Science.gov

Sample records for head gimbal assembly

  1. SU-C-BRB-01: Development of Dynamic Gimbaled X-Ray Head Swing Irradiation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, T; Miyabe, Y; Yokota, K; Akimoto, M; Mukumoto, N; Ishihara, Y; Nakamura, M; Mizowaki, T; Hiraoka, M; Takahashi, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The Vero4DRT has a unique gimbaled x-ray head with rotating around orthogonal two axes. The purpose of this study was to develop a new irradiation technique using the dynamic gimbaled x-ray head swing function. Methods: The Vero4DRT has maximum field size of 150Χ150 mm2. The expanded irradiation field (expanded-field) for the longitudinal direction which is vertical to the MLC sliding direction, was created by the MLC motion and the gimbaled x-ray head rotation. The gimbaled x-ray head was rotated ± 35 mm, and the expanded-field size was set as 150Χ220 mm2. To irradiate uniform dose distribution, the diamond-shaped radiation field was created and continuously moved for the longitudinal direction. It was achieved by combination of opening and closing of the MLC and gimbal swing rotation. To evaluate dosimetric characteristic of the expanded-field, films inserted in water-equivalent phantoms at 100 mm depth were irradiated and the field size, penumbra, flatness and symmetry were analyzed.In addition, the expanded-field irradiation technique was applied to virtual wedge irradiation. Wedged beam was acquired with the delta–shaped radiation field. 150Χ 220 mm2 fields with 15, 30, 45, and 60 degree wedge were examined. The wedge angles were measured with irradiated film and compared with assumed wedge angles. Results: The field size, penumbra, flatness and symmetry of the expanded-field were 150.0 mm, 8.1–8.4 mm, 2.8% and −0.8% for the lateral direction and 220.1 mm, 6.3–6.4 mm, 3.2% and −0.4% for the longitudinal direction at 100 mm depth. The measured wedge angles were 15.1, 30.2, 45.2 and 60.2 degrees. The differences between assumed and measured angles were within 0.2 degrees. Conclusion: A new technique of the gimbal swing irradiation was developed. To extend applied targets, especially for whole breast irradiation, the expanded-field and virtual wedge irradiations would be effective.

  2. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-09-01

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs.

  3. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, Alex Blair

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head dome assembly which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome is described. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending therethrough. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending therethrough, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending therethrough, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore therethrough, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening.

  4. Development of a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled X-ray head

    SciTech Connect

    Kamino, Yuichiro . E-mail: daisaku_horiuchi@mhi.co.jp; Takayama, Kenji; Kokubo, Masaki; Narita, Yuichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Kawawda, Noriyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nagata, Yasushi; Nishidai, Takehiro; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a new four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system, which enables precise setup, real-time tumor tracking, and pursuit irradiation. Methods and Materials: The system has an innovative gimbaled X-ray head that enables small-angle ({+-}2.4{sup o}) rotations (pan and tilt) along the two orthogonal gimbals. This design provides for both accurate beam positioning at the isocenter by actively compensating for mechanical distortion and quick pursuit of the target. The X-ray head is composed of an ultralight C-band linear accelerator and a multileaf collimator. The gimbaled X-ray head is mounted on a rigid O-ring structure with an on-board imaging subsystem composed of two sets of kilovoltage X-ray tubes and flat panel detectors, which provides a pair of radiographs, cone beam computed tomography images useful for image guided setup, and real-time fluoroscopic monitoring for pursuit irradiation. Results: The root mean square accuracy of the static beam positioning was 0.1 mm for 360{sup o} of O-ring rotation. The dynamic beam response and positioning accuracy was {+-}0.6 mm for a 0.75 Hz, 40-mm stroke and {+-}0.4 mm for a 2.0 Hz, 8-mm stroke. The quality of the images was encouraging for using the tomography-based setup. Fluoroscopic images were sufficient for monitoring and tracking lung tumors. Conclusions: Key functions and capabilities of our new system are very promising for precise image-guided setup and for tracking and pursuit irradiation of a moving target.

  5. TH-C-12A-03: Development of Expanded Field Irradiation Technique with Gimbaled X-Ray Head

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, T; Miyabe, Y; Yamada, M; Kaneko, S; Monzen, H; Mizowaki, T; Hiraoka, M; Sawada, A; Kokubo, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Vero4DRT has a maximum field size of 150×150 mm{sup 2}. The purposes of this study were to develop an expanded field irradiation technique using a unique gimbaled x-ray head of Vero4DRT and to evaluate its dosimetric characteristic. Methods: The expanded field irradiation consisted of four separate fields with 2.39 degree gimbal rotation around orthogonal two axes. The central beam axis for each field shifted 40 mm from the isocenter for longitudinal and lateral directions, and thus, the field size was expanded up to 230×230 mm{sup 2}. Adjacent region were created at the isocenter (center-adjacent expanded-field) and 20 mm from isocenter (offadjacent expanded-field). To create flat dose distribution in the combined piecewise-fields, the overlapping and gaps regions on the isocenter plane were adjusted with the gimbal rotating and the MLC. To evaluate dosimetric characteristic of the expanded-field, films inserted in water-equivalent phantoms at 50, 100 and 150 mm depth were irradiated and the field size, penumbra, flatness and symmetry were analyzed.In addition, the expandedfield irradiation technique was applied to IMRT. A head and neck IMRT field, which was planned for the conventional linac (Varian Clinac iX), was reproduced with the expanded-field of the Vero4DRT. The simulated dose distribution for the expanded IMRT field was compared to the measured dose distribution. Results: The field size, penumbra, flatness and symmetry of center- and off- adjacent expanded-fields were 230.2–232.1 mm, 7.8–10.7 mm, 2.3–6.5% and –0.5–0.4% at 100 mm depth. The 82.1% area of the expanded IMRT dose distribution was within 5% difference between measurement and simulation, which was analyzed upper 50% dose area, and the 3%/3 mm gamma pass rate was 98.4%. Conclusions: The expandedfield technique was developed using the gimbaled x-ray head. To extend applied targets, such as whole breast irradiations or head and neck IMRT, the expanded-field technique

  6. Geometric and dosimetric accuracy of dynamic tumor-tracking conformal arc irradiation with a gimbaled x-ray head

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Tomohiro; Miyabe, Yuki Yamada, Masahiro; Kaneko, Shuji; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Sawada, Akira; Kokubo, Masaki

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The Vero4DRT system has the capability for dynamic tumor-tracking (DTT) stereotactic irradiation using a unique gimbaled x-ray head. The purposes of this study were to develop DTT conformal arc irradiation and to estimate its geometric and dosimetric accuracy. Methods: The gimbaled x-ray head, supported on an O-ring gantry, was moved in the pan and tilt directions during O-ring gantry rotation. To evaluate the mechanical accuracy, the gimbaled x-ray head was moved during the gantry rotating according to input command signals without a target tracking, and a machine log analysis was performed. The difference between a command and a measured position was calculated as mechanical error. To evaluate beam-positioning accuracy, a moving phantom, which had a steel ball fixed at the center, was driven based on a sinusoidal wave (amplitude [A]: 20 mm, time period [T]: 4 s), a patient breathing motion with a regular pattern (A: 16 mm, average T: 4.5 s), and an irregular pattern (A: 7.2–23.0 mm, T: 2.3–10.0 s), and irradiated with DTT during gantry rotation. The beam-positioning error was evaluated as the difference between the centroid position of the irradiated field and the steel ball on images from an electronic portal imaging device. For dosimetric accuracy, dose distributions in static and moving targets were evaluated with DTT conformal arc irradiation. Results: The root mean squares (RMSs) of the mechanical error were up to 0.11 mm for pan motion and up to 0.14 mm for tilt motion. The RMSs of the beam-positioning error were within 0.23 mm for each pattern. The dose distribution in a moving phantom with tracking arc irradiation was in good agreement with that in static conditions. Conclusions: The gimbal positional accuracy was not degraded by gantry motion. As in the case of a fixed port, the Vero4DRT system showed adequate accuracy of DTT conformal arc irradiation.

  7. 49 CFR 572.192 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.192 Section 572.192... Dummy, Small Adult Female § 572.192 Head assembly. (a) The head assembly consists of the head (180-1000...) of this section, the head assembly shall meet performance requirements specified in paragraph (c)...

  8. 49 CFR 572.112 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.112 Section 572.112... 50th Percentile Male § 572.112 Head assembly. The head assembly consists of the head (drawing 78051-61X...) accelerometers that are mounted in conformance to § 572.36 (c). (a) Test procedure. (1) Soak the head assembly...

  9. 49 CFR 572.112 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.112 Section 572.112... 50th Percentile Male § 572.112 Head assembly. The head assembly consists of the head (drawing 78051-61X...) accelerometers that are mounted in conformance to § 572.36 (c). (a) Test procedure. (1) Soak the head assembly...

  10. 49 CFR 572.112 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.112 Section 572.112... 50th Percentile Male § 572.112 Head assembly. The head assembly consists of the head (drawing 78051-61X...) accelerometers that are mounted in conformance to § 572.36 (c). (a) Test procedure. (1) Soak the head assembly...

  11. 49 CFR 572.192 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.192 Section 572.192... Dummy, Small Adult Female § 572.192 Head assembly. (a) The head assembly consists of the head (180-1000...) of this section, the head assembly shall meet performance requirements specified in paragraph (c)...

  12. 49 CFR 572.112 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.112 Section 572.112... 50th Percentile Male § 572.112 Head assembly. The head assembly consists of the head (drawing 78051-61X...) accelerometers that are mounted in conformance to § 572.36 (c). (a) Test procedure. (1) Soak the head assembly...

  13. 49 CFR 572.192 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.192 Section 572.192... Test Dummy, Small Adult Female § 572.192 Head assembly. (a) The head assembly consists of the head (180...) of this section, the head assembly shall meet performance requirements specified in paragraph (c)...

  14. 49 CFR 572.192 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.192 Section 572.192... Test Dummy, Small Adult Female § 572.192 Head assembly. (a) The head assembly consists of the head (180...) of this section, the head assembly shall meet performance requirements specified in paragraph (c)...

  15. 49 CFR 572.192 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.192 Section 572.192... Dummy, Small Adult Female § 572.192 Head assembly. (a) The head assembly consists of the head (180-1000...) of this section, the head assembly shall meet performance requirements specified in paragraph (c)...

  16. 49 CFR 572.182 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.182 Section 572.182... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.182 Head assembly. (a) The head assembly consists of the head... 1 of 6). When tested to the test procedure specified in paragraph (b) of this section, the...

  17. 49 CFR 572.182 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.182 Section 572.182... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.182 Head assembly. (a) The head assembly consists of the head... 1 of 6). When tested to the test procedure specified in paragraph (b) of this section, the...

  18. 49 CFR 572.182 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.182 Section 572.182... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.182 Head assembly. (a) The head assembly consists of the head... 1 of 6). When tested to the test procedure specified in paragraph (b) of this section, the...

  19. 49 CFR 572.182 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.182 Section 572.182... Test Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.182 Head assembly. (a) The head assembly consists of the head (drawing 175-1000), including the neck upper transducer structural replacement, and a set of...

  20. 49 CFR 572.182 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.182 Section 572.182... Test Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.182 Head assembly. (a) The head assembly consists of the head (drawing 175-1000), including the neck upper transducer structural replacement, and a set of...

  1. 49 CFR 572.72 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.72 Section...-Year-Old Child § 572.72 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) Head assembly. The head consists of the... on SA 106C 001, sheet 8. (b) Head assembly impact response requirements. When the head is impacted...

  2. 49 CFR 572.72 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.72 Section...-Year-Old Child § 572.72 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) Head assembly. The head consists of the... on SA 106C 001, sheet 8. (b) Head assembly impact response requirements. When the head is impacted...

  3. 49 CFR 572.72 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.72 Section...-Year-Old Child § 572.72 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) Head assembly. The head consists of the... on SA 106C 001, sheet 8. (b) Head assembly impact response requirements. When the head is impacted...

  4. 49 CFR 572.72 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.72 Section...-Year-Old Child § 572.72 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) Head assembly. The head consists of the... on SA 106C 001, sheet 8. (b) Head assembly impact response requirements. When the head is impacted...

  5. 49 CFR 572.72 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.72 Section...-Year-Old Child § 572.72 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) Head assembly. The head consists of the... on SA 106C 001, sheet 8. (b) Head assembly impact response requirements. When the head is impacted...

  6. Use of Cumulative Degradation Factor Prediction and Life Test Result of the Thruster Gimbal Assembly Actuator for the Dawn Flight Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, C. John; Brophy, John R.; Etters, M. Andy; Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    The Dawn Ion Propulsion System is the ninth project in NASA s Discovery Program. The Dawn spacecraft is being developed to enable the scientific investigation of the two heaviest main-belt asteroids, Vesta and Ceres. Dawn is the first mission to orbit two extraterrestrial bodies, and the first to orbit a main-belt asteroid. The mission is enabled by the onboard Ion Propulsion System (IPS) to provide the post-launch delta-V. The three Ion Engines of the IPS are mounted on Thruster Gimbal Assembly (TGA), with only one engine operating at a time for this 10-year mission. The three TGAs weigh 14.6 kg.

  7. Hand Controller Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandera, Pablo (Inventor); Buchele, Paul (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A user input device for a vehicular electrical system is provided. The user input device includes a handle sized and shaped to be gripped by a human hand and a gimbal assembly within the handle. The gimbal assembly includes a first gimbal component, a second gimbal component coupled to the first gimbal component such that the second gimbal component is rotatable relative to the first gimbal component about a first axis, and a third gimbal component coupled to the second gimbal component such that the third gimbal component is rotatable relative to the second gimbal component about a second axis.

  8. Head assembly for multiposition borehole extensometer

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Donald N.

    1983-01-01

    A head assembly for a borehole extensometer and an improved extensometer for measuring subsurface subsidence. A plurality of inflatable anchors provide discrete measurement points. A metering rod is fixed to each of the anchors which are displaced when subsidence occurs, thereby translating the attached rod. The head assembly includes a sprocket wheel rotatably mounted on a standpipe and engaged by a chain which is connected at one end to the metering rod and at the other end to a counterweight. A second sprocket wheel connected to the standpipe also engages the chain and drives a connected potentiometer. The head assembly converts the linear displacement of the metering rod to the rotary motion of the second sprocket wheel, which is measured by the potentiometer, producing a continuous electrical output.

  9. 49 CFR 572.132 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.132 Section... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.132 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) The head assembly (refer to § 572.130(a)(1)(i)) for this test consists of the complete head...

  10. 49 CFR 572.172 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.172 Section... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.172 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) The head assembly for this test consists of the complete head (drawing 420-1000), a six-axis...

  11. 49 CFR 572.132 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.132 Section... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.132 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) The head assembly (refer to § 572.130(a)(1)(i)) for this test consists of the complete head...

  12. 49 CFR 572.132 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.132 Section... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.132 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) The head assembly (refer to § 572.130(a)(1)(i)) for this test consists of the complete head...

  13. 49 CFR 572.172 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.172 Section... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.172 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) The head assembly for this test consists of the complete head (drawing 420-1000), a six-axis...

  14. 49 CFR 572.132 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.132 Section... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.132 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) The head assembly (refer to § 572.130(a)(1)(i)) for this test consists of the complete head...

  15. 49 CFR 572.112 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Side Impact Hybrid Dummy...) accelerometers that are mounted in conformance to § 572.36 (c). (a) Test procedure. (1) Soak the head assembly in a test environment at any temperature between 18.9 and 25.6 degrees C. (66 to 78 degrees F.) and...

  16. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-01

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB6) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mm X 0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-Ib (mA) X 0.00808 (MeV/mA), where Ib is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1.

  17. 49 CFR 572.152 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.152 Section... 12-Month-Old Infant, Alpha Version § 572.152 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) The head assembly... impact. When the head assembly in paragraph (a) of this section is dropped from a height of 376.0 ±1.0...

  18. 49 CFR 572.152 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.152 Section... 12-Month-Old Infant, Alpha Version § 572.152 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) The head assembly... impact. When the head assembly in paragraph (a) of this section is dropped from a height of 376.0 ±1.0...

  19. 49 CFR 572.152 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.152 Section... 12-Month-Old Infant, Alpha Version § 572.152 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) The head assembly... impact. When the head assembly in paragraph (a) of this section is dropped from a height of 376.0 ±1.0...

  20. 49 CFR 572.152 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.152 Section... 12-Month-Old Infant, Alpha Version § 572.152 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) The head assembly... impact. When the head assembly in paragraph (a) of this section is dropped from a height of 376.0 ±1.0...

  1. Single Axis Piezoceramic Gimbal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, Garnett C.; Taleghani, Barmac K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication, testing, and analysis of a single axis piezoceramic gimbal. The fabrication process consist of pre-stressing a piezoceramic wafer using a high-temperature thermoplastic polyimide and a metal foil. The differential thermal expansion between the ceramic and metal induces a curvature. The pre-stressed, curved piezoceramic is mounted on a support mechanism and a mirror is attached to the piezoceramic. A plot of gimbal angle versus applied voltage to the piezoceramic is presented. A finite element analysis of the piezoceramic gimbal is described. The predicted gimbal angle versus applied voltage is compared to experimental results.

  2. 49 CFR 572.142 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... assembly (refer to § 572.140(a)(1)(i)) for this test consists of the head (drawing 210-1000), adapter plate.... (2) Prior to the test, clean the impact surface of the head skin and the steel impact plate surface... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.142...

  3. 49 CFR 572.142 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... assembly (refer to § 572.140(a)(1)(i)) for this test consists of the head (drawing 210-1000), adapter plate.... (2) Prior to the test, clean the impact surface of the head skin and the steel impact plate surface... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.142...

  4. 49 CFR 572.142 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... assembly (refer to § 572.140(a)(1)(i)) for this test consists of the head (drawing 210-1000), adapter plate.... (2) Prior to the test, clean the impact surface of the head skin and the steel impact plate surface... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.142...

  5. 49 CFR 572.142 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... assembly (refer to § 572.140(a)(1)(i)) for this test consists of the head (drawing 210-1000), adapter plate.... (2) Prior to the test, clean the impact surface of the head skin and the steel impact plate surface... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.142...

  6. 49 CFR 572.142 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... assembly (refer to § 572.140(a)(1)(i)) for this test consists of the head (drawing 210-1000), adapter plate.... (2) Prior to the test, clean the impact surface of the head skin and the steel impact plate surface... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.142...

  7. Magnetic Gimbal Proof-of-Concept Hardware performance results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Keith O.

    The Magnetic Gimbal Proof-of-Concept Hardware activities, accomplishments, and test results are discussed. The Magnetic Gimbal Fabrication and Test (MGFT) program addressed the feasibility of using a magnetic gimbal to isolate an Electro-Optical (EO) sensor from the severe angular vibrations induced during the firing of divert and attitude control system (ACS) thrusters during space flight. The MGFT effort was performed in parallel with the fabrication and testing of a mechanically gimballed, flex pivot based isolation system by the Hughes Aircraft Missile Systems Group. Both servo systems supported identical EO sensor assembly mockups to facilitate direct comparison of performance. The results obtained from the MGFT effort indicate that the magnetic gimbal exhibits the ability to provide significant performance advantages over alternative mechanically gimballed techniques.

  8. Independent Peer Review of Communications, Navigation, and Networking re-Configurable Testbed (CoNNeCT) Project Antenna Pointing Subsystem (APS) Integrated Gimbal Assembly (IGA) Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Larsen, Curtis E.; Pellicciotti, Joseph W.

    2010-01-01

    Glenn Research Center Chief Engineer's Office requested an independent review of the structural analysis and modeling of the Communications, Navigation, and Networking re-Configurable Testbed (CoNNeCT) Project Antenna Pointing Subsystem (APS) Integrated Gimbal Assembly (IGA) to be conducted by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). At this time, the IGA had completed its critical design review (CDR). The assessment was to be a peer review of the NEi-NASTRAN1 model of the APS Antenna, and not a peer review of the design and the analysis that had been completed by the GRC team for CDR. Thus, only a limited amount of information was provided on the structural analysis. However, the NESC team had difficulty separating analysis concerns from modeling issues. The team studied the NASTRAN model, but did not fully investigate how the model was used by the CoNNeCT Project and how the Project was interpreting the results. The team's findings, observations, and NESC recommendations are contained in this report.

  9. 49 CFR 572.162 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.162 Section 572.162 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.162 Head assembly and test procedure. The...

  10. 49 CFR 572.162 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.162 Section 572.162 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.162 Head assembly and test procedure. The...

  11. 49 CFR 572.162 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.162 Section 572.162 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.162 Head assembly and test procedure. The...

  12. 49 CFR 572.162 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.162 Section 572.162 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.162 Head assembly and test procedure. The...

  13. 49 CFR 572.162 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.162 Section 572.162 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.162 Head assembly and test procedure. The...

  14. Gimbaled multispectral imaging system and method

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kevin H.; Crollett, Seferino; Henson, Tammy D.; Napier, Matthew; Stromberg, Peter G.

    2016-01-26

    A gimbaled multispectral imaging system and method is described herein. In an general embodiment, the gimbaled multispectral imaging system has a cross support that defines a first gimbal axis and a second gimbal axis, wherein the cross support is rotatable about the first gimbal axis. The gimbaled multispectral imaging system comprises a telescope that fixed to an upper end of the cross support, such that rotation of the cross support about the first gimbal axis causes the tilt of the telescope to alter. The gimbaled multispectral imaging system includes optics that facilitate on-gimbal detection of visible light and off-gimbal detection of infrared light.

  15. Enhanced Pointing Gimbal Mechanisms for Next Generation Communication Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalbandian, Ruben

    2013-09-01

    This paper summarizes the design and the development of a family of high precision Enhanced Pointing Gimbal Assemblies (EPGA) specifically targeting the next generation of satellite communication antenna technologies.The development and qualification of the first two EPGAs started some years ago. The purpose of this project has been to develop a gimbal based on a new rotary actuator technology achieving positioning performance superior to micro-stepping performance, to be used in highly accurate pointing and scanning mechanisms. The design also had to provide high stiffness and high load carrying capacity at the output stage.The design of this new line of gimbals is based on a rotary actuator with a high gear reduction ratio and high load carrying capacity output stage.Analysis of the latest missions, especially those for communication, earth observation and imaging, show that performance requirements for dual axis gimbals used for antenna pointing are becoming more and more demanding. Most recent Ka-band and future generation antenna technologies for smaller spot beams require finer resolutions of less than 0.003 degrees. Considerably larger solid core ( 3.0 meter diameter) and expandable wire-mesh ( 22 meter diameter) require higher load carrying capabilities and moment stiffness to sustain the launch and orbital maneuvering loads. The developed Enhanced Pointing Gimbal Assembly addresses those applications requiring small output step size, high precision pointing, and unpowered holding torque, which challenge the use of gimbals that use conventional rotary actuators.

  16. Piezoelectric actuated gimbal

    DOEpatents

    Tschaggeny, Charles W.; Jones, Warren F.; Bamberg, Eberhard

    2011-09-13

    A gimbal is described and which includes a fixed base member defining an axis of rotation; a second member concentrically oriented relative to the axis of rotation; a linear actuator oriented in immediate, adjoining force transmitting relation relative to the base member or to the second member, and which applies force along a linear axis which is tangential to the axis of rotation so as to cause the second member to rotate coaxially relative to the fixed base member; and an object of interest mounted to the second member such that the object of interest is selectively moved relative to the base member about the axis of rotation.

  17. 59. GENERAL VIEW OF HEAD, WHEEL, AND VANE ASSEMBLY OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. GENERAL VIEW OF HEAD, WHEEL, AND VANE ASSEMBLY OF ELI WINDMILL ON THE GROUND AT THE STOLL RESIDENCE ABOUT 1-1/2 MILES WEST OF NEBRASKA CITY ON STEAM WAGON ROAD. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  18. A precision bearing gimbal system for the Teal Ruby program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    A precision bearing gimbal system designed to allow a spaceborne infrared sensor to stare at points on the Earth while in orbit is described. The problems encountered, analytical tools and test methods used, and data applicable to users of similar systems are presented. Assembly procedures, bearing preload effects, moisture control, structural analysis, and noise control are specifically examined.

  19. Modeling and Vibration Analysis of Spinning Hard Disk and Head Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kao-An; Huang, Shyh-Chin

    A read/write head assembly attached to a spinning disk was modeled and investigated through a different approach, in which the head assembly was represented by a suspension arm with an attached mass and an air spring (film) at its free end. The receptance method was applied to connect the spinning disk and the head assembly. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of the combined spinning disk-fixed head assembly as a whole were then interpreted. Numerical results showed that the head assembly induced extra modes from a single disk. Even for just weak coupling between disk and head, the bifurcations of mode shapes were very obvious, but the changes of natural frequencies were slight. The effects on frequency changes due to head's flexibility, air spring constant, head's location, and spinning speed were examined as well. Disk's spinning speed was found to pull the disk-head frequency loci to pass through the crossings of single disk's frequency loci and induce curve veering phenomenon.

  20. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  1. High Gain Antenna Gimbal for the 2003-2004 Mars Exploration Rover Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, Jeff; Krishnan, Satish; Ayari, Laoucet

    2004-01-01

    The High Gain Antenna Assemblies built for the 2003-2004 Mars Exploration Rover (MER) missions provide the primary communication link for the Rovers once they arrive on Mars. The High Gain Antenna Gimbal (HGAG) portion of the assembly is a two-axis gimbal that provides the structural support, pointing, and tracking for the High Gain Antenna (HGA). The MER mission requirements provided some unique design challenges for the HGAG. This paper describes all the major subsystems of the HGAG that were developed to meet these challenges, and the requirements that drove their design.

  2. Non-Gimbaled Antenna Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigil, Jeannine S.

    1997-01-01

    The small satellite community has been interested in accessing fixed ground stations for means of space-to-ground transmissions, although a problem arises from the limited global coverage. There is a growing interest for using the Space Network (SN) or Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) as the primary support for communications because of the coverage it provides. This thesis will address the potential for satellite access of the Space Network with a non-gimbaled antenna configuration and low-power, coded transmission. The non-gimbaled antenna and the TDRS satellites, TDRS-East, TDRS-West, and TDRS-Zone of Exclusion, were configured in an orbital analysis software package called Satellite Tool Kit to emulate the three-dimensional position of the satellites. The access potential, which is the average number of contacts per day and the average time per contact, were obtained through simulations run over a 30-day period to gain all the possible orientations. The orbital altitude was varied from 600 km through 1200 km with the results being a function of orbital inclination angles varying from 20 deg through 100 deg and pointing half-angles of I0 deg through 40 deg. To compare the validity of the simulations, Jet Propulsion Laboratory granted the use of the TOPEX satellite. The TOPEX satellite was configured to emulate a spin-stabilized antenna with its communications antenna stowed in the zenith-pointing direction. This mimicked the antenna pointing spin-stabilized satellite in the simulations. To make valid comparisons, the TOPEX orbital parameters were entered into Satellite Tool Kit and simulated over five test times provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  3. Day Time Gimballing A-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A close-up view of a Space Shuttle Main Engine during a daytime test at Stennis Space Center shows how the engine is gimbaled, or rotated, to evaluate the performance of its components under simulated flight conditions.

  4. High-G Gimbal Technology Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    will verify the proposed High-G platform concept technology. 20 a -_ REFERENCES I. Invention Disclosure "High-G Gimbal Platform,* AMPC 37b6, 30 August...1977, Aubrey Rodgers. 2. Invention Disclosure "Snap-Lock Mechanism for High-G Gimbal Platform," AMPC 3831, 24 February 1978, Aubrey Rodgers. 3...Invention Disclosure "Rea.•tion Jet Torquer," AMPC 3832, 24 February 1978, Aubrey Rodgers and Eacar L. Bailey. 21 DISTRIBUTION No. of Copies Defense

  5. 49 CFR 572.122 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and the head must be oriented to an incline of 62 ±1 deg. between the “D” plane as shown in Figure N1 and the plane of the impact surface. The 1.57 mm (0.062 in) diameter holes located on either side...

  6. 49 CFR 572.122 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and the head must be oriented to an incline of 62 ±1 deg. between the “D” plane as shown in Figure N1 and the plane of the impact surface. The 1.57 mm (0.062 in) diameter holes located on either side...

  7. 49 CFR 572.122 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and the head must be oriented to an incline of 62 ±1 deg. between the “D” plane as shown in Figure N1 and the plane of the impact surface. The 1.57 mm (0.062 in) diameter holes located on either side...

  8. 49 CFR 572.122 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and the head must be oriented to an incline of 62 ±1 deg. between the “D” plane as shown in Figure N1 and the plane of the impact surface. The 1.57 mm (0.062 in) diameter holes located on either side...

  9. 49 CFR 572.122 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and the head must be oriented to an incline of 62 ±1 deg. between the “D” plane as shown in Figure N1 and the plane of the impact surface. The 1.57 mm (0.062 in) diameter holes located on either side...

  10. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  11. Sensing Horizontal Heading in Aircraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowdin, K. T.

    1986-01-01

    Modified gyroscopic system indicates geographic heading even in nearly vertical flight. Gyroscopes and gimbals of system assume this configuration when aircraft has pitched into vertical dive. Outer roll gimbal fixed with respect to aircraft frame in this orientation. Now, azimuth signal in modified system indicates what aircraft heading would be if it were to resume level flight from climb or dive.

  12. Suspension system for gimbal supported scanning payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Gimballed scanning devices or instruments are the subject of this invention. Scanning is an important aspect of space science. To achieve a scan pattern some means must be provided which impart to the payload an oscillatory motion. Various forms of machines have been employed for controllably conferring on scanning instruments predetermined scan patterns. They include control moment gyroscopes, reaction wheels, torque motors, reaction control systems, and the like. But rotating unbalanced mass (RUM) devices are a new and efficient way to generate scans in gimballed payloads. RUM devices are superior to previous scanning apparatus, but they require power consuming and frequently complex auxiliary control systems to position and reposition the particular scan pattern relative to a target or a number of targets. Herein the control system is simplified. The most frequently employed method for achieving the various scan patterns is to gimbal the scanning device. Gimbals are suspended in such a way that they can be activated to generate the scan pattern. The suspension means described is for payloads supported in gimbals wherein the payload rotation is restricted by a flex pivot so that the payload oscillates, thereby moving in a scan pattern.

  13. Gimbals in the insect leg.

    PubMed

    Frantsevich, Leonid; Wang, Weiying

    2009-01-01

    We studied the common kinematic features of the coxa and trochanter in cursorial and raptorial legs, which are the short size of the podomers, predominantly monoaxial joints, and the approximate orthogonality of adjacent joint axes. The chain coxa-trochanter with its short elements and serial orthogonality of joint axes resembles the gimbals which combine versatility and tolerance to external perturbations. The geometry of legs was studied in 23 insect species of 12 orders. Insects with monoaxial joints were selected. The joint between the trochanter and the femur (TFJ) is defined either by two vestigial condyles or by a straight anterior hinge. Direction of the joint axes in the two basal podomers was assessed by 3D measurements or by goniometry in two planes. Length of the coxa is <15% (mostly <8%) of the total length of the cursorial leg, that of the trochanter <10%. Angles between the proximal and distal joint axes in the middle coxa range from 124 to 84 degrees (mean 97+/-14 degrees ), in the trochanter (in all legs studied) from 125 to 72 degrees (mean 90+/-13 degrees ). Vectors of the distal axis in the coxa are concentrated about the normal to the plane defined by the proximal axis and the midpoint between the distal condyles. These vectors in the trochanter lie at various angles to the normal; angles are correlated with the direction of the TFJ relative to the femur. Range of reduction about the TFJ is over 60 degrees in the foreleg of Ranatra linearis, Mantispa lobata and the hind leg in Carabus coriaceus (confirming observations of previous authors), 40-60 degrees in the foreleg of Vespa crabro and in the middle one in Ammophila campestris, 10-30 degrees in other studied specimens. The special role of the trochanter in autotomy and in active propulsion in some insect groups is discussed. The majority of insects possess small trochanters and slightly movable TFJs with the joint axis laying in the femur-tibia plane. We pose the hypothesis that the TFJ

  14. Development of a Spacecraft Antenna Pointing Gimbal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, Charles; Rossoni, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The development of the pointing gimbal in the high-gain antenna system (HGAS) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft is described. The gimbal was designed for 5 years of service in Geo-Synchronous orbit. The hardware incorporates multiple levels of redundancy, allows harnessing and waveguide along its full length across its two axes of rotation and points with an accuracy of better than 0.065 . Significant issues with actuator alignment, Electrical Contact Ring noise, pointing budget, and waveguide failures are described, along with their respective resolutions

  15. High Performance Piezoelectric Actuated Gimbal (HIERAX)

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Tschaggeny; Warren Jones; Eberhard Bamberg

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a 3-axis gimbal whose three rotational axes are actuated by a novel drive system: linear piezoelectric motors whose linear output is converted to rotation by using drive disks. Advantages of this technology are: fast response, high accelerations, dither-free actuation and backlash-free positioning. The gimbal was developed to house a laser range finder for the purpose of tracking and guiding unmanned aerial vehicles during landing maneuvers. The tilt axis was built and the test results indicate excellent performance that meets design specifications.

  16. Design study of TDRS antenna gimbal system for LANDSAT-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J.

    1977-01-01

    The conceptual design studies of a two axis antenna drive assembly for the TDRSS link communications subsystem for LANDSAT D are presented. The recommended antenna drive assembly is a simple and reliable design substantially similar to the antenna and solar array drives developed and space qualified for programs such as DSCS 2 and FltSatCom. The gimbal design tradeoff is presented, along with drive electronics.

  17. Space Station Freedom Beta Gimbal Control via Sensitivity Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenwald, David A.; Ozguner, Umit; Graham, Ronald E.

    1993-01-01

    Tracking control of the Space Station Freedom solar array beta gimbals is investigated. Of particular interest is the issue of control in the presence of uncertainty in gimbal friction parameters. Sensitivity functions are incorporated into the feedback loop to desensitize the gimbal control law to parameter variations. Simulation results indicated that one such sensitivity function improves the closed-loop performance of the gimbals in the presence of unexpected friction parameter dispersions.

  18. Study and Characterization of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Head-to-tail Assembly Assisted by Aniline Polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Niu,Z.; Bruckman, M.; Kotakadi, V.; He, J.; Emrick, T.; Russell, T.; Yang, L.; Wang, Q.

    2006-01-01

    One-dimensional composite nanofibres with narrow dispersity, high aspect ratio and high processibility have been fabricated by head-to-tail self-assembly of rod-like tobacco mosaic virus assisted by aniline polymerization, which can promote many potential applications including electronics, optics, sensing and biomedical engineering.

  19. A gimbal platform stabilization for topographic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Michele, Mangiameli Giuseppe, Mussumeci

    2015-03-10

    The aim of this work is the stabilization of a Gimbal platform for optical sensors acquisitions in topographic applications using mobile vehicles. The stabilization of the line of sight (LOS) consists in tracking the command velocity in presence of nonlinear noise due to the external environment. The hardware architecture is characterized by an Ardupilot platform that allows the control of both the mobile device and the Gimbal. Here we developed a new approach to stabilize the Gimbal platform, which is based on neural network. For the control system, we considered a plant that represents the transfer function of the servo system control model for an inertial stabilized Gimbal platform. The transductor used in the feed-back line control is characterized by the Rate Gyro transfer function installed onboard of Ardupilot. For the simulation and investigation of the system performance, we used the Simulink tool of Matlab. Results show that the hardware/software approach is efficient, reliable and cheap for direct photogrammetry, as well as for general purpose applications using mobile vehicles.

