C57Bl/6 mice. Thus, forepaw steps were classified as exploratory, hind paw movement as locomotive. Multiple novel features pertaining to paw sequence, step lengths and exploratory touches were accessible through TracMouse and revealed subtle Parkinsonian phenotypes. Novel proxies using TracMouse revealed previously unidentified features of movement and may aid the understanding of (i) brain circuits related to motor planning and execution, and (ii) phenotype detection in experimental models of movement disorders.

  19. Hydrodynamic Phase Locking in Mouse Node Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Ishikawa, Takuji; Hamada, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    Rotational movement of mouse node cilia generates leftward fluid flow in the node cavity, playing an important role in left-right determination in the embryo. Although rotation of numerous cilia was believed necessary to trigger the determination, recent reports indicate the action of two cilia to be sufficient. We examine cooperative cilia movement via hydrodynamic interaction. Results show cilia to be cooperative, having phases locked in a certain relation; a system with a pair of nonidentical cilia can achieve phase-locked states more easily than one with a pair of identical cilia.

  20. Mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus skin infection.

    PubMed

    Malachowa, Natalia; Kobayashi, Scott D; Braughton, Kevin R; DeLeo, Frank R

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial skin and soft tissue infections are abundant worldwide and many are caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Indeed, S. aureus is the leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections in the USA. Here, we describe a mouse model of skin and soft tissue infection induced by subcutaneous inoculation of S. aureus. This animal model can be used to investigate a number of factors related to the pathogenesis of skin and soft tissue infections, including strain virulence and the contribution of specific bacterial molecules to disease, and it can be employed to test the potential effectiveness of antibiotic therapies or vaccine candidates.

  1. Embryonic in vivo electroporation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Saito, Tetsuichiro

    2010-01-01

    Electroporation combined with surgery is a quick and highly efficient method to transfect nucleic acids into various embryonic tissues in a spatiotemporally restricted manner. Forceps-type electrodes facilitate transfection by delivering electric pulses from outside of the embryo. Many electroporated embryos survive in the pregnant mouse, are born, and are reared. The developing central nervous system (CNS) is a good target for transfection, because there are many neural progenitors adjacent to the ventricle, into which nucleic acids are relatively easily injected. The expression of transfected genes persists in neurons for months.

  2. Mononuclear phagocyte subpopulations in the mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    George, James F; Lever, Jeremie M; Agarwal, Anupam

    2017-04-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes are the most common cells in the kidney associated with immunity and inflammation. Although the presence of these cells in the kidney has been known for decades, the study of mononuclear phagocytes in the context of kidney function and dysfunction is still at an early stage. The purpose of this review is to summarize the present knowledge regarding classification of these cells in the mouse kidney and to identify relevant questions that would further advance the field and potentially lead to new opportunities for treatment of acute kidney injury and other kidney diseases.

  3. Optogenetic Control of Mouse Outer Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Wilson, Teresa; Chen, Fangyi; Porsov, Edward; Subhash, Hrebesh; Foster, Sarah; Zhang, Yuan; Omelchenko, Irina; Bateschell, Michael; Wang, Lingyan; Brigande, John V.; Jiang, Zhi-Gen; Mao, Tianyi; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2016-01-01

    Normal hearing in mammals depends on sound amplification by outer hair cells (OHCs) presumably by their somatic motility and force production. However, the role of OHC force production in cochlear amplification and frequency tuning are not yet fully understood. Currently, available OHC manipulation techniques for physiological or clinical studies are limited by their invasive nature, lack of precision, and poor temporal-spatial resolution. To overcome these limitations, we explored an optogenetic approach based on channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR-2), a direct light-activated nonselective cation channel originally discovered in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Three approaches were compared: 1) adeno-associated virus-mediated in utero transfer of the ChR-2 gene into the developing murine otocyst, 2) expression of ChR-2(H134R) in an auditory cell line (HEI-OC1), and 3) expression of ChR-2 in the OHCs of a mouse line carrying a ChR-2 conditional allele. Whole cell recording showed that blue light (470 nm) elicited the typical nonselective cation current of ChR-2 with reversal potential around zero in both mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells and generated depolarization in both cell types. In addition, pulsed light stimulation (10 Hz) elicited a 1:1 repetitive depolarization and ChR-2 currents in mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells, respectively. The time constant of depolarization in OHCs, 1.45 ms, is 10 times faster than HEI-OC1 cells, which allowed light stimulation up to rates of 10/s to elicit corresponding membrane potential changes. Our study demonstrates that ChR-2 can successfully be expressed in mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells and that these present a typical light-sensitive current and depolarization. However, the amount of ChR-2 current induced in our in vivo experiments was insufficient to result in measurable cochlear effects. PMID:26789771

  4. Mouse models for understanding human developmental anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Generoso, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    The mouse experimental system presents an opportunity for studying the nature of the underlying mutagenic damage and the molecular pathogenesis of this class of anomalies by virtue of the accessibility of the zygote and its descendant blastomeres. Such studies could contribute to the understanding of the etiology of certain sporadic but common human malformations. The vulnerability of the zygotes to mutagens as demonstrated in the studies described in this report should be a major consideration in chemical safety evaluation. It raises questions regarding the danger to human zygotes when the mother is exposed to drugs and environmental chemicals.

  5. Centromere organization in man and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppesen, P.; Mitchell, A.; Kipling, D.; Nicol, L.

    1993-12-31

    The kinetochore, located at the primary constriction or centromere in mammalian metaphase chromosomes, is the site of attachment of spindle microtubules to the mitotic chromosome, and is thus essential for correct chromosome movement and segregation at anaphase. Errors in organization of the kinetochore and/or centromere may therefore lead to non-disjunction and aneuploidy. The centromeres of most, if not all, mammalian chromosomes contain repetitive DNA sequences, which are observed at the cytogenetic level as heterochromatin. We have combined immunofluorescence with primed in situ hybridization (PRINS) techniques to study the organization of repetitive DNA families in relation to chromosomal proteins located at centromeres in both man and mouse species.

  6. The volume effect in irradiated mouse colorectum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skwarchuk, Mark William

    1997-11-01

    Damage of the colorectum is the dose-limiting normal tissue complication following radiotherapy of prostate and cervical cancers. One approach for decreasing complications is to physically reduce the treatment volume. Mathematical models have been previously developed to describe the change in associated toxicity with a change in irradiated volume, i.e. the 'volume effect', for serial-type normal tissues including the colorectum. The first goal of this thesis was to test the hypothesis that there would not be a threshold length in the development of obstruction after irradiation of mouse colorectum, as predicted by the Probability model of the volume effect. The second goal was to examine if there were differences in the threshold and in the incidence of colorectal obstruction after irradiation of two mouse strains, C57B1/6 (C57) and C3Hf/Kam (C3H), previously found to be fibrosis-prone and-resistant, respectively, after lung irradiation due, in part, to genetic differences. The hypothesis examined was that differences in incidence between strains were due to the differential expression of the fibrogenic cytokines TGF/beta and TNF/alpha. Various lengths of C57 and C3H mouse colorectum were irradiated and the incidence of colorectal obstruction was followed up to 15 months. A threshold length was observed for both mouse strains, in contradiction of model predictions. The mechanism of the threshold was epithelial regeneration after irradiation. C57 mice had significantly higher incidence of colorectal obstruction compared to C3H mice, especially at smaller irradiated lengths. Colorectal tissue was obtained at various times after irradiation and prepared for histology, immunohistochemistry and RNase protection assay for measurement of TGF/beta 1, 2, 3 and TNF/alpha mRNA. Distinct strain differences in the histological time of appearance and spatial locations of fibrosis were observed. However, there were no consistent strain difference in mRNA levels or

  7. A mouse model of in utero transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nijagal, Amar; Le, Tom; Wegorzewska, Marta; Mackenzie, Tippi C

    2011-01-27

    The transplantation of stem cells and viruses in utero has tremendous potential for treating congenital disorders in the human fetus. For example, in utero transplantation (IUT) of hematopoietic stem cells has been used to successfully treat patients with severe combined immunodeficiency. In several other conditions, however, IUT has been attempted without success. Given these mixed results, the availability of an efficient non-human model to study the biological sequelae of stem cell transplantation and gene therapy is critical to advance this field. We and others have used the mouse model of IUT to study factors affecting successful engraftment of in utero transplanted hematopoietic stem cells in both wild-type mice and those with genetic diseases. The fetal environment also offers considerable advantages for the success of in utero gene therapy. For example, the delivery of adenoviral, adeno-associated viral, retroviral, and lentiviral vectors into the fetus has resulted in the transduction of multiple organs distant from the site of injection with long-term gene expression. in utero gene therapy may therefore be considered as a possible treatment strategy for single gene disorders such as muscular dystrophy or cystic fibrosis. Another potential advantage of IUT is the ability to induce immune tolerance to a specific antigen. As seen in mice with hemophilia, the introduction of Factor IX early in development results in tolerance to this protein. In addition to its use in investigating potential human therapies, the mouse model of IUT can be a powerful tool to study basic questions in developmental and stem cell biology. For example, one can deliver various small molecules to induce or inhibit specific gene expression at defined gestational stages and manipulate developmental pathways. The impact of these alterations can be assessed at various timepoints after the initial transplantation. Furthermore, one can transplant pluripotent or lineage specific progenitor

  8. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    trypsinogen cause hereditary pancreatitis in humans. Previous attempts to introduce these mutant forms of human trypsinogen into mice have failed to...cationic trypsinogen gene and obtained several new mutant strains. These newly created mouse strains will be characterized with respect to spontaneous...10 8. Special Reporting Requirements……………………………………11 9. Appendices……………………………………………………………11 4  Figure 1. Mutant forms of T7 trypsinogen

  9. Involvement of mouse and porcine PLCζ-induced calcium oscillations in preimplantation development of mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, Akihiro; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, phospholipase Cζ (PLCζ) has the ability to trigger calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in oocytes, leading to oocyte activation. Although there is a species-specific difference in the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern, whether PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations affect preimplantation embryonic development remains unclear. Here, we show that Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in mouse PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes stopped just before pronuclear formation, while that in porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes continued for several hours after pronuclei had been formed. This difference of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in oocytes after pronuclear formation was dependent on the difference in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence of PLCζ between the mouse and pig. However, mouse and porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts regardless of the absence or presence of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations after pronuclear formation. Furthermore, the developmental rate of mouse or porcine PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids to the blastocyst stage was not significantly different from that of strontium-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids. These results suggest that the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern in mouse oocytes is dependent on the NLS sequence of PLCζ and injection of PLCζ may be a useful method for activation of round spermatid-injected and somatic nuclear transferred oocytes. - Highlights: • Porcine PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations continued after pronuclear formation. • The Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern was dependent on the difference in the NLS sequence of PLCζ. • PLCζ-activated oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts. • PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids developed to blastocysts.

