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Sample records for head metal-on-metal cementless

  1. Cementless large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty in patients younger than 60 years--a multicenter early result.

    PubMed

    Wu, Po-Ting; Wang, Chih-Jen; Yen, Cheng-Yo; Jian, Ji-Shen; Lai, Kuo-An

    2012-01-01

    Large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty has the theoretical advantages of less wear and better range of motion than traditional polyethylene bearings and seems to be a better choice for young and active patients. We conducted a retrospective study and reported the early results of using such prostheses in 59 patients (70 hips) with a mean age of 43.1 years (range, 23-59 years) at the time of surgery. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head accounted for most diagnoses. Harris Hip Scores and hip range of motion both significantly improved (p<0.001) at an average follow-up of 32.6 months (range, 24-48 months). Only one intraoperative calcar fissure was encountered, and it was fixated by cerclage wiring; there was no infection, dislocation, or osteolysis around either the cup or the stem at the latest follow-up. A postoperative gap in the acetabular component was noted in 24 hips, with a mean depth of 1.11 mm, but this was not correlated with the functional score (p=0.291). Transient thigh pain, which resolved after 6 months, was observed in six patients but was not related to either the postoperative gap or cup inclination (p=1.000 and p=0.664, respectively). All patients resumed their original jobs and recreational activities with little discomfort. Thus far, large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty has shown excellent early results. The long-term results and the effects of metal debris and potentially elevated serum metal ion levels require further observation.

  2. Increased risk of revision of cementless stemmed total hip arthroplasty with metal-on-metal bearings

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Alma B; Mäkelä, Keijo; Eskelinen, Antti; Havelin, Leif Ivar; Furnes, Ove; Kärrholm, Johan; Garellick, Göran; Overgaard, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Data from the national joint registries in Australia and England and Wales have revealed inferior medium-term survivorship for metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) than for metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) THA. Based on data from the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA), we compared the revision risk of cementless stemmed THA with MoM and MoP bearings and we also compared MoM THA to each other. Patients and methods We identified 32,678 patients who were operated from 2002 through 2010 with cementless stemmed THA with either MoM bearings (11,567 patients, 35%) or MoP bearings (21,111 patients, 65%). The patients were followed until revision, death, emigration, or the end of the study period (December 31, 2011), and median follow-up was 3.6 (interquartile range (IQR): 2.4–4.8) years for MoM bearings and 3.4 (IQR: 2.0–5.8) years for MoP bearings. Multivariable regression in the presence of competing risk of death was used to assess the relative risk (RR) of revision for any reason (with 95% confidence interval (CI)). Results The cumulative incidence of revision at 8 years of follow-up was 7.0% (CI: 6.0–8.1) for MoM bearings and 5.1% (CI: 4.7–5.6) for MoP bearings. At 6 years of follow-up, the RR of revision for any reason was 1.5 (CI: 1.3–1.7) for MoM bearings compared to MoP bearings. The RR of revision for any reason was higher for the ASR (adjusted RR = 6.4, CI: 5.0–8.1), the Conserve Plus (adjusted RR = 1.7, CI: 1.1–2.5) and “other” acetabular components (adjusted RR = 2.4, CI: 1.5–3.9) than for MoP THA at 6 years of follow-up. Interpretation At medium-term follow-up, the survivorship for cementless stemmed MoM THA was inferior to that for MoP THA, and metal-related problems may cause higher revision rates for MoM bearings with longer follow-up. PMID:25715878

  3. Distributed Analysis of Hip Implants Using Six National and Regional Registries: Comparing Metal-on-Metal with Metal-on-Highly Cross-Linked Polyethylene Bearings in Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Furnes, Ove; Paxton, Elizabeth; Cafri, Guy; Graves, Stephen; Bordini, Barbara; Comfort, Thomas; Rivas, Moises Coll; Banerjee, Samprit; Sedrakyan, Art

    2014-01-01

    Background: The regulation of medical devices has attracted controversy recently because of problems related to metal-on-metal hip implants. There is growing evidence that metal-on-metal implants fail early and cause local and systemic complications. However, the failure associated with metal-on-metal head size is not consistently documented and needs to be communicated to patients and surgeons. The purpose of this study is to compare implant survival of metal on metal with that of metal on highly cross-linked polyethylene. Methods: Using a distributed health data network, primary total hip arthroplasties were identified from six national and regional total joint arthroplasty registries (2001 to 2010). Inclusion criteria were patient age of forty-five to sixty-four years, cementless total hip arthroplasties, primary osteoarthritis diagnosis, and exclusion of the well-known outlier implant ASR (articular surface replacement). The primary outcome was revision for any reason. A meta-analysis of survival probabilities was performed with use of a fixed-effects model. Metal-on-metal implants with a large head size of >36 mm were compared with metal-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene implants. Results: Metal-on-metal implants with a large head size of >36 mm were used in 5172 hips and metal-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene implants were used in 14,372 hips. Metal-on-metal total hip replacements with a large head size of >36 mm had an increased risk of revision compared with metal-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene total hip replacements with more than two years of follow-up, with no difference during the first two years after implantation. The results of the hazard ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) from the multivariable model at various durations of follow-up were 0.95 (0.74 to 1.23) at zero to two years (p = 0.698), 1.42 (1.16 to 1.75) at more than two years to four years (p = 0.001), 1.78 (1.45 to 2.19) at more than four years to six years (p < 0.001), and 2

  4. Pseudotumour incidence, cobalt levels and clinical outcome after large head metal-on-metal and conventional metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty: mid-term results of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, H C; Reininga, I H F; Zijlstra, W P; Boomsma, M F; Bulstra, S K; van Raay, J J A M

    2015-11-01

    We compared the incidence of pseudotumours after large head metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) with that after conventional metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) THA and assessed the predisposing factors to pseudotumour formation. From a previous randomised controlled trial which compared large head (38 mm to 60 mm) cementless MoM THA with conventional head (28 mm) cementless MoP THA, 93 patients (96 THAs: 41 MoM (21 males, 20 females, mean age of 64 years, standard deviation (sd) 4) and 55 MoP (25 males, 30 females, mean age of 65 years, sd 5) were recruited after a mean follow-up of 50 months (36 to 64). The incidence of pseudotumours, measured using a standardised CT protocol was 22 (53.7%) after MoM THA and 12 (21.8%) after MoP THA. Women with a MoM THA were more likely to develop a pseudotumour than those with a MoP THA (15 vs 7, odds ratio (OR) = 13.4, p < 0.001). There was a similar incidence of pseudotumours in men with MoM THAs and those with MoP THAs (7 vs 5, OR = 2.1, p = 0.30). Elevated cobalt levels (≥ 5 microgram/L) were only associated with pseudotumours in women with a MoM THA. There was no difference in mean Oxford and Harris hip scores between patients with a pseudotumour and those without. Contrary to popular belief, pseudotumours occur frequently around MoP THAs. Women with a MoM THA and an elevated cobalt level are at greatest risk. In this study, pseudotumours had no effect on the functional outcome after either large head MoM or conventional MoP THA.

  5. No association between serum metal ions and implant fixation in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Søballe, Kjeld; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Lorenzen, Nina Dyrberg; Mechlenburg, Inger; Stilling, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanism of failure of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been related to a high rate of metal wear debris, which is partly generated from the head-trunnion interface. However, it is not known whether implant fixation is affected by metal wear debris. Patients and methods 49 cases of MoM THA in 41 patients (10 women) with a mean age of 52 (28–68) years were followed with stereoradiographs after surgery and at 1, 2, and 5 years to analyze implant migration by radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Patients also participated in a 5- to 7-year follow-up with measurement of serum metal ions, questionnaires (Oxford hip score (OHS) and Harris hip score (HHS)), and measurement of cup and stem positions and systemic bone mineral density. Results At 1–2 years, mean total translation (TT) was 0.04 mm (95% CI: –0.07 to 0.14; p = 0.5) for the stems; at 2–5 years, mean TT was 0.13 mm (95% CI: –0.25 to –0.01; p = 0.03), but within the precision limit of the method. For the cups, there was no statistically significant TT or total rotation (TR) at 1–2 and 2–5 years. At 2–5 years, we found 4 cups and 5 stems with TT migrations exceeding the precision limit of the method. There was an association between cup migration and total OHS < 40 (4 patients, 4 hips; p = 0.04), but there were no statistically significant associations between cup or stem migration and T-scores < –1 (n = 10), cup and stem positions, or elevated serum metal ion levels (> 7µg/L (4 patients, 6 hips)). Interpretation Most cups and stems were well-fixed at 1–5 years. However, at 2–5 years, 4 cups and 5 stems had TT migrations above the precision limits, but these patients had serum metal ion levels similar to those of patients without measurable migrations, and they were pain-free. Patients with serum metal ion levels > 7 µg/L had migrations similar to those in patients with serum metal ion levels < 7 µg/L. Metal wear debris does not appear to influence the

  6. Does bearing size influence metal ion levels in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty? A comparison of three total hip systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was twofold: first, to determine whether there is a statistically significant difference in the metal ion levels among three different large-head metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip systems. The second objective was to assess whether position of the implanted prostheses, patient demographics or factors such as activity levels influence overall blood metal ion levels and whether there is a difference in the functional outcomes between the systems. Methods In a cross-sectional cohort study, three different metal-on-metal total hip systems were assessed: two monoblock heads, the Durom socket (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA) and the Birmingham socket (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA), and one modular metal-on-metal total hip system (Pinnacle, Depuy Orthopedics, Warsaw, IN, USA). Fifty-four patients were recruited, with a mean age of 59.7 years and a mean follow-up time of 41 months (12 to 60). Patients were evaluated clinically, radiologically and biochemically. Statistical analysis was performed on all collected data to assess any differences between the three groups in terms of overall blood metal ion levels and also to identify whether there was any other factor within the group demographics and outcomes that could influence the mean levels of Co and Cr. Results Although the functional outcome scores were similar in all three groups, the blood metal ion levels in the larger monoblock large heads (Durom, Birmingham sockets) were significantly raised compared with those of the Pinnacle group. In addition, the metal ion levels were not found to have a statistically significant relationship to the anteversion or abduction angles as measured on the radiographs. Conclusions When considering a MOM THR, the use of a monoblock large-head system leads to higher elevations in whole blood metal ions and offers no advantage over a smaller head modular system. PMID:24472283

  7. Importance of head diameter, clearance, and cup wall thickness in elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing prostheses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Jin, Zhongmin; Roberts, P; Grigoris, P

    2006-08-01

    The main design features of metal-on-metal (MOM) hip resurfacing prostheses in promoting elastohydrodynamic lubrication were investigated in the present study, including the femoral head diameter, the clearance, and the cup wall thickness. Simplified conceptual models were developed, based on equivalent uniform wall thicknesses for both the cup and the head as well as the support materials representing bone and cement, and subsequently used for elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis. Both typical first- and second-generation MOM hip resurfacing prostheses with different clearances and cup wall thicknesses were considered with a fixed large bearing diameter of 50 mm, as well as a 28 mm diameter MOM total hip replacement bearing for the purpose of comparison. The importance of the head diameter and the clearance in promoting elastohydrodynamic lubrication was confirmed. Furthermore, it was also predicted that a relatively thin acetabular cup in the more recently introduced second-generation MOM hip resurfacing prostheses would be capable of improving elastohydrodynamic lubrication even further.

  8. The effect of femoral head diameter upon lubrication and wear of metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Smith, S L; Dowson, D; Goldsmith, A A

    2001-01-01

    It has been found that a remarkable reduction in the wear of metal-on-metal hip joints can be achieved by simply increasing the diameter of the joint. A tribological evaluation of metal-on-metal joints of 16, 22.225, 28 and 36 mm diameter was conducted in 25 per cent bovine serum using a hip joint simulator. The joints were subject to dynamic motion and loading cycles simulating walking for both lubrication and wear studies. For each size of joint in the lubrication study, an electrical resistivity technique was used to detect the extent of surface separation through a complete walking cycle. Wear of each size of joint was measured gravimetrically in wear tests of at least 2 x 10(6) cycles duration. Joints of 16 and 22.225 mm diameter showed no surface separation in the lubrication study. This suggested that wear would be proportional to the sliding distance and hence joint size in this boundary lubrication regime. A 28 mm diameter joint showed only limited evidence of surface separation suggesting that these joints were operating in a mixed lubrication regime. A 36 mm diameter joint showed surface separation for considerable parts of each walking cycle and hence evidence of the formation of a protective lubricating film. Wear testing of 16 and 22.225 mm diameter metal-on-metal joints gave mean wear rates of 4.85 and 6.30 mm3/10(6) cycles respectively. The ratio of these wear rates, 0.77, is approximately the same as the joint diameters ratio, 16/22.225 or 0.72, as expected from simple wear theory for dry or boundary lubrication conditions. No bedding-in was observed with these smaller diameter joints. For the 28 mm diameter joint, from 0 to 2 x 10(6) cycles, the mean wear rate was 1.62 mm3/10(6) cycles as the joints bedded-in. Following bedding-in, from 2.0 x 10(6) to 4.7 x 10(6) cycles, the wear rate was 0.54 mm3/10(6) cycles. As reported previously by Goldsmith et al. in 2000 [1], the mean steady state wear rate of the 36 mm diameter joints was lower than those

  9. An in vitro study of the reduction in wear of metal-on-metal hip prostheses using surface-engineered femoral heads.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J; Hu, X Q; Tipper, J L; Stewart, T D; Williams, S; Stone, M H; Davies, C; Hatto, P; Bolton, J; Riley, M; Hardaker, C; Isaac, G H; Berry, G; Ingham, E

    2002-01-01

    Although the wear of existing metal-on-metal (MOM) hip prostheses (1 mm3/10(6) cycles) is much lower than the more widely used polyethylene-on-metal bearings, there are concerns about the toxicity of metal wear particles and elevated metal ion levels, both locally and systemically, in the human body. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of reducing the volume of wear, the concentration of metal debris and the level of metal ion release through using surface-engineered femoral heads. Three thick (8-12 microm) coatings (TiN, CrN and CrCN) and one thin (2 microm) coating (diamond-like carbon, DLC), were evaluated on the femoral heads when articulating against high carbon content cobalt-chromium alloy acetabular inserts (HC CoCrMo) and compared with a clinically used MOM cobalt-chromium alloy bearing couple using a physiological anatomical hip joint simulator (Leeds Mark II). This study showed that CrN, CrCN and DLC coatings produced substantially lower wear volumes for both the coated femoral heads and the HC CoCrMo inserts. The TiN coating itself had little wear, but it caused relatively high wear of the HC CoCrMo inserts compared with the other coatings. The majority of the wear debris for all half-coated couples comprised small, 30 nm or less, CoCrMo metal particles. The Co, Cr and Mo ion concentrations released from the bearing couples of CrN-, CrCN- and DLC-coated heads articulating against HC CoCrMo inserts were at least 7 times lower than those released from the clinical MOM prostheses. These surface-engineered femoral heads articulating on HC CoCrMo acetabular inserts produced significantly lower wear volumes and rates, and hence lower volumetric concentrations of wear particles, compared with the clinical MOM prosthesis. The substantially lower ion concentration released by these surface-engineered components provides important evidence to support the clinical application of this technology.

  10. Comparison of Whole-Blood Metal Ion Levels Among Four Types of Large-Head, Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Arthroplasty Implants: A Concise Follow-up, at Five Years, of a Previous Report.

    PubMed

    Hutt, Jonathan; Lavigne, Martin; Lungu, Eugen; Belzile, Etienne; Morin, François; Vendittoli, Pascal-André

    2016-02-17

    Few studies of total hip arthroplasty (THA) implants with a large-diameter femoral head and metal-on-metal design have directly compared the progression of metal ion levels over time and the relationship to complications. As we previously reported, 144 patients received one of four types of large-diameter-head, metal-on-metal THA designs (Durom, Birmingham, ASR XL, or Magnum implants). Cobalt, chromium, and titanium ion levels were measured over five years. We compared ion levels and clinical results over time. The Durom group showed the highest levels of cobalt (p ≤ 0.002) and titanium ions (p ≤ 0.03). Both the Durom and Birmingham groups demonstrated significant ongoing cobalt increases up to five years. Eight patients (seven with a Durom implant and one with a Birmingham implant) developed adverse local tissue reaction. Six Durom implants and one Birmingham implant required revision, with one pseudotumor under surveillance at the time of the most recent follow-up. We found that ion generation and related complications varied among designs. More concerning was that, for some designs, ion levels continued to increase. Coupling a cobalt-chromium adapter sleeve to an unmodified titanium femoral trunnion along with a large metal-on-metal bearing may explain the poor performances of two of the designs in the current study. PMID:26888673

  11. Metal-on-metal hip joint tribology.

    PubMed

    Dowson, D; Jin, Z M

    2006-02-01

    The basic tribological features of metal-on-metal total hip replacements have been reviewed to facilitate an understanding of the engineering science underpinning the renaissance of these hard-on-hard joints. Metal-on-polymer hip replacements operate in the boundary lubrication regime, thus leading to the design guidance to reduce the femoral head diameter as much as is feasible to minimize frictional torque and volumetric wear. This explains why the gold-standard implant of this form from the past half-century had a diameter of only 22.225 mm (7/8 in). Metal-on-metal implants can operate in the mild mixed lubrication regime in which much of the applied load is supported by elastohydrodynamic films. Correct tribological design leads to remarkably low steady state wear rates. Promotion of the most effective elastohydrodynamic films calls for the largest possible head diameters and the smallest clearances that can reasonably be adopted, consistent with fine surface finishes, good sphericity and minimal structural elastic deformation of the cup on its foundations. This guidance, which is opposite in form to that developed for metal-on-polymer joints, is equally valid for solid (monolithic) metallic heads on metallic femoral stems and surface replacement femoral shells. Laboratory measurements of friction and wear in metal-on-metal joints have confirmed their potential to achieve a very mild form of mixed lubrication. The key lies in the generation of effective elastohydrodynamic lubricating films of adequate thickness compared with the composite roughness of the head and cup. The calculation of the film thickness is by no means easy, but the full procedure is outlined and the use of an empirical formula that displays good agreement with calculations based upon the full numerical solutions is explained. The representation of the lambda ratio, lambda, embracing both film thickness and composite roughness, is described.

  12. Shorter, rough trunnion surfaces are associated with higher taper wear rates than longer, smooth trunnion surfaces in a contemporary large head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty system.

    PubMed

    Brock, Timothy M; Sidaginamale, Raghavendra; Rushton, Steven; Nargol, Antoni V F; Bowsher, John G; Savisaar, Christina; Joyce, Tom J; Deehan, David J; Lord, James K; Langton, David J

    2015-12-01

    Taper wear at the head-neck junction is a possible cause of early failure in large head metal-on-metal (LH-MoM) hip replacements. We hypothesized that: (i) taper wear may be more pronounced in certain product designs; and (ii) an increased abductor moment arm may be protective. The tapers of 104 explanted LH-MoM hip replacements revised for adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD) from a single manufacturer were analyzed for linear and volumetric wear using a co-ordinate measuring machine. The mated stem was a shorter 12/14, threaded trunnion (n=72) or a longer, smooth 11/13 trunnion (n=32). The abductor moment arm was calculated from pre-revision radiographs. Independent predictors of linear and volumetric wear included taper angle, stem type, and the horizontal moment arm. Tapers mated with the threaded 12/14 trunnion had significantly higher rates of volumetric wear (0.402 mm3/yr vs. 0.123 mm3/yr [t=-2.145, p=0.035]). There was a trend to larger abductor moment arms being protective (p=0.055). Design variation appears to play an important role in taper-trunnion junction failure. We recommend that surgeons bear these findings in mind when considering the use of a short, threaded trunnion with a cobalt-chromium head. PMID:26135357

  13. Shorter, rough trunnion surfaces are associated with higher taper wear rates than longer, smooth trunnion surfaces in a contemporary large head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty system.

    PubMed

    Brock, Timothy M; Sidaginamale, Raghavendra; Rushton, Steven; Nargol, Antoni V F; Bowsher, John G; Savisaar, Christina; Joyce, Tom J; Deehan, David J; Lord, James K; Langton, David J

    2015-12-01

    Taper wear at the head-neck junction is a possible cause of early failure in large head metal-on-metal (LH-MoM) hip replacements. We hypothesized that: (i) taper wear may be more pronounced in certain product designs; and (ii) an increased abductor moment arm may be protective. The tapers of 104 explanted LH-MoM hip replacements revised for adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD) from a single manufacturer were analyzed for linear and volumetric wear using a co-ordinate measuring machine. The mated stem was a shorter 12/14, threaded trunnion (n=72) or a longer, smooth 11/13 trunnion (n=32). The abductor moment arm was calculated from pre-revision radiographs. Independent predictors of linear and volumetric wear included taper angle, stem type, and the horizontal moment arm. Tapers mated with the threaded 12/14 trunnion had significantly higher rates of volumetric wear (0.402 mm3/yr vs. 0.123 mm3/yr [t=-2.145, p=0.035]). There was a trend to larger abductor moment arms being protective (p=0.055). Design variation appears to play an important role in taper-trunnion junction failure. We recommend that surgeons bear these findings in mind when considering the use of a short, threaded trunnion with a cobalt-chromium head.

  14. Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S; Kaulback, K; Levin, L

    2012-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is in clinical use as an appropriate alternative to total hip arthroplasty in young patients. In this technique, a metal cap is placed on the femoral head to cover the damaged surface of the bone and a metal cup is placed in the acetabulum. Objectives The primary objective of this analysis was to compare the revision rates of MOM HRA using different implants with the benchmark set by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). The secondary objective of this analysis was to review the literature regarding adverse biological effects associated with implant material. Review Methods A literature search was performed on February 13, 2012, to identify studies published from January 1, 2009, to February 13, 2012. Results The revision rates for MOM HRA using 6 different implants were reviewed. The revision rates for MOM HRA with 3 implants met the NICE criteria, i.e., a revision rate of 10% or less at 10 years. Two implants had short-term follow-ups and MOM HRA with one of the implants failed to meet the NICE criteria. Adverse tissue reactions resulting in failure of the implants have been reported by several studies. With a better understanding of the factors that influence the wear rate of the implants, adverse tissue reactions and subsequent implant failure can be minimized. Many authors have suggested that patient selection and surgical technique affect the wear rate and the risk of tissue reactions. The biological effects of high metal ion levels in the blood and urine of patients with MOM HRA implants are not known. Studies have shown an increase in chromosomal aberrations in patients with MOM articulations, but the clinical implications and long-term consequences of this increase are still unknown. Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with MOM HRA implants did not have an overall increase in mortality or risk of cancer. There is insufficient clinical data to confirm the

  15. Mechanical failure of metal-polyethylene sandwich liner in metal-on-metal total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Yasushi; Fetto, Joseph F

    2015-01-01

    Metal-on-metal had been proposed as an optimal articulation in THRs, however, many monoblock prostheses have been recalled in the USA because of significant high rates of early failure. Metal-on-metal prostheses had been implanted in our institution, and this is a case history of a single patient, in whom metal-on-metal THRs with different femoral sizes of heads were implanted. A 57-year-old female patient underwent bilateral total hip replacements with metal-on-metal prostheses using metal-polyethylene "sandwich" liners 9 years ago on the right side and 7 years ago on the left side respectively. The only difference in both sides was the femoral head diameter of 28 mm in right and 34 mm in left. Seven years after the left surgery, the acetabular liner was dissociated, however, metallosis was not detected. Although the larger femoral head was thought to increase hip joint stability, it dictated a reduction in polyethylene thickness in this prosthesis design, and it was 4 mm in the left hip. Recently, metal-on-metal articulations are thought not to be optimal for hip joint bearing surface, however, this clinical failure was due to the polyethylene thickness and quality.

  16. Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this review was to assess the safety and effectiveness of metal on metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty for young patients compared with that of total hip replacement (THR) in the same population. Clinical Need Total hip replacement has proved to be very effective for late middle-aged and elderly patients with severe degenerative diseases of the hips. As indications for THR began to include younger patients and those with a more active life style, the longevity of the implant became a concern. Evidence suggests that these patients experience relatively higher rates of early implant failure and the need for revision. The Swedish hip registry, for example, has demonstrated a survival rate in excess of 80% at 20 years for those aged over 65 years, whereas this figure was 33% by 16 years in those aged under 55 years. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a bone-conserving alternative to THR that restores normal joint biomechanics and load transfer. The technique has been used around the world for more than 10 years, specifically in the United Kingdom and other European countries. The Technology Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty is an alternative procedure to conventional THR in younger patients. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is less invasive than THR and addresses the problem of preserving femoral bone stock at the initial operation. This means that future hip revisions are possible with THR if the initial MOM arthroplasty becomes less effective with time in these younger patients. The procedure involves the removal and replacement of the surface of the femoral head with a hollow metal hemisphere, which fits into a metal acetabular cup. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a technically more demanding procedure than is conventional THR. In hip resurfacing, the femoral head is retained, which makes it much more difficult to access the acetabular cup. However, hip resurfacing arthroplasty has several advantages over a

  17. Taper Failure After Large-Diameter Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Zachary H; Estrera, Kenneth; Levine, Brett R

    2016-09-01

    The use of metal-on-metal bearing surfaces for total hip arthroplasty increased dramatically in the past decade for a variety of reasons, including the advantage of using larger-diameter femoral heads to reduce instability. However, recent research suggesting negative outcomes and high failure rates associated with some of these implants has decreased their use. Further, the use of larger-diameter femoral heads on relatively small femoral neck tapers has caused concern about localized corrosion at this junction, particularly with varus femoral alignment and longer femoral neck and head lengths. Although the advent of modular components offers the surgeon greater intraoperative flexibility, this modularity may prove to be a weak link when coupled with large-diameter femoral heads. This report describes a patient with a history of bilateral metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty complicated by failure of the right hip as a result of fretting and mechanically assisted crevice corrosion. Notching of the femoral neck and head dissociation occurred 10 years after the primary procedure. The authors describe the patient's presenting symptoms, the possible etiology of the catastrophic failure, and the method of treatment and provide a brief review of metal-on-metal implants that may shed some light on the complications in this case. [Orthopedics.2016; 39(5):e984-e987.]. PMID:27248338

  18. Severe corrosion after malpositioning of a metallic head over the Morse taper of a cementless hip arthroplasty. A case report.

    PubMed

    Pansard, E; Fouilleron, N; Dereudre, G; Migaud, H; Girard, J

    2012-04-01

    Morse tapers are frequently used in total hip replacement to achieve precise adjustment of lengths and femoral offset. Mechanically, they do not raise any specific problems so long as strict positioning requirements are observed and elements from different manufacturers are not mixed together. We report a case in which the implant induced unexplained pain at 2 years, in relation to a defective fit between the metallic head and the Morse taper. Asymmetric partial fit of the head onto the taper was detected on control X-ray and was implicated as causing metallosis due to excessive release of metal debris from the Morse taper. Revision required femoral stem exchange because of the damage to the Morse taper as well as replacing the cup with new metal-metal bearings. Evolution was favorable at 3 years' follow-up. Most hip replacements include a Morse taper; the present clinical case is a reminder that strict positioning rules are to be respected, without which corrosion and wear may lead to mechanical failure.

  19. Taper junction failure in large-diameter metal-on-metal bearings

    PubMed Central

    Langton, D. J.; Sidaginamale, R.; Lord, J. K.; Nargol, A. V. F.; Joyce, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives An ongoing prospective study to investigate failing metal-on-metal hip prostheses was commenced at our centre in 2008. We report on the results of the analysis of the first consecutive 126 failed mated total hip prostheses from a single manufacturer. Methods Analysis was carried out using highly accurate coordinate measuring to calculate volumetric and linear rates of the articular bearing surfaces and also the surfaces of the taper junctions. The relationship between taper wear rates and a number of variables, including bearing diameter and orientation of the acetabular component, was investigated. Results The measured rates of wear and distribution of material loss from the taper surfaces appeared to show that the primary factor leading to taper failure is the increased lever arm acting on this junction in contemporary large-diameter metal-on-metal hip replacements. Conclusions Our analysis suggests that varus stems, laterally engaging taper systems and larger head diameters all contribute to taper failure. PMID:23610672

  20. Transient elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of metal-on-metal hip implant under simulated walking conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Jin, Z M; Hirt, F; Rieker, C; Roberts, P; Grigoris, P

    2006-01-01

    The transient elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) analysis was performed in this study for a typical metal-on-metal bearing employing a polyethylene backing underneath a metallic cup inlay under dynamic operating conditions of load and speed representative of normal walking. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup. The governing Reynolds and elasticity equations were solved simultaneously by using both finite difference and finite element methods. The predicted transient film thickness from the present study was compared with the estimation based on the quasi-static analysis. It was found that the polyethylene backing employed in the typical metal-on-metal hip bearing, combined with dynamic squeeze-film action, significantly improved the transient lubricant film thickness under cyclic walking and consequently a fluid film lubrication regime was possible for smooth bearing surfaces with an average roughness less than 0.005 microm.

  1. Analysis of mixed lubrication mechanism in metal-on-metal hip joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z M

    2002-01-01

    A simple mixed lubrication model has been developed to predict the asperity contact and wear for the metal-on-metal bearing couple for total hip joint replacements. It has been shown that the femoral head radius has a large effect on the predicted asperity contact and wear depending on the lubrication regime. An increase in the femoral head radius can lead to an increase in wear under a predominantly boundary lubrication regime, but this trend can be reversed under a mixed lubrication regime towards fluid film lubrication. These observations are consistent with the recent experimental findings from hip simulator studies by Smith and co-workers.

  2. Metal-on-metal: history, state of the art (2010)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The history of metal-on-metal bearing began with K. Mc Kee. Several "episodes" have marked the history of metal-on-metal articulations, and each has contributed to a better understanding of this type of tribology. But to date the indications for this bearing are debated and are subject to reservations because of the existence of permanently elevated levels of circulating metal ions. It therefore appears that the monitoring of our patients, the documentation of our revisions and the collaboration with our industry partners as well as communicating with our biology and pathology colleagues is necessary to help us solve these problems. PMID:21234564

  3. Effect of simplifications of bone and components inclination on the elastohydrodynamic lubrication modeling of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingen; Liu, Feng; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2013-05-01

    It is important to study the lubrication mechanism of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing prosthesis in order to understand its overall tribological performance, thereby minimize the wear particles. Previous elastohydrodynamic lubrication studies of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing prosthesis neglected the effects of the orientations of the cup and head. Simplified pelvic and femoral bone models were also adopted for the previous studies. These simplifications may lead to unrealistic predictions. For the first time, an elastohydrodynamic lubrication model was developed and solved for a full metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty. The effects of the orientations of components and the realistic bones on the lubrication performance of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing prosthesis were investigated by comparing the full model with simplified models. It was found that the orientation of the head played a very important role in the prediction of pressure distributions and film profiles of the metal-on-metal hip resurfacing prosthesis. The inclination of the hemispherical cup up to 45° had no appreciable effect on the lubrication performance of the metal-on-metal hip resurfacing prosthesis. Moreover, the combined effect of material properties and structures of bones was negligible. Future studies should focus on higher inclination angles, smaller coverage angle and microseparation related to the occurrences of edge loading.

  4. Analysis of elastohydrodynamic lubrication in McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Yew, A; Udofia, I; Jagatia, M; Jin, Z M

    2004-01-01

    An elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) analysis was carried out in this study for a typical McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip prosthesis under a simple steady state rotation. The finite element method was used initially to investigate the effect of the cement and bone on the predicted contact pressure distribution between the two articulating surfaces under dry conditions, and subsequently to determine the elastic deformation of both the femoral and the acetabular components required for the lubrication analysis. Both Reynolds equation and the elasticity equation were coupled and solved numerically using the finite difference method. Important features in reducing contact stresses and promoting fluid-film lubrication associated with the McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip implant were identified as the large femoral head and the thin acetabular cup. For the typical McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip prosthesis considered under typical walking conditions, an increase in the femoral head radius from 14 to 17.4 mm (for a fixed radial clearance of 79 microm) was shown to result in a 25 per cent decrease in the maximum dry contact pressure and a 60 per cent increase in the predicted minimum film thickness. Furthermore, the predicted maximum contact pressure considering both the cement and the bone was found to be decreased by about 80 per cent, while the minimum film thickness was predicted to be increased by 50 per cent. Despite a significant increase in the predicted minimum lubricating film thickness due to the large femoral head and the thin acetabular cup, a mixed lubrication regime was predicted for the McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip implant under estimated in vivo steady state walking conditions, depending on the surface roughness of the bearing surfaces. This clearly demonstrated the important influences of the material, design and manufacturing parameters on the tribological performance of these hard-on-hard hip prostheses. Furthermore, in the present contact

  5. Graphitic Tribological Layers in Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y.; Pourzal, R.; Wimmer, M. A.; Jacobs, J. J.; Fischer, A.; Marks, L. D.

    2011-12-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, and when nonoperative methods have failed, a prosthetic implant is a cost-effective and clinically successful treatment. Metal-on-metal replacements are an attractive implant technology, a lower-wear alternative to metal-on-polyethylene devices. Relatively little is known about how sliding occurs in these implants, except that proteins play a critical role and that there is a tribological layer on the metal surface. We report evidence for graphitic material in the tribological layer in metal-on-metal hip replacements retrieved from patients. As graphite is a solid lubricant, its presence helps to explain why these components exhibit low wear and suggests methods of improving their performance; simultaneously, this raises the issue of the physiological effects of graphitic wear debris.

  6. CoCrMo Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yifeng; Hoffman, Emily; Wimmer, Markus; Fischer, Alfons; Jacobs, Joshua; Marks, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    After the rapid growth in the use of CoCrMo metal-on-metal hip replacements since the second generation was introduced circa 1990, metal-on-metal hip replacements have experienced a sharp decline in the last two years due to biocompatibility issues related to wear and corrosion products. Despite some excellent clinical results, the release of wear and corrosion debris and the adverse response of local tissues have been of great concern. There are many unknowns regarding how CoCrMo metal bearings interact with the human body. This perspective article is intended to outline some recent progresses in understanding wear and corrosion of metal-on-metal hip replacement both in-vivo and in-vitro. The materials, mechanical deformation, corrosion, wear-assisted corrosion, and wear products will be discussed. Possible adverse health effects caused by wear products will be briefly addressed, as well as some of the many open questions such as the detailed chemistry of corrosion, tribochemical reactions and the formation of graphitic layers. Nowadays we design almost routinely for high performance materials and lubricants for automobiles; humans are at least as important. It is worth remembering that a hip implant is often the difference between walking and leading a relatively normal life, and a wheelchair. PMID:23196425

  7. Poor mid-term survival of the low-carbide metal-on-metal Zweymüller-plus total hip arthroplasty system: a concise follow-up, at a minimum of ten years, of a previous report*.

    PubMed

    Repantis, Thomas; Vitsas, Vasilis; Korovessis, Panagiotis

    2013-03-20

    Between 1994 and 1999, 217 metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties with a low-carbide bearing surface were performed with use of the cementless Zweymüller SL-Plus stem and the Bicon-Plus threaded cup in 194 consecutive patients. After a minimum follow-up of ten years, 181 living patients (203 hips) were available for evaluation. The revision rate after an average of twelve years was 18% (thirty-six hips in thirty-six patients were revised). The main reason for revision was aseptic loosening of one or both components. The probability of survival of the stem at fifteen years was 77% (95% confidence interval [CI], 65% to 86%). The probability of survival of the cup was 80% (95% CI, 62% to 90%). These high failure rates at mid-term follow-up led us to abandon the use of low-carbide metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty components. PMID:23515994

  8. Lubrication and friction prediction in metal-on-metal hip implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F. C.; Brockett, C.; Williams, S.; Udofia, I.; Fisher, J.; Jin, Z. M.

    2008-03-01

    A general methodology of mixed lubrication analysis and friction prediction for a conforming spherical bearing in hip implants was developed, with particular reference to a typical metal-on-metal hip replacement. Experimental measurement of frictional torque for a similar implant was carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup under cyclic operating conditions of representative load and motion. The mixed lubrication model presented in this study was first applied to identify the contact characteristics on the bearing surfaces, consisting of both fluid-film and boundary lubricated regions. The boundary lubricated contact was assumed to occur when the predicted fluid film thickness was less than a typical boundary protein layer absorbed on the bearing surfaces. Subsequently, the friction was predicted from the fluid-film lubricated region with viscous shearing due to both Couette and Poiseuille flows and the boundary protein layer contact region with a constant coefficient of friction. The predicted frictional torque of the typical metal-on-metal hip joint implant was compared with the experimental measurement conducted in a functional hip simulator and a reasonably good agreement was found. The mixed lubrication regime was found to be dominant for the conditions considered. Although the percentage of the boundary lubricated region was quite small, the corresponding contribution to friction was quite large and the resultant friction factor was quite high.

  9. Lubrication and friction prediction in metal-on-metal hip implants.

    PubMed

    Wang, F C; Brockett, C; Williams, S; Udofia, I; Fisher, J; Jin, Z M

    2008-03-01

    A general methodology of mixed lubrication analysis and friction prediction for a conforming spherical bearing in hip implants was developed, with particular reference to a typical metal-on-metal hip replacement. Experimental measurement of frictional torque for a similar implant was carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup under cyclic operating conditions of representative load and motion. The mixed lubrication model presented in this study was first applied to identify the contact characteristics on the bearing surfaces, consisting of both fluid-film and boundary lubricated regions. The boundary lubricated contact was assumed to occur when the predicted fluid film thickness was less than a typical boundary protein layer absorbed on the bearing surfaces. Subsequently, the friction was predicted from the fluid-film lubricated region with viscous shearing due to both Couette and Poiseuille flows and the boundary protein layer contact region with a constant coefficient of friction. The predicted frictional torque of the typical metal-on-metal hip joint implant was compared with the experimental measurement conducted in a functional hip simulator and a reasonably good agreement was found. The mixed lubrication regime was found to be dominant for the conditions considered. Although the percentage of the boundary lubricated region was quite small, the corresponding contribution to friction was quite large and the resultant friction factor was quite high.

  10. Metal-on-metal joint bearings and hematopoetic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This is a review of the hip arthroplasty era. We concentrate on new metal bearings, surface replacements, and the lessons not learned, and we highlight recent reports on malignancies and joint implants. A low incidence of blood malignancies has been found in bone marrow taken at prosthetic surgery. The incidence is increased after replacement with knee implants that release very low systemic levels of metal ions. A carcinogenic effect of the high levels of metal ions released by large metal-on-metal implants cannot be excluded. Ongoing Swedish implant registry studies going back to 1975 can serve as a basis for evaluation of this risk. PMID:23140092

  11. Arthroplasty in Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dong Cheol; Jung, Kwangyoung

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive joint disease requiring early hip arthroplasty. The polyethylene-metal design using a 22-mm femoral head component, introduced by Charnley in 1950, has been widely used for over half a century. Since then, different materials with the capacity to minimize friction between bearing surfaces and various cement or cementless insert fixations have been developed. Although the outcome of second and third generation designs using better bearing materials and technologies has been favorable, less favorable results are seen with total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteonecrosis. Selection of appropriate materials for hip arthroplasty is important for any potential revisions that might become inevitable due to the limited durability of a prosthetic hip joint. Alternative hip arthroplasties, which include hemiresurfacing arthroplasty and bipolar hemiarthroplasty, have not been found to have acceptable outcomes. Metal-on-metal resurfacing has recently been suggested as a feasible option for young patients with extra physical demands; however, concerns about complications such as hypersensitivity reaction or pseudotumor formation on metal bearings have emerged. To ensure successful long-term outcomes in hip arthroplasty, factors such as insert stabilization and surfaces with less friction are essential. Understanding these aspects in arthroplasty is important to selection of proper materials and to making appropriate decisions for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:27536561

  12. Early results of metal on metal articulation total hip arthroplasty in young patients.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, J A; Kwan, M K; Merican, A M; Abbas, A A; Kamari, Z H; Hisa, M K; Ismail, Z; Idrus, R M

    2004-12-01

    We report our early experience of 20 cases of metal on metal articulation total hip arthroplasty in 19 young patients. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (63%) was the commonest diagnosis for patients undergoing this procedure, followed by osteoarthritis (21%). In general, most of the patients were young and physically active with an average age of 43.1 years (range, 25 to 58 years). The average follow-up period was 18 months (range, 7 to 46 months). The mean total Harris Hip Score preoperatively and at final follow-up was 31 points and 89 points respectively. The mean total Pain Score improved from an average of 11.5 to 41.1 points at final follow-up. Sixteen (84%) of the patients had a good to excellent hip score. There was one dislocation, which stabilized after reduction and conservative management. One case of early infection underwent a two-staged revision.

  13. Corrosion on the acetabular liner taper from retrieved modular metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Gascoyne, Trevor C; Dyrkacz, Richard M; Turgeon, Thomas R; Burnell, Colin D; Wyss, Urs P; Brandt, Jan-M

    2014-10-01

    Eight retrieved metal-on-metal total hip replacements displayed corrosion damage along the cobalt-chromium alloy liner taper junction with the Ti alloy acetabular shell. Scanning electron microscopy indicated the primary mechanism of corrosion to be grain boundary and associated crevice corrosion, which was likely accelerated through mechanical micromotion and galvanic corrosion resulting from dissimilar alloys. Coordinate measurements revealed up to 4.3mm(3) of the cobalt-chromium alloy taper surface was removed due to corrosion, which is comparable to previous reports of corrosion damage on head-neck tapers. The acetabular liner-shell taper appears to be an additional source of metal corrosion products in modular total hip replacements. Patients with these prostheses should be closely monitored for signs of adverse reaction towards corrosion by-products.