  20. Steering laws for double-gimbal control-moment gyros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winder, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    Derivation of CMG steering laws was considered. The type of CMG considered was a double gimbal one which has a constant magnitude momentum vector. The equations for the generation of torque of an inertially fixed CMG are presented. To realize a particular commanded torque, the gimbal rates of the CMG must be specified. These gimbal rates are shown to be functions of gimbal angle orientation and the commanded torque. The conventional cross-product steering law was derived by minimizing a function which was the square of the magnitude of the error between the commanded torque and the realizable torque of the gyro. This steering law was severely dependent upon the inner gimbal angle. When the inner gimbal reaches 90 degrees, the cross product law requires infinite outer gimbal rates to realize finite torque values.

  1. Inertial Stabilization Of Periscopic Sights Band Driven Three Axle Gimbal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Bruce; Richi, James

    1983-10-01

    There are many applications for the use of optical instruments in vehicles, especially in the military. It is required that these instruments function while the vehicle is on the move, in rough terrain. Angular distrubances of the line-of-sight pointing vector can render these instruments useless as observation or pointing devices, due to image blurring. Instruments that must retain resolution in this environment are usually stabilized by means of gimbals. If the entire instrument (such as a large television camera) is to be stabilized, the problem becomes one of a simple stable platform, or, a single axle gimbal. If, however, the instrument is hard mounted to the vehicle and the image is instead to be stabilized by means of a compensating optical component, such as a periscope head mirror, the problem is a little more complex. In a periscopic sight the head mirror must be driven at half-speed to the line-of-sight disturbance to compensate for the angle doubling effect of the mirror. That is, in order to stabilize the line-of-sight, the mirror cannot be inertiallv stable, but must be coupled to a stable mass at a ratio of 1:2. In many applications it is necessary to transmit the elevation angle of the line-of-sight to a fire control system, or, to direct the lines-of-sight of other platforms. In order to do this, transducers are mounted on the "drive axle", (gyros, synchros, tachometers, potentiometers, motors), which detect and trasmit the angular position and rate of the elevation line-of-sight. This drive axle becomes the stable element and is coupled to the mirror axle, at a 2:1 ratio, by means of gears or metallic belts or bands. This is a double axle gimbal system. When subjected to a rotational disturbance such as boat or vehicle motion the inertias of the drive and mirror axles react with one-another to cause a displacement of the line-of-sight pointing vector. This disturbance is a dynamic coupling of inertias. It exists even in the absence of friction

  2. Simplified failure sequence evaluation of reactor pressure vessel head corroding in-core instrumentation assembly

    SciTech Connect

    McVicker, J.P.; Conner, J.T.; Hasrouni, P.N.; Reizman, A.

    1995-11-01

    In-Core Instrumentation (ICI) assemblies located on a Reactor Pressure Vessel Head have a history of boric acid leakage. The acid tends to corrode the nuts and studs which fasten the flanges of the assembly, thereby compromising the assembly`s structural integrity. This paper provides a simplified practical approach in determining the likelihood of an undetected progressing assembly stud deterioration, which would lead to a catastrophic loss of reactor coolant. The structural behavior of the In-Core Instrumentation flanged assembly is modeled using an elastic composite section assumption, with the studs transmitting tension and the pressure sealing gasket experiencing compression. Using the above technique, one can calculate the flange relative deflection and the consequential coolant loss flow rate, as well as the stress in any stud. A solved real life example develops the expected failure sequence and discusses the exigency of leak detection for safe shutdown. In the particular case of Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) it is concluded that leak detection occurs before catastrophic failure of the ICI flange assembly.

  3. Problems Encountered During the Recertification of the GLORY Solar Array Dual Axis Gimbal Drive Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, Marc; Schepis, Jospeh P.; Bruckner, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The Glory observatory is the current incarnation of the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mission spacecraft bus. The VCL spacecraft bus, having been cancelled for programmatic reasons in 2000, was nearly integrated when it was put into storage for possible future use. The Glory mission was a suitable candidate for using this spacecraft and in 2006 an effort to recertify the two axis solar array gimbal drive after its extended storage was begun. What was expected to be a simple performance validation of the two dual axis gimbal stepper motors became a serious test, diagnosis and repair task once questions arose on the flight worthiness of the hardware. A significant test program logic flow was developed which identified decisions that could be made based on the results of individual recertification tests. Without disassembling the bi-axial gimbals, beginning with stepper motor threshold voltage measurements and relating these to powered drive torque measurements, both performed at the spacecraft integrator s facility, a confusing picture of the health of the actuators came to light. Tests at the gimbal assembly level and tests of the disassembled actuators were performed by the manufacturer to validate our results and torque discrepancies were noted. Further disassembly to the component level of the actuator revealed the source of the torque loss.

  4. MiniSAR composite gimbal arm development.

    SciTech Connect

    Klarer, Paul Richard; Winscott, Mark

    2005-01-01

    An exploratory effort in the application of carbon epoxy composite structural materials to a multi-axis gimbal arm design is described. An existing design in aluminum was used as a baseline for a functionally equivalent redesigned outer gimbal arm using a carbon epoxy composite material. The existing arm was analyzed using finite element techniques to characterize performance in terms of strength, stiffness, and weight. A new design was virtually prototyped. using the same tools to produce a design with similar stiffness and strength, but reduced overall weight, than the original arm. The new design was prototyped using Rapid Prototyping technology, which was subsequently used to produce molds for fabricating the carbon epoxy composite parts. The design tools, process, and results are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of a double Gimbal IPACS design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, P. R.; Coronato, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    The suitability of various integrated power/attitude control systems (IPACS) rotor materials was analyzed. Three materials were investigated: (1) 6A1-4V-Titanium (the current IPACS rotor material); (2) B120 VCA Titanium; and (3) Custom 455 stainless steel. The preliminary linear vibration analysis was updated to include the weights and stiffnesses of the gimbals design. A belleville washer spring preload mechanism was designed to replace the existing helical spring and interference fit preload mechanism.

  6. Large-diameter total hip arthroplasty modular heads require greater assembly forces for initial stability

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, A. R.; Sullivan, N. P. T.; Whitehouse, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Modular junctions are ubiquitous in contemporary hip arthroplasty. The head-trunnion junction is implicated in the failure of large diameter metal-on-metal (MoM) hips which are the currently the topic of one the largest legal actions in the history of orthopaedics (estimated costs are stated to exceed $4 billion). Several factors are known to influence the strength of these press-fit modular connections. However, the influence of different head sizes has not previously been investigated. The aim of the study was to establish whether the choice of head size influences the initial strength of the trunnion-head connection. Materials and Methods Ti-6Al-4V trunnions (n = 60) and two different sizes of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) heads (28 mm and 36 mm; 30 of each size) were used in the study. Three different levels of assembly force were considered: 4 kN; 5 kN; and 6 kN (n = 10 each). The strength of the press-fit connection was subsequently evaluated by measuring the pull-off force required to break the connection. The statistical differences in pull-off force were examined using a Kruskal–Wallis test and two-sample Mann–Whitney U test. Finite element and analytical models were developed to understand the reasons for the experimentally observed differences. Results 36 mm diameter heads had significantly lower pull-off forces than 28 mm heads when impacted at 4 kN and 5 kN (p < 0.001; p < 0.001), but not at 6 kN (p = 0.21). Mean pull-off forces at 4 kN and 5 kN impaction forces were approximately 20% larger for 28 mm heads compared with 36 mm heads. Finite element and analytical models demonstrate that the differences in pull-off strength can be explained by differences in structural rigidity and the resulting interface pressures. Conclusion This is the first study to show that 36 mm Co-Cr heads have up to 20% lower pull-off connection strength compared with 28 mm heads for equivalent assembly forces. This effect is likely

  7. Analytical study of the inside-out Gimbal dynamics. Volume 1: Analytical study of inside-out/coincident Gimbal dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybak, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    The performance capabilities and limitations of the instrument pointing system (IPS) are described. Suggestions of design modifications that result in overall improved IPS performance are included. Since the design and configuration of the IPS was modified a portion of the study was performed with the inside-out Gimbal configuration which was updated to the present coincident Gimbal system configuration. Due to the similarity of the two systems, the results obtained for the inside-out Gimbal also apply to the coincident Gimbal system.

  8. Signalosome assembly by domains undergoing dynamic head-to-tail polymerization.

    PubMed

    Bienz, Mariann

    2014-10-01

    A key mechanism for guarding against inappropriate activation of signaling molecules is their weak affinity for effectors, which prevents them from undergoing accidental signal-transducing interactions due to fluctuations in their cellular concentration. The molecular devices that overcome these weak affinities are the signalosomes: dynamic clusters of transducing molecules assembled typically at signal-activated receptors. Signalosomes contain high local concentrations of protein-binding sites, and thus have a high avidity for their low-affinity ligands that generate signal responses. This review focuses on three domains - DIX (dishevelled and axin), PB1 (Phox and Bem1), and SAM (sterile alpha motif) - that undergo dynamic head-to-tail polymerization to assemble signalosomes and similar particles that require transient high local concentrations of protein-binding sites.

  9. Structure, assembly, and DNA packaging of the bacteriophage T4 head.

    PubMed

    Black, Lindsay W; Rao, Venigalla B

    2012-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 head is an elongated icosahedron packed with 172 kb of linear double-stranded DNA and numerous proteins. The capsid is built from three essential proteins: gp23*, which forms the hexagonal capsid lattice; gp24*, which forms pentamers at 11 of the 12 vertices; and gp20, which forms the unique dodecameric portal vertex through which DNA enters during packaging and exits during infection. Intensive work over more than half a century has led to a deep understanding of the phage T4 head. The atomic structure of gp24 has been determined. A structural model built for gp23 using its similarity to gp24 showed that the phage T4 major capsid protein has the same fold as numerous other icosahedral bacteriophages. However, phage T4 displays an unusual membrane and portal initiated assembly of a shape determining self-sufficient scaffolding core. Folding of gp23 requires the assistance of two chaperones, the Escherichia coli chaperone GroEL acting with the phage-coded gp23-specific cochaperone, gp31. The capsid also contains two nonessential outer capsid proteins, Hoc and Soc, which decorate the capsid surface. Through binding to adjacent gp23 subunits, Soc reinforces the capsid structure. Hoc and Soc have been used extensively in bipartite peptide display libraries and to display pathogen antigens, including those from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Neisseria meningitides, Bacillus anthracis, and foot and mouth disease virus. The structure of Ip1*, one of a number of multiple (>100) copy proteins packed and injected with DNA from the full head, shows it to be an inhibitor of one specific restriction endonuclease specifically targeting glycosylated hydroxymethyl cytosine DNA. Extensive mutagenesis, combined with atomic structures of the DNA packaging/terminase proteins gp16 and gp17, elucidated the ATPase and nuclease functional motifs involved in DNA translocation and headful DNA cutting. The cryoelectron microscopy structure of the T4 packaging

  10. Centaur engine gimbal friction characteristics under simulated thrust load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askew, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was performed to determine the friction characteristics of the engine gimbal system of the Centaur upper stage rocket. Because the Centaur requires low-gain autopilots in order to meet all stability requirements for some configurations, control performance (response to transients and limit-cycle amplitudes) depends highly on these friction characteristics. Forces required to rotate the Centaur engine gimbal system were measured under a simulated thrust load of 66,723 N (15,000 lb) and in an altitude/thermal environment. A series of tests was performed at three test conditions; ambient temperature and pressure, ambient temperature and vacuum, and cryogenic temperature and vacuum. Gimbal rotation was controlled, and tests were performed in which rotation amplitude and frequency were varied by using triangular and sinusoidal waveforms. Test data revealed an elastic characteristic of the gimbal, independent of the input signal, which was evident prior to true gimbal sliding. The torque required to initiate gimbal sliding was found to decrease when both pressure and temperature decreased. Results from the low amplitude and low frequency data are currently being used in mathematically modeling the gimbal friction characteristics for Centaur autopilot performance studies.

  11. Failure of Harmonic Gears During Verification of a Two-Axis Gimbal for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Michael R.; Gehling, Russ; Head, Ray

    2006-01-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft has three two-axis gimbal assemblies that support and move the High Gain Antenna and two solar array wings. The gimbal assemblies are required to move almost continuously throughout the mission's seven-year lifetime, requiring a large number of output revolutions for each actuator in the gimbal assemblies. The actuator for each of the six axes consists of a two-phase brushless dc motor with a direct drive to the wave generator of a size-32 cup-type harmonic gear. During life testing of an actuator assembly, the harmonic gear teeth failed completely, leaving the size-32 harmonic gear with a maximum output torque capability less than 10% of its design capability. The investigation that followed the failure revealed limitations of the heritage material choices that were made for the harmonic gear components that had passed similar life requirements on several previous programs. Additionally, the methods used to increase the stiffness of a standard harmonic gear component set, while accepted practice for harmonic gears, is limited in its range. The stiffness of harmonic gear assemblies can be increased up to a maximum stiffness point that, if exceeded, compromises the reliability of the gear components for long life applications.

  12. An evaluation of dry film lubricants and substrate materials for use on SSME gimbal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harp, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Failure of the spherical bearing shaft of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) gimbal bearing assembly was encountered during Design Verification Specification testing of the full scale engine. Investigation revealed that the failure was caused by a deficiency in the lubrication system. Based upon the materials and gimbal operating conditions, a lubricant of MoS2 and graphite with a ceramic binder was the best lubricant candidate for this particular application; however, the decision to implement the change was not made without verification testing. Scaled down simulation testing was performed. Four different substrate materials and eight different dry film lubricants were subjected to tests under simulated SSME environmental and stress load conditions. The test specimens were evaluated for friction and operating life. Each test specimen was subjected to cyclic operation under load until failure. The force required to move the bearing surfaces relative to each other was monitored throughout the test, thus providing analytical data for derivation of the coefficient of friction. Results indicate that the MoS2/graphite lubricant with ceramic binder proved to be superior from the standpoint of endurance and also from the standpoint of friction reducing capabilities when applied to the titanium substrate material used on SSME. Endurance of this lubricant was approximately 16 times that of the lubricant which was being used when the SSME gimbal failed.

  13. Two gimbal bearing case studies: Some lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, Stuart H.

    1988-01-01

    Two troublesome, torque related problems associated with gimbal actuators are discussed. Large, thin section angular contact bearings can have a surprisingly high torque sensitivity to radial thermal gradients. A predictive thermal-mechanical bearing analysis, as described, was helpful in establishing a safe temperature operating envelope. In the second example, end-of-travel torque limits of an oscillatory gimbal bearing appoached motor stall during limit cycling life tests. Bearing modifications required to restore acceptable torque performance are described. The lessons learned from these case studies should benefit designers of precision gimbals where singular bearing torque related problems are not uncommon.

  14. Maximizing Headgroup Repulsion: Hybrid Surfactants with Ultrahighly Charged Inorganic Heads and Their Unusual Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nonequilibrium states of matter are arousing huge interest because of the outstanding possibilities to generate unprecedented structures with novel properties. Self-organizing soft matter is the ideal object of study as it unifies periodic order and high dynamics. Compared to settled systems, it becomes vital to realize more complex interaction patterns. A promising and intricate approach is implementing controlled balance between attractive and repulsive forces. We try to answer a fundamental question in surfactant science: How are processes like lyotropic liquid crystals and micellization affected, when headgroup charge becomes so large that repulsive interactions are inevitable? A particular challenge is that size and shape of the surfactant must not change. We could realize the latter by means of new hybrid surfactants with a heteropolyanion head [EW11O39]n− (E = PV, SiIV, BIII; n = 3, 4, 5). Among the unusual self-assembled structures, we report a new type of micelle with dumbbell morphology. PMID:27690457

  15. Space Station Power Generation in Support of the Beta Gimbal Anomaly Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delleur, Ann M.; Propp, Timothy W.

    2003-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is the largest and most complex spacecraft ever assembled and operated in orbit. The first U.S. photovoltaic (PV) module, containing two solar arrays, was launched, installed, and activated in early December 2000. After the first week of continuously rotating the U.S. solar arrays, engineering personnel in the ISS Mission Evaluation Room (MER) observed higher than expected electrical currents on the drive motor in one of the Beta Gimbal Assemblies (BGA), the mechanism used to maneuver a U.S. solar array. The magnitude of the motor currents continued to increase over time on both BGA's, creating concerns about the ability of the gimbals to continue pointing the solar arrays towards the sun, a function critical for continued assembly of the ISS. A number of engineering disciplines convened in May 2001 to address this on-orbit hardware anomaly. This paper reviews the ISS electrical power system (EPS) analyses performed to develop viable operational workarounds that would minimize BGA use while maintaining sufficient solar array power to continue assembly of the ISS. Additionally, EPS analyses performed in support of on-orbit BGA troubleshooting exercises is reviewed. EPS capability analyses were performed using SPACE, a computer code developed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) for the ISS program office.

  16. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Fife, A.B.; Ballas, G.J.

    1998-02-24

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. 5 figs.

  17. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Fife, Alex Blair; Ballas, Gary J.

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening.

  18. Space Station Power Generation Investigated in Support of the Beta Gimbal Anomaly Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delleur, Ann M.; Propp, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is the largest and most complex spacecraft ever assembled and operated in orbit. The first U.S. photovoltaic module, containing two solar arrays, was launched, installed, and activated in early December 2000. After the first week of continuously rotating the U.S. solar arrays, engineering personnel in the ISS Mission Evaluation Room observed higher than expected electrical currents on the drive motor in one of the Beta Gimbal Assemblies (BGA), the mechanism used to maneuver a U.S. solar array (see the on-orbit photograph). The magnitude of the motor currents continued to increase over time on both BGAs, creating concerns about the ability of the gimbals to continue pointing the solar arrays towards the Sun, a function critical for continued assembly of the ISS. The BGA provides two critical capabilities to the ISS: (1) transfer of electrical power across a rotating joint and (2) positioning of the solar arrays. A number of engineering disciplines convened in May 2001 to address this on-orbit hardware anomaly. Over the course of a year, many scenarios were developed and used. Only two are discussed here: parked arrays and dual-angle mode.

  19. A gimbaled low noise momentum wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bichler, U.; Eckardt, T.

    1993-01-01

    The bus actuators are the heart and at the same time the Achilles' heel of accurate spacecraft stabilization systems, because both their performance and their perturbations can have a deciding influence on the achievable pointing accuracy of the mission. The main task of the attitude actuators, which are mostly wheels, is the generation of useful torques with sufficiently high bandwidth, resolution and accuracy. This is because the bandwidth of the whole attitude control loop and its disturbance rejection capability is dependent upon these factors. These useful torques shall be provided, without - as far as possible - parasitic noise like unbalance forces and torques and harmonics. This is because such variable frequency perturbations excite structural resonances which in turn disturb the operation of sensors and scientific instruments. High accuracy spacecraft will further require bus actuators for the three linear degrees of freedom (DOF) to damp structural oscillations excited by various sources. These actuators have to cover the dynamic range of these disturbances. Another interesting feature, which is not necessarily related to low noise performance, is a gimballing capability which enables, in a certain angular range, a three axis attitude control with only one wheel. The herein presented Teldix MWX, a five degree of freedom Magnetic Bearing Momentum Wheel, incorporates all the above required features. It is ideally suited to support, as a gyroscopic actuator in the attitude control system, all High Pointing Accuracy and Vibration Sensitive space missions.

  20. A gimbaled low noise momentum wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichler, U.; Eckardt, T.

    1993-05-01

    The bus actuators are the heart and at the same time the Achilles' heel of accurate spacecraft stabilization systems, because both their performance and their perturbations can have a deciding influence on the achievable pointing accuracy of the mission. The main task of the attitude actuators, which are mostly wheels, is the generation of useful torques with sufficiently high bandwidth, resolution and accuracy. This is because the bandwidth of the whole attitude control loop and its disturbance rejection capability is dependent upon these factors. These useful torques shall be provided, without - as far as possible - parasitic noise like unbalance forces and torques and harmonics. This is because such variable frequency perturbations excite structural resonances which in turn disturb the operation of sensors and scientific instruments. High accuracy spacecraft will further require bus actuators for the three linear degrees of freedom (DOF) to damp structural oscillations excited by various sources. These actuators have to cover the dynamic range of these disturbances. Another interesting feature, which is not necessarily related to low noise performance, is a gimballing capability which enables, in a certain angular range, a three axis attitude control with only one wheel. The herein presented Teldix MWX, a five degree of freedom Magnetic Bearing Momentum Wheel, incorporates all the above required features. It is ideally suited to support, as a gyroscopic actuator in the attitude control system, all High Pointing Accuracy and Vibration Sensitive space missions.

  1. Response of an Impact Test Apparatus for Fall Protective Headgear Testing Using a Hybrid-III Head/Neck Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Caccese, V.; Ferguson, J.; Lloyd, J.; Edgecomb, M.; Seidi, M.; Hajiaghamemar, M.

    2017-01-01

    A test method based upon a Hybrid-III head and neck assembly that includes measurement of both linear and angular acceleration is investigated for potential use in impact testing of protective headgear. The test apparatus is based upon a twin wire drop test system modified with the head/neck assembly and associated flyarm components. This study represents a preliminary assessment of the test apparatus for use in the development of protective headgear designed to prevent injury due to falls. By including angular acceleration in the test protocol it becomes possible to assess and intentionally reduce this component of acceleration. Comparisons of standard and reduced durometer necks, various anvils, front, rear, and side drop orientations, and response data on performance of the apparatus are provided. Injury measures summarized for an unprotected drop include maximum linear and angular acceleration, head injury criteria (HIC), rotational injury criteria (RIC), and power rotational head injury criteria (PRHIC). Coefficient of variation for multiple drops ranged from 0.4 to 6.7% for linear acceleration. Angular acceleration recorded in a side drop orientation resulted in highest coefficient of variation of 16.3%. The drop test apparatus results in a reasonably repeatable test method that has potential to be used in studies of headgear designed to reduce head impact injury. PMID:28216804

  2. Redundant single gimbal control moment gyroscope singularity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedrossian, Nazareth S.; Paradiso, Joseph; Bergmann, Edward V.; Rowell, Derek

    1990-01-01

    The robotic manipulator is proposed as the mechanical analog to single gimbal control moment gyroscope systems, and it is shown that both systems share similar difficulties with singular configurations. This analogy is used to group gimbal angles corresponding to any momentum state into different families. The singularity problem associated with these systems is examined in detail. In particular, a method is presented to test for the possibility of nontorque-producing gimbal motion at a singular configuration, as well as to determine the admissible motions in the case when this is possible. Sufficient conditions are derived for instances where the singular system can be reconfigured into a nonsingular state by these nontorque-producing motions.

  3. Gimbals Drive and Control Electronics Design, Development and Testing of the LRO High Gain Antenna and Solar Array Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernyakov, Boris; Thakore, Kamal

    2010-01-01

    Launched June 18, 2009 on an Atlas V rocket, NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) is the first step in NASA's Vision for Space Exploration program and for a human return to the Moon. The spacecraft (SC) carries a wide variety of scientific instruments and provides an extraordinary opportunity to study the lunar landscape at resolutions and over time scales never achieved before. The spacecraft systems are designed to enable achievement of LRO's mission requirements. To that end, LRO's mechanical system employed two two-axis gimbal assemblies used to drive the deployment and articulation of the Solar Array System (SAS) and the High Gain Antenna System (HGAS). This paper describes the design, development, integration, and testing of Gimbal Control Electronics (GCE) and Actuators for both the HGAS and SAS systems, as well as flight testing during the on-orbit commissioning phase and lessons learned.

  4. Engine Gimbal Requirements for Ground Testing of J-2X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalcik, Julia; Leahy, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Apollo-era J-2 that powered the second and third stages of the Saturn V, the current J-2X is the liquid hydrogen and oxygen high-altitude rocket engine in development for both the Ares I Upper Stage and Ares V Earth Departure Stage. During my summer 2009 internship, J-2X was at a stage in its design maturity where verification testing needed to be considered for the benefit of adequate test facility preparation. My task was to focus on gimbal requirements and gimbal related hot-fire test plans. Facility capabilities were also of interest, specifically for hot-fire testing slated to occur at test stands A-1, A-2, and A-3 at Stennis Space Center(SSC) in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. Gimbal requirements and stage interface conditions were investigated by applying a top-to-bottom systems engineering approach, which involved system level requirements, engine level requirements from both government and engine contractor perspectives, component level requirements, and the J-2X to Upper Stage and Earth Departure Stage interface control documents. Previous hydrogen and oxygen liquid rocket engine gimbal verification methods were researched for a glimpse at lessons learned. Discussion among the J-2X community affected by gimballing was organized to obtain input relative to proper verification of their respective component. Implementing suggestions such as gimbal pattern, angulated dwell time, altitude testing options, power level, and feed line orientation, I was able to match tests to test stands in the A Complex at SSC. Potential test capability gaps and risks were identified and pursued. The culmination of all these efforts was to coordinate with SSC to define additional facility requirements for both the A-3 altitude test stand that is currently under construction and the A-1 sea level test stand which is being renovated

  5. Analytical study of inside-out Gimbal dynamics. Volume 2: Appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybak, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    Stability data, eigenvalue data, and instrument pointing system earth point tracking time histories at various orbital altitudes are presented. These data apply to the inside-out Gimbal system configuration and the coincident Gimbal system configuration.

  6. Smart phone orientation estimation comparisons using three axis gimbal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaquin, Kevin G.; Fields, MaryAnne

    2016-05-01

    Smartphones have put powerful sensor arrays in nearly everyone's pockets. Fusing the data from these sensors it is possible to estimate the phone's current orientation. In this study we utilize a 3 axis gimbal to compare the performance of multiple orientation estimation algorithms. Controlling the position of the gimbal allows us to compare the known device orientation to the estimated orientation. Using this same method we determine where each algorithm's faults lie, and where they begin to break down. Then repeating these movements we are able to compare each algorithm to each other.

  7. Failure management of multiple gimbal inertial systems for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, D. W.; Mckern, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    A failure detection and isolation technique for use with four gimbaled inertial measurement units (IMU) is presented. By using simulated boost and entry shuttle trajectories with specific gimbaled IMU models, failure detection thresholds are developed based on red-line life dependent requirements and warning thresholds within the red-line thresholds based on expected worst case IMU performance. Using these trajectories, established trajectory threshold, and multiple IMU models, various failure detection and isolation techniques are evaluated for application in both powered and unpowered flight phases. The adequacy of the systems for both attitude and velocity detection methods is evaluated and recommendations for space shuttle applications are made.

  8. Jerrie Cobb, Lady Pilot, testing Gimbal Rig in AWT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    Jerrie Cobb, a well known female pilot in the 1950s, testing Gimbal Rig in the Altitude Wind Tunnel, AWT in April 1960. The Gimbal Rig, formally called MASTIF or Multiple Axis Space Test Inertia Facility, was used to train astronauts to control the spin of a tumbling spacecraft. Jerrie Cobb was the first female to pass all three phases of the Mercury Astronaut Program but NASA rules stipulated that only military test pilots could become astronauts and there were no female military test pilots. Jerrie completed this astounding feat in 1961. The MASTIF was installed at the Altitude Wind Tunnel at the Lewis Research Center, now John H. Glenn Research Center.

  9. Two different approaches for a control law of single gimbal control moment gyros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiehlen, W. O.

    1972-01-01

    In the field of momentum exchange attitude control systems, single gimbal control moment gyros (SGCMG) are of increasing interest. A gimbal angle approach and a gimbal rate approach are presented for the SGCMG control law including the singularity avoidance. Both approaches are compared and some illustrative examples are given.

  10. Evolution of the cephalopod head complex by assembly of multiple molluscan body parts: Evidence from Nautilus embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Shuichi; Sasaki, Takenori; Moritaki, Takeya; Kasugai, Takashi; Vecchione, Michael; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2008-01-01

    Cephalopod head parts are among the most complex occurring in all invertebrates. Hypotheses for the evolutionary process require a drastic body-plan transition in relation to the life-style changes from benthos to active nekton. Determining these transitions, however, has been elusive because of scarcity of fossil records of soft tissues and lack of some of the early developmental stages of the basal species. Here we report the first embryological evidence in the nautiloid cephalopod Nautilus pompilius for the morphological development of the head complex by a unique assembly of multiple archetypical molluscan body parts. Using a specialized aquarium system, we successfully obtained a series of developmental stages that enabled us to test previous controversial scenarios. Our results demonstrate that the embryonic organs exhibit body plans that are primarily bilateral and antero-posteriorly elongated at stereotyped positions. The distinct cephalic compartment, foot, brain cords, mantle, and shell resemble the body plans of monoplacophorans and basal gastropods. The numerous digital tentacles of Nautilus develop from simple serial and spatially-patterned bud-like anlagen along the anterior-posterior axis, indicating that origins of digital tentacles or arms of all other cephalopods develop not from the head but from the foot. In middle and late embryos, the primary body plans largely change to those of juveniles or adults, and finally form a "head" complex assembled by anlagen of the foot, cephalic hood, collar, hyponome (funnel), and the foot-derived epidermal covers. We suggest that extensions of the collar-funnel compartment and free epidermal folds derived from multiple topological foot regions may play an important role in forming the head complex, which is thought to be an important feature during the body plan transition.

  11. A compact magnetic bearing for gimballed momentum wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yabu-Uchi, K.; Inoue, M.; Akishita, S.; Murakami, C.; Okamoto, O.

    1983-01-01

    A three axis controlled magnetic bearing and its application to a momentum wheel are described. The four divided stators provide a momentum wheel with high reliability, low weight, large angular momentum storage capacity, and gimbal control. Those characteristics are desirable for spacecraft attitude control.

  12. Torque command steering law for double-gimbaled control moment gyros applied to rotor energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, H. F.

    1984-01-01

    A steering law is presented which has all the features required for space applications, assuming the CMG outer gimbal freedom is unlimited. The reason is the idea of mounting all the outer gimbal axes of the CMGs parallel to each other. This allows the decomposition of the steering law problem into a linear one for the inner gimbal angle rates and a planar one for the outer gimbal angle rates. The inner gimbal angle rates are calculated first, since they are not affected by the outer gimbal angle rates. For the calculation of the outer rates, the inner rates are then known quantities. An outer gimbal angle distribution function (to avoid singularities internal to the total angular momentum envelope) generates distribution rates next, and finally the pseudoinverse method is used to insure that the desired total torque is delivered.

  13. AXISYMMETRIC, THROTTLEABLE NON-GIMBALLED ROCKET ENGINE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackheim, Robert L. (Inventor); Hutt, John J. (Inventor); Anderson, William E. (Inventor); Dressler, Gordon A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A rocket engine assembly is provided for a vertically launched rocket vehicle. A rocket engine housing of the assembly includes two or more combustion chambers each including an outlet end defining a sonic throat area. A propellant supply for the combustion chambers includes a throttling injector, associated with each of the combustion chambers and located opposite to sonic throat area, which injects the propellant into the associated combustion chamber. A modulator, which may form part of the injector, and which is controlled by a controller, modulates the flow rate of the propellant to the combustion chambers so that the chambers provide a vectorable net thrust. An expansion nozzle or body located downstream of the throat area provides expansion of the combustion gases produced by the combustion chambers so as to increase the net thrust.

  14. Design and Development of a Two-Axis Thruster Gimbal with Xenon Propellant Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asadurian, Armond

    2010-01-01

    A Two-Axis Thruster Gimbal was developed for a two degree-of-freedom tip-tilt gimbal application. This light weight gimbal mechanism is equipped with flexible xenon propellant lines and features numerous thermal control features for all its critical components. Unique thermal profiles and operating environments have been the key design drivers for this mechanism which is fully tolerant of extreme space environmental conditions. Providing thermal controls that are compatible with flexible components and are also capable of surviving launch vibration within this gimbal mechanism has proven to be especially demanding, requiring creativity and significant development effort. Some of these features, design drivers, and lessons learned will be examined herein.

  15. Gimbal Influence on the Stability of Exterior Orientation Parameters of UAV Acquired Images.

    PubMed

    Gašparović, Mateo; Jurjević, Luka

    2017-02-18

    In this paper, results from the analysis of the gimbal impact on the determination of the camera exterior orientation parameters of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are presented and interpreted. Additionally, a new approach and methodology for testing the influence of gimbals on the exterior orientation parameters of UAV acquired images is presented. The main motive of this study is to examine the possibility of obtaining better geometry and favorable spatial bundles of rays of images in UAV photogrammetric surveying. The subject is a 3-axis brushless gimbal based on a controller board (Storm32). Only two gimbal axes are taken into consideration: roll and pitch axes. Testing was done in a flight simulation, and in indoor and outdoor flight mode, to analyze the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and photogrammetric data. Within these tests the change of the exterior orientation parameters without the use of a gimbal is determined, as well as the potential accuracy of the stabilization with the use of a gimbal. The results show that using a gimbal has huge potential. Significantly, smaller discrepancies between data are noticed when a gimbal is used in flight simulation mode, even four times smaller than in other test modes. In this test the potential accuracy of a low budget gimbal for application in real conditions is determined.

  16. Gimbal Influence on the Stability of Exterior Orientation Parameters of UAV Acquired Images

    PubMed Central

    Gašparović, Mateo; Jurjević, Luka

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, results from the analysis of the gimbal impact on the determination of the camera exterior orientation parameters of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are presented and interpreted. Additionally, a new approach and methodology for testing the influence of gimbals on the exterior orientation parameters of UAV acquired images is presented. The main motive of this study is to examine the possibility of obtaining better geometry and favorable spatial bundles of rays of images in UAV photogrammetric surveying. The subject is a 3-axis brushless gimbal based on a controller board (Storm32). Only two gimbal axes are taken into consideration: roll and pitch axes. Testing was done in a flight simulation, and in indoor and outdoor flight mode, to analyze the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and photogrammetric data. Within these tests the change of the exterior orientation parameters without the use of a gimbal is determined, as well as the potential accuracy of the stabilization with the use of a gimbal. The results show that using a gimbal has huge potential. Significantly, smaller discrepancies between data are noticed when a gimbal is used in flight simulation mode, even four times smaller than in other test modes. In this test the potential accuracy of a low budget gimbal for application in real conditions is determined. PMID:28218699

  17. Evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic movements at the vertebrate head-trunk interface coordinate the transport and assembly of hypopharyngeal structures.

    PubMed

    Lours-Calet, Corinne; Alvares, Lucia E; El-Hanfy, Amira S; Gandesha, Saniel; Walters, Esther H; Sobreira, Débora Rodrigues; Wotton, Karl R; Jorge, Erika C; Lawson, Jennifer A; Kelsey Lewis, A; Tada, Masazumi; Sharpe, Colin; Kardon, Gabrielle; Dietrich, Susanne

    2014-06-15

    The vertebrate head-trunk interface (occipital region) has been heavily remodelled during evolution, and its development is still poorly understood. In extant jawed vertebrates, this region provides muscle precursors for the throat and tongue (hypopharyngeal/hypobranchial/hypoglossal muscle precursors, HMP) that take a stereotype path rostrally along the pharynx and are thought to reach their target sites via active migration. Yet, this projection pattern emerged in jawless vertebrates before the evolution of migratory muscle precursors. This suggests that a so far elusive, more basic transport mechanism must have existed and may still be traceable today. Here we show for the first time that all occipital tissues participate in well-conserved cell movements. These cell movements are spearheaded by the occipital lateral mesoderm and ectoderm that split into two streams. The rostrally directed stream projects along the floor of the pharynx and reaches as far rostrally as the floor of the mandibular arch and outflow tract of the heart. Notably, this stream leads and engulfs the later emerging HMP, neural crest cells and hypoglossal nerve. When we (i) attempted to redirect hypobranchial/hypoglossal muscle precursors towards various attractants, (ii) placed non-migratory muscle precursors into the occipital environment or (iii) molecularly or (iv) genetically rendered muscle precursors non-migratory, they still followed the trajectory set by the occipital lateral mesoderm and ectoderm. Thus, we have discovered evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic movements, driven by the occipital lateral mesoderm and ectoderm, that ensure cell transport and organ assembly at the head-trunk interface.