  10. Chimeric elk/mouse prion proteins in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Oehler, Abby; Johnson, Natrina L; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2013-02-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer and elk is a highly communicable neurodegenerative disorder caused by prions. Investigations of CWD are hampered by slow bioassays in transgenic (Tg) mice. Towards the development of Tg mice that will be more susceptible to CWD prions, we created a series of chimeric elk/mouse transgenes that encode the N terminus of elk PrP (ElkPrP) up to residue Y168 and the C terminus of mouse PrP (MoPrP) beyond residue 169 (mouse numbering), designated Elk3M(SNIVVK). Between codons 169 and 219, six residues distinguish ElkPrP from MoPrP: N169S, T173N, V183I, I202V, I214V and R219K. Using chimeric elk/mouse PrP constructs, we generated 12 Tg mouse lines and determined incubation times after intracerebral inoculation with the mouse-passaged RML scrapie or Elk1P CWD prions. Unexpectedly, one Tg mouse line expressing Elk3M(SNIVVK) exhibited incubation times of <70 days when inoculated with RML prions; a second line had incubation times of <90 days. In contrast, mice expressing full-length ElkPrP had incubation periods of >250 days for RML prions. Tg(Elk3M,SNIVVK) mice were less susceptible to CWD prions than Tg(ElkPrP) mice. Changing three C-terminal mouse residues (202, 214 and 219) to those of elk doubled the incubation time for mouse RML prions and rendered the mice resistant to Elk1P CWD prions. Mutating an additional two residues from mouse to elk at codons 169 and 173 increased the incubation times for mouse prions to >300 days, but made the mice susceptible to CWD prions. Our findings highlight the role of C-terminal residues in PrP that control the susceptibility and replication of prions.

  11. Chimeric elk/mouse prion proteins in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Oehler, Abby; Johnson, Natrina L.; DeArmond, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer and elk is a highly communicable neurodegenerative disorder caused by prions. Investigations of CWD are hampered by slow bioassays in transgenic (Tg) mice. Towards the development of Tg mice that will be more susceptible to CWD prions, we created a series of chimeric elk/mouse transgenes that encode the N terminus of elk PrP (ElkPrP) up to residue Y168 and the C terminus of mouse PrP (MoPrP) beyond residue 169 (mouse numbering), designated Elk3M(SNIVVK). Between codons 169 and 219, six residues distinguish ElkPrP from MoPrP: N169S, T173N, V183I, I202V, I214V and R219K. Using chimeric elk/mouse PrP constructs, we generated 12 Tg mouse lines and determined incubation times after intracerebral inoculation with the mouse-passaged RML scrapie or Elk1P CWD prions. Unexpectedly, one Tg mouse line expressing Elk3M(SNIVVK) exhibited incubation times of <70 days when inoculated with RML prions; a second line had incubation times of <90 days. In contrast, mice expressing full-length ElkPrP had incubation periods of >250 days for RML prions. Tg(Elk3M,SNIVVK) mice were less susceptible to CWD prions than Tg(ElkPrP) mice. Changing three C-terminal mouse residues (202, 214 and 219) to those of elk doubled the incubation time for mouse RML prions and rendered the mice resistant to Elk1P CWD prions. Mutating an additional two residues from mouse to elk at codons 169 and 173 increased the incubation times for mouse prions to >300 days, but made the mice susceptible to CWD prions. Our findings highlight the role of C-terminal residues in PrP that control the susceptibility and replication of prions. PMID:23100369

  12. Mouse assay for determination of arsenic bioavailability in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Bradham, Karen D; Diamond, Gary L; Scheckel, Kirk G; Hughes, Michael F; Casteel, Stan W; Miller, Bradley W; Klotzbach, Julie M; Thayer, William C; Thomas, David J

    2013-01-01

    A mouse assay for measuring the relative bioavailability (RBA) of arsenic (As) in soil was developed. In this study, results are presented of RBA assays of 16 soils, including multiple assays of the same soils, which provide a quantitative assessment of reproducibility of mouse assay results, as well as a comparison of results from the mouse assay with results from a swine and monkey assay applied to the same test soils. The mouse assay is highly reproducible; three repeated assays on the same soils yielded RBA estimates that ranged from 1 to 3% of the group mean. The mouse, monkey, and swine models yielded similar results for some, but not all, test materials. RBA estimates for identical soils (nine test soils and three standard reference materials [SRM]) assayed in mice and swine were significantly correlated (r = 0.70). Swine RBA estimates for 6 of the 12 test materials were higher than those from the mouse assay. RBA estimates for three standard reference materials (SRM) were not statistically different (mouse/swine ratio ranged from 0.86-1). When four test soils from the same orchard were assessed in the mouse, monkey, and swine assays, the mean soil As RBA were not statistically different. Mouse and swine models predicted similar steady state urinary excretion fractions (UEF) for As of 62 and 74%, respectively, during repeated ingestion doses of sodium arsenate, the water-soluble As form used as the reference in the calculation of RBA. In the mouse assay, the UEF for water soluble As(V) (sodium arsenate) and As(III) (sodium [meta] arsenite) were 62% and 66%, respectively, suggesting similar absolute bioavailabilities for the two As species. The mouse assay can serve as a highly cost-effective alternative or supplement to monkey and swine assays for improving As risk assessments by providing site-specific assessments of RBA of As in soils.

  13. ROCK inhibition prevents early mouse embryo development.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xing; Chen, Kun-Lin; Zhang, Yu; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2014-08-01

    ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector that is important for actin assembly and is involved in various cellular functions, including cell contraction, migration, motility, and tumor cell invasion. In this study, we investigated ROCK expression and function during early mouse embryo development. Inhibiting ROCK by Y-27632 treatment at the zygote stage resulted in first cleavage failure, and most embryos failed to develop to the 8-cell stage. When adding Y-27632 at the 8-cell stage, embryos failed to undergo compaction and could not develop into blastocysts. In addition, fluorescence staining intensity analysis indicated that actin expression at blastomere membranes was significantly reduced. After ROCK inhibition, two or more nuclei were observed in a cell, which indicated possible cytokinesis failure. Moreover, after ROCK inhibition with Y-27632, the phosphorylation levels of LIMK1/2, a downstream molecule of ROCK, were decreased at blastomere membranes. Thus, our results showed conserved roles for ROCK in this mammalian embryo model and indicated that a ROCK-LIMK1/2-actin pathway might regulate cleavage and blastocyst formation during early mouse embryo development.

  14. Knockout mouse production assisted by Blm knockdown

    PubMed Central

    FUKUDA, Mikiko; INOUE, Mayuko; MURAMATSU, Daisuke; MIYACHI, Hitoshi; SHINKAI, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Production of knockout mice using targeted embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is a powerful approach for investigating the function of specific genes in vivo. Although the protocol for gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) in ESCs is already well established, the targeting efficiency varies at different target loci and is sometimes too low. It is known that knockdown of the Bloom syndrome gene, BLM, enhances HR-mediated gene targeting efficiencies in various cell lines. However, it has not yet been investigated whether this approach in ESCs is applicable for successful knockout mouse production. Therefore, we attempted to answer this question. Consistent with previous reports, Blm knockdown enhanced gene targeting efficiencies for three gene loci that we examined by 2.3–4.1-fold. Furthermore, the targeted ESC clones generated good chimeras and were successful in germline transmission. These data suggest that Blm knockdown provides a general benefit for efficient ESC-based and HR-mediated knockout mouse production. PMID:26598326

  15. A Mouse Model of Endocardial Fibroelastosis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Elizabeth S.; Pepper, Victoria K.; Best, Cameron; Onwuka, Ekene; Yi, Tai; Tara, Shuhei; Cianciolo, Rachel; Baker, Peter; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Endocardial Fibroelastosis (EFE) is a pathologic condition of abnormal deposition of collagen and elastin within the endocardium of the heart. It is seen in conjunction with a variety of diseases including hypoplastic left heart syndrome and viral endocarditis. While an experimental model using heterotopic heart transplant in rats has been described, we sought to fully describe a mouse model that can be used to further elucidate the potential mechanisms of and treatments for EFE. Materials and Methods The hearts of 2-day-old C57BL/6 mice were transplanted into the abdomen of 7-week-old C57BL/6 mice. At 2 weeks, the hearts were harvested and histologic analysis performed using hematoxylin and eosin, Masson’s Trichrome, Russell-Movat’s Pentachrome, Picrosirius Red, Hart’s, Verhoeff-Van Gieson, and Weigert’s Resorcin-Fuschin stains. Additionally, one heart was analysed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results Specimens demonstrated abnormal accumulation of both collagen and elastin within the endocardium with occasional expansion in to the myocardium. Heterogeneity in extracellular matrix deposition was noted in the histologic specimens. In addition, TEM demonstrated the presence of excess collagen within the endocardium. Conclusions The heterotopic transplantation of an immature heart into a mouse results in changes consistent with EFE. This model is appropriate to investigate the etiology and treatment of endocardial fibroelastosis. PMID:26363814