  14. Microseparation, fluid pressure and flow in failures of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Wroblewski, B. M.; Siney, P. D.; Fleming, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacing was introduced into clinical practice because it was perceived to be a better alternative to conventional total hip replacement for young and active patients. However, an increasing number of reports of complications have arisen focusing on design and orientation of the components, the generation of metallic wear particles and serum levels of metallic ions. The procedure introduced a combination of two elements: large-dimension components and hard abrasive particles of metal wear. The objective of our study was to investigate the theory that microseparation of the articular surfaces draws in a high volume of bursal fluid and its contents into the articulation, and at relocation under load would generate high pressures of fluid ejection, resulting in an abrasive water jet. Methods This theoretical concept using MoM resurfacing components (head diameter 55 mm) was modelled mathematically and confirmed experimentally using a material-testing machine that pushed the head into the cup at a rate of 1000 mm/min until fully engaged. Results The mathematical model showed the pattern but not the force of fluid ejection, the highest pressures were expected when the separation of the components was only a fraction of one millimetre. The experimental work confirmed the results; with the mean peak ejection pressure of 43 763 N/m2 equivalent to 306 mmHg or 5 psi. Conclusions The mechanical effect of the high-pressure abrasive water jet is the likely cause of the spectrum of complications reported with metal-on-metal resurfacing. Investigating serum levels of metallic elements may not be the best method for assessing the local mechanical effects of the abrasive water jet. PMID:23610667

  15. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Gabarre, Sergio; Más, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality. PMID:25802848

  16. Implant Design in Cementless Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Taek

    2016-01-01

    When performing cementless hip arthroplasty, it is critical to achieve firm primary mechanical stability followed by biological fixation. In order to achieve this, it is essential to fully understand characteristics of implant design. In this review, the authors review fixation principles for a variety of implants used for cementless hip replacement and considerations for making an optimal selection. PMID:27536647

  17. Ultrasound screening of periarticular soft tissue abnormality around metal-on-metal bearings.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Takashi; Sakai, Takashi; Takao, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2012-06-01

    Although metal hypersensitivity or pseudotumors are concerns for metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings, detailed pathologies of patterns, severity, and incidence of periprosthetic soft tissue lesions are incompletely understood. We examined the potential of ultrasound for screening of periarticular soft tissue lesions around MoM bearings. Ultrasound examinations were conducted in 88 hips (79 patients) with MoM hip resurfacings or MoM total hip arthroplasties with a large femoral head. Four qualitative ultrasound patterns were shown, including normal pattern in 69 hips, joint-expansion pattern in 11 hips, cystic pattern in 5 hips, and mass pattern in 3 hips. Hips with the latter 3 abnormal patterns showed significantly higher frequency of clinical symptoms, without significant differences of sex, duration of implantation, head sizes, and cup abduction/anteversion angles, compared with hips with normal pattern. Ultrasound examination provides sensitive screening of soft tissue reactions around MoM bearings and may be useful in monitoring progression and defining treatment for periarticular soft tissue abnormalities. PMID:22047978

  18. Clinical and Wear Analyses of 9 Large Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Mathijssen, N. M. C.; Witt, F.; Morlock, M. M.; Vehmeijer, S. B. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Metal-on-Metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasties (THA) are associated with pseudotumor formation and high revision rates. This prospective study analysed the clinical and wear analyses of 9 large Metal-on-Metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasties (THA) to understand the underlying mechanisms of failure. The MoM bearings were revised for multiple reasons; the main reason was pseudotumor formation. Materials and Methods From 2006 till 2010 the Reinier de Graaf Hospital implanted 160 large head M2a-Magnum™ (Biomet Inc. Warsaw, Indiana, USA) THAs in 150 patients. The first year, 9 bearings were revised and analysed at the Biomechanics Section, Hamburg University of Technology, Germany. We performed clinical (Harris Hip Score, radiographic analysis, blood cobalt and chromium) and wear analysis (implant, tissue and fluid) of the 9 bearings. Since this study did not fall under the scope of the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act in The Netherlands, no ethical approval was necessary. In this prospective study all patient details were anonymized by the corresponding author, all other authors were blinded during the research and wear analyses. Patients with bilateral MoM implants were excluded. Results The 9 bearings had a median (IQR) survival of 41.0 (25) months in situ. From these bearings, three showed no noticeable wear. The median (IQR) head wear volume was 3.2 (3.6) mm3 and maximum wear depth 0.02 (0.02) mm. For the cup the median (IQR) wear volume was 0.23 (0.3) mm3 with a maximum wear depth of 0.03 (0.05) mm. Conclusion An early identification of parameters related to failure of the MoM THA, such as pain, decreased range of motion, radiographic changes and high levels of blood cobalt and chromium is of great importance for patient’s quality of life. Especially now patients and surgeons face the long term effects of all these bearings still in situ. This study reports the clinical and wear analyses of 9 MoM THA. In the majority of this group the

  19. Unicondylar knee arthroplasty: a cementless perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Michael E.; Englund, Roy E.; Leighton, Ross K.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To compare the results of cementless unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) with those already reported in a similar study on cemented UKA. Design A case-series cross-sectional study. Setting The Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax. Patients Fifty-one patients who underwent a total of 57 UKAs between May 1989 and May 1997. Inclusion criteria were osteoarthritis involving the predominantly the medial compartment of the knee, relative sparing of the other compartments, less than 15° of varus, minimal knee instability, and attendance at the postoperative clinical visit. Intervention Cementless UKA. Main outcome measures Clinical parameters that included pain, range of motion and the Knee Society Clinical Knee Score. Roentgenographic parameters that included α, β, γ and σ angles and the presence of periprosthetic radiolucency or loose beads. Results Age, weight, gender and follow-up interval did not significantly affect the clinical results in terms of pain, range of motion or knee score. Knees with more than 1 mm of radiolucency had significantly lower knee scores than those with no radiolucency. Knees that radiologically had loose beads also had significantly lower knee scores. The clinical outcomes of cementless UKA were comparable to those already reported on cemented UKA. Cementless femurs had less radiolucency than the cemented femurs, whereas cementless tibias had more radiolucency than their cemented counterparts. Conclusions Cementless UKA seems to be as efficacious as cemented UKA. However, there is some concern about the amount of radiolucency in the cementless tibial components. A randomized clinical trial comparing both cementless and cemented tibial components with a cementless femur (hybrid knee) is needed to further assess this controversial issue in UKA. PMID:11129829

  20. Long-term outcome of a metal-on-polyethylene cementless hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Timothy L; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Campbell, Patricia A; Al-Hamad, Mariam; Amstutz, Harlan C

    2014-04-01

    Due to the well-documented problems surrounding metal-on-metal bearings, the use of hip resurfacing has declined. Since the potential benefits of hip resurfacing remain desirable, it may be beneficial to investigate the long-term outcome of hip resurfacings using metal-on-polyethylene in the 1980's. We report the long-term survivorship and modes of failure of a cementless metal-on-polyethylene resurfacing (n = 178) with different porous ingrowth surfaces. While acetabular loosening was absent, a high incidence of femoral failures (femoral loosening = 18.1%, osteolytic neck fracture = 21%) occurred despite using the same ingrowth surface for both components. Ongoing developments using the lessons learned from these previous generation components and utilizing modern low wear materials, e.g., cross-linked polyethylene, may lead to improved implants for future hip resurfacings. PMID:24090660

  1. An analysis of screw fixation of the femoral component in cementless hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Martin, J W; Sugiyama, H; Kaiser, A D; Van Hoech, J; Whiteside, L A

    1990-01-01

    A cementless hip stem that allows screw fixation of the collar to cortical bone in the calcar region was found to achieve enhanced rotational stability when implanted in preserved cadaveric human femora. Although the implants with screws showed less tendency for subsidence than the implants without screws, rotational micromotion was not found to be statistically different under light loading conditions. When implanted in composite bone, the addition of screws in the configuration tested was associated with significant metal-on-metal wear during combined compression and rotational cyclic loading. This finding is of concern due to potential wear particle toxicity and possible lowered fatigue life of the prosthesis. Therefore, specific design changes are recommended. PMID:2243211

  2. Edge loading in metal-on-metal hips: low clearance is a new risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Zografos, Angelos; Sayles, Ritchie S; Hart, Alister; Cann, Philippa

    2012-01-01

    The revision rate of large head metal-on-metal and resurfacing hips are significantly higher than conventional total hip replacements. The revision of these components has been linked to high wear caused by edge loading; which occurs when the head–cup contact patch extends over the cup rim. There are two current explanations for this; first, there is loss of entrainment of synovial fluid resulting in breakdown of the lubricating film and second, edge loading results in a large local increase in contact pressure and consequent film thickness reduction at the cup rim, which causes an increase in wear. This paper develops a method to calculate the distance between the joint reaction force vector and the cup rim – the contact patch centre to rim (CPCR) distance. However, the critical distance for the risk of edge loading is the distance from the contact patch edge to rim (CPER) distance. An analysis of explanted hip components, divided into edge worn and non-edge-worn components showed that there was no statistical difference in CPCR values, but the CPER value was significantly lower for edge worn hips. Low clearance hips, which have a more conformal contact, have a larger diameter contact patch and thus are more at risk of edge loading for similarly positioned hips. PMID:22558836

  3. Gender is a significant factor for failure of metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Latteier, Michael J; Berend, Keith R; Lombardi, Adolph V; Ajluni, Andrew F; Seng, Brian E; Adams, Joanne B

    2011-09-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) articulations offers low wear, larger head size, and increased stability. Reports of early failure are troubling and include failure of ingrowth and metal articulation problems such as metallosis, hypersensitivity, pseudotumor, and unexplained pain. This study investigates the survivorship of modern MoM articulations by gender. We reviewed 1589 primary MoM THA in 1363 patients, with minimum 2-year follow-up for 1212 hips. Follow-up averaged 60 months. There were 643 female patients and 719 male patients. The incidence of cup revision was significantly higher in women than in men (8.2% vs 2.7%; P = .0000), as was incidence of aseptic loosening (4.3% vs 1.1%; P = .0006), and failure for metal-bearing complications (2.2% vs 0.6%; P = .0126). There appear to be gender factors influencing the success of MoM THA, which may include hormonal, anatomic, or functional differences. PMID:21641761

  4. Bearing surfaces for hip arthroplasty - is metal-on-metal a passing fancy?

    PubMed

    Lee, Reginald K; Nevelos, Jim; Vigdorchik, Jonathan; Markel, David C

    2012-12-01

    Metal-on-metal bearings have had popularity that has waxed and waned over the years. The advantages realized relative to wear resistance and strength had been offset by early failures, manufacturing difficulty, and most recently by adverse soft tissue responses to the metallic debris. The bearing's history, evolution, advantages and disadvantages will be discussed in attempt to answer the question: is metal-on-metal a passing fancy?

  5. Contact mechanics and elastohydrodynamic lubrication in a novel metal-on-metal hip implant with an aspherical bearing surface.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingen; Gao, Leiming; Liu, Feng; Yang, Peiran; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-03-22

    Diameter and diametral clearance of the bearing surfaces of metal-on-metal hip implants and structural supports have been recognised as key factors to reduce the dry contact and hydrodynamic pressures and improve lubrication performance. On the other hand, application of aspherical bearing surfaces can also significantly affect the contact mechanics and lubrication performance by changing the radius of the curvature of a bearing surface and consequently improving the conformity between the head and the cup. In this study, a novel metal-on-metal hip implant employing a specific aspherical bearing surface, Alpharabola, as the acetabular surface was investigated for both contact mechanics and elastohydrodynamic lubrication under steady-state conditions. When compared with conventional spherical bearing surfaces, a more uniform pressure distribution and a thicker lubricant film thickness within the loaded conjunction were predicted for this novel Alpharabola hip implant. The effects of the geometric parameters of this novel acetabular surface on the pressure distribution and lubricant thickness were investigated. A significant increase in the predicted lubricant film thickness and a significant decrease in the dry contact and hydrodynamic pressures were found with appropriate combinations of these geometric parameters, compared with the spherical bearing surface.

  6. Three metal-on-metal hip replacement devices from the same manufacturer--a short- to mid-term survival.

    PubMed

    Kostensalo, Inari; Junnila, Mika; Mokka, Jari; Virolainen, Petri; Vahlberg, Tero; Mäkelä, Keijo T

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate short- to mid-term results of three different metal-on-metal hip devices from the same manufacturer. A total of 329 hip operations were performed in a single academic unit between 2004 and 2010 using either Birmingham hip resurfacing or Synergy--Birmingham and Synergy--R3 total hip arthroplasty. The overall survival rate at the end of the follow-up time for Birmingham hip resurfacing was 88%, for Synergy--Birmingham total hip arthroplasty 95%, and for Synergy--R3 total hip arthroplasty 81% (p = 0.036). Five revision operations were performed due to adverse reaction to metal debris. Head sizes > 50 mm had lower revision rates compared to smaller ones. Synergy--R3 had a poor survival already at short-term. The mid-term survival of Birmingham hip resurfacing arthroplasty was inferior compared to previous studies.

  7. Cost comparison of cementless versus cemented hemiarthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Tripuraneni, Krishna R; Carothers, Joshua T; Junick, Daniel W; Archibeck, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    Hip hemiarthroplasties are frequently performed for displaced femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to identify the costs associated with cementless and cemented hemiarthroplasties, compare operative times, and identify complications. The hypothesis was that cementless hemiarthroplasties cost less than cemented hemiarthroplasties, require less operative time, and have fewer perioperative complications. A retrospective review was conducted of 2 surgeons' patients admitted for displaced femoral neck fractures between 2006 and 2010. Group 1 included 45 patients who underwent monopolar hemiarthroplasties with cementless femoral components via a standard posterior approach by a single surgeon. Group 2 included 49 patients who underwent monopolar hemiarthroplasties with cemented femoral components via a modified lateral approach by a single surgeon. Surgical and anesthesia times and the cost of implants and accessories were recorded. The cost for cementless components was $3275.60 (femoral stem, $2800; monopolar head, $400; sleeve, $75.60), whereas the cost of cemented components was $3694.47 (femoral stem, $1800; monopolar head, $400; sleeve, $75.60, 3 Simplex with tobramycin cement packets, $1221; cement mixer/irrigator with tip/centralizer and plug/pressurizer, $197.87), a cost savings of 12.7% ($418.87). Operative time was significantly reduced in group 1 vs group 2 (mean, 32.9 vs 56.1 minutes, respectively; P<.01). Anesthesia time was also significantly reduced in group 1 (mean, 82.3 vs 102.9 minutes, respectively; P<.01). The difference in mean anesthetic times demonstrates an overall cost savings of 18.6%, or $1161.30. No difference in complications was noted between the groups perioperatively. Regional cost variances, vendor-hospital contracts, and surgeons' operative times are factors that may influence cost savings. This study demonstrates significantly lower operative and anesthetic times and observable cost savings with cementless femoral

  8. Survivorship of standard versus modified posterior surgical approaches in metal-on-metal hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    M. Takamura, K.; Maher, P.; Nath, T.; Su, E. P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MOMHR) is available as an alternative option for younger, more active patients. There are failure modes that are unique to MOMHR, which include loosening of the femoral head and fractures of the femoral neck. Previous studies have speculated that changes in the vascularity of the femoral head may contribute to these failure modes. This study compares the survivorship between the standard posterior approach (SPA) and modified posterior approach (MPA) in MOMHR. Methods A retrospective clinical outcomes study was performed examining 351 hips (279 male, 72 female) replaced with Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR, Smith and Nephew, Memphis, Tennessee) in 313 patients with a pre-operative diagnosis of osteoarthritis. The mean follow-up period for the SPA group was 2.8 years (0.1 to 6.1) and for the MPA, 2.2 years (0.03 to 5.2); this difference in follow-up period was statistically significant (p < 0.01). Survival analysis was completed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results At four years, the Kaplan–Meier survival curve for the SPA was 97.2% and 99.4% for the MPA; this was statistically significant (log-rank; p = 0.036). There were eight failures in the SPA and two in the MPA. There was a 3.5% incidence of femoral head collapse or loosening in the SPA and 0.4% in the MPA, which represented a significant difference (p = 0.041). There was a 1.7% incidence of fractures of the femoral neck in the SPA and none in the MPA (p = 0.108). Conclusion This study found a significant difference in survivorship at four years between the SPA and the MPA (p = 0.036). The clinical outcomes of this study suggest that preserving the vascularity of the femoral neck by using the MPA results in fewer vascular-related failures in MOMHRs. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:150–4 PMID:24842931

  9. Midterm results of 36 mm metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Akrawi, Hawar; Hossain, Fahad S; Niculescu, Stefan; Hashim, Zaid; Ng, Arron Biing; Shetty, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the many perceived benefits of metal-on-metal (MoM) articulation in total hip arthroplasty (THA), there have been growing concerns about metallosis and adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD). Analysis of size 36 mm MoM articulation THAs is presented. These patients were evaluated for patient characteristics, relationship between blood metal ions levels and the inclination as well as the version of acetabular component, cumulative survival probability at final followup and functional outcome at final followup. Materials and Methods: 288, size 36 mm MoM THAs implanted in 269 patients at our institution from 2004 to 2010 were included in this retrospective study. These patients were assessed clinically for hip symptoms, perioperative complications and causes of revision arthroplasty were analysed. Biochemically, blood cobalt and chromium metal ions level were recorded and measurements of acetabular inclination and version were examined. Radiological evaluation utilizing Metal Artefact Reduction Sequence (MARS) MRI was undertaken and implant cumulative survivorship was evaluated. Results: The mean followup was 5 years (range 2–7 years), mean age was 73 years and the mean Oxford hip score was 36.9 (range 5–48). Revision arthroplasty was executed in 20 (7.4%) patients, of which 15 patients underwent single-stage revision THA. The causes of revision arthroplasty were: ARMD changes in 6 (2.2%) patients, infection in 5 (1.9%) patients and aseptic loosening in 5 (1.9%) patients. Three (1.1%) patients had their hips revised for instability, 1 (0.3%) for raised blood metal ions levels. The implant cumulative survival rate, with revision for any reason, was 68.9% at 7 years. Conclusions: Although medium-sized MoM THA with a 36 mm head has a marginally better survivorship at midterm followup, compared to larger size head MoM articulating THA, our findings nonetheless are still worryingly poor in comparison to what has been quoted in the literature

  10. Assessing the material loss of the modular taper interface in retrieved metal-on-metal hip replacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bills, Paul J.; Racasan, R.; Tessier, P.; Blunt, L. A.

    2015-06-01

    Measuring the amount of material loss in the case of revised hip replacements is considered to be a prerequisite of understanding and assessing the true in vivo performance of the implant. This paper outlines a method developed by the authors for quantifying taper material loss as well as more general taper interface parameters. Previous studies have mostly relied on visual inspection to assess the material loss at the taper interface, whereas this method aims to characterize any surface and form changes through the use of an out-of-roundness measurement machine. Along with assessing the volumetric wear, maximum linear penetration and taper contact length can also be determined. The method was applied to retrieved large head metal-on-metal femoral heads in order to quantify the material loss at this junction. Material loss from the female femoral head taper can be characterized as a localized area that is in contact with the stem taper surface. The study showed that this method has good repeatability and a low level of interoperability variation between operators.

  11. New Insights into Wear and Biological Effects of Metal-on-Metal Bearings

    PubMed Central

    Catelas, Isabelle; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the renewed interest in metal-on-metal implants in the past two decades, the underlying wear mechanisms and biological effects are still not fully understood. Methods: This paper first reviews the tribology of metal-on-metal bearings, bringing new insights into the interaction of wear and corrosion, and putting the characteristics and the potential origin of wear particles in perspective with the proposed wear mechanisms. It then summarizes the current knowledge on the biological effects of particles and metal ions in relation to these wear mechanisms. Results: Tribochemical reactions play an important role in the wear of metal-on-metal joints. The generated tribomaterial, which progressively forms by mechanical mixing of the uppermost nanocrystalline zone of the metal surface with proteins from the synovial fluid, governs the wear rate and influences the corrosive behavior of the bearing. Nanometer-sized wear particles may initially originate from the passivation layer covering the implant surface and then detach from this tribolayer. The inflammatory response observed surrounding metal-on-metal implants appears to be lower than that around metal-on-polyethylene implants. However, metallic byproducts, which can complex with proteins, may lead to a T lymphocyte-mediated hypersensitivity response. Conclusions: The tribolayer appears to have beneficial effects on the wear rate. Much information has been gained on wear particle characteristics, but the exact mechanisms of particle detachment remain to be further elucidated. Excessive wear along with a hypersensitivity response may be at the origin of the early adverse tissue reactions that have been recently reported in some patients with metal-on-metal implants. Clinical Relevance: Future development of new methods to improve the tribolayer retention and optimize the tribocorrosive properties of the implant may minimize the clinical impact of implant wear and immune responses. PMID:21543694

  12. Effect of wear of bearing surfaces on elastohydrodynamic lubrication of metal-on-metal hip implants.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Jin, Z M; Hirt, F; Rieker, C; Roberts, P; Grigoris, P

    2005-09-01

    The effect of geometry change of the bearing surfaces owing to wear on the elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) of metal-on-metal (MOM) hip bearings has been investigated theoretically in the present study. A particular MOM Metasul bearing (Zimmer GmbH) was considered, and was tested in a hip simulator using diluted bovine serum. The geometry of the worn bearing surface was measured using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM) and was modelled theoretically on the assumption of spherical geometries determined from the maximum linear wear depth and the angle of the worn region. Both the CMM measurement and the theoretical calculation were directly incorporated into the elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis. It was found that the geometry of the original machined bearing surfaces, particularly of the femoral head with its out-of-roundness, could lead to a large reduction in the predicted lubricant film thickness and an increase in pressure. However, these non-spherical deviations can be expected to be smoothed out quickly during the initial running-in period. For a given worn bearing surface, the predicted lubricant film thickness and pressure distribution, based on CMM measurement, were found to be in good overall agreement with those obtained with the theoretical model based on the maximum linear wear depth and the angle of the worn region. The gradual increase in linear wear during the running-in period resulted in an improvement in the conformity and consequently an increase in the predicted lubricant film thickness and a decrease in the pressure. For the Metasul bearing tested in an AMTI hip simulator, a maximum total linear wear depth of approximately 13 microm was measured after 1 million cycles and remained unchanged up to 5 million cycles. This resulted in a threefold increase in the predicted average lubricant film thickness. Consequently, it was possible for the Metasul bearing to achieve a fluid film lubrication regime during this period, and this was

  13. Breast milk metal ion levels in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Nelis, Raymond; de Waal Malefijt, Jan; Gosens, Taco

    2013-01-01

    Metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty of the hip has been used increasingly over the last 10 years in younger active patients. The dissolution of the metal wear particles results in measurable increases in cobalt and chromium ions in the serum and urine of patients with a metal-on-metal bearing. We measured the cobalt, chromium, and molybdenum ion levels in urine; serum; and breast milk in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis after a pathologic fracture of the femoral neck. Metal-on-metal hip prosthesis leads to increasing levels of molybdenum in breast milk in the short-term follow-up. There are no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt ions in breast milk. Besides the already known elevated concentrations in serum of chromium and cobalt after implantation of a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis, we found no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt in urine. PMID:22868068

  14. Ten to twelve-year results with the Zweymüller cementless total hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Vervest, Ton M J S; Anderson, Patricia G; Van Hout, Freek; Wapstra, Frits-Hein; Louwerse, Robert T; Koetsier, Juriaan W A

    2005-04-01

    Between January 1987 and December 1990, 221 Zweymüller cementless total hip arthroplasties were performed in 211 patients with idiopathic osteoarthritis. A total of 136 patients (142 prostheses) were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 134 months (SD 9.5). The study group consisted of 78 Hochgezogen and 64 Stepless stem prostheses, all with a threaded titanium cup and ceramic head. No clinical and radiological differences were found between the 2 stem prostheses. Seven cups had been revised because of aseptic loosening; 17 cups showed radiolucent lines, osteolysis, or migration. Mean linear polyethylene wear of 105 (74%) cups was 0.46 mm (SD 0.27), with an annual wear of 0.04 mm (SD 0.02). Wear did not correlate with pain, cup migration, radiolucent lines, or osteolysis. Cumulative survival was 96%. Zweymüller cementless total hip arthroplasty showed good midterm results. PMID:15809956

  15. Metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty: no way under the sun!--in the affirmative.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2005-06-01

    I have been charged in this debate format to refute the idea suggested in the title. To do this, I will address 2 questions: (1) What problem does it solve? and (2) What risk does it pose? The answers to these questions will support my conclusion that metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty is the wrong operation to be making a reappearance at this time.

  16. The effect of the metal-on-metal hip controversy on Internet search activity.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Nigel; Kelly, John C; Moore, David P; Kenny, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    The recall of the articular surface replacement (ASR) hip prosthesis in 2010 represents one of the most controversial areas in orthopaedic surgery in recent years. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of the metal-on-metal hip controversy on Internet search activity in four different regions and determine whether the number of related news reports affected Internet search activity. The Google Trends, Keywords and News applications were used to record the number of news articles and Internet search activity for the terms "hip recall", "metal-on-metal hip" and "ASR hip" from October 2009 to October 2012 in the USA, the UK, Australia and Ireland. There was a large increase in search activity following the official recall in August 2010 in all countries. There was significantly greater search activity after the recall in Ireland compared with the UK for the search term "hip recall" (P = 0.004). For the term "metal-on-metal hip", the UK had significantly more search activity (P = 0.0009). There was a positive correlation between the number of news stories in UK and Ireland with Internet search activity but not in the USA or Australia. Differences between countries affected by the same recall highlight the complex effects of the media on public awareness. The data demonstrates a window of opportunity prior to the official recall for the development of an awareness campaign to provide patients with accurate information.

  17. Cancer incidence and cause-specific mortality in patients with metal-on-metal hip replacements in Finland

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Metal-on-metal hip implants have been widely used, especially in the USA, Australia, England and Wales, and Finland. We assessed risk of death and updated data on the risk of cancer related to metal-on-metal hip replacements. Patients and methods A cohort of 10,728 metal-on-metal hip replacement patients and a reference cohort of 18,235 conventional total hip replacement patients were extracted from the Finnish Arthroplasty Register for the years 2001–2010. Data on incident cancer cases and causes of death until 2011 were obtained from the Finnish Cancer Registry and Statistics Finland. The relative risk of cancer and death were expressed as standardized incidence ratio (SIR) and standardized mortality ratio (SMR). SIR/SIR ratios and SMR/SMR ratios, and Poisson regression were used to compare the cancer risk and the risk of death between cohorts. Results The overall risk of cancer in the metal-on-metal cohort was not higher than that in the non-metal-on-metal cohort (RR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.82–1.02). The risk of soft-tissue sarcoma and basalioma in the metal-on-metal cohort was higher than in the non-metal-on-metal cohort (SIR/SIR ratio = 2.6, CI: 1.02–6.4 for soft-tissue sarcoma; SIR/SIR ratio = 1.3, CI: 1.1–1.5 for basalioma). The overall risk of death in the metal-on-metal cohort was less than that in the non-metal-on-metal cohort (RR = 0.78, CI: 0.69–0.88). Interpretation The overall risk of cancer or risk of death because of cancer is not increased after metal-on-metal hip replacement. The well-patient effect and selection bias contribute substantially to the findings concerning mortality. Arthrocobaltism does not increase mortality in patients with metal-on-metal hip implants in the short term. However, metal-on-metal hip implants should not be considered safe until data with longer follow-up time are available. PMID:24397743

  18. Steady-state elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of a metal-on-metal hip implant employing a metallic cup with an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene backing.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Wang, F C; Jin, Z M; Hirt, F; Rieker, C; Grigoris, P

    2004-01-01

    The elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) analysis was carried out in this study for a 28 mm diameter metal-on-metal hip prosthesis employing a metallic cup with an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) backing under a simple steady state rotation representing the flexion/extension during walking. Both Reynolds and elasticity equations were coupled and solved numerically by the finite difference method. The elastic deformation was determined by means of the fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique using the displacement coefficients obtained from the finite element method. Excellent agreement of the predicted elastic deformation was obtained between the FFT technique and the conventional direct summation method. The number of grid points used in the lubrication analysis was found to be important in predicting accurate film thicknesses, particularly at low viscosities representative of physiological lubricants. The effect of the clearance between the femoral head and the acetabular cup on the predicted lubricant film thickness was shown to be significant, while the effect of load was found to be negligible. Overall, the UHMWPE backing was found not only to reduce the contact pressure as identified in a previous study by the authors (Liu et al., 2003) but also significantly to increase the lubricant film thickness for the 28 mm diameter metal-on-metal hip implant, as compared with a metallic mono-block cup.

  19. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of metal-on-metal hip prostheses under steady state entraining motion.

    PubMed

    Jagatia, M; Jin, Z M

    2001-01-01

    The elastohydrodynamic lubrication problem of metal-on-metal hip joint replacements was considered in this study. A simple ball-in-socket configuration was used to represent the hip prosthesis. The Reynolds equation in a spherical coordinate was adopted for the fluid-film lubrication analysis, to account for the ball-in-socket geometry. The corresponding elastic deformation was calculated by means of the finite element method in order to consider the complex ball-in-socket geometry as well as the backing materials underneath the acetabular cup. Both the Reynolds and the elasticity equations were solved simultaneously using the Newton-Raphson finite difference method. The general methodology developed was then applied to a recent experimental prototype metal-on-metal hip implant. It was shown that the backing materials underneath the acetabular cup had little influence on the predicted contact pressure and the elastic deformation at the bearing surfaces for this particular example. Both the film thickness and the hydrodynamic pressure distributions were obtained under various loads up to 2500 N. The predicted minimum lubricating film thickness from the present study was compared with a simple estimation using the Hamrock and Dowson formulae based upon an equivalent ball-on-plane model and excellent agreement was found. However, it was pointed out that for some forms of metal-on-metal hip prostheses with a thin acetabular cup, a polyethylene inlay underneath a metallic bearing insert or a taper connection between a bearing insert and a fixation shell, the general methodology developed in the present study should be used and this will be considered in future studies.

  20. Metal-on-Metal Hip Arthroplasty: A Review of Adverse Reactions and Patient Management.

    PubMed

    Drummond, James; Tran, Phong; Fary, Camdon

    2015-01-01

    Recent alarming joint registry data highlighting increased revision rates has prompted further research into the area of metal-on-metal hip replacements and resurfacings. This review article examines the latest literature on the topic of adverse reactions to metal debris and summarises the most up-to-date guidelines on patient management. Adverse reactions to metal debris can cause significant damage to soft tissue and bone if not diagnosed early. Furthermore, not every patient with an adverse reaction to metal debris will be symptomatic. As such, clinicians must remain vigilant when assessing and investigating these patients in order to detect failing implants and initiate appropriate management. PMID:26132653

  1. Metal-on-Metal Hip Arthroplasty: A Review of Adverse Reactions and Patient Management

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, James; Tran, Phong; Fary, Camdon

    2015-01-01

    Recent alarming joint registry data highlighting increased revision rates has prompted further research into the area of metal-on-metal hip replacements and resurfacings. This review article examines the latest literature on the topic of adverse reactions to metal debris and summarises the most up-to-date guidelines on patient management. Adverse reactions to metal debris can cause significant damage to soft tissue and bone if not diagnosed early. Furthermore, not every patient with an adverse reaction to metal debris will be symptomatic. As such, clinicians must remain vigilant when assessing and investigating these patients in order to detect failing implants and initiate appropriate management. PMID:26132653

  2. Friction in metal-on-metal total disc arthroplasty: effect of ball radius.

    PubMed

    Moghadas, Parshia; Mahomed, Aziza; Hukins, David W L; Shepherd, Duncan E T

    2012-02-01

    Total disc arthroplasty (TDA) can be used to replace a degenerated intervertebral disc in the spine. There are different designs of prosthetic discs, but one of the most common is a ball-and-socket combination. Contact between the bearing surfaces can result in high frictional torque, which can then result in wear and implant loosening. This study was designed to determine the effects of ball radius on friction. Generic models of metal-on-metal TDA were manufactured with ball radii of 10, 12, 14 and 16 mm, with a radial clearance of 0.015 mm. A simulator was used to test each sample in flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial rotation at frequencies of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25, 1.5, 1.75 and 2 Hz under loads of 50, 600, 1200 and 2000 N, in new born calf serum. Frictional torque was measured and Stribeck curves were plotted to illustrate the lubrication regime in each case. It was observed that implants with a smaller ball radius showed lower friction and showed boundary and mixed lubrication regimes, whereas implants with larger ball radius showed boundary lubrication only. This study suggests designing metal-on-metal TDAs with ball radius of 10 or 12 mm, in order to reduce wear and implant loosening.

  3. Protrusio of a ceramic femoral head through the acetabular metallic shell, extensive metallosis and 'bubble sign'.

    PubMed

    Malizos, Konstantinos; Roidis, Nikolaos T; Poultsides, Lazaros; Basdekis, George; Moraitis, Theofanis; Xenakis, Theodoros

    2009-02-01

    A 24-year-old patient with a history of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis underwent a primary cementless left total hip arthroplasty (THA). The original THA consisted of an Optifix 54 cup with a 3-mm thick polyethylene liner, an Optifix size 4 stem (Smith & Nephew Richards, Memphis, Tennessee) and a Biolox aluminum 32-mm femoral head. Fourteen years later, radiographs demonstrated extensive wear of the polyethylene liner resulting in direct articulation and abrasion wear of the ceramic femoral head on the cup and a bubble sign. This article presents a case of a catastrophic failure of a ceramic/polyethylene bearing with destruction of the polyethylene liner and the metallic shell and protrusio of the nonfractured ceramic head through the metallic shell. To our knowledge this is the first description of extensive metallosis and subsequent radiograph bubble sign not presenting as a result of wear of a metal-on-metal articulation. At the time of revision surgery-Hydrocel TNT Monoblock 58 cup (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana), Wagner 265/14 stem (Zimmer), and a Co/Cr 28-mm head-copious metallic debris was seen both macroscopically and histologically, with the ceramic head protruding behind the metallic shell. Multiple factors may have been responsible for this failure including a thin polyethylene shell, a suboptimal locking mechanism, gamma in air sterilization for polyethylene, multiple screw-holes that reduce the contact surface between shell and polyethylene, the rough surface on the inside of the shell and non-articular wear at the metal polyethylene interface within the acetabular component and the high demands of this active young patient. PMID:19301791

  4. In vivo wear of three types of metal on metal hip prostheses during two decades of use.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H; Park, S H; Chiesa, R; Doorn, P; Lu, B; Normand, P; Grigoris, P; Amstutz, H

    1996-08-01

    Wear was analyzed on 21 metal on metal hip replacements, including McKee-Farrar, Müller, and Ring, that were retrieved from patients after as many as 25 years. Light and scanning electron microscopy indicated that early wear included substantial third body abrasion, possibly from particles generated while scratches from the original polishing were being eradicated and from dislodged surface carbides. However, the main contact zones were eventually worn smoother than the original surfaces. Wear was quantified by digitizing the shapes of the components on a coordinate measuring machine and identifying those areas that deviated from the original spheric surface. On the femoral heads, wear was typically concentrated in the superomedial region, that is, on the load axis. Three cases also had substantial wear inferiorly, but there were no cases with circumferential (equatorial) wear. The long term wear rates averaged approximately 6 micrometers per year or less and produced an average of approximately 6 mm3 of metallic wear debris per year or less. Wear rate tended to increase as clearance increased over the range of 127 to 386 micrometers, and a McKee-Farrar prosthesis with the extreme clearance of 1.7 mm wore approximately 16 times faster than the average, but there was no apparent relationship between clearance and time to revision. Larger McKee-Farrar balls had less volumetric wear, on average, than smaller balls, and the Müller balls had the greatest wear, which may have been due to contact with the edges of recesses machined into the bearing zones of the Müller cups. PMID:8769330

  5. Prediction of contact mechanics in metal-on-metal Total Hip Replacement for parametrically comprehensive designs and loads.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Finn E; Nyman, Edward; Coburn, James C

    2015-07-16

    Manufacturers and investigators of Total Hip Replacement (THR) bearings require tools to predict the contact mechanics resulting from diverse design and loading parameters. This study provides contact mechanics solutions for metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings that encompass the current design space and could aid pre-clinical design optimization and evaluation. Stochastic finite element (FE) simulation was used to calculate the head-on-cup contact mechanics for five thousand combinations of design and loading parameters. FE results were used to train a Random Forest (RF) surrogate model to rapidly predict the contact patch dimensions, contact area, pressures and plastic deformations for arbitrary designs and loading. In addition to widely observed polar and edge contact, FE results included ring-polar, asymmetric-polar, and transitional categories which have previously received limited attention. Combinations of design and load parameters associated with each contact category were identified. Polar contact pressures were predicted in the range of 0-200 MPa with no permanent deformation. Edge loading (with subluxation) was associated with pressures greater than 500 MPa and induced permanent deformation in 83% of cases. Transitional-edge contact (with little subluxation) was associated with intermediate pressures and permanent deformation in most cases, indicating that, even with ideal anatomical alignment, bearings may face extreme wear challenges. Surrogate models were able to accurately predict contact mechanics 18,000 times faster than FE analyses. The developed surrogate models enable rapid prediction of MoM bearing contact mechanics across the most comprehensive range of loading and designs to date, and may be useful to those performing bearing design optimization or evaluation.

  6. Effect of microseparation on contact mechanics in metal-on-metal hip replacements-A finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John

    2015-08-01

    Some early failures of metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements associated with elevated wear have caused concerns for the use of this bearing combination. Simulator studies have shown that microseparation and its associated rim contact and edge loading may produce the most severe wear in MoM bearings. It is generally recognized that this high wear can be attributed to the high contact stress of the head on the rim of the cup. In this study, an improved finite element contact model that incorporates an elastic-perfectly plastic material property for cobalt-chrome alloy of the metal bearing was developed in an attempt to provide an accurate prediction of the stress and strain for the rim contact. The effects of the microseparation displacement (0.1-2 mm), cup inclination angle (25-65°) and cup rim radius (0.5-4 mm) on the contact stress/strain were investigated. The results show that a translational displacement >0.1 mm under a load >0.5 kN can produce a highly concentrated contact stress at the surface of the cup rim which can lead to plastic deformation. This study also suggests that the magnitude of translational displacement was the major factor that determined the severity of the contact conditions and level of stress and strain under microseparation conditions. Future studies will address the effect of surgical translational and rotational malposition and component design on the magnitude of microseparation, contact stress and strain and severity of wear.

  7. Validation of primary metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties on the National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland using data from the London Implant Retrieval Centre

    PubMed Central

    Sabah, S. A.; Henckel, J.; Cook, E.; Whittaker, R.; Hothi, H.; Pappas, Y.; Blunn, G.; Skinner, J. A.; Hart, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroplasty registries are important for the surveillance of joint replacements and the evaluation of outcome. Independent validation of registry data ensures high quality. The ability for orthopaedic implant retrieval centres to validate registry data is not known. We analysed data from the National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (NJR) for primary metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties performed between 2003 and 2013. Records were linked to the London Implant Retrieval Centre (RC) for validation. A total of 67 045 procedures on the NJR and 782 revised pairs of components from the RC were included. We were able to link 476 procedures (60.9%) recorded with the RC to the NJR successfully. However, 306 procedures (39.1%) could not be linked. The outcome recorded by the NJR (as either revised, unrevised or death) for a primary procedure was incorrect in 79 linked cases (16.6%). The rate of registry-retrieval linkage and correct assignment of outcome code improved over time. The rates of error for component reference numbers on the NJR were as follows: femoral head category number 14/229 (5.0%); femoral head batch number 13/232 (5.3%); acetabular component category number 2/293 (0.7%) and acetabular component batch number 24/347 (6.5%). Registry-retrieval linkage provided a novel means for the validation of data, particularly for component fields. This study suggests that NJR reports may underestimate rates of revision for many types of metal-on-metal hip replacement. This is topical given the increasing scope for NJR data. We recommend a system for continuous independent evaluation of the quality and validity of NJR data. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:10–18. PMID:25568407

  8. Morphological Study of the Newly Designed Cementless Femoral Stem

    PubMed Central

    Baharuddin, Mohd Yusof; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam; Mohd Noor, Alias

    2014-01-01

    A morphology study was essential to the development of the cementless femoral stem because accurate dimensions for both the periosteal and endosteal canal ensure primary fixation stability for the stem, bone interface, and prevent stress shielding at the calcar region. This paper focused on a three-dimensional femoral model for Asian patients that applied preoperative planning and femoral stem design. We measured various femoral parameters such as the femoral head offset, collodiaphyseal angle, bowing angle, anteversion, and medullary canal diameters from the osteotomy level to 150 mm below the osteotomy level to determine the position of the isthmus. Other indices and ratios for the endosteal canal, metaphyseal, and flares were computed and examined. The results showed that Asian femurs are smaller than Western femurs, except in the metaphyseal region. The canal flare index (CFI) was poorly correlated (r < 0.50) to the metaphyseal canal flare index (MCFI), but correlated well (r = 0.66) with the corticomedullary index (CMI). The diversity of the femoral size, particularly in the metaphyseal region, allows for proper femoral stem design for Asian patients, improves osseointegration, and prolongs the life of the implant. PMID:25025068

  9. Metal on metal total hip arthroplasty and a large groin mass: Not always adverse reaction to metallic debris

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Harry; Magnussen, Alex; Sharma, Aadhar; Skinner, John

    2014-01-01

    Due to their improved wear rates, Metal-on-metal bearings have been increasingly used in the past decade by orthopaedic surgeons carrying out total hip arthroplasty. However there is increasing evidence that there are significant complications associated with such implants. One well documented complication is that of metallic debris leading to pseudotumour formation, however there is less known about associations with other tumours within the pelvis. We present two cases where an intra-pelvic mass in patients with metal-on-metal implants were diagnosed as being of a different aetiology. This highlights the need for careful assessment of such patients in order to guide appropriate management. PMID:25560054

  10. Have cementless and resurfacing components improved the medium-term results of hip replacement for patients under 60 years of age?

    PubMed Central

    Mason, James; Baker, Paul; Gregg, Paul J; Porter, Martyn; Deehan, David J; Reed, Mike R

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose The optimal hip replacement for young patients remains unknown. We compared patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), revision risk, and implant costs over a range of hip replacements. Methods We included hip replacements for osteoarthritis in patients under 60 years of age performed between 2003 and 2010 using the commonest brand of cemented, cementless, hybrid, or resurfacing prosthesis (11,622 women and 13,087 men). The reference implant comprised a cemented stem with a conventional polyethylene cemented cup and a standard-sized head (28- or 32-mm). Differences in implant survival were assessed using competing-risks models, adjusted for known prognostic influences. Analysis of covariance was used to assess improvement in PROMs (Oxford hip score (OHS) and EQ5D index) in 2014 linked procedures. Results In males, PROMs and implant survival were similar across all types of implants. In females, revision was statistically significantly higher in hard-bearing and/or small-stem cementless implants (hazard ratio (HR) = 4) and resurfacings (small head sizes (< 48 mm): HR = 6; large head sizes (≥ 48 mm): HR = 5) when compared to the reference cemented implant. In component combinations with equivalent survival, women reported significantly greater improvements in OHS with hybrid implants (22, p = 0.006) and cementless implants (21, p = 0.03) (reference, 18), but similar EQ5D index. For men and women, National Health Service (NHS) costs were lowest with the reference implant and highest with a hard-bearing cementless replacement. Interpretation In young women, hybrids offer a balance of good early functional improvement and low revision risk. Fully cementless and resurfacing components are more costly and do not provide any additional benefit for younger patients. PMID:25285617

  11. Endo medullary extractability of cementless full HA coated femoral stem: Results from 19 cases.

    PubMed

    Lecuire, François; Melere, Gilles; Martres, Sébastien

    2015-03-01

    The Aura cementless full HA coated stem is an anatomical femoral component with a different surface treatment in the metaphyseal and diaphyseal areas. We have studied the feasibility of isolated endo-medullar extraction of the stem. 19 patients (6 infections, 6 neck fractures, 3 stems with risk of fracture, 3 head fractures, and 1 recurrent dislocation) were subjected to the removal of a stable and bone integrated implant at a mean of 4.5 years after surgery. The 19 cases represent the entire population of Aura cementless integrated stem requiring revision during the period of 2003 through 2011, excluding periprosthetic bone fracture cases. The technique consisted of a careful release of the metaphyseal part of the implant with thin osteotomes, followed by the use of a highly efficient extractor. The re-implanted procedure always utilised standard stems: 17 cementless stems full HA coated (13 had the same size as the removed implant, 4 cases had larger sizes) and two received cemented stems. The 19 stems were extracted by simple endo-medullary approach, without the need for additional action. Several complications were encountered, 1 intraoperative diaphyseal fracture, requiring a wiring, 1 fracture of the lesser trochanter at 15 days post-surgery, requiring a revision and 2 postoperative dislocations. Except for the early revision due to fracture, no other stem was revised. There was no recurrence of infection and the functional results were satisfactory (PMA 15-18). 3 patients showed metaphyseal lucent lines on X-Ray leading us to advise the use of a standard stem with larger size after distal reaming, combined with preventive circulate of the calcar. The use of dedicated instrumentation allows successful extraction of full HA coated short stem by endomedullary approach. PMID:26280859

  12. Patients with metal-on-metal articulation in trapeziometacarpal total joint arthroplasty may have elevated serum chrome and cobalt.

    PubMed

    Hansen, T B; Dremstrup, L; Stilling, M

    2013-10-01

    Serum chrome and cobalt was measured in 50 patients with trapeziometacarpal total joint replacement with metal-on-metal articulation and compared with serum chrome and cobalt values in 23 patients with trapeziometacarpal total joint replacement with metal-on-polyethylene articulation. In 10 of 50 (20%) patients with metal-on-metal articulation, slightly elevated serum chrome or cobalt values were found compared with only one in 23 (4%) patients with metal-on-polyethylene articulation. All metal values were lower than accepted 'normal values' for metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty and so considered not to be a general health risk. However, the mean disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) score was 24 in patients with elevated serum chrome or cobalt compared with 10 in patients with normal metal values (p < 0.05) suggesting a local clinical effect of the elevated serum chrome or cobalt values. We recommend that patients with trapeziometacarpal total joint replacement with metal-on-metal articulation are followed with DASH score and radiological examination every 3-5 years and serum chrome and cobalt should be analysed in symptomatic cases to learn more about possible local complications leading to, or arising from, metal debris.

  13. Tribolayer Formation in a Metal-on-Metal (MoM) Hip Joint: An Electrochemical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, MT; Nagelli, C; Pourzal, R; Fischer, A; Laurent, MP; Jacobs, JJ; Wimmer, MA

    2013-01-01

    The demand for total hip replacement (THR) surgery is increasing in the younger population due to faster rehabilitation and more complete restoration of function. Up to 2009, metal-on-metal (MoM) hip joint bearings were a popular choice due to their design flexibility, post-operative stability and relatively low wear rates. The main wear mechanisms that occur along the bearing surface of MoM joints are tribochemical reactions that deposit a mixture of wear debris, metal ions and organic matrix of decomposed proteins known as a tribolayer. No in-depth electrochemical studies have been reported on the structure and characteristics of this tribolayer or about the parameters involved in its formation. In this study, we conducted an electrochemical investigation of different surfaces (bulk-like: control, nano-crystalline: new implant and tribolayer surface: retrieved implant) made out of two commonly used hip CoCrMo alloys (high-carbon and low-carbon). As per ASTM standard, cyclic polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests were conducted. The results obtained from electrochemical parameters for different surfaces clearly indicated a reduction in corrosion for the tribolayer surface (Icorr: 0.76 μA/cm2). Further, polarization resistance (Rp:2.39±0.60MΩ/cm2) and capacitance (Cdl:15.20±0.75 μF/cm2) indicated variation in corrosion kinetics for the tribolayer surface, that attributed to its structure and stability in a simulated body environment. PMID:24099949

  14. Effect of swing phase load on metal-on-metal hip lubrication, friction and wear.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sophie; Jalali-Vahid, Davood; Brockett, Claire; Jin, Zhongmin; Stone, Martin H; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2006-01-01

    There is renewed interest in metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip replacements (THRs), however, variable wear rates have been observed clinically. It is hypothesised that changes in soft tissue tensioning during surgery may alter loading of THRs during the swing phase of gait leading to changes in fluid film lubrication, friction and wear. This study aimed to assess the effect of swing phase load on the lubrication, friction and wear of MOM hip replacements. Theoretical lubrication modelling was carried out using elastohydrodynamic theory. All the governing equations were solved numerically for the lubricant film thickness between the articulating surfaces under the transient dynamic conditions with low and high swing phase loads. Friction testing was completed using a single axis pendulum simulator, simplified loading cycles were applied with low and high swing phase loads. MOM hip replacements were tested in a hip simulator, modified to provide different swing phase loading regimes; a low (100 N) and a high load (as per ISO 14242-1; 280 N). Results demonstrated that the performance of MOM bearings is highly dependent on swing phase load. Hence, changes in the tension of the tissues at surgery and variations in muscle forces may increase swing phase load, reduce lubrication, increase friction and accelerate wear. This may explain some of the variations that have been observed with clinical wear rates.

  15. A lexicon for wear of metal-on-metal hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    McKellop, Harry A; Hart, Alister; Park, Sang-Hyun; Hothi, Harry; Campbell, Pat; Skinner, John A

    2014-09-01

    Research on metal-on-metal (MoM) hip bearings has generated an extensive vocabulary to describe the wear processes and resultant surface damage. However, a lack of consistency and some redundancy exist in the current terminology. To facilitate the understanding of MoM tribology and to enhance communication of results among researchers and clinicians, we propose four categories of wear terminology: wear modes refer to the in vivo conditions under which the wear occurred; wear mechanisms refer to fundamental wear processes (adhesion, abrasion, fatigue, and tribochemical reactions); wear damage refers to the resultant changes in the morphology and/or composition of the surfaces; and wear features refer to the specific wear phenomena that are described in terms of the relevant modes, mechanisms, and damage. Clarifying examples are presented, but it is expected that terms will be added to the lexicon as new mechanisms and types of damage are identified. Corrosion refers to electrochemical processes that can remove or add material and thus also generate damage. Corrosion can act alone or may interact with mechanical wear. Examples of corrosion damage are also presented. However, an in-depth discussion of the many types of corrosion and their effects is beyond the scope of the present wear lexicon.