  18. Structural rearrangements in the phage head-to-tail interface during assembly and infection

    PubMed Central

    Chaban, Yuriy; Lurz, Rudi; Brasilès, Sandrine; Cornilleau, Charlène; Karreman, Matthia; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Tavares, Paulo; Orlova, Elena V.

    2015-01-01

    Many icosahedral viruses use a specialized portal vertex to control genome encapsidation and release from the viral capsid. In tailed bacteriophages, the portal system is connected to a tail structure that provides the pipeline for genome delivery to the host cell. We report the first, to our knowledge, subnanometer structures of the complete portal–phage tail interface that mimic the states before and after DNA release during phage infection. They uncover structural rearrangements associated with intimate protein–DNA interactions. The portal protein gp6 of bacteriophage SPP1 undergoes a concerted reorganization of the structural elements of its central channel during interaction with DNA. A network of protein–protein interactions primes consecutive binding of proteins gp15 and gp16 to extend and close the channel. This critical step that prevents genome leakage from the capsid is achieved by a previously unidentified allosteric mechanism: gp16 binding to two different regions of gp15 drives correct positioning and folding of an inner gp16 loop to interact with equivalent loops of the other gp16 subunits. Together, these loops build a plug that closes the channel. Gp16 then fastens the tail to yield the infectious virion. The gatekeeper system opens for viral genome exit at the beginning of infection but recloses afterward, suggesting a molecular diaphragm-like mechanism to control DNA efflux. The mechanisms described here, controlling the essential steps of phage genome movements during virus assembly and infection, are likely to be conserved among long-tailed phages, the largest group of viruses in the Biosphere. PMID:25991862

  19. Gimballing magnetic bearing reaction wheel with digital controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Bernd; Ehinger, Markus; Raue, Hans Knut; Seiler, René

    2005-07-01

    Magnetic bearing reaction wheels provide a number of interesting advantages over ball bearing wheels. They allow high-speed operation with minimum loss torque and generate substantially less micro-vibrations. However, they require dedicated, demanding control electronics. A conroller based on a Digital Signal Processor has been developed. The controller was tested with an 87 Nms wheel prototype equipped with a magnetic bearing allowing active control in five axes. The wheel provides low-noise operation from 0 to 8000 rpm with a rotor gimballing capability of up to ±1.7°. The paper reviews the design principles and presents relevant test results, e.g. regarding the active suppression of micro-vibrations.

  20. Development of a Miniature, Two-Axis, Triple-Helmholtz-Driven Gimbal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharif, Boz; Joscelyn, Ed; Wilcox, Brian; Johnson, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper details the development of a Helmholtz-driven, 2-axis gimbal to position a flat mirror within 50 microradian (fine positioning) in a space environment. The gimbal is intended to travel on a deep space mission mounted on a miniature "rover" vehicle. The gimbal will perform both pointing and scanning functions. The goal for total mass of the gimbal was 25 grams. The primary challenge was to design and build a bearing system that would achieve the required accuracy in addition to supporting the relatively large mass of the mirror and the outer gimbal. The mechanism is subjected to 100-G loading without the aid of any additional caging mechanism. Additionally, it was desired to have the same level of accuracy during Earth-bound, 1-G testing. Due to the inherent lack of damping in a zero-G, vacuum environment; the ability of the gimbal to respond to very small amounts of input energy is paramount. Initial testing of the first prototype revealed exceedingly long damping times required even while exposed to the damping effects of air and 1-G friction. It is envisioned that fine positioning of the gimbal will be accomplished in very small steps to avoid large disturbances to the mirror. Various bearing designs, including materials, lubrication options and bearing geometry will be discussed. In addition various options for the Helmholtz coil design will be explored with specific test data given. Ground testing in the presence of 1-G was compounded by the local magnetic fields due to the "compass" effect on the gimbal. The test data will be presented and discussed. Additionally, rationale for estimating gimbal performance in a zero-G environment will be presented and discussed.

  1. On the design and development of a miniature ceramic gimbal bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Robert A.; Odwyer, Barry; Gordon, Keith M.; Jarvis, Edward W.

    1990-01-01

    A review is made of a program to develop ceramic gimbal bearings for a miniaturized missile guidance system requiring nonmagnetic properties and higher load capacity than possible with conventional AISI 440C stainless steel bearings. A new gimbal design concept is described which utilizes the compressive strength and nonmagnetic properties of silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramics for the gimbal bearing. Considerable manufacturing development has occurred in the last 5 years making ceramic bearings a viable option in the gimbal design phase. A preliminary study into the feasibility of the proposed design is summarized. Finite element analysis of the brittle ceramic bearing components under thermal stress and high acceleration loading were conducted to ensure the components will not fail catastrophically in service. Finite element analysis was also used to optimize the adhesive joint design. Bearing torque tests run at various axial loads indicate that the average running torque of ceramic bearings varies with load similarly to that of conventional steel bearings.

  2. Thrust vector control of upper stage with a gimbaled thruster during orbit transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Jia, Yinghong; Jin, Lei; Duan, Jiajia

    2016-10-01

    In launching Multi-Satellite with One-Vehicle, the main thruster provided by the upper stage is mounted on a two-axis gimbal. During orbit transfer, the thrust vector of this gimbaled thruster (GT) should theoretically pass through the mass center of the upper stage and align with the command direction to provide orbit transfer impetus. However, it is hard to be implemented from the viewpoint of the engineering mission. The deviations of the thrust vector from the command direction would result in large velocity errors. Moreover, the deviations of the thrust vector from the upper stage mass center would produce large disturbance torques. This paper discusses the thrust vector control (TVC) of the upper stage during its orbit transfer. Firstly, the accurate nonlinear coupled kinematic and dynamic equations of the upper stage body, the two-axis gimbal and the GT are derived by taking the upper stage as a multi-body system. Then, a thrust vector control system consisting of the special attitude control of the upper stage and the gimbal rotation of the gimbaled thruster is proposed. The special attitude control defined by the desired attitude that draws the thrust vector to align with the command direction when the gimbal control makes the thrust vector passes through the upper stage mass center. Finally, the validity of the proposed method is verified through numerical simulations.

  3. Adaptive PD Tracking Control of Gimbal on Satellite Based on Parameter Revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Min; Zhao, Guo-Wei; Bai, Jun-Qing; Wang, Hao-Yu

    As key component of pointing and tracking mission of satellite, gimbal with two or more degree of freedom is usually mounted on the satellite in order to fulfill certain space mission, such as optical communication between satellites, target recognition, antenna with certain pointing direction and so on. In these missions, gimbal is mostly used to point to and track a space target or a given track. However, for most control method, because of their constant feedback parameter, the gimbal still track target with constant speed when the target is in high-speed or the satellite mounted with gimbal is suddenly undertaken shock. In fact, the gimbal could track target with different speed to improve pointing accuracy under particular circumstance. In order to solve the problem, an algorithm to revise feedback parameter is designed to be different functions of pointing angle error of gimbal. At last a simulation is carried out to verify the improvement of joint angle error using this algorithm under particular circumstance. The results proved that the joint angle error is efficiently decreased with feedback parameter revision.

  4. Identification of Essential Genes in the Salmonella Phage SPN3US Reveals Novel Insights into Giant Phage Head Structure and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Benítez Quintana, Andrea Denisse; Bosch, Martine A.; Coll De Peña, Adriana; Aguilera, Elizabeth; Coulibaly, Assitan; Wu, Weimin; Osier, Michael V.; Hudson, André O.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Black, Lindsay W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Giant tailed bacterial viruses, or phages, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage ϕKZ, have long genomes packaged into large, atypical virions. Many aspects of ϕKZ and related phage biology are poorly understood, mostly due to the fact that the functions of the majority of their proteins are unknown. We hypothesized that the Salmonella enterica phage SPN3US could be a useful model phage to address this gap in knowledge. The 240-kb SPN3US genome shares a core set of 91 genes with ϕKZ and related phages, ∼61 of which are virion genes, consistent with the expectation that virion complexity is an ancient, conserved feature. Nucleotide sequencing of 18 mutants enabled assignment of 13 genes as essential, information which could not have been determined by sequence-based searches for 11 genes. Proteome analyses of two SPN3US virion protein mutants with knockouts in 64 and 241 provided new insight into the composition and assembly of giant phage heads. The 64 mutant analyses revealed all the genetic determinants required for assembly of the SPN3US head and a likely head-tail joining role for gp64, and its homologs in related phages, due to the tailless-particle phenotype produced. Analyses of the mutation in 241, which encodes an RNA polymerase β subunit, revealed that without this subunit, no other subunits are assembled into the head, and enabled identification of a “missing” β′ subunit domain. These findings support SPN3US as an excellent model for giant phage research, laying the groundwork for future analyses of their highly unusual virions, host interactions, and evolution. IMPORTANCE In recent years, there has been a paradigm shift in virology with the realization that extremely large viruses infecting prokaryotes (giant phages) can be found in many environments. A group of phages related to the prototype giant phage ϕKZ are of great interest due to their virions being among the most complex of prokaryotic viruses and their potential for

  5. SU-E-T-465: Dose Calculation Method for Dynamic Tumor Tracking Using a Gimbal-Mounted Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, S; Inoue, T; Kurokawa, C; Usui, K; Sasai, K; Utsunomiya, S; Ebe, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dynamic tumor tracking using the gimbal-mounted linac (Vero4DRT, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Japan) has been available when respiratory motion is significant. The irradiation accuracy of the dynamic tumor tracking has been reported to be excellent. In addition to the irradiation accuracy, a fast and accurate dose calculation algorithm is needed to validate the dose distribution in the presence of respiratory motion because the multiple phases of it have to be considered. A modification of dose calculation algorithm is necessary for the gimbal-mounted linac due to the degrees of freedom of gimbal swing. The dose calculation algorithm for the gimbal motion was implemented using the linear transformation between coordinate systems. Methods: The linear transformation matrices between the coordinate systems with and without gimbal swings were constructed using the combination of translation and rotation matrices. The coordinate system where the radiation source is at the origin and the beam axis along the z axis was adopted. The transformation can be divided into the translation from the radiation source to the gimbal rotation center, the two rotations around the center relating to the gimbal swings, and the translation from the gimbal center to the radiation source. After operating the transformation matrix to the phantom or patient image, the dose calculation can be performed as the no gimbal swing. The algorithm was implemented in the treatment planning system, PlanUNC (University of North Carolina, NC). The convolution/superposition algorithm was used. The dose calculations with and without gimbal swings were performed for the 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} field with the grid size of 5 mm. Results: The calculation time was about 3 minutes per beam. No significant additional time due to the gimbal swing was observed. Conclusions: The dose calculation algorithm for the finite gimbal swing was implemented. The calculation time was moderate.

  6. Gimbal system configurations and line-of-sight control techniques for small UAV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Rick; Mooty, Greg; Hilkert, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    The proliferation of small Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) in the past decade has been driven, in part, by the diverse applications that various industries have found for these platforms. Originally, these applications were predominately military in nature but now include law enforcement/security, environmental monitoring/remote sensing, agricultural surveying, movie making and others. Many of these require sensors/payloads such as cameras, laser pointers/ illuminators/rangefinders and other systems that must be pointed and/or stabilized and therefore require a precision miniature gimbal or other means to control their line-of-sight (LOS). Until now, these markets have been served by traditional/larger gimbals; however, the latest class of small UAVs demands much smaller gimbals while maintaining high-performance. The limited size and weight of these gimbaled devices result in design challenges unique to the small-gimbal design field. In the past five years, Ascendant Engineering Solutions has engaged in designing, analyzing and building several small-gimbal systems to meet these challenges and has undertaken a number of trade studies to investigate techniques to achieve optimal performance within the inherent limitations mentioned above. These have included investigating various gimbal configurations, feedback sensors such as gyros, IMUs and encoders, drive train configurations, control system techniques, packaging and interconnect, as well as technology such as fast-steering mirrors and image-stabilization algorithms. This paper summarizes the results of these trade studies, attempts to identify inherent trends and limitations in the various design approaches and techniques, and discusses some practical issues such as test and verification.

  7. Performance of the high-altitude balloon experiment Roto-lok drive gimbal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulthess, Marcus R.; Ardaman, Andrew A.; Baugh, Steven; Carson, Donald G.

    1994-07-01

    This paper presents and discusses laboratory performance measurements of a Roto-Lok drive system for the HABE azimuth and elevation gimbals. The HABE system is a 7,000 lb acquisition tracking and pointing (ATP) balloon-launched vehicle. The primary azimuth and elevation drive systems are zero-backlash torque multipliers referred to by the trade name Roto-Lok rotary drive and designed by Sagebrush Technology, Inc. The Roto-Lok used in the azimuth gimbal has a limited 320 deg of angular travel; therefore, it is supplemented with a secondary drive element to provide unlimited travel. This secondary drive is used to counteract the gross angles resulting from the freely rotating nature of the untethered balloon system. The Roto-Lok drive is used for the fine tracking and pointing of the gimbals. Both the azimuth and elevation Rota-Lok drives are tandem drives with an end-to-end ratio of 72:1. Performance specifications developed from the mission requirements are compared against the actual system performance measurements. The entire gimbaled azimuth and elevation systems are required to point in inertial space to less than 250 (mu) rad RMS over the band DC to 100 Hz for each axis. Performance measurements better than the specification were measured. The primary gimbal base-motion disturbances, however, are due to the motor cogging torque or torque ripple. A brief discussion of the measurement methods and the control system used to drive the gimbals is presented. Several system anomalies, such as the structural compliance between the drive element and the inertial rate sensors and the coarse gear backlash, are discussed in terms of their impact on the gimbal control system.

  8. Passing Current through Electrically Conducting Lyotropic Liquid Crystals and Micelles Assembled from Hybrid Surfactants with π-Conjugated Tail and Polyoxometalate Head

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The solvent-mediated ability for molecularly encoded self-assembly into states of higher order (micelles, lyotropic liquid crystals) embodies the basis for many applications of surfactants in science and society. Surfactants are used frequently in recipes for nanoparticle synthesis. Because ordinary surfactants comprise insulating constituents (alkyl groups as side-chains and charged organic heads), such nanostructures are wrapped in an electrically inactive barrier, and this is a large disadvantage for future developments in nanotechnology. Implications of micelles with electrically conducting walls made from either “metallic” or “semiconducting” surfactants are huge, also in other areas such as nanoelectrocatalysis or micellar energy storage. We cross this frontier by replacing not only the hydrophilic chain but also the hydrophilic head by electronically conducting entities. We report the synthesis of surfactants with oligo para-phenylene-ethynylene as a π-conjugated side-chain attached to a redox-active, inorganic polyoxometalate cluster as charged head. It is proven that electronic communication between head and tail takes place. Hybridization on the molecular level leads to the emergence of advanced surfactant features such as semiconductor properties (Egap = 2.6 eV) in soft lyotropic systems (micelles, liquid crystals). PMID:27809472

  9. Modeling of biaxial gimbal-less MEMS scanning mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Wantoch, Thomas; Gu-Stoppel, Shanshan; Senger, Frank; Mallas, Christian; Hofmann, Ulrich; Meurer, Thomas; Benecke, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    One- and two-dimensional MEMS scanning mirrors for resonant or quasi-stationary beam deflection are primarily known as tiny micromirror devices with aperture sizes up to a few Millimeters and usually address low power applications in high volume markets, e.g. laser beam scanning pico-projectors or gesture recognition systems. In contrast, recently reported vacuum packaged MEMS scanners feature mirror diameters up to 20 mm and integrated high-reflectivity dielectric coatings. These mirrors enable MEMS based scanning for applications that require large apertures due to optical constraints like 3D sensing or microscopy as well as for high power laser applications like laser phosphor displays, automotive lighting and displays, 3D printing and general laser material processing. This work presents modelling, control design and experimental characterization of gimbal-less MEMS mirrors with large aperture size. As an example a resonant biaxial Quadpod scanner with 7 mm mirror diameter and four integrated PZT (lead zirconate titanate) actuators is analyzed. The finite element method (FEM) model developed and computed in COMSOL Multiphysics is used for calculating the eigenmodes of the mirror as well as for extracting a high order (n < 10000) state space representation of the mirror dynamics with actuation voltages as system inputs and scanner displacement as system output. By applying model order reduction techniques using MATLABR a compact state space system approximation of order n = 6 is computed. Based on this reduced order model feedforward control inputs for different, properly chosen scanner displacement trajectories are derived and tested using the original FEM model as well as the micromirror.

  10. Design considerations of a slit diaphragm flexure used in a precision mirror gimbal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Brian; Kaufman, Morris

    2011-09-01

    Two precision mirror gimbals were designed using slit diaphragm flexures to provide two-axis precision mirror alignment in space-limited applications. Both gimbals are currently in use in diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility: one design in the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic and the other in the Neutron Imaging System (NIS) diagnostic. The GRH gimbal has an adjustment sensitivity of 0.1 mrad about both axes and a total adjustment capability of +/-6° the NIS gimbal has an adjustment sensitivity of 0.8 μrad about both axes and a total adjustment range of +/-3°. Both slit diaphragm flexures were electro-discharge machined out of high-strength titanium and utilize stainless steel stiffeners. The stiffener-flexure design results in adjustment axes with excellent orthogonality and centering with respect to the mirror in a single stage; a typical two-axis gimbal flexure requires two stages. Finite element analyses are presented for both flexure designs, and a design optimization of the GRH flexure is discussed.

  11. Precision Pointing Control System (PPCS) system design and analysis. [for gimbaled experiment platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frew, A. M.; Eisenhut, D. F.; Farrenkopf, R. L.; Gates, R. F.; Iwens, R. P.; Kirby, D. K.; Mann, R. J.; Spencer, D. J.; Tsou, H. S.; Zaremba, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    The precision pointing control system (PPCS) is an integrated system for precision attitude determination and orientation of gimbaled experiment platforms. The PPCS concept configures the system to perform orientation of up to six independent gimbaled experiment platforms to design goal accuracy of 0.001 degrees, and to operate in conjunction with a three-axis stabilized earth-oriented spacecraft in orbits ranging from low altitude (200-2500 n.m., sun synchronous) to 24 hour geosynchronous, with a design goal life of 3 to 5 years. The system comprises two complementary functions: (1) attitude determination where the attitude of a defined set of body-fixed reference axes is determined relative to a known set of reference axes fixed in inertial space; and (2) pointing control where gimbal orientation is controlled, open-loop (without use of payload error/feedback) with respect to a defined set of body-fixed reference axes to produce pointing to a desired target.

  12. Steering law design for redundant single-gimbal control moment gyroscopes. [for spacecraft attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedrossian, Nazareth S.; Paradiso, Joseph; Bergmann, Edward V.; Rowell, Derek

    1990-01-01

    Two steering laws are presented for single-gimbal control moment gyroscopes. An approach using the Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse with a nondirectional null-motion algorithm is shown by example to avoid internal singularities for unidirectional torque commands, for which existing algorithms fail. Because this is still a tangent-based approach, however, singularity avoidance cannot be guaranteed. The singularity robust inverse is introduced as an alternative to the pseudoinverse for computing torque-producing gimbal rates near singular states. This approach, coupled with the nondirectional null algorithm, is shown by example to provide better steering law performance by allowing torque errors to be produced in the vicinity of singular states.

  13. A new type of magnetic gimballed momentum wheel and its application to attitude control in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, C.; Ohkami, Y.; Okamoto, O.; Nakajima, A.; Inoue, M.; Tsuchiya, J.; Yabu-uchi, K.; Akishita, S.; Kida, T.

    A new type of magnetically suspended gimbal momentum wheel utilizing permanent magnets is described. The bearing was composed of four independent thrust actuators which control the rotor thrust position and gimbal angles cooperatively, so that the bearing comes to have a simple mechanism with high reliability and light weight. The high speed instability problem due to the internal damping was easily overcome by introducing anisotropic radial stiffness. A momentum flywheel with the 3-axis controlled magnetic bearing displays good performance for attitude control of satellite with biased momentum.

  14. A steering law for three double-gimbal control moment gyro systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, T.

    1975-01-01

    A steering law for three double-gimbal control moment gyro (CMG) systems is proposed. This steering law is applicable to systems with almost any configuration of CMGs and the CMG-out operation needs no special modification. Examples of three double gimbal CMG systems in an orthogonal configuration and in a parallel configuration are shown along with the results of digital simulations. Simulation results show that any command torque can always be met except when the system is in a singular state and that, whenever the system is in, or close to, a singularity, the steering law drives the system state out of the vicinity of the singularity.

  15. An analysis of the Dahl friction model and its effect on a CMG gimbal rate controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurre, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of friction, represented by the Dahl model, on a CMG rate control system was investigated by digital simulation. The conclusion from these simulation results is that gimbal pivot friction can be a significant effect on the gimbal rate control system. The magnitude of the problem this presents depends on the characteristics of the actual pivot. It would appear from this preliminary look that one solution is to insure that the control system natural frequency is higher by some prescribed amount than the natural frequency of the friction loop.

  16. Spata6 is required for normal assembly of the sperm connecting piece and tight head-tail conjunction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuiqiao; Stratton, Clifford J; Bao, Jianqiang; Zheng, Huili; Bhetwal, Bhupal P; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Yan, Wei

    2015-02-03

    "Pinhead sperm," or "acephalic sperm," a type of human teratozoospermia, refers to the condition in which ejaculate contains mostly sperm flagella without heads. Family clustering and homogeneity of this syndrome suggests a genetic basis, but the causative genes remain largely unknown. Here we report that Spata6, an evolutionarily conserved testis-specific gene, encodes a protein required for formation of the segmented columns and the capitulum, two major structures of the sperm connecting piece essential for linking the developing flagellum to the head during late spermiogenesis. Inactivation of Spata6 in mice leads to acephalic spermatozoa and male sterility. Our proteomic analyses reveal that SPATA6 is involved in myosin-based microfilament transport through interaction with myosin subunits (e.g., MYL6).

  17. Non-Gimbaled Antenna Pointing: Summary of Results and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    -gain antennas and associated attitude control and drive electronics; (3) The class of satellites is severely weight and power limited; (4) There are perceived problems in scheduling communications for this class of user on the SN. This report addresses the potential for SN access using non-gimbaled, i.e. fixed-pointed, antennas in the design of the small satellite using modest transmission power to achieve the necessary space-to-ground transmissions. The advantage of using the SN is in the reduction of mission costs arising from using the SN infrastructure instead of a dedicated, proprietary ground station using a similar type of communications package. From the simulations and analysis presented, we will show that a modest satellite configuration can be used with the space network to achieve the data transmission goals of a number of users and thereby rival the performance achieved with proprietary ground stations. In this study, we will concentrate on the return data link (from the user satellite through a TDRS to the ground data entry point). The forward command link (from the ground data entry point through a TDRS to the user satellite) will usually be a lower data rate service and the data volume will also be considerably lower than the return link's requirement. Therefore, we assume that if the return link requirements are satisfied, then the forward link requirements can also be satisfied.

  18. Role of the host cell in bacteriophage T4 development. I. Characterization of host mutants that block T4 head assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Revel, H R; Stitt, B L; Lielausis, I; Wood, W B

    1980-01-01

    To study the role of the host cell in bacteriophage T4 infection, we selected more than 600 mutant host-defective bacteria that absorbed and were killed by phage T4+ but were unable to support its growth. The mutants were grouped into seven classes by the growth patterns of T4 phages carrying compensating mutations (go mutants [grows on]), selected on four prototype host-defective strains. Lysis and DNA synthesis experiments indicated that classes A, AD, D, and B (the majority of the host-defective mutants) block T4+ development at an assembly step, class C mutants affect an early stage in phage development, and class F mutants appear to act at more than one stage. Analysis of T4+ infection in the assembly-defective mutants by in vitro complementation, electron microscopy, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the host-defective mutations interfere with T4+ capsid formation at the level of phage gene 31 function, before assembly of any recognizable capsid structure. The mutations map near purA, but at two or possibly three different sites. The go mutant phages able to overcome the host defect carry mutations in either gene 31, as found by others for similar defective hosts, or in the gene for the major capsid protein (gene 23). The gene 23 go mutations do not bypass the requirement for gene 31 function. These results suggest that at least three components must interact to initiate T4 head assembly: gp31, gp23, and one or more host factors. The compensatory effects of mutational alterations in these components are highly allele specific, consistent with the view that phage and host components interact directly in protein complexes. Images PMID:6988606

  19. Macro-modelling of a double-gimballed electrostatic torsional micromirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guangya; Tay, Francis E. H.; Chau, Fook Siong

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents the development of a reduced-order macro-model for the double-gimballed electrostatic torsional micromirror using the hierarchical circuit-based approach. The proposed macro-model permits extremely fast simulation while providing nearly FEM accuracy. The macro-model is coded in MAST analog hardware description language (AHDL), and the simulations are implemented in the SABERTM simulator. Both the static and dynamic behaviour of the double-gimballed electrostatic torsional micromirror have been investigated. The dc and frequency analysis results obtained by the proposed macro-model are in good agreement with CoventorWareTM finite element analysis results. Based on the macro-model we developed, system-level simulation of a closed-loop controlled double-gimballed torsional micromirror is also performed. Decentralized PID controllers are proposed for the control of the micromirror. A sequential-loop-closing method is used for tuning the multiple control loops during the simulation. After tuning, the closed-loop controlled double-gimballed torsional micromirror demonstrates an improved transient performance and satisfactory disturbance rejection ability.

  20. Stabilized Gimbal for Airborne Water Surface Velocity Measurements in Riverine and Littoral Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    model gimbal that contains a cooled midwave IR camera (FLIR Neutrino ), COTS visible camera and onboard INS/GPS stabilization. The most significant...FLIR Neutrino 640x480 array, NETD < 25 mK 35 FOV, remote focus GigE data output visible camera Point Grey Flea 3 2MP resolution, 35 FOV

  1. A lightweight high performance dual-axis gimbal for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, D.J.; Hakala, D.B.; Malueg, R.

    1995-05-05

    This paper describes the design, development and performance of a lightweight precision gimbal with dual-axis slew capability to be used in a closed-loop optical tracking system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory-LLNL. The motivation for the development of this gimbal originates from the need to acquire and accurately localize warm objects (T{approximately}500 K) in a cluttered background. The design of the gimbal is centered around meeting the following performance requirements: pointing accuracy with control < 35 {mu}rad-(1-{omega}); slew capability > 0.2 rad/sec; mechanical weight < 5 kg. These performance requirements are derived by attempting to track a single target from multiple satellites in low Earth orbit using a mid-wave infrared camera. Key components in the gimbal hardware that are essential to meeting the performance objectives include a nickel plated beryllium mirro, an accurate lightweight capacitive pickoff device for angular measurement about the elevation axis, a 16-bit coarse/fine resolver for angular measurement about the azimuth axis, a toroidally wound motor with low hysteresis for providing torque about the azimuth axis, and the selection of beryllium parts to insure high stiffness to weight ratios and more efficient thermal conductivity. Each of these elements are discussed in detail to illustrate the design trades performed to meet the tracking and slewing requirements demanded. Preliminary experimental results are also given for various commanded tracking maneuvers.

  2. Two-axis gimbal for air-to-air and air-to-ground laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talmor, Amnon G.; Harding, Harvard; Chen, Chien-Chung

    2016-03-01

    For bi-directional links between high-altitude-platforms (HAPs) and ground, and air-to-air communication between such platforms, a hemispherical +30°C field-of-regard and low-drag low-mass two-axis gimbal was designed and prototyped. The gimbal comprises two servo controlled non-orthogonal elevation over azimuth axis, and inner fast steering mirrors for fine field-of-regard adjustment. The design encompasses a 7.5cm diameter aperture refractive telescope in its elevation stage, folded between two flat mirrors with an exit lens leading to a two mirrors miniature Coude-path fixed to the azimuth stage. Multiple gimbal configurations were traded prior to finalizing a selection that met the requirements. The selected design was manifested onboard a carbon fiber and magnesium composite structure, motorized by custom-built servo motors, and commutated by optical encoders. The azimuth stage is electrically connected to the stationary base via slip ring while the elevation stage made of passive optics. Both axes are aligned by custom-built ceramic-on-steel angular contact duplex bearings, and controlled by embedded electronics featuring a rigid-flex PCB architecture. FEA analysis showed that the design is mechanically robust over a temperature range of +60°C to -80°C, and with first mode of natural frequencies above 400Hz. The total mass of the prototyped gimbal is 3.5kg, including the inner optical bench, which contains fast steering mirrors (FSMs) and tracking sensors. Future version of this gimbal, in prototyping stage, shall weigh less than 3.0kg.

  3. General view of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) assembly ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) assembly with the expansion nozzle removed and resting on a cushioned mat on the floor of the SSME Processing Facility. The most prominent features in this view are the Low-Pressure Fuel Turbopump (LPFTP) on the upper left of the engine assembly, the LPFTP Discharge Duct looping around the assembly, the Gimbal Bearing on the top center of the assembly, the Electrical Interface Panel sits just below the Gimbal Bearing and the Low-Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump is mounted on the top right of the engine assembly in this view. - Space Transportation System, Space Shuttle Main Engine, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  4. Design and development of the Cassini main engine assembly Gimbal mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, Dale

    1996-01-01

    Cassini is an international cooperative effort between NASA, which is producing the orbiter spacecraft, the European Space Agency, which is providing the Huygens Probe, and the Italian Space Agency, which is responsible for the spacecraft radio antenna and portions of three scientific experiments. In the U.S., the mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. Lockheed-Martin successfully bid on the contract to build the PMS (Propulsion Module Subsystem) for this project. The Cassini spacecraft will be launched on an expedition to Saturn in October, 1997. Its mission is to enter orbit around Saturn in July, 2004, and to explore its moons, rings, and magnetic environment for four years. Cassini will carry the Huygens probe, an instrument package equipped with a parachute, which is designed to study the atmosphere and surface of Saturn's largest moon, Titan.

  5. Internal performance of two nozzles utilizing gimbal concepts for thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, Bobby L.; Taylor, John G.

    1990-01-01

    The internal performance of an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle and a nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle, both of which utilized a gimbal type mechanism for thrust vectoring was evaluated in the Static Test Facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The nonaxisymmetric nozzle used the gimbal concept for yaw thrust vectoring only; pitch thrust vectoring was accomplished by simultaneous deflection of the upper and lower divergent flaps. The model geometric parameters investigated were pitch vector angle for the axisymmetric nozzle and pitch vector angle, yaw vector angle, nozzle throat aspect ratio, and nozzle expansion ratio for the nonaxisymmetric nozzle. All tests were conducted with no external flow, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 to approximately 12.0.

  6. Rotor's Suspension for Vernier-gimballing magnetically suspended flywheel with conical magnetic bearing.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiqiang; Xiang, Biao; Wang, Chun'e

    2015-09-01

    A novel Vernier-gimballing magnetically suspended flywheel with conical magnetic bearing (conical MB) can generate great gyroscopic moment by tilting the high-speed rotor. To output the gyroscopic moment, the high-speed rotor must be suspended stably and can be tilted. But when the rotor tilts, the gap between the stator and rotor of conical MB changes nonlinearly, what will cause the magnetic force and current stiffness of this conical MB to be serious nonlinear. To solve these problems, one kind of adaptive controller based on Lyapunov stability theory is designed by regarding the current stiffness of this conical MB as uncertain parameter. The validity of this adaptive control method is verified on a Vernier-gimballing MSFW with 68 Nms angular momentum and 1.7° maximum tilting angle. All experimental results indicated that this adaptive control has better performances on controlling rotor's stable suspension than existing PID control when the rotor translates or tilts.

  7. Single gimbal/strapdown inertial navigation system for use on spin stabilized flight test vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, A.C.; Andreas, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A hybrid strapdown inertial navigation system intended for use on spin stabilized flight test vehicles is described. The configuration of the navigator which is briefly described consists of three floated rate integrating gyros, one of which is used in conjunction with the gimbal with the remaining two operated in a rate gyro mode. Outputs from the two strapdown gyros and three accelerometers are digitized and processed by a high performance computer. The navigation algorithms utilize a direction cosine matrix formulation for the attitude computation implemented in the digital computer. The implementation of this algorithm for the single gimbal configuration is described. An accuracy model and results for a reentry vehicle flight test trajectory are presented. The flight test performance from launch to reentry is presented.

  8. Stabilization loop of a two axes gimbal system using self-tuning PID type fuzzy controller.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Maher Mahmoud; Vali, Ahmad Reza; Toloei, Ali Reza; Arvan, Mohammad Reza

    2014-03-01

    The application of inertial stabilization system is to stabilize the sensor's line of sight toward a target by isolating the sensor from the disturbances induced by the operating environment. The aim of this paper is to present two axes gimbal system. The gimbals torque relationships are derived using Lagrange equation considering the base angular motion and dynamic mass unbalance. The stabilization loops are constructed with cross coupling unit utilizing proposed fuzzy PID type controller. The overall control system is simulated and validated using MATLAB. Then, the performance of proposed controller is evaluated comparing with conventional PI controller in terms of transient response analysis and quantitative study of error analysis. The simulation results obtained in different conditions prove the efficiency of the proposed fuzzy controller which offers a better response than the classical one, and improves further the transient and steady-state performance.

  9. Effects of flexibility on AGS performance. [Annular suspension pointing system Gimbal System aboard Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, H. L.; Cunningham, D. C.; Worley, H. E.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has had under development the Annular Suspension Pointing System Gimbal System (AGS) since early 1979. The AGS is an Orbiter cargo bay mounted subarcsecond 3 axis inertial pointer that can accommodate a wide range of payloads which require more stringent pointing than the Orbiter can provide. This paper will describe the AGS, state performance requirements and the control law configuration. Then an approach to investigating the flexible body effects on control system design will be discussed.

  10. Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) gimballed star tracker. [developed for the Skylab program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lana, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Design and development of six gimballed star trackers for Skylab's Apollo Telescope Mount, which performed successfully on all three manned Skylab missions and accumulated a total usage time of approximately 3,500 hours, is described in terms of configurations, materials and construction, qualification testing, performance, and reliability characteristics. A brief program history and design changes incorporated during the life of the program are also discussed. Extensive drawings, block diagrams, and photographs are provided.

  11. Optimal Space Station solar array gimbal angle determination via radial basis function neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Daniel J.; Oezguener, Uemit; Graham, Ronald E.

    1994-01-01

    The potential for excessive plume impingement loads on Space Station Freedom solar arrays, caused by jet firings from an approaching Space Shuttle, is addressed. An artificial neural network is designed to determine commanded solar array beta gimbal angle for minimum plume loads. The commanded angle would be determined dynamically. The network design proposed involves radial basis functions as activation functions. Design, development, and simulation of this network design are discussed.