  16. Molecular analysis of heritable mouse mutations.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M

    1987-10-01

    Germ-line mutations of the mouse have for years comprised one class of biological markers for mammalian reproductive and developmental toxicology. Understanding the molecular nature of mutations and the mechanisms by which mutations are translated into specific (and often complex) phenotypes, however, still looms as a major goal of mammalian biology. Molecular genetic analysis of heritable mouse mutations constitutes a significant, experimentally malleable strategy for relating genomic DNA structure to genic expression and function in mammals. The integrated use of recombinant DNA technology, which allows both the identification and analysis of expression of single genes, and classical genetic and cytogenetic analysis, which allow the important correlation between basic DNA defects and the organismic consequences of such defects, has been crucial to this strategy. Some of the approaches (e.g., specific-gene cloning, random-clone analysis of genomic regions, insertional mutagenesis) for studying the nature and effect of both mutations and their wild-type counterparts that have resulted from this integration of genetic analysis and molecular biology have been applied to many loci within the murine genome. Studies of the nature and effects of a complex set of radiation-induced mutations at the dilute-short ear (d-se) region of chromosome 9, a specific example of this type of integrated analysis, are discussed.

  17. Antibodies to mouse lung capillary endothelium.

    PubMed

    Rorvik, M C; Allison, D P; Hotchkiss, J A; Witschi, H P; Kennel, S J

    1988-07-01

    We are interested in developing monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) that recognize specific cell types in the lung of BALB/c mice. Normal mouse lung homogenate was used to immunize F344 rats and hybridomas were produced by fusion of rat spleen cells with mouse myeloma SP 2/0. Two hybridomas were selected which produced MoAbs active in immunohistochemistry of lung cells. MoAb 273-34A and 411-201B both show extensive peroxidase staining of capillary endothelial cells within alveolar walls of lungs at the light microscopic level. To demonstrate cell specificity, immunoelectron microscopy with gold-labeled antibody was performed. Lightly fixed lungs were frozen and thin-sectioned before staining with MoAb and 5-nm gold particles coupled to secondary antibody. Quantitative analyses of these cryosections show that both antibodies, used at optimal concentrations, are specific for binding to capillary endothelial cells. More than 95% of the gold particles are associated with capillary endothelial cells on the thin side of the alveolar wall. When capillaries adjoined thick septa containing interstitial cells, about two thirds of the gold particles were associated with endothelial cells and about one quarter with interstitial cells. These MoAbs should be useful in studying the role of endothelial cells in toxic lung injury.

  18. Characterization of mouse IFT complex B.

    PubMed

    Follit, John A; Xu, Fenghui; Keady, Brian T; Pazour, Gregory J

    2009-08-01

    The primary cilium plays a key role in the development of mammals and in the maintenance of health. Primary cilia are assembled and maintained by the process of intraflagellar transport (IFT). In this work, we characterize mouse IFT complex B by identifying all of the mammalian orthologues of complex B and B-associated proteins previously identified in Chlamydomonas and Caenorhabditis and also identify a new component (IFT25/Hspb11) of complex B by database analysis. We tagged each of these proteins with the FLAG epitope and show that all except IFT172 and IFT20 localize to cilia and the peri-basal body or centrosomal region at the base of cilia. All of the proteins except IFT172 immunoprecipitate IFT88 indicating that they are co-assembled into a complex. IFT20 is the only complex B protein that localizes to the Golgi apparatus. However, overexpression of IFT54/Traf3ip1, the mouse orthologue of Dyf-11/Elipsa, displaces IFT20 from the Golgi apparatus. IFT54 does not localize to the Golgi complex nor does it interact with GMAP210, which is the protein that anchors IFT20 to the Golgi apparatus. This suggests that IFT54s effect on IFT20 is a dominant negative phenotype caused by its overexpression. Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  20. Genetic Networks in Mouse Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Struebing, Felix L.; Lee, Richard K.; Williams, Robert W.; Geisert, Eldon E.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the output neuron of the eye, transmitting visual information from the retina through the optic nerve to the brain. The importance of RGCs for vision is demonstrated in blinding diseases where RGCs are lost, such as in glaucoma or after optic nerve injury. In the present study, we hypothesize that normal RGC function is transcriptionally regulated. To test our hypothesis, we examine large retinal expression microarray datasets from recombinant inbred mouse strains in GeneNetwork and define transcriptional networks of RGCs and their subtypes. Two major and functionally distinct transcriptional networks centering around Thy1 and Tubb3 (Class III beta-tubulin) were identified. Each network is independently regulated and modulated by unique genomic loci. Meta-analysis of publically available data confirms that RGC subtypes are differentially susceptible to death, with alpha-RGCs and intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs) being less sensitive to cell death than other RGC subtypes in a mouse model of glaucoma. PMID:27733864

  1. Applying thiouracil tagging to mouse transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Gay, Leslie; Karfilis, Kate V; Miller, Michael R; Doe, Chris Q; Stankunas, Kryn

    2014-02-01

    Transcriptional profiling is a powerful approach for studying mouse development, physiology and disease models. Here we describe a protocol for mouse thiouracil tagging (TU tagging), a transcriptome analysis technology that includes in vivo covalent labeling, purification and analysis of cell type-specific RNA. TU tagging enables the isolation of RNA from a given cell population of a complex tissue, avoiding transcriptional changes induced by cell isolation trauma, as well as the identification of actively transcribed RNAs and not preexisting transcripts. Therefore, in contrast to other cell-specific transcriptional profiling methods based on the purification of tagged ribosomes or nuclei, TU tagging provides a direct examination of transcriptional regulation. We describe how to (i) deliver 4-thiouracil to transgenic mice to thio-label cell lineage-specific transcripts, (ii) purify TU-tagged RNA and prepare libraries for Illumina sequencing and (iii) follow a straightforward bioinformatics workflow to identify cell type-enriched or differentially expressed genes. Tissue containing TU-tagged RNA can be obtained in 1 d, RNA-seq libraries can be generated within 2 d and, after sequencing, an initial bioinformatics analysis can be completed in 1 additional day.

  2. Mouse Models of Anemia of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Airie; Rivera, Seth; Shprung, Dana; Limbrick, Donald; Gabayan, Victoria; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Anemia of cancer (AC) may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and impair quality of life. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of AC could facilitate better treatment, but animal models to study AC are lacking. We characterized four syngeneic C57BL/6 mouse cancers that cause AC. Mice with two different rapidly-growing metastatic lung cancers developed the characteristic findings of anemia of inflammation (AI), with dramatically different degrees of anemia. Mice with rapidly-growing metastatic melanoma also developed a severe anemia by 14 days, with hematologic and inflammatory parameters similar to AI. Mice with a slow-growing peritoneal ovarian cancer developed an iron-deficiency anemia, likely secondary to chronically impaired nutrition and bleeding into the peritoneal cavity. Of the four models, hepcidin mRNA levels were increased only in the milder lung cancer model. Unlike in our model of systemic inflammation induced by heat-killed Brucella abortus, ablation of hepcidin in the ovarian cancer and the milder lung cancer mouse models did not affect the severity of anemia. Hepcidin-independent mechanisms play an important role in these murine models of AC. PMID:24681760

  3. The hairless mouse in skin research

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Fernando; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.; VanBuskirk, Anne M.; Reeve, Vivienne E.; Kusewitt, Donna F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The hairless (Hr) gene encodes a transcriptional co-repressor highly expressed in the mammalian skin. In the mouse, several null and hypomorphic Hr alleles have been identified resulting in hairlessness in homozygous animals, characterized by alopecia developing after a single cycle of relatively normal hair growth. Mutations in the human ortholog have also been associated with congenital alopecia. Although a variety of hairless strains have been developed, outbred SKH1 mice are the most widely used in dermatologic research. These unpigmented and immunocompetent mice allow for ready manipulation of the skin, application of topical agents, and exposure to UVR, as well as easy visualization of the cutaneous response. Wound healing, acute photobiologic responses, and skin carcinogenesis have been extensively studied in SKH1 mice and are well characterized. In addition, tumors induced in these mice resemble, both at the morphologic and molecular levels, UVR-induced skin malignancies in man. Two limitations of the SKH1 mouse in dermatologic research are the relatively uncharacterized genetic background and its outbred status, which precludes inter-individual transplantation studies. PMID:18938063

  4. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of mouse embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan; Norris, Francesca; Cleary, Jon; Zhang, Edward; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Johnson, Peter; Scambler, Pete; Lythgoe, Mark; Beard, Paul

    2012-06-01

    The ability to noninvasively image embryonic vascular anatomy in mouse models is an important requirement for characterizing the development of the normal cardiovascular system and malformations in the heart and vascular supply. Photoacoustic imaging, which can provide high resolution non invasive images of the vasculature based upon optical absorption by endogenous hemoglobin, is well suited to this application. In this study, photoacoustic images of mouse embryos were obtained ex vivo and in vivo. The images show intricate details of the embryonic vascular system to depths of up to 10 mm, which allowed whole embryos to be imaged in situ. To achieve this, an all-optical photoacoustic scanner and a novel time reversal image reconstruction algorithm, which provide deep tissue imaging capability while maintaining high spatial resolution and contrast were employed. This technology may find application as an imaging tool for preclinical embryo studies in developmental biology as well as more generally in preclinical and clinical medicine for studying pathologies characterized by changes in the vasculature.