  16. Poor short term outcome with a metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Levy, Yadin D; Ezzet, Kace A

    2013-08-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings for total hip arthroplasty (THA) have come under scrutiny with reports of high failure rates. Clinical outcome studies with several commercially available MoM THA bearings remain unreported. We evaluated 78 consecutive MoM THAs from a single manufacturer in 68 patients. Sixty-six received cobalt-chrome (CoCr) monoblock and 12 received modular titanium acetabular cups with internal CoCr liners. Femoral components were titanium with modular necks. At average 2.1 years postoperatively, 12 THAs (15.4%) demonstrated aseptic failure (10 revisions, 2 revision recommended). All revised hips demonstrated capsular necrosis with positive histology reaction for aseptic lymphocytic vasculitis-associated lesions/adverse local tissue reactions. Prosthetic instability following revision surgery was relatively common. Female gender was a strong risk factor for failure, though smaller cups were not. Both monoblock and modular components fared poorly. Corrosion was frequently observed around the proximal and distal end of the modular femoral necks. PMID:23538122

  17. Fast growing pseudotumour in a hairdresser after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cadossi, M; Chiarello, E; Savarino, L; Mazzotti, A; Tedesco, G; Greco, M; Giannini, S

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old female hairdresser who underwent metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MOMHR) for hip osteoarthritis developed a benign pelvic pseudotumour. Elevated levels of chromium and cobalt ions were detected in the blood. Patch testing after pseudotumor formation, showed positive skin reactions to cobalt and nickel. Marked hypereosinophilia was noted, as well as the presence of eosinophils in the pseudotumor mass. A revision to a ceramic-on-ceramic implant was performed. Radiographs showed no implant loosening or bone resorption. We hypothesized that a steep cup positioning as well as hypersensitivity response to the metal nanoparticles and ion release may have induced pseudotumour development. Currently there is no evidence that negative patch testing reduces the probability to develop an adverse reaction to metal debris therefore we suggest to carefully investigate patient medical history regarding occupation exposure and daily contact with jewellery, beauty and cleaning products before implanting MOMHR. The main challenge is to identify a sensitive patient candidate to MOMHR never suspected to be. PMID:24825038

  18. Management of metal-on-metal hip implant patients: Who, when and how to revise?

    PubMed Central

    Berber, Reshid; Skinner, John A; Hart, Alister J

    2016-01-01

    The debate on how best to manage patients with metal-on-metal (MOM) hip implants continues. With over 1 million patients affected worldwide, the impact is far reaching. The majority of the aggressive failures of MOM hip implants have been dealt with by revision hip surgery, leaving patients with a much more indolent pattern of failure of devices that have been in situ for more than 10 years. The longer-term outcome for such patients remains unknown, and much debate exists on how best to manage these patients. Regulatory guidance is available but remains open to interpretation due to the lack of current evidence and long-term studies. Metal ion thresholds for concern have been suggested at 7 ppb for hip resurfacing arthroplasty and below this level for large diameter total hip arthroplasties. Soft tissue changes including pseudotumours and muscle atrophy have been shown to progress, but this is not consistent. New advanced imaging techniques are helping to diagnose complications with metal hips and the reasons for failure, however these are not widely available. This has led to some centres to tackle difficult cases through multidisciplinary collaboration, for both surgical management decisions and also follow-up decisions. We summarise current evidence and consider who is at risk, when revision should be undertaken and how patients should be managed. PMID:27190754

  19. Cross-sectional imaging of metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Elizabeth; Henckel, Johann; Sabah, Shiraz; Satchithananda, Keshthra; Skinner, John; Hart, Alister

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — Metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) MRI is widely advocated for surveillance of metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties (MOM-HAs). However, its use is limited by susceptibility artifact at the prosthesis-bone interface, local availability, patient compliance, and cost (Hayter et al. 2011a). We wanted to determine whether CT is a suitable substitute for MARS MRI in evaluation of the painful MOM-HA. Patients and methods — 50 MOM-HA patients (30 female) with unexplained painful prostheses underwent MARS MRI and CT imaging. 2 observers who were blind regarding the clinical data objectively reported the following outcomes: soft tissue lesions (pseudotumors), muscle atrophy, and acetabular and femoral osteolysis. Diagnostic test characteristics were calculated. Results — Pseudotumor was diagnosed in 25 of 50 hips by MARS MRI and in 11 of 50 by CT. Pseudotumors were classified as type 1 (n = 2), type 2A (n = 17), type 2B (n = 4), and type 3 (n = 2) by MARS MRI. CT did not permit pseudotumor classification. The sensitivity of CT for diagnosis of pseudotumor was 44% (95% CI: 25–65). CT had “slight” agreement with MARS MRI for quantification of muscle atrophy (κ = 0.23, CI: 0.16–0.29; p < 0.01). Osteolysis was identified in 15 of 50 patients by CT. 4 of these lesions were identified by MARS MRI. Interpretation — CT was found to be superior to MRI for detection of osteolysis adjacent to MOM-HA, and should be incorporated into diagnostic algorithms. CT was unable to classify and failed to detect many pseudotumors, and it was unreliable for assessment of muscle atrophy. Where MARS MRI is contraindicated or unavailable, CT would be an unsuitable substitute and other modalities such as ultrasound should be considered PMID:25267500

  20. The Inflammatory Phenotype in Failed Metal-On-Metal Hip Arthroplasty Correlates with Blood Metal Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Paukkeri, Erja-Leena; Korhonen, Riku; Hämäläinen, Mari; Pesu, Marko; Eskelinen, Antti; Moilanen, Teemu; Moilanen, Eeva

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hip arthroplasty is the standard treatment of a painful hip destruction. The use of modern metal-on-metal (MOM) bearing surfaces gained popularity in total hip arthroplasties during the last decade. Recently, worrisome failures due to adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD), including pseudotumor response, have been widely reported. However, the pathogenesis of this reaction remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ARMD response by flow cytometry approach. Methods Sixteen patients with a failed Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) hip prosthesis were included in the study. Samples of pseudotumor tissues collected during revision surgery were degraded by enzyme digestion and cells were typed by flow cytometry. Whole blood chromium and cobalt concentrations were analyzed with mass spectrometry before revision surgery. Results Flow cytometry analysis showed that the peri-implant pseudotumor tissue expressed two principal phenotypes, namely macrophage-dominated and T-lymphocyte-dominated response; the average portions being 54% (macrophages) and 25% (T-lymphocytes) in macrophage-dominated inflammation and 20% (macrophages) and 54% (T-lymphocytes) in T-lymphocyte-dominated response. The percentages of B-lymphocytes and granulocytes were lower in both phenotypes. Interestingly, the levels of blood chromium and cobalt were significantly higher in patients with macrophage-dominated response. Conclusions The results suggest that the adverse tissue reactions induced by MOM wear particles contain heterogeneous pathogeneses and that the metal levels are an important factor in the determination of the inflammatory phenotype. The present results support the hypothesis that higher metal levels cause cytotoxicity and tissue injury and macrophages are recruited to clear the necrotic debris. On the other hand, the adverse response developed in association with lower metal levels is T-lymphocyte-dominated and is likely to reflect

  1. Balancing innovation and medical device regulation: the case of modern metal-on-metal hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    Due to problems with wear particle generation and subsequent loosening using conventional metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacements, there has been a shift toward alternative bearing systems, including metal-on-metal (MoM), for younger, more active patients with degenerative joint disease. Based on positive results from early short-term clinical studies, MoM hip replacements were readily adopted by orthopedic surgeons with thousands being implanted worldwide over the past decade. Unacceptably high revision rates reported by two national joint registries called into question the rigorousness of the regulatory approval process for these implants, particularly with respect to premarket data requirements to prove safety, effectiveness, and the appropriateness of the regulatory pathway chosen. The purpose of this review was to investigate the balance between facilitating the introduction of new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment. The case of MoM hip replacement devices was used to frame the investigation and subsequent discussions. The regulatory approval processes and post-market surveillance requirements associated with three common MoM hip replacements (two resurfacings: the Birmingham and articular surface replacement and the articular surface replacement XL total hip replacement) were investigated. With respect to modern MoM hip replacement devices, the balance between facilitating the introduction of these new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment was not achieved. The lessons learned from these experiences have application beyond joint replacements to the introduction of new medical technologies in general, particularly for those who have a significant potential for harm. In this regard, a series of recommendations have been developed to contribute to the evolution of the medical device regulatory process

  2. Balancing innovation and medical device regulation: the case of modern metal-on-metal hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    Due to problems with wear particle generation and subsequent loosening using conventional metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacements, there has been a shift toward alternative bearing systems, including metal-on-metal (MoM), for younger, more active patients with degenerative joint disease. Based on positive results from early short-term clinical studies, MoM hip replacements were readily adopted by orthopedic surgeons with thousands being implanted worldwide over the past decade. Unacceptably high revision rates reported by two national joint registries called into question the rigorousness of the regulatory approval process for these implants, particularly with respect to premarket data requirements to prove safety, effectiveness, and the appropriateness of the regulatory pathway chosen. The purpose of this review was to investigate the balance between facilitating the introduction of new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment. The case of MoM hip replacement devices was used to frame the investigation and subsequent discussions. The regulatory approval processes and post-market surveillance requirements associated with three common MoM hip replacements (two resurfacings: the Birmingham and articular surface replacement and the articular surface replacement XL total hip replacement) were investigated. With respect to modern MoM hip replacement devices, the balance between facilitating the introduction of these new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment was not achieved. The lessons learned from these experiences have application beyond joint replacements to the introduction of new medical technologies in general, particularly for those who have a significant potential for harm. In this regard, a series of recommendations have been developed to contribute to the evolution of the medical device regulatory process

  3. Microfocus study of metal distribution and speciation in tissue extracted from revised metal on metal hip implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Alister J.; Sandison, Ann; Quinn, Paul; Sampson, Barry; Atkinson, Kirk D.; Skinner, John A.; Goode, Angela; Powell, Jonathan J.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.

    2009-11-01

    Unexplained tissue inflammation in metal-on-metal hip replacements is suspected to be caused by implant-derived nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of the metal particles in tissue surrounding metal-on-metal (MOM) hips that has been extracted during revision. Mapping of tissue surrounding the failed MOM hips was performed using microfocus X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). This revealed mainly Cr which was localized to the cellular regions. There was co-localisation of Co, were present, to areas of high Cr abundance. XANES of the tissue and appropriate standards revealed that the most common species were Cr(III) and Co(II). EXAFS analysis of the tissue and various metal standards revealed that the most abundant implant-related species was Cr(III) phosphate. Different tissue preparation methods, including frozen sectioning, were examined but were found not to affect the distribution or speciation of the metals in the tissue.

  4. Early Outcomes Following Metal-on-Metal Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty in Patients Younger Than 50 Years.

    PubMed

    Riley, Clay; Idoine, John; Shishani, Yousef; Gobezie, Reuben; Edwards, Bradley

    2016-09-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) is a useful intervention for older patients with glenohumeral arthritis and a deficient rotator cuff. However, as a semiconstrained prosthesis, conventional reverse TSA implanted in a young patient could fail over time secondary to polyethylene wear and subsequent osteolysis. A metal-on-metal prosthesis may avoid this type of failure. The purpose of this study is to assess the outcomes in an initial cohort of young patients who underwent reverse TSA using a metal-on-metal prosthesis. Surgical indications included age younger than 50 years with a functioning deltoid and significant impairment of shoulder function with irreparable rotator cuff due to tumor resection, arthritis, or revision surgery. Nine patients with an average age of 37 years underwent implantation of a custom metal-on-metal reverse TSA prosthesis. All patients had a minimum 12-month follow-up or a failure of their procedure requiring revision surgery prior to 1 year. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores, Constant scores, and range of motion were recorded and analyzed pre- and postoperatively to assess improvement, and all complications were noted. Average ASES score improved from 47 points preoperatively to 73.4 points postoperatively (P=.013). Average Constant and adjusted Constant scores improved from 20.8 points and 16% preoperatively to 61.8 points and 67.3% postoperatively, respectively (P=.019 and P=.068). Mean postoperative active forward flexion and active external rotation were 119.4° and 10°, respectively. Complications included the following: 3 patients sustained a postoperative dislocation, 1 patient had a glenoid fracture and complete loss of fixation of the baseplate, and 1 patient experienced dissociation of the glenosphere from the base-plate. Although metal-on-metal reverse TSA may appear to be an attractive choice in the treatment of young patients with limited reconstructive options, postoperative outcomes are

  5. Minimum 10-Year Wear Analysis of Highly Cross-Linked Polyethylene in Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    So, Kazutaka; Goto, Koji; Kuroda, Yutaka; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-12-01

    Fifty-four patients (64 hips) underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty between 2000 and 2003 with a 22-mm zirconia ceramic bearing on highly cross-linked polyethylene, and were evaluated with a mean 11.9-year postoperative follow-up (range, 10-14 years). Linear wear was measured on the anteroposterior radiograph of the hip. No evidence of osteolysis and loosening was found on the final radiograph in any of the cases, and the steady-state linear wear rate was 0.017±0.018 mm/year. No significant correlation was found between the linear wear rate and age, body weight, cup inclination angle, or polyethylene thickness. Highly cross-linked polyethylene showed excellent wear resistance for >10 years when used in combination with 22-mm zirconia heads.

  6. Meeting the demands of on-going metal-on-metal hip surveillance through nurse led services.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Sue; Langfield, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    This paper discusses the implications following a recall of all metal-on-metal hip replacements by the Medicines and Healthcare products regulatory Agency (MHRA). Issues identified were the release of metal ions from the metal implants. These ions were found to seep into local tissues and cause reactions that destroyed muscle and bone leaving some patients with long term disability. At the centre surveillance was monitored by an extension of the current Nurse Led services using existing staff and resources. There were a significant number of patients that required monitoring and there were difficulties contacting these patients and ensuring that they understood the importance of attending a clinic. PMID:26772766

  7. Clinical results of cementless total hip arthroplasty with shortening osteotomy for high dislocation with developmental dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Desteli, Engin Eren; Imren, Yunus; Tan, Erkan; Erdoğan, Murat; Özcan, Hüseyin

    2015-03-01

    Total hip arthroplasty for severe developmental dysplasia of the hip is a technically challenging procedure. Subtrochanteric femoral osteotomy enables reducing the femoral head and restoring abductor muscle strength without compromising proximal femoral bone stock in advanced dysplasia.We aimed to retrospectively evaluate Crowe type III or IV developmental dysplasia of the hip who underwent reconstruction with cementless total hip arthroplasty combined with a transverse subtrochanteric femoral osteotomy. Sixty hips of 52 patients (11 male, 49 female) with Crowe type III (n: 37) or IV (n: 23) developmental dysplasia of the hip were included. The average age was 51.4 years. Surgery was performed in lateral decubitis position with posterolateral approach. Subtrochanteric transverse femoral osteotomy were used with cementless components. 40 of the femoral components were Secur-Fit type, and 20 of them were secur-fit plus max type. Ceramic-ceramic coupling was used in 24 cases and metal-polyethylene coupling was used in 36 cases. Merle D'Aubigne and Harris Hip score were used to rate the clinical outcome at the final follow up. All femoral shortening osteotomies were united at a mean of 5.7 months. Mean Merle D'Aubigne pain score was increased from 3.1 to 5.4, and mean Harris Hip score improved from 39 to 92.8, postoperatively (p<0.01). There was no significant difference in time to union between different types of stems. 4 femoral stems had asymptomatic radiolucent lines. There was no significant difference in time to union between different types of stems. PMID:26280851

  8. Combined Vascular and Orthopaedic Approach for a Pseudotumor Causing Deep Vein Thrombosis after Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Hamid, Hossam; Miles, Jonathan; Carrington, Richard W. J.; Hart, Alister; Loh, Alex; Skinner, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacings have been associated with a variety of complications resulting from adverse reaction to metal debris. Pseudotumors have rarely been reported to cause deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Study Design. A case report and a review of the literature. Case Presentation. A 75-year-old female who had left metal-on-metal hip resurfacing 6 years ago presented with left groin pain associated with unilateral lower limb edema and swelling. By duplex and MRI studies, our patient had an extensive soft tissue necrosis associated with a large pelvic mass causing extensive DVT of the lower limb secondary to mechanical compression of the left iliac vein. Results. Our case was initially treated for DVT followed by dual surgical approach. The pseudotumor was excised through a separate iliofemoral approach and revision of the hip implant was undertaken through a posterior approach in the same setting. An inferior vena cava (IVC) filter was inserted to minimise the perioperative risks of handling the iliac veins. Conclusion. A combined approach with vascular surgeons is required. Combined resection of the pseudotumor and revision of the metal bearing surfaces is essential, in order to achieve a good surgical outcome in this rare complication. PMID:26457216

  9. Retrieval analysis of 240 metal-on-metal hip components, comparing modular total hip replacement with hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Matthies, A; Underwood, R; Cann, P; Ilo, K; Nawaz, Z; Skinner, J; Hart, A J

    2011-03-01

    This study compared component wear rates and pre-revision blood metal ions levels in two groups of failed metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties: hip resurfacing and modular total hip replacement (THR). There was no significant difference in the median rate of linear wear between the groups for both acetabular (p = 0.4633) and femoral (p = 0.0872) components. There was also no significant difference in the median linear wear rates when failed hip resurfacing and modular THR hips of the same type (ASR and Birmingham hip resurfacing (BHR)) were compared. Unlike other studies of well-functioning hips, there was no significant difference in pre-revision blood metal ion levels between hip resurfacing and modular THR. Edge loading was common in both groups, but more common in the resurfacing group (67%) than in the modular group (57%). However, this was not significant (p = 0.3479). We attribute this difference to retention of the neck in resurfacing of the hip, leading to impingement-type edge loading. This was supported by visual evidence of impingement on the femur. These findings show that failed metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and modular THRs have similar component wear rates and are both associated with raised pre-revision blood levels of metal ions. PMID:21357950

  10. Effect of bearing geometry and structure support on transient elastohydrodynamic lubrication of metal-on-metal hip implants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Jin, Zhongming; Roberts, Paul; Grigoris, Peter

    2007-01-01

    An effective lubrication can significantly reduce wear of metal-on-metal artificial hip joints. The improvement of the lubrication can be achieved through the optimisation of the bearing geometry in terms of a small clearance and/or the structural support such as a polyethylene backing underneath a metallic bearing in a sandwich acetabular cup form. The separate effects of these two factors on fluid film lubrication of 28 mm diameter metal-on-metal total hip joints under walking conditions were numerically investigated in this paper. The results show that a larger lubricant film due to the polyethylene backing can be significantly enhanced by the transient squeeze-film action, particularly during the stance phase, and a similar lubricant film can be developed for both the monolithic cup relying on the smaller clearance and the sandwich cup benefiting from the polyethylene backing. Both cup systems can function in a wide range of lubrication regimes, covering both mixed and fluid film, under the current design and manufacture conditions.

  11. Increased Mortality in Metal-on-Metal versus Non-Metal-on-Metal Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty at 10 Years and Longer Follow-Up: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meessen, J. M. T. A.; Fiocco, M.; van der Heide, H. J. L.; Sedrakyan, A.; Nelissen, R. G. H. H.

    2016-01-01

    Importance There are concerns about increased mortality in patients with metal-on-metal bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Objective To determine the mortality and the morbidity in patients with metal-on-metal articulations (MOM THA) compared to patients with non-metal-on-metal articulations (non-MOM THA) after primary total hip arthroplasty. Data Sources Search of PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane, CINAHL, AcademicSearchPremier, ScienceDirect, Wiley and clinical trial registers through March 2015, augmented by a hand search of references from the included articles. No language restrictions were applied. Study Selection Two reviewers screened and identified randomised controlled trials and observational studies of primary total hip arthroplasty comparing MOM THA with non-MOM THA. Data Extraction and Synthesis Two reviewers independently extracted study data and assessed risk of bias. Risk differences (RD) were calculated with random effect models. Meta-regression was used to explore modifying factors. Main Outcomes and Measures Difference in mortality and difference in morbidity expressed as revisions and medical complications between patients with MOM THA and non-MOM THA. Results Forty-seven studies were included, comprising 4,000 THA in randomised trials and over 500,000 THA in observational studies. For mortality, random effects analysis revealed a higher pooled RD of 0.7%, 95%, confidence interval (CI) [0.0%, 2.3%], I-square 42%; the heterogeneity was explained by differences in follow-up. When restricted to studies with long term follow-up (i.e. 10 years or more), the RD for mortality was 8.5%, 95%, CI [5.8%, 11.2%]; number needed to treat was 12. Further subgroup analyses and meta-regression random effects models revealed no evidence for other moderator variables (study level covariates, e.g. resurfacing vs. non-resurfacing MOM) than follow-up duration. The quality of the evidence presented in this meta-analysis was characterized as

  12. Metal ion levels and functional results after either resurfacing hip arthroplasty or conventional metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Modern metal-on-metal hip resurfacing was introduced as a bone-preserving method of joint reconstruction for young and active patients; however, the large diameter of the bearing surfaces is of concern for potentially increased metal ion release. Patients and methods 71 patients (< 65 years old) were randomly assigned to receive either a resurfacing (R) hip arthroplasty (n = 38) or a conventional metal-on-metal (C) hip arthroplasty (n = 33). Functional outcomes were assessed preoperatively and at 6, 12, and 24 months. Cobalt and chromium blood levels were analyzed preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Results All functional outcome scores improved for both groups. At 12 and 24 months, the median UCLA activity score was 8 in the R patients and 7 in the C patients (p < 0.05). At 24 months, OHS was median 16 in C patients and 13 in R patients (p < 0.05). However, in spite of randomization, UCLA scores also appeared to be higher in R patients at baseline. Satisfaction was similar in both groups at 24 months. Cobalt concentrations were statistically significantly higher for R patients only at 3 and 6 months. Chromium levels remained significantly higher for R patients until 24 months. No pseudotumors were encountered in either group. One R patient was revised for early aseptic loosening and in 2 C patients a cup insert was exchanged for recurrent dislocation. Interpretation R patients scored higher on UCLA, OHS, and satisfaction at some time points; however, as for the UCLA, preoperative levels were already in favor of R. The differences, although statistically significant, were of minor clinical importance. Chromium blood levels were statistically significantly higher for R patients at all follow-up measurements, whereas for cobalt this was only observed up to 6 months. The true value of resurfacing hip arthroplasty over conventional metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty will be determined by longer follow-up and a possible shift of balance between their

  13. Validation of primary metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties on the National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland using data from the London Implant Retrieval Centre: a study using the NJR dataset.

    PubMed

    Sabah, S A; Henckel, J; Cook, E; Whittaker, R; Hothi, H; Pappas, Y; Blunn, G; Skinner, J A; Hart, A J

    2015-01-01

    Arthroplasty registries are important for the surveillance of joint replacements and the evaluation of outcome. Independent validation of registry data ensures high quality. The ability for orthopaedic implant retrieval centres to validate registry data is not known. We analysed data from the National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (NJR) for primary metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties performed between 2003 and 2013. Records were linked to the London Implant Retrieval Centre (RC) for validation. A total of 67,045 procedures on the NJR and 782 revised pairs of components from the RC were included. We were able to link 476 procedures (60.9%) recorded with the RC to the NJR successfully. However, 306 procedures (39.1%) could not be linked. The outcome recorded by the NJR (as either revised, unrevised or death) for a primary procedure was incorrect in 79 linked cases (16.6%). The rate of registry-retrieval linkage and correct assignment of outcome code improved over time. The rates of error for component reference numbers on the NJR were as follows: femoral head category number 14/229 (5.0%); femoral head batch number 13/232 (5.3%); acetabular component category number 2/293 (0.7%) and acetabular component batch number 24/347 (6.5%). Registry-retrieval linkage provided a novel means for the validation of data, particularly for component fields. This study suggests that NJR reports may underestimate rates of revision for many types of metal-on-metal hip replacement. This is topical given the increasing scope for NJR data. We recommend a system for continuous independent evaluation of the quality and validity of NJR data.

  14. Changes in metal levels and chromosome aberrations in the peripheral blood of patients after metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ladon, Dariusz; Doherty, Ann; Newson, Roger; Turner, Justine; Bhamra, Manjit; Case, C Patrick

    2004-12-01

    A prospective study was performed to investigate changes in metal levels and chromosome aberrations in patients within 2 years of receiving metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties. There was a statistically significant increase of cobalt and chromium concentrations, with a small increase in molybdenum, in whole blood at 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. There was also a statistically significant increase of both chromosome translocations and aneuploidy in peripheral blood lymphocytes at 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. The changes were generally progressive with time, but the change in aneuploidy was much greater than in chromosome translocations. No statistically significant correlations were found in secondary analyses between chromosome translocation indices and cobalt or chromium concentration in whole blood. Although the clinical consequences of these changes, if any, are unknown, future epidemiological studies could usefully include direct comparisons of patients with implants of different composition.

  15. Cobalt to Chromium Ratio is Not a Key Marker for Adverse Local Tissue Reaction (ALTR) in Metal on Metal Hips.

    PubMed

    Fehring, Thomas K; Carter, Joshua L; Fehring, Keith A; Odum, Susan M; Griffin, William L

    2015-09-01

    The diagnosis of adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) after metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoMTHA) presents a significant challenge. No single biomarker is specific for ALTR. The purpose of this study was to determine if the ratio of cobalt to chromium ions is useful for diagnosing ALTR in MoMTHA. In 89 bearing-related revision THAs, preoperative cobalt and chromium ion levels were compared to an intraoperative soft tissue damage grading scale. The average cobalt to chromium ratio was 2.96 (0-20). There was no correlation between the tissue scale and the cobalt to chromium ratio (R=0.095; P=0.41). Many variables affecting ion production/excretion mitigate the use of the ion ratio. The cobalt to chromium ratio is not a predictive biomarker for ALTR in MoMTHA.

  16. Progressive Cardiomyopathy in a Patient With Elevated Cobalt Ion Levels and Bilateral Metal-on-Metal Hip Arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Brian A; Maynard, Lance; Sotereanos, Nicholas G; Sewecke, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-01

    Systemic cobalt toxicity is a rare complication after metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip arthroplasty. Here we present a case of progressive cardiomyopathy, as evidenced by biopsy and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in a patient with bilateral MOM total hip arthroplasties. To our knowledge, it is one of the first cases in which cardiomyopathy resulting from systemic cobalt disease has been shown on MRI. While there is no guideline to unequivocally diagnose cobalt cardiomyopathy, the constellation of findings, including pathologic, biologic, blood levels, imaging, and surgical, all uniformly indicate a unifying diagnosis. The lack of improvement after removal of the prosthetic device supports a diagnosis of permanent myocardial damage, which is consistent with cardiomyopathy of advanced toxic etiology.

  17. A HIERARCHY OF COMPUTATIONALLY DERIVED SURGICAL AND PATIENT INFLUENCES ON METAL ON METAL PRESS-FIT ACETABULAR CUP FAILURE

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, S G; Phillips, A T M; Bull, A M J; Cobb, J P

    2014-01-01

    The impact of anatomical variation and surgical error on excessive wear and loosening of the acetabular component of large diameter metal on metal hip arthroplasties was measured using a multi-factorial analysis through 112 different simulations. Each surgical scenario was subject to eight different daily loading activities using finite element analysis. Excessive wear appears to be predominantly dependent on cup orientation, with inclination error having a higher influence than version error, according to the study findings. Acetabular cup loosening, as inferred from initial implant stability, appears to depend predominantly on factors concerning the area of cup-bone contact, specifically the level of cup seating achieved and the individual patient’s anatomy. The extent of press fit obtained at time of surgery did not appear to influence either mechanism of failure in this study. PMID:22513086

  18. Case studies in management of THA failure secondary to taper corrosion, modular junctions and metal-on-metal bearings.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Adolph V

    2014-04-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of patients with painful total hip arthroplasties secondary to taper corrosion and wear of modular junctions and metal-on-metal bearings represents a major challenge for the orthopaedic clinician. Guidelines are evolving as we analyze the growing body of evidence regarding metal-related failures of orthopaedic implants and adverse reactions to metal debris. In this article 6 case examples are presented to enhance understanding and application of current evidence into practice. Clinical expertise is integrated with the best available evidence from research and national joint registries data into the decision making process relevant for patient care in everyday practice. Issues addressed include understanding taper corrosion and metal failure mechanisms, clinical presentation of adverse soft tissue reactions, utility of specialized tests such as metal ion analysis and cross-sectional imaging studies, the utility of modular components for primary THA, dealing with recalled component, and current recommendations.

  19. [Bionic surface design in metal on metal bearings for total hip arthroplasty--optimization of tribological characteristics].

    PubMed

    Böhling, U; Scholz, J; Thomas, W; Grundei, H

    2005-04-01

    Bionic systems are aiming to integrate natural observing into mechanical solutions. This has been realized in the design of metal on metal bearing in total hip resurface arthroplasty. The articular side of the femoral cup is covered with a dimple like surface. Under laboratory condition this so called "surf-metal-cup" achieved a reduction of the mechanical wear to almost a third part in comparison to a metal-cup with plane surface. This advantage, caused by the reduced friction-coefficient due to improved hydrodynamic lubrication could also be proved under laboratory conditions. The clinical introduction is expected to offer a significant extension of durability in this prosthetic system and needs to be proved in a long-term study.

  20. Mortality rates at 10 years after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing compared with total hip replacement in England: retrospective cohort analysis of hospital episode statistics

    PubMed Central

    Kendal, Adrian R; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Arden, Nigel K; Judge, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare 10 year mortality rates among patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and total hip replacement in England. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting English hospital episode statistics database linked to mortality records from the Office for National Statistics. Population All adults who underwent primary elective hip replacement for osteoarthritis from April 1999 to March 2012. The exposure of interest was prosthesis type: cemented total hip replacement, uncemented total hip replacement, and metal-on-metal hip resurfacing. Confounding variables included age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index, rurality, area deprivation, surgical volume, and year of operation. Main outcome measures All cause mortality. Propensity score matching was used to minimise confounding by indication. Kaplan-Meier plots estimated the probability of survival up to 10 years after surgery. Multilevel Cox regression modelling, stratified on matched sets, described the association between prosthesis type and time to death, accounting for variation across hospital trusts. Results 7437 patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing were matched to 22 311 undergoing cemented total hip replacement; 8101 patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing were matched to 24 303 undergoing uncemented total hip replacement. 10 year rates of cumulative mortality were 271 (3.6%) for metal-on-metal hip resurfacing versus 1363 (6.1%) for cemented total hip replacement, and 239 (3.0%) for metal-on-metal hip resurfacing versus 999 (4.1%) for uncemented total hip replacement. Patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing had an increased survival probability (hazard ratio 0.51 (95% confidence interval 0.45 to 0.59) for cemented hip replacement; 0.55 (0.47 to 0.65) for uncemented hip replacement). There was no evidence for an interaction with age or sex. Conclusions Patients with hip osteoarthritis undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing have reduced mortality in

  1. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Anwander, H.; Cron, G. O.; Rakhra, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hips with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA) have a high rate of adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR), often associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) measures tissue perfusion with the parameter Ktrans (volume transfer constant of contrast agent). Our purpose was 1) to evaluate the feasibility of DCE-MRI in patients with THA and 2) to compare DCE-MRI in patients with MoM bearings with metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) bearings, hypothesising that the perfusion index Ktrans in hips with MoM THA is higher than in hips with MoP THA. Methods In this pilot study, 16 patients with primary THA were recruited (eight MoM, eight MoP). DCE-MRI of the hip was performed at 1.5 Tesla (T). For each patient, Ktrans was computed voxel-by-voxel in all tissue lateral to the bladder. The mean Ktrans for all voxels was then calculated. These values were compared with respect to implant type and gender, and further correlated with clinical parameters. Results There was no significant difference between the two bearing types with both genders combined. However, dividing patients by THA bearing and gender, women with MoM bearings had the highest Ktrans values, exceeding those of women with MoP bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.053 min−1; p-value < 0.05) and men with MoM bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.034 min−1; p-value < 0.001). Considering only the men, patients with MoM bearings had lower Ktrans than those with MoP bearings (0.034 min−1 versus 0.046 min−1; p < 0.05). Conclusion DCE-MRI is feasible to perform in tissues surrounding THA. Females with MoM THA show high Ktrans values in DCE-MRI, suggesting altered tissue perfusion kinematics which may reflect relatively greater inflammation. Cite this article: Dr P. E. Beaule. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty: A pilot stud. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:73–79. DOI: 10

  2. Successful hip arthroplasty using cementless titanium implants in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Effenberger, Harald; Ramsauer, Thomas; Böhm, Gerhard; Hilzensauer, Gerhard; Dorn, Ulrich; Lintner, Felix

    2002-03-01

    Over a period of eight years, we implanted a total of 76 cementless hip prostheses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The clinical results of 47 patients (70 hips) increased from a mean Harris Hip Score of 33 to 85 after an average of 49 months (range 1-11 years). One threaded cup has had to be revised because of loosening, and one stem because of femoral fracture. At the latest follow-up, 88% of Hofer-Imhof threaded cups had complete bone ingrowth (Type 0); 10% had near-complete bone ingrowth with minimal radiolucency in one third of the bone contact area (Type 1), and 2% had radiolucency in two thirds of the bone contact area (Type 2). Hemispherical push-in cups showed significantly more radiolucency around the cup. For the stems (Uni, Zweymüller SL), 83% showed no radiolucency (Type 0); 17% had radiolucency only very proximally (Type 1). Minor remodelling (Type 1) occurred in 60% of the femoral shafts; 30% had moderate femoral density loss (Type 2), and 10% had severe bone loss and cortical thinning (Type 3). There was no correlation between marked shaft atrophy and clinical symptoms. With regard to radiolucency and remodelling, there was no significant difference between the two types of stem used. Cementless hip arthroplasty using titanium implants has an excellent outcome in the medium term. PMID:11880907

  3. Early results with the cementless Variall hip system.

    PubMed

    Suda, Arnold J; Knahr, Karl

    2009-01-01

    This study presents the early results of the Variall cementless hip system, a further development of the reliable Alloclassic Zweymüller system. In a prospective randomized study, 319 patients (333 hips) underwent the Variall cementless hip system with four different bearings and were scored using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) Score and the Short Form-36 health survey form, with a follow-up period of 3 years. The patients were grouped according to age, with those in the age range 23-75 years as group one (n = 285) and those over 75 years of age as group two (n = 48). For both the Short Form-36 and WOMAC scoring, worse function was found in group two (i.e., patients >75 years). In this group, the function scores were worse in patients who received a conventional polyethylene bearing. The clinical and radiological results after 5 or more years will lead to a clearer prediction. PMID:19105776

  4. Are all metal-on-metal hip revision operations contributing to the National Joint Registry implant survival curves?

    PubMed Central

    Sabah, S. A.; Henckel, J.; Koutsouris, S.; Rajani, R.; Hothi, H.; Skinner, J. A.; Hart, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The National Joint Registry for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (NJR) has extended its scope to report on hospital, surgeon and implant performance. Data linkage of the NJR to the London Implant Retrieval Centre (LIRC) has previously evaluated data quality for hip primary procedures, but did not assess revision records. Methods We analysed metal-on-metal hip revision procedures performed between 2003 and 2013. A total of 69 929 revision procedures from the NJR and 929 revised pairs of components from the LIRC were included. Results We were able to link 716 (77.1%) revision procedures on the NJR to the LIRC. This meant that 213 (22.9%) revision procedures at the LIRC could not be identified on the NJR. We found that 349 (37.6%) explants at the LIRC completed the full linkage process to both NJR primary and revision databases. Data completion was excellent (> 99.9%) for revision procedures reported to the NJR. Discussion This study has shown that only approximately one third of retrieved components at the LIRC, contributed to survival curves on the NJR. We recommend prospective registry-retrieval linkage as a tool to feedback missing and erroneous data to the NJR and improve data quality. Take home message: Prospective Registry – retrieval linkage is a simple tool to evaluate and improve data quality on the NJR. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:33–9. PMID:26733513

  5. The influence of clearance on friction, lubrication and squeaking in large diameter metal-on-metal hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Brockett, Claire L; Harper, Phil; Williams, Sophie; Isaac, Graham H; Dwyer-Joyce, Rob S; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2008-04-01

    Large diameter metal-on-metal bearings (MOM) are becoming increasingly popular, addressing the needs of young and more active patients. Clinical data has shown excellent short-to-mid-term results, though incidences of transient squeaking have been noted between implantation and up to 2 years post-operative. Geometric design features, such as clearance, have been significant in influencing the performance of the bearings. Sets of MOM bearings with different clearances were investigated in this study using a hip friction simulator to examine the influence of clearance on friction, lubrication and squeaking. The friction factor was found to be highest in the largest clearance bearings under all test conditions. The incidence of squeaking was also highest in the large clearance bearings, with all bearings in this group squeaking throughout the study. A very low incidence of squeaking was observed in the other two clearance groups. The measured lubricating film was found to be lowest in the large clearance bearings. This study suggests that increasing the bearing clearance results in reduced lubricant film thickness, increased friction and an increased incidence of squeaking.

  6. Clinical usefulness of blood metal measurements to assess the failure of metal-on-metal hip implants

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Barry; Hart, Alister

    2012-01-01

    In April 2010, a Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency safety alert concerning all metal-on-metal (MOM) hip replacements recommended measuring chromium and cobalt concentrations when managing patients with painful prostheses. The need for this review is illustrated by the recent surge in requests for these blood tests from orthopaedic surgeons following this alert. The aim is to provide guidance to laboratories in assessing these requests and advising clinicians on interpretation. First, we summarize the basic terminology regarding the types of hip replacements, with emphasis on the MOM type. Second, we describe the clinical concerns over implant-derived wear debris in the local tissues and distant sites. Analytical aspects of the measurement of the relevant metal ions and what factors affect the levels measured are discussed. The application of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques to the measurement of these metals is considered in detail. The biological effects of metal wear products are summarized with local toxicity and systemic biological effects considered, including carcinogenicity, genotoxicity and systemic toxicity. Clinical cases are used to illustrate pertinent points. PMID:22155921

  7. A simulator study of adverse wear with metal and cement debris contamination in metal-on-metal hip bearings

    PubMed Central

    Halim, T.; Clarke, I. C.; Burgett-Moreno, M. D.; Donaldson, T. K.; Savisaar, C.; Bowsher, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Third-body wear is believed to be one trigger for adverse results with metal-on-metal (MOM) bearings. Impingement and subluxation may release metal particles from MOM replacements. We therefore challenged MOM bearings with relevant debris types of cobalt–chrome alloy (CoCr), titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and polymethylmethacrylate bone cement (PMMA). Methods Cement flakes (PMMA), CoCr and Ti6Al4V particles (size range 5 µm to 400 µm) were run in a MOM wear simulation. Debris allotments (5 mg) were inserted at ten intervals during the five million cycle (5 Mc) test. Results In a clean test phase (0 Mc to 0.8 Mc), lubricants retained their yellow colour. Addition of metal particles at 0.8 Mc turned lubricants black within the first hour of the test and remained so for the duration, while PMMA particles did not change the colour of the lubricant. Rates of wear with PMMA, CoCr and Ti6Al4V debris averaged 0.3 mm3/Mc, 4.1 mm3/Mc and 6.4 mm3/Mc, respectively. Conclusions Metal particles turned simulator lubricants black with rates of wear of MOM bearings an order of magnitude higher than with control PMMA particles. This appeared to model the findings of black, periarticular joint tissues and high CoCr wear in failed MOM replacements. The amount of wear debris produced during a 500 000-cycle interval of gait was 30 to 50 times greater than the weight of triggering particle allotment, indicating that MOM bearings were extremely sensitive to third-body wear. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:29–37. PMID:25736072

  8. Which imaging modality is most effective for identifying pseudotumours in metal-on-metal hip resurfacings requiring revision

    PubMed Central

    Matharu, G. S.; Mansour, R.; Dada, O.; Ostlere, S.; Pandit, H. G.; Murray, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aims of this study were to compare the diagnostic test characteristics of ultrasound alone, metal artefact reduction sequence MRI (MARS-MRI) alone, and ultrasound combined with MARS-MRI for identifying intra-operative pseudotumours in metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MoMHR) patients undergoing revision surgery. Methods This retrospective diagnostic accuracy study involved 39 patients (40 MoMHRs). The time between imaging modalities was a mean of 14.6 days (0 to 90), with imaging performed at a mean of 5.3 months (0.06 to 12) before revision. The prevalence of intra-operative pseudotumours was 82.5% (n = 33). Results Agreement with the intra-operative findings was 82.5% (n = 33) for ultrasound alone, 87.5% (n = 35) for MARS-MRI alone, and 92.5% (n = 37) for ultrasound and MARS-MRI combined. The diagnostic characteristics for ultrasound alone and MARS-MRI alone reached similar sensitivities (90.9% vs 93.9%) and positive predictive values (PPVs; 88.2% vs 91.2%), but higher specificities (57.1% vs 42.9%) and negative predictive values (NPVs; 66.7% vs 50.0%) were achieved with MARS-MRI. Ultrasound and MARS-MRI combined produced 100% sensitivity and 100% NPV, whilst maintaining both specificity (57.1%) and PPV (91.7%). For the identification of a pseudotumour, which was confirmed at revision surgery, agreement was substantial for ultrasound and MARS-MRI combined (κ = 0.69), moderate for MARS-MRI alone (κ = 0.54), and fair for ultrasound alone (κ = 0.36). Discussion These findings suggest that ultrasound and/or MARS-MRI have a role when assessing patients with a MoMHR, with the choice dependent on local financial constraints and the availability of ultrasound expertise. However in patients with a MoMHR who require revision, combined imaging was most effective. Take home message: Combined imaging with ultrasound and MARS-MRI always identified intra-operative pseudotumours if present. Furthermore, if neither imaging modality showed a pseudotumour, one was not

  9. Blood metal ion testing is an effective screening tool to identify poorly performing metal-on-metal bearing surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sidaginamale, R. P.; Joyce, T. J.; Lord, J. K.; Jefferson, R.; Blain, P. G.; Nargol, A. V. F.; Langton, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this piece of work were to: 1) record the background concentrations of blood chromium (Cr) and cobalt (Co) concentrations in a large group of subjects; 2) to compare blood/serum Cr and Co concentrations with retrieved metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacings; 3) to examine the distribution of Co and Cr in the serum and whole blood of patients with MoM hip arthroplasties; and 4) to further understand the partitioning of metal ions between the serum and whole blood fractions. Methods A total of 3042 blood samples donated to the local transfusion centre were analysed to record Co and Cr concentrations. Also, 91 hip resurfacing devices from patients who had given pre-revision blood/serum samples for metal ion analysis underwent volumetric wear assessment using a coordinate measuring machine. Linear regression analysis was carried out and receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to assess the reliability of metal ions to identify abnormally wearing implants. The relationship between serum and whole blood concentrations of Cr and Co in 1048 patients was analysed using Bland-Altman charts. This relationship was further investigated in an in vitro study during which human blood was spiked with trivalent and hexavalent Cr, the serum then separated and the fractions analysed. Results Only one patient in the transfusion group was found to have a blood Co > 2 µg/l. Blood/Serum Cr and Co concentrations were reliable indicators of abnormal wear. Blood Co appeared to be the most useful clinical test, with a concentration of 4.5 µg/l showing sensitivity and specificity for the detection of abnormal wear of 94% and 95%, respectively. Generated metal ions tended to fill the serum compartment preferentially in vivo and this was replicated in the in vitro study when blood was spiked with trivalent Cr and bivalent Co. Conclusions Blood/serum metal ion concentrations are reliable indicators of abnormal wear processes. Important differences exist

  10. Initial mechanical stability of cementless highly-porous titanium tibial components

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Timothy Brandon; Amer, Luke D; Warren, Christopher P; Cornwell, Phillip; Meneghini, R Michael

    2008-01-01

    Cementless fixation in total knee replacement has seen limited use since reports of early failure surfaced in the late 80s and early 90s. However the emergence of improved biomaterials, particularly porous titanium and tantalum, has led to a renewed interest in developing a cementless tibial component to enhance long-term survivorship of the implants. Cement is commonly employed to minimize micromotion in new implants but represents a weak interface between the implant and bone. The elimination of cement and application of these new biomaterials, which theoretically provide improved stability and ultimate osseointegration, would likely result in greater knee replacement success. Additionally, the removal of cement from the procedure would help minimize surgical durations and get rid of the time needed for curing, thereby the chance of infection. The purpose of this biomechanical study was twofold. The first goal was to assess whether vibration analysis techniques can be used to evaluate and characterize initial mechanical stability of cementless implants more accurately than the traditional method of micromotion determination, which employs linear variable differential transducers (LVDTs). Second, an evaluative study was performed to determine the comparative mechanical stability of five designs of cementless tibial components under mechanical loading designed to simulate in vivo forces. The test groups will include a cemented Triathlon Keeled baseplate control group, three different 2-peg cementless baseplates with smooth, mid, and high roughnesses and a 4-peg cement/ess baseplate with mid-roughness.

  11. Outcomes of a Newer-Generation Cementless Total Knee Arthroplasty Design.

    PubMed

    Harwin, Steven F; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Mont, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Newer-generation cementless total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) aim to improve durability, function, and longevity. In a large series of cementless TKAs at a mean 4-year follow-up, the authors evaluated (1) survivorship, (2) range of motion, (3) patient-reported outcomes, and (4) complications. Mean age was 66 years (range, 34-88 years) and mean body mass index was 32.5 kg/m(2) (range, 20-54 kg/m(2)). Aseptic and septic implant survivorships were 99.6% and 99.5%, respectively. Mean extension, flexion, and Knee Society scores improved significantly. There were 3 septic failures. Aseptic failures included 3 aseptic loosenings, 1 polyethylene revision, and 1 revision to a cemented patella. This study showed excellent clinical and patient-reported outcomes of cementless TKA.