  12. Updating Gimbal Actuators for the Long Journey to Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iskenderian, Theodore; Joffe, Benjamin; Litty, Edward

    1997-01-01

    The Cassini mission requires extraordinary life and reliability from the linear servo-actuators which position the spacecraft's redundant rocket engines. Both commercial actuators and existing in-house actuator designs were studied for this application. Ultimately a device inherited from JPL's Mariner and Viking missions to Mars was selected because of its close match to functional requirements and its flight pedigree. However, several design improvements were necessary to meet life and reliability goals. Special attention was focused on reliability testing of the motor and mechanism at all stages of procurement and assembly because a brush type of DC motor was retained from the old design. These improvements and, in particular, efforts to develop new component sources are discussed in this paper.

  13. Heater head for stirling engine

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A.

    1985-07-09

    A monolithic heater head assembly which augments cast fins with ceramic inserts which narrow the flow of combustion gas and obtains high thermal effectiveness with the assembly including an improved flange design which gives greater durability and reduced conduction loss.

  14. Design and manufacturing considerations for high-performance gimbals used for land, sea, air, and space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Mike; Redd, Lafe; Vettese, Tom; Myatt, Ray; Uchida, David; Sellers, Del

    2015-09-01

    High performance stabilized EO/IR surveillance and targeting systems are in demand for a wide variety of military, law enforcement, and commercial assets for land, sea, air, and space. Operating ranges, wavelengths, and angular resolution capabilities define the requirements for EO/IR optics and sensors, and line of sight stabilization. Many materials and design configurations are available for EO/IR pointing gimbals depending on trade-offs of size, weight, power (SWaP), performance, and cost. Space and high performance military aircraft applications are often driven toward expensive but exceptionally performing beryllium and aluminum beryllium components. Commercial applications often rely on aluminum and composite materials. Gimbal design considerations include achieving minimized mass and inertia simultaneous with demanding structural, thermal, optical, and scene stabilization requirements when operating in dynamic operational environments. Manufacturing considerations include precision lapping and honing of ball bearing interfaces, brazing, welding, and casting of complex aluminum and beryllium alloy structures, and molding of composite structures. Several notional and previously developed EO/IR gimbal platforms are profiled that exemplify applicable design and manufacturing technologies.

  15. Inertially stabilized line-of-sight control system using a magnetic bearing with vernier gimbaling capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhuchong; Liu, Kun

    2014-11-01

    Line of sight stabilization and control system is widely used in pointing and stabilizing the line of sight of optical sensors. Multi-axis gimbals configurations are commonly used for isolating disturbance from the angular motion of the base where the stabilization platform is mounted. However, in the case of large payload, nonlinear friction and the bandwidth limit of the servo loop can greatly diminish the performance of the whole system. Magnetic actuators, because of their high force per mass capability and non-friction characteristic, are promising means of achieving high-accuracy stabilization. Nevertheless, the gap between magnetic actuators and the payload is very small, which limits the slewing range of the line of sight as well as the angular motion range of the base that can be isolated. A novel two-stage stabilization configuration is developed, which combines multi-axis gimbals configuration and magnetic actuators as well as both of their advantages. At the first stage, a multi-axis gimbals configuration is adopted to isolate the large angular motion of the base while at the second stage magnetic actuators are utilized to perform high-accuracy stabilization. A so-called "stabilizing inside and tracking outside" scheme is carried out to perform two-stage stabilization control. The advantage of this configuration compared with conventional configuration is analyzed through analytical method. Finally, the effectiveness of the design is investigated through simulation studies.

  16. Comparison of the strapdown and gimbaled seekers utilized in aerial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkan, Bülent; Uçar, Altuğ

    2012-06-01

    In order to orient aerial vehicles such as unmanned aerial vehicles and guided munitions toward intended target points, it often becomes vital to acquire the correct information about the states of the targets during the flight of the vehicles. One of the most widely-used ways to achieve this task is the utilization of seekers. Physically, the measurement capability of seekers is restricted due to some physical, optical, and electronic limitations such as limited field-of-view (FOV), atmospheric transmittance, and noise effects. Regarding these characteristics, basically two types of seekers are employed in the relevant applications: strapdown or body-fixed seekers and gimbaled seekers. The strapdown seekers are directly mounted on the considered vehicle body. Therefore, their measurements become relative to the body fixed reference frame of the missile. For relieving the FOV limitations of the strapdown seekers, the gimbaled seekers are preferred in some of the implementations. In this scheme, the seeker is mounted on a platform supported by two orthogonal gimbals and stabilized by means of rate gyro feedbacks. This way, the FOV range of the seeker is increased considerably. Also, the line of sight (LOS) angle and the LOS angular rate can be measured directly independently of the missile motion. This study deals with the comparison of these two kinds of seekers according to certain criteria involving mounting properties, FOV, angle and rate measurements, guidance method utilization, measurement methods, major sources of measurement errors, and cost. A general evaluation is submitted at the end of the work.

  17. Control Of Flexible Structures-2 (COFS-2) flight control, structure and gimbal system interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, Stanley; Gates, Stephen; Henderson, Timothy; Sackett, Lester; Kirchwey, Kim; Stoddard, Isaac; Storch, Joel

    1988-01-01

    The second Control Of Flexible Structures Flight Experiment (COFS-2) includes a long mast as in the first flight experiment, but with the Langley 15-m hoop column antenna attached via a gimbal system to the top of the mast. The mast is to be mounted in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. The servo-driven gimbal system could be used to point the antenna relative to the mast. The dynamic interaction of the Shuttle Orbiter/COFS-2 system with the Orbiter on-orbit Flight Control System (FCS) and the gimbal pointing control system has been studied using analysis and simulation. The Orbiter pointing requirements have been assessed for their impact on allowable free drift time for COFS experiments. Three fixed antenna configurations were investigated. Also simulated was Orbiter attitude control behavior with active vernier jets during antenna slewing. The effect of experiment mast dampers was included. Control system stability and performance and loads on various portions of the COFS-2 structure were investigated. The study indicates possible undesirable interaction between the Orbiter FCS and the flexible, articulated COFS-2 mast/antenna system, even when restricted to vernier reaction jets.

  18. Evaluation of ion-sputtered molybdenum disulfide bearings for spacecraft gimbals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Chou, R. G.; Hopple, G. B.; Wenger, W. L.

    1994-07-01

    High-density, sputtered molybdenum disulfide films (MoS2) were investigated as lubricants for the next generation of spacecraft gimbal bearings where low torque signatures and long life are required. Low friction in a vacuum environment, virturally no out-gassing, insensitivity to low temperature, and radiation resistance of these lubricant films are valued in such applications. One hundred and twenty five thousand hours of acumulated bearing test time were obtained on 24 pairs of flight-quality bearings ion-sputtered with three types of advanced MoS2 films. Life tests were conducted in a vacuum over a simulated duty cycle for a space payload gimbal. Optimum retainer and ball material composition were investigated. Comparisions were made with test bearings lubricated with liquid space lubricants. Self-lubricating PTFE retainers were required for long life, i.e., greater than 40 million gimbal cycles. Bearings with polyimide retainers, silicon nitride ceramic balls, or steel balls sputtered with MoS2 film suffered early torque failure, irrespective of the type of race-sputtered MoS2 film. Failure generally resulted from excess film or retainer debris deposited in the ball track which tended to jam the bearing. Both grease lubricated and the better MoS2 film lubricated bearings produced long lives, although the torque with liquid lubricants was lower and less irregular.

  19. Effect of Gimbal friction modeling technique on control stability and performance for Centaur upper-stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Ronald E.

    1987-01-01

    The powered-phase autopilot for the Centaur upper stage rocket uses an autopilot forward loop gain scheduler that decreases the proportional gain as propellant mass is depleted. Nonlinear time response simulation studies revealed that Centaur vehicles with low-gain autopilots would have large attitude error limit cycles. These limit cycles were due to the assumed presence of Coulomb friction in the engine gimbals. This situation could be corrected through the use of an harmonic dither, programmed into the on-board digital computer and added to the engine command signal. This would introduce impending motion to the engines, allowing control of the engines even under small commands. Control authority was found to be restored when dither was used. A concern arose that the Centaur could be unacceptably excited at resonances near the dither frequency, if the dither amplitude was to be chosen on the basis of friction level present, a test was conducted to measure this level. Dither characteristics were to be based on the test results. The test results showed that the gimbal friction characteristic was actually hysteretic rather than the assumed Coulomb friction. The simulation results showed that, using this new model of gimbal friction, dither would no longer be necessary.

  20. Effect of gimbal friction modelling technique on control stability and performance for Centaur upper stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Ronald E.

    1987-01-01

    The powered-phase autopilot for the Centaur upper stage rocket uses an autopilot forward loop gain scheduler that decreases the proportional gain as propellant mass is depleted. Nonlinear time response simulation studies revealed that Centaur vehicles with low-gain autopilots would have large attitude error limit cycles. These limit cycles were due to the assumed presence of Coulomb friction in the engine gimbals. This situation could be corrected through the use of an harmonic dither, programmed into the on-board digital computer and added to the engine command signal. This would introduce impending motion to the engines, allowing control of the engines even under small commands. Control authority was found to be restored when dither was used. A concern arose that the Centaur could be unacceptably excited at resonances near the dither frequency, if the dither amplitude was to be chosen on the basis of friction level present, a test was conducted to measure this level. Dither characteristics were to be based on the test results. The test results showed that the gimbal friction characteristic was actually hysteretic rather than the assumed Coulomb friction. The simulation results showed that, using this new model of gimbal friction, dither would no longer be necessary.

  1. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, James K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

  2. Design and optimization of a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator and dose evaluation using a simulated head phantom.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2012-12-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to design a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator. The optimization of this configuration has been realized in different steps. This proposed system consists of metallic uranium as neutron multiplier, TiF(3) and Al(2)O(3) as moderators, Pb as reflector, Ni as shield and Li-Poly as collimator to guide neutrons toward the patient position. The in-air parameters recommended by IAEA were assessed for this proposed configuration without using any filters which enables us to have a high epithermal neutron flux at the beam port. Also a simulated Snyder head phantom was used to evaluate dose profiles due to the irradiation of designed beam. The dose evaluation results and depth-dose curves show that the neutron beam designed in this work is effective for deep-seated brain tumor treatments even with D-T neutron generator with a neutron yield of 2.4×10(12) n/s. The Monte Carlo Code MCNP-4C is used in order to perform these calculations.

  3. Infrared Optical System For An Antitank Homing Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophe-Alain, Bernard; Froissart, Delzongle-Pierre; Perron, Michel

    1983-10-01

    A low cost scanning optical system for an antitank seeker head operating in the 8 to 12 pm wavelength region is described. The overall system consists of a spherical dome and a very simple two aspherical elements telescope. The objective provides a high resolution over a 1° by 2° degrees FOV at a relatively large aperture and remains extremely lightweight and compact. This device is included on a two axis gyroscope to allow the line of sight deviation and the inertial stabilization of the gimbal objective. Considerations which direct material selection are presented. They concern : - transmission and absorption coefficients in the spectral domain - thermal and spectral variation of the refractive index - mechanical and thermal properties to sustain the meteorological and missile speed effect. The reflective IR imager is made of two aspheric primary and secondary mirrors which provide - thermal insensitivity - easy aligment procedure in the visible domain - low production cost by means of replication The innovative optical design program principles are presented and the sensitivity to high order asphericities analysed. Optical blur performances of this device are compared to those of a paraboloidal primary - plane secondary one. The manufacturing process for both the master and the replica are reviewed along with the assembly tests. The 55 mm wide - 50 g weight scanning mirror is shown and its main characteristics discussed. Maximum emphasis is put on the technological solutions choosen for its subminiature motorcoil and its position detector. Both "black and white" and "false coloured" images of an armoured vehicule are shown as recorded by the IR seeker during a real time tracking sequence. A ten micrometer hybrid focal plane detector has been developed jointly by SAT and LIR. This technology promises to offer advantages for advanced missile homing heads. Images ob-tained with this direct coupled Cadmium Mercury Telluride photovoltaic detector and CCD

  4. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Kobsa, I.R.

    1994-02-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof. 12 figures.

  5. Steam separator latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy C.; Kobsa, Irvin R.

    1994-01-01

    A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof.

  6. Development of a Gimballed, dual frequency, space-based, microwave antenna for volume production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckie, Martin; Laidig, Dave

    1996-01-01

    A dual-frequency, two-axis Gimballed, Microwave Antenna (GMA) has been developed by COM DEV and Motorola for commercial satellites. The need for volume production of over three hundred antennas at a rate of four per week, a compressed development schedule, and the commercial nature of the effort necessitated a paradigm shift to an 'overall' cost-driven design approach. The translation of these demands into antenna requirements, a description of the resulting GMA design, and examples of development issues are detailed herein.

  7. Conceptual design of pointing control systems for space station gimballed payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Robert O.

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual design of the control system for Payload Pointing Systems (PPS) is developed using classic Proportional-Integral-Derivatives (PID) techniques. The major source of system pointing error is due to the disturbance-rich environment of the space station in the form of gimbal baseplate motions. These baseplate vibrations are characterized using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) techniques. Both time domain and frequency domain dynamic models are developed to assess control system performance. Three basic methods exist for the improvement of PPS pointing performance: increase control system bandwidth, add Image Motion Compensation, and/or reduce (or change) the baseplate disturbance environment.

  8. Spacecraft attitude maneuver using two single-gimbal control moment gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Shinya; Kojima, Hirohisa; Satoh, Mitsunori

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, arbitrary rest-to-rest attitude maneuver problems for a satellite using two single-gimbal control moment gyros (2SGCMGs) are considered. Although single-gimbal control moment gyros are configured in the same manner as the traditional pyramid-array CMG, only two CMGs are assumed to be available. Attitude maneuver problems are similar to problems involving two reaction wheels (RWs) from the viewpoint of the number of actuators. In other words, the problem treated herein is a kind of underactuated problem. Although 2SGCMGs can generate torques around all axes, they cannot generate torques around each axis independently. Therefore, control methods designed for a satellite using two reaction wheels cannot be applied to three-axis attitude maneuver problems for a satellite using 2SGCMGs. In this paper, for simplicity, maneuvers around the x- and z-axes are first considered, and then a maneuver around the y-axis due to the corning effect resulting from the maneuver around the x- and z-axes is considered. Since maneuvers around each axis are established by the proposed method, arbitrary attitude maneuvers can be achieved using 2SGCMGs. In addition, the maneuvering angles around the z- and x-axes, which are required in order to maneuver around the y-axis, are analytically determined, and the total time required for maneuvering around the y-axis is then analyzed numerically.

  9. Aeroelastic Stability of A Soft-Inplane Gimballed Tiltrotor Model In Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.; Langston, Chester W.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Piatak, David J.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Corso, Lawrence M.; Brown, Ross

    2001-01-01

    Soft-inplane rotor systems can significantly reduce the inplane rotor loads generated during the maneuvers of large tiltrotors, thereby reducing the strength requirements and the associated structural weight of the hub. Soft-inplane rotor systems. however, are subject to instabilities associated with ground resonance, and for tiltrotors this instability has increased complexity as compared to a conventional helicopter. Researchers at Langley Research Center and Bell Helicopter-Textron, Inc. have completed ail initial study of a soft-inplane gimballed tiltrotor model subject to ground resonance conditions in hover. Parametric variations of the rotor collective pitch and blade root damping, and their associated effects oil the model stability were examined. Also considered in the study was the effectiveness of ail active swash-plate and a generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm for stability augmentation of the ground resonance conditions. Results of this study show that the ground resonance behavior of a gimballed soft-inplane tiltrotor can be significantly different from that of a classical soft-inplane helicopter rotor. The GPC-based active swash-plate was successfully implemented, and served to significantly augment damping of the critical modes to an acceptable value.

  10. Performance testing of a magnetically suspended double gimbal control moment gyro based on the single axis air bearing table.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peiling; Zhang, Huijuan; Yan, Ning; Fang, Jiancheng

    2012-01-01

    Integrating the advantage of magnetic bearings with a double gimble control moment gyroscope (DGCMG), a magnetically suspended DGCMG (MSDGCMG) is an ideal actuator in high-precision, long life, and rapid maneuver attitude control systems. The work presented here mainly focuses on performance testing of a MSDGCMG independently developed by Beihang University, based on the single axis air bearing table. In this paper, taking into sufficient consideration to the moving-gimbal effects and the response bandwidth limit of the gimbal, a special MSDGCMG steering law is proposed subject to the limits of gimbal angle rate and angle acceleration. Finally, multiple experiments are carried out, with different MSDGCMG angular momenta as well as different desired attitude angles. The experimental results indicate that the MSDGCMG has a good gimbal angle rate and output torque tracking capabilities, and that the attitude stability with MSDGCMG as actuator is superior to 10(-3)°/s. The MSDGCMG performance testing in this paper, carried out under moving-base condition, will offer a technique base for the future research and application of MSDGCMGs.

  11. The Determination of Forces and Moments on a Gimballed SRM Nozzle Using a Cold Flow Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Bacchus, David L.; Hengel, John E.

    1994-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motor Air Flow Facility (SAF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was used to characterize the flow in the critical aft end and nozzle of a solid propellant rocket motor (SRM) as part of the design phase of development. The SAF is a high pressure, blowdown facility which supplies a controlled flow of air to a subscale model of the internal port and nozzle of a SRM to enable measurement and evaluation of the flow field and surface pressure distributions. The ASRM Aft Section/Nozzle Model is an 8 percent scale model of the 19 second burn time aft port geometry and nozzle of the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor, the now canceled new generation space Shuttle Booster. It has the capability to simulate fixed nozzle gimbal angles of 0, 4, and 8 degrees. The model was tested at full scale motor Reynolds Numbers with extensive surface pressure instrumentation to enable detailed mapping of the surface pressure distributions over the nozzle interior surface, the exterior surface of the nozzle nose and the surface of the simulated propellant grain in the aft motor port. A mathematical analysis and associated numerical procedure were developed to integrate the measured surface pressure distributions to determine the lateral and axial forces on the moveable section of the nozzle, the effective model thrust and the effective aerodynamic thrust vector (as opposed to the geometric nozzle gimbal angle). The nozzle lateral and axial aerodynamic loads and moments about the pivot point are required for design purposes and require complex, three dimensional flow analyses. The alignment of the thrust vector with the nozzle geometric centerline is also a design requirement requiring three dimensional analyses which were supported by this experimental program. The model was tested with all three gimbal angles at three pressure levels to determine Reynolds number effects and reproducibility. This program was successful in demonstrating that a measured surface pressure

  12. Precision gimballed mirror control in remote sensing LIDAR for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ravindra; Mudgil, Ashwani; Prakash, Chandra; Pal, Suranjan

    2006-12-01

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Systems are advantageously used to detect and measure very small concentrations of trace gases in the atmosphere. There is a requirement to interrogate and search for the presence of one or more of toxic agents out of a large number (about 20 or so) of possible agents at distances up to several kilometers with the help of a ground-based multi-wavelength DIAL system employing pulsed, tunable laser sources in the wavelength bands of 2-5 micron and 9.2-10.8 micron. The Laser beams from the two sources are directed in the atmosphere with a predefined divergence to scan the atmosphere. Two methodologies can be implemented to provide the beam steering, one is to mount the entire telescope of transmitting and receiving channel on to a motorized gimbal platform and second is to keep the optical telescope stationary and use a slewing mirror to steer the beam in required direction. The first scheme is named as mass control and second scheme is called mirror control. Both the schemes have relative advantages and disadvantages and in the present DIAL application second scheme is being adopted. The present opto-mechanical configuration of DIAL system employs a 700 x 500 mm 2 (Elliptical) steering mirror for transmitting the collimated beams in a required direction and receiving the reflected beam as well. In the receiving channel a Telescope is used which collects the return beam and focuses the same on to a detector. The slewing mirror is housed in a gimbal mount having a sufficient FOR (Field of Regard) in Azimuth and elevation plane. The paper describes the modeling and simulation of Opto-mechanical and servo-mechanical subsystems of precision gimbaled mirror and also discusses the issues related to design of control system. The requirement specifications in regard to field of regard, slew rates 5°/s, scanning rates 1°/s are to be met with stringent beam pointing and scanning accuracies. The design of this system is categorized as

  13. Failure detection and isolation methods for redundant gimballed inertial measurement units.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solov, E. G.; Thibodeau, J. R., III

    1973-01-01

    Skewed alignment of two redundant conventional inertial measuring units permits nonambiguous detection and isolation of hard and soft failures in real time by an airborne computer. Accelerometer outputs and gimbal readouts are monitored periodically, and attitude rate and velocity error vectors are computed from these data. Magnitudes of these vectors provide failure detection, and projection of these error vectors onto the coordinate axes of the two clusters permits isolation. A detailed Monte Carlo simulation of one version of the mechanization as applied to Space Shuttle boost trajectories demonstrates effectiveness down to very low levels of inertial instrument performance failures. The results indicate that worst case overall navigation performance occurs when accelerometer failures are of the order of 20 sigma and gyro failures are about 100 sigma for conventional state-of-the-art IMU instruments.

  14. Calibration of Gimbaled Platforms: The Solar Dynamics Observatory High Gain Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashmall, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    Simple parameterization of gimbaled platform pointing produces a complete set of 13 calibration parameters-9 misalignment angles, 2 scale factors and 2 biases. By modifying the parameter representation, redundancy can be eliminated and a minimum set of 9 independent parameters defined. These consist of 5 misalignment angles, 2 scale factors, and 2 biases. Of these, only 4 misalignment angles and 2 biases are significant for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) High Gain Antennas (HGAs). An algorithm to determine these parameters after launch has been developed and tested with simulated SDO data. The algorithm consists of a direct minimization of the root-sum-square of the differences between expected power and measured power. The results show that sufficient parameter accuracy can be attained even when time-dependent thermal distortions are present, if measurements from a pattern of intentional offset pointing positions is included.

  15. Attitude maneuver of spacecraft with a variable-speed double-gimbal control moment gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jikuya, Ichiro; Fujii, Kenta; Yamada, Katsuhiko

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, two types of computational procedures are presented for a rest-to-rest spacecraft maneuver using a variable-speed double-gimbal control moment gyro (VSDGCMG). The first procedure is a numerical computational procedure in which a quasi-time-optimal trajectory satisfying several physical constraints is obtained by repeating the Newton's method. The other procedure is an approximate computational procedure in which an analytical solution is obtained by approximately solving a series of linear optimal control problems. The two procedures play complementary roles: the former is suitable for implementation, and the latter can be used to select an initial value for use in the former. The effectiveness of the proposed procedures is demonstrated by plotting the surfaces of maneuvering time for all rotational axes and by plotting time responses for several maneuvering examples.

  16. Precision Attitude Determination System (PADS) design and analysis. Two-axis gimbal star tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Development of the Precision Attitude Determination System (PADS) focused chiefly on the two-axis gimballed star tracker and electronics design improved from that of Precision Pointing Control System (PPCS), and application of the improved tracker for PADS at geosynchronous altitude. System design, system analysis, software design, and hardware design activities are reported. The system design encompasses the PADS configuration, system performance characteristics, component design summaries, and interface considerations. The PADS design and performance analysis includes error analysis, performance analysis via attitude determination simulation, and star tracker servo design analysis. The design of the star tracker and electronics are discussed. Sensor electronics schematics are included. A detailed characterization of the application software algorithms and computer requirements is provided.

  17. ISS Double-Gimbaled CMG Subsystem Simulation Using the Agile Development Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inampudi, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary approach in simulating a cluster of 4 Control Moment Gyros (CMG) on the International Space Station (ISS) using a common sense approach (the agile development method) for concurrent mathematical modeling and simulation of the CMG subsystem. This simulation is part of Training systems for the 21st Century simulator which will provide training for crew members, instructors, and flight controllers. The basic idea of how the CMGs on the space station are used for its non-propulsive attitude control is briefly explained to set up the context for simulating a CMG subsystem. Next different reference frames and the detailed equations of motion (EOM) for multiple double-gimbal variable-speed control moment gyroscopes (DGVs) are presented. Fixing some of the terms in the EOM becomes the special case EOM for ISS's double-gimbaled fixed speed CMGs. CMG simulation development using the agile development method is presented in which customer's requirements and solutions evolve through iterative analysis, design, coding, unit testing and acceptance testing. At the end of the iteration a set of features implemented in that iteration are demonstrated to the flight controllers thus creating a short feedback loop and helping in creating adaptive development cycles. The unified modeling language (UML) tool is used in illustrating the user stories, class designs and sequence diagrams. This incremental development approach of mathematical modeling and simulating the CMG subsystem involved the development team and the customer early on, thus improving the quality of the working CMG system in each iteration and helping the team to accurately predict the cost, schedule and delivery of the software.

  18. Low eddy loss axial hybrid magnetic bearing with gimballing control ability for momentum flywheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiqiang; Sun, Jinji; Fang, Jiancheng; Shuzhi Sam, Ge

    2013-03-01

    For a magnetically suspended momentum flywheel (MSMF), the spinning rotor can be tilted by a pair of the presented axial hybrid magnetic bearing (AHMB) with eight poles and rotates around the radial axes to generate a large torque to maneuver the spacecraft. To improve the control performance and gimballing control ability of the AHMB, characteristics such as magnetic suspension force, angular stiffness and tilting momentum are researched. These segmented stator poles cause the magnetic density in the thrust rotor plate to be uneven unavoidably and the rotational loss is large at high speed, but we optimized the stator poles configuration and caused the thrust rotor plate formed by bulk DT4C and laminated material to make the magnetic density in the thrust rotor plate change less and be smoother. Laminated material such as 1J50 film with a thickness of 0.1 mm can make the variation of the magnetic density in DT4C become very small and the eddy loss of it be negligible, but the stress produced in the “O” shape stacks by reeling has a bad effect on its power loss. Nanocrystalline can reduce eddy losses and is not affected by the reeling process. Based on the AHBM consisting of the stator with eight improved poles and the presented thrust rotor plate with DT4 and nanocrystalline, the rotational loss of 5-DOF magnetically suspended momentum flywheel with angular momentum of 15 N m s at 5000 rpm has reduced from 23.4 W to 3.2 W, which proved that this AHMB has low eddy loss for the gimballing control ability.

  19. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to ...

  20. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions Head Lice Head Lice Condition Family HealthKids and Teens Share Head Lice Table of Contents1. Overview2. Symptoms3. Causes4. Prevention5. ...

  1. Eye-head coordination during large gaze shifts.

    PubMed

    Tweed, D; Glenn, B; Vilis, T

    1995-02-01

    1. Three-dimensional (3D) eye and head rotations were measured with the use of the magnetic search coil technique in six healthy human subjects as they made large gaze shifts. The aims of this study were 1) to see whether the kinematic rules that constrain eye and head orientations to two degrees of freedom between saccades also hold during movements; 2) to chart the curvature and looping in eye and head trajectories; and 3) to assess whether the timing and paths of eye and head movements are more compatible with a single gaze error command driving both movements, or with two different feedback loops. 2. Static orientations of the eye and head relative to space are known to resemble the distribution that would be generated by a Fick gimbal (a horizontal axis moving on a fixed vertical axis). We show that gaze point trajectories during eye-head gaze shifts fit the Fick gimbal pattern, with horizontal movements following straight "line of latitude" paths and vertical movements curving like lines of longitude. However, horizontal (and to a lesser extent vertical) movements showed direction-dependent looping, with rightward and leftward (and up and down) saccades tracing slightly different paths. Plots of facing direction (the analogue of gaze direction for the head) also showed the latitude/longitude pattern, without looping. In radial saccades, the gaze point initially moved more vertically than the target direction and then curved; head trajectories were straight. 3. The eye and head components of randomly sequenced gaze shifts were not time locked to one another. The head could start moving at any time from slightly before the eye until 200 ms after, and the standard deviation of this interval could be as large as 80 ms. The head continued moving for a long (up to 400 ms) and highly variable time after the gaze error had fallen to zero. For repeated saccades between the same targets, peak eye and head velocities were directly, but very weakly, correlated; fast eye

  2. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, J.K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

  3. Dual-Head Robotic Welder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, Gary S.

    1990-01-01

    Robotic welder uses two welding heads simultaneously. Developed for assembly of "hot dog" shell on main injector for Space Shuttle main engine, concept applicable to other, similarly rounded or contoured workpieces. Opposed heads reduce distortion and stress in opposed weld joints and speed up welding operations.

  4. High-performance two-axis gimbal system for free space laser communications onboard unmanned aircraft systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, Michael; Czarnomski, Mariusz; Qadir, Ashraf; Setness, Brock; Baer, Nicolai; Meyer, Jennifer; Semke, William H.

    2011-03-01

    A custom designed and manufactured gimbal with a wide field-of-view and fast response time is developed. This enhanced custom design is a 24 volt system with integrated motor controllers and drivers which offers a full 180o fieldof- view in both azimuth and elevation; this provides a more continuous tracking capability as well as increased velocities of up to 479° per second. The addition of active high-frequency vibration control, to complement the passive vibration isolation system, is also in development. The ultimate goal of this research is to achieve affordable, reliable, and secure air-to-air laser communications between two separate remotely piloted aircraft. As a proof-of-concept, the practical implementation of an air-to-ground laserbased video communications payload system flown by a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) will be demonstrated. A numerical tracking algorithm has been written, tested, and used to aim the airborne laser transmitter at a stationary ground-based receiver with known GPS coordinates; however, further refinement of the tracking capabilities is dependent on an improved gimbal design for precision pointing of the airborne laser transmitter. The current gimbal pointing system is a two-axis, commercial-off-the-shelf component, which is limited in both range and velocity. The current design is capable of 360o of pan and 78o of tilt at a velocity of 60o per second. The control algorithm used for aiming the gimbal is executed on a PC-104 format embedded computer onboard the payload to accurately track a stationary ground-based receiver. This algorithm autonomously calculates a line-of-sight vector in real-time by using the UAV autopilot's Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) which provides latitude, longitude, and altitude and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) which provides the roll, pitch, and yaw data, along with the known Global Positioning System (GPS) location of the ground-based photodiode array receiver.

  5. Magnetic bearing momentum wheels with magnetic gimballing capability for 3-axis active attitude control and energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindlinger, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    A 3-axis active attitude control system with only one rotating part was developed using a momentum wheel with magnetic gimballing capability as a torque actuator for all three body axes. A brief description of magnetic bearing technology is given. It is concluded that based on this technology an integrated energy storage/attitude control system with one air of counterrotating rings could reduce the complexity and weight of conventional systems.

  6. Steering Law Design for Redundant Single Gimbal Control Moment Gyro Systems. M.S. Thesis - Massachusetts Inst. of Technology.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedrossian, Nazareth Sarkis

    1987-01-01

    The correspondence between robotic manipulators and single gimbal Control Moment Gyro (CMG) systems was exploited to aid in the understanding and design of single gimbal CMG Steering laws. A test for null motion near a singular CMG configuration was derived which is able to distinguish between escapable and unescapable singular states. Detailed analysis of the Jacobian matrix null-space was performed and results were used to develop and test a variety of single gimbal CMG steering laws. Computer simulations showed that all existing singularity avoidance methods are unable to avoid Elliptic internal singularities. A new null motion algorithm using the Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse, however, was shown by simulation to avoid Elliptic type singularities under certain conditions. The SR-inverse, with appropriate null motion was proposed as a general approach to singularity avoidance, because of its ability to avoid singularities through limited introduction of torque error. Simulation results confirmed the superior performance of this method compared to the other available and proposed pseudoinverse-based Steering laws.

  7. Drilling head method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, V. R.

    1985-07-30

    A rotary drilling head wherein rotary friction between the rotary spindle assembly and the spindle housing is limited by improvements in bearing and seal lubrication and by seal structure such that the gripping action of a resiliently flexible packer on a drill string provides a rotary drive connection sufficient to impart rotation to the spindle assembly through rotation of the drill string.

  8. Compact forceps manipulator using friction wheel mechanism and gimbals mechanism for laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Katayama, Youichi; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Sakuma, Ichiro

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports evaluation of compact forceps manipulator designed for assisting laparoscopic surgery. The manipulator consists of two miniaturized parts; friction wheel mechanism which rotates and translates forceps (62 x 52 x 150[mm3], 0.6 [kg]), and gimbals mechanism which provides pivoting motion of forceps around incision hole on the abdomen (135 x 165 x 300 [mm3], 1.1 [kg]). The four-DOF motion of forceps around the incision hole on the abdomen in laparoscopic surgery is realized. By integration with robotized forceps or a needle insertion robot, it will work as a compact robotic arm in a master-slave system. It can also work under numerical control based on the computerized surgical planning. This table-mounted miniaturized manipulator contributes to the coexistence of clinical staffs and manipulators in the today's crowded operating room. As the results of mechanical performance evaluation with load of 4 [N], positioning accuracy was less than 1.2 [deg] in pivoting motion, less than 4 [deg] in rotation of forceps, less than 1.2 [mm] in longitudinal translation of forceps. As future works, we will modify mechanism for sterilization and safety improvement, and also integrate this manipulator with robotized forceps to build a surgery assisting robotic system.

  9. 49 CFR 572.6 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head. 572.6 Section 572.6 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 50th Percentile Male § 572.6 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly shown as number SA 150 M010 in Figure 1 and conforms to each of...

  10. 49 CFR 572.16 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head. 572.16 Section 572.16 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.16 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly designated as SA 103C 010 on drawing No. SA 103C 001, and conforms...

  11. 49 CFR 572.32 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head. 572.32 Section 572.32 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Test Dummy § 572.32 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly shown in drawing 78051-61X, revision C, and conforms to each of...

  12. 49 CFR 572.6 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head. 572.6 Section 572.6 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 50th Percentile Male § 572.6 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly shown as number SA 150 M010 in Figure 1 and conforms to each of...

  13. 49 CFR 572.16 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head. 572.16 Section 572.16 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.16 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly designated as SA 103C 010 on drawing No. SA 103C 001, and conforms...

  14. 49 CFR 572.32 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head. 572.32 Section 572.32 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Test Dummy § 572.32 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly shown in drawing 78051-61X, revision C, and conforms to each of...

  15. 49 CFR 572.16 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head. 572.16 Section 572.16 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.16 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly designated as SA 103C 010 on drawing No. SA 103C 001, and conforms...

  16. 49 CFR 572.32 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head. 572.32 Section 572.32 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Test Dummy § 572.32 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly shown in drawing 78051-61X, revision C, and conforms to each of...

  17. 49 CFR 572.16 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head. 572.16 Section 572.16 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.16 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly designated as SA 103C 010 on drawing No. SA 103C 001, and conforms...

  18. 49 CFR 572.6 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head. 572.6 Section 572.6 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 50th Percentile Male § 572.6 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly shown as number SA 150 M010 in Figure 1 and conforms to each of...

  19. 49 CFR 572.32 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head. 572.32 Section 572.32 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Test Dummy § 572.32 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly shown in drawing 78051-61X, revision C, and conforms to each of...

  20. 49 CFR 572.6 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head. 572.6 Section 572.6 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 50th Percentile Male § 572.6 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly shown as number SA 150 M010 in Figure 1 and conforms to each of...

  1. 49 CFR 572.16 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head. 572.16 Section 572.16 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.16 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly designated as SA 103C 010 on drawing No. SA 103C 001, and conforms...

  2. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, Frank M.; Anderson, Erin K.; Robinson, Casandra W.; Haynes, Harriet B.

    1999-01-01

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras.