  5. The scarless heart and the MRL mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Heber-Katz, Ellen; Leferovich, John; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Gourevitch, Dmitri; Clark, Lise

    2004-01-01

    The ability to regenerate tissues and limbs in its most robust form is seen in many non-mammalian species. The serendipitous discovery that the MRL mouse has a profound capacity for regeneration in some ways rivalling the classic newt and axolotl species raises the possibility that humans, too, may have an innate regenerative ability. The adult MRL mouse regrows cartilage, skin, hair follicles and myocardium with near perfect fidelity and without scarring. This is seen in the ability to close through-and-through ear holes, which are generally used for lifelong identification of mice, and the anatomic and functional recovery of myocardium after a severe cryo-injury. We present histological, biochemical and genetic data indicating that the enhanced breakdown of scar-like tissue may be an underlying factor in the MRL regenerative response. Studies as to the source of the cells in the regenerating MRL tissue are discussed. Such studies appear to support multiple mechanisms for cell replacement. PMID:15293806

  6. Neuronal mechanism of epileptogenesis in EL mouse.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jiro

    2013-01-01

    The convulsions of the EL mouse (EL) were described by Imaizumi et al. in 1954 and were established as epilepsy by Suzuki in 1976. The EL mouse has been kept as an inbred strain and is considered one of the best animal models originated in Japan. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant, and environmental risk factors for seizure occurrence are hypothesised to contribute to the polygenic background. Paroxysmal activities in the EL brain arise from the parietal cortex (PCX) and are augmented in the hippocampus, demonstrated by electrophysiology and autoradiography using 2-deoxy glucose when clinical symptoms of seizures appeared. The neurons in the EL PCX, where GABA activity is lower than that of DDY PCX demonstrate increased excitability to proprioceptive sensory input. After repetitive seizure-provoking stimuli, seizures are more easily induced, eventually occurring spontaneously. This phenomenon of "abnormal plasticity" is also observed in the EEG, decreasing GABA activity, expression of the immediately early gene, and various biochemical and molecular processes. This phenomenon is similar to the learning or progressive process of certain neurological diseases.

  7. New types of mouse centromeric satellite DNAs.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Inna S; Prusov, Andrey N; Enukashvily, Natella I; Podgornaya, Olga I

    2005-01-01

    Genomic databases do not contain complete sequences of the centromeric regions. We created a pUC19-based library of DNA fragments from isolated chromocentres of interphase nuclei. In this library we have found major satellite (MaSat) and two new satellite sequences - MS3 and MS4. The computer analysis of MS3 and MS4 sequences by alignment, fragment curved state and search for MAR motifs in comparison with the mouse major and minor satellite (MiSat) DNA has shown them to be new satellite fragments. Southern blot of MS3 and MS4 with total DNA digested by restriction enzymes shows the ladder characteristic of satellite DNA. 2.2% of the total DNA consists of MS3, the monomer of which is 150 bp long. The MS4 monomer is 300 bp long and accounts for 1.6% of the total DNA. On metaphase chromosomes MS3 and MS4 are located at the centromeric region. FISH analysis of L929 nuclei during the cell cycle showed relative positions of MaSat, MiSat, MS3, and MS4. All mapped satDNA fragments except MaSat belong to the outer layer of the chromocentres in the G0/G1 phase. MS3 is likely to be involved in the centromere formation. The mouse genome contains at least four satDNA types: AT-rich (MaSat and MiSat), and CG-rich (MS3 and MS4).

  8. Prdm9 polymorphism unveils mouse evolutionary tracks.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiromitsu; Tamura, Masaru; Osada, Naoki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Abe, Kuniya; Moriwaki, Kazuo; Ohta, Kunihiro; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2014-06-01

    PR/SET domain containing 9 (Prdm9) mediates histone modifications such as H3K4me3 and marks hotspots of meiotic recombination. In many mammalian species, the Prdm9 gene is highly polymorphic. Prdm9 polymorphism is assumed to play two critical roles in evolution: to diversify the spectrum of meiotic recombination hotspots and to cause male hybrid sterility, leading to reproductive isolation and speciation. Nevertheless, information about Prdm9 sequences in natural populations is very limited. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive population survey on Prdm9 polymorphism in the house mouse, Mus musculus. Overall M. musculus Prdm9 displays an extraordinarily high level of polymorphism, particularly in regions encoding zinc finger repeats, which recognize recombination hotspots. Prdm9 alleles specific to various M. musculus subspecies dominate in subspecies territories. Moreover, introgression into other subspecies territories was found for highly divergent Prdm9 alleles associated with t-haplotype. The results of our phylogeographical analysis suggest that the requirement for hotspot diversity depends on geographical range and time span in mouse evolution, and that Prdm9 polymorphism has not been maintained by a simple balanced selection in the population of each subspecies.

  9. Cytogenetic effect of griseofulvin in mouse spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, M A; Hassan, N H

    1996-01-01

    The genotoxic effects of griseofulvin (GF) in mouse primary spermatocytes at diakinesis metaphase I of meiosis were investigated. Griseofulvin was administered orally as a single dose of 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000 mg kg-1 body wt. and a multiple treatment with a daily dose of 1000 mg kg-1 body wt. for three and five successive doses. Both single and multiple treatment induced a statistically significant increase in the percentage of chromosomal aberrations which have a dose and time-dependent relationship. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations peaked 6 and 12 h post treatment; with the highest dose of the drug it reached 27.8% +/- 0.87 and 27.66% +/- 0.48 6 and 12 h respectively, compared with 5.6% +/- 0.39 and 5.2% +/- 0.48 for the control. The types of aberrations recorded were structural, including X-Y and autosomal univalent, gaps, breaks, fragments, chain IV and numerical in the form of diploid, triploid, tetraploid and aneuploid. The results of this study suggest that griseofulvin has a genotoxic effect in mouse spermatocytes.

  10. Tracking Mouse Bone Marrow Monocytes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hamon, Pauline; Rodero, Mathieu Paul; Combadière, Christophe; Boissonnas, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Real time multiphoton imaging provides a great opportunity to study cell trafficking and cell-to-cell interactions in their physiological 3-dimensionnal environment. Biological activities of immune cells mainly rely on their motility capacities. Blood monocytes have short half-life in the bloodstream; they originate in the bone marrow and are constitutively released from it. In inflammatory condition, this process is enhanced, leading to blood monocytosis and subsequent infiltration of the peripheral inflammatory tissues. Identifying the biomechanical events controlling monocyte trafficking from the bone marrow towards the vascular network is an important step to understand monocyte physiopathological relevance. We performed in vivo time-lapse imaging by two-photon microscopy of the skull bone marrow of the Csf1r-Gal4VP16/UAS-ECFP (MacBlue) mouse. The MacBlue mouse expresses the fluorescent reporters enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP) under the control of a myeloid specific promoter 1, in combination with vascular network labelling. We describe how this approach enables the tracking of individual medullar monocytes in real time to further quantify the migratory behaviour within the bone marrow parenchyma and the vasculature, as well as cell-to-cell interactions. This approach provides novel insights into the biology of the bone marrow monocyte subsets and allows to further address how these cells can be influenced in specific pathological conditions. PMID:25867540

  11. Unitary response of mouse olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Chaim, Yair; Cheng, Melody M.; Yau, King-Wai

    2011-01-01

    The sense of smell begins with odorant molecules binding to membrane receptors on the cilia of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), thereby activating a G protein, Golf, and the downstream effector enzyme, an adenylyl cyclase (ACIII). Recently, we have found in amphibian ORNs that an odorant-binding event has a low probability of activating sensory transduction at all; even when successful, the resulting unitary response apparently involves a single active Gαolf–ACIII molecular complex. This low amplification is in contrast to rod phototransduction in vision, the best-quantified G-protein signaling pathway, where each photoisomerized rhodopsin molecule is well known to produce substantial amplification by activating many G-protein, and hence effector-enzyme, molecules. We have now carried out similar experiments on mouse ORNs, which offer, additionally, the advantage of genetics. Indeed, we found the same low probability of transduction, based on the unitary olfactory response having a fairly constant amplitude and similar kinetics across different odorants and randomly encountered ORNs. Also, consistent with our picture, the unitary response of Gαolf+/− ORNs was similar to WT in amplitude, although their Gαolf-protein expression was only half of normal. Finally, from the action potential firing, we estimated that ≤19 odorant-binding events successfully triggering transduction in a WT mouse ORN will lead to signaling to the brain. PMID:21187398

  12. Peptidylarginine deiminase in rat and mouse hemopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Nagata, S; Senshu, T

    1990-01-15

    Peptidylarginine (protein-L-arginine) deiminase activities have been demonstrated in extracts of rat and mouse peritoneal macrophages, bone marrow cells, splenic adherent cells, neutrophils, and mouse monocyte/macrophage cell lines. The enzyme in these cells is indistinguishable from the skeletal muscle enzyme with respect to immunochemical properties.