  12. Preparation of the proximal femur in cementless total hip revision.

    PubMed

    Mallory, T H

    1988-10-01

    With an increased incidence of revision for the failed cemented total hip arthroplasty, techniques of revision surgery need meticulous attention to detail. Although the causes of the failed cemented total hip arthroplasty are many, they tend to follow characteristic patterns. The proximal femur can be exposed through an extensive muscle split incision, which offers a complete circumferential view of the femur. The cement removal is enhanced by controlled perforation using high-speed drills. Classification of bony deficits of the proximal femur can be divided into Type I, including intact cortex and medullary content; Type II, in which there is intact cortex but deficient medullary content; and Type III, in which deficits of both the cortex and medullary canal are present. Prosthetic selection is based on residual bone stock. In general, cementless fixation is advocated, with distal fixation using long-stem devices. Augmentation of bone deficits requires the use of segmental prosthetic replacement or fresh-frozen allografts. One hundred sixty patients were followed for two to six years. Satisfactory results have occurred in over 90% of the patients; better results are anticipated in patients with minimal bone deficits. Aseptic loosening requiring rerevision has occurred in 5% of the patient population. Understanding the dynamics of failure and the residual bone deficits allows one to manage the failed cemented total hip arthroplasty with greater efficiency and predictability. PMID:3416541

  13. Evaluation of the wear properties of a metal-on-metal total joint replacement system and in vitro macrophage response to resultant wear particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. John, Kenneth Raymond

    The wear of the polyethylene in total joint prostheses has been a source of morbidity and early device failure which has been extensively reported in the last ten to twelve years. While research continues to attempt to reduce the wear of polyethylene joint bearing surfaces by modifications in polymer processing, there is a renewed interest in the use of metal-on-metal bearing couples for hip replacement devices. This study investigated the in vitro wear resistance of two cobalt/chromium/molybdenum alloys, which differed primarily in the carbon content, as potential alloys for use in such a metal-on-metal hip bearing couple. The results showed that the alloy with the higher (0.25%) carbon content was more wear resistant and this alloy was chosen for testing in a hip simulator system which modeled the loads and motions which might be exerted on a clinically implanted hip replacement. Comparison of the results of metal-on-polyethylene specimens to metal-on-metal specimens showed that the volumetric wear of the metal-on-polyethylene bearing couple over 5,000,000 cycles was 110--180 times as great as that for the metal bearing couple. Polyethylene and metal particles retrieved from either pin-on-disk testing lubricant or hip simulator testing lubricant were cleaned and examined for consistency with the particles reported by other laboratories for particles from periprosthetic tissues and found to be similar. The particles were then added to macrophage (J774a) cell cultures and the release of Prostaglandin E2, Interleukin-6, and Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha measured for each experiment in response to the particles. The cell mediators released by the cells was found to correlate with the dosage of particles and the chemical identity of the particles. Most of the cellular response to the polyethylene particles seemed to be as a result of phagocytosis of the particles while most of the response to metal particles seemed to be related to cytotoxicity of the particles. Based

  14. Clinical and radiographic results and wear performance in different generations of a cementless porous-coated acetabular cup

    PubMed Central

    García-Cimbrelo, E.

    2007-01-01

    We compared clinical results and wear performance in two different generations of a cementless porous-coated cup, analysing the long-term results of 83 uncemented Harris-Galante I cups (32-mm femoral head) and 93 uncemented Harris-Galante II cups (28-mm femoral head). All polyethylene liners were gamma irradiated in air. Polyethylene linear wear was estimated using a software package. The minimum follow-up was 10 years. Nine Harris-Galante I cups and two Harris-Galante II cups were revised due to aseptic loosening or polyethylene problems. The mean femoral head penetration at 6 weeks after surgery was 0.15 ± 0.05 mm for the Harris-Galante I cups and 0.12 ± 0.03 for the Harris-Galante II cups (p < 0.001);but mean wear was 0.13 ± 0.23 mm per year for the Harris-Galante I cups and 0.11 ± 0.10 for the Harris-Galante II cups (p = 0.740). Most of the metallic shells in both groups showed stable fixation. The so-called second-generation cups had lower initial polyethylene wear that resulted in less polyethylene wear at the latest the follow-up, but the overall wear rate was similar in both groups despite the different femoral head sizes and the improved locking mechanism. PMID:17265157

  15. The immunobiology of cobalt: demonstration of a potential aetiology for inflammatory pseudotumours after metal-on-metal replacement of the hip.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, H; Deehan, D; Holland, J; Kirby, J; Tyson-Capper, A

    2014-09-01

    Abnormal wear of cobalt-containing metal-on-metal joints is associated with inflammatory pseudotumours. Cobalt ions activate human toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which normally responds to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in sepsis. Activation of TLR4 by LPS increases the expression of chemokines IL-8 and CXCL10, which recruit leukocytes and activated T-cells, respectively. This study was designed to determine whether cobalt induces a similar inflammatory response to LPS by promoting the expression of IL-8 and CXCL10. A human monocytic cell line, derived from acute monocytic leukaemia, was treated with cobalt ions and expression of IL-8 and CXCL10 measured at mRNA and protein levels. Cobalt-treated macrophages showed a 60-fold increase in IL-8 mRNA, and an eightfold increase in production of the mature chemokine (both p < 0.001); expression of the CXCL10 gene and protein was also significantly increased by cobalt (both p < 0.001). Experiments were also performed in the presence of CLI-095, a TLR4-specific antagonist which abrogated the cobalt-mediated increase in IL-8 and CXCL10 expression. These findings suggest that cobalt ions induce inflammation similar to that observed during sepsis by the simultaneous activation of two TLR4-mediated signalling pathways. These pathways result in increased production of IL-8 and CXCL10, and may be implicated in pseudotumour formation following metal-on-metal replacement.

  16. An integrated CAD/CAM/robotic milling method for custom cementless femoral prostheses.

    PubMed

    Wen-ming, Xi; Ai-min, Wang; Qi, Wu; Chang-hua, Liu; Jian-fei, Zhu; Fang-fang, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Aseptic loosening is the primary cause of cementless femoral prosthesis failure and is related to the primary stability of the cementless femoral prosthesis in the femoral cavity. The primary stability affects both the osseointegration and the long-term stability of cementless femoral prostheses. A custom cementless femoral prosthesis can improve the fit and fill of the prosthesis in the femoral cavity and decrease the micromotion of the proximal prosthesis such that the primary stability of the custom prosthesis can be improved, and osseointegration of the proximal prosthesis is achieved. These results will help to achieve long-term stability in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In this paper, we introduce an integrated CAD/CAM/robotic method of milling custom cementless femoral prostheses. The 3D reconstruction model uses femoral CT images and 3D design software to design a CAD model of the custom prosthesis. After the transformation matrices between two units of the robotic system are calibrated, consistency between the CAM software and the robotic system can be achieved, and errors in the robotic milling can be limited. According to the CAD model of the custom prosthesis, the positions of the robotic tool points are produced by the CAM software of the CNC machine. The normal vector of the three adjacent robotic tool point positions determines the pose of the robotic tool point. In conclusion, the fit rate of custom pig femur stems in the femoral cavities was 90.84%. After custom femoral prostheses were inserted into the femoral cavities, the maximum gaps between the prostheses and the cavities measured less than 1 mm at the diaphysis and 1.3 mm at the metaphysis. PMID:26210779

  17. An integrated CAD/CAM/robotic milling method for custom cementless femoral prostheses.

    PubMed

    Wen-ming, Xi; Ai-min, Wang; Qi, Wu; Chang-hua, Liu; Jian-fei, Zhu; Fang-fang, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Aseptic loosening is the primary cause of cementless femoral prosthesis failure and is related to the primary stability of the cementless femoral prosthesis in the femoral cavity. The primary stability affects both the osseointegration and the long-term stability of cementless femoral prostheses. A custom cementless femoral prosthesis can improve the fit and fill of the prosthesis in the femoral cavity and decrease the micromotion of the proximal prosthesis such that the primary stability of the custom prosthesis can be improved, and osseointegration of the proximal prosthesis is achieved. These results will help to achieve long-term stability in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In this paper, we introduce an integrated CAD/CAM/robotic method of milling custom cementless femoral prostheses. The 3D reconstruction model uses femoral CT images and 3D design software to design a CAD model of the custom prosthesis. After the transformation matrices between two units of the robotic system are calibrated, consistency between the CAM software and the robotic system can be achieved, and errors in the robotic milling can be limited. According to the CAD model of the custom prosthesis, the positions of the robotic tool points are produced by the CAM software of the CNC machine. The normal vector of the three adjacent robotic tool point positions determines the pose of the robotic tool point. In conclusion, the fit rate of custom pig femur stems in the femoral cavities was 90.84%. After custom femoral prostheses were inserted into the femoral cavities, the maximum gaps between the prostheses and the cavities measured less than 1 mm at the diaphysis and 1.3 mm at the metaphysis.

  18. Prevalence of Pseudotumor in Patients After Metal-On-Metal Hip Arthroplasty Evaluated with Metal Ion Analysis and MARS-MRI.

    PubMed

    Sutphen, Sean A; MacLaughlin, Lewis H; Madsen, Adam A; Russell, Jackie H; McShane, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the prevalence of pseudotumors in patients with well-functioning and painful metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty, to characterize the pseudotumor with the use of MARS-MRI, and to assess the relationship between pseudotumors and metal ions. We retrospectively reviewed 102 single surgeon patients. The results showed that 68.6% developed pseudotumor with 60.9% of the asymptomatic group developing pseudotumor. The symptomatic group had a higher proportion of patients with elevated serum cobalt levels (P=0.035). There was no difference found with elevated metal ions and prevalence of pseudotumor, but elevated cobalt levels were associated with larger pseudotumor size (P=0.001). The available evidence indicated that most patients that develop pseudotumors are asymptomatic, and that elevated serum cobalt levels may be associated with symptoms and pseudotumor size. PMID:26253484

  19. Prevalence of Pseudotumor in Patients After Metal-On-Metal Hip Arthroplasty Evaluated with Metal Ion Analysis and MARS-MRI.

    PubMed

    Sutphen, Sean A; MacLaughlin, Lewis H; Madsen, Adam A; Russell, Jackie H; McShane, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the prevalence of pseudotumors in patients with well-functioning and painful metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty, to characterize the pseudotumor with the use of MARS-MRI, and to assess the relationship between pseudotumors and metal ions. We retrospectively reviewed 102 single surgeon patients. The results showed that 68.6% developed pseudotumor with 60.9% of the asymptomatic group developing pseudotumor. The symptomatic group had a higher proportion of patients with elevated serum cobalt levels (P=0.035). There was no difference found with elevated metal ions and prevalence of pseudotumor, but elevated cobalt levels were associated with larger pseudotumor size (P=0.001). The available evidence indicated that most patients that develop pseudotumors are asymptomatic, and that elevated serum cobalt levels may be associated with symptoms and pseudotumor size.

  20. Comparison of Clinical Efficacy Between Modular Cementless Stem Prostheses and Coated Cementless Long-Stem Prostheses on Bone Defect in Hip Revision Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huibin; Chen, Fang; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the clinical efficacy of modular cementless stem and coated cementless long-stem prostheses in hip revision arthroplasty. Material/Methods Sixty-five patients with complete hip revision surgery data during January 2005 to March 2015 were selected from the People’s Hospital of Linyi City and randomly divided into a S-ROM group (implanted with cementless modular stem prostheses, n=32) and a SLR-PLUS group (implanted with cementless coated long-stem prostheses, n=33). Harris score was used to evaluate the hip function of the patients in order to measure the clinical efficacy of the prostheses in total hip arthroplasty. Anteroposterior pelvic radiographs and lateral pelvic radiographs were taken and each patient’s hip arthroplasty condition was recorded. Kaplan-Meier method was applied to compare the cumulative 5-year non-revision rate between the 2 prostheses and log-rank method was used to inspect the statistical data. Results The Harris scores of both the S-ROM group and the SLR-PLUS group were significantly higher at 12 months after the operation than those before the operation (both P<0.05). The Harris scores of the patients with type I/II bone defects in the S-ROM group were not significantly different from those of the same types in the SLR-PLUS group at all time points (all P>0.05), while the Harris scores of the patients with type IIIA/IIIB in the S-ROM group were both significantly higher than those of the same types in the SLR-PLUS group at 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after the operation (all P<0.05). No significant difference was found in the cumulative 5-year non-revision rate between the type I/II patients in the S-ROM group (92.31%) and the patients of the same types in the SLR-PLUS group (85.71%) (P>0.05). However, the cumulative 5-year non-revision rate of the type IIIA/IIIB patients in the S-ROM group (89.47%) was significantly different from the patients of the same types in

  1. Total knee arthroplasty using cementless keels and cemented tibial trays: 10-year results

    PubMed Central

    Kolisek, Frank R.; Mont, Michael A.; Seyler, Thorsten M.; Marker, David R.; Jessup, Nenette M.; Siddiqui, Junaed A.; Monesmith, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The problem of early mechanical stability of cemented and cementless keels of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. The purpose of this study was to assess clinical and radiographic outcomes of a cohort of 51 TKAs using a cemented platform with cementless keel fixation. At a mean follow-up of 10.4 years (range, 7 to 14 years), the mean Knee Society Score (KSS) was 93 points (range, 59 to 100 points), and the mean functional score was 73 points (range, 0 to 100 points). Only one patient demonstrated progressive tibial radiolucencies at 13.1 years follow-up, which resolved with a revision with an exchange of components. The results of this study suggest that a proximally cemented tibial tray with a press-fit keel TKA provides excellent mean 10-year outcomes. PMID:18185931

  2. Cementless Hip Arthroplasty in Southern Iran, Midterm Outcome and Comparison of Two Designs

    PubMed Central

    Shahcheraghi, Gholam Hossein; Hashemi, Seyed Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cementless hip prosthesis was designed to provide biologic fixation, without the use of cement. The second generation components have shown more reliable bone ingrowths and survival rates. We are reporting a midterm result of two designs of cementless prosthesis in a unique culture with different social habits and expectations. Methods: 52 primary cementless total hip arthroplasty in 42 patients with the mean age of 48.8 years were retrospectively studied. Two groups of prosthesis had been implanted: Harris-Galante II (HGII) in 15 and Versys-Trilogy (V-T) in 37 hips, both from Zimmer company. The patients were assessed clinically, radiographically and with Harris hip score, SF36, WOMAC, and MACTAR questionnaires, with 65 months (26-136) mean follow-up. Results: All the V-T prostheses had survived well. Eight of HG II were revised by the last follow-up in 19-102 months. All had undergone acetabular revision and 2 combined with femoral revision. Broken tines of HGII cups were seen in 4 radiographs. The 65 months overall survival was 96.2% for femoral and 84.6% for acetabular components. 90% had good or excellent Harris hip scores. The functional scores were poorer in the HG II group. Pain relief and improved walking were the two main patients’ expectations fulfilled in 97.6% and 92.8%, respectively. Conclusions: The outcome of cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) is satisfactory and comparable with the literature based on the results of function and survival of this small comparative group. The use of HGII acetabular component should be abandoned. PMID:26379348

  3. A cementless, elastic press-fit socket with and without screws

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The acetabular component has remained the weakest link in hip arthroplasty regarding achievement of long-term survival. Primary fixation is a prerequisite for long-term performance. For this reason, we investigated the stability of a unique cementless titanium-coated elastic monoblock socket and the influence of supplementary screw fixation. Patient and methods During 2006–2008, we performed a randomized controlled trial on 37 patients (mean age 63 years (SD 7), 22 females) in whom we implanted a cementless press-fit socket. The socket was implanted with additional screw fixation (group A, n = 19) and without additional screw fixation (group B, n = 18). Using radiostereometric analysis with a 2-year follow-up, we determined the stability of the socket. Clinically relevant migration was defined as > 1 mm translation and > 2º rotation. Clinical scores were determined. Results The sockets without screw fixation showed a statistically significantly higher proximal translation compared to the socket with additional screw fixation. However, this higher migration was below the clinically relevant threshold. The numbers of migratory sockets were not significantly different between groups. After the 2-year follow-up, there were no clinically relevant differences between groups A and B regarding the clinical scores. 1 patient dropped out of the study. In the others, no sockets were revised. Interpretation We found that additional screw fixation is not necessary to achieve stability of the cementless press-fit elastic RM socket. We saw no postoperative benefit or clinical effect of additional screw fixation. PMID:23083434

  4. Promising short-term clinical results of the cementless Oxford phase III medial unicondylar knee prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    van Dorp, Karin B; Breugem, Stefan JM; Bruijn, Daniël J; Driessen, Marcel JM

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the short-term clinical results of the Oxford phase III cementless medial unicondylar knee prosthesis (UKP) compared to the cemented medial UKP. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in a tertairy orthopedic centre between the period of May 2010 and September 2012. We included 99 medial UKP in 97 patients and of these UKP, 53 were cemented and 46 were cementless. Clinical outcome was measured using a questionnaire, containing a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, Oxford Knee score, Kujala score and SF-12 score. Knee function was tested using the American Knee Society score. Complications, reoperations and revisions were recorded. Statistical significance was defined as a P value < 0.05. RESULTS: In a mean follow-up time of 19.5 mo, three cemented medial UKP were revised to a total knee prosthesis. Reasons for revision were malrotation of the tibial component, aseptic loosening of the tibial component and progression of osteoarthritis in the lateral- and patellofemoral compartment. In five patients a successful reoperation was performed, because of impingement or (sub)luxation of the polyethylene bearing. Patients with a reoperation were significant younger than patients in the primary group (56.7 vs 64.0, P = 0.01) and were more likely to be male (85.7% vs 38.8%, P = 0.015). Overall the cementless medial UKP seems to perform better, but the differences in clinical outcome are not significant; a VAS pain score of 7.4 vs 11.7 (P = 0.22), an Oxford Knee score of 43.3 vs 41.7 (P = 0.27) and a Kujala score of 79.6 vs 78.0 (P = 0.63). The American Knee Society scores were slightly better in the cementless group with 94.5 vs 90.2 (P = 0.055) for the objective score and 91.2 vs 87.8 (P = 0.25) for the subjective score. CONCLUSION: The cementless Oxford phase III medial UKP shows good short-term clinical results, when used in a specialist clinic by an experienced surgeon. PMID:27114932

  5. N-Acetyl-Cysteine as Effective and Safe Chelating Agent in Metal-on-Metal Hip-Implanted Patients: Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lonati, Davide; Ragghianti, Benedetta; Ronchi, Anna; Vecchio, Sarah; Locatelli, Carlo Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Systemic toxicity associated with cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) containing metal hip alloy may result in neuropathy, cardiomyopathy, and hypothyroidism. However clinical management concerning chelating therapy is still debated in literature. Here are described two metal-on-metal hip-implanted patients in which N-acetyl-cysteine decreased elevated blood metal levels. A 67-year-old male who underwent Co/Cr hip implant in September 2009 referred to our Poison Control Centre for persisting elevated Co/Cr blood levels (from March 2012 to November 2014). After receiving oral high-dose N-acetyl-cysteine, Co/Cr blood concentrations dropped by 86% and 87% of the prechelation levels, respectively, and persisted at these latter concentrations during the following 6 months of follow-up. An 81-year-old female who underwent Co/Cr hip implant in January 2007 referred to our Centre for detection of high Co and Cr blood levels in June 2012. No hip revision was indicated. After a therapy with oral high-dose N-acetyl-cysteine Co/Cr blood concentrations decreased of 45% and 24% of the prechelation levels. Chelating agents reported in hip-implanted patients (EDTA, DMPS, and BAL) are described in few cases. N-acetyl-cysteine may provide chelating sites for metals and in our cases reduced Co and Cr blood levels and resulted well tolerable. PMID:27148463

  6. Influence of particulate and dissociated metal-on-metal hip endoprosthesis wear on mesenchymal stromal cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rakow, Anastasia; Schoon, Janosch; Dienelt, Anke; John, Thilo; Textor, Martin; Duda, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Schulze, Frank; Ode, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    In hip arthroplasty the implants' articulating surfaces can be made of a cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloy. The use of these metal-on-metal (MoM) pairings can lead to the release of wear products such as metallic particles and dissociated metal species, raising concerns regarding their safety amongst orthopedic surgeons and the public. MoM-wear particles are reported to be heterogeneous in their physicochemical properties, are capable of inducing adverse effects on a cellular level and are thought to be involved in relevant clinical problems like aseptic osteolysis. Yet, it remains elusive how MoM-wear affects bone forming cells and their progenitors: bone marrow residing mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). This study introduces an assessment of the in vivo exposure to particulate and dissociated Co and Cr and evaluates the effects of MoM-wear on MSCs. The exposure to MoM-wear products in vivo and in vitro leads to a decrease in MSCs' osteogenic matrix mineralization and alkaline phosphatase activity on a cellular and systemic level. In conclusion, MoM-wear products are released in the periprosthetic region and elevate bone marrow Co and Cr concentrations towards levels that impair osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Therefore, the ongoing use of CoCrMo alloys for articulating surfaces in joint replacement implants needs critical reconsideration. PMID:27179133

  7. Clinical outcome study and radiological findings of Zweymuller metal on metal total hip arthroplasty. a follow-up of 6 to 15 years.

    PubMed

    Paleochorlidis, Ilias S; Badras, Leonidas S; Skretas, Efstathios F; Georgaklis, Vasilios A; Karachalios, Theofilos S; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2009-01-01

    We report the clinical and radiological outcome of 99 Zweymuller metal on metal total hip arthroplasties in 84 patients followed up prospectively for a mean period of 9.5 (range, 6-15) years. There were 29 (34.5%) male and 55 (65.5%) female patients with a mean age of 62.85 years (range, 50-70 years) at the time of surgery. All patients had osteoarthritis. One acetabular component and one stem were revised due to aseptic loosening. One femoral stem was revised due to a periprosthetic fracture. HHS score improved from a preoperative mean of 62.56 points (SD 8.87) to a final postoperative follow-up mean of 93.48 (SD 7.7). Cumulative success rate for both implants at 13 years, with aseptic loosening as the end point, was 97.05%, while for both implants at 13 years, with revision for any reason as the end point, it was 91.17%. Satisfactory results were observed with the use of this prosthesis. PMID:20041375

  8. The relationship between the angle of version and rate of wear of retrieved metal-on-metal resurfacings: a prospective, CT-based study.

    PubMed

    Hart, A J; Ilo, K; Underwood, R; Cann, P; Henckel, J; Lewis, A; Cobb, J; Skinner, J

    2011-03-01

    We measured the orientation of the acetabular and femoral components in 45 patients (33 men, 12 women) with a mean age of 53.4 years (30 to 74) who had undergone revision of metal-on-metal hip resurfacings. Three-dimensional CT was used to measure the inclination and version of the acetabular component, femoral version and the horizontal femoral offset, and the linear wear of the removed acetabular components was measured using a roundness machine. We found that acetabular version and combined version of the acetabular and femoral components were weakly positively correlated with the rate of wear. The acetabular inclination angle was strongly positively correlated with the rate of wear. Femoral version was weakly negatively correlated with the rate of wear. Application of a threshold of > 5 μm/year for the rate of wear in order to separate the revisions into low or high wearing groups showed that more high wearing components were implanted outside Lewinnek's safe zone, but that this was mainly due to the inclination of the acetabular component, which was the only parameter that significantly differed between the groups. We were unable to show that excess version of the acetabular component alone or combined with femoral version was associated with an increase in the rate of wear based on our assessment of version using CT. PMID:21357951

  9. Accuracy of methods for calculating volumetric wear from coordinate measuring machine data of retrieved metal-on-metal hip joint implants.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhen; McKellop, Harry A

    2014-03-01

    This study compared the accuracy and sensitivity of several numerical methods employing spherical or plane triangles for calculating the volumetric wear of retrieved metal-on-metal hip joint implants from coordinate measuring machine measurements. Five methods, one using spherical triangles and four using plane triangles to represent the bearing and the best-fit surfaces, were assessed and compared on a perfect hemisphere model and a hemi-ellipsoid model (i.e. unworn models), computer-generated wear models and wear-tested femoral balls, with point spacings of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mm. The results showed that the algorithm (Method 1) employing spherical triangles to represent the bearing surface and to scale the mesh to the best-fit surfaces produced adequate accuracy for the wear volume with point spacings of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mm. The algorithms (Methods 2-4) using plane triangles to represent the bearing surface and to scale the mesh to the best-fit surface also produced accuracies that were comparable to that with spherical triangles. In contrast, if the bearing surface was represented with a mesh of plane triangles and the best-fit surface was taken as a smooth surface without discretization (Method 5), the algorithm produced much lower accuracy with a point spacing of 0.5 mm than Methods 1-4 with a point spacing of 3 mm. PMID:24531891

  10. In vitro analysis of the wear, wear debris and biological activity of surface-engineered coatings for use in metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Williams, S; Tipper, J L; Ingham, E; Stone, M H; Fisher, J

    2003-01-01

    Extremely low wear rates have been reported for metal-on-metal total hip replacements, but concerns remain about the effects of metal ion release, dissolution rates and toxicity. Surface-engineered coatings have the potential to improve wear resistance and reduce the biological activity of the wear debris produced. The aim of this study was to examine the wear and wear debris generation from surface-engineered coatings: titanium nitride (TiN), chromium nitride (CrN) and chromium carbon nitride (CrCN) applied to a cobalt-chrome alloy (CoCr) substrate. The coatings were articulated against themselves in a simple geometry model. The wear particles generated were characterized and the cytotoxic effect on U937 macrophages and L929 fibroblasts assessed. The CrN and CrCN coatings showed a decrease in wear compared to the CoCr bearings and produced small (less than 40 nm in length) wear particles. The wear particles released from the surface engineered bearings also showed a decreased cytotoxic effect on cells compared to the CoCr alloy debris. The reduced wear volumes coupled with the reduced cytotoxicity per unit volume of wear indicate the potential for the clinical application of this technology.

  11. A longitudinal study of MARS MRI scanning of soft-tissue lesions around metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Briant-Evans, T W; Lyle, N; Barbur, S; Hauptfleisch, J; Amess, R; Pearce, A R; Conn, K S; Stranks, G J; Britton, J M

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the changes seen on serial metal artefact reduction magnetic resonance imaging scans (MARS-MRI) of metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties (MoM THAs). In total 155 THAs, in 35 male and 100 female patients (mean age 70.4 years, 42 to 91), underwent at least two MRI scans at a mean interval of 14.6 months (2.6 to 57.1), at a mean of 48.2 months (3.5 to 93.3) after primary hip surgery. Scans were graded using a modification of the Oxford classification. Progression of disease was defined as an increase in grade or a minimum 10% increase in fluid lesion volume at second scan. A total of 16 hips (30%) initially classified as 'normal' developed an abnormality on the second scan. Of those with 'isolated trochanteric fluid' 9 (47%) underwent disease progression, as did 7 (58%) of 'effusions'. A total of 54 (77%) of hips initially classified as showing adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) progressed, with higher rates of progression in higher grades. Disease progression was associated with high blood cobalt levels or an irregular pseudocapsule lining at the initial scan. There was no association with changes in functional scores. Adverse reactions to metal debris in MoM THAs may not be as benign as previous reports have suggested. Close radiological follow-up is recommended, particularly in high-risk groups. PMID:26430006

  12. A longitudinal study of MARS MRI scanning of soft-tissue lesions around metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Briant-Evans, T W; Lyle, N; Barbur, S; Hauptfleisch, J; Amess, R; Pearce, A R; Conn, K S; Stranks, G J; Britton, J M

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the changes seen on serial metal artefact reduction magnetic resonance imaging scans (MARS-MRI) of metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties (MoM THAs). In total 155 THAs, in 35 male and 100 female patients (mean age 70.4 years, 42 to 91), underwent at least two MRI scans at a mean interval of 14.6 months (2.6 to 57.1), at a mean of 48.2 months (3.5 to 93.3) after primary hip surgery. Scans were graded using a modification of the Oxford classification. Progression of disease was defined as an increase in grade or a minimum 10% increase in fluid lesion volume at second scan. A total of 16 hips (30%) initially classified as 'normal' developed an abnormality on the second scan. Of those with 'isolated trochanteric fluid' 9 (47%) underwent disease progression, as did 7 (58%) of 'effusions'. A total of 54 (77%) of hips initially classified as showing adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) progressed, with higher rates of progression in higher grades. Disease progression was associated with high blood cobalt levels or an irregular pseudocapsule lining at the initial scan. There was no association with changes in functional scores. Adverse reactions to metal debris in MoM THAs may not be as benign as previous reports have suggested. Close radiological follow-up is recommended, particularly in high-risk groups.

  13. Accuracy of methods for calculating volumetric wear from coordinate measuring machine data of retrieved metal-on-metal hip joint implants.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhen; McKellop, Harry A

    2014-03-01

    This study compared the accuracy and sensitivity of several numerical methods employing spherical or plane triangles for calculating the volumetric wear of retrieved metal-on-metal hip joint implants from coordinate measuring machine measurements. Five methods, one using spherical triangles and four using plane triangles to represent the bearing and the best-fit surfaces, were assessed and compared on a perfect hemisphere model and a hemi-ellipsoid model (i.e. unworn models), computer-generated wear models and wear-tested femoral balls, with point spacings of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mm. The results showed that the algorithm (Method 1) employing spherical triangles to represent the bearing surface and to scale the mesh to the best-fit surfaces produced adequate accuracy for the wear volume with point spacings of 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mm. The algorithms (Methods 2-4) using plane triangles to represent the bearing surface and to scale the mesh to the best-fit surface also produced accuracies that were comparable to that with spherical triangles. In contrast, if the bearing surface was represented with a mesh of plane triangles and the best-fit surface was taken as a smooth surface without discretization (Method 5), the algorithm produced much lower accuracy with a point spacing of 0.5 mm than Methods 1-4 with a point spacing of 3 mm.

  14. Gluteal muscle fatty atrophy is not associated with elevated blood metal ions or pseudotumors in patients with a unilateral metal-on-metal hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Reito, Aleksi; Elo, Petra; Nieminen, Jyrki; Puolakka, Timo; Eskelinen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose There are no international guidelines to define adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD). Muscle fatty atrophy has been reported to be common in patients with failing metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements. We assessed whether gluteal muscle fatty atrophy is associated with elevated blood metal ion levels and pseudotumors. Patients and methods 263 consecutive patients with unilateral ASR XL total hip replacement using a posterior approach and with an unoperated contralateral hip were included in the study. All patients had undergone a standard screening program at our institution, including MRI and blood metal ion measurement. Muscle fatty atrophy was graded as being absent, mild, moderate, or severe in each of the gluteal muscles. Results The prevalance of moderate-to-severe gluteal muscle atrophy was low (12% for gluteus minimus, 10% for gluteus medius, and 2% for gluteus maximus). Muscle atrophy was neither associated with elevated blood metal ion levels (> 5 ppb) nor with the presence of a clear (solid- or mixed-type) pseudotumor seen in MRI. A combination of moderate-to-severe atrophy in MRI, elevated blood metal ion levels, and MRI-confirmed mixed or solid pseudotumor was rare. Multivariable regression revealed that “preoperative diagnosis other than osteoarthrosis” was the strongest predictor of the presence of fatty atrophy. Interpretation Gluteal muscle atrophy may be a clinically significant finding with influence on hip muscle strength in patients with MoM hip replacement. However, our results suggest that gluteal muscle atrophy seen in MRI is not associated with either the presence or severity of ARMD, at least not in patients who have been operated on using the posterior approach. PMID:26427902

  15. Risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture in cementless total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Simo S A; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Kostensalo, Inari; Mäkelä, Keijo; Huhtala, Heini; Kettunen, Jukka S; Remes, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Intraoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture is a known complication of cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). We determined the incidence of—and risk factors for—intraoperative calcar fracture, and assessed its influence on the risk of revision. Patients and methods — This retrospective analysis included 3,207 cementless THAs (in 2,913 patients). 118 intraoperative calcar fractures were observed in these hips (3.7%). A control group of 118 patients/hips without calcar fractures was randomly selected. The mean follow-up was 4.2 (1.8–8.0) years. Demographic data, surgical data, type of implant, and proximal femur morphology were evaluated to determine risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture. Results — The revision rates in the calcar fracture group and the control group were 10% (95% CI: 5.9–17) and 3.4% (CI: 1.3–8.4), respectively. The revision rate directly related to intraoperative calcar fracture was 7.6%. The Hardinge approach and lower age were risk factors for calcar fracture. In the fracture group, 55 of 118 patients (47%) had at least one risk factor, while only 23 of118 patients in the control group (20%) had a risk factor (p = 0.001). Radiological analysis showed that in the calcar fracture group, there were more deviated femoral anatomies and proximal femur bone cortices were thinner. Interpretation — Intraoperative calcar fracture increased the risk of revision. The Hardinge approach and lower age were risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture. To avoid intraoperative fractures, special attention should be paid when cementless stems are used with deviant-shaped proximal femurs and with thin cortices. PMID:26541230

  16. Good short-term outcome of primary total hip arthroplasty with cementless bioactive glass ceramic bottom-coated implants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Cementless total hip arthroplasty is currently favored by many orthopedic surgeons. The design of the porous surface is critically important for long-term fixation. We examined the clinical and radiographic outcome of the cementless titanium hip implant with a bottom coating of apatite-wollastonite containing bioactive glass ceramic. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 109 hips (92 patients) that had undergone primary cementless total hip arthroplasty with bioactive glass ceramic bottom-coated implants. The mean follow-up period was 7 (3–9) years. Hip joint function was evaluated with the Merle d’Aubigné and Postel hip score, and radiographic changes were determined from anteroposterior radiographs. Results The mean hip score improved from 9.7 preoperatively to 17 at the final follow-up. The overall survival rate was 100% at 9 years, when radiographic loosening or revision for any reason was used as the endpoint. 3 stems in 2 patients subsided more than 3 mm vertically within 1 year after implantation. Radiographs of the interface of the stem and femur were all classified as bone ingrowth fixation. Conclusions The short-term results of this study show good outcome for cementless implants with a bottom coating of apatite-wollastonite containing bioactive glass ceramic. PMID:23043270

  17. Excellent Survivorship With the Use of Proximally Coated Tapered Cementless Stems for Total Hip Arthroplasty in Octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    Stroh, D. Alex; Johnson, Aaron J.; Mont, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The use of total hip arthroplasty (THA) continues to grow partially because of the increasing life expectancy of the American population. Whether to use cemented or cementless femoral fixation options in older patients is often debated. The purpose of the present study was to compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes after cementless THA in patients ≥80 years to younger patients. Clinical and radiographic data were gathered on 33 patients (35 hips) all 80 years or older who had undergone proximally coated cementless total hip arthroplasties. Outcomes were compared with a matching group for age, body mass index, and diagnosis, who had undergone the same procedure by the same surgeon at a similar time. Harris hip scores were evaluated pre- and postoperatively, and radiographs were reviewed for evaluation of fixation and stability. At a mean follow-up of 4 years, 97% of the hips (34 of 35) remained unrevised and the mean Harris hip score had improved by 39 points to 83 points (range, 26-100 points). On radiographic evaluation, 91% were found to have full bony ingrowth, with 1 hip having osteolysis of the proximal femur. Mortality was 23% at 86 months. Except for mortality, the outcomes and complication rates were similar to the younger group except that the matching group had higher final postoperative Harris hip scores. Proximally coated tapered cementless THA is a safe and efficacious method for providing good clinical outcomes with low revision rates in patients 80 years of age or older. PMID:23569678

  18. Survival analysis of cementless grit-blasted titanium total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, C; Kapandji, A I

    2001-04-01

    Although about 200000 cementless Zweymüller-Alloclassic total hip arthroplasties (THAs) were carried out worldwide in the last decade, the survival analysis of these prostheses was not available in the 2000 report of the Swedish national hip arthroplasty registry. We report a prospective survivorship analysis of 200 consecutive grit-blasted cementless Alloclassic primary THAs carried out since 1988. Using surgical, clinical and radiological endpoints for the stem and the threaded cup the ten-year survivorship was 91.5% for reoperation for any cause, 96.4% for hip pain (Merle d'Aubigné score < 5 points, clinical failure), 99.4% for definite aseptic loosening (radiological failure) and 99.3% for revision for aseptic loosening. Using the Swedish registry criteria of primary osteoarthritis and revision for aseptic loosening as the endpoint, the survival rate of 99.1% at ten years for the subgroup of 157 Alloclassic THAs in osteoarthritis compares favourably with that of the best modern cemented hip replacements reported in the Swedish arthroplasty registry. PMID:11341429

  19. Custom Cementless Stem Improves Hip Function in Young Patients at 15-year Followup

    PubMed Central

    Flecher, Xavier; Pearce, Oliver; Parratte, Sebastien; Aubaniac, Jean-Manuel

    2009-01-01

    THA in young patients is challenging regarding restoration and survival because patients are young, active, and tend to have disturbed anatomy. We asked whether a three-dimensional custom cementless stem could restore hip function, decrease osteolysis and wear, and enhance stem survival in young patients. We retrospectively reviewed 212 patients (233 hips) younger than 50 years (mean, 40 years) at a followup of 5 to 16 years (mean, 10 years). The Merle D’Aubigné-Postel and Harris hip scores improved at last followup. No thigh pain was recorded for any of the patients; 187 of the 212 patients (88%) had full activity recovery, 206 had full range of motion, and 151 had a score greater than 80 points for all five categories of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome score. Five patients had femoral osteolysis not associated with pain. With revision for any reason as an end point, the survivorship was 87% (range, 77%–97%) at 15 years, and considering stem revision only, the survivorship was 93% (confidence interval, 90%–97%) at 15 years. Our data compare favorably with those from series using standard cementless stems at the same followup with a high percentage of patients achieving functional restoration and a low rate of complications. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19690930

  20. The use of cementless acetabular component in revision surgery without pelvic discontinuity.

    PubMed

    Cherubino, Paolo; D'Angelo, Fabio; Surace, Michele Francesco; Murena, Luigi; Vulcano, Ettore

    2010-10-01

    Reconstruction of the failed acetabular component in total hip arthroplasty (THA) can be challenging. Although there are multiple reconstructive options available, a cementless acetabular component inserted with screws has been shown to have good intermediate-term results and is the reconstructive method of choice for the majority of acetabular revisions This reconstruction is feasible provided at least 50% of the implant contacts host bone. When such contact is not possible, and there is adequate medial and peripheral bone, techniques using alternative uncemented implants can be used for acetabular reconstruction. An uncemented cup can be placed at a "high hip center." Alternatively, the acetabular cavity can be progressively reamed to accommodate extra-large cups. Oblong cups, which take advantage of the oval-shaped cavity resulting from many failed acetabular components, can also be used. The success of these cementless techniques depends on the degree and location of bone loss. The correct indication to revision and the choice of the correct implant is the keystone for the success of this type of surgery and follows an accurate preoperative planning in order to understand the specific pathologic scenario. The aim of this paper is to review some technical options for the revision of the acetabular component also taking into account our personal experiences and series. PMID:21082580

  1. Influence of cementless cup surface on stability and bone fixation 2 years after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Urbański, Wiktor; Krawczyk, Artur; Dragan, Szymon Ł; Kulej, Mirosław; Dragan, Szymon F

    2012-01-01

    Loss of fixation between bone and implant surface is one of the main treatment problems in total hip arthroplasty. It might lead to implant instability, bone loss and treatment failure resulting in revision surgery. Surface modification is a method for improving bone response to implant and increasing implant osseointegration. However, the currently applied modifications such as hydroxyapatite coatings do not meet expectation and do not provide good clinical result. The object of the study was to evaluate the influence of acetabular cup surface modification on fixation and bone remodelling in total hip arthroplasty. Clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated in patients two years after cementless total hip replacement. Two groups were compared: patients with acetabular component with uncoated titanium surface and patients with hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular surface. Hips X-rays were analysed for early signs of losing stability of acetabular cups. Two years after surgery the analysis of X-rays did not reveal any statistical differences in stability, migration of acetabular components of endoprosthesis between both groups. No differences were also observed in bone remodelling around implants. Particularly high percentage of cups, i.e. 17.64%, were classified into the group with high risk of early implant loosening, i.e., the group with HA coatings. Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium cementless acetabular cups implanted by press-fit technique have no influence on their stability, bone-implant fixation and the remodelling of bone surrounding an implant two years after surgery.

  2. Asymptomatic prospective and retrospective cohorts with metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty indicate acquired lymphocyte reactivity varies with metal ion levels on a group basis.

    PubMed

    Hallab, Nadim J; Caicedo, Marco; McAllister, Kyron; Skipor, Anastasia; Amstutz, Harlan; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2013-02-01

    Some tissues from metal-on-metal (MoM) hip arthroplasty revisions have shown evidence of adaptive-immune reactivity (i.e., excessive peri-implant lymphocyte infiltration/activation). We hypothesized that, prior to symptoms, some people with MoM hip arthroplasty will develop quantifiable metal-induced lymphocyte reactivity responses related to peripheral metal ion levels. We tested three cohorts (Group 1: n = 21 prospective longitudinal MoM hip arthroplasty; Group 2: n = 17 retrospective MoM hip arthroplasty; and Group 3: n = 20 controls without implants). We compared implant position, metal-ion release, and immuno-reactivity. MoM cohorts had elevated (p < 0.01) amounts of serum Co and Cr compared to controls as early as 3 months post-op (Group 1:1.2 ppb Co, 1.5 ppb Cr; Group 2: 3.4 ppb Co, 5.4 ppb Cr; Group 3: 0.01 ppb Co, 0.1 ppb Cr). However, only after 1-4 years post-op did 56% of Group 1 develop metal-reactivity (vs. 5% pre-op, metal-LTT, SI > 2), compared with 76% of Group 2, and 15% of Group 3 controls (patch testing was a poor diagnostic indicator with only 1/21 Group 1 positive). Higher cup-abduction angles (50° vs. 40°) in Group 1 were associated with higher serum Cr (p < 0.07). However, sub-optimal cup-anteversion angles (9° vs. 20°) had higher serum Co (p < 0.08). Serum Cr and Co were significantly elevated in reactive versus non-reactive Group-1 participants (p < 0.04). CD4+CD69+ T-helper lymphocytes (but not CD8+) and IL-1β, IL-12, and IL-6 cytokines were all significantly elevated in metal-reactive versus non-reactive Group 1 participants. Our results showed that lymphocyte reactivity to metals can develop within the first 1-4 years after MoM arthroplasty in asymptomatic patients and lags increases in metal ion levels. This increased metal reactivity was more prevalent in those individuals with extreme cup angles and higher amounts of circulating metal.

  3. Load transfer with the Austin Moore cementless hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Keaveny, T M; Bartel, D L

    1993-03-01

    More than 1,300 Austin Moore hemiarthroplasties have been reviewed in the literature, with no reports of fracture of the stem. Many patients with these hip implants had good function. The lack of stem fractures in patients with good functions has not been explained and contrasts with stem fractures that have occurred in patients with cemented prostheses of other designs during the same time. We used three-dimensional finite-element analysis and free-body diagrams to explain the lack of fractures for this device by a description of the probable load-transfer mechanisms between the prosthesis and the bone. Results from our finite-element analysis indicate that, with good calcar-collar support, the stresses in the stem are small because the stem portion of the prosthesis and the bone are uncoupled and, consequently, do not share the resultant bending moment of the head and abductor forces. If the stem is coupled to the bone so that the resultant bending moment is shared, high stresses in the stem are predicted; such stresses are inconsistent with the complete absence of fractures of these prostheses. The results of the finite-element analysis further showed that loss of calcar-collar support with proximal fixation through the fenestrations resulted in high stresses in the stem and stress shielding of the proximal medial cortex. The uncoupled prosthesis also may be modeled with a free-body diagram as a three-force member loaded at the head, stem tip, and in the proximal region. With this model, it can be shown that the reaction force of the stem tip, and thus the peak bending stress in the stem, increases as calcar-collar support is decreased. If there is no calcar-collar support, proximal support must be provided by some combination of integration of bone in the fenestrations and wedging due to the lateral-medial taper of the device. Stresses in the stem are largest when there is no wedging, but high stresses develop in the cancellous bone in the fenestrations. When

  4. Cementless Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty with Ceramic Articulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jong-Hyuck; Yang, Seong-Jo; Kang, Joon-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The results of ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) bearing surfaces in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) were well known. However, it was not known in revision THA. The purpose of this study is to report the results of revision THA with ceramic articulation. Materials and Methods A total of 112 revision THAs were evaluated. The mean age at the time of surgery was 51.6 years (27.7 to 84.2 years). The mean duration of the follow-up periods was 6.3 years (2.3 to 11.4 years). Results The Harris hip scores improved from an average of 56.2 at the index surgery to an average of 93.3 at the last follow-up (P<0.001). None of hips showed osteolysis or ceramic head fracture. One hip showed aseptic loosening in the acetabular component with squeaking that caused a re-revision. There were nine cases of dislocation. The survivorship at 5 years was 94.5% (95% confidence interval, 87.9% to 97.6%) with revision for any reason as the endpoint and 100% with femoral revision. Conclusion The ceramic articulation is one of good bearing options for revision THA in patients with a long life expectancy. PMID:27536630

  5. Valgus subsidence of the tibial component in cementless Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Liddle, A. D.; Pandit, H. G.; Jenkins, C.; Lobenhoffer, P.; Jackson, W. F. M.; Dodd, C. A. F.; Murray, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    The cementless Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement has been demonstrated to have superior fixation on radiographs and a similar early complication rate compared with the cemented version. However, a small number of cases have come to our attention where, after an apparently successful procedure, the tibial component subsides into a valgus position with an increased posterior slope, before becoming well-fixed. We present the clinical and radiological findings of these six patients and describe their natural history and the likely causes. Two underwent revision in the early post-operative period, and in four the implant stabilised and became well-fixed radiologically with a good functional outcome. This situation appears to be avoidable by minor modifications to the operative technique, and it appears that it can be treated conservatively in most patients. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2014;96-B:345–9. PMID:24589789

  6. Biomechanical Study on Distal Filling Effects in Cementless Total Hip Replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Soo-Won; Lee, Jun-Hyoung; Choi, Hyung-Yun

    In cementless total hip replacement, initial stability of the femoral component is important in the long term fixation of the femoral stem. Initial stability is closely related to the relative displacement between the prosthesis and the cancellous bone of the proximal femur. After implantation of the prosthesis, the surrounding bone is partially shielded from load carrying and starts to resorb. Stress shielding causes the loss of the proximal bone. The stress distribution of femur must be assessed to predict stress shielding. The initial stability and the stress shielding were investigated for two loading conditions approximating a single leg stance and stair climbing. Two types of stems involving a distal filling and a distal short stem were studied by the finite element method to investigate the biomechanical distal filling effects. The distal short stem produced less stress shielding at the proximal bone than the distal filling stem, while both types of stems seemed to satisfy the initial stability requirement.

  7. Valgus subsidence of the tibial component in cementless Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Liddle, A D; Pandit, H G; Jenkins, C; Lobenhoffer, P; Jackson, W F M; Dodd, C A F; Murray, D W

    2014-03-01

    The cementless Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement has been demonstrated to have superior fixation on radiographs and a similar early complication rate compared with the cemented version. However, a small number of cases have come to our attention where, after an apparently successful procedure, the tibial component subsides into a valgus position with an increased posterior slope, before becoming well-fixed. We present the clinical and radiological findings of these six patients and describe their natural history and the likely causes. Two underwent revision in the early post-operative period, and in four the implant stabilised and became well-fixed radiologically with a good functional outcome. This situation appears to be avoidable by minor modifications to the operative technique, and it appears that it can be treated conservatively in most patients.