  3. Novel fluidic packaging of gimbal-less MEMS mirrors for increased optical resolution and overall performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanovic, Veljko; Kasturi, Abhishek; Yang, James

    2016-05-01

    Gimbal-less two-axis quasistatic MEMS mirrors have the ability to reflect optical beams to arbitrary positions and with arbitrary velocity. This technology has become established in many applications including laser based tracking, 3D scanning, biomedical imaging, free-space communication, and LiDAR. However, for certain defense applications, the total angle × diameter product, or the mirror's effective achievable resolution (θ*D product), has not been large enough to address requirements for agile steering in large fields of regard and with a low diffraction-limited beam divergence. Two key limitations have been the relatively low forces available in electrostatic combdrive actuators and the susceptibility of large-diameter MEMS mirrors to shock and vibrations. In this work, we demonstrate that these same MEMS mirrors can have dramatically increased performance when fully immersed and packaged in dielectric liquids with highly favorable torque-increasing, damping-increasing, and optical gain-increasing properties. The rotating electrostatic combdrive has its torque multiplied by liquid's relative permittivity of ~2.5. Furthermore, by selecting the appropriate fluid viscosity, quality factor of the device is reduced and structural damping is tuned to near critical damping. Finally, the increased scan angle due to the ~1.5-1.7 index of refraction of the fluid is an additional benefit. These numerous benefits of the fluidic packaging enabled us to double and in some cases triple the previously achieved θ*D product of two-axis quasistatic MEMS mirrors while still maintaining speeds applicable for above mentioned applications. One of the most exciting benefits of the packaging methodologies is that the damping dramatically increases shock and vibration tolerance, which will be tested next.

  4. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  5. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... scalp internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  6. Heads Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us HEADS UP Apps Reshaping the Culture Around Concussion in Sports Get HEADS UP on Your Web Site Concussion ... fit, and maintain the right helmet for specific sports. Concussion Laws Learn about Return to Play and other ...

  7. Head lice.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Barbara L; Weiner, Leonard B

    2002-09-01

    Head lice infestation is associated with little morbidity but causes a high level of anxiety among parents of school-aged children. This statement attempts to clarify issues of diagnosis and treatment of head lice and makes recommendations for dealing with head lice in the school setting.

  8. Definition and design of an experiment to test raster scanning with rotating unbalanced-mass devices on gimbaled payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightsey, W. D.; Alhorn, D. C.; Polites, M. E.

    1992-01-01

    An experiment designed to test the feasibility of using rotating unbalanced-mass (RUM) devices for line and raster scanning gimbaled payloads, while expending very little power is described. The experiment is configured for ground-based testing, but the scan concept is applicable to ground-based, balloon-borne, and space-based payloads, as well as free-flying spacecraft. The servos used in scanning are defined; the electronic hardware is specified; and a computer simulation model of the system is described. Simulation results are presented that predict system performance and verify the servo designs.

  9. Magnetic bearing momentum wheels with magnetic gimballing capability for 3-axis active attitude control and energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindlinger, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetic bearings used for the suspension of momentum wheels provide conclusive advantages: the low friction torques and the absence of abrasion allow the realization of lightweight high speed wheels with high angular momentum and energy storage capacity and virtually unlimited lifetime. The use of actively controlled bearings provides a magnetic gimballing capability by applying the external signals to the two servo loops controlling the rotational degrees of freedom. Thus, an attitude control system can be realized by using only one rotating mass for 3-axis active satellite stabilization.

  10. Aerodynamic Drag Analysis of 3-DOF Flex-Gimbal GyroWheel System in the Sense of Ground Test

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Xin; Feng, Sizhao; Liu, Kangzhi; Wang, Libin; Chen, Weishan

    2016-01-01

    GyroWheel is an innovative device that combines the actuating capabilities of a control moment gyro with the rate sensing capabilities of a tuned rotor gyro by using a spinning flex-gimbal system. However, in the process of the ground test, the existence of aerodynamic disturbance is inevitable, which hinders the improvement of the specification performance and control accuracy. A vacuum tank test is a possible candidate but is sometimes unrealistic due to the substantial increase in costs and complexity involved. In this paper, the aerodynamic drag problem with respect to the 3-DOF flex-gimbal GyroWheel system is investigated by simulation analysis and experimental verification. Concretely, the angular momentum envelope property of the spinning rotor system is studied and its integral dynamical model is deduced based on the physical configuration of the GyroWheel system with an appropriately defined coordinate system. In the sequel, the fluid numerical model is established and the model geometries are checked with FLUENT software. According to the diversity and time-varying properties of the rotor motions in three-dimensions, the airflow field around the GyroWheel rotor is analyzed by simulation with respect to its varying angular velocity and tilt angle. The IPC-based experimental platform is introduced, and the properties of aerodynamic drag in the ground test condition are obtained through comparing the simulation with experimental results. PMID:27941602

  11. Aerodynamic Drag Analysis of 3-DOF Flex-Gimbal GyroWheel System in the Sense of Ground Test.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xin; Feng, Sizhao; Liu, Kangzhi; Wang, Libin; Chen, Weishan

    2016-12-07

    GyroWheel is an innovative device that combines the actuating capabilities of a control moment gyro with the rate sensing capabilities of a tuned rotor gyro by using a spinning flex-gimbal system. However, in the process of the ground test, the existence of aerodynamic disturbance is inevitable, which hinders the improvement of the specification performance and control accuracy. A vacuum tank test is a possible candidate but is sometimes unrealistic due to the substantial increase in costs and complexity involved. In this paper, the aerodynamic drag problem with respect to the 3-DOF flex-gimbal GyroWheel system is investigated by simulation analysis and experimental verification. Concretely, the angular momentum envelope property of the spinning rotor system is studied and its integral dynamical model is deduced based on the physical configuration of the GyroWheel system with an appropriately defined coordinate system. In the sequel, the fluid numerical model is established and the model geometries are checked with FLUENT software. According to the diversity and time-varying properties of the rotor motions in three-dimensions, the airflow field around the GyroWheel rotor is analyzed by simulation with respect to its varying angular velocity and tilt angle. The IPC-based experimental platform is introduced, and the properties of aerodynamic drag in the ground test condition are obtained through comparing the simulation with experimental results.

  12. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injury, cerebral contusion, cerebral laceration, coma, head trauma, hematoma, impaired consciousness, postconcussion syndrome, skull fracture, skull penetration, stupor, vegetative state Family Health, Infants ...

  13. 17. HEAD OF STAIRCASE, SECOND FLOOR, ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES. VIEW TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. HEAD OF STAIRCASE, SECOND FLOOR, ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES. VIEW TO SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. FLUORINE CELL ANODE ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Cable, R.E.; Goode, W.B. Jr.; Henderson, W.K.; Montillon, G.H.

    1962-06-26

    An improved anode assembly is deslgned for use in electrolytlc cells ln the productlon of hydrogen and fluorlne from a moIten electrolyte. The anode assembly comprises a copper post, a copper hanger supported by the post, a plurality of carbon anode members, and bolt means for clamplng half of the anode members to one slde of the hanger and for clamplng the other half of the anode members to the other slde of the hanger. The heads of the clamplng bolts are recessed withln the anode members and carbon plugs are inserted ln the recesses above the bolt heads to protect the boIts agalnst corroslon. A copper washer is provided under the head of each clamplng boIt such that the anode members can be tightly clamped to the hanger with a resultant low anode jolnt resistance. (AEC)

  15. A steering law for a roof-type configuration for a single-gimbal control moment gyro system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, T.

    1974-01-01

    Single-Gimbal Control Moment Gyro (SGCMG) systems have been investigated for attitude control of the Large Space Telescope (LST) and the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO). However, various proposed steering laws for the SGCMG systems thus far have some defects because of singular states of the system. In this report, a steering law for a roof-type SGCMG system is proposed which is based on a new momentum distribution scheme that makes all the singular states unstable. This momentum distribution scheme is formulated by a treatment of the system as a sampled-data system. From analytical considerations, it is shown that this steering law gives control performance which is satisfactory for practical applications. Results of the preliminary computer simulation entirely support this premise.

  16. 49 CFR 572.32 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Test Dummy § 572.32 Head. (a... be less than 225g, and not more than 275g. The acceleration/time curve for the test shall be unimodal...). (c) Test procedure. (1) Soak the head assembly in a test environment at any temperature between...

  17. Head Tilt

    MedlinePlus

    ... Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco ...

  18. Head Noises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Explains how a toy called "Sound Bites" can be modified to demonstrate the transmission of sound waves. Students can hear music from the toy when they press it against any bone in their heads or shoulders. (WRM)

  19. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  20. Head lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... make the nits easier to remove. Some dishwashing detergents can help dissolve the "glue" that makes the ... clothes and bed linens in hot water with detergent. This also helps prevent head lice from spreading ...

  1. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... won't stop crying complains of head and neck pain (younger or nonverbal children may be more fussy) ... vision pupils of unequal size weakness or paralysis neck pain or stiffness seizure If your child is unconscious: ...

  2. Simple quality assurance method of dynamic tumor tracking with the gimbaled linac system using a light field.

    PubMed

    Miura, Hideharu; Ozawa, Shuichi; Hayata, Masahiro; Tsuda, Shintaro; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2016-09-08

    We proposed a simple visual method for evaluating the dynamic tumor tracking (DTT) accuracy of a gimbal mechanism using a light field. A single photon beam was set with a field size of 30 × 30 mm2 at a gantry angle of 90°. The center of a cube phantom was set up at the isocenter of a motion table, and 4D modeling was performed based on the tumor and infrared (IR) marker motion. After 4D modeling, the cube phantom was replaced with a sheet of paper, which was placed perpen-dicularly, and a light field was projected on the sheet of paper. The light field was recorded using a web camera in a treatment room that was as dark as possible. Calculated images from each image obtained using the camera were summed to compose a total summation image. Sinusoidal motion sequences were produced by moving the phantom with a fixed amplitude of 20 mm and different breathing periods of 2, 4, 6, and 8 s. The light field was projected on the sheet of paper under three conditions: with the moving phantom and DTT based on the motion of the phantom, with the moving phantom and non-DTT, and with a stationary phantom for comparison. The values of tracking errors using the light field were 1.12 ± 0.72, 0.31 ± 0.19, 0.27 ± 0.12, and 0.15 ± 0.09 mm for breathing periods of 2, 4, 6, and 8s, respectively. The tracking accuracy showed dependence on the breath-ing period. We proposed a simple quality assurance (QA) process for the tracking accuracy of a gimbal mechanism system using a light field and web camera. Our method can assess the tracking accuracy using a light field without irradiation and clearly visualize distributions like film dosimetry.

  3. Simple quality assurance method of dynamic tumor tracking with the gimbaled linac system using a light field.

    PubMed

    Miura, Hideharu; Ozawa, Shuichi; Hayata, Masahiro; Tsuda, Shintaro; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2016-09-01

    We proposed a simple visual method for evaluating the dynamic tumor tracking (DTT) accuracy of a gimbal mechanism using a light field. A single photon beam was set with a field size of 30×30 mm2 at a gantry angle of 90°. The center of a cube phantom was set up at the isocenter of a motion table, and 4D modeling was performed based on the tumor and infrared (IR) marker motion. After 4D modeling, the cube phantom was replaced with a sheet of paper, which was placed perpendicularly, and a light field was projected on the sheet of paper. The light field was recorded using a web camera in a treatment room that was as dark as possible. Calculated images from each image obtained using the camera were summed to compose a total summation image. Sinusoidal motion sequences were produced by moving the phantom with a fixed amplitude of 20 mm and different breathing periods of 2, 4, 6, and 8 s. The light field was projected on the sheet of paper under three conditions: with the moving phantom and DTT based on the motion of the phantom, with the moving phantom and non-DTT, and with a stationary phantom for comparison. The values of tracking errors using the light field were 1.12±0.72, 0.31±0.19, 0.27±0.12, and 0.15±0.09 mm for breathing periods of 2, 4, 6, and 8 s, respectively. The tracking accuracy showed dependence on the breathing period. We proposed a simple quality assurance (QA) process for the tracking accuracy of a gimbal mechanism system using a light field and web camera. Our method can assess the tracking accuracy using a light field without irradiation and clearly visualize distributions like film dosimetry. PACS number(s): 87.56 Fc, 87.55.Qr.

  4. System and method for controlling a combustor assembly

    DOEpatents

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2013-03-05

    A system and method for controlling a combustor assembly are disclosed. The system includes a combustor assembly. The combustor assembly includes a combustor and a fuel nozzle assembly. The combustor includes a casing. The fuel nozzle assembly is positioned at least partially within the casing and includes a fuel nozzle. The fuel nozzle assembly further defines a head end. The system further includes a viewing device configured for capturing an image of at least a portion of the head end, and a processor communicatively coupled to the viewing device, the processor configured to compare the image to a standard image for the head end.

  5. MULTIPLE SHAFT TOOL HEAD

    DOEpatents

    Colbert, H.P.

    1962-10-23

    An improved tool head arrangement is designed for the automatic expanding of a plurality of ferruled tubes simultaneously. A plurality of output shafts of a multiple spindle drill head are driven in unison by a hydraulic motor. A plurality of tube expanders are respectively coupled to the shafts through individual power train arrangements. The axial or thrust force required for the rolling operation is provided by a double acting hydraulic cylinder having a hollow through shaft with the shaft cooperating with an internally rotatable splined shaft slidably coupled to a coupling rigidly attached to the respectlve output shaft of the drill head, thereby transmitting rotary motion and axial thrust simultaneously to the tube expander. A hydraulic power unit supplies power to each of the double acting cylinders through respective two-position, four-way valves, under control of respective solenoids for each of the cylinders. The solenoids are in turn selectively controlled by a tool selection control unit which in turn is controlled by signals received from a programmed, coded tape from a tape reader. The number of expanders that are extended in a rolling operation, which may be up to 42 expanders, is determined by a predetermined program of operations depending upon the arrangement of the ferruled tubes to be expanded in the tube bundle. The tape reader also supplies dimensional information to a machine tool servo control unit for imparting selected, horizontal and/or vertical movement to the tool head assembly. (AEC)

  6. "E" Heating Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L.; Swaim, Robert J.; Johnson, Samuel D.; Coultrip, Robert H.; Phillips, W. Morris; Copeland, Carl E.

    1994-01-01

    Two separate areas heated inductively for adhesive bonding in single operation. "E" heating head developed to satisfy need for fast-acting and reliable induction heating device. Used in attaching "high-hat" stiffeners to aircraft panels. Incorporates principles and circuitry of toroid joining gun. Width and length configured to provide variously sized heat zones, depending on bonding requirements. Lightweight, portable and provides rapid, reliable heating of dual areas in any environment. Well suited for flight-line and depot maintenance, and battlefield repair. Also useful in automotive assembly lines to strengthen automobile panels.

  7. 49 CFR 572.83 - Head-neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head-neck. 572.83 Section 572.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child § 572.83 Head-neck. The head-neck assembly shown in drawing 1049/A consists of parts specified as items 1 through 16...

  8. 49 CFR 572.83 - Head-neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head-neck. 572.83 Section 572.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child § 572.83 Head-neck. The head-neck assembly shown in drawing 1049/A consists of parts specified as items 1 through 16...

  9. 49 CFR 572.83 - Head-neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head-neck. 572.83 Section 572.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child § 572.83 Head-neck. The head-neck assembly shown in drawing 1049/A consists of parts specified as items 1 through 16...

  10. 49 CFR 572.83 - Head-neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head-neck. 572.83 Section 572.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child § 572.83 Head-neck. The head-neck assembly shown in drawing 1049/A consists of parts specified as items 1 through 16...

  11. 49 CFR 572.83 - Head-neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head-neck. 572.83 Section 572.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child § 572.83 Head-neck. The head-neck assembly shown in drawing 1049/A consists of parts specified as items 1 through 16...

  12. General view of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) assembly ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) assembly with the expansion nozzle removed and resting on a cushioned mat on the floor of the SSME Processing Facility. The most prominent features in this view are the Low-pressure oxidizer Turbopump discharge Duct looping from the upper left side of the engine assembly to the lower left side of the assembly, the Low-Pressure Fuel Turbopump (LPFTP) is on the upper left of the assembly in this view and the LPFTP Discharge Duct loops from the upper left to upper right then turns back and down the assembly to the High-Pressure Fuel Turbopump on the lower right of the assembly. The Engine Controller and the Main fuel Valve Hydraulic Actuator are on the lower left portion of the assembly. The vertical rod that is in the approximate center of the engine assembly is a piece of ground support equipment call a Gimbal Actuator Replacement Strut which are used on the SSMEs when they are not installed in an orbiter. - Space Transportation System, Space Shuttle Main Engine, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  13. Constrained space camera assembly

    DOEpatents

    Heckendorn, F.M.; Anderson, E.K.; Robinson, C.W.; Haynes, H.B.

    1999-05-11

    A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity is disclosed. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras. 17 figs.

  14. Magnetic Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoshima, Tokihiko

    Figure 6.1 shows how rapidly the areal density of hard disk drives (HDD) has been increasing over the past 20 years [1]. Several critical innovations were necessary to bring about such rapid progress in the field of magnetic recording [2]. One of the most significant innovations from the viewpoint of material improvement was the electrodeposition of permalloy (Ni80Fe20), which was introduced by IBM in 1979 as the core material of a thin-film inductive head to increase the magnetic recording density [3]. After the introduction of the magneto-resistive (MR) element as the read head and the electrodeposited permalloy as the write head by IBM in 1991 [4], the rate of increase in the recording density of HDDs jumped from 30% per year to 60% per year. Recently, a giant magneto-resistive (GMR) element has been used for the read element instead of the MR element. The rate of increase in the recording density jumped to over 100% per year in 1999, which is an incredible rate of increase. Since 2002, however, the rate of increase has decreased to 30%; thus, new innovations are required to maintain the rate of increase. In 2004, the practical use of perpendicular magnetic recording instead of longitudinal magnetic recording was announced [5]. This system is a critical innovation for developing high-performance HDD systems with high-recording density. The design of the magnetic recording head was changed because of the change of the recording system.

  15. Investigation of application of two-degree-of-freedom dry tuned-gimbal gyroscopes to strapdown navigation systems. [for use in VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The work is described which was accomplished during the investigation of the application of dry-tuned gimbal gyroscopes to strapdown navigation systems. A conventional strapdown configuration, employing analog electronics in conjunction with digital attitude and navigation computation, was examined using various levels of redundancy and both orthogonal and nonorthogonal sensor orientations. It is concluded that the cost and reliability performance constraints which had been established could not be met simultaneously with such a system. This conclusion led to the examination of an alternative system configuration which utilizes an essentially new strapdown system concept. This system employs all-digital signal processing in conjunction with the newly-developed large scale integration (LSI) electronic packaging techniques and a new two-degree-of-freedom dry tuned-gimbal instrument which is capable of providing both angular rate and acceleration information. Such a system is capable of exceeding the established performance goals.

  16. Head injuries.

    PubMed

    Yanko, J

    1984-08-01

    In summary, the broad term "head injury" represents a large variety of more specific injuries. In order to anticipate and plan appropriate patient care, nurses need information regarding the cause of injury, the impact site, and the patient's clinical course in addition to current assessment findings. The nurse must also anticipate sequelae from secondary brain injury due to hypoxia, edema, increased intracranial pressure, changes in regional blood flows, or hypovolemic shock due to internal bleeding in another body system or cavity. The head-injured patient is a complex patient requiring intensive nursing care, observation, and assessment. By incorporating knowledge of the mechanisms of injury into nursing observations and assessments, nurses can provide more effective nursing interventions.

  17. Head lice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Head lice can only be diagnosed by finding live lice, as eggs take 7 days to hatch and may appear viable for weeks after death of the egg. Infestation may be more likely in school children, with risks increased in children with more siblings, longer hair, and of lower socioeconomic group. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for head lice? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 26 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: benzyl alcohol, dimeticone, herbal and essential oils, insecticide combinations, isopropyl myristate, ivermectin, lindane, malathion, mechanical removal by combing ("bug busting"), oral trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole, TMP-SMX), permethrin, phenothrin, pyrethrum, and spinosad. PMID:21575285

  18. Head lice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Head louse infection is diagnosed by finding live lice, as eggs take 7 days to hatch (but a few may take longer, up to 13 days) and may appear viable for weeks after death of the egg. Infestation may be more likely in school children, with risks increased in children with more siblings or of lower socioeconomic group. Factors such as longer hair make diagnosis and treatment more difficult. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of physically acting treatments for head lice? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found six studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 1,2-octanediol, dimeticone, herbal and essential oils, and isopropyl myristate. PMID:25587918

  19. Integrated hydraulic cooler and return rail in camless cylinder head

    DOEpatents

    Marriott, Craig D [Clawson, MI; Neal, Timothy L [Ortonville, MI; Swain, Jeff L [Flushing, MI; Raimao, Miguel A [Colorado Springs, CO

    2011-12-13

    An engine assembly may include a cylinder head defining an engine coolant reservoir, a pressurized fluid supply, a valve actuation assembly, and a hydraulic fluid reservoir. The valve actuation assembly may be in fluid communication with the pressurized fluid supply and may include a valve member displaceable by a force applied by the pressurized fluid supply. The hydraulic fluid reservoir may be in fluid communication with the valve actuation assembly and in a heat exchange relation to the engine coolant reservoir.

  20. Portable propellant cutting assembly, and method of cutting propellant with assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, Roger A. (Inventor); Hoskins, Shawn W. (Inventor); Payne, Brett D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A propellant cutting assembly and method of using the assembly to cut samples of solid propellant in a repeatable and consistent manner is disclosed. The cutting assembly utilizes two parallel extension beams which are shorter than the diameter of a central bore of an annular solid propellant grain and can be loaded into the central bore. The assembly is equipped with retaining heads at its respective ends and an adjustment mechanism to position and wedge the assembly within the central bore. One end of the assembly is equipped with a cutting blade apparatus which can be extended beyond the end of the extension beams to cut into the solid propellant.

  1. Bacteriophage assembly.

    PubMed

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A; Rossmann, Michael G

    2011-03-01

    Bacteriophages have been a model system to study assembly processes for over half a century. Formation of infectious phage particles involves specific protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, as well as large conformational changes of assembly precursors. The sequence and molecular mechanisms of phage assembly have been elucidated by a variety of methods. Differences and similarities of assembly processes in several different groups of bacteriophages are discussed in this review. The general principles of phage assembly are applicable to many macromolecular complexes.

  2. A novel offset cancellation based on parasitic-insensitive switched-capacitor sensing circuit for the out-of-plane single-Gimbaled decoupled CMOS-MEMS gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Hui; Huang, Han-Pang

    2013-03-14

    This paper presents a novel parasitic-insensitive switched-capacitor (PISC) sensing circuit design in order to obtain high sensitivity and ultra linearity and reduce the parasitic effect for the out-of-plane single-gimbaled decoupled CMOS-MEMS gyroscope (SGDG). According to the simulation results, the proposed PISC circuit has better sensitivity and high linearity in a wide dynamic range. Experimental results also show a better performance. In addition, the PISC circuit can use signal processing to cancel the offset and noise. Thus, this circuit is very suitable for gyroscope measurement.

  3. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  4. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... happen from a gunshot to the head. Head injuries include: Concussion , in which the brain is shaken, is the most common type of traumatic brain injury. Scalp wounds. Skull fractures. Head injuries ...

  5. Head circumference (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Head circumference is a measurement of the circumference of the child's head at its largest area (above the eyebrows and ears and around the back of the head). During routine check-ups, the distance is measured ...

  6. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  7. Gas cushion control of OVJP print head position

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2014-10-07

    An OVJP apparatus and method for applying organic vapor or other flowable material to a substrate using a printing head mechanism in which the print head spacing from the substrate is controllable using a cushion of air or other gas applied between the print head and substrate. The print head is mounted for translational movement towards and away from the substrate and is biased toward the substrate by springs or other means. A gas cushion feed assembly supplies a gas under pressure between the print head and substrate which opposes the biasing of the print head toward the substrate so as to form a space between the print head and substrate. By controlling the pressure of gas supplied, the print head separation from the substrate can be precisely controlled.

  8. A gimbal-less two-axis electrostatic scanner with tilted stationary vertical combs and serially connected springs via a microassembly process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Min-Ho; Moon, Seunghwan; Lee, Byeong Ha; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2014-09-01

    We propose a gimbal-less two-axis electrostatic microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scanner with tilted stationary vertical combs (TSVCs) fabricated via a microassembly process. The gimbal-less two-axis scanner has the advantage of being of a compact size and also does not need any additional fabrication sequence for electrical isolation. The TSVCs and coupled springs (T-shaped springs and folded springs) allow the mirror scanner to rotate around two axes with a large scanning angle. The fabrication steps for the proposed scanner can be remarkably reduced by employing a microassembly process, as there is no need to conduct a multistep etching process for height offset between two vertical combs. It was found that the width of the folded spring and the T-shaped spring dominated the resonant frequency of the fast axis and the slow axis, respectively. By modeling the capacitance change of TSVCs with respect to the rotational angle (θ), the effective tilted angle (ETA), as a new design criterion, was introduced to determine an adequate operation range. The optical scanning angle of the fabricated scanner was up to 7.8° at 90 V for the slow axis in quasistatic mode and up to 17.3° at 100 V for the fast axis in resonant mode at 2.84 kHz. The fabricated scanner can be used for various endoscopic optical applications.

  9. Results of a laboratory experiment that tests rotating unbalanced-mass devices for scanning gimbaled payloads and free-flying spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, D. C.; Polites, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Rotating unbalanced-mass (RUM) devices are a new way to scan space-based, balloon-borne, and ground-based gimbaled payloads, like x-ray and gamma-ray telescopes. They can also be used to scan free-flying spacecraft. Circular scans, linear scans, and raster scans can be generated. A pair of RUM devices generates the basic scan motion and an auxiliary control system using torque motors, control moment gyros, or reaction wheels keeps the scan centered on the target and produces some complementary motion for raster scanning. Previous analyses and simulation results show that this approach offers significant power savings compared to scanning only with the auxiliary control system, especially with large payloads and high scan frequencies. However, these claims have never been proven until now. This paper describes a laboratory experiment which tests the concept of scanning a gimbaled payload with RUM devices. A description of the experiment is given and test results that prove the concept are presented. The test results are compared with those from a computer simulation model of the experiment and the differences are discussed.

  10. Effects of certain control-system nonlinearities on stability and pointing of an attached double-gimbal experiment package in presence of random crew-motion disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaughnessy, J. D.; Groom, N. J.; Nene, V. D.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of two types of control-system nonlinearities, sensor deadband and actuator breakout torque, on the pointing capability of a Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) double-gimbal experiment isolation and control system are investigated. A composite structural model of a flexible experiment package connected through frictionless double gimbals to a flexible carrier vehicle is used for this investigation. Contributions of the primary carrier control system to experiment pointing are neglected. Pointing errors onboard the experiment package due to random crew-motion input into the carrier vehicle are computed. A stability investigation is performed to verify control-system stability with nominal nonlinearities and gains. Indications are that there is no stability problem due to the nonlinearities. A nonlinearity sensitivity study is carried out to determine the effects on pointing accuracy. Its results indicate that nominal ATM control system nonlinearities limit the pointing accuracy to approximately 0.4 arc second in the presence of crew motion. Methods of reducing the error to less than 0.1 arc second are discussed.

  11. Life test failure of harmonic gears in a Two-axis Gimbal for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Michael R.; Gehling, Russ; Head, Ray

    2006-01-01

    This paper will present a process for increasing the stiffness of harmonic gear assemblies and recommend a maximum stiffness point that, if exceeded, compromises the reliability of the gear components for long life applications.

  12. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    PubMed

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  13. Crew Assembly

    NASA Video Gallery

    Train to improve your dexterity and hand-eye coordination by assembling a puzzle.The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitement of exploration to challenge students to set goals, practice ...

  14. Optical Fiber Array Assemblies for Space Flight on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Jelanie; Matuszeski, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Custom fiber optic bundle array assemblies developed by the Photonics Group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center were an enabling technology for both the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) and the Laser Ranging (LR) Investigation on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) currently in operation. The unique assembly array designs provided considerable decrease in size and weight and met stringent system level requirements. This is the first time optical fiber array bundle assemblies were used in a high performance space flight application. This innovation was achieved using customized Diamond Switzerland AVIM optical connectors. For LOLA, a five fiber array was developed for the receiver telescope to maintain precise alignment for each of the 200/220 micron optical fibers collecting 1,064 nm wavelength light being reflected back from the moon. The array splits to five separate detectors replacing the need for multiple telescopes. An image illustration of the LOLA instrument can be found at the top of the figure. For the laser ranging, a seven-optical-fiber array of 400/440 micron fibers was developed to transmit light from behind the LR receiver telescope located on the end of the high gain antenna system (HGAS). The bundle was routed across two moving gimbals, down the HGAS boom arm, over a deployable mandrel and across the spacecraft to a detector on the LOLA instrument. The routing of the optical fiber bundle and its end locations is identified in the figure. The Laser Ranging array and bundle is currently accepting light at a wavelength of 532 nm sent to the moon from laser stations at Greenbelt MD and other stations around the world to gather precision ranging information from the Earth to the LRO spacecraft. The LR bundle assembly is capable of withstanding temperatures down to -55 C at the connectors, and 20,000 mechanical gimbal cycles at temperatures as cold as -20 C along the length of the seven-fiber bundle (that is packaged into the gimbals). The total

  15. Seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Roger Neal; Longfritz, William David

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that seals a gap formed by a groove comprises a seal body, a biasing element, and a connection that connects the seal body to the biasing element to form the seal assembly. The seal assembly further comprises a concave-shaped center section and convex-shaped contact portions at each end of the seal body. The biasing element is formed from an elastic material and comprises a convex-shaped center section and concave-shaped biasing zones that are opposed to the convex-shaped contact portions. The biasing element is adapted to be compressed to change a width of the seal assembly from a first width to a second width that is smaller than the first width. In the compressed state, the seal assembly can be disposed in the groove. After release of the compressing force, the seal assembly expands. The contact portions will move toward a surface of the groove and the biasing zones will move into contact with another surface of the groove. The biasing zones will bias the contact portions of the seal body against the surface of the groove.

  16. Research on modeling of the agile satellite using a single gimbal magnetically suspended CMG and the disturbance feedforward compensation for rotors.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peiling; Yan, Ning

    2012-12-12

    The magnetically suspended Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) has the advantages of long-life, micro-vibration and being non-lubricating, and is the ideal actuator for agile maneuver satellite attitude control. However, the stability of the rotor in magnetic bearing and the precision of the output torque of a magnetically suspended CMG are affected by the rapid maneuvers of satellites. In this paper, a dynamic model of the agile satellite including a magnetically suspended single gimbal control moment gyroscope is built and the equivalent disturbance torque effected on the rotor is obtained. The feedforward compensation control method is used to depress the disturbance on the rotor. Simulation results are given to show that the rotor displacement is obviously reduced.

  17. Research on Modeling of the Agile Satellite Using a Single Gimbal Magnetically Suspended CMG and the Disturbance Feedforward Compensation for Rotors

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Peiling; Yan, Ning

    2012-01-01

    The magnetically suspended Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) has the advantages of long-life, micro-vibration and being non-lubricating, and is the ideal actuator for agile maneuver satellite attitude control. However, the stability of the rotor in magnetic bearing and the precision of the output torque of a magnetically suspended CMG are affected by the rapid maneuvers of satellites. In this paper, a dynamic model of the agile satellite including a magnetically suspended single gimbal control moment gyroscope is built and the equivalent disturbance torque effected on the rotor is obtained. The feedforward compensation control method is used to depress the disturbance on the rotor. Simulation results are given to show that the rotor displacement is obviously reduced. PMID:23235442

  18. Architecture of the Mediator head module

    SciTech Connect

    Imasaki, Tsuyoshi; Calero, Guillermo; Cai, Gang; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Yamada, Kentaro; Cardelli, Francesco; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Berger, Imre; Kornberg, Guy Lorch; Asturias, Francisco J.; Kornberg, Roger D.; Takagi, Yuichiro

    2011-09-06

    Mediator is a key regulator of eukaryotic transcription, connecting activators and repressors bound to regulatory DNA elements with RNA polymerase II (Pol II). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mediator comprises 25 subunits with a total mass of more than one megadalton (refs 5, 6) and is organized into three modules, called head, middle/arm and tail. Our understanding of Mediator assembly and its role in regulating transcription has been impeded so far by limited structural information. Here we report the crystal structure of the essential Mediator head module (seven subunits, with a mass of 223 kilodaltons) at a resolution of 4.3 angstroms. Our structure reveals three distinct domains, with the integrity of the complex centred on a bundle of ten helices from five different head subunits. An intricate pattern of interactions within this helical bundle ensures the stable assembly of the head subunits and provides the binding sites for general transcription factors and Pol II. Our structural and functional data suggest that the head module juxtaposes transcription factor IIH and the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest subunit of Pol II, thereby facilitating phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain of Pol II. Our results reveal architectural principles underlying the role of Mediator in the regulation of gene expression.

  19. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  20. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  1. Increased head circumference

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003305.htm Increased head circumference To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Increased head circumference is when the measured distance around the ...

  2. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  3. Hinge assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vandergriff, D.H.

    1999-08-31

    A hinge assembly is disclosed having a first leaf, a second leaf and linking member. The first leaf has a contact surface. The second leaf has a first contact surface and a second contact surface. The linking member pivotally connects to the first leaf and to the second leaf. The hinge assembly is capable of moving from a closed position to an open position. In the closed position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the first contact surface of the second leaf. In the open position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the second contact surface of the second leaf. The hinge assembly can include a seal on the contact surface of the first leaf. 8 figs.

  4. Hinge assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vandergriff, David Houston

    1999-01-01

    A hinge assembly having a first leaf, a second leaf and linking member. The first leaf has a contact surface. The second leaf has a first contact surface and a second contact surface. The linking member pivotally connects to the first leaf and to the second leaf. The hinge assembly is capable of moving from a closed position to an open position. In the closed position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the first contact surface of the second leaf. In the open position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the second contact surface of the second leaf. The hinge assembly can include a seal on the contact surface of the first leaf.

  5. The Head Start Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward, Ed.; Styfco, Sally J., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The future of Head Start depends on how well people learn from and apply the lessons from its past. That's why everyone involved in early education needs this timely, forward-thinking book from the leader of Head Start. The first book to capture the Head Start debates in all their complexity and diversity, this landmark volume brings together the…

  6. Mania following head injury.

    PubMed

    Yatham, L N; Benbow, J C; Jeffers, A M

    1988-03-01

    A case of mania following head injury in an individual with a genetic predisposition to schizophrenia is reported. It is argued that the head injury is probably causative in his case and suggested that head injury should be considered as one of the aetiological factors in secondary mania.

  7. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person’s risk of head and neck cancer. Marijuana use. Research suggests that people who have used marijuana may be at higher risk for head and ... head and neck cancer include: Avoiding alcohol Discussing marijuana as a risk factor with your doctor and ...

  8. Treating Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... 180 K) En Español On this page: Blood-Sucking Bugs Steps for Safe Use Heading Off Head Lice Head lice. Every parent’s nightmare. A year-round problem, the number of cases seems to peak when ...

  9. Head Start Automation Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland Univ., College Park. Univ. Coll.

    The task for the National Data Management Project is to share technological capabilities with the Head Start Community in order to implement improved services for children and families involved in Head Start. Many Head Start programs have incorporated technology into their programs, including word processing, database management systems,…

  10. Head Injury Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fax: 847-378-0600 www.NeurosurgeryToday.org A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the normal function of the brain. TBI can result when the head suddenly and ...