  13. Principles and application of LIMS in mouse clinics.

    PubMed

    Maier, Holger; Schütt, Christine; Steinkamp, Ralph; Hurt, Anja; Schneltzer, Elida; Gormanns, Philipp; Lengger, Christoph; Griffiths, Mark; Melvin, David; Agrawal, Neha; Alcantara, Rafael; Evans, Arthur; Gannon, David; Holroyd, Simon; Kipp, Christian; Raj, Navis Pretheeba; Richardson, David; LeBlanc, Sophie; Vasseur, Laurent; Masuya, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Kimio; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Nobuhiko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Walling, Alison; Clary, David; Gallegos, Juan; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Gailus-Durner, Valerie

    2015-10-01

    Large-scale systemic mouse phenotyping, as performed by mouse clinics for more than a decade, requires thousands of mice from a multitude of different mutant lines to be bred, individually tracked and subjected to phenotyping procedures according to a standardised schedule. All these efforts are typically organised in overlapping projects, running in parallel. In terms of logistics, data capture, data analysis, result visualisation and reporting, new challenges have emerged from such projects. These challenges could hardly be met with traditional methods such as pen & paper colony management, spreadsheet-based data management and manual data analysis. Hence, different Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) have been developed in mouse clinics to facilitate or even enable mouse and data management in the described order of magnitude. This review shows that general principles of LIMS can be empirically deduced from LIMS used by different mouse clinics, although these have evolved differently. Supported by LIMS descriptions and lessons learned from seven mouse clinics, this review also shows that the unique LIMS environment in a particular facility strongly influences strategic LIMS decisions and LIMS development. As a major conclusion, this review states that there is no universal LIMS for the mouse research domain that fits all requirements. Still, empirically deduced general LIMS principles can serve as a master decision support template, which is provided as a hands-on tool for mouse research facilities looking for a LIMS.

  14. Mouse Genome Database: From sequence to phenotypes and disease models

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Joel E.; Kadin, James A.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Blake, Judith A.; Bult, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, www.informatics.jax.org) is the international scientific database for genetic, genomic, and biological data on the laboratory mouse to support the research requirements of the biomedical community. To accomplish this goal, MGD provides broad data coverage, serves as the authoritative standard for mouse nomenclature for genes, mutants, and strains, and curates and integrates many types of data from literature and electronic sources. Among the key data sets MGD supports are: the complete catalog of mouse genes and genome features, comparative homology data for mouse and vertebrate genes, the authoritative set of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for mouse gene functions, a comprehensive catalog of mouse mutations and their phenotypes, and a curated compendium of mouse models of human diseases. Here, we describe the data acquisition process, specifics about MGD's key data areas, methods to access and query MGD data, and outreach and user help facilities. genesis 53:458–473, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Genesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26150326

  15. Recognizing Student Emotions Using Brainwaves and Mouse Behavior Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azcarraga, Judith; Suarez, Merlin Teodosia

    2013-01-01

    Brainwaves (EEG signals) and mouse behavior information are shown to be useful in predicting academic emotions, such as confidence, excitement, frustration and interest. Twenty five college students were asked to use the Aplusix math learning software while their brainwaves signals and mouse behavior (number of clicks, duration of each click,…

  16. Mouse Vocal Communication System: Are Ultrasounds Learned or Innate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arriaga, Gustavo; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) are often used as behavioral readouts of internal states, to measure effects of social and pharmacological manipulations, and for behavioral phenotyping of mouse models for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. However, little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms of rodent USV production.…

  17. Designing Mouse Behavioral Tasks Relevant to Autistic-Like Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2004-01-01

    The importance of genetic factors in autism has prompted the development of mutant mouse models to advance our understanding of biological mechanisms underlying autistic behaviors. Mouse models of human neuropsychiatric diseases are designed to optimize (1) face validity, i.e., resemblance to the human symptoms; (2) construct validity, i.e.,…

  18. Biological Basis of Differential Susceptibility to Hepatocarcinogenesis among Mouse Strains*

    PubMed Central

    Maronpot, Robert R.

    2009-01-01

    There is a vast amount of literature related to mouse liver tumorigenesis generated over the past 60 years, not all of which has been captured here. The studies reported in this literature have generally been state of the art at the time they were carried out. A PubMed search on the topic “mouse liver tumors” covering the past 10 years yields over 7000 scientific papers. This review address several important topics related to the unresolved controversy regarding the relevance of mouse liver tumor responses observed in cancer bioassays. The inherent mouse strain differential sensitivities to hepatocarcinogenesis largely parallel the strain susceptibility to chemically induced liver neoplasia. The effects of phenobarbital and halogenated hydrocarbons in mouse hepatocarcinogenesis have been summarized because of recurring interest and numerous publications on these topics. No single simple paradigm fully explains differential mouse strain responses, which can vary more than 50-fold among inbred strains. In addition to inherent genetics, modifying factors including cell cycle balance, enzyme induction, DNA methylation, oncogenes and suppressor genes, diet, and intercellular communication influence susceptibility to spontaneous and induced mouse hepatocarcinogenesis. Comments are offered on the evaluation, interpretation, and relevance of mouse liver tumor responses in the context of cancer bioassays. PMID:22271974

  19. Generation of transgenic mouse model using PTTG as an oncogene.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Sham S; Kakar, Cohin

    2015-01-01

    The close physiological similarity between the mouse and human has provided tools to understanding the biological function of particular genes in vivo by introduction or deletion of a gene of interest. Using a mouse as a model has provided a wealth of resources, knowledge, and technology, helping scientists to understand the biological functions, translocation, trafficking, and interaction of a candidate gene with other intracellular molecules, transcriptional regulation, posttranslational modification, and discovery of novel signaling pathways for a particular gene. Most importantly, the generation of the mouse model for a specific human disease has provided a powerful tool to understand the etiology of a disease and discovery of novel therapeutics. This chapter describes in detail the step-by-step generation of the transgenic mouse model, which can be helpful in guiding new investigators in developing successful models. For practical purposes, we will describe the generation of a mouse model using pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) as the candidate gene of interest.

  20. Cloning and expression of mouse legumain, a lysosomal endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Chen, J M; Dando, P M; Stevens, R A; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    1998-10-01

    Legumain, a recently discovered mammalian cysteine endopeptidase, was found in all mouse tissues examined, but was particularly abundant in kidney and placenta. The distribution in subcellular fractions of mouse and rat kidney showed a lysosomal localization, and activity was detectable only after the organelles were disrupted. Nevertheless, ratios of legumain activity to that of cathepsin B differed considerably between mouse tissues. cDNA encoding mouse legumain was cloned and sequenced, the deduced amino acid sequence proving to be 83% identical to that of the human protein [Chen, Dando, Rawlings, Brown, Young, Stevens, Hewitt, Watts and Barrett (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 8090-8098]. Recombinant mouse legumain was expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells by use of a vector containing a cytomegalovirus promoter. The recombinant enzyme was partially purified and found to be an asparagine-specific endopeptidase closely similar to naturally occurring pig kidney legumain.

  1. Cloning and expression of mouse legumain, a lysosomal endopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J M; Dando, P M; Stevens, R A; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    1998-01-01

    Legumain, a recently discovered mammalian cysteine endopeptidase, was found in all mouse tissues examined, but was particularly abundant in kidney and placenta. The distribution in subcellular fractions of mouse and rat kidney showed a lysosomal localization, and activity was detectable only after the organelles were disrupted. Nevertheless, ratios of legumain activity to that of cathepsin B differed considerably between mouse tissues. cDNA encoding mouse legumain was cloned and sequenced, the deduced amino acid sequence proving to be 83% identical to that of the human protein [Chen, Dando, Rawlings, Brown, Young, Stevens, Hewitt, Watts and Barrett (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 8090-8098]. Recombinant mouse legumain was expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells by use of a vector containing a cytomegalovirus promoter. The recombinant enzyme was partially purified and found to be an asparagine-specific endopeptidase closely similar to naturally occurring pig kidney legumain. PMID:9742219

  2. Innovations in phenotyping of mouse models in the German Mouse Clinic.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Neschen, Susanne; Adler, Thure; Afonso, Luciana Caminha; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Bohla, Alexander; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cohrs, Christian; Dewert, Anna; Fridrich, Barbara; Garrett, Lillian; Glasl, Lisa; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Hurt, Anja; Janas, Eva; Janik, Dirk; Kahle, Melanie; Kistler, Martin; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Lengger, Christoph; Ludwig, Tonia; Maier, Holger; Marschall, Susan; Micklich, Kateryna; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Räss, Michael; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Scheerer, Markus; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Steinkamp, Ralph; Stöger, Claudia; Sun, Minxuan; Szymczak, Wilfried; Treise, Irina; Vargas Panesso, Ingrid Liliana; Vernaleken, Alexandra M; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolff-Muscate, Annemarie; Zeh, Ramona; Adamski, Jerzy; Beckers, Johannes; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H; Eickelberg, Oliver; Favor, Jack; Graw, Jochen; Höfler, Heinz; Höschen, Christoph; Katus, Hugo; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Neff, Frauke; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Stöger, Tobias; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Under the label of the German Mouse Clinic (GMC), a concept has been developed and implemented that allows the better understanding of human diseases on the pathophysiological and molecular level. This includes better understanding of the crosstalk between different organs, pleiotropy of genes, and the systemic impact of envirotypes and drugs. In the GMC, experts from various fields of mouse genetics and physiology, in close collaboration with clinicians, work side by side under one roof. The GMC is an open-access platform for the scientific community by providing phenotypic analysis in bilateral collaborations ("bottom-up projects") and as a partner and driver in international large-scale biology projects ("top-down projects"). Furthermore, technology development is a major topic in the GMC. Innovative techniques for primary and secondary screens are developed and implemented into the phenotyping pipelines (e.g., detection of volatile organic compounds, VOCs).