  8. Is increased modularity associated with increased fretting and corrosion damage in metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty devices?: a retrieval study.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Genymphas B; Hanzlik, Josa A; MacDonald, Daniel W; Gilbert, Jeremy L; Rimnac, Clare M; Kurtz, Steven M

    2013-09-01

    This retrieval study documents taper damage at modular interfaces in retrieved MOM THA systems and investigates if increased modularity is associated with increased fretting and corrosion. One hundred thirty-four (134) heads and 60 stems (41 modular necks) of 8 different bearing designs (5 manufacturers) were analyzed. Damage at the shell-liner interface of 18 modular CoCr acetabular liners and the corresponding 11 acetabular shells was also evaluated. The results of this study support the hypothesis that fretting and corrosion damage occurs at a variety of modular component interfaces in contemporary MOM THAs. We also found that modularity of the femoral stem was associated with increased damage at the head. An analysis of component and patient variables revealed that dissimilar alloy pairing, larger head sizes, increased medio-lateral offsets and longer neck moment arms were all associated with increased taper damage at the modular interfaces.

  9. Outcomes of Surgical Treatment of Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures in Cementless Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Wook; Lee, Jung-Ho; Park, Ji-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to evaluate the results of surgical treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures in cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). Materials and Methods From June 2002 to May 2012, 40 patients who could be followed-up for more than 1 year after surgery were enrolled in this study. The mean duration of follow-up was 28.5 months (range, 15-97 months) and the average age at the time of surgery was 71.5 years (range, 38-89 years). The fracture types were determined by using the Vancouver classification. Among intraoperative fractures, there were type A in 3 hips, type B2 in 2 hips and type B3 in one. Among postoperative fractures, type AG was present in 5 hips, type AL in 2 hips, type B1 in 15 hips, type B2 in 6 hips, type B3 in 3 hips, and type C in 3 hips. Evaluation of the results was based on bony union, stability of the prosthesis, postoperative complications, and Harris hip score at the final follow-up. Results Bony union was achieved in all but one case and the average time for bony union was 21 weeks. The mean Harris hip score was 86 at the final follow-up. Clinical results were above good in 34 of 40 hips (85.0%). Stem loosening occurred in one patient with a type B1 fracture treated with open reduction and plate fixation. Nonunion was observed in 1 patient with an AG type fracture. Conclusion Open reduction and fixation using a plate with a screw and cerclage wiring provided good results for periprosthetic fractures in patients who had a stable femoral stem without bone defects. Revision surgery with a cementless long stem should be considered in patients with an unstable stem or suspected stability in B1 type of THA using a proximal fixation type. PMID:27536618

  10. [Cementless total hip arthroplasty--results of 8-year follow-up study].

    PubMed

    Wall, Andrzej; Dragan, Szymon

    2006-01-01

    The subjects of the clinical examinations were 382 patients who from 1994 to 1999 were treated with the method of total cementless arthroplasty. The observation time ranged from 3 to 8 years. In the examined group the secondary cause of degenerative changes was identified in 210 (55%) patients. In the remaining 172 cases (45%) the primary cause of degenerative changes in the hip was diagnosed. Four types of cementless endoprostheses, varied in their construction, structure of their surfaces and material they were made of, were used to carry out the postoperative treatment of the degenerative changes in the hip: Antega, Zweymüller SL PLUS (Endoprosthetic) or Alloclasic type of stem, GSS-CL and PM-Plasmapore. The findings of the clinical investigation made it possible to determine the probability of surviving of an endoprosthesis up to the 8th year after an operation depending on a type of implanted stem, which according to Kaplan-Meier's method, amounted to 0.9603. The results of Harris scale evaluation of the function of the operated joints demonstrated the existence of the relationship between the function and the course of bone osteointegration and growth process. The detailed analysis of the X-ray examinations, and especially of the roentgenometric ones, taking into account stability of the endoprosthesis stem enabled to distinguish two stages of the clinical and roentgenological changes: the early stage (up to 6 months after an operation) characterised by settling and micromotions of the stem and the late stage (starting 6-9 months after an operation) with slowly gradual increasing of the function and holding back of stem settling. PMID:17017478

  11. Improved design of cementless hip stems using two-dimensional functionally graded materials.

    PubMed

    Hedia, H S; Shabara, M A N; El-Midany, T T; Fouda, N

    2006-10-01

    Increasingly, it is acknowledged that bone resorption around cementless hip implants may cause future problems. The solution is frequently sought in reducing implant stiffness. However, this confronts the designer with a true design conflict: how to reduce the stiffness without excessively loading the proximal bone/prosthesis interface? The aim of this work is to improve the design of cementless hip stem material, using two-dimensional (2D) functionally graded material (FGM) concept in order to solve the above problems. Two models were used in this analysis, using three materials with different elastic moduli, E(1), E(2), and E(3). In model I, the elastic moduli E(1) and E(2) gradually change along the upper stem surface, while E(3) is maintained constant along all the lower surface of the stem. However, in model II, the elastic moduli E(1) and E(2) gradually change along the lower stem surface, while E(3) is maintained constant all along the upper stem surface. It is found that the recommended model is model I, which has three distinct materials of hydroxyapatite, Bioglass, and collagen. The recommended design of 2D FGM is expected to reduce the stress shielding by 91% and 12%, respectively, compared with titanium stem and model II of FGM. It is found that this new design reduces the maximum interface shear stress at the lateral and medial sides of the femur by about 50%, compared with titanium stem. Furthermore, the maximum interface shear stress is reduced by about 17% and 11% at the lateral and medial sides of the femur, respectively, compared with that of model II of FGM.

  12. Primary Cementless Hip Arthroplasty in Unstable Intertrochanteric Femur Fracture in Elderlys: Short-term Results

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyung Lae; Cho, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was aimed to explore and report the short term results of primary cementless hip arthroplasty in treatment of unstable intertrochanteric femur fracture in elderlys. Materials and Methods Between March 2009 and Feburary 2012, 35 arthroplasty cases performed by single surgeon and followed up for more than one year were evaluated. They were 21 females and 14 males with mean age of 78 years (range, 71-92 years). Preoperative evaluation was performed by American Society of Anesthesia score. Retrospective evaluation was performed by operative time, transfusion amount, time to operation days, hospital stay and time to full weight bearing. Clinically, ambulatory ability was checked by Parker and Palmer (P&P) score and function of hip was appraised by Harris hip score (HSS). Radiologically, bone healing of fractured trochanteric fragment and presence of subsidence, stress shielding or osteolysis were checked. Results Fracture type was 11 cases of A2.2, 18 cases of A2.3 and 6 cases of A3.3. Femoral stems used were 8 cases of rectangular tapered wedge type and 27 cases of fluted modular distal fixation type. P&P score improved from mean preinjury score of 7.1 to mean postoperative last follow-up score of 6.5. Median HHS at last follow-up was 75. Mean time to full weight bearing was 47 days (24-79 days). Postoperative complications were one case of linear periprosthetic femoral fracture and one case of postoperative dislocation. Conclusion Cementless hip replacement arthroplasty could be a good option for unstable intertrochanteric femoral fracture in elderlys. PMID:27536574

  13. Bipolar Hemarthroplasty Using Cementless Conical Stem for Treatment of Dorr Type B and C Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong Hoon; Jung, Sung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The current study aims to evaluate the clinical and the radiological outcome of bipolar hemiarthroplasty using cementless cone stem to treat osteoporotic femoral neck fracture and compare the results according to the proximal femur geometry. Materials and Methods Seventy-five hips (75 patients) that underwent bipolar hemiarthroplasty with cementless cone stem between September 2006 and December 2011 were analyzed. The minimum follow-up period was 3 years. Thirty-three hips were classified as type B and 41 as type C. The clinical outcome was assessed using Harris hip score and the walking ability score. Radiographic evaluation was performed to evaluate the stability of the prosthesis. Results At the most recent follow up, the mean Harris hip score was 86 (range, 70-92) and 65% recovered to preoperative ambulatory status. In the radiographic exam, stable stem fixation was achieved in all cases. For the complications, eight hips developed deep vein thrombosis while three hips showed heterotopic ossification. Dislocation and delayed deep infection occurred in one hip resepectively. There were no significance differences in Harris hip score and walking ability score when the type B group was compare with the type C. Conclusion Bipolar hemiarthroplasty with cementless cone stem showed an excellent early outcome both clinically and radiographically regardless of the shape of the proximal femur. We believe this prosthesis can provide early stability to the Dorr type B and C femur and is an effective treatment for treating osteoporotic femoral neck fracture. PMID:27536631

  14. Excellent results with cementless total hip arthroplasty and alumina-on-alumina pairing: minimum ten-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kress, Alexander M.; Schmidt, Rainer; Holzwarth, Ulrich; Forst, Raimund

    2010-01-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic coupling is thought to be a durable alternative to metal- or alumina-on-polyethylene pairing. No evidence exists suggesting superior clinical and radiological results for hydroxyapatite-coated stems versus uncoated stems. The aim of this study is to report the performance of an alumina-on-alumina bearing cementless total hip arthroplasty and to compare stems with a tapered design with and without hydroxyapatite coating. We prospectively analysed the results of cementless tapered femoral stems (40 hydroxyapatite-coated versus 22 uncoated stems), a metal-backed fibre mesh hydroxyapatite-coated socket and alumina-on-alumina pairing. Of 75 hips studied, 62 were available for follow-up (mean of 10.5 years after surgery). The average Harris hip score was 90. Only one hydroxyapatite-coated stem was revised for aseptic loosening. One instance of non-progressive osteolysis was detected around a screw of a cup. All other components showed radiographic signs of stable ingrowth. Hydroxyapatite coating of the stem had no significant impact on the clinical or radiological results. Total hip arthroplasty with the presented implant and pairing provides a durable standard for all patients requiring hip joint replacement against which all newer generations of cementless implants should be judged. PMID:21079952

  15. Treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head: everything's new.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2007-06-01

    Since the 1970s, the mantra of those treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head was to save the head at all costs. Total hip arthroplasty (THA), the only effective surgical treatment once the head has mechanically and clinically failed, had a poor track record for young active patients. Recently, THA using highly cross-linked polyethylene, metal-on-metal bearing surfaces, or ceramic-on-ceramic bearing surfaces have given promising results, changing the "save-at-all-costs" paradigm. Operations that have a low success rate, high complication rate or morbidity, or compromise subsequent THA can no longer be justified. This includes femoral osteotomy and free vascularized fibular graft. Core decompression is justified, when indicated, because of its low morbidity and absence of complications with subsequent THA.

  16. Heads Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... Juvenil HEADS UP to School Sports Online Concussion Training Coaches Parents Athletes Sports Officials HEADS UP to Schools School Nurses Teachers, Counselors, and School Professionals Parents HEADS UP ...

  17. Toxicology of wear particles of cobalt-chromium alloy metal-on-metal hip implants Part II: Importance of physicochemical properties and dose in animal and in vitro studies as a basis for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Madl, Amy K; Kovochich, Michael; Liong, Monty; Finley, Brent L; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Oberdörster, Günter

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the Part II analysis was to evaluate animal and in vitro toxicology studies of CoCr particles with respect to their physicochemistry and dose relevance to metal-on-metal (MoM) implant patients as derived from Part I. In the various toxicology studies, physicochemical characteristics were infrequently considered and administered doses were orders of magnitude higher than what occurs in patients. Co was consistently shown to rapidly release from CoCr particles for distribution and elimination from the body. CoCr micron sized particles appear more biopersistent in vivo resulting in inflammatory responses that are not seen with similar mass concentrations of nanoparticles. We conclude, that in an attempt to obtain data for a complete risk assessment, future studies need to focus on physicochemical characteristics of nano and micron sized particles and on doses and dose metrics relevant to those generated in patients or in properly conducted hip simulator studies.

  18. Non-linear three-dimensional finite element analysis of a cementless hip endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Tensi, H M; Gese, H; Ascherl, R

    1989-01-01

    In this finite element study the stresses between a stem component of a cementless hip endoprosthesis (Young modulus of Co-Cr-Mo) and the human femur were calculated for two different loading types. Linear and non-linear models were used to simulate the interface implant bone. Two models, a stem with a porous coated surface over the entire length and a stem with a porous coated surface in the proximal region were compared regarding the load transmission to the femur. An additional calculation of an 'isoelastic' stem (Young modulus of cortical bone) was done to show the influence of the stem stiffness. A porous coated surface over the entire length causes principal shear stresses up to 2.75 MPa in the distal-medial region during level walking. The highest compressive stresses were calculated in the proximal-lateral region as 1.5 MPa in cancellous bone. A more physiological load transmission is obtained by limiting the coated area to the proximal region. All stresses in the two models are lower than experimentally evaluated strengths in the interface between implant and bone. A strong influence of the Young modulus of the stem material on the interface stresses was found. An 'isoelastic' stem causes compressive stresses in the proximal-lateral region whose values exceed the experimental strength of cancellous bone.

  19. Failure of Polyethylene Inlays in Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Retrieval Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christoph; Heisel, Christian; Thomsen, Marc; Bitsch, Rudi G.

    2016-01-01

    A retrieval analysis has been performed on 50 polyethylene inlays of cementless screw ring implants (Mecring, Mecron, Berlin, Germany) to investigate the failure mechanism of this specific open cup hip arthroplasty design that has shown a high clinical failure rate. Design-specific damage modes like rim creep, collar fatigue, and backside wear were assessed. Furthermore, the inlays were measured using a CMM to determine deformation. In 90% backside wear was observed and collar fatigue occurred in 68% of the cases. Rim creep was present in 38% of the polyethylene inlays. In 90% of the cases the cup opening diameter was 32.1 mm or less and 46% had a diameter less than 32 mm. It seems that creep and deformation of the polyethylene leads to a reduced diameter at the cup opening and consequently decreased clearance. To avoid this type of failure, polyethylene inlays should be supported at the back by the cup to reduce the risk of ongoing creep deformation. PMID:27660758

  20. A finite element analysis of the vibration behaviour of a cementless hip system.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M A; Seral-García, B

    2013-01-01

    An early diagnosis of aseptic loosening of a total hip replacement (THR) by plain radiography, scintigraphy or arthography has been shown to be less reliable than using a vibration technique. However, it has been suggested that it may be possible to distinguish between a secure and a loose prosthesis using a vibration technique. In fact, vibration analysis methods have been successfully used to assess dental implant stability, to monitor fracture healing and to measure bone mechanical properties. Several studies have combined the vibration technique with the finite element (FE) method in order to better understand the events involved in the experimental technique. In the present study, the main goal is to simulate the change in the resonance frequency during the osseointegration process of a cementless THR (Zweymüller). The FE method was used and a numerical modal analysis was conducted to obtain the natural frequencies and mode shapes under vibration. The effects were studied of different bone and stem material properties, and different contact conditions at the bone-implant interface. The results were in agreement with previous experimental and computational observations, and differences among the different cases studied were detected. As the osseointegration process at the bone-implant interface evolved, the resonance frequency values of the femur-prosthesis system also increased. In summary, vibration analysis combined with the FE method was able to detect different boundary conditions at the bone-implant interface in cases of both osseointegration and loosening. PMID:22300407

  1. Design process of cementless femoral stem using a nonlinear three dimensional finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Minimal available information concerning hip morphology is the motivation for several researchers to study the difference between Asian and Western populations. Current use of a universal hip stem of variable size is not the best option for all femur types. This present study proposed a new design process of the cementless femoral stem using a three dimensional model which provided more information and accurate analysis compared to conventional methods. Methods This complete design cycle began with morphological analysis, followed by femoral stem design, fit and fill analysis, and nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA). Various femur parameters for periosteal and endosteal canal diameters are measured from the osteotomy level to 150 mm below to determine the isthmus position. Results The results showed better total fit (53.7%) and fill (76.7%) canal, with more load distributed proximally to prevent stress shielding at calcar region. The stem demonstrated lower displacement and micromotion (less than 40 μm) promoting osseointegration between the stem–bone and providing primary fixation stability. Conclusion This new design process could be used as a preclinical assessment tool and will shorten the design cycle by identifying the major steps which must be taken while designing the femoral stem. PMID:24484753

  2. Mid-term Results of Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Modular Cementless Femoral Stems

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyung-Gyu; Min, Byung-Woo; Ye, Hee-Uk; Lim, Kyung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of revision total hip arthroplasty using modular distal fixation stems for proximal femoral deficiency. Materials and Methods Forty-five patients (47 hips) were analyzed more than 24 months after revision total hip arthroplasty that used modular distal fixation stems and was performed between 2006 and 2012. There were proximal femoral defects in all cases. Preoperative femoral defect classification revealed Paprosky type II in 31 cases, type IIIA in 7, and type IIIB in 9. The mean duration of follow-up was 53.4 (25-100) months. We evaluated the Harris hip score (HHS), walking ability according to Koval as clinical parameters, stem stability, and stem position change as radiographic parameters. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed. Results The average HHS improved form 39.5 points to 91.3 points and walking ability also improved in most cases; all patients had stable fixation of the femoral stem. Postoperative complications included 5 cases of infection and 2 cases of dislocation. The survival rate with the end point of re-revision surgery due to infection or dislocation was 86% after 8-year follow-up. Conclusion Cementless revision total hip arthroplasty using modular femoral stems is useful because the stems can be stably fixed on the diaphyseal portion of the femur, which has relatively good bone quality at mid-term follow-up. PMID:27536616

  3. Primary stability recognition of the newly designed cementless femoral stem using digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Baharuddin, Mohd Yusof; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Hamedi, Mahyar; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam; Mohd Noor, Alias; Harris, Arief Ruhullah A; Abdul Majid, Norazman

    2014-01-01

    Stress shielding and micromotion are two major issues which determine the success of newly designed cementless femoral stems. The correlation of experimental validation with finite element analysis (FEA) is commonly used to evaluate the stress distribution and fixation stability of the stem within the femoral canal. This paper focused on the applications of feature extraction and pattern recognition using support vector machine (SVM) to determine the primary stability of the implant. We measured strain with triaxial rosette at the metaphyseal region and micromotion with linear variable direct transducer proximally and distally using composite femora. The root mean squares technique is used to feed the classifier which provides maximum likelihood estimation of amplitude, and radial basis function is used as the kernel parameter which mapped the datasets into separable hyperplanes. The results showed 100% pattern recognition accuracy using SVM for both strain and micromotion. This indicates that DSP could be applied in determining the femoral stem primary stability with high pattern recognition accuracy in biomechanical testing. PMID:24800230

  4. Design optimization of cementless metal-backed cup prostheses using the concept of functionally graded material.

    PubMed

    Hedia, H S; El-Midany, T T; Shabara, M A N; Fouda, N

    2006-09-01

    Metal backing has been widely used in acetabular cup design. A stiff backing for a polyethylene liner was initially believed to be mechanically favourable. Yet, recent studies of the load transfer around acetabular cups have shown that a stiff backing causes two problems. It generates higher stress peaks around the acetabular rim than those caused by full polyethylene cups and reduces the stresses transferred to the dome of the acetabulum causing stress shielding. The aim of this study is to overcome these two problems by improving the design of cementless metal-backed acetabular cups using the two-dimensional functionally graded material (FGM) concept through finite-element analysis and optimization techniques. It is found that the optimal 2D FGM model must have three bioactive materials of hydroxyapatite, Bioglass and collagen. This optimal material reduces the stress shielding at the dome of the acetabulum by 40% and 37% compared with stainless steel and titanium metal backing shells, respectively. In addition, using the 2D FGM model reduces the maximum interface shear stress in the bone by 31% compared to the titanium metal backing shell.

  5. Effects of some technological aspects on the fatigue strength of a cementless hip stem.

    PubMed

    Viceconti, M; Toni, A; Giunti, A

    1995-07-01

    Four prototype cementless hip stems were tested following the ISO 7206 protocol for the assessment of the endurance properties and compared with a cast Cr-Co-Mo (ASTM F75) commercially available stem which was used as reference design. All the tested stems were similar in shape and size, but with some substantial differences. The first was made of forged Ti6A14V alloy (ASTM F136). The second, made of the same material, featured a central hole intended to reduce the bending stiffness of the stem itself. The third was identical to the second but for a small tooling notch in one of the fillets of the hole. The fourth was similar to the first but had a coating of sintered titanium beads in the proximal part. All of these modifications were made to evaluate the effect of fatigue strength of intentional or unintentional features commonly found in commercial stems. The forged Ti6A14V allow was found to be substantially stronger than the cast ASTM F75 Cr-Co-Mo alloy. However, tooling notches or sintered coatings were found to dramatically reduce this strength. Thus, the Ti6A14V alloy calls for an accurate design process, especially when complex shapes or sintered structures are required.

  6. Cementless total knee arthroplasty with Profix: a 8- to 10-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hardeman, François; Vandenneucker, Hilde; Van Lauwe, Johan; Bellemans, Johan

    2006-12-01

    A consecutive series of 115 cementless Profix (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, USA) Total Knee Arthroplasties performed in 113 patients were followed in order to determine the functional results and survivorship at 8 to 10 years. All patients were included in a prospective database and were reviewed annually until final follow-up. Patients overall satisfaction was excellent or good in 91.3% of cases. The mean Knee Society's knee and function scores increased respectively from 49.3 and 36.7 preoperatively to 93.1 and 82.2 postoperatively. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of implant survival at 10 years was 97.1%. Two patients underwent revision and were considered as failures. One patient had a fracture of the medial condyle at 4 days post-surgery, and the other was revised for aseptic loosening of the tibial component at 6 years post-surgery. On the basis of this long-term follow-up study, we can conclude that the Profix Total Knee System is effective and safe. PMID:17064905

  7. Primary Stability Recognition of the Newly Designed Cementless Femoral Stem Using Digital Signal Processing

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Hamedi, Mahyar; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam; Mohd Noor, Alias; Harris, Arief Ruhullah A.; Abdul Majid, Norazman

    2014-01-01

    Stress shielding and micromotion are two major issues which determine the success of newly designed cementless femoral stems. The correlation of experimental validation with finite element analysis (FEA) is commonly used to evaluate the stress distribution and fixation stability of the stem within the femoral canal. This paper focused on the applications of feature extraction and pattern recognition using support vector machine (SVM) to determine the primary stability of the implant. We measured strain with triaxial rosette at the metaphyseal region and micromotion with linear variable direct transducer proximally and distally using composite femora. The root mean squares technique is used to feed the classifier which provides maximum likelihood estimation of amplitude, and radial basis function is used as the kernel parameter which mapped the datasets into separable hyperplanes. The results showed 100% pattern recognition accuracy using SVM for both strain and micromotion. This indicates that DSP could be applied in determining the femoral stem primary stability with high pattern recognition accuracy in biomechanical testing. PMID:24800230

  8. Failure of Polyethylene Inlays in Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Retrieval Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christoph; Heisel, Christian; Thomsen, Marc; Bitsch, Rudi G.

    2016-01-01

    A retrieval analysis has been performed on 50 polyethylene inlays of cementless screw ring implants (Mecring, Mecron, Berlin, Germany) to investigate the failure mechanism of this specific open cup hip arthroplasty design that has shown a high clinical failure rate. Design-specific damage modes like rim creep, collar fatigue, and backside wear were assessed. Furthermore, the inlays were measured using a CMM to determine deformation. In 90% backside wear was observed and collar fatigue occurred in 68% of the cases. Rim creep was present in 38% of the polyethylene inlays. In 90% of the cases the cup opening diameter was 32.1 mm or less and 46% had a diameter less than 32 mm. It seems that creep and deformation of the polyethylene leads to a reduced diameter at the cup opening and consequently decreased clearance. To avoid this type of failure, polyethylene inlays should be supported at the back by the cup to reduce the risk of ongoing creep deformation.

  9. Accuracy and repeatability of cementless total hip replacement surgery in patients with deformed anatomies.

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Riccardo; Grazi, Erika; Testi, Debora; Viceconti, Marco; Cappello, Angelo; Toni, Aldo

    2003-03-01

    The present study is aimed to assess the repeatability of orthopaedic surgeons in planning total hip replacement surgery, and the Planned-vs.-Achieved accuracy obtainable with a conventional unassisted surgical procedure. A CT-based surgical planning system called Hip-Op was used for pre-operative planning the pose of the cementless components. The study group included only patients affected by severe deformities of the hip joint. In the repeatability study three surgeons were asked to repetitively plan the same three cases in a blind way. There was agreement among surgeons and also consistency for each surgeon in planning the implant position, while the most expert surgeon was more repeatable in planning the implant orientation. For all patients of the study group, the Planned-vs.-Achieved accuracy was computed as the difference between the spatial position of both prosthetic components derived from the post-operative CT scans and that achieved by the surgeon in the pre-operative planning. The average differences for the stem were lower than 5 mm for the position, and lower than 5 degrees for the orientation. For the socket the average differences increased to 8 mm and 10 degrees. The study shows the need for a more informative planning environment and for intra-operative supports, especially when deformed anatomies are involved.

  10. The effect of stem fit on bone hypertrophy and pain relief in cementless total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A

    1989-10-01

    This study was designed to clinically evaluate the effects of a tight distal fit and collar seating in hips with a cylindrical distal stem, collar, and proximal porous coating. A clinical assessment of pain and a roentgenographic assessment of patterns of proximal femoral hypertrophy were made in 105 patients. Intraoperative evaluations of the distal stem fit were performed so that a tight distal fit was ensured in 67 patients. Thirty-eight patients who did not have intraoperative sizing were determined roentgenographically to have a loose distal fit. Pain was significantly more likely to occur in those patients with a loose distal fit (20 of 38) than in those with a tight distal fit (two of 67). Collar seating was associated with hypertrophy under the seated portion of the collar in all cases, and failure to seat the collar was associated with recession and rounding of the upper femoral cortical edge. Distal hypertrophy occurred in 24 of the 67 hips with a tight distal fit, and a tight distal fit did not prevent proximal hypertrophy. It was concluded that a tight distal fit is associated with more complete pain relief in cementless total hip arthroplasty and that a tight distal fit of a cylindrical stem does not prevent proximal load bearing. PMID:2791383

  11. Profiling the third-body wear damage produced in CoCr surfaces by bone cement, CoCr, and Ti6Al4V debris: a 10-cycle metal-on-metal simulator test.

    PubMed

    Halim, Thomas; Burgett, Michelle; Donaldson, Thomas K; Savisaar, Christina; Bowsher, John; Clarke, Ian C

    2014-07-01

    Particles of bone cement (polymethyl methacrylate), CoCr and Ti6Al4V were compared for their abrasion potential against CoCr substrates. This appears to be the first study utilizing CoCr and Ti6Al4V particulates to abrade CoCr bearings and the first study profiling the morphology of third-body abrasive wear scratches in a hip simulator. The 5 mg debris allotments (median size range 140-300 µm) were added to cups mounted both inverted and anatomically with metal-on-metal (MOM) bearings in a 10-cycle, hip simulator test. Surface abrasion was characterized by roughness indices and scratch profiles. Compared to third-body abrasion with metal debris, polymethyl methacrylate debris had minimal effect on the CoCr surfaces. In all, 10 cycles of abrasion with metal debris demonstrated that roughness indices (Ra, PV) increased approximately 20-fold from the unworn condition. The scratch profiles ranged 20-108 µm wide and 0.5-2.8 µm deep. The scratch aspect ratio (W/PV) averaged 0.03, and this very low ratio indicated that the 140 µm CoCr beads had plastically deformed to create wide but shallow scratches. There was no evidence of transfer of CoCr beads to CoCr bearings. The Ti64 particles produced similar scratch morphology with the same aspect ratio as the CoCr particulates. However, the titanium particulates also showed a unique ability to flatten and adhere to the CoCr, forming smears and islands of contaminating metal on the CoCr bearings. The morphology of scratches and metal transfer produced by these large metal particulates in the simulator appeared identical to those reported on retrieved metal-on-metal bearings.

  12. Effect of femoral canal shape on mechanical stress distribution and adaptive bone remodelling around a cementless tapered-wedge stem

    PubMed Central

    Oba, M.; Kobayashi, N.; Ike, H.; Tezuka, T.; Saito, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In total hip arthroplasty (THA), the cementless, tapered-wedge stem design contributes to achieving initial stability and providing optimal load transfer in the proximal femur. However, loading conditions on the femur following THA are also influenced by femoral structure. Therefore, we determined the effects of tapered-wedge stems on the load distribution of the femur using subject-specific finite element models of femurs with various canal shapes. Patients and Methods We studied 20 femurs, including seven champagne flute-type femurs, five stovepipe-type femurs, and eight intermediate-type femurs, in patients who had undergone cementless THA using the Accolade TMZF stem at our institution. Subject–specific finite element (FE) models of pre- and post-operative femurs with stems were constructed and used to perform FE analyses (FEAs) to simulate single-leg stance. FEA predictions were compared with changes in bone mineral density (BMD) measured for each patient during the first post-operative year. Results Stovepipe models implanted with large-size stems had significantly lower equivalent stress on the proximal-medial area of the femur compared with champagne-flute and intermediate models, with a significant loss of BMD in the corresponding area at one year post-operatively. Conclusions The stovepipe femurs required a large-size stem to obtain an optimal fit of the stem. The FEA result and post-operative BMD change of the femur suggest that the combination of a large-size Accolade TMZF stem and stovepipe femur may be associated with proximal stress shielding. Cite this article: M. Oba, Y. Inaba, N. Kobayashi, H. Ike, T. Tezuka, T. Saito. Effect of femoral canal shape on mechanical stress distribution and adaptive bone remodelling around a cementless tapered-wedge stem. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:362–369. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.59.2000525. PMID:27601435

  13. A Multicenter Approach Evaluating the Impact of Vitamin E-Blended Polyethylene in Cementless Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Marcus; van Wasen, Andrea; Warwas, Sebastian; Landgraeber, Stefan; Haversath, Marcel; Group, VITAS

    2014-01-01

    Since polyethylene is one of the most frequently used biomaterials as a liner in total hip arthroplasty, strong efforts have been made to improve design and material properties over the last 50 years. Antioxidants seems to be a promising alternative to further increase durability and reduce polyethylene wear in long term. As of yet, only in vitro results are available. While they are promising, there is yet no clinical evidence that the new material shows these advantages in vivo. To answer the question if vitamin-E enhanced ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is able to improve long-term survivorship of cementless total hip arthroplasty we initiated a randomized long-term multicenter trial. Designed as a superiority study, the oxidation index assessed in retrieval analyses of explanted liners was chosen as primary parameter. Radiographic results (wear rate, osteolysis, radiolucency) and functional outcome (Harris Hip Scores, University of California-Los Angeles, Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Visual Analogue Scale) will serve as secondary parameters. Patients with the indication for a cementless total hip arthroplasty will be asked to participate in the study and will be randomized to either receive a standard hip replacement with a highly cross-linked UHMWPE-X liner or a highly cross-linked vitamin-E supplemented UHMWPE-XE liner. The follow-up will be 15 years, with evaluation after 5, 10 and 15 years. The controlled randomized study has been designed to determine if Vitamin-E supplemented highly cross-linked polyethylene liners are superior to standard XLPE liners in cementless total hip arthroplasty. While several studies have been started to evaluate the influence of vitamin-E, most of them evaluate wear rates and functional results. The approach used for this multicenter study, to analyze the oxidation status of retrieved implants, should make it possible to directly evaluate the ageing process and development of the implant

  14. Mathematical optimization of elastic properties: application to cementless hip stem design.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, J H; Huiskes, R

    1997-05-01

    The designer of a cementless hip stem in total hip replacement must find a balance between two conflicting demands. On the one hand, a stiff stem shields the surrounding bone from mechanical loading (stress shielding), which may lead to bone loss, particularly around the proximal part of the stem. Reducing the stem stiffness decreases the amount of stress shielding and hence the amount of bone loss. However, this measure inevitably promotes higher proximal interface stresses and thereby increases the risk of proximal interface failure. The designer's task therefore is to optimize the stem stiffness in order to find the best compromise in the conflict. Yet, a better compromise might be found when the stem material was nonhomogeneous, in other words when an arbitrary distribution of the elastic properties inside the stem was allowed. The number of conceivable designs would increase enormously, making the designer's task almost impossible. In the present paper, we develop a numerical design optimization method to determine the optimal stiffness characteristics for a hip stem. A finite element program is coupled with a numerical optimization method, thus producing a design optimization scheme. The scheme minimizes the probability for interface failure while limiting the amount of bone loss, by adapting the parameters describing the nonhomogeneous elastic modulus distribution. As an example, a simplified model of a hip stem is made, whose modulus distribution is optimized. Assuming equal long-term bone loss, the maximum interface stress can be reduced by over 50 percent when compared to a homogeneous flexible stem, thus demonstrating the value of the new approach. PMID:9168392

  15. Head circumference

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child's head circumference Normal ranges for a child's sex and age (weeks, months), based on values that experts have obtained for normal growth rates of infants' and children's heads Measurement of the head circumference is an ...

  16. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to ...

  17. Adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) associated with corrosion products in metal-on-metal and dual modular neck total hip replacements is associated with upregulation of interferon gamma-mediated chemokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Kolatat, Kritti; Perino, Giorgio; Wilner, Gabrielle; Kaplowitz, Elianna; Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Boettner, Friedrich; Westrich, Geoffrey H; Jerabek, Seth A; Goldring, Steven R; Purdue, P Edward

    2015-10-01

    Adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR) associated with tribocorrosion following total hip arthroplasty (THA) have become a significant clinical concern in recent years. In particular, implants featuring metal-on-metal bearing surfaces and modular femoral stems have been reported to result in elevated rates of ALTR. These tribocorrosion-related tissue reactions are characterized by marked necrosis and lymphocytic infiltration, which contrasts sharply with the macrophagic and foreign body giant cell inflammation associated with polyethylene wear particle induced peri-implant osteolysis. In this study, we characterize tribocorrosion-associated ALTR at a molecular level. Gene expression profiling of peri-implant tissue around failing implants identifies upregulation of numerous inflammatory mediators in ALTR, including several interferon gamma inducible factors, most notably the chemokines MIG/CXCL9 and IP-10/CXCL10. This expression profile is distinct from that associated with polyethylene wear induced osteolysis, which is characterized by induction of markers of alternative macrophage activation, such as chitotriosidase (CHIT-1). Importantly, MIG/CXCL9 and IP-10/CXCL10 are also elevated at the protein level in the synovial fluid and, albeit more moderately, the serum, of ALTR patients, raising the possibility that these factors may serve as circulating biomarkers for the early detection of ALTR in at-risk patients. PMID:25940887

  18. Cementless total hip arthroplasty in developmental dysplasia of the hip with end stage osteoarthritis: 2-7 years' clinical results.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Tugrul; Guclu, Berk; Karaguven, Dogac; Kaya, Alper; Akan, Burak; Cetin, Ilker

    2015-01-01

    Between 2006 and 2011, 102 hips of 78 patients with end-stage osteoarthritis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). According to the Crowe's classification, 22 hips (21%) were type 1, 19 hips (18%) were type 2, 22 hips (21%) were type 3 and 39 hips (38%) were type 4 respectively. Functional and clinical analyses were performed by Harris Hip Scores (HHS). There were 73 (71%) excellent or good results according to HHS. The postoperative HHS was significantly lower in patients who underwent femoral shortening (p<0.01). We observed 25 (24.5%) complications in total, 15 (14.7%) of which required revision surgery. The authors concluded that THA for DDH is a safe and a reliable procedure with good clinical outcomes. PMID:25907395

  19. Transverse Subtrochanteric Shortening Osteotomy During Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty in Crowe Type-III or IV Developmental Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Sofu, Hakan; Kockara, Nizamettin; Gursu, Sarper; Issin, Ahmet; Oner, Ali; Sahin, Vedat

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of transverse subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy during cementless total hip arthroplasty in Crowe Type-III or IV developmental dysplasia. Seventy-three osteotomies were included in our study. Mean follow-up was 61 months. Harris hip score, leg length discrepancy, neurological status, union status of the osteotomy, and femoral component stability were the criteria for evaluation. All complications were noted. The mean Harris hip score improved from 38.6 points to 83.7 points. The mean leg length discrepancy decreased from 56.5 mm to 10.7 at the latest follow-up. The mean union time was 5.2 months. We observed 4 non-unions. Transverse subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy is an effective and reliable method in restoration of a more normal limb. PMID:25707993

  20. Similar incidence of periprosthetic fluid collections after ceramic-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasties and metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasties: results of a screening metal artefact reduction sequence-MRI study.

    PubMed

    Bisseling, P; de Wit, B W K; Hol, A M; van Gorp, M J; van Kampen, A; van Susante, J L C

    2015-09-01

    Patients from a randomised trial on resurfacing hip arthroplasty (RHA) (n = 36, 19 males; median age 57 years, 24 to 65) comparing a conventional 28 mm metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA) (n = 28, 17 males; median age 59 years, 37 to 65) and a matched control group of asymptomatic patients with a 32 mm ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP) THA (n = 33, 18 males; median age 63 years, 38 to 71) were cross-sectionally screened with metal artefact reducing sequence-MRI (MARS-MRI) for pseudotumour formation at a median of 55 months (23 to 72) post-operatively. MRIs were scored by consensus according to three different classification systems for pseudotumour formation. Clinical scores were available for all patients and metal ion levels for MoM bearing patients. Periprosthetic lesions with a median volume of 16 mL (1.5 to 35.9) were diagnosed in six patients in the RHA group (17%), one in the MoM THA group (4%) and six in the CoP group (18%). The classification systems revealed no clear differences between the groups. Solid lesions (n = 3) were exclusively encountered in the RHA group. Two patients in the RHA group and one in the MoM THA group underwent a revision for pseudotumour formation. There was no statistically significant relationship between clinical scoring, metal ion levels and periprosthetic lesions in any of the groups. Periprosthetic fluid collections are seen on MARS-MRI after conventional CoP THA and RHA and may reflect a soft-tissue collection or effusion. Currently available MRI classification systems seem to score these collections as pseudotumours, causing an-overestimatation of the incidence of pseudotumours. PMID:26330582

  1. CoCr wear particles generated from CoCr alloy metal-on-metal hip replacements, and cobalt ions stimulate apoptosis and expression of general toxicology-related genes in monocyte-like U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Posada, Olga M; Gilmour, Denise; Tate, Rothwelle J; Grant, M Helen

    2014-11-15

    Cobalt-chromium (CoCr) particles in the nanometre size range and their concomitant release of Co and Cr ions into the patients' circulation are produced by wear at the articulating surfaces of metal-on-metal (MoM) implants. This process is associated with inflammation, bone loss and implant loosening and led to the withdrawal from the market of the DePuy ASR™ MoM hip replacements in 2010. Ions released from CoCr particles derived from a resurfacing implant in vitro and their subsequent cellular up-take were measured by ICP-MS. Moreover, the ability of such metal debris and Co ions to induce both apoptosis was evaluated with both FACS and immunoblotting. qRT-PCR was used to assess the effects on the expression of lymphotoxin alpha (LTA), BCL2-associated athanogene (BAG1), nitric oxide synthase 2 inducible (NOS2), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS), growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible alpha (GADD45A). ICP-MS showed that the wear debris released significant (p<0.05) amounts of Co and Cr ions into the culture medium, and significant (p<0.05) cellular uptake of both ions. There was also an increase (p<0.05) in apoptosis after a 48h exposure to wear debris. Analysis of qRT-PCR results found significant up-regulation (p<0.05) particularly of NOS2 and BAG1 in Co pre-treated cells which were subsequently exposed to Co ions+debris. Metal debris was more effective as an inducer of apoptosis and gene expression when cells had been pre-treated with Co ions. This suggests that if a patient receives sequential bilateral CoCr implants, the second implant may be more likely to produce adverse effects than the first one. PMID:25281833

  2. Retrospective cohort study of the performance of the Pinnacle metal on metal (MoM) total hip replacement: a single-centre investigation in combination with the findings of a national retrieval centre

    PubMed Central

    Langton, David John; Sidaginamale, Raghavendra Prasad; Avery, Peter; Waller, Sue; Tank, Ghanshyabhai; Lord, James; Joyce, Thomas; Cooke, Nick; Logishetty, Raj; Nargol, Antoni Viraf Francis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine risk factors for revision in patients implanted with a commonly used metal on metal (MoM) hip replacement. Design Retrospective cohort study in combination with a prospective national retrieval study (Northern Retrieval Registry (NRR)). Setting Combined orthopaedic unit in combination with the NRR. Participants All patients implanted with a DePuy Pinnacle MoM hip prostheses by the 2 senior authors were invited to attend for a review which included clinical examination, blood metal ion measurements, radiographs and targeted imaging. Explanted components underwent wear analysis using validated methodology and these results were compared with those obtained from the NRR. Results 489 MoM Pinnacle hips were implanted into 434 patients (243 females and 191 males). Of these, 352 patients attended the MoM recall clinics. 64 patients had died during the study period. For the purposes of survival analysis, non-attendees were assumed to have well-functioning prostheses. The mean follow-up of the cohort as a whole was 89 months. 71 hips were revised. Prosthetic survival for the whole cohort was 83.6% (79.9–87.3) at 9 years. The majority of explanted devices exhibited signs of taper junction failure. Risk factors for revision were bilateral MoM prostheses, smaller Pinnacle liners, and implantation in 2006 and later years. A significant number of devices were found to be manufactured out of their specifications. This was confirmed with analysis of the wider data set from the NRR. Conclusions This device was found to have an unacceptably high revision rate. Bilateral prostheses, those implanted into female patients and devices implanted in later years were found to be at greater risk. A significant number of explanted components were found to be manufactured with bearing diameters outside of the manufacturer's stated tolerances. Our findings highlight the clinical importance of hitherto unrecognised variations in device production. PMID:27130159

  3. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  4. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... or prescription products. Over-the-counter shampoos and lotions containing pyrethrin (one brand name: Rid) or permethrin ( ... commonly used to treat head lice. Shampoos and lotions that kill head lice contain pesticides and other ...

  5. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  6. Cementless total hip replacement without femoral osteotomy in patients with severe developmental dysplasia of the hip: minimum 15-year clinical and radiological results.