  11. Sabot assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz

    2016-11-08

    A sabot assembly includes a projectile and a housing dimensioned and configured for receiving the projectile. An air pressure cavity having a cavity diameter is disposed between a front end and a rear end of the housing. Air intake nozzles are in fluid communication with the air pressure cavity and each has a nozzle diameter less than the cavity diameter. In operation, air flows through the plurality of air intake nozzles and into the air pressure cavity upon firing of the projectile from a gun barrel to pressurize the air pressure cavity for assisting in separation of the housing from the projectile upon the sabot assembly exiting the gun barrel.

  12. Latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, J.R.; Harper, W.H.; Perez, R.

    1984-08-17

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing. 2 figs.

  13. Nitrogenase assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogenase contains two unique metalloclusters: the P-cluster and the M-cluster. The assembly processes of P- and M-clusters are arguably the most complicated processes in bioinorganic chemistry. There is considerable interest in decoding the biosynthetic mechanisms of the P- and M-clusters, because these clusters are not only biologically important, but also chemically unprecedented. Understanding the assembly mechanisms of these unique metalloclusters is crucial for understanding the structure-function relationship of nitrogenase. Here, we review the recent advances in this research area, with an emphasis on our work that provide important insights into the biosynthetic pathways of these high-nuclearity metal centers. PMID:23232096

  14. Latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, James R.; Harper, William H.; Perez, Raymond

    1986-01-01

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing.

  15. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, Nicholas F.; Green, Donald R.; Price, Larry S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  16. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, N.F.; Green, D.R.; Price, L.S.

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  17. Videometric head tracker for augmented reality applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janin, Adam L.; Zikan, Karel; Mizell, David; Banner, Mike; Sowizral, Henry A.

    1995-12-01

    For the past three years, we have been developing augmented reality technology for application to a variety of touch labor tasks in aircraft manufacturing and assembly. The system would be worn by factory workers to provide them with better-quality information for performing their tasks than was previously available. Using a see-through head-mounted display (HMD) whose optics are set at a focal length of about 18 in., the display and its associated head tracking system can be used to superimpose and stabilize graphics on the surface of a work piece. This technology would obviate many expensive marking systems now used in aerospace manufacturing. The most challenging technical issue with respect to factory applications of AR is head position and orientation tracking. It requires high accuracy, long- range tracking in a high-noise environment. The approach we have chosen uses a head- mounted miniature video camera. The user's wearable computer system utilizes the camera to find fiducial markings that have been placed on known coordinates on or near the work piece. The system then computes the user's position and orientation relative to the fiducial marks. It is referred to as a `videometric' head tracker. In this paper, we describe the steps we took and the results we obtained in the process of prototyping our videometric head tracker, beginning with analytical and simulation results, and continuing through the working prototypes.

  18. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What ... there any new developments in treating my disease? Head and neck cancer overview The way a particular head and ...

  19. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... find out more. Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ... find out more. Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ...

  20. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  1. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  2. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  3. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  4. Sensor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2004-04-13

    A ribbon-like sensor assembly is described wherein a length of an optical fiber embedded within a similar lengths of a prepreg tow. The fiber is ""sandwiched"" by two layers of the prepreg tow which are merged to form a single consolidated ribbon. The consolidated ribbon achieving a generally uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin does not ""pool"" around the periphery of the embedded fiber.

  5. Dump assembly

    DOEpatents

    Goldmann, Louis H.

    1986-01-01

    A dump assembly having a fixed conduit and a rotatable conduit provided with overlapping plates, respectively, at their adjacent ends. The plates are formed with openings, respectively, normally offset from each other to block flow. The other end of the rotatable conduit is provided with means for securing the open end of a filled container thereto. Rotation of the rotatable conduit raises and inverts the container to empty the contents while concurrently aligning the conduit openings to permit flow of material therethrough.

  6. Integrated head package for top mounted nuclear instrumentation

    DOEpatents

    Malandra, Louis J.; Hornak, Leonard P.; Meuschke, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear reactor such as a pressurized water reactor has an integrated head package providing structural support and increasing shielding leading toward the vessel head. A reactor vessel head engages the reactor vessel, and a control rod guide mechanism over the vessel head raises and lowers control rods in certain of the thimble tubes, traversing penetrations in the reactor vessel head, and being coupled to the control rods. An instrumentation tube structure includes instrumentation tubes with sensors movable into certain thimble tubes disposed in the fuel assemblies. Couplings for the sensors also traverse penetrations in the reactor vessel head. A shroud is attached over the reactor vessel head and encloses the control rod guide mechanism and at least a portion of the instrumentation tubes when retracted. The shroud forms a structural element of sufficient strength to support the vessel head, the control rod guide mechanism and the instrumentation tube structure, and includes radiation shielding material for limiting passage of radiation from retracted instrumentation tubes. The shroud is thicker at the bottom adjacent the vessel head, where the more irradiated lower ends of retracted sensors reside. The vessel head, shroud and contents thus can be removed from the reactor as a unit and rested safely and securely on a support.

  7. Deposition head for laser

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    A deposition head for use as a part of apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. The deposition head delivers the laser beam and powder to a deposition zone, which is formed at the tip of the deposition head. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of the deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which the deposition head moves along the tool path.

  8. Shingle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2007-02-20

    A barrier, such as a PV module, is secured to a base by a support to create a shingle assembly with a venting region defined between the barrier and base for temperature regulation. The first edge of one base may be interengageable with the second edge of an adjacent base to be capable of resisting first and second disengaging forces oriented perpendicular to the edges and along planes oriented parallel to and perpendicular to the base. A deflector may be used to help reduce wind uplift forces.

  9. Dump assembly

    DOEpatents

    Goldmann, L.H.

    1984-12-06

    This is a claim for a dump assembly having a fixed conduit and a rotatable conduit provided with overlapping plates, respectively, at their adjacent ends. The plates are formed with openings, respectively, normally offset from each other to block flow. The other end of the rotatable conduit is provided with means for securing the open end of a filled container thereto. Rotation of the rotatable conduit raises and inverts the container to empty the contents while concurrently aligning the conduit openings to permit flow of material therethrough. 4 figs.

  10. Pushrod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Potter, Jerry D.

    1987-01-01

    A pushrod assembly including a carriage mounted on a shaft for movement therealong and carrying a pushrod engageable with a load to be moved. A magnet is mounted on a supporting bracket for movement along such shaft. Means are provided for adjustably spacing said magnet away from said carriage to obtain a selected magnetic attractive or coupling force therebetween. Movement of the supporting bracket and the magnet carried thereby pulls the carriage along with it until the selected magnetic force is exceeded by a resistance load acting on the carriage.

  11. Pushrod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Potter, J.D.

    1984-03-30

    A pushrod assembly including a carriage mounted on a shaft for movement therealong and carrying a pushrod engageable with a load to be moved is described. A magnet is mounted on a supporting bracket for movement along such shaft. Means are provided for adjustably spacing magnet away from the carriage to obtain a selected magnetic attractive or coupling force therebetween. Movement of the supporting bracket and the magnet carried thereby pulls the carriage along with it until the selected magnetic force is exceeded by a resistance load acting on the carriage.

  12. Head Start. Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    Head Start is a national program that provides comprehensive developmental services for preschool children (ages 3 to 5) from low-income families and social services for their families. Approximately 1,400 community-based nonprofit organizations and school systems develop programs to meet specific needs. Head Start began in 1965 in the Office of…

  13. Woodpeckers and head injury.

    PubMed

    May, P R; Fuster, J M; Newman, P; Hirschman, A

    1976-02-28

    The woodpecker is an experiment in Nature, a model for the investigation of mechanisms of basic importance for head injury and its prevention. A preliminary anatomical study of the woodpecker's head suggests that it may be fruitful to explore impact protective systems which are radically different from those in common use.

  14. RETORT ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Loomis, C.C.; Ash, W.J.

    1957-11-26

    An improved retort assembly useful in the thermal reduction of volatilizable metals such as magnesium and calcium is described. In this process a high vacuum is maintained in the retort, however the retort must be heated to very high temperatures while at the same time the unloading end must bo cooled to condense the metal vapors, therefore the retention of the vacuum is frequently difficult due to the thermal stresses involved. This apparatus provides an extended condenser sleeve enclosed by the retort cover which forms the vacuum seal. Therefore, the seal is cooled by the fluid in the condenser sleeve and the extreme thermal stresses found in previous designs together with the deterioration of the sealing gasket caused by the high temperatures are avoided.

  15. Swivel assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael; Bradford, Kline; Rawle, Michael; Bartholomew, David B.; McPherson, James

    2007-03-20

    A swivel assembly for a downhole tool string comprises a first and second coaxial housing cooperatively arranged. The first housing comprises a first transmission element in communication with surface equipment. The second housing comprises a second transmission element in communication with the first transmission element. The second housing further comprises a third transmission element adapted for communication with a network integrated into the downhole tool string. The second housing may be rotational and adapted to transmit a signal between the downhole network and the first housing. Electronic circuitry is in communication with at least one of the transmission elements. The electronic circuitry may be externally mounted to the first or second housing. Further, the electronic circuitry may be internally mounted in the second housing. The electronic circuitry may be disposed in a recess in either first or second housing of the swivel.

  16. Thermocouple assembly

    DOEpatents

    Thermos, Anthony Constantine; Rahal, Fadi Elias

    2002-01-01

    A thermocouple assembly includes a thermocouple; a plurality of lead wires extending from the thermocouple; an insulating jacket extending along and enclosing the plurality of leads; and at least one internally sealed area within the insulating jacket to prevent fluid leakage along and within the insulating jacket. The invention also provides a method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple including the steps of a) attaching a plurality of lead wires to a thermocouple; b) adding a heat sensitive pseudo-wire to extend along the plurality of lead wires; c) enclosing the lead wires and pseudo-wire inside an insulating jacket; d) locally heating axially spaced portions of the insulating jacket to a temperature which melts the pseudo-wire and fuses it with an interior surface of the jacket.

  17. Ulnar head replacement.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Timothy J; van Schoonhoven, Joerg

    2007-03-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing awareness of the anatomical and biomechanical significance of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). With this has come a more critical approach to surgical management of DRUJ disorders and a realization that all forms of "excision arthroplasty" can only restore forearm rotation at the expense of forearm stability. This, in turn, has led to renewed interest in prosthetic replacement of the ulnar head, a procedure that had previously fallen into disrepute because of material failures with early implants, in particular, the Swanson silicone ulnar head replacement. In response to these early failures, a new prosthesis was developed in the early 1990s, using materials designed to withstand the loads across the DRUJ associated with normal functional use of the upper limb. Released onto the market in 1995 (Herbert ulnar head prosthesis), clinical experience during the last 10 years has shown that this prosthesis is able to restore forearm function after ulnar head excision and that the materials (ceramic head and noncemented titanium stem), even with normal use of the limb, are showing no signs of failure in the medium to long term. As experience with the use of an ulnar head prosthesis grows, so does its acceptance as a viable and attractive alternative to more traditional operations, such as the Darrach and Sauve-Kapandji procedures. This article discusses the current indications and contraindications for ulnar head replacement and details the surgical procedure, rehabilitation, and likely outcomes.

  18. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

    1998-08-18

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

  19. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Reutzel, Edward W.

    1998-01-01

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  20. A dosimetric comparison of real-time adaptive and non-adaptive radiotherapy: A multi-institutional study encompassing robotic, gimbaled, multileaf collimator and couch tracking

    PubMed Central

    Colvill, Emma; Booth, Jeremy; Nill, Simeon; Fast, Martin; Bedford, James; Oelfke, Uwe; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Poulsen, Per; Worm, Esben; Hansen, Rune; Ravkilde, Thomas; Scherman Rydhög, Jonas; Pommer, Tobias; Munck af Rosenschold, Per; Lang, Stephanie; Guckenberger, Matthias; Groh, Christian; Herrmann, Christian; Verellen, Dirk; Poels, Kenneth; Wang, Lei; Hadsell, Michael; Sothmann, Thilo; Blanck, Oliver; Keall, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A study of real-time adaptive radiotherapy systems was performed to test the hypothesis that, across delivery systems and institutions, the dosimetric accuracy is improved with adaptive treatments over non-adaptive radiotherapy in the presence of patient-measured tumor motion. Methods and materials Ten institutions with robotic(2), gimbaled(2), MLC(4) or couch tracking(2) used common materials including CT and structure sets, motion traces and planning protocols to create a lung and a prostate plan. For each motion trace, the plan was delivered twice to a moving dosimeter; with and without real-time adaptation. Each measurement was compared to a static measurement and the percentage of failed points for γ-tests recorded. Results For all lung traces all measurement sets show improved dose accuracy with a mean 2%/2 mm γ-fail rate of 1.6% with adaptation and 15.2% without adaptation (p < 0.001). For all prostate the mean 2%/2 mm γ-fail rate was 1.4% with adaptation and 17.3% without adaptation (p < 0.001). The difference between the four systems was small with an average 2%/2 mm γ-fail rate of <3% for all systems with adaptation for lung and prostate. Conclusions The investigated systems all accounted for realistic tumor motion accurately and performed to a similar high standard, with real-time adaptation significantly outperforming non-adaptive delivery methods. PMID:27016171

  1. Ultrasound: Head (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  2. Overview of Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... appear to be more serious than it is. Did You Know... Because the scalp has many blood ... these symptoms occur, prompt medical attention is essential. Did You Know... The degree of external head injury ...

  3. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... to 2 weeks. If you have a small fracture and your bones did not move around much, ... to see a bone doctor (orthopedic surgeon). Some fractures require surgery to: Insert pins and plates to ...

  4. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Karl B.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the medical literature on head injuries in soccer and concludes that protective headgear to reduce these injuries may not be as effective as rule changes and other measures, such as padding goal posts. (IAH)

  5. TCGA head Neck

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  6. 49 CFR 572.152 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) thick and 610 mm (24 in) square. The impact surface shall be clean, dry and have a micro finish of not less than 203.2 × 10−6 mm (8 micro inches) (RMS) and not more than 2032.0 × 10−6 mm (80 micro...

  7. 49 CFR 572.172 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... impact surface shall be clean, dry and have a micro finish of not less than 203.2 × 10−6 mm (8 micro inches) (RMS) and not more than 2032.0 × 10−6 mm (80 micro inches) (RMS). (5) Allow at least 2...

  8. 49 CFR 572.132 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) thick and 610 mm (24.0 in) square. The impact surface shall be clean, dry and have a micro finish of not less than 203.2.×10−6 mm (8 micro inches) (RMS) and not more than 2032.0×10−6 mm (80 micro inches)...

  9. An Annotated Bibliography of the Head Start Research Since 1965. Head Start Evaluation, Synthesis and Utilization Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CSR, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This bibliography and the related synthesis of research were assembled to make Head Start studies more accessible to researchers and to inform policymakers and practitioners about the major findings included in this body of research. The bibliography and the literature review constitute an update of the 1975 publication: "A Review of Head…

  10. Electrical Connector Assembly

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    hereinafter 5 appear, a feature of the invention is the provision of an 6 electrical connector assembly including a female connector 7 assembly comprising...urging of the male connector assembly 3 into the female connector assembly, a leading edge of ehe 4 retention ring engages the claw fingers forcing...assembly barrel portion to pass through the female connector 3 assembly annular wall central opening, and permitting entry of 9 the pin into the sleeve

  11. Missouri: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Missouri's Early Head Start/Child Care Partnership Project expands access to Early Head Start (EHS) services for children birth to age 3 by developing partnerships between federal Head Start, EHS contractors, and child care providers. Head Start and EHS contractors that participate in the initiative provide services through community child care…

  12. Closure head for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1980-01-01

    A closure head for a nuclear reactor includes a stationary outer ring integral with the reactor vessel with a first rotatable plug disposed within the stationary outer ring and supported from the stationary outer ring by a bearing assembly. A sealing system is associated with the bearing assembly to seal the annulus defined between the first rotatable plug and the stationary outer ring. The sealing system comprises tubular seal elements disposed in the annulus with load springs contacting the tubular seal elements so as to force the tubular seal elements against the annulus in a manner to seal the annulus. The sealing system also comprises a sealing fluid which is pumped through the annulus and over the tubular seal elements causing the load springs to compress thereby reducing the friction between the tubular seal elements and the rotatable components while maintaining a gas-tight seal therebetween.

  13. Visual cueing considerations in Nap-of-the-Earth helicopter flight head-slaved helmet-mounted displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, Arthur J.; Kohn, Silvia

    1993-01-01

    The pilot's ability to derive Control-Oriented Visual Field Information from teleoperated Helmet-Mounted displays in Nap-of-the-Earth flight, is investigated. The visual field with these types of displays, commonly used in Apache and Cobra helicopter night operations, originates from a relatively narrow field-of-view Forward Looking Infrared Radiation Camera, gimbal-mounted at the nose of the aircraft and slaved to the pilot's line-of-sight, in order to obtain a wide-angle field-of-regard. Pilots have encountered considerable difficulties in controlling the aircraft by these devices. Experimental simulator results presented here indicate that part of these difficulties can be attributed to head/camera slaving system phase lags and errors. In the presence of voluntary head rotation, these slaving system imperfections are shown to impair the Control-Oriented Visual Field Information vital in vehicular control, such as the perception of the anticipated flight path or the vehicle yaw rate. Since, in the presence of slaving system imperfections, the pilot will tend to minimize head rotation, the full wide-angle field-of-regard of the line-of-sight slaved Helmet-Mounted Display, is not always fully utilized.

  14. Polymeric assemblies for sensitive colorimetric assays

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    The presently claimed invention relates to polymeric assemblies which visibly change color in the presence of analyte. In particular, the presently claimed invention relates to liposomes comprising a plurality of lipid monomers, which comprises a polymerizable group, a hydrophilic head group and a hydrophobic tail group, and one or more ligands. Overall carbon chain length, and polymerizable group positioning on the monomer influence color change sensitivity to analyte concentrations.

  15. Head segmentation in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Schilling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Classic theories of vertebrate head segmentation clearly exemplify the idealistic nature of comparative embryology prior to the 20th century. Comparative embryology aimed at recognizing the basic, primary structure that is shared by all vertebrates, either as an archetype or an ancestral developmental pattern. Modern evolutionary developmental (Evo-Devo) studies are also based on comparison, and therefore have a tendency to reduce complex embryonic anatomy into overly simplified patterns. Here again, a basic segmental plan for the head has been sought among chordates. We convened a symposium that brought together leading researchers dealing with this problem, in a number of different evolutionary and developmental contexts. Here we give an overview of the outcome and the status of the field in this modern era of Evo-Devo. We emphasize the fact that the head segmentation problem is not fully resolved, and we discuss new directions in the search for hints for a way out of this maze. PMID:20607135

  16. Pediatric head injury.

    PubMed

    Tulipan, N

    1998-01-01

    Pediatric head injury is a public health problem that exacts a high price from patients, their families and society alike. While much of the brain damage in head-injured patients occurs at the moment of impact, secondary injuries can be prevented by aggressive medical and surgical intervention. Modern imaging devices have simplified the task of diagnosing intracranial injuries. Recent advances in monitoring technology have made it easier to assess the effectiveness of medical therapy. These include intracranial pressure monitoring devices that are accurate and safe, and jugular bulb monitoring which provides a continuous, qualitative measure of cerebral blood flow. The cornerstones of treatment remain hyperventilation and osmotherapy. Despite maximal treatment, however, the mortality and morbidity associated with pediatric head injury remains high. Reduction of this mortality and morbidity will likely depend upon prevention rather than treatment.

  17. Latching relay switch assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

  18. Flexible Heating Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L.; Johnson, Samuel D.; Coultrip, Robert H.; Phillips, W. Morris

    1994-01-01

    United States Air Force is investigating method of repairing aircraft by use of adhesive bonding with induction heating to cure adhesive. Fast-acting and reliable induction heating device that is lightweight, portable, and easy to use needed for such applications. Newly developed flexible heating head lightweight and conforms to complex, curved surfaces. Incorporates principles and circuitry of toroid joining gun described in "Toroid Joining Gun for Fittings and Couplings" (LAR-14278). Concentrates heat in local area through induction heating. Flexible heating head contains tank circuit, connected via cable to source of power.

  19. Holographic Optical Head

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    optical path from HOE to focal point can be made (ie same for both rays. We do this for a thin lens; in reality, the condition is obtained by ray...I2 RADC-TR-90-200 Final Technical Report September 1990 uric FILE COPY HOLOGRAPHIC OPTICAL HEAD Holometrix, Inc. P. Gregory DeBaryshe, Charles S. th...aa w 1. REPOA ATE 3. Reoa"rm AND DAS C September 1990 Final Aug 88 - May 90 4. TME AND hTME s. FUMO NUMBERS HOLOGRAPHIC OPTICAL HEAD C - F30602-88-C

  20. Probe tip heating assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  1. Inlet nozzle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Knight, R.C.; Precechtel, D.R.; Smith, B.G.

    1985-09-09

    An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

  2. Tilt assembly for tracking solar collector assembly

    DOEpatents

    Almy, Charles; Peurach, John; Sandler, Reuben

    2012-01-24

    A tilt assembly is used with a solar collector assembly of the type comprising a frame, supporting a solar collector, for movement about a tilt axis by pivoting a drive element between first and second orientations. The tilt assembly comprises a drive element coupler connected to the drive element and a driver, the driver comprising a drive frame, a drive arm and a drive arm driver. The drive arm is mounted to the drive frame for pivotal movement about a drive arm axis. Movement on the drive arm mimics movement of the drive element. Drive element couplers can extend in opposite directions from the outer portion of the drive arm, whereby the assembly can be used between adjacent solar collector assemblies in a row of solar collector assemblies.

  3. Sculpting Ceramic Heads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapiro, Maurice

    1983-01-01

    Clay sculpture is difficult to produce because of the requirements of kiln firing. The problems can be overcome by modeling the original manikin head and making a plaster mold, pressing molding slabs of clay into the plaster mold to form the hollow clay armature, and sculpting on the armature. (IS)

  4. Is Head Start Dying?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Ann; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Analysis of problems faced by Head Start and its present status includes a review of its transfer from O.E.O. to H.E.W., its extensions, the Westinghouse Report, and other studies and articles. Decline in public interest and support is noted. (KW)

  5. Preventing head injuries in children

    MedlinePlus

    Concussion - preventing in children; Traumatic brain injury - preventing in children; TBI - children; Safety - preventing head injury ... not ride on these vehicles. After having a concussion or mild head injury , your child may need ...

  6. CT angiography - head and neck

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007677.htm CT angiography - head and neck To use the sharing features on this page, ... create pictures of the blood vessels in the head and neck. How the Test is Performed You will be ...

  7. Design and Test of the CC Cryostat Head Cart

    SciTech Connect

    Jaques, Al; /Fermilab

    1989-08-08

    This Engineering Note documents the design of the stand to be used to transport the CC Cryostat heads into the D-Zero clean room. Due to the width of the clean room access door, the heads will have to be upright to fit through. This head cart will hold the heads upright and wheel them into the clean room on a guided track. Before the wheels are placed on the heat cart, it will be used as a stand to place the heads on for the purpose of test fitting the super insulation. The head cart will not only be structurally sufficient to support the weight of the heads but also stiff enough to allow a maximum deflection of 1/2-inch at the end of the 48-inch cylinder. The heaviest head assembly weighs about 9000 pounds. Following A.I.S.C. specifications and using a 9000 pound design load, the head cart was initially designed and built and later modified in order to meet the deflection requirements. Bending and tension stresses were limited to two thirds the yield strength. Weld and shear stresses are limited to 0.4*Fy. The C7 X 12.25 channels, the L2.5 X 2.5 X 0.25 angles adn the 1/2-inch plate are all A36 steel. In order to validate the need for an end plate in the 48-inch cylinder, an ANSYS model was created of the cylinder itself to determine it's rigidity under a point load applied at it's outer end. Appendix D contains the results which demonstrate the rigidity of the cylinder-end plate assembly. Also included is a Frame-Mac simulation of the head cart which was used to estimate the deflection at the cylinder end. A load test was performed to 133% of the rated capacity, or 12,000 pounds. The test load was incrementally applied using a crane and hook scale. A graph of deflection vs. load is shown in Appendix E. A spreader beam was designed and built to properly test the head cart. Stress calculations for this test spreader beam are included in Appendix C.

  8. Firearm trigger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  9. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  10. Yes, Head Start Improves Reading!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Janet J.

    This study evaluated the effect of a Head Start program on children's intelligence and reading achievement test scores over a three year period. Each of 25 Head Start children was paired with a non-Head Start child of the same reace, sex, age, socioeconomic status, date of school entrance, kindergarten experience, promotion record, and type of…

  11. Minnesota: Early Head Start Initiatiive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Minnesota provides supplemental state funding to existing federal Head Start and Early Head Start (EHS) grantees to increase their capacity to serve additional infants, toddlers, and pregnant women. The initiative was started in 1997 when the state legislature earmarked $1 million of the general state Head Start supplemental funds for children…

  12. MAGNETIC RECORDING HEAD

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, L.C.

    1958-06-17

    An electromagetic recording head is described for simultaneous recording of a plurality of signals within a small space on a magnetically semsitized medium. Basically the head structure comprises a non-magnetic centerpiece provided with only first and second groups of spaced cut-out slots respectively on opposite sides of the centerpiece. The two groups of slots are in parallel alignment and the slots of one group are staggered with respect to the slots of the other group so that one slot is not directly opposite another slot. Each slot has a magnet pole piece disposed therein and cooperating with a second pole and coil to provide a magnetic flux gap at the upper end of the slot. As a tape is drawn over the upper end of the centerpiece the individual magnetic circuits are disposed along its width to provide means for simultaneously recording information on separate portions, tracks. of the tape.

  13. Membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kaschemekat, J.

    1994-03-15

    A membrane module assembly is described which is adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation. 2 figures.

  14. Membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kaschemekat, Jurgen

    1994-01-01

    A membrane module assembly adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation.

  15. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.754 Structural steel...) Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing...

  16. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.754 Structural steel...) Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.754 Structural steel...) Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.754 Structural steel...) Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.754 Structural steel...) Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing...

  20. 49 CFR 572.165 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... torso assembly of a seated dummy is subjected to a force continuously applied at the head to neck pivot... permits the upper torso assembly to translate in angular motion until the machined surface of the... plane, at which time the force applied as shown in Figure S2 must be within 88.6 N ±25 N (20.0 lbf...

  1. 49 CFR 572.135 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... upper torso assembly of a seated dummy is subjected to a force continuously applied at the head to neck... amount that permits the upper torso assembly to translate in angular motion relative to the vertical transverse plane 45 ±0.5 degrees at which time the force applied must be not less than 320 N (71.5 lbf)...

  2. 49 CFR 572.175 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... upper torso assembly of a seated dummy is subjected to a force continuously applied at the head to neck... flex by an amount that permits the upper torso assembly to translate in angular motion relative to the vertical transverse plane 35 ± 0.5 degrees at which time the force applied must be not less than 180 N...

  3. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David H [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  4. System, Apparatus and Method Employing a Dual Head Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Donald B. (Inventor); Stysley, Paul R. (Inventor); Poulios, Demetrios (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system, apparatus and method employing a laser with a split-head, V-assembly gain material configuration. Additionally, the present invention is directed to techniques to better dissipate or remove unwanted energies in laser operations. The present invention is also directed to techniques for better collimated laser beams, with single spatial mode quality (TEM00), with improved efficiency, in extreme environments, such as in outer space.

  5. Interconnect assembly for an electronic assembly and assembly method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Gerbsch, Erich William

    2003-06-10

    An interconnect assembly and method for a semiconductor device, in which the interconnect assembly can be used in lieu of wirebond connections to form an electronic assembly. The interconnect assembly includes first and second interconnect members. The first interconnect member has a first surface with a first contact and a second surface with a second contact electrically connected to the first contact, while the second interconnect member has a flexible finger contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member. The first interconnect member is adapted to be aligned and registered with a semiconductor device having a contact on a first surface thereof, so that the first contact of the first interconnect member electrically contacts the contact of the semiconductor device. Consequently, the assembly method does not require any wirebonds, but instead merely entails aligning and registering the first interconnect member with the semiconductor device so that the contacts of the first interconnect member and the semiconductor device make electrically contact, and then contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member with the flexible finger of the second interconnect member.

  6. HEXPANDO Expanding Head for Fastener-Retention Hexagonal Wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, John

    2011-01-01

    The HEXPANDO is an expanding-head hexagonal wrench designed to retain fasteners and keep them from being dislodged from the tool. The tool is intended to remove or install socket-head cap screws (SHCSs) in remote, hard-to-reach locations or in circumstances when a dropped fastener could cause damage to delicate or sensitive hardware. It is not intended for application of torque. This tool is made of two assembled portions. The first portion of the tool comprises tubing, or a hollow shaft, at a length that gives the user adequate reach to the intended location. At one end of the tubing is the expanding hexagonal head fitting with six radial slits cut into it (one at each of the points of the hexagonal shape), and a small hole drilled axially through the center and the end opposite the hex is internally and externally threaded. This fitting is threaded into the shaft (via external threads) and staked or bonded so that it will not loosen. At the other end of the tubing is a knurled collar with a through hole into which the tubing is threaded. This knob is secured in place by a stop nut. The second assembled portion of the tool comprises a length of all thread or solid rod that is slightly longer than the steel tubing. One end has a slightly larger knurled collar affixed while the other end is tapered/pointed and threaded. When the two portions are assembled, the all thread/rod portion feeds through the tubing and is threaded into the expanding hex head fitting. The tapered point allows it to be driven into the through hole of the hex fitting. While holding the smaller collar on the shaft, the user turns the larger collar, and as the threads feed into the fitting, the hex head expands and grips the SHCS, thus providing a safe way to install and remove fasteners. The clamping force retaining the SHCS varies depending on how far the tapered end is inserted into the tool head. Initial tests of the prototype tool, designed for a 5 mm or # 10SHCS have resulted in up to 8 lb

  7. Telerobotic truss assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Philip L.

    1987-01-01

    The ACCESS truss was telerobotically assembled in order to gain experience with robotic assembly of hardware designed for astronaut extravehicular (EVA) assembly. Tight alignment constraints of the ACCESS hardware made telerobotic assembly difficult. A wider alignment envelope and a compliant end effector would have reduced the problem. The manipulator had no linear motion capability, but many of the assembly operations required straight line motion. The manipulator was attached to a motion table in order to provide the X, Y, and Z translations needed. A programmable robot with linear translation capability would have eliminated the need for the motion table and streamlined the assembly. Poor depth perception was a major problem. Shaded paint schemes and alignment lines were helpful in reducing this problem. The four cameras used worked well for only some operations. It was not possible to identify camera locations that worked well for all assembly steps. More cameras or movable cameras would have simplified some operations. The audio feedback system was useful.

  8. Head stabilization in herons.

    PubMed

    Katzir, G; Schechtman, E; Carmi, N; Weihs, D

    2001-07-01

    We examined head stabilization in relation to body mass and length of legs in four heron species (little egrets, Egretta garzetta; night herons, Nycticorax nycticorax; squacco herons, Ardeola ralloides; and cattle egrets, Bubulcus ibis: Aves: Ardeidae). Head stabilization, under controlled, sinusoidal, perch perturbations was mostly elicited at frequencies lower than 1 Hz. Maximal perturbation amplitudes sustained were positively correlated with leg length and maximal perturbation frequencies sustained were negatively correlated with body mass and with leg length. The species differed significantly in average maximal perturbation amplitudes sustained. Combinations of amplitude and frequency for which stabilization was achieved were bounded by a decreasing concave "envelope" curve in the frequency-amplitude plane, with inter specific differences in "envelope". As physical constraints, we tested maximal vertical acceleration, which translates into a line defined by the product of frequency2 x amplitude, and maximal vertical velocity, which translates into a line defined by the product of frequency x amplitude. Both relations were in good agreement with the experimental results for all but squacco herons. The results support predictions based on mechanical considerations and may explain the predominance of motor patterns employed by herons while foraging.

  9. Perspectives on Hilton Head.

    PubMed

    Zellmer, W A

    1986-06-01

    A conference ASHP sponsored in 1985 on directions for clinical practice in pharmacy (the "Hilton Head conference") is analyzed, and the implications of the conference for practitioners are discussed. The Hilton Head conference was a consensus-building exercise through which practitioners developed shared values, goals, and ideals about the basic purpose of the profession. The conferees agreed that a fundamental purpose of pharmacy is to serve as a force in society for safe and appropriate use of drugs. In pursuing the implications of this point of agreement, it is argued that pharmacy should not foster a separate corps of clinical practitioners. Rather, traditional pharmacy should be melded with the values system fostered by the clinical movement so that pharmacy as a whole will become more fully professionalized. Directors of pharmacy departments should launch consensus-building efforts within their departments through which strategic plans can be developed to increase pharmacy's clinical thrust. If all pharmacists in a department participate in the development of a clinically focused strategic plan, they will have a greater commitment to the success of that plan. If pharmacists see themselves as practitioners of a clinical profession, they will speak and behave accordingly, and others will perceive of them as clinical professionals.

  10. QTL mapping of leafy heads by genome resequencing in the RIL population of Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang; Wang, Han; Zhong, Weili; Bai, Jinjuan; Liu, Pinglin; He, Yuke

    2013-01-01

    Leaf heads of cabbage (Brassica oleracea), Chinese cabbage (B. rapa), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) are important vegetables that supply mineral nutrients, crude fiber and vitamins in the human diet. Head size, head shape, head weight, and heading time contribute to yield and quality. In an attempt to investigate genetic basis of leafy head in Chinese cabbage (B. rapa), we took advantage of recent technical advances of genome resequencing to perform quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping using 150 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from the cross between heading and non-heading Chinese cabbage. The resequenced genomes of the parents uncovered more than 1 million SNPs. Genotyping of RILs using the high-quality SNPs assisted by Hidden Markov Model (HMM) generated a recombination map. The raw genetic map revealed some physical assembly error and missing fragments in the reference genome that reduced the quality of SNP genotyping. By deletion of the genetic markers in which recombination rates higher than 20%, we have obtained a high-quality genetic map with 2209 markers and detected 18 QTLs for 6 head traits, from which 3 candidate genes were selected. These QTLs provide the foundation for study of genetic basis of leafy heads and the other complex traits.

  11. Does dimeticone clear head lice?

    PubMed

    2007-07-01

    Head lice infestation is common and mainly affects children of primary school age. Treatments include licensed topical preparations containing conventional chemical insecticides and medical devices. Each of these fail to eradicate head lice in some patients and resistance is a problem with chemical insecticides. Dimeticone 4% lotion (Hedrin - Thornton & Ross) is a new treatment licensed "for the eradication of head lice infestations". Here we consider its place in the context of other options.

  12. Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2012-10-23

    A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

  13. Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2011-11-22

    A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

  14. Chryse 'Alien Head'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    26 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an impact crater in Chryse Planitia, not too far from the Viking 1 lander site, that to seems to resemble a bug-eyed head. The two odd depressions at the north end of the crater (the 'eyes') may have formed by wind or water erosion. This region has been modified by both processes, with water action occurring in the distant past via floods that poured across western Chryse Planitia from Maja Valles, and wind action common occurrence in more recent history. This crater is located near 22.5oN, 47.9oW. The 150 meter scale bar is about 164 yards long. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/lower left.