  3. Biology of Mouse Thymic Virus, a Herpesvirus of Mice, and the Antigenic Relationship to Mouse Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Cross, S. S.; Parker, J. C.; Rowe, W. P.; Robbins, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Mouse thymic virus (TA) is a herpesvirus which produces extensive necrosis of the thymus of newborn mice 7 to 14 days after infection. Infectious virus can be recovered from the thymus for only 10 days after infection, with highest titers occurring between days 5 and 7. In mice 5 days old or less, TA infects thymus cells and produces massive necrosis. TA also infects the salivary glands and persists as a chronic infection. Newborn mice infected with TA have no detectable humoral immune response. Infected adult mice respond, and humoral antibody is detected 7 days after infection. Titers are maintained for months thereafter. Regardless of the age of the mice inoculated with TA, persistent infection was established in the salivary glands, but no evidence for thymus involvement was observed when adults were infected. TA does not cross-react serologically by immunofluorescent, complement fixation, or virus neutralization tests with mouse cytomegalovirus; however, interestingly, the epidemiology of the two herpesviruses are similar. Both mouse cytomegalovirus and TA were isolated from the same animals in populations of laboratory and wild mice. Evidence of infection with mouse cytomegalovirus and TA were most apparent by virus isolations, since humoral antibody responses are rarely observed. All strains of mice tested were susceptible to TA infection. However, in some strains maximum necrosis occurred at 7 days, compared with 10 to 14 days for other strains. The difference in age susceptibility and the target tissue of thymus in newborn mice suggests that TA is a model herpesvirus for studying the effects of viral infections on humoral and cell-mediated immunological functions. Images PMID:231008

  4. The Mouse House: a brief history of the ORNL mouse-genetics program, 1947-2009.

    PubMed

    Russell, Liane B

    2013-01-01

    The large mouse genetics program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is often remembered chiefly for the germ-cell mutation-rate data it generated and their uses in estimating the risk of heritable radiation damage. In fact, it soon became a multi-faceted research effort that, over a period of almost 60 years, generated a wealth of information in the areas of mammalian mutagenesis, basic genetics (later enriched by molecular techniques), cytogenetics, reproductive biology, biochemistry of germ cells, and teratology. Research in the area of germ-cell mutagenesis explored the important physical and biological factors that affect the frequency and nature of induced mutations and made several unexpected discoveries, such as the major importance of the perigametic interval (the zygote stage) for the origin of spontaneous mutations and for the sensitivity to induced genetic change. Of practical value was the discovery that ethylnitrosourea was a supermutagen for point mutations, making high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse feasible worldwide. Teratogenesis findings resulted in recommendations still generally accepted in radiological practice. Studies supporting the mutagenesis research added whole bodies of information about mammalian germ-cell development and about molecular targets in germ cells. The early decision to not merely count but propagate genetic variants of all sorts made possible further discoveries, such as the Y-chromosome's importance in mammalian sex determination and the identification of rare X-autosome translocations, which, in turn, led to the formulation of the single-active-X hypothesis and provided tools for studies of functional mosaicism for autosomal genes, male sterility, and chromosome-pairing mechanism. Extensive genetic and then molecular analyses of large numbers of induced specific-locus mutants resulted in fine-structure physical and correlated functional mapping of significant portions of the mouse genome and constituted a

  5. The Mouse House: A brief history of the ORNL mouse-genetics program, 1947–2009

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Liane B.

    2013-10-01

    The large mouse genetics program at the Oak Ridge National Lab is often re-membered chiefly for the germ-cell mutation-rate data it generated and their uses in estimating the risk of heritable radiation damage. In fact, it soon became a multi-faceted research effort that, over a period of almost 60 years, generated a wealth of information in the areas of mammalian mutagenesis, basic genetics (later enriched by molecular techniques), cytogenetics, reproductive biology, biochemistry of germ cells, and teratology. Research in the area of germ-cell mutagenesis explored the important physical and biological factors that affect the frequency and nature of induced mutations and made several unexpected discoveries, such as the major importance of the perigametic interval (the zygote stage) for the origin of spontaneous mutations and for the sensitivity to induced genetic change. Of practical value was the discovery that ethylnitrosourea was a supermutagen for point mutations, making high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse feasible worldwide. Teratogenesis findings resulted in recommendations still generally accepted in radiological practice. Studies supporting the mutagenesis research added whole bodies of information about mammalian germ-cell development and about molecular targets in germ cells. The early decision to not merely count but propagate genetic variants of all sorts made possible further discoveries, such as the Y-Chromosome s importance in mammalian sex determination and the identification of rare X-autosome translocations, which, in turn, led to the formulation of the single-active-X hypothesis and provided tools for studies of functional mosaicism for autosomal genes, male sterility, and chromosome-pairing mechanism. Extensive genetic and then molecular analyses of large numbers of induced specific-locus mutants resulted in fine-structure physical and correlated functional mapping of significant portions of the mouse genome and constituted a valuable

  6. Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-03-30

    Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

  7. Molecular characterization of the mouse agouti locus.

    PubMed

    Bultman, S J; Michaud, E J; Woychik, R P

    1992-12-24

    The agouti (a) locus acts within the microenvironment of the hair follicle to regulate coat color pigmentation in the mouse. We have characterized a gene encoding a novel 131 amino acid protein that we propose is the one gene associated with the agouti locus. This gene is normally expressed in a manner consistent with a locus function, and, more importantly, its structure and expression are affected by a number of representative alleles in the agouti dominance hierarchy. In addition, we found that the pleiotropic effects associated with the lethal yellow (Ay) mutation, which include pronounced obesity, diabetes, and the development of neoplasms, are accompanied by deregulated overexpression of the agouti gene in numerous tissues of the adult animal.

  8. Actin dynamics in mouse fibroblasts in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moes, Maarten J. A.; Bijvelt, Jose J.; Boonstra, Johannes

    2007-09-01

    After stimulating with the growth factor PDGF, cells exhibit abundant membrane ruffling and other morphological changes under normal gravity conditions. These morphological changes are largely determined by the actin microfilament system. Now these actin dynamics were studied under microgravity conditions in mouse fibroblasts during the DELTA mission. The aim of the present study was to describe the actin morphology in detail, to establish the effect of PDGF on actin morphology and to study the role of several actin-interacting proteins involved in introduced actin dynamics in microgravity. Identical experiments were conducted at 1G on earth as a reference. No results in microgravity were obtained due to a combination of malfunctioning hardware and unfulfilled temperature requirements.

  9. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-03-20

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. Utilizing stringent protein inclusion criteria that required the identification of at least two unique peptides (1% false discovery rate at the peptide level) we identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis.

  10. Placental copper transport in the brindled mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Garnica, A.; Bates, J.

    1986-03-01

    Pregnant brindled (brin) mice were injected at 16 or 19 days gestation with 2 doses of CuCl/sub 2/ 6 mcg/g/dose, separated by 12 h, and sacrificed 6 h after the second. The copper conc. in placenta (P) and kidneys (K) of uninjected (UI) brin mice were higher than in UI controls, while conc. in liver (L) and fetal carcass (F) were lower. After injection (I), placental copper conc. increased while the carcass conc. remained unchanged. Brin mouse is a model for the human inborn error of copper metabolism, Menkes syndrome, which is characterized by signs of copper deficiency. These data indicate that metabolism of copper in brin fetus is abnormal, but depressed fetal copper levels cannot be corrected by acute copper dosing because of the sequestration of copper in placenta.

  11. Photobiomodulation of early mouse embryo development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sviridova-Chailakhyan, T. A.; Fakhranurova, L. I.; Simonova, N. B.; Khramov, R. N.; Manokhin, A. A.; Paskevich, S. I.; Chailakhyan, L. M.

    2008-04-01

    The effect of artificial sunlight (AS) from a xenon source and of converted AS with an additional orange-red luminescent (λ MAX=626 nm) component (AS+L) on the development of mouse zygotes was investigated. A plastic screen with a photoluminophore layer was used for production of this orange-red luminescent (L) component. A single short-term (15 min) exposure produced a long-term stable positive effect on early embryo development of mice, which persisted during several days. After exposure to AS+L, a stimulating influence on preimplantation development was observed, in comparison with the control group without AS exposure. The positive effects were as follows: increase in percent of embryos (P <= 0.05) developed to the blastocyst stage (96.2 %) with hatching from the zona pellucida (80.8 %) within 82-96 hours in vitro compared to the control (67.1 % and 28.8 %, respectively).

  12. HOST-PARASITE RELATIONS IN MOUSE TYPHOID

    PubMed Central

    Mackaness, G. B.; Blanden, R. V.; Collins, F. M.

    1966-01-01

    The development of acquired resistance to Salmonella typhimurium has been studied in mice infected intravenously with small numbers of streptomycin-sensitive or streptomycin-resistant organisms. By the 14th day of a primary infection the mouse develops a mechanism capable of destroying completely a super infecting dose of organisms, but is unable to eliminate organisms of the primary infection. The latter are constantly returned to the circulation from necrotic foci at the sites of implantation. Passive transfer of serum from actively infected or vaccinated animals, and immunization with heat-killed organisms, increase the capacity of the host to clear organisms from the blood, but do not interfere to any significant extent with their subsequent multiplication in the tissues. It is concluded that the resistance of actively infected animals depends on a nonhumoral mechanism capable of destroying organisms from endogenous or exogenous sources. PMID:5922285

  13. Distribution of mitochondria in reconstructed mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Fulka, Helena

    2004-02-01

    It has been suggested that nucleus replacement (transfer) may be used as an efficient oocyte therapy in order to prevent transmission of mutated mitochondrial DNA from mother to offspring in humans. The essential and not yet answered question is how mitochondria surrounding the karyoplast will be distributed in the newly reconstructed oocytes. In our model experiments, we have evaluated the distribution of mitochondria in reconstructed immature mouse oocytes when germinal vesicle karyoplasts, with labeled mitochondria, were fused to unlabeled cytoplasts. The penetration of mitochondria from karyoplasts into cytoplasts can be detected almost immediately after the beginning of fusion. In immature reconstructed oocytes, mitochondria are first located in the oocyte center but they are homogeneously distributed within the whole cytoplasm before the completion of maturation. Fusion of oocytes at different stages of maturation suggests that the speed of mitochondria distribution is cell cycle dependent.