    PubMed

    Imbuldeniya, A M; Walter, W L; Zicat, B A; Walter, W K

    2014-11-01

    We describe the clinical and radiological results of cementless primary total hip replacement (THR) in 25 patients (18 women and seven men; 30 THRs) with severe developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Their mean age at surgery was 47 years (23 to 89). In all, 21 hips had Crowe type III dysplasia and nine had Crowe type IV. Cementless acetabular components with standard polyethylene liners were introduced as close to the level of the true acetabulum as possible. The modular cementless S-ROM femoral component was used with a low resection of the femoral neck. A total of 21 patients (25 THRs) were available for review at a mean follow-up of 18.7 years (15.8 to 21.8). The mean modified Harris hip score improved from 46 points pre-operatively to 90 at final follow up (p < 0.001). A total of 15 patients (17 THRs; 57%) underwent revision of the acetabular component at a mean of 14.6 years (7 to 20.8), all for osteolysis. Two patients (two THRs) had symptomatic loosening. No patient underwent femoral revision. Survival with revision of either component for any indication was 81% at 15 years (95% CI 60.1 to 92.3), with 21 patients at risk. This technique may reduce the need for femoral osteotomy in severe DDH, while providing a good long-term functional result. PMID:25371455

  7. Outcome of uncemented primary femoral stems for treatment of femoral head osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, Marc W; Hungerford, David S; Jones, Lynne C

    2009-04-01

    Cementless total hip replacement has been advocated for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. This study examined the outcome of the femoral stem of four generations of an uncemented, proximally porous-coated, chrome-cobalt total hip prosthesis. There were 158 cases in 141 osteonecrosis patients (74 men, 67 women) who had a mean age of 46 years (range, 17-83 years). The mean follow-up was 103 months (range, 20-235 months). The femoral components of 144 cases were not revised and had a mean Harris hip score of 84 (+/-15) at final follow-up. Of the 14 revisions (8.9%), the primary reasons for revision were loosening or significant osteolysis. There were one infection and one chronic dislocation. Proximally porous-coated, anatomic, press-fit stems provide excellent long-term results in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

  8. Prevalence of Failure due to Adverse Reaction to Metal Debris in Modern, Medium and Large Diameter Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements--The Effect of Novel Screening Methods: Systematic Review and Metaregression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Reito, Aleksi; Lainiala, Olli; Elo, Petra; Eskelinen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements were used for almost a decade before adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) were found to be a true clinical problem. Currently, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the usefulness of systematic screening for ARMD. We implemented a systematic review and meta-analysis to establish the prevalence of revision confirmed ARMD stratified by the use of different screening protocols in patients with MoM hip replacements. Five levels of screening were identified: no screening (level 0), targeted blood metal ion measurement and/or cross-sectional imaging (level 1), metal ion measurement without imaging (level 2), metal ion measurement with targeted imaging (level 3) and comprehensive screening (both metal ions and imaging for all; level 4). 122 studies meeting our eligibility criteria were included in analysis. These studies included 144 study arms: 100 study arms with hip resurfacings, 33 study arms with large-diameter MoM total hip replacements (THR), and 11 study arms with medium-diameter MoM THRs. For hip resurfacing, the lowest prevalence of ARMD was seen with level 0 screening (pooled prevalence 0.13%) and the highest with level 4 screening (pooled prevalace 9.49%). Pooled prevalence of ARMD with level 0 screening was 0.29% and with level 4 screening 21.3% in the large-diameter MoM THR group. In metaregression analysis of hip resurfacings, level 4 screening was superior with regard to prevalence of ARMD when compared with other levels. In the large diameter THR group level 4 screening was superior to screening 0,2 and 3. These outcomes were irrespective of follow-up time or study publication year. With hip resurfacings, routine cross-sectional imaging regardless of clinical findings is advisable. It is clear, however, that targeted metal ion measurement and/or imaging is not sufficient in the screening for ARMD in any implant concepts. However, economic aspects should be weighed when choosing the preferred screening level

  9. Prevalence of Failure due to Adverse Reaction to Metal Debris in Modern, Medium and Large Diameter Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements – The Effect of Novel Screening Methods: Systematic Review and Metaregression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reito, Aleksi; Lainiala, Olli; Elo, Petra; Eskelinen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements were used for almost a decade before adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) were found to be a true clinical problem. Currently, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the usefulness of systematic screening for ARMD. We implemented a systematic review and meta-analysis to establish the prevalence of revision confirmed ARMD stratified by the use of different screening protocols in patients with MoM hip replacements. Five levels of screening were identified: no screening (level 0), targeted blood metal ion measurement and/or cross-sectional imaging (level 1), metal ion measurement without imaging (level 2), metal ion measurement with targeted imaging (level 3) and comprehensive screening (both metal ions and imaging for all; level 4). 122 studies meeting our eligibility criteria were included in analysis. These studies included 144 study arms: 100 study arms with hip resurfacings, 33 study arms with large-diameter MoM total hip replacements (THR), and 11 study arms with medium-diameter MoM THRs. For hip resurfacing, the lowest prevalence of ARMD was seen with level 0 screening (pooled prevalence 0.13%) and the highest with level 4 screening (pooled prevalace 9.49%). Pooled prevalence of ARMD with level 0 screening was 0.29% and with level 4 screening 21.3% in the large-diameter MoM THR group. In metaregression analysis of hip resurfacings, level 4 screening was superior with regard to prevalence of ARMD when compared with other levels. In the large diameter THR group level 4 screening was superior to screening 0,2 and 3. These outcomes were irrespective of follow-up time or study publication year. With hip resurfacings, routine cross-sectional imaging regardless of clinical findings is advisable. It is clear, however, that targeted metal ion measurement and/or imaging is not sufficient in the screening for ARMD in any implant concepts. However, economic aspects should be weighed when choosing the preferred screening level

  10. CoCr wear particles generated from CoCr alloy metal-on-metal hip replacements, and cobalt ions stimulate apoptosis and expression of general toxicology-related genes in monocyte-like U937 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Posada, Olga M.; Gilmour, Denise; Tate, Rothwelle J.; Grant, M. Helen

    2014-11-15

    Cobalt-chromium (CoCr) particles in the nanometre size range and their concomitant release of Co and Cr ions into the patients' circulation are produced by wear at the articulating surfaces of metal-on-metal (MoM) implants. This process is associated with inflammation, bone loss and implant loosening and led to the withdrawal from the market of the DePuy ASR™ MoM hip replacements in 2010. Ions released from CoCr particles derived from a resurfacing implant in vitro and their subsequent cellular up-take were measured by ICP-MS. Moreover, the ability of such metal debris and Co ions to induce both apoptosis was evaluated with both FACS and immunoblotting. qRT-PCR was used to assess the effects on the expression of lymphotoxin alpha (LTA), BCL2-associated athanogene (BAG1), nitric oxide synthase 2 inducible (NOS2), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS), growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible alpha (GADD45A). ICP-MS showed that the wear debris released significant (p < 0.05) amounts of Co and Cr ions into the culture medium, and significant (p < 0.05) cellular uptake of both ions. There was also an increase (p < 0.05) in apoptosis after a 48 h exposure to wear debris. Analysis of qRT-PCR results found significant up-regulation (p < 0.05) particularly of NOS2 and BAG1 in Co pre-treated cells which were subsequently exposed to Co ions + debris. Metal debris was more effective as an inducer of apoptosis and gene expression when cells had been pre-treated with Co ions. This suggests that if a patient receives sequential bilateral CoCr implants, the second implant may be more likely to produce adverse effects than the first one. - Highlights: • Effects of CoCr nanoparticles and Co ions on U937 cells were investigated. • Ions released from wear debris play an important role in cellular response, • Toxicity of Co ions could be related to NO metabolic processes and apoptosis. • CoCr particles were a more effective inducer of apoptosis after cell

  11. Study of bone remodeling of two models of femoral cementless stems by means of DEXA and finite elements

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A hip replacement with a cemented or cementless femoral stem produces an effect on the bone called adaptive remodelling, attributable to mechanical and biological factors. All of the cementless prostheses designs try to achieve an optimal load transfer in order to avoid stress-shielding, which produces an osteopenia. Long-term densitometric studies taken after implanting ABG-I and ABG-II stems confirm that the changes made to the design and alloy of the ABG-II stem help produce less proximal atrophy of the femur. The simulation with FE allowed us to study the biomechanical behaviour of two stems. The aim of this study was, if possible, to correlate the biological and mechanical findings. Methods Both models with prostheses ABG-I and II have been simulated in five different moments of time which coincide with the DEXA measurements: postoperative, 6 months, 1, 3 and 5 years, in addition to the healthy femur as the initial reference. For the complete comparative analysis of both stems, all of the possible combinations of bone mass (group I and group II of pacients in two controlled studies for ABG-I and II stems, respectively), prosthetic geometry (ABG-I and ABG-II) and stem material (Wrought Titanium or TMZF) were simulated. Results and Discussion In both groups of bone mass an increase of stress in the area of the cancellous bone is produced, which coincides with the end of the HA coating, as a consequence of the bottleneck effect which is produced in the transmission of loads, and corresponds to Gruen zones 2 and 6, where no osteopenia can be seen in contrast to zones 1 and 7. Conclusions In this study it is shown that the ABG-II stem is more effective than the ABG-I given that it generates higher tensional values on the bone, due to which proximal bone atrophy diminishes. This biomechanical behaviour with an improved transmission of loads confirmed by means of FE simulation corresponds to the biological findings obtained with Dual-Energy X

  12. Correlative analysis of MRI-evident abductor hip muscle degeneration and power after minimally invasive versus conventional unilateral cementless THA.

    PubMed

    Vasilakis, Ioannis; Solomou, Ekaterini; Vitsas, Vasilis; Fennema, Peter; Korovessis, Panagiotis; Siamblis, Dimitrios K

    2012-12-01

    The 2 main null hypotheses of this study were: (1) the 4-year surgical trauma-related degeneration within the hip abductor muscles after a minimally invasive approach to total hip arthroplasty would be similar to that following a conventional approach; and (2) no differences in perioperative blood loss or postoperative hip pain would be observed between the minimally invasive and conventional approaches.In 40 consecutive randomly selected adult patients with unilateral primary hip osteoarthritis, a cementless Zweymüller-Plus THA (Smith & Nephew Orthopaedics, Baar, Switzerland) was implanted by a single surgeon in 1 institution during the same period. Twenty patients underwent a minimally invasive approach (group A), and 20 patients underwent a conventional anterolateral approach (group B). Four years postoperatively, the operated and contralateral nonoperated hips of 37 available patients from both groups were examined with magnetic resonance imaging to show any changes in the gluteus medius and tensor fascia latae. Simultaneously, hip abductor power was measured bilaterally in both groups. Anthropometric data, blood loss, Short Form 36 self-assessment questionnaire, visual analog pain score, and walking distance were also analyzed.The reliability of magnetic resonance imaging and hip abductor power measurements was high. No difference was found in hip abductor power on the operated side between the 2 groups, whereas hip abductor power on the nonoperated side was significantly higher in both groups. This study revealed no mechanical and functional benefits in favor of patients undergoing minimally invasive vs conventional total hip arthroplasty. PMID:23218622

  13. Prospective five-year subsidence analysis of a cementless fully hydroxyapatite-coated femoral hip arthroplasty component.

    PubMed

    Clauss, Martin; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; Goossens, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Early subsidence >1.5 mm is considered to be a predictive factor for later aseptic loosening of the femoral component following total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim of this study was to assess five-year subsidence rates of the cementless hydroxyapatite-coated twinSys stem (Mathys Ltd., Bettlach, Switzerland).This prospective single-surgeon series examined consecutive patients receiving a twinSys stem at Maria Middelares Hospital, Belgium. Patients aged >85 years or unable to come to follow-up were excluded. Subsidence was assessed using Ein Bild Roentgen Analyse--Femoral Component Analysis (EBRA-FCA). Additional clinical and radiographic assessments were performed. Follow-ups were prospectively scheduled at two, five, 12, 24, and 60 months.In total, 218 THA (211 patients) were included. At five years, mean subsidence was 0.66 mm (95% CI: 0.43-0.90). Of the 211 patients, 95.2% had an excellent or good Harris Hip Score. There were few radiological changes. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated five-year stem survival to be 98.4% (95% CI: 97.6-100%).Subsidence levels of the twinSys femoral stem throughout the five years of follow-up were substantially lower than the 1.5 mm level predictive of aseptic loosening. This was reflected in the high five-year survival rate.

  14. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Contact Pattern between the Cortical Bone and Femoral Prosthesis after Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Hajime; Sugaya, Hisashi; Nishino, Tomofumi; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The cementless stem Excia (B. Braun, Melsungen, Germany) implant has a rectangular cross-sectional shape with back-and-forth flanges and a plasma-sprayed, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate coating from the middle to proximal portion to increase initial fixation and early bone formation. Here, the conformity of the Excia stem to the femoral canal morphology was three-dimensionally assessed using computed tomography. Forty-three patients (45 hips) were examined after primary total hip arthroplasty with a mean follow-up of 27 ± 3 months (range: 24–36 months). Spot welds occurred at zone 2 in 16 hips and at zone 6 in 24 hips, with 83% (20/24 hips) of those occurring within 3 months after surgery. First- (n = 12 hips), second- (n = 32), and third- (n = 1) degree stress shielding were observed. The stem was typically in contact with the cortical bone in the anterolateral mid-portion (100%) and posteromedial distal portions (85%). Stress shielding did not progress, even in cases where the stems were in contact with the distal portions. The anterior flange was in contact with the bone in all cases. The stability of the mid-lateral portion with the dicalcium phosphate dihydrate coating and the anterior flange may have inhibited the progression of stress shielding beyond the second degree. PMID:26881087

  15. Correlative analysis of MRI-evident abductor hip muscle degeneration and power after minimally invasive versus conventional unilateral cementless THA.

    PubMed

    Vasilakis, Ioannis; Solomou, Ekaterini; Vitsas, Vasilis; Fennema, Peter; Korovessis, Panagiotis; Siamblis, Dimitrios K

    2012-12-01

    The 2 main null hypotheses of this study were: (1) the 4-year surgical trauma-related degeneration within the hip abductor muscles after a minimally invasive approach to total hip arthroplasty would be similar to that following a conventional approach; and (2) no differences in perioperative blood loss or postoperative hip pain would be observed between the minimally invasive and conventional approaches.In 40 consecutive randomly selected adult patients with unilateral primary hip osteoarthritis, a cementless Zweymüller-Plus THA (Smith & Nephew Orthopaedics, Baar, Switzerland) was implanted by a single surgeon in 1 institution during the same period. Twenty patients underwent a minimally invasive approach (group A), and 20 patients underwent a conventional anterolateral approach (group B). Four years postoperatively, the operated and contralateral nonoperated hips of 37 available patients from both groups were examined with magnetic resonance imaging to show any changes in the gluteus medius and tensor fascia latae. Simultaneously, hip abductor power was measured bilaterally in both groups. Anthropometric data, blood loss, Short Form 36 self-assessment questionnaire, visual analog pain score, and walking distance were also analyzed.The reliability of magnetic resonance imaging and hip abductor power measurements was high. No difference was found in hip abductor power on the operated side between the 2 groups, whereas hip abductor power on the nonoperated side was significantly higher in both groups. This study revealed no mechanical and functional benefits in favor of patients undergoing minimally invasive vs conventional total hip arthroplasty.

  16. The effect of patient age, gender, and tibial component fixation on pain relief after cementless total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A

    1991-10-01

    Cementless total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) were prospectively evaluated for pain relief in 1110 knees. The effect of screws in the tibial component, the age of the patients, and the gender of the patients were studied to determine the effect of these parameters on pain relief one and two years postsurgery. The group with screws in the tibial component (Ortholoc II) had a significantly higher percentage of pain-free knees at one year than at two years postsurgery, and the older patients had a significantly higher rate of pain-free knees at one- and two years postsurgery than the younger patients. Older female patients with Ortholoc I TKAs had a significantly higher percentage of pain-free knees than did older male patients at one-year postsurgery, but not at two years. The group with screws in the tibial components (Ortholoc II) had a higher percentage of pain-free knees at one-year postsurgery than did the Ortholoc I knees, but there was no difference between Ortholoc I and II at two-years postsurgery. In the Ortholoc II group, there was also no difference in results among sexes or between patients older and younger than 65 years old. The correlation coefficient was calculated to evaluate the relationship between body weight and the degree of pain after TKA. No significant correlation could be found at one and two years after surgery. PMID:1914298

  17. Comparison of the risk of revision in cementless total hip arthroplasty with ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-polyethylene bearings

    PubMed Central

    Varnum, Claus; Pedersen, Alma B; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Overgaard, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) bearings were introduced in total hip arthroplasty (THA) to reduce problems related to polyethylene wear. We compared the 9-year revision risk for cementless CoC THA and for cementless metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) THA. Patients and methods In this prospective, population-based study from the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Registry, we identified all the primary cementless THAs that had been performed from 2002 through 2009 (n = 25,656). Of these, 1,773 THAs with CoC bearings and 9,323 THAs with MoP bearings were included in the study. To estimate the relative risk (RR) of revision, we used regression with the pseudo-value approach and treated death as a competing risk. Results 444 revisions were identified: 4.0% for CoC THA (71 of 1,773) and 4.0% for MoP THA (373 of 9,323). No statistically significant difference in the risk of revision for any reason was found for CoC and MoP bearings after 9 years of follow-up (adjusted RR = 1.3, 95% CI: 0.72–2.4). Revision rates due to component failure were 0.5% (n = 8) for CoC bearings and 0.1% (n = 6) for MoP bearings (p < 0.001). 6 patients with CoC bearings (0.34%) underwent revision due to ceramic fracture. Interpretation When compared to the “standard” MoP bearings, CoC THA had a 33% higher (though not statistically significantly higher) risk of revision for any reason at 9 years. PMID:25637339

  18. Head injury.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  19. Prospective randomised clinical trial assessing subsidence and rotation, using radiostereometric analysis, of two modular cementless femoral stems (Global K2 and Apex)

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Mark; Ebert, Jay; Nivbrant, Oscar; Wood, David

    2014-01-01

    Aims To accurately assess subsidence, rotation and clinical scores in two cementless femoral stems. Methods 260 patients received either K2 or Apex femoral stems and were studied over 2y, with RSA and clinical scores. Results Mean Oxford Hip score for both stems was excellent (45.78 and 46.76). Very little subsidence or rotation were noted on RSA in either stem. There were no statistically significant differences in clinical scores, or radiological motion between stems. Revision rate was 0.8% over the study period. Conclusion Excellent clinical and RSA scores over the 2y study period predict good long term outcomes for these stems. PMID:25104894

  20. The femoral head/neck offset and hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Beaulé, P E; Harvey, N; Zaragoza, E; Le Duff, M J; Dorey, F J

    2007-01-01

    Because the femoral head/neck junction is preserved in hip resurfacing, patients may be at greater risk of impingement, leading to abnormal wear patterns and pain. We assessed femoral head/neck offset in 63 hips undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and in 56 hips presenting with non-arthritic pain secondary to femoroacetabular impingement. Most hips undergoing resurfacing (57%; 36) had an offset ratio or= 50.5 degrees. Most hips undergoing resurfacing have an abnormal femoral head/neck offset, which is best assessed in the sagittal plane. PMID:17259408

  1. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  2. Head Noises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Explains how a toy called "Sound Bites" can be modified to demonstrate the transmission of sound waves. Students can hear music from the toy when they press it against any bone in their heads or shoulders. (WRM)

  3. Ibandronate and cementless total hip arthroplasty: densitometric measurement of periprosthetic bone mass and new therapeutic approach to the prevention of aseptic loosening

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Quarta, Laura; Calcagnile, Fabio; Grimaldi, Antonella; Orgiani, M. Antonio; Marsilio, Antonio; Rollo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Summary Studies of the mechanisms of periprosthetic bone loss have led to the development of pharmacologic strategies intended to enhance bone mass recovery after surgery and consequently prevent aseptic loosening and prolong the implant survival. Bisphosphonates, potent anti-resorptive drugs widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and other disorders of bone metabolism, were shown to be particularly effective in reducing periprosthetic bone resorption in the first year after hip and knee arthroplasty, both cemented and cementless. Based on these results, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ibandronate on periprosthetic bone loss in a 2-year study of postmenopausal women that underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty. In the first 6 months both groups (A, treated with ibandronate 3 mg i.v. within five days after surgery and then with oral ibandronate 150 mg/month, plus calcium and vitamin D supplementation; and B, treated with calcium and vitamin D supplementation only) experienced bone loss, though to a lesser extent in group A. After 12 months, group A showed a remarkable BMD recovery, that was statistically significant versus baseline values (about +1, 74% of global BMD) and most evident in region R1 (+3, 81%) and R2 (+4, 12%); in group B, on the contrary, BMD values were unchanged compared with those at 6 months post-surgery. Quality of life scores also showed a greater improvement in group A, both at 6 and 12 months after surgery, likely because of the pain-reducing effects of ibandronate treatment. PMID:22783337

  4. Ibandronate and cementless total hip arthroplasty: densitometric measurement of periprosthetic bone mass and new therapeutic approach to the prevention of aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Quarta, Laura; Calcagnile, Fabio; Grimaldi, Antonella; Orgiani, M Antonio; Marsilio, Antonio; Rollo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the mechanisms of periprosthetic bone loss have led to the development of pharmacologic strategies intended to enhance bone mass recovery after surgery and consequently prevent aseptic loosening and prolong the implant survival. Bisphosphonates, potent anti-resorptive drugs widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and other disorders of bone metabolism, were shown to be particularly effective in reducing periprosthetic bone resorption in the first year after hip and knee arthroplasty, both cemented and cementless. Based on these results, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ibandronate on periprosthetic bone loss in a 2-year study of postmenopausal women that underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty. In the first 6 months both groups (A, treated with ibandronate 3 mg i.v. within five days after surgery and then with oral ibandronate 150 mg/month, plus calcium and vitamin D supplementation; and B, treated with calcium and vitamin D supplementation only) experienced bone loss, though to a lesser extent in group A. After 12 months, group A showed a remarkable BMD recovery, that was statistically significant versus baseline values (about +1, 74% of global BMD) and most evident in region R1 (+3, 81%) and R2 (+4, 12%); in group B, on the contrary, BMD values were unchanged compared with those at 6 months post-surgery. Quality of life scores also showed a greater improvement in group A, both at 6 and 12 months after surgery, likely because of the pain-reducing effects of ibandronate treatment.

  5. Computational Evaluation of the Effects of Bone Ingrowth on Bone Resorptive Remodeling after a Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Duk-Young; Kang, Yu-Bong; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Nakai, Ryusuke; Ikeuchi, Ken; Sekel, Ron

    In this study, we simulated a wide cortex separation from a cementless hip prosthesis using the bone resorption remodeling method that is based on the generation of high compressive stress around the distal cortical bone. Thereafter, we estimated the effect on late migration quantities of the hip prosthesis produced by the interface state arising from bone ingrowth. This was accomplished using cortical bone remodeling over a long period of time. Two-dimensional natural hip and implanted hip FEM models were constructed with each of the following interface statements between the bone and prosthesis: (1) non-fixation, (2) proximal 1/3, (3) proximal 2/3 and (4) full-fixation. The fixation interfaces in the fully and partially porous coated regions were rigidly fixed by bony ingrowth. The non-fixation model was constructed as a critical situation, with the fibrous or bony tissue not integrated at all into the implant surface. The daily load history was generated using the three loading cases of a one-legged stance as well as abduction and adduction motions. With the natural hip and one-legged stance, the peak compressive principal stresses were found to be under the criteria value for causing bone resorption, while no implant movement occurred. The migration magnitude of the stem of the proximal 1/3 fixation model with adduction motion was much higher, reaching 6%, 11%and 21%greater than those of the non-fixation, proximal 2/3 fixation and all-fixation models, respectively. The full-fixation model showed the lowest compressive principal stress and implant movement. Thus, we concluded that the late loosening and subsequent movement of the stem in the long term could be estimated with the cortical bone remodeling method based on a high compressive stress at the bone-implant interface. The change caused at the bone-prosthesis interface by bony or fibrous tissue ingrowth constituted the major factor in determining the extent of cortical bone resorption occurring with

  6. Cementless total hip arthroplasty with the rectangular titanium Zweymuller stem. A concise follow-up, at a minimum of fifteen years, of a previous report.

    PubMed

    Grübl, Alexander; Chiari, Catharina; Giurea, Alexander; Gruber, Martin; Kaider, Alexandra; Marker, Martina; Zehetgruber, Harald; Gottsauner-Wolf, Florian

    2006-10-01

    Between October 1986 and November 1987, 208 total hip arthroplasties were performed with use of the cementless Zweymüller stem and a threaded cup in 200 consecutive patients. Of 102 patients (108 hips) who were available for follow-up at a minimum of 180 months postoperatively, eighty-three (eighty-nine hips) had the primary joint replacement still intact. No stem had been revised because of aseptic loosening, but we found various degrees of osteolysis around sixteen (18%) of the implants. The probability of survival of the stem at fifteen years was 0.98 (95% confidence interval, 0.96 to 1.00). The probability of survival of the cup was 0.85 (95% confidence interval, 0.79 to 0.91). PMID:17015598

  7. Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty in Hip Dysplasia with an Extensively Porous-Coated Cylindrical Stem Modified for Asians: A 12-Year Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tsutomu; Otani, Takuya; Sugiyama, Hajime; Hayama, Tetsuo; Katsumata, Souichi; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-06-01

    Long-term outcomes of primary cementless total hip arthroplasty were examined for 198 hips of Asian patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip. AML stems were modified for patients' relatively small physique. Stable fixation was achieved despite various proximal femoral deformities. At follow up (mean 12.1 years), radiographs demonstrated fixation in all hips, with 100% stem survivorship. Radiographic changes revealed that the severity of stress-shielding was mild in 55% of hips, moderate in 26%, and severe in 19%. Longer follow up is needed to determine whether these changes will develop into clinical manifestations. A distal fixation stem can be a useful reconstruction option when application of a proximal fixation stem in primary total hip arthroplasty is difficult for various reasons. PMID:25677937

  8. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Non-Modular Cementless Long-Stem Distal Fixation for Salvage of Failed Internal Fixation of Intertrochanteric Fracture.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaojun; Zhou, Zongke; Yang, Jing; Shen, Bin; Kang, Pengde; Pei, Fuxing

    2015-11-01

    Thirty one patients were treated with salvage total hip arthroplasty (THA) for failed internal fixation of intertrochanteric fracture. After a mean follow-up of 47.5 months, all patients reported remarkable pain relief and return to ambulation. Twenty five patients had no pain, and 6 patients complained of residual trochanteric low-grade pain without compromise of activities. The Harris Hip score increased from a preoperative average of 28.4 points to a postoperative average of 85.6 points. All patients demonstrated successful bony union and five had Brooker I or II heterotopic ossification. Seven patients had intraoperative or early complications and were treated successfully. There was no infection, re-fracture, loosening, or revision for any reason. Salvage THA using non-modular cementless long-stem prosthesis represents an effective procedure after failed intertrochanteric fixation.

  9. The influence of contact ratio and its location on the primary stability of cementless total hip arthroplasty: A finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Reimeringer, M; Nuño, N

    2016-05-01

    Cementless hip stems are fixed to the surrounding bone by means of press-fit. To ensure a good press-fit, current surgical technique specifies an under-reaming of the bone cavity using successively larger broaches. Nevertheless, this surgical technique is inaccurate. Several studies show that the contact ratio (percentage of stem interface in contact with bone) achieved after surgery can vary between 20% and 95%. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the influence of the contact ratio and its location on the primary stability of a cementless total hip arthroplasty using finite element analysis. A straight tapered femoral stem implanted in a composite bone was subjected to stair climbing. Micromotion of 7600 nodes at the stem-bone interface was computed for different configurations of contact ratios between 2% and 98%) along the hip stem. Considering the 15 configurations evaluated, the average micromotion ranges between 27μm and 54μm. The percentage of the porous interface of the stem having micromotion below 40μm that allows bone ingrowth range between 25-57%. The present numerical study shows that full contact (100%) between stem and bone is not necessary to obtain a good primary stability. The stem primary stability is influenced by both the contact ratio and its location. Several configurations with contact ratio lower than 100% and involving either the proximal or the cortical contact provide better primary stability than the full contact configuration. However, with contact ratio lower than 40%, the stem should be in contact with cortical bone to ensure a good primary stability. PMID:26920509

  10. Head Position and Internally Headed Relative Clauses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basilico, David

    1996-01-01

    Examines "Head Movement" in internally headed relative clauses (IHRCs). The article shows that in some cases, head movement to an external position need not take place and demonstrates that this movement of the head to a sentence-internal position results from the quantificational nature of IHRCs and Diesing's mapping hypothesis (1990, 1992). (56…

  11. Basic principles and uniform terminology for the head-neck junction in hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Werner, Paul H; Ettema, Harmen B; Witt, Florian; Morlock, Michael M; Verheyen, Cees C P M

    2015-01-01

    Recent problems with large head metal on metal hip replacements have spiked renewed interest in the head-neck junction. A thorough knowledge of the principles of the locking mechanism, the assembly technique and affecting factors on the strength of this junction is needed. Currently a confusing variability in terms is used to describe this junction. This overcomplicates an already complex issue. The purpose of this literature review is to collect and list the different terms used and to propose a uniform terminology. Two authors independently searched the electronic databases of PubMed, CINAHL and MEDLINE with specific key words and combinations according to the PRISMA guidelines. The initial search yielded a total of 518 articles with ultimately 53 articles included in the present analysis. No consensus for a uniform term for the 2 sides of the head-stem junction was found. Since there is already pronounced variability in taper designs between different manufacturers (even so similarly named, e.g. "12/14"), a uniform terminology could be the first step to simplify the situation. "Male" and "female taper" is proposed as the appropriate terminology for the stem and head junction in hip replacement, respectively. The importance of the assembly technique understanding the principles of the locking mechanism is emphasised. PMID:25362881

  12. Cementless total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Salvatore; Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Agati, Gabriele; Massè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Interest for uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has greatly increased in recent years. This technique, less used than cemented knee replacement in the last decades, sees a revival thanks an advance in prosthetic design, instrumentation and operative technique. The related literature in some cases shows conflicting data on survival and on the revision’s rate, but in most cases a success rate comparable to cemented TKA is reported. The optimal fixation in TKA is a subject of debate with the majority of surgeons favouring cemented fixation. PMID:27162779

  13. Mid-term clinical results of total hip arthroplasty using a Wagner standard cup for dysplastic hip

    PubMed Central

    Maezawa, Katsuhiko; Nozawa, Masahiko; Yuasa, Takahito; Aritomi, Kentaro; Ogawa, Seiki; Maruyama, Yuichiro; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Background The outcome of cementless total hip arthroplasty depends on many factors. We must not forget fundamental things those are design of outer surface of the component, that leads bone ingrowth into the prosthesis, better initial stability, and better insertional techniques. The purpose of this study was to review our experience with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty with a Wagner standard cup for patients who had acetabular dysplasia. Patients and methods Fifty-four patients with 55 hips underwent primary metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (Metasul prosthesis) with a Wagner standard cup (44–48 mm in outer diameter) and were followed for a minimum of 10 years. All patients received the same type of cementless femoral component (Natural hip stem) and femoral head (28 mm in diameter). Results Seventeen of the 55 Wagner standard cups (30.9%) showed aseptic loosening over a mean period of 3.6 years after surgery, and there were no bone anchors on the outer surface of the 16 retrieved cups. Conclusion From our experience, the small Wagner standard cup does not achieve sufficient osteointegration and we do not recommend the use of this cup, especially for patients with acetabular dysplasia and/or those with a small stature. PMID:25561751

  14. Head circumference (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Head circumference is a measurement of the circumference of the child's head at its largest area (above the eyebrows and ears and around the back of the head). During routine check-ups, the distance is measured ...

  15. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    PubMed

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  16. Mid-term results using a cementless hip prosthesis in young Chinese patients: a five- to seven-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, XueYong; Yang, Jing; Shen, Bin; Zhou, ZongKe; Zhang, Hui

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of 74 cementless total hip arthroplasties (THA) in 69 young Chinese patients. The Asian size and MMA AML stems with smoothly tapered tip were used, and the patients were followed up for at least five years. The mean Harris hip score was 45.4 preoperatively and 95.3 at the last follow-up. The incidence of thigh pain was 5.4%, and was related to the short stature of the patient (<160 cm) (P = 0.030). Six patients (6 hips, 8.1%) had acetabular osteolysis in zone 2; reoperation was performed in one patient because of osteolysis and wear of the polyethylene liner. The survival rate of the metal acetabular and femoral components was 100% (95% confidence interval, 0.95–1.0). Primary THA with this AML prosthesis had an acceptable mid-term result in young Chinese patients. PMID:19050881

  17. REVISION TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY USING A MODULAR CEMENTLESS DISTAL FIXATION PROSTHESIS: THE ZMR® HIP SYSTEM. CLINICAL AND RADIOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF 30 CASES

    PubMed Central

    Canella, Richard Prazeres; de Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista; Ganev, Gerson Gandhi; de Vincenzi, Luiz Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results from 30 cases of revision of total hip arthroplasty using a modular cementless distal fixation prosthesis: the ZMR® Hip System. Method: Between July 2005 and December 2008, 30 operations were performed, on 14 men and 14 women. Two male patients had bilateral surgery. The mean age was 59.2 years (29-81 years), with a mean follow-up of 24 months. The Paprosky classification was used for periprosthetic bone loss, and the Harris Hip Score (HHS) was used to evaluate clinical results. On radiographs, distal migration of the femoral stem was defined in accordance with Sporer. Proximal bone remodeling was classified using the Callaghan criteria. Results: The mean preoperative HHS was 39, and there was a significant increase to 93 points in the final evaluation, which indicated excellent clinical results. No femoral stem migration greater than 5 mm (Sporer) was observed on radiographs, thus suggesting that all the femoral prostheses presented osseointegration and remained stable from the time of the surgery until the final evaluation. The proximal femoral remodeling was either type B or type C in 29 hips, according to Callaghan. Seven patients had complications, but without interfering with osseointegration of the femoral components. Conclusion: Our results from revision of total hip arthroplasty using the ZMR® Hip System were extremely encouraging, and all the components became osseointegrated and remained fixed at the time of the final evaluation. PMID:27022553

  18. Cementless Titanium Mesh Fixation of Osteoporotic Burst Fractures of the Lumbar Spine Leads to Bony Healing: Results of an Experimental Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Roepenack, Paula; Roesner, Jan; Herlyn, Philipp Karl Ewald; Martin, Heiner; Reichel, Martin; Rotter, Robert; Vollmar, Brigitte; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gradl, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Current treatment strategies for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) focus on cement-associated solutions. Complications associated with cement application are leakage, embolism, adjacent fractures, and compromise in bony healing. This study comprises a validated VCF model in osteoporotic sheep in order to (1) evaluate a new cementless fracture fixation technique using titanium mesh implants (TMIs) and (2) demonstrate the healing capabilities in osteoporotic VCFs. Methods. Twelve 5-year-old Merino sheep received ovariectomy, corticosteroid injections, and a calcium/phosphorus/vitamin D-deficient diet for osteoporosis induction. Standardized VCFs (type AO A3.1) were created, reduced, and fixed using intravertebral TMIs. Randomly additional autologous spongiosa grafting (G1) or no augmentation was performed (G2, n = 6 each). Two months postoperatively, macroscopic, micro-CT and biomechanical evaluation assessed bony consolidation. Results. Fracture reduction succeeded in all cases without intraoperative complications. Bony consolidation was proven for all cases with increased amounts of callus development for G2 (58.3%). Micro-CT revealed cage integration. Neither group showed improved results with biomechanical testing. Conclusions. Fracture reduction/fixation using TMIs without cement in osteoporotic sheep lumbar VCF resulted in bony fracture healing. Intravertebral application of autologous spongiosa showed no beneficial effects. The technique is now available for clinical use; thus, it offers an opportunity to abandon cement-associated complications. PMID:27019848

  19. Effects of femoral component material properties on cementless fixation in total hip arthroplasty. A comparison study between carbon composite, titanium alloy, and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Otani, T; Whiteside, L A; White, S E; McCarthy, D S

    1993-02-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced-carbon composite material is an attractive implant material because its modulus of elasticity can be made similar to that of cortical bone. This study investigated the effect of femoral prosthesis elastic modulus on cementless implant fixation. Distal, as well as proximal, relative micromovements between implant and bone were measured in two testing protocols (axial-load and torsional-load), comparing identically shaped carbon composite (modulus of elasticity = 18.6 GPa), Ti6Al4V (100 GPa), and 630 stainless steel (200 GPa) prostheses. In the axial-load test, proximal mediolateral micromotions were significantly larger in the flexible composite stem than in the two metals. In the torsional-load test, rotational micromotions and "slop" displacements in the flexible stem were significantly larger proximally and significantly smaller distally than in the two metals. While these results suggest that proximal stress transfer may be improved by a flexible stem, they raise the possibility of increased proximal micromotion, and suggest that improved proximal fixation may be necessary to achieve clinical success with flexible composite femoral components.

  20. Making A Noble-Metal-On-Metal-Oxide Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Irvin M.; Davis, Patricia P.; Upchurch, Billy T.

    1989-01-01

    Catalyst exhibits superior performance in oxidation of CO in CO2 lasers. Two-step process developed for preparing platinum- or palladium-on-tin-oxide catalyst for recombination of CO and O2, decomposition products that occur in high-voltage discharge region of closed-cycle CO2 laser. Process also applicable to other noble-metal/metal-oxide combinations.

  1. Metal-On-Metal Bonding and Rebonding Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Bogicevic, A.

    1999-02-23

    Density-functional calculations for a wide variety of metals show that, contrary to the rebonding view of adsorbate bonding, addimers do not have notably longer surface bonds than adatoms, do not reside farther above the surface, and do not meet the rebonding arguments for augmented mobility. Rebonding concepts are found to have some utility in explaining addimer stability.

  2. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  3. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  4. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  5. Rifampicin-fosfomycin coating for cementless endoprostheses: antimicrobial effects against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Alt, Volker; Kirchhof, Kristin; Seim, Florian; Hrubesch, Isabelle; Lips, Katrin S; Mannel, Henrich; Domann, Eugen; Schnettler, Reinhard

    2014-10-01

    New strategies to decrease infection rates in cementless arthroplasty are needed, especially in the context of the growing incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of a rifampicin-fosfomycin coating against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA in a rabbit infection prophylaxis model. Uncoated or rifampicin-fosfomycin-coated K-wires were inserted into the intramedullary canal of the tibia in rabbits and contaminated with an inoculation dose of 10(5) or 10(6) colony-forming units of MSSA EDCC 5055 in study 1 and MRSA T6625930 in study 2, respectively. After 28days the animals were killed and clinical, histological and microbiological assessment, including pulse-field gel electrophoresis, was conducted. Positive culture growth in agar plate testing and/or clinical signs and/or histological signs were defined positive for infection. Statistical evaluation was performed using Fisher's exact test. Both studies showed a statistically significant reduction of infection rates for rifampicin-fosfomycin-coated implants compared to uncoated K-wires (P=0.015). In both studies none of the 12 animals that were treated with a rifampicin-fosfomycin-coated implant showed clinical signs of infection or a positive agar plate testing result. In both studies, one animal of the coating group showed the presence of sporadic bacteria with concomitant inflammatory signs in histology. The control groups in both studies exhibited an infection rate of 100% with clear clinical signs of infection and positive culture growth in all animals. In summary, the rifampicin-fosfomycin-coating showed excellent antimicrobial activity against both MSSA and MRSA, and therefore warrants further clinical testing.

  6. Cementless anatomical prosthesis for the treatment of 3-part and 4-part proximal humerus fractures: cadaver study and prospective clinical study with minimum 2 years followup

    PubMed Central

    Obert, Laurent; Saadnia, Rachid; Loisel, François; Uhring, Julien; Adam, Antoine; Rochet, Séverin; Clappaz, Pascal; Lascar, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional and radiological outcomes of a cementless, trauma-specific locked stem for 3- and 4-part proximal humeral fractures. Materials and methods: This study consisted of two parts: a cadaver study with 22 shoulders and a multicenter prospective clinical study of 23 fracture patients evaluated at least 2 years after treatment. In the cadaver study, the locked stem (HumelockTM, FX Solutions) and its instrumentation were evaluated. In the clinical study, five senior surgeons at four different hospitals performed the surgical procedures. An independent surgeon evaluated the patients using clinical (Constant score, QuickDASH) and radiological (X-rays, CT scans) outcome measures. Results: The cadaver study allowed us to validate the height landmarks relative to the pectoralis major tendon. In the clinical study, at the review, abduction was 95° (60–160), forward flexion was 108° (70–160), external rotation (elbow at body) was 34° (0–55), the QuickDASH was 31 (4.5–59), the overall Constant score was 54 (27–75), and the weighted Constant score was 76 (31.5–109). Discussion: This preliminary study of hemiarthroplasty (HA) with a locked stem found results that were at least equivalent to published series. As all patients had at least a 2-year follow-up, integration of the locked stem did not cause any specific complications. These results suggest that it is possible to avoid using cement when hemiarthroplasty is performed for the humeral stem. This implant makes height adjustment and transosseous suturing of the tuberosities more reproducible. PMID:27194107

  7. The Head Start Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward, Ed.; Styfco, Sally J., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The future of Head Start depends on how well people learn from and apply the lessons from its past. That's why everyone involved in early education needs this timely, forward-thinking book from the leader of Head Start. The first book to capture the Head Start debates in all their complexity and diversity, this landmark volume brings together the…

  8. Head Start Facilities Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Assessment Management, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    A quality Head Start facility should provide a physical environment responsive both to the needs of the children and families served and to the needs of staff, volunteers, and community agencies that share space with Head Start. This manual is a tool for Head Start grantees and delegate agencies for assessing existing facilities, making…

  9. Characterization of the fretting corrosion behavior, surface and debris from head-taper interface of two different modular hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Claudio T; Barbosa, Cassio; Monteiro, Maurício J; Abud, Ibrahim C; Caminha, Ieda M V; Roesler, Carlos R M

    2016-09-01

    Modular hip prostheses are flexible to match anatomical variations and to optimize mechanical and tribological properties of each part by using different materials. However, micromotions associated with the modular components can lead to fretting corrosion and, consequently, to release of debris which can cause adverse local tissue reactions in human body. In the present study, the surface damage and residues released during in vitro fretting corrosion tests were characterized by stereomicroscope, SEM and EDS. Two models of modular hip prosthesis were studied: Model SS/Ti Cementless whose stem was made of ASTM F136 Ti-6Al-4V alloy and whose metallic head was made of ASTM F138 austenitic stainless steel, and Model SS/SS Cemented with both components made of ASTM F138 stainless steel. The fretting corrosion tests were evaluated according to the criteria of ASTM F1875 standard. Micromotions during the test caused mechanical wear and material loss in the head-taper interface, resulting in fretting-corrosion. Model SS/SS showed higher grade of corrosion. Different morphologies of debris predominated in each model studied. Small and agglomerated particles were observed in the Model SS/Ti and irregular particles in the Model SS/SS. After 10 million cycles, the Model SS/Ti was more resistant to fretting corrosion than the Model SS/SS. PMID:27179766

  10. Characterization of the fretting corrosion behavior, surface and debris from head-taper interface of two different modular hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Claudio T; Barbosa, Cassio; Monteiro, Maurício J; Abud, Ibrahim C; Caminha, Ieda M V; Roesler, Carlos R M

    2016-09-01

    Modular hip prostheses are flexible to match anatomical variations and to optimize mechanical and tribological properties of each part by using different materials. However, micromotions associated with the modular components can lead to fretting corrosion and, consequently, to release of debris which can cause adverse local tissue reactions in human body. In the present study, the surface damage and residues released during in vitro fretting corrosion tests were characterized by stereomicroscope, SEM and EDS. Two models of modular hip prosthesis were studied: Model SS/Ti Cementless whose stem was made of ASTM F136 Ti-6Al-4V alloy and whose metallic head was made of ASTM F138 austenitic stainless steel, and Model SS/SS Cemented with both components made of ASTM F138 stainless steel. The fretting corrosion tests were evaluated according to the criteria of ASTM F1875 standard. Micromotions during the test caused mechanical wear and material loss in the head-taper interface, resulting in fretting-corrosion. Model SS/SS showed higher grade of corrosion. Different morphologies of debris predominated in each model studied. Small and agglomerated particles were observed in the Model SS/Ti and irregular particles in the Model SS/SS. After 10 million cycles, the Model SS/Ti was more resistant to fretting corrosion than the Model SS/SS.

  11. Small diameter acetabulum and femoral head in total hip arthroplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip, with no femoral osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Verettas, Dionysios-Alexandros; Chloropoulou, Pelagia; Xarchas, Konstantinos; Drosos, Georgios; Ververidis, Athanasios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of 66 total hip arthroplasties in 62 patients of mean age 46 years (24-74 years), with developmental dysplasia of the hip. In all cases the centre of rotation of the new hip was positioned at the site of the true acetabulum. In all patients cementless press fit acetabular components of small diameter (42-44 mm) were used, articulating exclusively with a 22.25 mm modular metal femoral head, without the use of bone grafts or shortening osteotomies of the femur. Despite the use of small diameter femoral heads the rate of dislocation was 3%. After an average follow-up period of 9 years (4-18 years), no revisions were required for infection, loosening or wear or implant migration. Osteolytic lesions were seen in the periacetabular region in 3 patients who were symptom free. A total of 2 revisions were required for instability and 2 patients had the wires of their trochanteric osteotomy removed because of bursitis. Leg length inequality was improved in 55% of the patients and one postoperative transient sciatic nerve lesion settled within 4 months. We believe that in patients with painful dysplastic hips, the use of small diameter implants with the centre of rotation at the true acetabulum, can give very satisfactory results, without any supplementary procedures. PMID:25907394

  12. Small diameter acetabulum and femoral head in total hip arthroplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip, with no femoral osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Verettas, Dionysios-Alexandros; Chloropoulou, Pelagia; Xarchas, Konstantinos; Drosos, Georgios; Ververidis, Athanasios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of 66 total hip arthroplasties in 62 patients of mean age 46 years (24-74 years), with developmental dysplasia of the hip. In all cases the centre of rotation of the new hip was positioned at the site of the true acetabulum. In all patients cementless press fit acetabular components of small diameter (42-44 mm) were used, articulating exclusively with a 22.25 mm modular metal femoral head, without the use of bone grafts or shortening osteotomies of the femur. Despite the use of small diameter femoral heads the rate of dislocation was 3%. After an average follow-up period of 9 years (4-18 years), no revisions were required for infection, loosening or wear or implant migration. Osteolytic lesions were seen in the periacetabular region in 3 patients who were symptom free. A total of 2 revisions were required for instability and 2 patients had the wires of their trochanteric osteotomy removed because of bursitis. Leg length inequality was improved in 55% of the patients and one postoperative transient sciatic nerve lesion settled within 4 months. We believe that in patients with painful dysplastic hips, the use of small diameter implants with the centre of rotation at the true acetabulum, can give very satisfactory results, without any supplementary procedures.

  13. Meteoric Head Echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajduk, A.; Galád, A.

    1995-01-01

    Results of the analysis of 3261 radar meteor head echoes observed during the Orionid and Lyrid periods by the high-power radar of the Springhill Meteor Observatory are given. Dependence of the occurence of head echoes on the geometrical factors and physical properties of the meteoroids has been studied. Increas of the head echo rates with the elevation of the shower radiant and with the velocity of meteoroids has been observed.

  14. Deposition head for laser

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    A deposition head for use as a part of apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. The deposition head delivers the laser beam and powder to a deposition zone, which is formed at the tip of the deposition head. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of the deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which the deposition head moves along the tool path.

  15. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, Alex Blair

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head dome assembly which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome is described. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending therethrough. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending therethrough, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending therethrough, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore therethrough, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening.

  16. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-09-01

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs.

  17. Head Injuries in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  18. THA Using an Anatomic Stem in Patients With Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Yong-Chan; Kim, Hee Joong; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Kim, Tae-Young

    2008-01-01

    Treating young patients with femoral head osteonecrosis (ON) remains challenging. Anatomic stems were introduced in the 1980s and 1990s to improve the proximal canal fit in an attempt to enhance long-term implant survival, an important aspect of treating young patients. We began using one design in 1993 and asked three questions to confirm whether the design criteria improved outcomes in patients with ON: (1) What is the long term survivorship of these implants?; (2) What is the amount and rate of wear?; and (3) What is the incidence of osteolysis? We retrospectively reviewed 56 patients (69 hips) who underwent THA for femoral head ON with a cementless anatomic stem proximally coated with hydroxyapatite. Four patients (four hips) were lost to followup and 16 patients (19 hips) died. In the remaining 36 patients (46 hips) the minimum followup was 10 years (mean, 11.2 years; range, 10–13 years). The mean age at operation was 48.6 years. The average Harris hip score at last followup was 87 points. Worst-case survivorship was 58.1% at 13 years and best-case was 93.3%. The average linear wear of the polyethylene liner was 2.02 mm and the average annual wear was 0.18 mm per year. Thirty-seven hips (80%) had femoral osteolysis and 14 (30%) had acetabular osteolysis. One patient who had extensive femoral osteolysis and stem loosening was revised at 11.2 years postoperatively. The high rates of polyethylene wear and osteolysis are of concern. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18327627

  19. Head Circumference and Neurocognitive Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2015-07-01

    Investigators from Universities of Glasgow and Bristol, UK, determined the value of head circumference (HC) as a screening measure, the incidence of head centile shifting, and the relationship between extremes of head size and later neurodevelopmental problems. PMID:26933592

  20. American Head and Neck Society

    MedlinePlus

    American Head & Neck Society Mission Statement: Advance Education, Research, and Quality of Care for the head and neck oncology patient. American Head & Neck Society | AHNS The mission of the AHNS is ...

  1. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Reutzel, Edward W.

    1998-01-01

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  2. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

    1998-08-18

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

  3. Radial head arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, M T; Ilyas, A M; Jupiter, J B

    2010-02-01

    In conclusion, radial head fractures with 3 or more fragments have a high incidence of complications when treated with ORIF including hardware failure, malunion, nonunion, and the need for re-operation. Radial head arthroplasty has demonstrated good success in the treatment of complex, comminuted radial head fractures which are not amenable to non-opeative treatment or ORIF. Success can be optimized by diligent surgical dissection, avoiding inadvertent nerve injury, placement of an appropriately sized implant, repair of associated injuries, and early protected motion. PMID:20214854

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic ... Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, ...