  15. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    DOEpatents

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  16. Interview with Joe F. Head

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Kim

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Joe F. Head, Dean of University Admissions and Enrollment Services at Kennesaw State University (KSU) in Georgia, who has more than 35 years of experience in admissions and enrollment services. After completing an M.Ed. in higher education at Georgia Southern University, Head immediately landed a position as…

  17. Maine: Early Head Start Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Maine has two initiatives that build on Early Head Start (EHS). The first initiative, Fund for a Healthy Maine, has since 2001 provided tobacco settlement money to existing Head Start and EHS programs to expand the number of children who receive full-day, full-year services. Local programs have the option of using these funds for EHS, depending on…

  18. Cutting Head for Ultrasonic Lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, Earl D. (Inventor); Goodfriend, Roger (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A cutting head for attachment to the end of the wire probe of an ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration instrument. The cutting head has a plurality of circumferentially arranged teeth formed at one end thereof to provide a cup-shaped receptacle for kidney stones encountered during the disintegration procedure. An integral reduced diameter collar diminishes stress points in the wire and reduces breakage thereof.

  19. Head Start Nutrition Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montclair State Coll., Upper Montclair, NJ.

    This multidisciplinary preschool nutrition education curriculum was written for use in the instruction of 3- to 5-year-olds in the National Head Start program. Introductory notes on cooking experiences for Head Start children and suggested menus for young children are followed by nine units. The curriculum incorporates a variety of teaching…

  20. The head-mounted microscope.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery.

  1. The Start of Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The creation of the Head Start program occurred at break-neck speed with many dramatic turns and many colorful players. No one tells the story better than Edward Zigler in "Head Start: The Inside Story of America's Most Successful Educational Experiment"--a detailed and personal, behind the scenes look at the program's inception. From this…

  2. State Funding of Head Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Legislature, Boise. Office of Performance Evaluation.

    This background paper details Head Start, a federally funded program serving preschool age children from low-income families, and focuses on the program's effectiveness and the adequacy of historic federal funding levels. The paper provides an overview of the Head Start Program, describes federal requirements for local programs, and describes Head…

  3. Head Start Impact Study: First Year Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael; Bell, Stephen; Cook, Ronna; Heid, Camilla; Lopez, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Congressionally-mandated Head Start Impact Study is being conducted across 84 nationally representative grantee/delegate agencies. Approximately 5,000 newly entering 3- and 4-year-old children applying for Head Start were randomly assigned to either a Head Start group that had access to Head Start program services or to a non-Head Start group…

  4. Laser bottom hole assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  5. Liquid rocket valve assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design and operating characteristics of valve assemblies used in liquid propellant rocket engines are discussed. The subjects considered are as follows: (1) valve selection parameters, (2) major design aspects, (3) design integration of valve subassemblies, and (4) assembly of components and functional tests. Information is provided on engine, stage, and spacecraft checkout procedures.

  6. Turbine disc sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-03-05

    A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

  7. Permanent magnet assembly

    DOEpatents

    Chell, Jeremy; Zimm, Carl B.

    2006-12-12

    A permanent magnet assembly is disclosed that is adapted to provide a magnetic field across an arc-shaped gap. Such a permanent magnet assembly can be used, for example, to provide a time-varying magnetic field to an annular region for use in a magnetic refrigerator.

  8. Perspective: Geometrically frustrated assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grason, Gregory M.

    2016-09-01

    This perspective will overview an emerging paradigm for self-organized soft materials, geometrically frustrated assemblies, where interactions between self-assembling elements (e.g., particles, macromolecules, proteins) favor local packing motifs that are incompatible with uniform global order in the assembly. This classification applies to a broad range of material assemblies including self-twisting protein filament bundles, amyloid fibers, chiral smectics and membranes, particle-coated droplets, curved protein shells, and phase-separated lipid vesicles. In assemblies, geometric frustration leads to a host of anomalous structural and thermodynamic properties, including heterogeneous and internally stressed equilibrium structures, self-limiting assembly, and topological defects in the equilibrium assembly structures. The purpose of this perspective is to (1) highlight the unifying principles and consequences of geometric frustration in soft matter assemblies; (2) classify the known distinct modes of frustration and review corresponding experimental examples; and (3) describe outstanding questions not yet addressed about the unique properties and behaviors of this broad class of systems.

  9. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, Carolyn

    1993-01-01

    A high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  10. High speed door assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, C.

    1993-04-27

    A high speed door assembly is described, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  11. Assembly: a resource for assembled genomes at NCBI.

    PubMed

    Kitts, Paul A; Church, Deanna M; Thibaud-Nissen, Françoise; Choi, Jinna; Hem, Vichet; Sapojnikov, Victor; Smith, Robert G; Tatusova, Tatiana; Xiang, Charlie; Zherikov, Andrey; DiCuccio, Michael; Murphy, Terence D; Pruitt, Kim D; Kimchi, Avi

    2016-01-04

    The NCBI Assembly database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/assembly/) provides stable accessioning and data tracking for genome assembly data. The model underlying the database can accommodate a range of assembly structures, including sets of unordered contig or scaffold sequences, bacterial genomes consisting of a single complete chromosome, or complex structures such as a human genome with modeled allelic variation. The database provides an assembly accession and version to unambiguously identify the set of sequences that make up a particular version of an assembly, and tracks changes to updated genome assemblies. The Assembly database reports metadata such as assembly names, simple statistical reports of the assembly (number of contigs and scaffolds, contiguity metrics such as contig N50, total sequence length and total gap length) as well as the assembly update history. The Assembly database also tracks the relationship between an assembly submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Consortium (INSDC) and the assembly represented in the NCBI RefSeq project. Users can find assemblies of interest by querying the Assembly Resource directly or by browsing available assemblies for a particular organism. Links in the Assembly Resource allow users to easily download sequence and annotations for current versions of genome assemblies from the NCBI genomes FTP site.

  12. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  13. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  14. Mechanisms of Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Jason D.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are nanoscale entities containing a nucleic acid genome encased in a protein shell called a capsid, and in some cases surrounded by a lipid bilayer membrane. This review summarizes the physics that govern the processes by which capsids assembles within their host cells and in vitro. We describe the thermodynamics and kinetics for assembly of protein subunits into icosahedral capsid shells, and how these are modified in cases where the capsid assembles around a nucleic acid or on a lipid bilayer. We present experimental and theoretical techniques that have been used to characterize capsid assembly, and we highlight aspects of virus assembly which are likely to receive significant attention in the near future. PMID:25532951

  15. Automated assembly in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Sandanand; Dwivedi, Suren N.; Soon, Toh Teck; Bandi, Reddy; Banerjee, Soumen; Hughes, Cecilia

    1989-01-01

    The installation of robots and their use of assembly in space will create an exciting and promising future for the U.S. Space Program. The concept of assembly in space is very complicated and error prone and it is not possible unless the various parts and modules are suitably designed for automation. Certain guidelines are developed for part designing and for an easy precision assembly. Major design problems associated with automated assembly are considered and solutions to resolve these problems are evaluated in the guidelines format. Methods for gripping and methods for part feeding are developed with regard to the absence of gravity in space. The guidelines for part orientation, adjustments, compliances and various assembly construction are discussed. Design modifications of various fasteners and fastening methods are also investigated.

  16. Modeling Viral Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    I present a review of the theoretical and computational methodologies that have been used to model the assembly of viral capsids. I discuss the capabilities and limitations of approaches ranging from equilibrium continuum theories to molecular dynamics simulations, and I give an overview of some of the important conclusions about virus assembly that have resulted from these modeling efforts. Topics include the assembly of empty viral shells, assembly around single-stranded nucleic acids to form viral particles, and assembly around synthetic polymers or charged nanoparticles for nanotechnology or biomedical applications. I present some examples in which modeling efforts have promoted experimental breakthroughs, as well as directions in which the connection between modeling and experiment can be strengthened. PMID:25663722

  17. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... f t k e P Types of Cancer Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  18. Heads Up to High School Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us HEADS UP Apps Reshaping the Culture Around Concussion in Sports Get HEADS UP on Your Web Site Concussion ... leading experts and organizations, developed the HEADS UP: Concussion in School Sports initiative and materials. Specific Concussion Information for... Coaches ...

  19. Eye and head motion during head turns in spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William E.; Uri, John J.; Moore, Thomas P.; Pool, Sam L.

    1988-01-01

    Eye-head motion was studied pre-, in- and postflight during single voluntary head turns. A transient increase in vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain occurred early in the flight, but later trended toward normal. This increased gain was produced by a relative increase in eye counterrotation velocity. Asymmetries in gain with right and left turns also occurred, caused by asymmetries in eye counterrotation velocities. These findings were remarkably similar to those from Soviet primate studies using gaze fixation targets, except the human study trended more rapidly toward normal. These findings differ substantially from those measuring VOR gain by head oscillation, in which no significant changes were found inflight. No visual disturbances were noted in either test condition or in normal activities. These head turn studies are the only ones to date documenting any functional change in VOR in weightlessness.

  20. Read/write head for a magnetic tape device having grooves for reducing tape floating

    DOEpatents

    Aoki, Kenji

    2005-08-09

    A read/write head for a magnetic tape includes an elongated chip assembly and a tape running surface formed in the longitudinal direction of the chip assembly. A pair of substantially spaced parallel read/write gap lines for supporting read/write elements extend longitudinally along the tape running surface of the chip assembly. Also, at least one groove is formed on the tape running surface on both sides of each of the read/write gap lines and extends substantially parallel to the read/write gap lines.

  1. Cutting Head for Ultrasonic Lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, E. D.; Goodfriend, R.

    1987-01-01

    Kidney stones lodged in urinary tract disintegrated with increased safety and efficiency by cutting head attached to end of vibrated wire probe. Aligns probe with stone and enables probe to vibrate long enough to disintegrate stone. Design of cutting head reduces risk of metal-fatigue-induced breakage of probe tip leaving metal fragments in urinary tract. Teeth of cutting head both seat and fragment kidney stone, while extension of collar into catheter lessens mechanical strain in probe wire, increasing probe life and lessening danger of in situ probe breakage.

  2. Anaphylaxis due to head injury.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Heather C; Bruner, David I

    2015-05-01

    Both anaphylaxis and head injury are often seen in the emergency department, but they are rarely seen in combination. We present a case of a 30-year-old woman who presented with anaphylaxis with urticaria and angioedema following a minor head injury. The patient responded well to intramuscular epinephrine without further complications or airway compromise. Prior case reports have reported angioedema from hereditary angioedema during dental procedures and maxillofacial surgery, but there have not been any cases of first-time angioedema or anaphylaxis due to head injury.

  3. Anaphylaxis Due to Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Heather C.; Bruner, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Both anaphylaxis and head injury are often seen in the emergency department, but they are rarely seen in combination. We present a case of a 30-year-old woman who presented with anaphylaxis with urticaria and angioedema following a minor head injury. The patient responded well to intramuscular epinephrine without further complications or airway compromise. Prior case reports have reported angioedema from hereditary angioedema during dental procedures and maxillofacial surgery, but there have not been any cases of first-time angioedema or anaphylaxis due to head injury. PMID:25987924

  4. Design, manufacture, and test of coolant pump-motor assembly for Brayton power conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabacz, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, and testing of seven coolant circulating pump-motor assemblies are discussed. The pump-motor assembly is driven by the nominal 44.4-volt, 400-Hz, 3-phase output of a nominal 56-volt dc input inverter. The pump-motor assembly will be used to circulate Dow Corning 200 liquid coolant for use in a Brayton cycle space power system. The pump-motor assembly develops a nominal head of 70 psi at 3.7 gpm with an over-all efficiency of 26 percent. The design description, drawings, photographs, reliability results, and developmental and acceptance test results are included.

  5. DC source assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

    2013-02-26

    Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  6. Premixer assembly for mixing air and fuel for combustion

    SciTech Connect

    York, William David; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2016-12-13

    A premixer assembly for mixing air and fuel for combustion includes a plurality of tubes disposed at a head end of a combustor assembly. Also included is a tube of the plurality of tubes, the tube including an inlet end and an outlet end. Further included is at least one non-circular portion of the tube extending along a length of the tube, the at least one non-circular portion having a non-circular cross-section, and the tube having a substantially constant cross-sectional area along its length

  7. Polymerized supramolecular assemblies and biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, David F.

    2001-03-01

    The creation of durable, biomembrane-mimetic coatings for inorganic and polymeric surfaces that are biocompatible, i.e. resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption, remains an important goal that is expected to impact numerous fields. It has already been shown that the physical stability of lipid bilayer vesicles can be dramatically enhanced by cross-linking polymerization of reactive lipids, such as phosphatidylcholines. Bilayers of these same lipids on clean silicon dioxide surfaces can be formed by fusion of small bilayer vesicles with the surface. Radical initiated polymerization of these supported bilayers yields a stable poly(lipid) film that is not perturbed upon exposure to surfactant. Moreover, the cross-linked bilayer film can be removed from water into air with retention of the poly(lipid) bilayer structure. These polymerized bilayer films could be repeatedly transferred from water to air to water with no obvious change in their biocompatibility. The supported bilayer films were equally resistant to non-specific protein adsorption before and after polymerization. This indicates that biocompatible nature of the phosphorylcholine head group of the lipids was not compromised by polymerization of the lipids. The ability to maintain surface biocompatibility of membranes while substantially increasing their stability would appear to extend the technological uses of supramolecular assemblies of lipids.

  8. Baby's Head Shape: What's Normal?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the top of your baby's head where the skull bones haven't yet grown together. These spots, ... rapidly growing brain during infancy. Because your baby's skull is malleable, however, a tendency to rest the ...

  9. Zero torque gear head wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, A. R.; Norman, R. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A gear head wrench particularly suited for use in applying torque to bolts without transferring torsional stress to bolt-receiving structures is introduced. The wrench is characterized by a coupling including a socket, for connecting a bolt head with a torque multiplying gear train, provided within a housing having an annulus concentrically related to the socket and adapted to be coupled with a spacer interposed between the bolt head and the juxtaposed surface of the bolt-receiving structure for applying a balancing counter-torque to the spacer as torque is applied to the bolt head whereby the bolt-receiving structure is substantially isolated from torsional stress. As a result of the foregoing, the operator of the wrench is substantially isolated from any forces which may be imposed.

  10. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cancer and the stage (extent) of the disease. In general, patients with early-stage head and neck cancers (particularly those limited to the site of origin) are treated with one modality—either radiation therapy ...

  11. Flat Head Syndrome (Positional Plagiocephaly)

    MedlinePlus

    ... symmetrical, but for a variety of reasons the asymmetry becomes less apparent as well. For example, in ... a flattened head does not affect a child's brain growth or cause developmental delays or brain damage. ...

  12. Vibrotactile Sensitivity of the Head

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    tissue in the skull, via vibrators mounted on the head, which stimulates the cochlea (resulting in an auditory sensation) while bypassing the external...are compatible with the sensitivity of the user. The extent to which vibrotactile* stimulation of the head is viable as a method of communication...cycle fraction of 0.25, and three repetitions extending the stimulation period of the signal to 750 ms (figure 5). Furthermore, the signal was divided

  13. Cutting head for ultrasonic lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anguluo, E. D.; Goodfriend, R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A cutting head for attachment to the end of the wire probe of an ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration instrument is described. The cutting head has a plurality of circumferentially arranged teeth formed at one end thereof to provide a cup shaped receptacle for kidney stones encountered during the disintegration procedure. An integral reduced diameter collar diminishes stress points in the wire and reduce breakage thereof.

  14. Designing Assemblies Of Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F. W.; Kennedy, D.; Butler, R.; Aston, G.; Anderson, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    VICONOPT calculates vibrations and instabilities of assemblies of prismatic plates. Designed for efficient, accurate analysis of buckling and vibration, and for optimum design of panels of composite materials. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  15. Integrated thruster assembly program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The program is reported which has provided technology for a long life, high performing, integrated ACPS thruster assembly suitable for use in 100 typical flights of a space shuttle vehicle over a ten year period. The four integrated thruster assemblies (ITA) fabricated consisted of: propellant injector; a capacitive discharge, air gap torch type igniter assembly; fast response igniter and main propellant valves; and a combined regen-dump film cooled chamber. These flightweight 6672 N (1500 lb) thruster assemblies employed GH2/GO2 as propellants at a chamber pressure of 207 N/sq cm (300 psia). Test data were obtained on thrusted performance, thermal and hydraulic characteristics, dynamic response in pulsing, and cycle life. One thruster was fired in excess of 42,000 times.

  16. Swipe transfer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, Robert M.; Mills, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The swipe transfer assembly is a mechanical assembly which is used in conjunction with glove boxes and other sealed containments. It is used to pass small samples into or out of glove boxes without an open breach of the containment, and includes a rotational cylinder inside a fixed cylinder, the inside cylinder being rotatable through an arc of approximately 240.degree. relative to the outer cylinder. An offset of 120.degree. from end to end allows only one port to be opened at a time. The assembly is made of stainless steel or aluminum and clear acrylic plastic to enable visual observation. The assembly allows transfer of swipes and smears from radiological and other specially controlled environments.

  17. The proteasome assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Madura, Kiran

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of the proteasome — the cellular machine that eliminates unwanted proteins — is a carefully choreographed affair, involving a complex sequence of steps overseen by dedicated protein chaperones. PMID:19516331

  18. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  19. Station Assembly Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the assembly of the International Space Station since Nov. 20, 1998, with the delivery of the Zarya module, through May 16, 2011, with the delivery of the EXPRESS Logistics C...

  20. Rnnotator Assembly Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jeff

    2010-06-03

    Jeff Martin of the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses a de novo transcriptome assembly pipeline from short RNA-Seq reads on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  1. Supramolecular DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Christopher K; Hamblin, Graham D; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2011-12-01

    The powerful self-assembly features of DNA make it a unique template to finely organize and control matter on the nanometre scale. While DNA alone offers a high degree of fidelity in its self-assembly, a new area of research termed 'supramolecular DNA assembly' has recently emerged. This field combines DNA building blocks with synthetic organic, inorganic and polymeric structures. It thus brings together the toolbox of supramolecular chemistry with the predictable and programmable nature of DNA. The result of this molecular partnership is a variety of hybrid architectures, that expand DNA assembly beyond the boundaries of Watson-Crick base pairing into new structural and functional properties. In this tutorial review we outline this emerging field of study, and describe recent research aiming to synergistically combine the properties inherent to DNA with those of a number of supramolecular scaffolds. This ultimately creates structures with numerous potential applications in materials science, catalysis and medicine.

  2. Magnetostrictive valve assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A magnetostrictive valve assembly includes a housing that defines a passage with a seat being formed therein. A magnetically-biased and axially-compressed magnetostrictive assembly slidingly fitted in the passage is configured as a hollow and open-ended conduit adapted to support a flow of a fluid therethrough. Current-carrying coil(s) disposed about the passage in the region of the magnetostrictive assembly generate a magnetic field in the passage when current flows through the coil(s). A hollow valve body with side ports is coupled on one end thereof to an axial end of the magnetostrictive assembly. The other end of the valve body is designed to seal with the seat formed in the housing's passage when brought into contact therewith.

  3. Automated Assembly Center (AAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this project are as follows: to integrate advanced assembly and assembly support technology under a comprehensive architecture; to implement automated assembly technologies in the production of high-visibility DOD weapon systems; and to document the improved cost, quality, and lead time. This will enhance the production of DOD weapon systems by utilizing the latest commercially available technologies combined into a flexible system that will be able to readily incorporate new technologies as they emerge. Automated assembly encompasses the following areas: product data, process planning, information management policies and framework, three schema architecture, open systems communications, intelligent robots, flexible multi-ability end effectors, knowledge-based/expert systems, intelligent workstations, intelligent sensor systems, and PDES/PDDI data standards.

  4. Recuperator assembly and procedures

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Yungmo; McKeirnan, Jr., Robert D.

    2008-08-26

    A construction of recuperator core segments is provided which insures proper assembly of the components of the recuperator core segment, and of a plurality of recuperator core segments. Each recuperator core segment must be constructed so as to prevent nesting of fin folds of the adjacent heat exchanger foils of the recuperator core segment. A plurality of recuperator core segments must be assembled together so as to prevent nesting of adjacent fin folds of adjacent recuperator core segments.

  5. VIRUS instrument collimator assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jennifer L.; DePoy, Darren L.; Prochaska, Travis; Allen, Richard D.; Williams, Patrick; Rheault, Jean-Philippe; Li, Ting; Nagasawa, Daniel Q.; Akers, Christopher; Baker, David; Boster, Emily; Campbell, Caitlin; Cook, Erika; Elder, Alison; Gary, Alex; Glover, Joseph; James, Michael; Martin, Emily; Meador, Will; Mondrik, Nicholas; Rodriguez-Patino, Marisela; Villanueva, Steven; Hill, Gary J.; Tuttle, Sarah; Vattiat, Brian; Lee, Hanshin; Chonis, Taylor S.; Dalton, Gavin B.; Tacon, Mike

    2014-07-01

    The Visual Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument is a baseline array 150 identical fiber fed optical spectrographs designed to support observations for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). The collimator subassemblies of the instrument have been assembled in a production line and are now complete. Here we review the design choices and assembly practices used to produce a suite of identical low-cost spectrographs in a timely fashion using primarily unskilled labor.

  6. Reversed theta sequences of hippocampal cell assemblies during backward travel.

    PubMed

    Cei, Anne; Girardeau, Gabrielle; Drieu, Céline; Kanbi, Karim El; Zugaro, Michaël

    2014-05-01

    Hippocampal cell assemblies coding for past, present and future events form theta-timescale (~100 ms) sequences that represent spatio-temporal episodes. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. We recorded hippocampal and entorhinal cortical activity as rats experienced backward travel on a model train. Although the firing fields of place cells remained stable, the order in which they were activated in the theta sequence was reversed during backward travel. Thus, hippocampal cell assemblies coordinated their relative timing to correctly predict the sequential traversal of place fields in reverse order. At the single-cell level, theta phase represented distance traveled through the field, even though the head of the rat was oriented opposite to travel direction and entorhinal head-direction cells maintained their preferred firing direction. Our results challenge most theoretical models of theta sequence generation in the hippocampus.

  7. Ghost Head Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Looking like a colorful holiday card, a new image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope reveals a vibrant green and red nebula far from Earth.

    The image of NGC 2080, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is available online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . Images like this help astronomers investigate star formation in nebulas.

    NGC 2080, nicknamed 'The Ghost Head Nebula,' is one of a chain of star-forming regions lying south of the 30 Doradus nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. 30 Doradus is the largest star-forming complex in the local group of galaxies. This 'enhanced color' picture is composed of three narrow-band-filter images obtained by Hubble on March 28, 2000.

    The red and blue light come from regions of hydrogen gas heated by nearby stars. The green light on the left comes from glowing oxygen. The energy to illuminate the green light is supplied by a powerful stellar wind, a stream of high-speed particles coming from a massive star just outside the image. The central white region is a combination of all three emissions and indicates a core of hot, massive stars in this star-formation region. Intense emission from these stars has carved a bowl-shaped cavity in surrounding gas.

    In the white region, the two bright areas (the 'eyes of the ghost') - named A1 (left) and A2 (right) -- are very hot, glowing 'blobs' of hydrogen and oxygen. The bubble in A1 is produced by the hot, intense radiation and powerful stellar wind from one massive star. A2 contains more dust and several hidden, massive stars. The massive stars in A1 and A2 must have formed within the last 10,000 years, since their natal gas shrouds are not yet disrupted by the powerful radiation of the newborn stars.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center

  8. Cutting assembly. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Treuhaft, M.B.; Oser, M.S.

    1981-06-25

    A mining auger comprises a cutting head carried at one end of a tubular shaft and a plurality of wall segments which in a first position thereof are disposed side by side around said shaft and in a second position thereof are disposed oblique to said shaft. A vane projects outwardly from each wall segment. When the wall segments are in their first position, the vanes together form a substantially continuous helical wall. A cutter is mounted on the peripheral edge of each of the vanes. When the wall segments are in their second position, the cutters on the vanes are disposed radially outward from the perimeter of the cutting head.

  9. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    SciTech Connect

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  10. Subdividing Text: Headings, Content and Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struck, Larry

    Text headings can be used to structural and expressive advantage in technical material, increasing textual coherence and encouraging reader/text correspondence. The five general types of headings are differentiated by their functions: (1) descriptive headings refer to the most prominent feature of a text section; (2) reflective headings provide…

  11. 29 CFR 1917.93 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Head protection. 1917.93 Section 1917.93 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.93 Head protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each... the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The employer must ensure that head protection complies with...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.100 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Head protection. 1926.100 Section 1926.100 Labor... § 1926.100 Head protection. (a) Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head... Institute, Z89.1-1969, Safety Requirements for Industrial Head Protection. (c) Helmets for the...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.100 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Head protection. 1926.100 Section 1926.100 Labor... § 1926.100 Head protection. (a) Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head... Institute, Z89.1-1969, Safety Requirements for Industrial Head Protection. (c) Helmets for the...

  14. 29 CFR 1917.93 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Head protection. 1917.93 Section 1917.93 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.93 Head protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each... the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The employer must ensure that head protection complies with...

  15. 29 CFR 1917.93 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Head protection. 1917.93 Section 1917.93 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.93 Head protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each... the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The employer must ensure that head protection complies with...

  16. 29 CFR 1917.93 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Head protection. 1917.93 Section 1917.93 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.93 Head protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each... the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The employer must ensure that head protection complies with...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.100 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Head protection. 1926.100 Section 1926.100 Labor... § 1926.100 Head protection. (a) Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head... protected by protective helmets. (b) Criteria for head protection. (1) The employer must provide...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.100 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Head protection. 1926.100 Section 1926.100 Labor... § 1926.100 Head protection. (a) Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head... protected by protective helmets. (b) Criteria for head protection. (1) The employer must provide...

  19. 29 CFR 1917.93 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Head protection. 1917.93 Section 1917.93 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.93 Head protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each... the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The employer must ensure that head protection complies with...

  20. The perception of heading during eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royden, Constance S.; Banks, Martin S.; Crowell, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Warren and Hannon (1988, 1990), while studying the perception of heading during eye movements, concluded that people do not require extraretinal information to judge heading with eye/head movements present. Here, heading judgments are examined at higher, more typical eye movement velocities than the extremely slow tracking eye movements used by Warren and Hannon. It is found that people require extraretinal information about eye position to perceive heading accurately under many viewing conditions.

  1. Dropped head syndrome. Three case-reports.

    PubMed

    Chaouat, D; Belange, G

    1999-01-01

    Dropped head syndrome is characterized by gradual forward sagging of the head due to weakness of the neck extensor muscles. We report three cases in elderly patients seen by rheumatologists at our institution. There was some evidence suggestive of a neurogenic process, whereas most reported cases of dropped head syndrome have been ascribed to myopathy. Dropped head syndrome can probably be produced by multiple causes. The close ties between dropped head syndrome and acquired camptocormia in adults are discussed.

  2. Photovoltaic self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Lavin, Judith; Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2010-10-01

    This late-start LDRD was focused on the application of chemical principles of self-assembly on the ordering and placement of photovoltaic cells in a module. The drive for this chemical-based self-assembly stems from the escalating prices in the 'pick-and-place' technology currently used in the MEMS industries as the size of chips decreases. The chemical self-assembly principles are well-known on a molecular scale in other material science systems but to date had not been applied to the assembly of cells in a photovoltaic array or module. We explored several types of chemical-based self-assembly techniques, including gold-thiol interactions, liquid polymer binding, and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions designed to array both Si and GaAs PV chips onto a substrate. Additional research was focused on the modification of PV cells in an effort to gain control over the facial directionality of the cells in a solvent-based environment. Despite being a small footprint research project worked on for only a short time, the technical results and scientific accomplishments were significant and could prove to be enabling technology in the disruptive advancement of the microelectronic photovoltaics industry.

  3. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  4. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  5. Assembly Test Article (ATA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Glen A.

    1988-01-01

    The assembly test article (ATA) consisted of two live loaded redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) segments which were assembled and disassembled to simulate the actual flight segment stacking process. The test assembly joint was flight RSRM design, which included the J-joint insulation design and metal capture feature. The ATA test was performed mid-November through 24 December 1987, at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. The purpose of the test was: certification that vertical RSRM segment mating and separation could be accomplished without any damage; verification and modification of the procedures in the segment stacking/destacking documents; and certification of various GSE to be used for flight assembly and inspection. The RSRM vertical segment assembly/disassembly is possible without any damage to the insulation, metal parts, or seals. The insulation J-joint contact area was very close to the predicted values. Numerous deviations and changes to the planning documents were made to ensure the flight segments are effectively and correctly stacked. Various GSE were also certified for use on flight segments, and are discussed in detail.

  6. Power module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Jeremy B [Torrance, CA; Newson, Steve [Redondo Beach, CA

    2011-11-15

    A power module assembly of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicular power inverter, wherein the power inverter has a grounded chassis, is provided. The power module assembly comprises a conductive base layer electrically coupled to the chassis, an insulating layer disposed on the conductive base layer, a first conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, a second conductive node disposed on the insulating layer, wherein the first and second conductive nodes are electrically isolated from each other. The power module assembly also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the first conductive node, and further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the conductive base layer, and a second electrode electrically connected to the second conductive node.

  7. Liaison based assembly design

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, A.; Kholwadwala, D.; Wilson, R.H.

    1996-12-01

    Liaison Based Assembly Design extends the current information infrastructure to support design in terms of kinematic relationships between parts, or liaisons. These liaisons capture information regarding contact, degrees-of-freedom constraints and containment relationships between parts in an assembly. The project involved defining a useful collection of liaison representations, investigating their properties, and providing for maximum use of the data in downstream applications. We tested our ideas by implementing a prototype system involving extensions to Pro/Engineer and the Archimedes assembly planner. With an expanded product model, the design system is more able to capture design intent. When a product update is attempted, increased knowledge availability improves our ability to understand the effect of design changes. Manufacturing and analysis disciplines benefit from having liaison information available, so less time is wasted arguing over incomplete design specifications and our enterprise can be more completely integrated.

  8. Supported PV module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Mascolo, Gianluigi; Taggart, David F.; Botkin, Jonathan D.; Edgett, Christopher S.

    2013-10-15

    A supported PV assembly may include a PV module comprising a PV panel and PV module supports including module supports having a support surface supporting the module, a module registration member engaging the PV module to properly position the PV module on the module support, and a mounting element. In some embodiments the PV module registration members engage only the external surfaces of the PV modules at the corners. In some embodiments the assembly includes a wind deflector with ballast secured to a least one of the PV module supports and the wind deflector. An array of the assemblies can be secured to one another at their corners to prevent horizontal separation of the adjacent corners while permitting the PV modules to flex relative to one another so to permit the array of PV modules to follow a contour of the support surface.

  9. Blade attachment assembly

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell; Miller, Diane Patricia

    2016-05-03

    An assembly and method for affixing a turbomachine rotor blade to a rotor wheel are disclosed. In an embodiment, an adaptor member is provided disposed between the blade and the rotor wheel, the adaptor member including an adaptor attachment slot that is complementary to the blade attachment member, and an adaptor attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot. A coverplate is provided, having a coverplate attachment member that is complementary to the rotor wheel attachment slot, and a hook for engaging the adaptor member. When assembled, the coverplate member matingly engages with the adaptor member, and retains the blade in the adaptor member, and the assembly in the rotor wheel.

  10. Memory and head injury severity.

    PubMed

    Dikmen, S; Temkin, N; McLean, A; Wyler, A; Machamer, J

    1987-12-01

    One hundred and two consecutive head injured patients were studied at 1 and 12 months after injury. Their performances were compared with a group of uninjured friends. The results indicate that impairment in memory depends on the type of task used, time from injury to testing, and on the severity of head injury (that is, degree of impaired consciousness). Head injury severity indices are more closely related to behavioural outcome early as compared with later after injury. At 1 year, only those with deep or prolonged impaired consciousness (as represented by greater than 1 day of coma, Glasgow Coma Scale of 8 or less, and post traumatic amnesia of 2 weeks or greater) are performing significantly worse than comparison subjects.

  11. Dropped head syndrome in mitochondriopathy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, J

    2004-11-01

    In a 63-year-old, 165-cm-tall woman with a history of repeated tick bites, dilative cardiomyopathy, osteoporosis, progressive head ptosis with neck stiffness and cervical pain developed. The family history was positive for thyroid dysfunction and neuromuscular disorders. Neurological examination revealed prominent forward head drop, weak anteflexion and retroflexion, nuchal rigidity, weakness of the shoulder girdle, cogwheel rigidity, and tetraspasticity. The lactate stress test was abnormal. Electromyograms of various muscles were myogenic. Muscle biopsy showed non-specific myogenic abnormalities and generally weak staining for cytochrome oxydase. Mitochondriopathy with multi-organ involvement was suspected. The response to anti-Parkinson medication was poor. In conclusion, dropped head syndrome (DHS) may be due to multi-organ mitochondriopathy, manifesting as Parkinsonism, tetraspasticity, dilative cardiomyopathy, osteoporosis, short stature, and myopathy. Anti-Parkinson medication is of limited effect.

  12. Transfer of fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Vuckovich, M.; Burkett, J. P.; Sallustio, J.

    1984-12-11

    Fuel assemblies of a nuclear reactor are transferred during fueling or refueling or the like by a crane. The work-engaging fixture of the crane picks up an assembly, removes it from this slot, transfers it to the deposit site and deposits it in its slot at the deposit site. The control for the crane includes a strain gauge connected to the crane line which raises and lowers the load. The strain gauge senses the load on the crane. The signal from the strain gauge is compared with setpoints; a high-level setpoint, a low-level setpoint and a slack-line setpoint. If the strain gauge signal exceeds the high-level setpoint, the line drive is disabled. This event may occur during raising of a fuel assembly which encounters resistance. The high-level setpoint may be overridden under proper precautions. The line drive is also disabled if the strain gauge signal is less than the low-level setpoint. This event occurs when a fuel assembly being deposited contacts the bottom of its slot or an obstruction in, or at the entry to the slot. To preclude lateral movement and possible damage to a fuel assembly suspended from the crane line, the traverse drive of the crane is disabled once the strain-gauge exceets the lov-level setpoint. The traverse drive can only be enabled after the strain-gauge signal is less than the slack-line set-point. This occurs when the lines has been set in slack-line setting. When the line is tensioned after slack-li ne setting, the traverse drive remains enabled only if the line has been disconnected from the fuel assembly.

  13. Flow Cage Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Badescu, Mircea (Inventor); Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor); Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Apparatus, systems and methods for implementing flow cages and flow cage assemblies in association with high pressure fluid flows and fluid valves are provided. Flow cages and flow assemblies are provided to dissipate the energy of a fluid flow, such as by reducing fluid flow pressure and/or fluid flow velocity. In some embodiments the dissipation of the fluid flow energy is adapted to reduce erosion, such as from high-pressure jet flows, to reduce cavitation, such as by controllably increasing the flow area, and/or to reduce valve noise associated with pressure surge.

  14. Low inductance connector assembly

    DOEpatents

    Holbrook, Meghan Ann; Carlson, Douglas S

    2013-07-09

    A busbar connector assembly for coupling first and second terminals on a two-terminal device to first and second contacts on a power module is provided. The first terminal resides proximate the first contact and the second terminal resides proximate the second contact. The assembly comprises a first bridge having a first end configured to be electrically coupled to the first terminal, and a second end configured to be electrically coupled to the second contact, and a second bridge substantially overlapping the first bridge and having a first end electrically coupled to the first contact, and a second end electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  15. Lightweight reflector assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argoud, M. J.; Jolley, J.; Walker, W. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An inexpensive, lightweight reflective assembly member having good optical quality and particularly adaptable to accommodating temperature variations without providing destructive thermal stresses and reflective slope errors is described. The reflective assembly consists of a thin sheet of glass with appropriate reflective coating and a cellular glass block substrate bonded together. The method of fabrication includes abrading the cellular substrate with an abrasive master die to form an appropriate concave surface. An adhesive is applied to the abraded surface and a lamina reflective surface is placed under a uniform pressure to conform the reflective surface onto the desired abraded surface of the substrate.