  14. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  15. ACUTE HEPATITIS ASSOCIATED WITH MOUSE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, John B.

    1953-01-01

    The mortality rate for 80 Swiss weanlings infected with mouse hepatitis was 2.5 per cent in comparison with 98 per cent for 140 Princeton weanlings. In Swiss weanlings discrete lesions, which generally failed to progress, were observed in the liver from the 3rd through the 10th day after intraperitoneal injection. The causal virus was demonstrable in peritoneal washings through the 21st day and less regularly in the liver through the 14th day. It was also detectable in both loci after subcutaneous injection. Infant Swiss mice were susceptible through the 10th day of life, intraperitoneal injection being commonly followed by death. The pathogenicity and titer of the virus were significantly increased by successive passage in Swiss weanlings. The virus was detected in the blood of Swiss weanlings on subcutaneous injection only after it had been modified by passage. PMID:13109100

  16. Multiphoton microscopy of cleared mouse organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Sonia G.; Chia, Thomas H.; Zinter, Joseph P.; Levene, Michael J.

    2010-05-01

    Typical imaging depths with multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are limited to less than 300 μm in many tissues due to light scattering. Optical clearing significantly reduces light scattering by replacing water in the organ tissue with a fluid having a similar index of refraction to that of proteins. We demonstrate MPM of intact, fixed, cleared mouse organs with penetration depths and fields of view in excess of 2 mm. MPM enables the creation of large 3-D data sets with flexibility in pixel format and ready access to intrinsic fluorescence and second-harmonic generation. We present high-resolution images and 3-D image stacks of the brain, small intestine, large intestine, kidney, lung, and testicle with image sizes as large as 4096×4096 pixels.

  17. Mouse intragastric infusion (iG) model

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Akiko; Lazaro, Raul; Wang, Ping-Yen; Higashiyama, Reiichi; Machida, Keigo; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Direct intragastric delivery of a diet, nutrient or test substance can be achieved in rodents (mice and rats) on a long-term (2–3 months) basis using a chronically implanted gastrostomy catheter and a flow-through swivel system. This rodent intragastric infusion (iG) model has broad applications in research on food intake, gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, GI neuroendocrinology, drug metabolism and toxicity, obesity and liver disease. It achieves maximal control over the rate and pattern of delivery and it can be combined with normal ad libitum feeding of solid diet if so desired. It may be adopted to achieve infusion at other sites of the GI system to test the role of a bypassed GI segment in neuroendocrine physiology, and its use in genetic mouse models facilitates the genetic analysis of a central question under investigation. PMID:22461066

  18. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model.

  19. An extended retinotopic map of mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jun; Ng, Lydia; Williams, Derric; Valley, Matthew; Li, Yang; Garrett, Marina; Waters, Jack

    2017-01-01

    Visual perception and behavior are mediated by cortical areas that have been distinguished using architectonic and retinotopic criteria. We employed fluorescence imaging and GCaMP6 reporter mice to generate retinotopic maps, revealing additional regions of retinotopic organization that extend into barrel and retrosplenial cortices. Aligning retinotopic maps to architectonic borders, we found a mismatch in border location, indicating that architectonic borders are not aligned with the retinotopic transition at the vertical meridian. We also assessed the representation of visual space within each region, finding that four visual areas bordering V1 (LM, P, PM and RL) display complementary representations, with overlap primarily at the central hemifield. Our results extend our understanding of the organization of mouse cortex to include up to 16 distinct retinotopically organized regions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18372.001 PMID:28059700

  20. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Aya M; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately one-fifth of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here, we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With

  1. A mouse model of mandibular osteotomy healing.

    PubMed

    Paccione, M F; Warren, S M; Spector, J A; Greenwald, J A; Bouletreau, P J; Longaker, M T

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a novel mouse model of membranous osteotomy healing. By applying this model to transgenic mice or using in situ hybridization techniques, we can subsequently investigate candidate genes that are believed to be important in membranous osteotomy healing. In the current study, 20 adult male CD-1 mice underwent a full-thickness osteotomy between the second and third molars of the right hemimandible using a 3-mm diamond disc and copious irrigation. Compo-Post pins were secured into the mandible, 2 mm anterior and posterior to the osteotomy. After the soft tissues were reapproximated and the skin was closed, an acrylic external fixator was attached to the exposed posts for stabilization. The animals were killed on postoperative day number 7, 10, 14, and 28 (n=5 animals per time point). The right hemimandibles were decalcified and embedded in paraffin for histologic evaluation or immunohistochemistry localizing osteocalcin. At 7 days after the osteotomy, early intramembranous bone formation could be seen extending from either edge of the osteotomized bone. By 10 days, an increasing number of small blood vessels could be seen within and around the osteotomy. At 14 days, the bone edges were in close approximation, and by 28 days the callus had been replaced by actively remodeling woven bone in all specimens examined. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that osteocalcin expression correlated temporally with the transition from a soft to a hard callus. Furthermore, osteocalcin was spatially confined to osteoblasts actively laying down new osteoid or remodeling bone. This study describes a novel mouse model of membranous osteotomy healing that can be used as a paradigm for future osteotomy healing studies investigating candidate genes critical for osteogenesis and successful bone repair.

  2. Phoenixin: A candidate pruritogen in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Cowan, A; Lyu, R-M; Chen, Y-H; Dun, S L; Chang, J-K; Dun, N J

    2015-12-03

    Phoenixin (PNX) is a 14-amino acid amidated peptide (PNX-14) or an N-terminal extended 20-residue amidated peptide (PNX-20) recently identified in neural and non-neural tissue. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a major peak corresponding to PNX-14, with negligible PNX-20, in mouse spinal cord extracts. Using a previously characterized antiserum that recognized both PNX-14 and PNX-20, PNX-immunoreactivity (irPNX) was detected in a population of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells and in cell processes densely distributed to the superficial layers of the dorsal horn; irPNX cell processes were also detected in the skin. The retrograde tracer, Fluorogold, injected subcutaneously (s.c.) to the back of the cervical and thoracic spinal cord of mice, labeled a population of DRG, some of which were also irPNX. PNX-14 (2, 4 and 8 mg/kg) injected s.c.to the nape of the neck provoked dose-dependent repetitive scratching bouts directed to the back of the neck with the hindpaws. The number of scratching bouts varied from 16 to 95 in 30 min, commencing within 5 min post-injection and lasted 10-15 min. Pretreatment of mice at -20 min with nalfurafine (20 μg/kg, s.c.), the kappa opioid receptor agonist, significantly reduced the number of bouts induced by PNX-14 (4 mg/kg) compared with that of saline-pretreated mice. Our results suggest that the peptide, PNX-14, serves as one of the endogenous signal molecules transducing itch sensation in the mouse.

  3. Cardiac mouse lymphatics: developmental and anatomical update.

    PubMed

    Flaht-Zabost, Aleksandra; Gula, Grzegorz; Ciszek, Bogdan; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Jankowska-Steifer, Ewa; Madej, Maria; Niderla-Bielińska, Justyna; Radomska-Leśniewska, Dorota; Ratajska, Anna

    2014-06-01

    The adult mouse heart possesses an extensive lymphatic plexus draining predominantly the subepicardium and the outer layer of the myocardial wall. However, the development of this plexus has not been entirely explored, partially because of the lack of suitable methods for its visualization as well as prolonged lymphatic vessel formation that starts prenatally and proceeds during postnatal stages. Also, neither the course nor location of collecting vessels draining lymph from the mouse heart have been precisely characterized. In this article, we report that murine cardiac lymphatic plexus development that is limited prenatally only to the subepicardial area, postnatally proceeds from the subepicardium toward the myocardial wall with the base-to-apex gradient; this plexus eventually reaches the outer half of the myocardium with a predominant location around branches of coronary arteries and veins. Based on multiple marker immunostaining, the molecular marker-phenotype of cardiac lymphatic endothelial cells can be characterized as: Prox-1(+), Lyve-1(+), VEGFR3(+), Podoplanin(+), VEGFR2(+), CD144(+), Tie2(+), CD31(+), vWF(-), CD34(-), CD133(-). There are two major collecting vessels: one draining the right and left ventricles along the left conal vein and running upwards to the left side of the pulmonary trunk and further to the nearest lymph nodes (under the aortic arch and near the trachea), and the other one with its major branch running along the left cardiac vein and further on the surface of the coronary sinus and the left atrium to paratracheal lymph nodes. The extracardiac collectors gain the smooth muscle cell layer during late postnatal stages.

  4. Phoenixin: a candidate pruritogen in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Alan; Lyu, Rong-Ming; Chen, Yi-Hung; Dun, Siok Le; Chang, Jaw-Kang; Dun, Nae J.