  5. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome, Brown’s syndrome, orbital wall fractures, and restricted eye movement associated with thyroid eye disease. 2) Nystagmus: Some patients with nystagmus (jerky eye movements) will acquire a head turn or tilt if ...

  6. Head Lice: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... it may be necessary to use a second bottle. Pay special attention to instructions on the label ... or printed on the label. Nit (head lice egg) combs, often found in lice medicine packages, should ...

  7. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... head and neck cancer. Poor oral and dental hygiene . Poor care of the mouth and teeth has ... sore throat Foul mouth odor not explained by hygiene Hoarseness or change in voice Nasal obstruction or ...

  8. Overview of Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Baby Health Highlights: Sept. 13, 2016 Smokers' Perceptions May Play Role in Addiction Sugar Companies Shifted ... amount of oxygen given and the rate and depth of breaths given by the ventilator. The head ...

  9. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... to 2 weeks. If you have a small fracture and your bones did not move around much, ... to see a bone doctor (orthopedic surgeon). Some fractures require surgery to: Insert pins and plates to ...

  10. Ultrasound: Head (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  11. Head tilt during driving.

    PubMed

    Zikovitz, D C; Harris, L R

    1999-05-01

    In order to distinguish between the use of visual and gravito-inertial force reference frames, the head tilt of drivers and passengers were measured as they went around corners at various speeds. The visual curvature of the corners were thus dissociated from the magnitude of the centripetal forces (0.30-0.77 g). Drivers' head tilts were highly correlated with the visually-available estimate of the curvature of the road (r2=0.86) but not with the centripetal force (r2<0.1). Passengers' head tilts were inversely correlated with the lateral forces (r2=0.3-0.7) and seem to reflect a passive sway. The strong correlation of the tilt of drivers' heads with a visual aspect of the road ahead, supports the use of a predominantly visual reference frame for the driving task. PMID:10722313

  12. Treating Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention. Head lice are most common among preschool children attending child care, elementary school children, and ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  13. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... and circulation. If necessary, begin rescue breathing and CPR . If the person's breathing and heart rate are normal but the person is unconscious, treat as if there is a spinal injury . Stabilize the head and neck by placing your ...

  14. TCGA head Neck

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  15. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Karl B.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the medical literature on head injuries in soccer and concludes that protective headgear to reduce these injuries may not be as effective as rule changes and other measures, such as padding goal posts. (IAH)

  16. Missouri: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Missouri's Early Head Start/Child Care Partnership Project expands access to Early Head Start (EHS) services for children birth to age 3 by developing partnerships between federal Head Start, EHS contractors, and child care providers. Head Start and EHS contractors that participate in the initiative provide services through community child care…

  17. Large-diameter total hip arthroplasty modular heads require greater assembly forces for initial stability

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, A. R.; Sullivan, N. P. T.; Whitehouse, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Modular junctions are ubiquitous in contemporary hip arthroplasty. The head-trunnion junction is implicated in the failure of large diameter metal-on-metal (MoM) hips which are the currently the topic of one the largest legal actions in the history of orthopaedics (estimated costs are stated to exceed $4 billion). Several factors are known to influence the strength of these press-fit modular connections. However, the influence of different head sizes has not previously been investigated. The aim of the study was to establish whether the choice of head size influences the initial strength of the trunnion-head connection. Materials and Methods Ti-6Al-4V trunnions (n = 60) and two different sizes of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) heads (28 mm and 36 mm; 30 of each size) were used in the study. Three different levels of assembly force were considered: 4 kN; 5 kN; and 6 kN (n = 10 each). The strength of the press-fit connection was subsequently evaluated by measuring the pull-off force required to break the connection. The statistical differences in pull-off force were examined using a Kruskal–Wallis test and two-sample Mann–Whitney U test. Finite element and analytical models were developed to understand the reasons for the experimentally observed differences. Results 36 mm diameter heads had significantly lower pull-off forces than 28 mm heads when impacted at 4 kN and 5 kN (p < 0.001; p < 0.001), but not at 6 kN (p = 0.21). Mean pull-off forces at 4 kN and 5 kN impaction forces were approximately 20% larger for 28 mm heads compared with 36 mm heads. Finite element and analytical models demonstrate that the differences in pull-off strength can be explained by differences in structural rigidity and the resulting interface pressures. Conclusion This is the first study to show that 36 mm Co-Cr heads have up to 20% lower pull-off connection strength compared with 28 mm heads for equivalent assembly forces. This effect is likely

  18. Head muscle development.

    PubMed

    Tzahor, Eldad

    2015-01-01

    The developmental paths that lead to the formation of skeletal muscles in the head are distinct from those operating in the trunk. Craniofacial muscles are associated with head and neck structures. In the embryo, these structures derive from distinct mesoderm populations. Distinct genetic programs regulate different groups of muscles within the head to generate diverse muscle specifications. Developmental and lineage studies in vertebrates and invertebrates demonstrated an overlap in progenitor populations derived from the pharyngeal mesoderm that contribute to certain head muscles and the heart. These studies reveal that the genetic program controlling pharyngeal muscles overlaps with that of the heart. Indeed cardiac and craniofacial birth defects are often linked. Recent studies suggest that early chordates, the last common ancestor of tunicates and vertebrates, had an ancestral pharyngeal mesoderm lineage that later during evolution gave rise to both heart and craniofacial structures. This chapter summarizes studies related to the origins, signaling, genetics, and evolution of the head musculature, highlighting its heterogeneous characteristics in all these aspects.

  19. Head segmentation in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Schilling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Classic theories of vertebrate head segmentation clearly exemplify the idealistic nature of comparative embryology prior to the 20th century. Comparative embryology aimed at recognizing the basic, primary structure that is shared by all vertebrates, either as an archetype or an ancestral developmental pattern. Modern evolutionary developmental (Evo-Devo) studies are also based on comparison, and therefore have a tendency to reduce complex embryonic anatomy into overly simplified patterns. Here again, a basic segmental plan for the head has been sought among chordates. We convened a symposium that brought together leading researchers dealing with this problem, in a number of different evolutionary and developmental contexts. Here we give an overview of the outcome and the status of the field in this modern era of Evo-Devo. We emphasize the fact that the head segmentation problem is not fully resolved, and we discuss new directions in the search for hints for a way out of this maze. PMID:20607135

  20. Lubricating the swordfish head.

    PubMed

    Videler, John J; Haydar, Deniz; Snoek, Roelant; Hoving, Henk-Jan T; Szabo, Ben G

    2016-07-01

    The swordfish is reputedly the fastest swimmer on Earth. The concave head and iconic sword are unique characteristics, but how they contribute to its speed is still unknown. Recent computed tomography scans revealed a poorly mineralised area near the base of the rostrum. Here we report, using magnetic resonance imaging and electron microscopy scanning, the discovery of a complex organ consisting of an oil-producing gland connected to capillaries that communicate with oil-excreting pores in the skin of the head. The capillary vessels transport oil to abundant tiny circular pores that are surrounded by denticles. The oil is distributed from the pores over the front part of the head. The oil inside the gland is identical to that found on the skin and is a mixture of methyl esters. We hypothesize that the oil layer, in combination with the denticles, creates a super-hydrophobic layer that reduces streamwise friction drag and increases swimming efficiency. PMID:27385753

  1. Shaking head means "no".

    PubMed

    Weiler, Stefan; Offinger, Alexander; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2013-09-10

    A 45-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department because of twitching of the head. The patient took a tablet of sumatriptan every 3-4 h because of increasing head pain after a car accident. Owing to depression, the patient was on long-term treatment with venlafaxine. The patient presented as hypertensive, tachycardic, with dyskinesia and spontaneous myoclonic movements of the right sternocleidomastoid muscle. In a CT scan of the head and cervical spine any fractures, bleeding or damage of the vessels after the accident could be ruled out. After discontinuation of all serotonergic agents, administration of lorazepam symptoms resolved 24 h after the last intake of sumatriptan. Serotonin syndrome is a clinical diagnosis, which requires a high-index of diagnostic suspicion. Clinical features include a broad spectrum of symptoms ranging from mild to life-threatening manifestations. Management is based on removal of precipitating drugs and symptomatic care including benzodiazepines.

  2. Rocket injector head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A high number of liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen orifices per unit area are provided in an injector head designed to give intimate mixing and more thorough combustion. The injector head comprises a main body portion, a cooperating plate member as a flow chamber for one propellant, a cooperating manifold portion for the second propellant, and an annular end plate for enclosing an annular propellant groove formed around the outer edge of the body. All the openings for one propellant are located at the same angle with respect to a radial plane to permit a short combustion chamber.

  3. MULTIPLE SHAFT TOOL HEAD

    DOEpatents

    Colbert, H.P.

    1962-10-23

    An improved tool head arrangement is designed for the automatic expanding of a plurality of ferruled tubes simultaneously. A plurality of output shafts of a multiple spindle drill head are driven in unison by a hydraulic motor. A plurality of tube expanders are respectively coupled to the shafts through individual power train arrangements. The axial or thrust force required for the rolling operation is provided by a double acting hydraulic cylinder having a hollow through shaft with the shaft cooperating with an internally rotatable splined shaft slidably coupled to a coupling rigidly attached to the respectlve output shaft of the drill head, thereby transmitting rotary motion and axial thrust simultaneously to the tube expander. A hydraulic power unit supplies power to each of the double acting cylinders through respective two-position, four-way valves, under control of respective solenoids for each of the cylinders. The solenoids are in turn selectively controlled by a tool selection control unit which in turn is controlled by signals received from a programmed, coded tape from a tape reader. The number of expanders that are extended in a rolling operation, which may be up to 42 expanders, is determined by a predetermined program of operations depending upon the arrangement of the ferruled tubes to be expanded in the tube bundle. The tape reader also supplies dimensional information to a machine tool servo control unit for imparting selected, horizontal and/or vertical movement to the tool head assembly. (AEC)

  4. Imaging of head trauma.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Sandra; Gupta, Rajiv; Ptak, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is an indispensable part of the initial assessment and subsequent management of patients with head trauma. Initially, it is important for diagnosing the extent of injury and the prompt recognition of treatable injuries to reduce mortality. Subsequently, imaging is useful in following the sequelae of trauma. In this chapter, we review indications for neuroimaging and typical computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols used in the evaluation of a patient with head trauma. We review the role of CT), the imaging modality of choice in the acute setting, and the role of MRI in the evaluation of patients with head trauma. We describe an organized and consistent approach to the interpretation of imaging of these patients. Important topics in head trauma, including fundamental concepts related to skull fractures, intracranial hemorrhage, parenchymal injury, penetrating trauma, cerebrovascular injuries, and secondary effects of trauma, are reviewed. The chapter concludes with advanced neuroimaging techniques for the evaluation of traumatic brain injury, including use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS), techniques which are still under development. PMID:27432678

  5. Sculpting Ceramic Heads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapiro, Maurice

    1983-01-01

    Clay sculpture is difficult to produce because of the requirements of kiln firing. The problems can be overcome by modeling the original manikin head and making a plaster mold, pressing molding slabs of clay into the plaster mold to form the hollow clay armature, and sculpting on the armature. (IS)

  6. Orion Touchdown Heading Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    At touchdown Orion must be aligned so that the crew person's feet are forward in the direction of the horizontal velocity. To ensure that this requirement is met active heading control is being implemented on the Orion crew module. This technique reduces probability of roll-over during splashdown, assures axial loads on the crew at touchdown, and alleviates structural requirements on impact allowing for a light-weight structural design. On-board sensors are used to measure current vehicle orientation and horizontal velocity used in generation of the heading error signal. Linear velocity measured by the IMU drifts while under parachutes due to wind gusts and has to be corrected by GPS; this makes GPS critical for successful landing. Jet fire logic is achieved by use of a phase-plane and commands are realized by using roll jets from the reaction control system (RCS); using pre existing hardware eliminates additional hardware and structural requirements. Touchdown performance is measured by an orientation envelope that was co-developed with structures so that the performance requirements overlap adding system redundancy. Heading control also introduces new difficulties to be addressed such as parachute line twist torque as well as increasing vehicle sensitivity to wind shifts and sea states. Solving these difficulties requires added complexity to flight software as well as increasing the propellant required to achieve successful touchdown. while offering promising results, the criticality of GPS along with a significant propellant cost raises questions on the effectiveness of using touchdown heading control.

  7. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, James K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

  8. CT angiography - head and neck

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - brain; CTA - skull; CTA - cranial; TIA-CTA head; Stroke-CTA head; Computed tomography angiography - neck; CTA - neck; Vertebral artery - CTA; Carotid artery stenosis - CTA; ...

  9. Head Injury Screening Tests Approved

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160556.html Head Injury Screening Tests Approved Assess brain function after possible concussions To use the sharing features ... HealthDay News) -- New computer software to assess the brain's function after a traumatic head injury have been approved ...

  10. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  11. Heads Up to High School Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... Juvenil HEADS UP to School Sports Online Concussion Training Coaches Parents Athletes Sports Officials HEADS UP to Schools School Nurses Teachers, Counselors, and School Professionals Parents HEADS UP ...

  12. Minnesota: Early Head Start Initiatiive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Minnesota provides supplemental state funding to existing federal Head Start and Early Head Start (EHS) grantees to increase their capacity to serve additional infants, toddlers, and pregnant women. The initiative was started in 1997 when the state legislature earmarked $1 million of the general state Head Start supplemental funds for children…

  13. Maryland Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Since 2000, Maryland has provided state supplemental funds to Head Start and Early Head Start (EHS) programs to improve access. Local EHS programs may use funds, through child care partnerships, to extend the EHS day or year. Maryland's approach to building on EHS includes: (1) Increase the capacity of existing Head Start and EHS programs to…

  14. MAGNETIC RECORDING HEAD

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, L.C.

    1958-06-17

    An electromagetic recording head is described for simultaneous recording of a plurality of signals within a small space on a magnetically semsitized medium. Basically the head structure comprises a non-magnetic centerpiece provided with only first and second groups of spaced cut-out slots respectively on opposite sides of the centerpiece. The two groups of slots are in parallel alignment and the slots of one group are staggered with respect to the slots of the other group so that one slot is not directly opposite another slot. Each slot has a magnet pole piece disposed therein and cooperating with a second pole and coil to provide a magnetic flux gap at the upper end of the slot. As a tape is drawn over the upper end of the centerpiece the individual magnetic circuits are disposed along its width to provide means for simultaneously recording information on separate portions, tracks. of the tape.

  15. Measuring head circumference

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide an evidence-based update emphasizing the importance of measuring head circumference (HC) in infants, with a focus on microcephaly. Quality of evidence PubMed and EMBASE (OvidSP) were searched. Search terms used were head circumference and infants and measurement; microcephaly and infants and measurement; idiopathic microcephaly and infants; and congenital microcephaly and infants. Most of the references for this review were published in 2000 or later. Most evidence is level II. Main message Serial measurement of HC should be incorporated into routine well-child care. Measure the distance around the back of the child’s head with a nonelastic tape measure held above the eyebrows and ears, and plot the measurement on an age- and sex-appropriate growth chart. Microcephaly is HC more than 2 SD below the mean. The most common disability associated with microcephaly is intellectual delay; other common concomitant conditions include epilepsy, cerebral palsy, language delay, strabismus, ophthalmologic disorders, and cardiac, renal, urinary tract, and skeletal anomalies. An interdisciplinary approach to microcephaly is warranted. Although there are no specific interventions to enhance brain growth, dietary or surgical interventions might be helpful in some cases. Infants with microcephaly who show developmental delays might benefit from early intervention programs or developmental physical and occupational therapy. Conclusion Early identification of HC concerns by family physicians can be a critical first step in identifying disorders such as microcephaly, leading to referral to pediatric specialists and, as needed, provision of family-centred early intervention services. PMID:26505062

  16. Active head rotations and eye-head coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zangemeister, W. H.; Stark, L.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that head movements play an important role in gaze. The interaction between eye and head movements involves both their shared role in directing gaze and the compensatory vestibular ocular reflex. The dynamics of head trajectories are discussed, taking into account the use of parameterization to obtain the peak velocity, peak accelerations, the times of these extrema, and the duration of the movement. Attention is given to the main sequence, neck muscle EMG and details of the head-movement trajectory, types of head model accelerations, the latency of eye and head movement in coordinated gaze, gaze latency as a function of various factors, and coordinated gaze types. Clinical examples of gaze-plane analysis are considered along with the instantaneous change of compensatory eye movement (CEM) gain, and aspects of variability.

  17. Head stabilization in herons.

    PubMed

    Katzir, G; Schechtman, E; Carmi, N; Weihs, D

    2001-07-01

    We examined head stabilization in relation to body mass and length of legs in four heron species (little egrets, Egretta garzetta; night herons, Nycticorax nycticorax; squacco herons, Ardeola ralloides; and cattle egrets, Bubulcus ibis: Aves: Ardeidae). Head stabilization, under controlled, sinusoidal, perch perturbations was mostly elicited at frequencies lower than 1 Hz. Maximal perturbation amplitudes sustained were positively correlated with leg length and maximal perturbation frequencies sustained were negatively correlated with body mass and with leg length. The species differed significantly in average maximal perturbation amplitudes sustained. Combinations of amplitude and frequency for which stabilization was achieved were bounded by a decreasing concave "envelope" curve in the frequency-amplitude plane, with inter specific differences in "envelope". As physical constraints, we tested maximal vertical acceleration, which translates into a line defined by the product of frequency2 x amplitude, and maximal vertical velocity, which translates into a line defined by the product of frequency x amplitude. Both relations were in good agreement with the experimental results for all but squacco herons. The results support predictions based on mechanical considerations and may explain the predominance of motor patterns employed by herons while foraging.

  18. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, J.K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

  19. Firing Properties of Rat Lateral Mammillary Single Units: Head Direction, Head Pitch, and Angular Head Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Stackman, Robert W.; Taube, Jeffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    Many neurons in the rat anterodorsal thalamus (ADN) and postsubiculum (PoS) fire selectively when the rat points its head in a specific direction in the horizontal plane, independent of the animal’s location and ongoing behavior. The lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) are interconnected with both the ADN and PoS and, therefore, are in a pivotal position to influence ADN/PoS neurophysiology. To further understand how the head direction (HD) cell signal is generated, we recorded single neurons from the LMN of freely moving rats. The majority of cells discharged as a function of one of three types of spatial correlates: (1) directional heading, (2) head pitch, or (3) angular head velocity (AHV). LMN HD cells exhibited higher peak firing rates and greater range of directional firing than that of ADN and PoS HD cells. LMN HD cells were modulated by angular head velocity, turning direction, and anticipated the rat’s future HD by a greater amount of time (~95 msec) than that previously reported for ADN HD cells (~25 msec). Most head pitch cells discharged when the rostrocaudal axis of the rat’s head was orthogonal to the horizontal plane. Head pitch cell firing was independent of the rat’s location, directional heading, and its body orientation (i.e., the cell discharged whenever the rat pointed its head up, whether standing on all four limbs or rearing). AHV cells were categorized as fast or slow AHV cells depending on whether their firing rate increased or decreased in proportion to angular head velocity. These data demonstrate that LMN neurons code direction and angular motion of the head in both horizontal and vertical planes and support the hypothesis that the LMN play an important role in processing both egocentric and allocentric spatial information. PMID:9787007

  20. Does dimeticone clear head lice?

    PubMed

    2007-07-01

    Head lice infestation is common and mainly affects children of primary school age. Treatments include licensed topical preparations containing conventional chemical insecticides and medical devices. Each of these fail to eradicate head lice in some patients and resistance is a problem with chemical insecticides. Dimeticone 4% lotion (Hedrin - Thornton & Ross) is a new treatment licensed "for the eradication of head lice infestations". Here we consider its place in the context of other options.

  1. Grandparent Headed Families and Head Start: Developing Effective Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dannison, Linda L.; Smith, Andrea B.

    Numerous challenges face the growing number of grandparent-headed households, including isolation from friends and social supports, and difficulties in caring for grandchildren exhibiting multiple needs. This paper describes a pilot program in which a university and a large county-wide Head Start program formed a partnership to focus on serving…

  2. NASA head sworn in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James C. Fletcher was sworn in on May 12, 1986, as administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). At a news conference after he was sworn in, Fletcher said that NASA would deal with both its technical problems and its procedural problems before the shuttle will fly again. According to press accounts, he stressed that funds should be made available to replace the Challenger orbiter, which was lost in an explosion on January 28.Fletcher, who had also headed the agency from 1971 to 1977, succeeds James M. Beggs, who was indicted in December 1985 for conspiring to defraud the federal government while serving as a senior executive at the General Dynamics Corporation.

  3. Chryse 'Alien Head'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    26 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an impact crater in Chryse Planitia, not too far from the Viking 1 lander site, that to seems to resemble a bug-eyed head. The two odd depressions at the north end of the crater (the 'eyes') may have formed by wind or water erosion. This region has been modified by both processes, with water action occurring in the distant past via floods that poured across western Chryse Planitia from Maja Valles, and wind action common occurrence in more recent history. This crater is located near 22.5oN, 47.9oW. The 150 meter scale bar is about 164 yards long. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/lower left.

  4. Kansas: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Kansas Early Head Start (KEHS) provides comprehensive services following federal Head Start Program Performance Standards for pregnant women and eligible families with children from birth to age 4. KEHS was implemented in 1998 using Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) quality set-aside dollars augmented by a transfer of federal…

  5. Nebraska: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Since 1999, Nebraska's Early Head Start Infant/Toddler Quality Initiative has supported Early Head Start (EHS) and community child care partnerships to improve the quality and professionalism of infant and toddler care. EHS programs apply to receive funding to establish partnerships with center-based or home-based child care.The initiative has…

  6. Cutting Head for Ultrasonic Lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, Earl D. (Inventor); Goodfriend, Roger (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A cutting head for attachment to the end of the wire probe of an ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration instrument. The cutting head has a plurality of circumferentially arranged teeth formed at one end thereof to provide a cup-shaped receptacle for kidney stones encountered during the disintegration procedure. An integral reduced diameter collar diminishes stress points in the wire and reduces breakage thereof.

  7. The Start of Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The creation of the Head Start program occurred at break-neck speed with many dramatic turns and many colorful players. No one tells the story better than Edward Zigler in "Head Start: The Inside Story of America's Most Successful Educational Experiment"--a detailed and personal, behind the scenes look at the program's inception. From this…

  8. Vision Screening For Head Starters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Celia

    To determine which children in the Head Start program may have vision problems, Head Start teachers and staff do vision "screening." This booklet demonstrates how to do the screening using the Snellen "E Chart." Trouble signs that the test administrator should be aware of are listed, and vision scores are explained simply. Amblyopia is defined,…

  9. Interview with Joe F. Head

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Kim

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Joe F. Head, Dean of University Admissions and Enrollment Services at Kennesaw State University (KSU) in Georgia, who has more than 35 years of experience in admissions and enrollment services. After completing an M.Ed. in higher education at Georgia Southern University, Head immediately landed a position as…

  10. Be-heading the Word.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Laurie

    1990-01-01

    Examines the notion of "head" in syntax and the extent to which it extends to morphology in English, and discusses the notion of headedness and percolation. The argument is made that percolation in English does not work, casting doubt on the notion of head in morphology. (34 references) (GLR)

  11. Head Start Impact Study: First Year Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael; Bell, Stephen; Cook, Ronna; Heid, Camilla; Lopez, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Congressionally-mandated Head Start Impact Study is being conducted across 84 nationally representative grantee/delegate agencies. Approximately 5,000 newly entering 3- and 4-year-old children applying for Head Start were randomly assigned to either a Head Start group that had access to Head Start program services or to a non-Head Start group…

  12. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Cancer; Head and Neck Sarcoma; Paraganglioma of Head and Neck; Chordoma of Head and Neck; Chondrosarcoma of Head and Neck; Angiofibroma of Head and Neck

  13. Turbidity Current Head Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, David; Sanchez, Miguel Angel; Medina, Pablo

    2010-05-01

    A laboratory experimental set - up for studying the behaviour of sediment in presence of a turbulent field with zero mean flow is compared with the behaviour of turbidity currents [1] . Particular interest is shown on the initiation of sediment motion and in the sediment lift - off. The behaviour of the turbidity current in a flat ground is compared with the zero mean flow oscilating grid generated turbulence as when wave flow lifts off suspended sediments [2,3]. Some examples of the results obtained with this set-up relating the height of the head of the turbidity current to the equilibrium level of stirred lutoclines are shown. A turbulent velocity u' lower than that estimated by the Shield diagram is required to start sediment motion. The minimum u' required to start sediment lift - off, is a function of sediment size, cohesivity and resting time. The lutocline height depends on u', and the vorticity at the lutocline seems constant for a fixed sediment size [1,3]. Combining grid stirring and turbidty current head shapes analyzed by means of advanced image analysis, sediment vertical fluxes and settling speeds can be measured [4,5]. [1] D. Hernandez Turbulent structure of turbidity currents and sediment transport Ms Thesis ETSECCPB, UPC. Barcelona 2009. [2] A. Sánchez-Arcilla; A. Rodríguez; J.C. Santás; J.M. Redondo; V. Gracia; R. K'Osyan; S. Kuznetsov; C. Mösso. Delta'96 Surf-zone and nearshore measurements at the Ebro Delta. A: International Conference on Coastal Research through large Scale Experiments (Coastal Dynamics '97). University of Plymouth, 1997, p. 186-187. [3] P. Medina, M. A. Sánchez and J. M. Redondo. Grid stirred turbulence: applications to the initiation of sediment motion and lift-off studies Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Part B: Hydrology, Oceans and Atmosphere. 26, Issue 4, 2001, Pages 299-304 [4] M.O. Bezerra, M. Diez, C. Medeiros, A. Rodriguez, E. Bahia., A. Sanchez-Arcilla and J.M. Redondo. Study on the influence of waves on

  14. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Print to PDF Head and Neck Cancer - Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  15. Keeping Your Head On Target

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Aaron L.; Zee, David S.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the human brain controls eye movements are reasonably well understood, but those for the head less so. Here, we show that the mechanisms for keeping the head aimed at a stationary target follow strategies similar to those for holding the eyes steady on stationary targets. Specifically, we applied the neural integrator hypothesis that originally was developed for holding the eyes still in eccentric gaze positions to describe how the head is held still when turned toward an eccentric target. We found that normal humans make head movements consistent with the neural integrator hypothesis, except that additional sensory feedback is needed, from proprioceptors in the neck, to keep the head on target. We also show that the complicated patterns of head movements in patients with cervical dystonia can be predicted by deficits in a neural integrator for head motor control. These results support ideas originally developed from animal studies that suggest fundamental similarities between oculomotor and cephalomotor control, as well as a conceptual framework for cervical dystonia that departs considerably from current clinical views. PMID:23825431

  16. Eye and head motion during head turns in spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William E.; Uri, John J.; Moore, Thomas P.; Pool, Sam L.

    1988-01-01

    Eye-head motion was studied pre-, in- and postflight during single voluntary head turns. A transient increase in vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain occurred early in the flight, but later trended toward normal. This increased gain was produced by a relative increase in eye counterrotation velocity. Asymmetries in gain with right and left turns also occurred, caused by asymmetries in eye counterrotation velocities. These findings were remarkably similar to those from Soviet primate studies using gaze fixation targets, except the human study trended more rapidly toward normal. These findings differ substantially from those measuring VOR gain by head oscillation, in which no significant changes were found inflight. No visual disturbances were noted in either test condition or in normal activities. These head turn studies are the only ones to date documenting any functional change in VOR in weightlessness.

  17. Hangman's fracture in head injury.

    PubMed

    Umebese, P F; Orhewere, F A

    1989-09-01

    Five patients with fracture of pedicle of axis vertebra as a complication of head injury are reported. The ages of the patients ranged from 16-25 years and all of them were victims of road traffic accidents. The head injuries were moderately severe requiring admission. The average Glasgow Coma Scale sum on admission was 11. Simple non-operative management in a well padded stiff collar with sand bags supporting the head in a neutral position in bed resulted in full recovery without complication after an average of 4 weeks recumbency.

  18. Anaphylaxis Due to Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Heather C.; Bruner, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Both anaphylaxis and head injury are often seen in the emergency department, but they are rarely seen in combination. We present a case of a 30-year-old woman who presented with anaphylaxis with urticaria and angioedema following a minor head injury. The patient responded well to intramuscular epinephrine without further complications or airway compromise. Prior case reports have reported angioedema from hereditary angioedema during dental procedures and maxillofacial surgery, but there have not been any cases of first-time angioedema or anaphylaxis due to head injury. PMID:25987924

  19. No effect of additional screw fixation of a cementless, all-polyethylene press-fit socket on migration, wear, and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Minten, Michiel J M; Heesterbeek, Petra J C; Spruit, Maarten

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Additional screw fixation of the all-polyethylene press-fit RM cup (Mathys) has no additional value for migration, in the first 2 years after surgery. However, the medium-term and long-term effects of screw fixation remain unclear. We therefore evaluated the influence of screw fixation on migration, wear, and clinical outcome at 6.5 years using radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Patients and methods - This study involved prolonged follow-up from a previous randomized controlled trial (RCT). We analyzed RSA radiographs taken at baseline and at 1-, 2-, and 6.5-year follow-up. Cup migration and wear were assessed using model-based RSA software. Wear was calculated as translation of the femoral head model in relation to the cup model. Total translation, rotation, and wear were calculated mathematically from results of the orthogonal components. Results - 27 patients (15 with screw fixation and 12 without) were available for follow-up at 6.5 (5.6-7.2) years. Total translation (0.50 mm vs. 0.56 mm) and rotation (1.01 degrees vs. 1.33 degrees) of the cup was low, and was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Wear increased over time, and was similar between the 2 groups (0.58 mm vs. 0.53 mm). Wear rate (0.08 mm/year vs. 0.09 mm/year) and clinical outcomes were also similar. Interpretation - Our results indicate that additional screw fixation of all-polyethylene press-fit RM cups has no additional value regarding medium-term migration and clinical outcome. The wear rate was low in both groups. PMID:27299418

  20. Counting heads in Cairo.

    PubMed

    1994-09-14

    Representatives of 182 nations gathered in Cairo in September, 1994, at the Un Conference on Population and Development. The resulting 113-page Draft Program of Action contains sober discussions on demographic issues, including projections of population increase in the decades ahead. It focuses on the potential growth of famine, disease, warfare, environmental degradation, and general human misery if the world's population cannot be stabilized at around 8 billion in the next 20 years. The 1994 figure stands at about 5.7 billion, and there will be 12.5 billion people if no action is taken. Previous conferences hosted under the UN helped spark a remarkable decline in fertility rates, especially in Indonesia and Thailand. Even in populous Bangladesh, some 40% of women now use contraceptives, while the fertility rate has dropped from 7 to 4.2 in 2 decades. The proposals debated in Cairo include sustainable development, gender equality, and the empowerment of women. Whatever the country or culture, fertility rates tend to fall dramatically as women become more educated. This has been borne out almost everywhere, most notably in Japan and Singapore. The conference has been criticized by the Vatican as advocating an international standard for easy abortion, encouraging sex education for teenagers, and sanctioning marriages other than between a man and a woman. Some conservative Muslim thinkers have also complained that it promotes Western values and fosters illicit sex. Many supporters of population planning have argued that the empowerment of women will reduce the incidence of abortion. The Cairo document will alienate many across Asia with its references to the plurality of family forms, including the large number of households headed by single parents. The one goal on which everyone can agree is the need to promote policies that will stabilize the global headcount.

  1. Heater head for stirling engine

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A.

    1985-07-09

    A monolithic heater head assembly which augments cast fins with ceramic inserts which narrow the flow of combustion gas and obtains high thermal effectiveness with the assembly including an improved flange design which gives greater durability and reduced conduction loss.

  2. Zero torque gear head wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, A. R.; Norman, R. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A gear head wrench particularly suited for use in applying torque to bolts without transferring torsional stress to bolt-receiving structures is introduced. The wrench is characterized by a coupling including a socket, for connecting a bolt head with a torque multiplying gear train, provided within a housing having an annulus concentrically related to the socket and adapted to be coupled with a spacer interposed between the bolt head and the juxtaposed surface of the bolt-receiving structure for applying a balancing counter-torque to the spacer as torque is applied to the bolt head whereby the bolt-receiving structure is substantially isolated from torsional stress. As a result of the foregoing, the operator of the wrench is substantially isolated from any forces which may be imposed.

  3. Montessori Head Start Implementation Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Alcillia; Kahn, David

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of the Montessori method in Head Start programs, focusing on educational environment, teacher training, parent involvement, and funding. Outlines the phased implementation of a Montessori program and provides a list of Montessori publications and organizations. (MDM)

  4. Cutting head for ultrasonic lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anguluo, E. D.; Goodfriend, R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A cutting head for attachment to the end of the wire probe of an ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration instrument is described. The cutting head has a plurality of circumferentially arranged teeth formed at one end thereof to provide a cup shaped receptacle for kidney stones encountered during the disintegration procedure. An integral reduced diameter collar diminishes stress points in the wire and reduce breakage thereof.

  5. Ghost Head Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Looking like a colorful holiday card, a new image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope reveals a vibrant green and red nebula far from Earth.

    The image of NGC 2080, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is available online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . Images like this help astronomers investigate star formation in nebulas.

    NGC 2080, nicknamed 'The Ghost Head Nebula,' is one of a chain of star-forming regions lying south of the 30 Doradus nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. 30 Doradus is the largest star-forming complex in the local group of galaxies. This 'enhanced color' picture is composed of three narrow-band-filter images obtained by Hubble on March 28, 2000.

    The red and blue light come from regions of hydrogen gas heated by nearby stars. The green light on the left comes from glowing oxygen. The energy to illuminate the green light is supplied by a powerful stellar wind, a stream of high-speed particles coming from a massive star just outside the image. The central white region is a combination of all three emissions and indicates a core of hot, massive stars in this star-formation region. Intense emission from these stars has carved a bowl-shaped cavity in surrounding gas.

    In the white region, the two bright areas (the 'eyes of the ghost') - named A1 (left) and A2 (right) -- are very hot, glowing 'blobs' of hydrogen and oxygen. The bubble in A1 is produced by the hot, intense radiation and powerful stellar wind from one massive star. A2 contains more dust and several hidden, massive stars. The massive stars in A1 and A2 must have formed within the last 10,000 years, since their natal gas shrouds are not yet disrupted by the powerful radiation of the newborn stars.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center

  6. [Illustrations of visceral referred pain. "Head-less" Head's zones].

    PubMed

    Henke, C; Beissner, F

    2011-04-01

    Reviewing anatomical, physiological and neurological standard literature for illustrations of referred visceral pain only one type of illustration can frequently be found, which is referred to as Treves and Keith. In fact, the original illustration as a model for most current pictures stems from the German edition of Sir Frederick Treves' famous book "Surgical Applied Anatomy" from 1914, which was reillustrated for didactical reasons for the German readership. While neither Treves and Keith nor the German illustrator Otto Kleinschmidt ever published any work on referred pain this illustration must have been adapted or copied from older sources by the illustrator. Therefore the comprehensive systematic original works before 1914 were reviewed, namely those of Sir Henry Head and Sir James Mackenzie. Due to the name of the phenomenon in the German literature of Head's zones, the illustrations were expected to be based mainly on Head's work. However, a comparison of all available illustrations led to the conclusion that Kleinschmidt chiefly used information from Mackenzie as a model for his illustration. Due to the inexact reproduction of Mackenzie's work by the illustrator some important features were lost that had been reported by the original authors. These include the phenomenon of Head's maximum points, which nowadays has fallen into oblivion.Therefore current charts, based on the illustration by Kleinschmidt from 1914, lack experimental evidence and appear to be a simplification of the observational results of both Head's and Mackenzie's original systematic works.

  7. 29 CFR 1926.100 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Head protection. 1926.100 Section 1926.100 Labor... § 1926.100 Head protection. (a) Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head... protected by protective helmets. (b) Criteria for head protection. (1) The employer must provide...

  8. 29 CFR 1917.93 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Head protection. 1917.93 Section 1917.93 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.93 Head protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each... the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The employer must ensure that head protection complies with...

  9. 29 CFR 1917.93 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Head protection. 1917.93 Section 1917.93 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.93 Head protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each... the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The employer must ensure that head protection complies with...

  10. 29 CFR 1917.93 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Head protection. 1917.93 Section 1917.93 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.93 Head protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each... the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The employer must ensure that head protection complies with...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.100 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Head protection. 1926.100 Section 1926.100 Labor... § 1926.100 Head protection. (a) Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head... Institute, Z89.1-1969, Safety Requirements for Industrial Head Protection. (c) Helmets for the...

  12. 29 CFR 1917.93 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Head protection. 1917.93 Section 1917.93 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.93 Head protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each... the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The employer must ensure that head protection complies with...

  13. 29 CFR 1917.93 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Head protection. 1917.93 Section 1917.93 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.93 Head protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each... the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The employer must ensure that head protection complies with...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.100 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Head protection. 1926.100 Section 1926.100 Labor... § 1926.100 Head protection. (a) Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head... Institute, Z89.1-1969, Safety Requirements for Industrial Head Protection. (c) Helmets for the...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.100 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Head protection. 1926.100 Section 1926.100 Labor... § 1926.100 Head protection. (a) Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head... protected by protective helmets. (b) Criteria for head protection. (1) The employer must provide...

  16. Communicating printed headings to the ear.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Robert F; Chen, Hung-Tao; Jawahir, Aqeel A; Lemarié, Julie

    2016-05-01

    Two experiments compared three methods of translating printed headings into an auditory format. In both experiments, college students listened to a text with instructions to stop the recording whenever they heard a heading and type the hierarchical level and exact wording of the heading. Listeners were poor at identifying headings and their levels if the headings were not distinguished from the rest of the text. However, listeners were very good at identifying headings if any method of signalling was used to distinguish headings and communicate their hierarchical level. The methods included: (1) tones preceding headings, (2) changes of speaker to indicate headings or (3) verbal labels preceding headings. Although all three signalling methods improved identification of a heading's hierarchical level, the labelling method was the most effective means of communicating hierarchical level. Thus, the study identifies a simple method of effectively communicating headings in spoken text. Practitioner Summary: The study attempted to identify effective ways of communicating heading information in spoken text. College students listened to texts in order to detect headings and record their wording and hierarchical level. Performance was excellent when headings were preceded by verbal phrases that signalled the upcoming headings and their levels. PMID:27267653

  17. Bistable Head Positioning Arm Latch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, Ken; Endo, Juro; Mita, Masahiro; Abelein, Nathan

    A simple, low cost, yet effective device has been developed for immobilizing the head-arm assembly in a disk drive or similar mechanism during power-off conditions. The latching scheme also provides a consistent means of releasing the head-arm assembly from the immobilized position upon power up of the disk drive. The latch uses no electrical power in either immobilized or released state. This design is immune to extreme torque and linear shock forces applied to the disk drive case. The latch system can use the energy stored in the spinning disks to drive the head-arm assembly toward a safe position while simultaneously arming the latch mechanism to secure the head-arm assembly in the safe position upon arrival. A low energy five msec pulse of current drives the latch from one state to the other. Solenoids as presently used in latch mechanisms are bulky, expensive, have variable force characteristics, and often generate contaminants. The latch described in this paper is expected to replace such solenoids. It may also replace small magnet latches, which have limited latch force and apply unwanted torque to a proximate head positioning arm.

  18. The perception of heading during eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royden, Constance S.; Banks, Martin S.; Crowell, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Warren and Hannon (1988, 1990), while studying the perception of heading during eye movements, concluded that people do not require extraretinal information to judge heading with eye/head movements present. Here, heading judgments are examined at higher, more typical eye movement velocities than the extremely slow tracking eye movements used by Warren and Hannon. It is found that people require extraretinal information about eye position to perceive heading accurately under many viewing conditions.

  19. [Head injuries in the Bible].

    PubMed

    Feinsod, M

    1995-12-15

    3 cases of head injury are described in the Bible: the death of Sisera by the hand of Jael (Judges 4: 21; 5: 25); the skull fractures of Avimelech incurred at the tower of Tevetz, (Judges, 9: 53, 54); and the slaying of Goliath by David, (Samuel I 17: 49-51). The various attempts to understand the mechanisms of these head injuries using philology, knowledge of the art of biblical warfare and modern medical considerations are reviewed. We try to identify the site of the mortal blow to Sisera's head, to understand why Avimelech asked to be killed, and to decide whether the giant from Gath was a rugged warrior or just an endocrinological cripple.

  20. Fractures of the Radial Head.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Klaus Josef; Wegmann, Kilian; Müller, Lars P; Gohlke, Frank E

    2015-11-01

    Radial head fractures are the most common fractures around the elbow. Because they are often accompanied by ligamentous injuries, we recommend considering them to be osteoligamentous injuries rather than simple fractures, even in undisplaced or minimally displaced fractures. Surgeons should always suspect and actively exclude concomitant ligament tears. The incidence of these associated injuries increases with greater severity of the radial head fracture. However, the standard Mason classification system does not adequately address this problem, and all attempts to establish a new classification system that provides concise treatment algorithms have failed. This article discusses the current treatment options and the current controversies in nonsurgical therapy, open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) and radial head replacement. PMID:26498543

  1. Rotary head type reproducing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Takayama, Nobutoshi; Edakubo, Hiroo; Kozuki, Susumu; Takei, Masahiro; Nagasawa, Kenichi

    1986-01-01

    In an apparatus of the kind arranged to reproduce, with a plurality of rotary heads, an information signal from a record bearing medium having many recording tracks which are parallel to each other with the information signal recorded therein and with a plurality of different pilot signals of different frequencies also recorded one by one, one in each of the recording tracks, a plurality of different reference signals of different frequencies are simultaneously generated. A tracking error is detected by using the different reference signals together with the pilot signals which are included in signals reproduced from the plurality of rotary heads.

  2. Rotating head and piston engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gomm, T.J.; Messick, N.C.

    1992-07-21

    This patent describes a rotary piston combustion engine. It comprises a housing means, an engine block housing a single toroidal bore, a piston carrier ring spaced outwardly along the entire perimeter of the toroidal bore with at least one finger extending inwardly for piston attachment, a power transfer cylinder, a power output shaft, an auxiliary shaft with driven gearing means meshing with the driving gearing means, a rotating head with windows for piston passage, a trapezoidal porting means in the engine block and in the rotating head, an exhaust port means.

  3. Head kinematics during shaking associated with abusive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Lintern, T O; Puhulwelle Gamage, N T; Bloomfield, F H; Kelly, P; Finch, M C; Taberner, A J; Nash, M P; Nielsen, P M F

    2015-09-18

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is a potentially fatal result of child abuse but the mechanisms of injury are controversial. To address the hypothesis that shaking alone is sufficient to elicit the injuries observed, effective computational and experimental models are necessary. This paper investigates the use of a coupled rigid-body computational modelling framework to reproduce in vivo shaking kinematics in AHT. A sagittal plane OpenSim computational model of a lamb was developed and used to interpret biomechanical data from in vivo shaking experiments. The acceleration of the head during shaking was used to provide in vivo validation of the associated computational model. Results of this study demonstrated that peak accelerations occurred when the head impacted the torso and produced acceleration magnitudes exceeding 200ms(-)(2). The computational model demonstrated good agreement with the experimental measurements and was shown to be able to reproduce the high accelerations that occur during impact. The biomechanical results obtained with the computational model demonstrate the utility of using a coupled rigid-body modelling framework to describe infant head kinematics in AHT.

  4. Thermodynamic parameters governing the self-assembly of head-head-head lanthanide bimetallic helicates.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas B; Scopelliti, Rosario; Bünzli, Jean-Claude G

    2007-01-01

    The heterobitopic ligands L ABX (X=1, 2, 3, 4 or 5), differing only by a Cl or NEt(2) substituent, have been designed to complex with a pair of lanthanide ions to form triple-stranded bimetallic helicates of overall composition [Ln2(L ABX)3]6+. The percentage of HHH (head-head-head) isomer, in which each of the three ligand strands coordinates to the same lanthanide ion with the same coordination unit, is deciding the ability of the ligands to selectively form heterobimetallic complexes containing one luminescent and one magnetic or two different luminescent ions. It deviates significantly from the statistical value of 25 % and ranges from 6-20 % for L AB2 complexes to 93-96 % for L AB4 complexes. The equilibrium between HHT (head-head-tail) and HHH isomers has been investigated in detail for homobimetallic helicates (Ln=Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Lu) by means of variable temperature NMR and thermodynamic parameters have been determined. The equilibrium is characterized by small values of DeltaH and DeltaS, which vary in opposite direction along the lanthanide series for complexes with the same ligand in a way that keeps the value of DeltaG almost constant. The results are interpreted in terms of differences in interstrand stacking, ion-dipole interactions and metal-metal repulsion. PMID:17600785

  5. New Insights into Hard Phases of CoCrMo Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Y.; Pourzal, R.; Stemmer, P.; Wimmer, M.A.; Jacobs, J.J.; Fischer, A.; Marks, L. D.

    2012-01-01

    The microstructural and mechanical properties of the hard phases in CoCrMo prosthetic alloys in both cast and wrought conditions were examined using transmission electron microscopy and nanoindentation. Besides the known carbides of M23C6-type (M=Cr, Mo, Co) and M6C-type which are formed by either eutectic solidification or precipitation, a new mixed-phase hard constituent has been found in the cast alloys, which is composed of ~100 nm fine grains. The nanosized grains were identified to be mostly of M23C6 type using nano-beam precession electron diffraction, and the chemical composition varied from grain to grain being either Cr- or Co-rich. In contrast, the carbides within the wrought alloy having the same M23C6 structure were homogeneous, which can be attributed to the repeated heating and deformation steps. Nanoindentation measurements showed that the hardness of the hard phase mixture in the cast specimen was ~15.7 GPa, while the M23C6 carbides in the wrought alloy were twice as hard (~30.7 GPa). The origin of the nanostructured hard phase mixture was found to be related to slow cooling during casting. Mixed hard phases were produced at a cooling rate of 0.2 °C/s, whereas single phase carbides were formed at a cooling rate of 50 °C/s. This is consistent with sluggish kinetics and rationalizes different and partly conflicting microstructural results in the literature, and could be a source of variations in the performance of prosthetic devices in-vivo. PMID:22659365

  6. Information for Patients Who Have Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... their implants. These problems included: General hypersensitivity reaction (skin rash) Cardiomyopathy Neurological changes including sensory changes (auditory, or visual impairments) Psychological status change ( ...