  16. Phylogenetic Comparative Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husemann, Peter; Stoye, Jens

    Recent high throughput sequencing technologies are capable of generating a huge amount of data for bacterial genome sequencing projects. Although current sequence assemblers successfully merge the overlapping reads, often several contigs remain which cannot be assembled any further. It is still costly and time consuming to close all the gaps in order to acquire the whole genomic sequence. Here we propose an algorithm that takes several related genomes and their phylogenetic relationships into account to create a contig adjacency graph. From this a layout graph can be computed which indicates putative adjacencies of the contigs in order to aid biologists in finishing the complete genomic sequence.

  17. Self assembling proteins

    DOEpatents

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  18. Steric environment around acetylcholine head groups of bolaamphiphilic nanovesicles influences the release rate of encapsulated compounds

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Avital; Guidotti, Matteo; Shaubi, Eleonora; Popov, Mary; Linder, Charles; Heldman, Eliahu; Grinberg, Sarina

    2014-01-01

    Two bolaamphiphilic compounds with identical acetylcholine (ACh) head groups, but with different lengths of an alkyl chain pendant adjacent to the head group, as well as differences between their hydrophobic skeleton, were investigated for their ability to self-assemble into vesicles that release their encapsulated content upon hydrolysis of their head groups by acetylcholinesterase (AChE). One of these bolaamphiphiles, synthesized from vernolic acid, has an alkyl chain pendant of five methylene groups, while the other, synthesized from oleic acid, has an alkyl chain pendant of eight methylene groups. Both bolaamphiphiles formed stable spherical vesicles with a diameter of about 130 nm. The ACh head groups of both bolaamphiphiles were hydrolyzed by AChE, but the hydrolysis rate was significantly faster for the bolaamphiphile with the shorter aliphatic chain pendant. Likewise, upon exposure to AChE, vesicles made from the bolaamphiphile with the shorter alkyl chain pendant released their encapsulated content faster than vesicles made from the bolaamphiphile with the longer alkyl chain pendant. Our results suggest that the steric environment around the ACh head group of bolaamphiphiles is a major factor affecting the hydrolysis rate of the head groups by AChE. Attaching an alkyl chain to the bolaamphiphile near the ACh head group allows self-assembled vesicles to form with a controlled release rate of the encapsulated materials, whereas shorter alkyl chains enable a faster head group hydrolysis, and consequently faster release, than longer alkyl chains. This principle may be implemented in the design of bolaamphiphiles for the formation of vesicles for drug delivery with desired controlled release rates. PMID:24531296

  19. Rotary head type reproducing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Takayama, Nobutoshi; Edakubo, Hiroo; Kozuki, Susumu; Takei, Masahiro; Nagasawa, Kenichi

    1986-01-01

    In an apparatus of the kind arranged to reproduce, with a plurality of rotary heads, an information signal from a record bearing medium having many recording tracks which are parallel to each other with the information signal recorded therein and with a plurality of different pilot signals of different frequencies also recorded one by one, one in each of the recording tracks, a plurality of different reference signals of different frequencies are simultaneously generated. A tracking error is detected by using the different reference signals together with the pilot signals which are included in signals reproduced from the plurality of rotary heads.

  20. Head kinematics during shaking associated with abusive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Lintern, T O; Puhulwelle Gamage, N T; Bloomfield, F H; Kelly, P; Finch, M C; Taberner, A J; Nash, M P; Nielsen, P M F

    2015-09-18

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is a potentially fatal result of child abuse but the mechanisms of injury are controversial. To address the hypothesis that shaking alone is sufficient to elicit the injuries observed, effective computational and experimental models are necessary. This paper investigates the use of a coupled rigid-body computational modelling framework to reproduce in vivo shaking kinematics in AHT. A sagittal plane OpenSim computational model of a lamb was developed and used to interpret biomechanical data from in vivo shaking experiments. The acceleration of the head during shaking was used to provide in vivo validation of the associated computational model. Results of this study demonstrated that peak accelerations occurred when the head impacted the torso and produced acceleration magnitudes exceeding 200ms(-)(2). The computational model demonstrated good agreement with the experimental measurements and was shown to be able to reproduce the high accelerations that occur during impact. The biomechanical results obtained with the computational model demonstrate the utility of using a coupled rigid-body modelling framework to describe infant head kinematics in AHT.

  1. Fire resistant PV shingle assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2012-10-02

    A fire resistant PV shingle assembly includes a PV assembly, including PV body, a fire shield and a connection member connecting the fire shield below the PV body, and a support and inter-engagement assembly. The support and inter-engagement assembly is mounted to the PV assembly and comprises a vertical support element, supporting the PV assembly above a support surface, an upper interlock element, positioned towards the upper PV edge, and a lower interlock element, positioned towards the lower PV edge. The upper interlock element of one PV shingle assembly is inter-engageable with the lower interlock element of an adjacent PV shingle assembly. In some embodiments the PV shingle assembly may comprise a ventilation path below the PV body. The PV body may be slidably mounted to the connection member to facilitate removal of the PV body.

  2. Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2013-12-31

    A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assempbled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting regions of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

  3. Metaphase Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2017-01-01

    A microtubule-based bipolar spindle is required for error-free chromosome segregation during cell division. In this review I discuss the molecular mechanisms required for the assembly of this dynamic micrometer-scale structure in animal cells. PMID:28165376

  4. Modeling Protein Self Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck; Hull, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of proteins is an important part of the standards-based science curriculum. Proteins serve vital roles within the cell and malfunctions in protein self assembly are implicated in degenerative diseases. Experience indicates that this topic is a difficult one for many students. We have found that the concept…

  5. Segmented stator assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwalla, Murtuza; Alexander, James Pellegrino; El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi; Shah, Manoj Ramprasad; Quirion, Owen Scott

    2013-04-02

    An electric machine and stator assembly are provided that include a continuous stator portion having stator teeth, and a tooth tip portion including tooth tips corresponding to the stator teeth of the continuous stator portion, respectively. The tooth tip portion is mounted onto the continuous stator portion.

  6. Walking boot assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.; Chambers, A. B.; Stjohn, R. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A walking boot assembly particularly suited for use with a positively pressurized spacesuit is presented. A bootie adapted to be secured to the foot of a wearer, an hermetically sealed boot for receiving the bootie having a walking sole, an inner sole, and an upper portion adapted to be attached to an ankle joint of a spacesuit, are also described.

  7. Beyond the Assembly Line.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitz, Rebecca; Guild, Todd

    1985-01-01

    Describes how Hughes Aircraft trainers followed four steps in meeting the challenges of a flexible manufacturing environment: needs assessment, design strategy, pilot evaluation, and follow-through. Within this environment, 50 self-paced training products were developed for one of the company's wire and back plane harness assembly departments. (CT)

  8. Corium protection assembly

    DOEpatents

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A corium protection assembly includes a perforated base grid disposed below a pressure vessel containing a nuclear reactor core and spaced vertically above a containment vessel floor to define a sump therebetween. A plurality of layers of protective blocks are disposed on the grid for protecting the containment vessel floor from the corium.

  9. Dump valve assembly

    DOEpatents

    Owen, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    A dump valve assembly comprising a body having a bore defined by a tapered wall and a truncated spherical valve member adapted to seat along a spherical surface portion thereof against said tapered wall. Means are provided for pivoting said valve member between a closed position engagable with said tapered wall and an open position disengaged therefrom.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR BURIAL ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1961-05-01

    A burial assembly is shown whereby an entire reactor core may be encased with lead shielding, withdrawn from the reactor site and buried. This is made possible by a five-piece interlocking arrangement that may be easily put together by remote control with no aligning of bolt holes or other such close adjustments being necessary.

  11. Fibrillin Assembly Requires Fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Sabatier, Laetitia; Chen, Daliang; Fagotto-Kaufmann, Christine; Hubmacher, Dirk; McKee, Marc D.; Annis, Douglas S.; Mosher, Deane F.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrillins constitute the major backbone of multifunctional microfibrils in elastic and nonelastic extracellular matrices. Proper assembly mechanisms are central to the formation and function of these microfibrils, and their properties are often compromised in pathological circumstances such as in Marfan syndrome and in other fibrillinopathies. Here, we have used human dermal fibroblasts to analyze the assembly of fibrillin-1 in dependence of other matrix-forming proteins. siRNA knockdown experiments demonstrated that the assembly of fibrillin-1 is strictly dependent on the presence of extracellular fibronectin fibrils. Immunolabeling performed at the light and electron microscopic level showed colocalization of fibrillin-1 with fibronectin fibrils at the early stages of the assembly process. Protein-binding assays demonstrated interactions of fibronectin with a C-terminal region of fibrillin-1, -2, and -3 and with an N-terminal region of fibrillin-1. The C-terminal half of fibrillin-2 and -3 had propensities to multimerize, as has been previously shown for fibrillin-1. The C-terminal of all three fibrillins interacted strongly with fibronectin as multimers, but not as monomers. Mapping studies revealed that the major binding interaction between fibrillins and fibronectin involves the collagen/gelatin-binding region between domains FNI6 and FNI9. PMID:19037100

  12. Rotary shaft sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Dietle, Lannie L; Schroeder, John E; Kalsi, Manmohan S; Alvarez, Patricio D

    2013-08-13

    A rotary shaft sealing assembly in which a first fluid is partitioned from a second fluid in a housing assembly having a rotary shaft located at least partially within. In one embodiment a lip seal is lubricated and flushed with a pressure-generating seal ring preferably having an angled diverting feature. The pressure-generating seal ring and a hydrodynamic seal may be used to define a lubricant-filled region with each of the seals having hydrodynamic inlets facing the lubricant-filled region. Another aspect of the sealing assembly is having a seal to contain pressurized lubricant while withstanding high rotary speeds. Another rotary shaft sealing assembly embodiment includes a lubricant supply providing a lubricant at an elevated pressure to a region between a lip seal and a hydrodynamic seal with a flow control regulating the flow of lubricant past the lip seal. The hydrodynamic seal may include an energizer element having a modulus of elasticity greater than the modulus of elasticity of a sealing lip of the hydrodynamic seal.

  13. Rotary shaft sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Dietle, Lannie L.; Schroeder, John E.; Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Alvarez, Patricio D.

    2010-09-21

    A rotary shaft sealing assembly in which a first fluid is partitioned from a second fluid in a housing assembly having a rotary shaft located at least partially within. In one embodiment a lip seal is lubricated and flushed with a pressure-generating seal ring preferably having an angled diverting feature. The pressure-generating seal ring and a hydrodynamic seal may be used to define a lubricant-filled region with each of the seals having hydrodynamic inlets facing the lubricant-filled region. Another aspect of the sealing assembly is having a seal to contain pressurized lubricant while withstanding high rotary speeds. Another rotary shaft sealing assembly embodiment includes a lubricant supply providing a lubricant at an elevated pressure to a region between a lip seal and a hydrodynamic seal with a flow control regulating the flow of lubricant past the lip seal. The hydrodynamic seal may include an energizer element having a modulus of elasticity greater than the modulus of elasticity of a sealing lip of the hydrodynamic seal.

  14. Turbomachine blade assembly

    DOEpatents

    Garcia Crespo, Andres Jose

    2016-11-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include a system comprising a turbomachine blade assembly having a blade portion, a shank portion, and a mounting portion, wherein the blade portion, the shank portion, and the mounting portion comprise a first plurality of plies extending from a tip of the airfoil to a base of the dovetail.

  15. Lageos assembly operation plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueger, J.

    1975-01-01

    Guidelines and constraints procedures for LAGEOS assembly, operation, and design performance are given. Special attention was given to thermal, optical, and dynamic analysis and testing. The operation procedures illustrate the interrelation and sequence of tasks in a flow diagram. The diagram also includes quality assurance functions for verification of operation tasks.

  16. Head Start Dental Health Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Head Start Bureau.

    This curriculum for Head Start programs provides preschool learning experiences that teach about dental health. The majority of the curriculum guide is devoted to the following lesson plans: (1) "Introduction of 'Smiley the Super Pup'," an optional puppet character which may be used to review the concepts covered in each lesson; (2)…

  17. Model of beam head erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1980-08-08

    An analytical model of beam head dynamics is presented, leading to an estimate of the erosion rate due to the combined effects of Ohmic dissipation and scattering. Agreement with the results of a computer simulation and detailed one-dimensional computations is good in all respects except for the scaling of the erosion rate with net current.

  18. Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder and necrosis is a major skeletal problem in broiler breeders since they are maintained for a long time in the farm. The etiology of this disease is not well understood. A field study was conducted to understand the basis of this metabolic disease. Six ...

  19. Hurricane Rina Headed to Mexico

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of NOAA GOES-13 satellite observations from October 23 at 2:45 p.m. EDT through Oct. 25 at 1:30 p.m. EDT shows a strengthening Hurricane Rina in the western Caribbean Sea and headed fo...

  20. Head Start Planned Variation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Jenny

    There is little agreement concerning which methods of preschool intervention are most effective. In order to evaluate several approaches to early childhood education, Project Head Start, in conjunction with Project Follow Through, has initiated the Planned Variation program. This year only a pilot project is underway with eight schools…

  1. Graham confirmed as OSTP Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    William R. Graham was confirmed by the Senate on October 1, 1986, as the science advisor to President Ronald Reagan and head of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Formerly the deputy administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Graham started his new post on October 6.

  2. The endoderm indirectly influences morphogenetic movements of the zebrafish head kidney through the posterior cardinal vein and VegfC

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chih-Wei; Hsu, Hsiao-Chu; You, May-su; Lin, Jamie; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Integration of blood vessels and organ primordia determines organ shape and function. The head kidney in the zebrafish interacts with the dorsal aorta (DA) and the posterior cardinal vein (PCV) to achieve glomerular filtration and definitive hematopoiesis, respectively. How the head kidney co-develops with both the axial artery and vein remains unclear. We found that in endodermless sox32-deficient embryos, the head kidney associated with the PCV but not the DA. Disrupted convergent migration of the PCV and the head kidney in sox32-deficient embryos was rescued in a highly coordinated fashion through the restoration of endodermal cells. Moreover, grafted endodermal cells abutted the host PCV endothelium in the transplantation assay. Interestingly, the severely-disrupted head kidney convergence in the sox32-deficient embryo was suppressed by both the cloche mutation and the knockdown of endothelial genes, indicating that an interaction between the endoderm and the PCV restricts the migration of the head kidney. Furthermore, knockdown of either vegfC or its receptor vegfr3 suppressed the head kidney convergence defect in endodermless embryos and perturbed the head kidney-PCV association in wild-type embryos. Our findings thus underscore a role for PCV and VegfC in patterning the head kidney prior to organ assembly and function. PMID:27477767

  3. American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ezra E W; LaMonte, Samuel J; Erb, Nicole L; Beckman, Kerry L; Sadeghi, Nader; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Abbott, Dennis M; Fisher, Penelope S; Stein, Kevin D; Lyman, Gary H; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L

    2016-05-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  4. Space assembly fixtures and aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, K. A.; Lillenas, A. N.

    1980-01-01

    Concepts and requirements for assembly fixtures and aids necessary for the assembly and maintenance of spare platforms were studied. Emphasis was placed on erectable and deployable type structures with the shuttle orbiter as the assembly base. Both single and multiple orbiter flight cases for the platform assembly were considered. Applicable space platform assembly studies were reviewed to provide a data base for establishing the assembly fixture and aids design requirements, assembly constraints, and the development of representative design concepts. Conclusions indicated that fixture requirements will vary with platform size. Larger platforms will require translation relative to the orbiter RMS working volume. The installation of platform payloads and subsystems (e.g., utility distribution) must also be considered in the specification of assembly fixtures and aids.

  5. Late Disassembly of Femoral Head and Neck of A Modular Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Parvej; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Modular total hip arthroplasty system are now widely used, as these components increase the flexibility during primary and revision total hip arthoplasty. But this modularity itself associated with some risk of intraoperative and postoperative complications. Case Report: We report a case of late disassembly of a primary total arthroplasty in a 42 years old patient five years after the replacement surgery where the femoral head remained in the acetabular socket. Conclusion: Femoral head should be solidly impacted onto the stem and confirm that it has been assembled correctly before reduction. PMID:27299010

  6. Head stabilization in whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinloch, M.R.; Cronin, T.W.; Olsen, G.H.; Chavez-Ramirez, Felipe

    2005-01-01

    The whooping crane (Grus americana) is the tallest bird in North America, yet not much is known about its visual ecology. How these birds overcome their unusual height to identify, locate, track, and capture prey items is not well understood. There have been many studies on head and eye stabilization in large wading birds (herons and egrets), but the pattern of head movement and stabilization during foraging is unclear. Patterns of head movement and stabilization during walking were examined in whooping cranes at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland USA. Four whooping cranes (1 male and 3 females) were videotaped for this study. All birds were already acclimated to the presence of people and to food rewards. Whooping cranes were videotaped using both digital and Hi-8 Sony video cameras (Sony Corporation, 7-35 Kitashinagawa, 6-Chome, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, Japan), placed on a tripod and set at bird height in the cranes' home pens. The cranes were videotaped repeatedly, at different locations in the pens and while walking (or running) at different speeds. Rewards (meal worms, smelt, crickets and corn) were used to entice the cranes to walk across the camera's view plane. The resulting videotape was analyzed at the University of Maryland at Baltimore County. Briefly, we used a computerized reduced graphic model of a crane superimposed over each frame of analyzed tape segments by means of a custom written program (T. W. Cronin, using C++) with the ability to combine video and computer graphic input. The speed of the birds in analyzed segments ranged from 0.30 m/s to 2.64 m/s, and the proportion of time the head was stabilized ranged from 79% to 0%, respectively. The speed at which the proportion reached 0% was 1.83 m/s. The analyses suggest that the proportion of time the head is stable decreases as speed of the bird increases. In all cases, birds were able to reach their target prey with little difficulty. Thus when cranes are walking searching for food

  7. Biomechanical investigation of head impacts in football

    PubMed Central

    Withnall, C; Shewchenko, N; Gittens, R; Dvorak, J

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to measure the head accelerations induced from upper extremity to head and head to head impact during the game of football and relate this to the risk of mild traumatic brain injury using the Head Impact Power (HIP) index. Furthermore, measurement of upper neck forces and torques will indicate the potential for serious neck injury. More stringent rules or punitive sanctions may be warranted for intentional impact by the upper extremity or head during game play. Methods: Game video of 62 cases of head impact (38% caused by the upper extremity and 30% by the head of the opposing player) was provided by F-MARC. Video analysis revealed the typical impact configurations and representative impact speeds. Upper extremity impacts of elbow strike and lateral hand strike were re-enacted in the laboratory by five volunteer football players striking an instrumented Hybrid III pedestrian model crash test manikin. Head to head impacts were re-enacted using two instrumented test manikins. Results: Elbow to head impacts (1.7–4.6 m/s) and lateral hand strikes (5.2–9.3 m/s) resulted in low risk of concussion (<5%) and severe neck injury (<5%). Head to head impacts (1.5–3.0 m/s) resulted in high concussion risk (up to 67%) but low risk of severe neck injury (<5%). Conclusion: The laboratory simulations suggest little risk of concussion based on head accelerations and maximum HIP. There is no biomechanical justification for harsher penalties in this regard. However, deliberate use of the head to impact another player's head poses a high risk of concussion, and justifies a harsher position by regulatory bodies. In either case the risk of serious neck injury is very low. PMID:16046356

  8. 49 CFR 572.125 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... seated dummy is subjected to a force continuously applied at the head to neck pivot pin level through a... upper torso assembly to translate in angular motion until the machined rear surface of the instrument... plane, at which time the force applied as shown in Figure N5 must be not less than 147 N (33 lbf)...

  9. 49 CFR 572.165 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (specified in 49 CFR 572.125(a)), mounting plate insert (specified in 49 CFR 572.125(a)), nylon shoulder bushing (specified in 49 CFR 572.125(a)), nut (specified in 49 CFR 572.125(a)), spine box weighting plates... torso assembly of a seated dummy is subjected to a force continuously applied at the head to neck...

  10. 49 CFR 572.165 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (specified in 49 CFR 572.125(a)), mounting plate insert (specified in 49 CFR 572.125(a)), nylon shoulder bushing (specified in 49 CFR 572.125(a)), nut (specified in 49 CFR 572.125(a)), spine box weighting plates... torso assembly of a seated dummy is subjected to a force continuously applied at the head to neck...

  11. Commutating Feed Assembly.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    AD-AOBS 567 ITT GILFILLAN VAN NUYS CA F/6 17/9 CONF4UTATING FEED ASSEMBLY. 1W DEC 79 R WOL.FSON F19628-79-C-OOSS UNCLASSIFIED RADC -TR79303 NI. 1i.ll...INTRODUCTION 9 2 COMMUTATING FEED ASSEMBLY REQUIREMENTS 10 . 3 TECHNICAL PROBLEMS 11 1: 3.1 System Design 12 3.1.1 Radius of Circular Array 12 3.1.2 Design...Support Structure 16 3.3 Annular Rotary Coupler 16 3.4 Stripline Feed Network 17 w V.3.4.1 Range of Coupling Values vs. Percent Power into Load 17 3.4.2

  12. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  13. Mechanical seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    2001-01-01

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transferring it to the mechanical diode.

  14. Mechanical seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    2002-01-01

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transfering it to the mechanical diode.

  15. Vacuum breaker valve assembly

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Jeffrey L.; Upton, Hubert Allen

    1999-04-27

    Breaker valve assemblies for a simplified boiling water nuclear reactor are described. The breaker valve assembly, in one form, includes a valve body and a breaker valve. The valve body includes an interior chamber, and an inlet passage extends from the chamber and through an inlet opening to facilitate transporting particles from outside of the valve body to the interior chamber. The breaker valve is positioned in the chamber and is configured to substantially seal the inlet opening. Particularly, the breaker valve includes a disk which is sized to cover the inlet opening. The disk is movably coupled to the valve body and is configured to move substantially concentrically with respect to the valve opening between a first position, where the disk completely covers the inlet opening, and a second position, where the disk does not completely cover the inlet opening.

  16. Turbine seal assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Little, David A.

    2013-04-16

    A seal assembly that limits gas leakage from a hot gas path to one or more disc cavities in a turbine engine. The seal assembly includes a seal apparatus that limits gas leakage from the hot gas path to a respective one of the disc cavities. The seal apparatus comprises a plurality of blade members rotatable with a blade structure. The blade members are associated with the blade structure and extend toward adjacent stationary components. Each blade member includes a leading edge and a trailing edge, the leading edge of each blade member being located circumferentially in front of the blade member's corresponding trailing edge in a direction of rotation of the turbine rotor. The blade members are arranged such that a space having a component in a circumferential direction is defined between adjacent circumferentially spaced blade members.

  17. Low inductance busbar assembly

    DOEpatents

    Holbrook, Meghan Ann

    2010-09-21

    A busbar assembly for electrically coupling first and second busbars to first and second contacts, respectively, on a power module is provided. The assembly comprises a first terminal integrally formed with the first busbar, a second terminal integrally formed with the second busbar and overlapping the first terminal, a first bridge electrode having a first tab electrically coupled to the first terminal and overlapping the first and second terminals, and a second tab electrically coupled to the first contact, a second bridge electrode having a third tab electrically coupled to the second terminal, and overlapping the first and second terminals and the first tab, and a fourth tab electrically coupled to the second contact, and a fastener configured to couple the first tab to the first terminal, and the third tab to the second terminal.

  18. Desmosome assembly and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nekrasova, Oxana; Green, Kathleen J

    2013-11-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that anchor intermediate filaments (IFs) to the plasma membrane, forming a supracellular scaffold that provides mechanical resilience to tissues. This anchoring function is accomplished by specialized members of the cadherin family and associated cytoskeletal linking proteins, which together form a highly organized membrane core flanked by mirror-image cytoplasmic plaques. Due to the biochemical insolubility of desmosomes, the mechanisms that govern assembly of these components into a functional organelle remained elusive. Recently developed molecular reporters and live cell imaging approaches have provided powerful new tools to monitor this finely tuned process in real time. Here we discuss studies that are beginning to decipher the machinery and regulation governing desmosome assembly and homeostasis in situ and how these mechanisms are affected during disease pathogenesis.

  19. Fuel nozzle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Lacey, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2011-08-30

    A fuel nozzle assembly is provided. The assembly includes an outer nozzle body having a first end and a second end and at least one inner nozzle tube having a first end and a second end. One of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel plenum and a fuel passage extending therefrom, while the other of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel injection hole slidably aligned with the fuel passage to form a fuel flow path therebetween at an interface between the body and the tube. The nozzle body and the nozzle tube are fixed against relative movement at the first ends of the nozzle body and nozzle tube, enabling the fuel flow path to close at the interface due to thermal growth after a flame enters the nozzle tube.

  20. Ingestion resistant seal assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Little, David A

    2011-12-13

    A seal assembly limits gas leakage from a hot gas path to one or more disc cavities in a gas turbine engine. The seal assembly includes a seal apparatus associated with a blade structure including a row of airfoils. The seal apparatus includes an annular inner shroud associated with adjacent stationary components, a wing member, and a first wing flange. The wing member extends axially from the blade structure toward the annular inner shroud. The first wing flange extends radially outwardly from the wing member toward the annular inner shroud. A plurality of regions including one or more recirculation zones are defined between the blade structure and the annular inner shroud that recirculate working gas therein back toward the hot gas path.

  1. Ignition system monitoring assembly

    DOEpatents

    Brushwood, John Samuel

    2003-11-04

    An ignition system monitoring assembly for use in a combustion engine is disclosed. The assembly includes an igniter having at least one positioning guide with at least one transmittal member being maintained in a preferred orientation by one of the positioning guides. The transmittal member is in optical communication with a corresponding target region, and optical information about the target region is conveyed to the reception member via the transmittal member. The device allows real-time observation of optical characteristics of the target region. The target region may be the spark gap between the igniter electrodes, or other predetermined locations in optical communication with the transmittal member. The reception member may send an output signal to a processing member which, in turn, may produce a response to the output signal.

  2. Hubble Space Telescope Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This photograph shows the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) flight article assembly with multilayer insulation, high gain anterna, and solar arrays in a clean room of the Lockheed Missile and Space Company. The HST is the first of NASA's great observatories and the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made. The purpose of the HST is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit by placing the telescope in space, enabling astronomers to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had overall responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Connecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. The Lockheed Missile and Space Company, Sunnyvale, California, produced the protective outer shroud and spacecraft systems, and assembled and tested the finished telescope.

  3. Solution deposition assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Roussillon, Yann; Scholz, Jeremy H; Shelton, Addison; Green, Geoff T; Utthachoo, Piyaphant

    2014-01-21

    Methods and devices are provided for improved deposition systems. In one embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system is provided for use with a solution and a substrate. The system comprises of a solution deposition apparatus; at least one heating chamber, at least one assembly for holding a solution over the substrate; and a substrate curling apparatus for curling at least one edge of the substrate to define a zone capable of containing a volume of the solution over the substrate. In another embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system for use with a substrate, the system comprising a solution deposition apparatus; at heating chamber; and at least assembly for holding solution over the substrate to allow for a depth of at least about 0.5 microns to 10 mm.

  4. Infrared floodlight assembly

    DOEpatents

    Wierzbicki, Julian J.; Chakrabarti, Kirti B.

    1987-09-22

    An infrared floodlight assembly (10) including a cast aluminum outer housing (11) defining a central chamber (15) therein. A floodlight (14), having a tungsten halogen lamp as the light source, is spacedly positioned within a heat conducting member (43) within chamber (15) such that the floodlight is securedly positioned in an aligned manner relative to the assembly's filter (35) and lens (12) components. The invention also includes venting means (51) to allow air passage between the interior of the member (43) and the adjacent chamber (15), as well as engagement means (85) for engaging a rear surface of the floodlight (14) to retain it firmly against an internal flange of the member (43). A reflector (61), capable of being compressed to allow insertion or removal, is located within the heat conducting member's interior between the floodlight (14) and filter (35) to reflect infrared radiation toward the filter (35) and spaced lens (12).

  5. Hearing Aid Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Progress in hearing aids has come a long way. Yet despite such progress hearing aids are not the perfect answer to many hearing problems. Some adult ears cannot accommodate tightly fitting hearing aids. Mouth movements such as chewing, talking, and athletic or other active endeavors also lead to loosely fitting ear molds. It is well accepted that loosely fitting hearing aids are the cause of feedback noise. Since feedback noise is the most common complaint of hearing aid wearers it has been the subject of various patents. Herein a hearing aid assembly is provided eliminating feedback noise. The assembly includes the combination of a hearing aid with a headset developed to constrict feedback noise.

  6. HSPES membrane electrode assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved fuel cell electrode, as well as fuel cells and membrane electrode assemblies that include such an electrode, in which the electrode includes a backing layer having a sintered layer thereon, and a non-sintered free-catalyst layer. The invention also features a method of forming the electrode by sintering a backing material with a catalyst material and then applying a free-catalyst layer.

  7. Uniform Test Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belov, Dmitry I.

    2008-01-01

    In educational practice, a test assembly problem is formulated as a system of inequalities induced by test specifications. Each solution to the system is a test, represented by a 0-1 vector, where each element corresponds to an item included (1) or not included (0) into the test. Therefore, the size of a 0-1 vector equals the number of items "n"…

  8. Printed wiring assembly cleanliness

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.M.

    1992-12-01

    This work installed a product cleanliness test capability in a manufacturing environment. A previously purchased testing device was modified extensively and installed in a production department. The device, the testing process, and some soldering and cleaning variables were characterized to establish their relationship to the device output. The characterization provided information which will be required for cleanliness testing to be an adequate process control of printed wiring assembly soldering and cleaning processes.

  9. REACTOR NOZZLE ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Capuder, F.C.; Dearwater, J.R.

    1959-02-10

    An improved nozzle assembly useful in a process for the direct reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride by means of dissociated ammonia in a heated reaction vessel is descrlbed. The nozzle design provides for intimate mixing of the two reactants and at the same time furnishes a layer of dissociated ammonia adjacent to the interior wall of the reaction vessel, thus preventing build-up of the reaction product on the vessel wall.

  10. Composite airfoil assembly

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-03-03

    A composite blade assembly for mounting on a turbine wheel includes a ceramic airfoil and an airfoil platform. The ceramic airfoil is formed with an airfoil portion, a blade shank portion and a blade dovetail tang. The metal platform includes a platform shank and a radially inner platform dovetail. The ceramic airfoil is captured within the metal platform, such that in use, the ceramic airfoil is held within the turbine wheel independent of the metal platform.

  11. Fibronectin Aggregation and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Tomoo; Erickson, Harold P.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of fibronectin (FN) assembly and the self-association sites are still unclear and contradictory, although the N-terminal 70-kDa region (I1–9) is commonly accepted as one of the assembly sites. We previously found that I1–9 binds to superfibronectin, which is an artificial FN aggregate induced by anastellin. In the present study, we found that I1–9 bound to the aggregate formed by anastellin and a small FN fragment, III1–2. An engineered disulfide bond in III2, which stabilizes folding, inhibited aggregation, but a disulfide bond in III1 did not. A gelatin precipitation assay showed that I1–9 did not interact with anastellin, III1, III2, III1–2, or several III1–2 mutants including III1–2KADA. (In contrast to previous studies, we found that the III1–2KADA mutant was identical in conformation to wild-type III1–2.) Because I1–9 only bound to the aggregate and the unfolding of III2 played a role in aggregation, we generated a III2 domain that was destabilized by deletion of the G strand. This mutant bound I1–9 as shown by the gelatin precipitation assay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis, and it inhibited FN matrix assembly when added to cell culture. Next, we introduced disulfide mutations into full-length FN. Three disulfide locks in III2, III3, and III11 were required to dramatically reduce anastellin-induced aggregation. When we tested the disulfide mutants in cell culture, only the disulfide bond in III2 reduced the FN matrix. These results suggest that the unfolding of III2 is one of the key factors for FN aggregation and assembly. PMID:21949131

  12. Combustor liner support assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halila, Ely E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A support assembly for a gas turbine engine combustor includes an annular frame having a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart tenons, and an annular combustor liner disposed coaxially with the frame and including a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart tenons circumferentially adjoining respective ones of the frame tenons for radially and tangentially supporting the liner to the frame while allowing unrestrained differential thermal radial movement therebetween.

  13. A MRI rotary phased array head coil.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing Keong; Weber, Ewald; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-08-01

    A new rotary phased array (RPA) head coil that can provide homogenous brain images comparable to volumetric radiofrequency coils is proposed for magnetic resonance brain imaging applications. The design of the RPA head coil is a departure from conventional circumferential array design method, as coil elements of the RPA head coil have a "paddle-like" structure consisting of a pair of main conductors located on opposite sides, inserted equi-angularly around and over the head. A prototype 2T receive-only 4-element RPA head coil was constructed and experimentally tested against a conventional receive-only 4-element phased array head coil and a commercial receive-only quadrature birdcage head coil. Homogenous phantom images acquired by the RPA head coil show that signal intensity deep at the center of the phantom was improved as compared to the conventional phased array head coil and this improvement allow the RPA head coil to acquire homogenous brain images similar to brain images acquired with the birdcage head coil. In addition, partial parallel imaging was used in conjunction with the RPA head coil to enable rapid imaging.

  14. The life of a head louse.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Ian

    When children return to school after the summer holiday, cases of head lice appear to increase. Ian Burgess describes the life cycle of the head louse and dispels some of the myths about transmission of this insect. A second article discusses the detection and treatment of head lice.

  15. Orbital Welding Head Held By Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangl, Kenneth J.; Graham, Benny F.; Nesmith, Malcolm F.; Mcferrin, David C.

    1992-01-01

    Orbital welding head positioned by robot controls motion and voltage of arc-welding torch mounted in head. New head encircles part at torch end, and held and manipulated by robot arm at opposite end. Entire welding operation automated. Useful for operations in hazardous environments.

  16. Field Measurement of Head Related Transfer Functions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    HEAD RELATED TRANSFER FUNCTIONS FREDERIC WIGHTMAN, Ph.D. DORIS J. KISTLER, Ph.D. HEARING DEVELOPMENT... function , F the free-field to eardrum transfer function (sometimes called the head - related transfer function , or HRTF), and M the microphone transfer ...into three areas: 1) acoustical measurements of free-field-to-eardrum transfer functions (also called head -relaLed transfer functions , or

  17. 29 CFR 1915.155 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Head protection. 1915.155 Section 1915.155 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.155 Head protection. (a) Use. (1) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears a protective helmet when working in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head...

  18. 29 CFR 1918.103 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Head protection. 1918.103 Section 1918.103 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.103 Head... in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The...

  19. 31 CFR 0.106 - Bureau Heads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bureau Heads. 0.106 Section 0.106 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EMPLOYEE RULES OF CONDUCT General Provisions Responsibilities § 0.106 Bureau Heads. Bureau heads or designees...

  20. 29 CFR 1915.155 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Head protection. 1915.155 Section 1915.155 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.155 Head protection. (a) Use. (1) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears a protective helmet when working in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head...