    2015-01-01

    Phoenixin (PNX) is a 14-amino acid amidated peptide (PNX-14) or an N-terminal extended 20-residue amidated peptide (PNX-20) recently identified in neural and non-neural tissue. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a major peak corresponding to PNX-14, with negligible PNX-20, in mouse spinal cord extracts. Using a previously characterized antiserum that recognized both PNX-14 and PNX-20, PNX-immunoreactivity (irPNX) was detected in a population of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells and in cell processes densely distributed to the superficial layers of the dorsal horn; irPNX cell processes were also detected in the skin. The retrograde tracer, Fluorogold, injected subcutaneously (s.c.) to the back of the cervical and thoracic spinal cord of mice, labeled a population of DRG, some of which were also irPNX. PNX-14 (2, 4 and 8 mg/kg) injected s.c.to the nape of the neck provoked dose-dependent repetitive scratching bouts directed to the back of the neck with the hindpaws. The number of scratching bouts varied from 16–95 in 30 min, commencing within 5 min post-injection and lasted 10–15 min. Pretreatment of mice at −20 min with nalfurafine (20 µg/kg, s.c.), the kappa opioid receptor agonist, significantly reduced the number of bouts induced by PNX-14 (4 mg/kg) compared with that of saline-pretreated mice. Our results suggest that the peptide, PNX-14, serves as one of the endogenous signal molecules transducing itch sensation in the mouse. PMID:26415767

  5. Blastocoel expansion in the preimplantation mouse embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Manejwala, F.M.

    1989-01-01

    Since cAMP can regulate fluid transport in many types of epithelia, the mechanism of fluid transport and the role of cAMP in the mouse blastocyst were examined. Results described here indicate an increase in the ability of mouse embryos to elevate cAMP levels in response to activators of adenylate cyclase, which is the enzyme that synthesizes cAMP, during the transition from morula to blastocyst. In addition, a positive correlation is observed between the increase in activatable adenylate cyclase and the presence of a blastocoel. Moreover, elevating intracellular cAMP in nascent cavitating embryos stimulates the rate of fluid transport in the blastocoel. Accumulation of fluid in the blastocoel is a function of the tight permeability seal around the embryo and the vectorial flow of ions into the blastocoel. Results reported here indicate that extracellular Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} are required for expansion of the blastocoel in nascent cavitating blastocysts. Sodium uptake into the embryo is carrier-mediated and probably occurs through multiple routes which include the Na{sup +}-channel and the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger. Chloride uptake is non-carrier mediated and may occur by a paracellular route. In addition, cAMP, which stimulates blastocoel expansion, also stimulates uptake of {sup 22}Na{sup +}. This effect may be mediated by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase, since inhibition of this enzyme inhibits both the cAMP-stimulated rate of blastocoel expansion and {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake.

  6. Leptin targets in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael M; Lachey, Jennifer L; Sternson, Scott M; Lee, Charlotte E; Elias, Carol F; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Elmquist, Joel K

    2009-06-10

    The central actions of leptin are essential for homeostatic control of adipose tissue mass, glucose metabolism, and many autonomic and neuroendocrine systems. In the brain, leptin acts on numerous different cell types via the long-form leptin receptor (LepRb) to elicit its effects. The precise identification of leptin's cellular targets is fundamental to understanding the mechanism of its pleiotropic central actions. We have systematically characterized LepRb distribution in the mouse brain using in situ hybridization in wildtype mice as well as by EYFP immunoreactivity in a novel LepRb-IRES-Cre EYFP reporter mouse line showing high levels of LepRb mRNA/EYFP coexpression. We found substantial LepRb mRNA and EYFP expression in hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic sites described before, including the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, ventral premammillary nucleus, ventral tegmental area, parabrachial nucleus, and the dorsal vagal complex. Expression in insular cortex, lateral septal nucleus, medial preoptic area, rostral linear nucleus, and in the Edinger-Westphal nucleus was also observed and had been previously unreported. The LepRb-IRES-Cre reporter line was used to chemically characterize a population of leptin receptor-expressing neurons in the midbrain. Tyrosine hydroxylase and Cre reporter were found to be coexpressed in the ventral tegmental area and in other midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Lastly, the LepRb-IRES-Cre reporter line was used to map the extent of peripheral leptin sensing by central nervous system (CNS) LepRb neurons. Thus, we provide data supporting the use of the LepRb-IRES-Cre line for the assessment of the anatomic and functional characteristics of neurons expressing leptin receptor.

  7. Transplanting mouse induced pluripotent stem cells into mouse otocysts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroki; Minoda, Ryosei; Miwa, Toru; Yamada, Takao; Ise, Momoko

    2017-03-27

    The otocyst is an attractive target for studying treatment strategies for genetic hearing loss and for understanding inner ear development. We have previously reported that trans-uterine supplemental gene therapy in vivo into the otocysts of mice, which had a loss of function mutation in a causative gene of deafness, was able to prevent putative hearing loss. We herein set out to clarify the feasibility of allogenic cell transplantation into the mouse otocysts in vivo. We transplanted naive mouse-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (miPSCs) into the otocysts of wild type mice or connexin (Cx) 30 deficient mice, at embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5). The transplanted m-iPSCs survived in the lumens of the inner ears at E13.5 and E15.5 in wild type mice. In the Cx30 deficient mouse, the transplanted cells survived similarly, with some of the transplanted cells migrating into the lining cells of the lumens of the inner ears at E13.5 and showing tumorigenic cell proliferation at E15.5. In addition, engrafted cells appear to be able to differentiate after the cell transplantation. Our results suggest that otocyst transplanted cells survived and differentiated. A Cx30 deficiency may facilitate cell migration. These findings may offer some hope for cell transplantation therapy for profound genetic hearing loss caused by a Cxs deficiency.

  8. Chromosomal localization of the human and mouse hyaluronan synthase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A.; Seldin, M.F.

    1997-05-01

    We have recently identified a new vertebrate gene family encoding putative hyaluronan (HA) synthases. Three highly conserved related genes have been identified, designated HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3 in humans and Has1, Has2, and Has3 in the mouse. All three genes encode predicted plasma membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane domains and approximately 25% amino acid sequence identity to the Streptococcus pyogenes HA synthase, HasA. Furthermore, expression of any one HAS gene in transfected mammalian cells leads to high levels of HA biosynthesis. We now report the chromosomal localization of the three HAS genes in human and in mouse. The genes localized to three different positions within both the human and the mouse genomes. HAS1 was localized to the human chromosome 19q13.3-q13.4 boundary and Has1 to mouse Chr 17. HAS2 was localized to human chromosome 8q24.12 and Has2 to mouse Chr 15. HAS3 was localized to human chromosome 16q22.1 and Has3 to mouse Chr 8. The map position for HAS1 reinforces the recently reported relationship between a small region of human chromosome 19q and proximal mouse chromosome 17. HAS2 mapped outside the predicted critical region delineated for the Langer-Giedion syndrome and can thus be excluded as a candidate gene for this genetic syndrome. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Engineering subtle targeted mutations into the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Menke, Douglas B

    2013-09-01

    Homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells offers an exquisitely precise mechanism to introduce targeted modifications to the mouse genome. This ability to produce specific alterations to the mouse genome has become an essential tool for the analysis of gene function and the development of mouse models of human disease. Of the many thousands of mouse alleles that have been generated by gene targeting, the majority are designed to completely ablate gene function, to create conditional alleles that are inactivated in the presence of Cre recombinase, or to produce reporter alleles that label-specific tissues or cell populations (Eppig et al., 2012, Nucleic Acids Res 40:D881-D886). However, there is a variety of powerful motivations for the introduction of subtle targeted mutations (STMs) such as point mutations, small deletions, or small insertions into the mouse genome. The introduction of STMs allows the ablation of specific transcript isoforms, permits the functional investigation of particular domains or amino acids within a protein, provides the ability to study the role of specific sites with in cis-regulatory elements, and can result in better mouse models of human genetic disorders. In this review, I examine the current strategies that are commonly used to introduce STMs into the mouse genome and highlight new gene targeting technologies, including TALENs and CRISPR/Cas, which are likely to influence the future of gene targeting in mice.

  10. The spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus) completes nephrogenesis before birth.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Hayley; Walker, David W; Cullen-McEwen, Luise; Wintour, E Marelyn; Moritz, Karen

    2005-08-01

    The spiny mouse is relatively mature at birth. We hypothesized that like other organs, the kidney may be more developed in the spiny mouse at birth, than in other rodents. If nephrogenesis is complete before birth, the spiny mouse may provide an excellent model with which to study the effects of an altered intrauterine environment on renal development. Due to its desert adaptation, the spiny mouse may have a reduced cortex-to-medulla ratio but an equivalent total nephron number to the C57/BL mouse. Kidneys were collected from fetal and neonatal spiny mice and sectioned for gross examination of metanephric development. Kidneys were collected from adult spiny mice (10 wk of age), and glomerular number, volume, and cortex-to-medulla ratios were determined using unbiased stereology. Nephrogenesis is complete in spiny mouse kidneys before birth. Metanephrogenesis begins at approximately day 18, and by day 38 of a 40-day gestation, the nephrogenic zone is no longer present. Spiny mice have a significantly (P < 0.001) lower total nephron number compared with C57/BL mice, although the total glomerular volume is similar. The cortex-to-medulla ratio of the spiny mouse is significantly (P < 0.01) smaller. The spiny mouse is the first rodent species shown to complete nephrogenesis before birth. This makes it an attractive candidate for the study of fetal and neonatal kidney development and function. The reduced total nephron number and cortex-to-medulla ratio in the spiny mouse may contribute to its ability to highly concentrate its urine under stressful conditions (i.e., dehydration).

  11. Sequence, molecular properties, and chromosomal mapping of mouse lumican