  7. Metal on metal oxide nanowire Co-catalyzed Si photocathode for solar water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ke; Madsen, Kristian; Andersen, Pål; Bao, Weining; Sun, Zhelin; Wang, Deli

    2012-05-01

    We report a systematic study of Si|ZnO and Si|ZnO| metal photocathodes for effective photoelectrochemical cells and hydrogen generation. Both ZnO nanocrystalline thin films and vertical nanowire arrays were studied. Si|ZnO electrodes showed increased cathodic photocurrents due to improved charge separation by the formation of a p/n junction, and Si|ZnO:Al (n+-ZnO) and Si|ZnO(N2) (thin films prepared in N2/Ar gas) lead to a further increase in cathodic photocurrents. Si|ZnONW (nanowire array) photocathodes dramatically increased the photocurrents and thus photoelectrochemical conversion efficiency due to the enhanced light absorption and enlarged surface area. The ZnO film thickness and ZnO nanowire length were important to the enhancements. A thin metal coating on ZnO showed increased photocurrent due to a catalyzed hydrogen evolution reaction and Ni metal showed comparable catalytic activities to those of Pt and Pd. Moreover, photoelectrochemical instability of Si|ZnO electrodes was minimized by metal co-catalysts. Our results indicate that the metal and ZnO on p-type Si serve as co-catalysts for photoelectrochemical water splitting, which can provide a possible low-cost and scalable method to fabricate high efficiency photocathodes for practical applications in clean solar energy harvesting.

  8. Hurricane Rina Headed to Mexico

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of NOAA GOES-13 satellite observations from October 23 at 2:45 p.m. EDT through Oct. 25 at 1:30 p.m. EDT shows a strengthening Hurricane Rina in the western Caribbean Sea and headed fo...

  9. Head nurse or hotel manager?

    PubMed

    McAlvanah, M

    1989-01-01

    The responsibility of making room assignments for patients can be both a challenging and frustrating experience for a head nurse. Many factors must be considered when making room assignments while consumer dissatisfaction with the process must be handled creatively and with understanding. PMID:2734042

  10. Graham confirmed as OSTP Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    William R. Graham was confirmed by the Senate on October 1, 1986, as the science advisor to President Ronald Reagan and head of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Formerly the deputy administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Graham started his new post on October 6.

  11. MAKING WAVES, DENVER HEAD START.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denver Opportunity, CO.

    THIS DOCUMENT PROVIDES A DESCRIPTIVE SURVEY OF PROJECT HEAD START ACTIVITIES IN DENVER, COLORADO. THE PRIMARY EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES OF THE PROGRAM ARE CITED AS (1) CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT THROUGH EXPERIENCES IN AN ENLARGED ENVIRONMENT, (2) SELF-CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT THROUGH SUCCESSFUL INTERACTION WITH TEACHERS AND WITH PEERS, AND (3) THE DEVELOPMENT OF…

  12. Pressure testing of torispherical heads

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, M.D.; Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P.

    1995-12-01

    Two vessels fabricated from SA516-70 steel with 6% knuckle radius torispherical heads were tested under internal pressure to failure. The D/t ratios of Vessel 1 and Vessel 2 were 238 and 185 respectively. The calculated maximum allowable working pressures of Vessel 1 and 2 heads using the ASME Section 8, Div. 1 rules and measured dimensions were 85 and 110 psi, respectively. Vessel 1 failed at a nozzle weld in the cylindrical shell at 700 psi pressure. Neither buckling nor any other objectionable deformation of the head was observed at a theoretical double-elastic-slope collapse pressure of 241 and a calculated buckling pressure of 270 psi. Buckles were observed developing slowly after 600 psi pressure, and a total of 22 buckles were observed after the test, having the maximum amplitude of 0.15 inch. Vessel 2 failed at the edge of the longitudinal weld of the cylindrical shell at 1,080 psi pressure. Neither buckling nor any other objectionable deformation of the head was observed up to the final pressure, which exceeded the theoretical double-elastic-slope collapse and calculated buckling pressures of 274 psi and 342 psi, respectively.

  13. Model of beam head erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1980-08-08

    An analytical model of beam head dynamics is presented, leading to an estimate of the erosion rate due to the combined effects of Ohmic dissipation and scattering. Agreement with the results of a computer simulation and detailed one-dimensional computations is good in all respects except for the scaling of the erosion rate with net current.

  14. Head Start Dental Health Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Head Start Bureau.

    This curriculum for Head Start programs provides preschool learning experiences that teach about dental health. The majority of the curriculum guide is devoted to the following lesson plans: (1) "Introduction of 'Smiley the Super Pup'," an optional puppet character which may be used to review the concepts covered in each lesson; (2) "Visiting the…

  15. Outcomes Following Radial Head Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fowler, John R; Henry, Sarah E; Xu, Peter; Goitz, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    Most current series of radial head arthroplasty include small numbers of patients with short- to medium-term follow-up and significant heterogeneity in patients, treatments, and outcome measures. The purpose of this systematic review was to review outcomes for radial head arthroplasty based on injury chronicity, injury pattern, and type of implant used. The authors systematically searched electronic databases for studies containing radial head arthroplasty or radial head replacement and identified 19 studies for inclusion in the analysis. For each included study, a composite mean was obtained for Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) and range of motion. Outcomes were said to differ significantly if their confidence intervals did not overlap. The MEPS for acute treatment (90) was higher than that for delayed treatment (81). There was no difference in the pooled MEPS between the isolated (89) and complex injury pattern (87) groups or implant material. There was no difference in range of motion between the acute and delayed or isolated and complex groups, but the average degree of pronation was higher in patients treated with titanium implants (76°) compared with cobalt chromium implants (66°). This systematic review suggests that outcomes are improved following acute arthroplasty for treatment of radial head fractures compared with delayed treatment, based on MEPS. The lack of other significant differences detected is likely due to the significant heterogeneity and inadequate power in current studies. Further prospective studies isolating the different variables will be needed to determine their true effect on outcomes. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):153-160.]. PMID:27045484

  16. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer This page ... and neck cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer Abitrexate (Methotrexate) ...

  17. Head stabilization in whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinloch, M.R.; Cronin, T.W.; Olsen, G.H.; Chavez-Ramirez, Felipe

    2005-01-01

    The whooping crane (Grus americana) is the tallest bird in North America, yet not much is known about its visual ecology. How these birds overcome their unusual height to identify, locate, track, and capture prey items is not well understood. There have been many studies on head and eye stabilization in large wading birds (herons and egrets), but the pattern of head movement and stabilization during foraging is unclear. Patterns of head movement and stabilization during walking were examined in whooping cranes at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland USA. Four whooping cranes (1 male and 3 females) were videotaped for this study. All birds were already acclimated to the presence of people and to food rewards. Whooping cranes were videotaped using both digital and Hi-8 Sony video cameras (Sony Corporation, 7-35 Kitashinagawa, 6-Chome, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, Japan), placed on a tripod and set at bird height in the cranes' home pens. The cranes were videotaped repeatedly, at different locations in the pens and while walking (or running) at different speeds. Rewards (meal worms, smelt, crickets and corn) were used to entice the cranes to walk across the camera's view plane. The resulting videotape was analyzed at the University of Maryland at Baltimore County. Briefly, we used a computerized reduced graphic model of a crane superimposed over each frame of analyzed tape segments by means of a custom written program (T. W. Cronin, using C++) with the ability to combine video and computer graphic input. The speed of the birds in analyzed segments ranged from 0.30 m/s to 2.64 m/s, and the proportion of time the head was stabilized ranged from 79% to 0%, respectively. The speed at which the proportion reached 0% was 1.83 m/s. The analyses suggest that the proportion of time the head is stable decreases as speed of the bird increases. In all cases, birds were able to reach their target prey with little difficulty. Thus when cranes are walking searching for food

  18. The Head-Injured College Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Cooper B.

    Intended for use by professionals as well as head-injured college students and their families, the text provides basic information about head injuries, brain anatomy, the effects of injury to the various areas of the brain, and the major factors in recovery and rehabilitation. It examines the viability of college attendance for the head-injured…

  19. Combustor with non-circular head end

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Won -Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston

    2015-09-29

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a head end with a non-circular configuration, a number of fuel nozzles positioned about the head end, and a transition piece extending downstream of the head end.

  20. Headsup: New Directions for Department Heads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midwood, Dale; Hillier, Dudley

    This resource booklet attempts to describe the new directions of the department head role. In a recent study by Kenneth Leithwood, "The Secondary School Department Head," 1987, department heads identified democratic decision-making, human relations, planning for program and staff development, and teacher supervision as functions crucial to the…

  1. 49 CFR 572.16 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head. 572.16 Section 572.16 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.16 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly designated as SA 103C 010 on drawing No. SA 103C 001, and conforms...

  2. 29 CFR 1915.155 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Head protection. 1915.155 Section 1915.155 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.155 Head protection. (a) Use. (1) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears a protective helmet when working in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head...

  3. 29 CFR 1915.155 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Head protection. 1915.155 Section 1915.155 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.155 Head protection. (a) Use. (1) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears a protective helmet when working in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head...

  4. 29 CFR 1910.135 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Head protection. 1910.135 Section 1910.135 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.135 Head protection. (a) General... in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head from falling objects. (2) The...

  5. 49 CFR 572.16 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head. 572.16 Section 572.16 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.16 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly designated as SA 103C 010 on drawing No. SA 103C 001, and conforms...

  6. 29 CFR 1915.155 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Head protection. 1915.155 Section 1915.155 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.155 Head protection. (a) Use. (1) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears a protective helmet when working in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.135 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Head protection. 1910.135 Section 1910.135 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.135 Head protection. (a) General... in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head from falling objects. (2) The...

  8. 29 CFR 1910.135 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Head protection. 1910.135 Section 1910.135 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.135 Head protection. (a) General... in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head from falling objects. (2) The...

  9. 33 CFR 142.30 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Head protection. 142.30 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.30 Head... conductors shall wear a head protector meeting the specifications of ANSI Z89.1, for the hazard involved....

  10. 29 CFR 1918.103 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Head protection. 1918.103 Section 1918.103 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.103 Head... in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The...

  11. 31 CFR 0.106 - Bureau Heads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... explanation of the applicable post-employment restrictions contained in 18 U.S.C. 207 and 5 CFR part 2641 and... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bureau Heads. 0.106 Section 0.106... RULES OF CONDUCT General Provisions Responsibilities § 0.106 Bureau Heads. Bureau heads or designees...

  12. 33 CFR 142.30 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Head protection. 142.30 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.30 Head... conductors shall wear a head protector meeting the specifications of ANSI Z89.1, for the hazard involved....

  13. 29 CFR 1915.155 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Head protection. 1915.155 Section 1915.155 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.155 Head protection. (a) Use. (1) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears a protective helmet when working in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head...

  14. 31 CFR 0.106 - Bureau Heads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... explanation of the applicable post-employment restrictions contained in 18 U.S.C. 207 and 5 CFR part 2641 and... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bureau Heads. 0.106 Section 0.106... RULES OF CONDUCT General Provisions Responsibilities § 0.106 Bureau Heads. Bureau heads or designees...

  15. 29 CFR 1918.103 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Head protection. 1918.103 Section 1918.103 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.103 Head... in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The...

  16. 29 CFR 1918.103 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Head protection. 1918.103 Section 1918.103 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.103 Head... in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The...

  17. 49 CFR 572.16 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head. 572.16 Section 572.16 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.16 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly designated as SA 103C 010 on drawing No. SA 103C 001, and conforms...

  18. 29 CFR 1918.103 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Head protection. 1918.103 Section 1918.103 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.103 Head... in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.135 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Head protection. 1910.135 Section 1910.135 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.135 Head protection. (a) General... in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head from falling objects. (2) The...

  20. 33 CFR 142.30 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Head protection. 142.30 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.30 Head... conductors shall wear a head protector meeting the specifications of ANSI Z89.1, for the hazard involved....

  1. 29 CFR 1915.155 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Head protection. 1915.155 Section 1915.155 Labor... (PPE) § 1915.155 Head protection. (a) Use. (1) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears a protective helmet when working in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head...

  2. 31 CFR 0.106 - Bureau Heads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... explanation of the applicable post-employment restrictions contained in 18 U.S.C. 207 and 5 CFR part 2641 and... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bureau Heads. 0.106 Section 0.106... RULES OF CONDUCT General Provisions Responsibilities § 0.106 Bureau Heads. Bureau heads or designees...

  3. 33 CFR 142.30 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Head protection. 142.30 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.30 Head... conductors shall wear a head protector meeting the specifications of ANSI Z89.1, for the hazard involved....

  4. 29 CFR 1918.103 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Head protection. 1918.103 Section 1918.103 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.103 Head... in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The...

  5. 49 CFR 572.16 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head. 572.16 Section 572.16 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-Year-Old Child § 572.16 Head. (a) The head consists of the assembly designated as SA 103C 010 on drawing No. SA 103C 001, and conforms...

  6. 33 CFR 142.30 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Head protection. 142.30 Section... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.30 Head... conductors shall wear a head protector meeting the specifications of ANSI Z89.1, for the hazard involved....

  7. 29 CFR 1910.135 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Head protection. 1910.135 Section 1910.135 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.135 Head protection. (a) General... in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head from falling objects. (2) The...

  8. A MRI rotary phased array head coil.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing Keong; Weber, Ewald; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-08-01

    A new rotary phased array (RPA) head coil that can provide homogenous brain images comparable to volumetric radiofrequency coils is proposed for magnetic resonance brain imaging applications. The design of the RPA head coil is a departure from conventional circumferential array design method, as coil elements of the RPA head coil have a "paddle-like" structure consisting of a pair of main conductors located on opposite sides, inserted equi-angularly around and over the head. A prototype 2T receive-only 4-element RPA head coil was constructed and experimentally tested against a conventional receive-only 4-element phased array head coil and a commercial receive-only quadrature birdcage head coil. Homogenous phantom images acquired by the RPA head coil show that signal intensity deep at the center of the phantom was improved as compared to the conventional phased array head coil and this improvement allow the RPA head coil to acquire homogenous brain images similar to brain images acquired with the birdcage head coil. In addition, partial parallel imaging was used in conjunction with the RPA head coil to enable rapid imaging.

  9. Alaska Head Start Annual Program Report, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education and Early Devolopment, Juneau. Head Start State Collaboration Office.

    This annual report details the accomplishments of the Alaska Head Start Program for fiscal year 1999. The report begins with a description of the Head Start program and its core values, and delineates the administrative and program partners of Head Start, its service population, eligibility requirements, funding sources, service models, and…

  10. Alaska Head Start. Annual Report for 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Community and Regional Affairs, Juneau.

    This annual report details the accomplishments of the Alaska Head Start Program for fiscal year 1998. The report begins with a graphic presentation of the locations of Alaska Head Start programs and a table delineating the administrative and program partners of Head Start, its service population, eligibility requirements, funding sources, service…

  11. High head hydro powerplant evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J.L.; Helwig, P.C.; Sturge, L.G.

    1986-12-01

    When the head on a hydroelectric powerplant is between about 250-700 m (800-2,300 ft) the turbine can be either an impulse or reaction Francis unit. For each type of unit the operating characteristics and design of the powerplant will be substantially different. This paper outlines a comparison of the two types of powerplant, which was undertaken for the 136 MW Cat Arm Development in Newfoundland, where a gross head of 386.5 m (1,268 ft) is harnessed. The initial cost-benefit analysis indicated that a Francis unit should be selected, but a Pelton unit was chosen, based on an analysis of the operating characteristics and other unquantifiable benefits.

  12. Head Resistance Due to Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinschmidt, R V; Parsons, S R

    1920-01-01

    Part 1 deals with the head resistance of a number of common types of radiator cores at different speeds in free air, as measured in the wind tunnel at the bureau of standards. This work was undertaken to determine the characteristics of various types of radiator cores, and in particular to develop the best type of radiator for airplanes. Some 25 specimens of core were tested, including practically all the general types now in use, except the flat plate type. Part 2 gives the results of wind tunnel tests of resistance on a model fuselage with a nose radiator. Part 3 presents the results of preliminary tests of head resistance of a radiator enclosed in a streamlined casing. Special attention is given to the value of wing radiator and of the radiator located in the open, especially when it is provided with a properly designed streamlined casing.

  13. Tape/head interface study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Existing high energy tapes, high track density heads, and transport guidance techniques were evaluated and characterized to enable these technologies to be employed in future spacecraft recorders with high confidence. The results of these study efforts demonstrated tracking accuracy tape and head density that will support spacecraft recorders with data rates of a minimum of 150 Mbps and storage capacities ranging from 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 11th bits. Seven high energy tapes of either .25 in width, 1.00 in width, or both, were tested. All tapes were tested at the same speed (30 ips) and the same packing density (33 KBI). The performance of all 1 in tapes was considered superior.

  14. Sealed head access area enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Martin P.; Govi, Aldo R.

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder power reactor is provided with a sealed head access area enclosure disposed above the reactor vessel head consisting of a plurality of prefabricated structural panels including a center panel removably sealed into position with inflatable seals, and outer panels sealed into position with semipermanent sealant joints. The sealant joints are located in the joint between the edge of the panels and the reactor containment structure and include from bottom to top an inverted U-shaped strip, a lower layer of a room temperature vulcanizing material, a separator strip defining a test space therewithin, and an upper layer of a room temperature vulcanizing material. The test space is tapped by a normally plugged passage extending to the top of the enclosure for testing the seal or introducing a buffer gas thereinto.

  15. Hot gas engine heater head

    DOEpatents

    Berntell, John O.

    1983-01-01

    A heater head for a multi-cylinder double acting hot gas engine in which each cylinder is surrounded by an annular regenerator unit, and in which the tops of each cylinder and its surrounding regenerator are interconnected by a multiplicity of heater tubes. A manifold for the heater tubes has a centrally disposed duct connected to the top of the cylinder and surrounded by a wider duct connecting the other ends of the heater tubes with the regenerator unit.

  16. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Vilaas S; Reis, Martin N; Aulino, Joseph M; Berger, Kevin L; Broder, Joshua; Choudhri, Asim F; Kendi, A Tuba; Kessler, Marcus M; Kirsch, Claudia F; Luttrull, Michael D; Mechtler, Laszlo L; Prall, J Adair; Raksin, Patricia B; Roth, Christopher J; Sharma, Aseem; West, O Clark; Wintermark, Max; Cornelius, Rebecca S; Bykowski, Julie

    2016-06-01

    Neuroimaging plays an important role in the management of head trauma. Several guidelines have been published for identifying which patients can avoid neuroimaging. Noncontrast head CT is the most appropriate initial examination in patients with minor or mild acute closed head injury who require neuroimaging as well as patients with moderate to severe acute closed head injury. In short-term follow-up neuroimaging of acute traumatic brain injury, CT and MRI may have complementary roles. In subacute to chronic traumatic brain injury, MRI is the most appropriate initial examination, though CT may have a complementary role in select circumstances. Advanced neuroimaging techniques are areas of active research but are not considered routine clinical practice at this time. In suspected intracranial vascular injury, CT angiography or venography or MR angiography or venography is the most appropriate imaging study. In suspected posttraumatic cerebrospinal fluid leak, high-resolution noncontrast skull base CT is the most appropriate initial imaging study to identify the source, with cisternography reserved for problem solving. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:27262056

  17. Myers nominated to head USGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-05-01

    U.S. President George W. Bush will nominate Mark Myers to be director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the White House announced on 3 May. Myers most recently held the position of Alaska State Geologist and director of the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Survey. Prior to that position, Myers headed the State of Alaska Division of Oil and Gas, the agency that oversees leases of state lands for oil and gas exploration.

  18. Family Connections: Helping Early Head Start/Head Start Staff and Parents Address Mental Health Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beardslee, William R.; Avery, Mary Watson; Ayoub, Catherine; Watts, Caroline L.

    2009-01-01

    Early Head Start/Head Start teachers and staff encounter parents who have wrestled with depression and other adversities every day. This article describes an innovative program of trainings for and consultation to Early Head Start/Head Start staff to help them effectively deal with mental heath challenges faced by parents and children. The program…

  19. Target position relative to the head is essential for predicting head movement during head-free gaze pursuit.

    PubMed

    C Pallus, Adam; G Freedman, Edward

    2016-08-01

    Gaze pursuit is the coordinated movement of the eyes and head that allows humans and other foveate animals to track moving objects. The control of smooth pursuit eye movements when the head is restrained is relatively well understood, but how the eyes coordinate with concurrent head movements when the head is free remains unresolved. In this study, we describe behavioral tasks that dissociate head and gaze velocity during head-free pursuit in monkeys. Existing models of gaze pursuit propose that both eye and head movements are driven only by the perceived velocity of the visual target and are therefore unable to account for these data. We show that in addition to target velocity, the positions of the eyes in the orbits and the retinal position of the target are important factors for predicting head movement during pursuit. When the eyes are already near their limits, further pursuit in that direction will be accompanied by more head movement than when the eyes are centered in the orbits, even when target velocity is the same. The step-ramp paradigm, often used in pursuit tasks, produces larger or smaller head movements, depending on the direction of the position step, while gaze pursuit velocity is insensitive to this manipulation. Using these tasks, we can reliably evoke head movements with peak velocities much faster than the target's velocity. Under these circumstances, the compensatory eye movements, which are often called counterproductive since they rotate the eyes in the opposite direction, are essential to maintaining accurate gaze velocity.

  20. Animal Models of Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cernak, Ibolja

    2005-01-01

    Summary: Animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are used to elucidate primary and secondary sequelae underlying human head injury in an effort to identify potential neuroprotective therapies for developing and adult brains. The choice of experimental model depends upon both the research goal and underlying objectives. The intrinsic ability to study injury-induced changes in behavior, physiology, metabolism, the blood/tissue interface, the blood brain barrier, and/or inflammatory- and immune-mediated responses, makes in vivo TBI models essential for neurotrauma research. Whereas human TBI is a highly complex multifactorial disorder, animal trauma models tend to replicate only single factors involved in the pathobiology of head injury using genetically well-defined inbred animals of a single sex. Although such an experimental approach is helpful to delineate key injury mechanisms, the simplicity and hence inability of animal models to reflect the complexity of clinical head injury may underlie the discrepancy between preclinical and clinical trials of neuroprotective therapeutics. Thus, a search continues for new animal models, which would more closely mimic the highly heterogeneous nature of human TBI, and address key factors in treatment optimization. PMID:16389305

  1. Preventing head and neck injury.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, A S; McCrory, P

    2005-06-01

    A wide range of head and neck injury risks are present in sport, including catastrophic injury. The literature since 1980 on prevention of head and neck injury in sport was reviewed, focusing on catastrophic and brain injury and identifying the range of injury prevention methods in use. There have been few formal evaluations of injury prevention methods. Approaches that are considered, or have been proven, to be successful in preventing injury include: modification of the baseball; implementation of helmet standards in ice hockey and American football and increased wearing rates; use of full faceguards in ice hockey; changes in rules associated with body contact; implementation of rules to reduce the impact forces in rugby scrums. Helmets and other devices have been shown to reduce the risk of severe head and facial injury, but current designs appear to make little difference to rates of concussion. Research methods involving epidemiological, medical, and human factors are required in combination with biomechanical and technological approaches to reduce further injury risks in sport.

  2. Porcine Head Response to Blast

    PubMed Central

    Shridharani, Jay K.; Wood, Garrett W.; Panzer, Matthew B.; Capehart, Bruce P.; Nyein, Michelle K.; Radovitzky, Raul A.; Bass, Cameron R. ‘Dale’

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational models has been one method to elucidate that response of the brain in blast, and to identify possible mechanical correlates of injury. However, model validation against experimental data is required to ensure that the model output is representative of in vivo biomechanical response. This study exposes porcine subjects to primary blast overpressures generated using a compressed-gas shock tube. Shock tube blasts were directed to the unprotected head of each animal while the lungs and thorax were protected using ballistic protective vests similar to those employed in theater. The test conditions ranged from 110 to 740 kPa peak incident overpressure with scaled durations from 1.3 to 6.9 ms and correspond approximately with a 50% injury risk for brain bleeding and apnea in a ferret model scaled to porcine exposure. Instrumentation was placed on the porcine head to measure bulk acceleration, pressure at the surface of the head, and pressure inside the cranial cavity. Immediately after the blast, 5 of the 20 animals tested were apneic. Three subjects recovered without intervention within 30 s and the remaining two recovered within 8 min following respiratory assistance and administration of the respiratory stimulant doxapram. Gross examination of the brain revealed no indication of bleeding. Intracranial pressures ranged from 80 to 390 kPa as a result of the blast and were notably lower than the shock tube reflected pressures of 300–2830 kPa, indicating pressure attenuation by the skull up to a factor of 8.4. Peak head accelerations were measured from 385 to 3845 G’s and were well correlated with peak incident overpressure (R2 = 0.90). One SD corridors for the surface pressure, intracranial pressure (ICP), and head acceleration are

  3. Effects of vestibular loss on head stabilization in response to head and body perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Control of head position during postural responses is important to facilitate both the interpretation of vestibular signals and the stabilization of gaze. In these experiments, we compared head stabilization for two different postural tasks: 1) in response to perturbations at the head, and 2) in response to perturbations induced at the support surface, which perturb both body and head position. To determine whether normal vestibular function is necessary for head stabilization in these two tasks, responses to forward and backward mechanical perturbations of the head and body were compared for 13 normal subjects and 4 patients with profound bilateral vestibular loss (two with vestibular loss in adulthood and two in infancy). Normal subjects showed little neck muscle activity for body perturbations, but large, early activations in both neck extensors and flexors for head perturbations. In contrast, vestibular patients showed excessive neck muscle activation for body perturbations and reduced or absent neck muscle activity for head perturbations. Patients with vestibular loss in adulthood also showed increased head acceleration in response to both head and body perturbations, but patients with vestibular loss in infancy showed more normal head accelerations. For body perturbations, the differences in head acceleration between patients and normals were greater for later head acceleration peaks, indicating poor head control during the execution of the postural response. Trunk angle changes were also higher in the patients for forward body perturbations, indicating that poorer control of trunk position could have contributed to their poorer head stabilization. These results indicate that the vestibular system plays an important role in head and trunk stabilization for both head and body perturbations. However, the more normal head accelerations of the patients with infant vestibular loss also indicate that other mechanisms, possibly involving neck reflexes, can at least

  4. 49 CFR 572.72 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.72 Section...-Year-Old Child § 572.72 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) Head assembly. The head consists of the... on SA 106C 001, sheet 8. (b) Head assembly impact response requirements. When the head is impacted...

  5. 49 CFR 572.72 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.72 Section...-Year-Old Child § 572.72 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) Head assembly. The head consists of the... on SA 106C 001, sheet 8. (b) Head assembly impact response requirements. When the head is impacted...

  6. Head position modulates optokinetic nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Ferraresi, A.; Botti, F. M.; Panichi, R.; Barmack, N. H.

    2011-01-01

    Orientation and movement relies on both visual and vestibular information mapped in separate coordinate systems. Here, we examine how coordinate systems interact to guide eye movements of rabbits. We exposed rabbits to continuous horizontal optokinetic stimulation (HOKS) at 5°/s to evoke horizontal eye movements, while they were statically or dynamically roll-tilted about the longitudinal axis. During monocular or binocular HOKS, when the rabbit was roll-tilted 30° onto the side of the eye stimulated in the posterior → anterior (P → A) direction, slow phase eye velocity (SPEV) increased by 3.5–5°/s. When the rabbit was roll-tilted 30° onto the side of the eye stimulated in the A → P direction, SPEV decreased to ~2.5°/s. We also tested the effect of roll-tilt after prolonged optokinetic stimulation had induced a negative optokinetic afternystagmus (OKAN II). In this condition, the SPEV occurred in the dark, “open loop.” Modulation of SPEV of OKAN II depended on the direction of the nystagmus and was consistent with that observed during “closed loop” HOKS. Dynamic roll-tilt influenced SPEV evoked by HOKS in a similar way. The amplitude and the phase of SPEV depended on the frequency of vestibular oscillation and on HOKS velocity. We conclude that the change in the linear acceleration of the gravity vector with respect to the head during roll-tilt modulates the gain of SPEV depending on its direction. This modulation improves gaze stability at different image retinal slip velocities caused by head roll-tilt during centric or eccentric head movement. PMID:21735244

  7. Essential radiology for head injury

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, D.W.H.; Kreel, L.

    1988-01-01

    The book covers the guidelines established by the Royal College of Radiologists for the radiographic evaluation of head injuries. It presents a chapter reviewing the normal radiologic anatomy of the skull in six different projections. The advantages and limitations of each projection are addressed. The third chapter, contains 43 radiographs dedicated to the calcified pineal gland and other intracranial calcifications. The book reports on specific types of fractures: linear fractures of the vault, depressed fractures of the vault, fractures in children, fractures of the base of the skull, and fractures of the facial bones.

  8. Resonance in a head massager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Jair Lúcio Prados

    2015-04-01

    Mechanical structures such as pendula, bridges, or buildings always exhibit one (or more) natural oscillation frequency.1 If that structure is subjected to oscillatory forces of this same frequency, resonance occurs, with consequent increase of the structure oscillation amplitude. There is no shortage of simple experiments for demonstrating resonance in high school classes using a variety of materials, such as saw blades,2 guitars,3 pendulums,4 wine glasses,5 bottles,6 Ping-Pong balls,7 and pearl strings.8 We present here an experimental demonstration using only an inexpensive head (or scalp) massager, which can be purchased for less than a dollar.

  9. Head movement during walking in the cat.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Humza N; Beloozerova, Irina N; Sun, Hai; Marlinski, Vladimir

    2016-09-22

    Knowledge of how the head moves during locomotion is essential for understanding how locomotion is controlled by sensory systems of the head. We have analyzed head movements of the cat walking along a straight flat pathway in the darkness and light. We found that cats' head left-right translations, and roll and yaw rotations oscillated once per stride, while fore-aft and vertical translations, and pitch rotations oscillated twice. The head reached its highest vertical positions during second half of each forelimb swing, following maxima of the shoulder/trunk by 20-90°. Nose-up rotation followed head upward translation by another 40-90° delay. The peak-to-peak amplitude of vertical translation was ∼1.5cm and amplitude of pitch rotation was ∼3°. Amplitudes of lateral translation and roll rotation were ∼1cm and 1.5-3°, respectively. Overall, cats' heads were neutral in roll and 10-30° nose-down, maintaining horizontal semicircular canals and utriculi within 10° of the earth horizontal. The head longitudinal velocity was 0.5-1m/s, maximal upward and downward linear velocities were ∼0.05 and ∼0.1m/s, respectively, and maximal lateral velocity was ∼0.05m/s. Maximal velocities of head pitch rotation were 20-50°/s. During walking in light, cats stood 0.3-0.5cm taller and held their head 0.5-2cm higher than in darkness. Forward acceleration was 25-100% higher and peak-to-peak amplitude of head pitch oscillations was ∼20°/s larger. We concluded that, during walking, the head of the cat is held actively. Reflexes appear to play only a partial role in determining head movement, and vision might further diminish their role. PMID:27339731

  10. Head movement during walking in the cat.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Humza N; Beloozerova, Irina N; Sun, Hai; Marlinski, Vladimir

    2016-09-22

    Knowledge of how the head moves during locomotion is essential for understanding how locomotion is controlled by sensory systems of the head. We have analyzed head movements of the cat walking along a straight flat pathway in the darkness and light. We found that cats' head left-right translations, and roll and yaw rotations oscillated once per stride, while fore-aft and vertical translations, and pitch rotations oscillated twice. The head reached its highest vertical positions during second half of each forelimb swing, following maxima of the shoulder/trunk by 20-90°. Nose-up rotation followed head upward translation by another 40-90° delay. The peak-to-peak amplitude of vertical translation was ∼1.5cm and amplitude of pitch rotation was ∼3°. Amplitudes of lateral translation and roll rotation were ∼1cm and 1.5-3°, respectively. Overall, cats' heads were neutral in roll and 10-30° nose-down, maintaining horizontal semicircular canals and utriculi within 10° of the earth horizontal. The head longitudinal velocity was 0.5-1m/s, maximal upward and downward linear velocities were ∼0.05 and ∼0.1m/s, respectively, and maximal lateral velocity was ∼0.05m/s. Maximal velocities of head pitch rotation were 20-50°/s. During walking in light, cats stood 0.3-0.5cm taller and held their head 0.5-2cm higher than in darkness. Forward acceleration was 25-100% higher and peak-to-peak amplitude of head pitch oscillations was ∼20°/s larger. We concluded that, during walking, the head of the cat is held actively. Reflexes appear to play only a partial role in determining head movement, and vision might further diminish their role.

  11. Heading in football. Part 1: Development of biomechanical methods to investigate head response

    PubMed Central

    Shewchenko, N; Withnall, C; Keown, M; Gittens, R; Dvorak, J

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: There has been growing controversy regarding long term effects of repeated low severity head impacts such as when heading a football. However, there are few scientific data substantiating these concerns in terms of the biomechanical head response to impact. The present study aimed to develop a research methodology to investigate the biomechanical response of human subjects during intentional heading and identify strategies for reducing head impact severity. Methods: A controlled laboratory study was carried out with seven active football players, aged 20–23 and of average stature and weight. The subjects were fitted with photographic targets for kinematic analysis and instrumented to measure head linear/angular accelerations and neck muscle activity. Balls were delivered at two speeds (6 m/s and 8 m/s) as the subjects executed several specific forward heading manoeuvres in the standing position. Heading speeds up to 11 m/s were seen when the head closing speed was considered. One subject demonstrating averaged flexion–extension muscle activity phased with head acceleration data and upper torso kinematics was used to validate a biofidelic 50th percentile human model with a detailed head and neck. The model was exercised under ball incoming speeds of 6–7 m/s with parameter variations including torso/head alignment, neck muscle tensing, and follow through. The model output was subsequently compared with additional laboratory tests with football players (n = 3). Additional heading scenarios were investigated including follow through, non-active ball impact, and non-contact events. Subject and model head responses were evaluated with peak linear and rotational accelerations and maximum incremental head impact power. Results: Modelling of neck muscle tensing predicted lower head accelerations and higher neck loads whereas volunteer head acceleration reductions were not consistent. Modelling of head–torso alignment predicted a modest reduction in

  12. A pre-Hispanic head.

    PubMed

    Bianucci, Raffaella; Jeziorska, Maria; Lallo, Rudy; Mattutino, Grazia; Massimelli, Massimo; Phillips, Genevieve; Appenzeller, Otto

    2008-01-01

    This report on a male head revealed biologic rhythms, as gleaned from hydrogen isotope ratios in hair, consistent with a South-American origin and Atomic Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon dating (AMS) compatible with the last pre-Hispanic period (1418-1491 AD, 95.4% probability). Biopsies showed exceptionally well-preserved tissues. The hair contained high levels of toxic elements (lead, arsenic and mercury) incompatible with life. There was no evidence for lead deposition in bone consistent with post-mortem accumulation of this toxic element in the hair. We propose that the high content of metals in hair was the result of metabolic activity of bacteria leading to metal complexation in extra cellular polymeric substances (EPS). This is a recognized protective mechanism for bacteria that thrive in toxic environments. This mechanism may account for the tissues preservation and gives a hint at soil composition where the head was presumably buried. Our results have implications for forensic toxicology which has, hitherto, relied on hair analyses as one means to reconstruct pre-mortem metabolism and for detecting toxic elements accumulated during life. Our finding also has implications for other archaeological specimens where similar circumstances may distort the results of toxicological studies.

  13. Clinical trials in head injury.

    PubMed

    Reinert, M M; Bullock, R

    1999-06-01

    Secondary brain damage, following severe head injury is considered to be a major cause for bad outcome. Impressive reductions of the extent of brain damage in experimental studies have raised high expectations for cerebral neuroprotective treatment, in the clinic. Therefore multiple compounds were and are being evaluated in trials. In this review we discuss the pathomechanisms of traumatic brain damage, based upon their clinical importance. The role of hypothermia, mannitol, barbiturates, steroids, free radical scavengers, arachidonic acid inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists, and potassium channel blockers, will be discussed. The importance of a uniform strategic approach for evaluation of potentially interesting new compounds in clinical trials, to ameliorate outcome in patients with severe head injury, is proposed. To achieve this goal, two nonprofit organizations were founded: the European Brain Injury Consortium (EBIC) and the American Brain Injury Consortium (ABIC). Their aim lies in conducting better clinical trials, which incorporate lessons learned from previous trials, such that the succession of negative, or incomplete studies, as performed in previous years, will cease.

  14. Clinical Trials in Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    NARAYAN, RAJ K.; MICHEL, MARY ELLEN; Ansell, Beth; Baethmann, Alex; Biegon, Anat; Bracken, Michael B.; Bullock, M. Ross; Choi, Sung C.; Clifton, Guy L.; Contant, Charles F.; Coplin, William M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Ghajar, Jamshid; Grady, Sean M.; Grossman, Robert G.; Hall, Edward D.; Heetderks, William; Hovda, David A.; Jallo, Jack; Katz, Russell L.; Knoller, Nachshon; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Maas, Andrew I.; Majde, Jeannine; Marion, Donald W.; Marmarou, Anthony; Marshall, Lawrence F.; McIntosh, Tracy K.; Miller, Emmy; Mohberg, Noel; Muizelaar, J. Paul; Pitts, Lawrence H.; Quinn, Peter; Riesenfeld, Gad; Robertson, Claudia S.; Strauss, Kenneth I.; Teasdale, Graham; Temkin, Nancy; Tuma, Ronald; Wade, Charles; Walker, Michael D.; Weinrich, Michael; Whyte, John; Wilberger, Jack; Young, A. Byron; Yurkewicz, Lorraine

    2006-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major public health problem globally. In the United States the incidence of closed head injuries admitted to hospitals is conservatively estimated to be 200 per 100,000 population, and the incidence of penetrating head injury is estimated to be 12 per 100,000, the highest of any developed country in the world. This yields an approximate number of 500,000 new cases each year, a sizeable proportion of which demonstrate signficant long-term disabilities. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of proven therapies for this disease. For a variety of reasons, clinical trials for this condition have been difficult to design and perform. Despite promising pre-clinical data, most of the trials that have been performed in recent years have failed to demonstrate any significant improvement in outcomes. The reasons for these failures have not always been apparent and any insights gained were not always shared. It was therefore feared that we were running the risk of repeating our mistakes. Recognizing the importance of TBI, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) sponsored a workshop that brought together experts from clinical, research, and pharmaceutical backgrounds. This workshop proved to be very informative and yielded many insights into previous and future TBI trials. This paper is an attempt to summarize the key points made at the workshop. It is hoped that these lessons will enhance the planning and design of future efforts in this important field of research. PMID:12042091

  15. Anatomy of the infant head

    SciTech Connect

    Bosma, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    This text is mainly an atlas of illustration representing the dissection of the head and upper neck of the infant. It was prepared by the author over a 20-year period. The commentary compares the anatomy of the near-term infant with that of a younger fetus, child, and adult. As the author indicates, the dearth of anatomic information about postnatal anatomic changes represents a considerable handicap to those imaging infants. In part 1 of the book, anatomy is related to physiologic performance involving the pharynx, larynx, and mouth. Sequential topics involve the regional anatomy of the head (excluding the brain), the skeleton of the cranium, the nose, orbit, mouth, larynx, pharynx, and ear. To facilitate use of this text as a reference, the illustrations and text on individual organs are considered separately (i.e., the nose, the orbit, the eye, the mouth, the larynx, the pharynx, and the ear). Each part concerned with a separate organ includes materials from the regional illustrations contained in part 2 and from the skeleton, which is treated in part 3. Also included in a summary of the embryologic and fetal development of the organ.

  16. Modeling heading in adult soccer players.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Ernesto; Ponce, Daniel; Andresen, Max

    2014-01-01

    Heading soccer balls can generate mild brain injuries and in the long run can lead to difficulty in solving problems, memory deficits, and language difficulties. Researchers evaluated the effects on the head for both correct and incorrect heading techniques. They based the head's geometry on medical images. They determined the injury's magnitude by comparing the neurological tissue's resistance with predictions of the generated stresses. The evaluation examined fast playing conditions in adult soccer, taking into account the ball's speed and the type of impact. Mathematical simulations using the finite element method indicated that correctly heading balls arriving at moderate speed presents a low risk of brain injury. However, damage can happen around the third cervical vertebra. These results coincide with medical studies. Incorrect heading greatly increases the brain injury risk and can alter the parietal area. PMID:25248195

  17. Head-Mounted and Head-Up Display Glossary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Richard L.; Allen, J. Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    One of the problems in head-up and helmet-mounted display (HMD) literature has been a lack of standardization of words and abbreviations. Several different words have been used for the same concept; for example, flight path angle, flight path marker, velocity vector, and total velocity vector all refer to the same thing. In other cases, the same term has been used with two different meanings, such as binocular field-of-view which means the field-of-view visible to both left and right eyes according to some or the field-of-view visible to either the left or right eye or both according to others. Many of the terms used in HMD studies have not been well-defined. We need to have a common language to ensure that system descriptions are communicated. As an example, the term 'stabilized' has been widely used with two meanings. 'Roll-stabilized' has been used to mean a symbol which rotates to indicate the roll or bank of the aircraft. 'World-stabilized' and 'head-stabilized' have both been used to indicate symbols which move to remain fixed with respect to external objects. HMDs present unique symbology problems not found in HUDs. Foremost among these is the issue of maintaining spatial orientation of the symbols. All previous flight displays, round dial instruments, HDDs, and HUDs have been fixed in the cockpit. With the HMD, the flight display can move through a large angle. The coordinates use in transforming from the real-world to the aircraft to the HMD have not been consistently defined. This glossary contains terms relating to optics and vision, displays, and flight information, weapons and aircraft systems. Some definitions, such as Navigation Display, have been added to clarify the definitions for Primary Flight Display and Primary Flight Reference. A list of HUD/HMD related abbreviations is also included.

  18. Selecting children for head CT following head injury

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, A; Nickerson, E; Trefan, L; Houston, R; Hyde, P; Pearson, G; Edwards, R; Parslow, RC; Maconochie, I

    2016-01-01

    Objective Indicators for head CT scan defined by the 2007 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines were analysed to identify CT uptake, influential variables and yield. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Hospital inpatient units: England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Channel Islands. Patients Children (<15 years) admitted to hospital for more than 4 h following a head injury (September 2009 to February 2010). Interventions CT scan. Main outcome measures Number of children who had CT, extent to which NICE guidelines were followed and diagnostic yield. Results Data on 5700 children were returned by 90% of eligible hospitals, 84% of whom were admitted to a general hospital. CT scans were performed on 30.4% of children (1734), with a higher diagnostic yield in infants (56.5% (144/255)) than children aged 1 to 14 years (26.5% (391/1476)). Overall, only 40.4% (984 of 2437 children) fulfilling at least one of the four NICE criteria for CT actually underwent one. These children were much less likely to receive CT if admitted to a general hospital than to a specialist centre (OR 0.52 (95% CI 0.45 to 0.59)); there was considerable variation between healthcare regions. When indicated, children >3 years were much more likely to have CT than those <3 years (OR 2.35 (95% CI 2.08 to 2.65)). Conclusion Compliance with guidelines and diagnostic yield was variable across age groups, the type of hospital and region where children were admitted. With this pattern of clinical practice the risks of both missing intracranial injury and overuse of CT are considerable. PMID:27449674

  19. Paragangliomas of the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Woolen, Sean; Gemmete, Joseph J

    2016-05-01

    Paragangliomas of the head and neck are rare vascular skull-base tumors derived from the paraganglionic system with an estimated incidence of 1:30,000 accounting for 3% of all paragangliomas. The most common paraganglioma locations of the head and neck in descending order are the carotid body, jugular, tympanic, and vagal paragangliomas. This article discusses the clinical characterics, normal anatamy, imaging findings and protocols, pathology, staging, and differential diagnosis for paragangliomas of the head and neck. PMID:27154608

  20. Head perturbations during walking while viewing a head-fixed target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Vallabh E.; Zivotofsky, Ari Z.; Discenna, Alfred O.; Leigh, R. John

    1995-01-01

    Inexpensive, head-fixed computer displays are now available that subjects can wear during locomotion. Our hypothesis is that viewing a head-fixed visual display will change the character- istics of rotational head perturbations during natural walking. Using a 3-axis angular rate sensor, we measured head rotations during natural or treadmill walking, in 10 normal subjects and 2 patients with deficient vestibular function, as they attempted to view (1) a stationary target at optical infinity; and (2) a target at a distance of 20 cm rigidly attached to the head. Normal subjects and patients showed no significant change in the predominant frequency of head rotations in any plane (ranging 0.7-5.7 Hz) during the two different viewing tasks. Mean peak head velocities also showed no difference during the two viewing conditions except in the yaw plane, in which values were greater while viewing the near target. Predominant frequencies of head rotations were similar in the pitch plane during natural or treadmill walking; however, peak velocities of pitch head rotations were substantially greater during natural walking. One vestibular patient showed modest increases of head velocity during natural walking compared with normal subjects. Rotational head perturbations that occur during natural walking are largely unaffected when subjects view a head-fixed target. There is need to study how such perturbations, which induce vestibular eye movements, affect vision of head-fixed displays.

  1. Trial of Postoperative Radiation, Cisplatin, and Panitumumab in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Cancer of Head; Cancer of Head and Neck; Cancer of Neck; Cancer of the Head; Cancer of the Head and Neck; Cancer of the Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Head Cancer; Head Neoplasms; Head, Neck Neoplasms; Neck Cancer; Neck Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Head; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Neoplasms, Neck; Neoplasms, Upper Aerodigestive Tract; UADT Neoplasms; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Neoplasms

  2. Radial head button holing: a cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su-Mi; Chai, Jee Won; You, Ja Yeon; Park, Jina; Bae, Kee Jeong

    2016-10-01

    "Buttonholing" of the radial head through the anterior joint capsule is a known cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation associated with Monteggia injuries in pediatric patients. To the best of our knowledge, no report has described an injury consisting of buttonholing of the radial head through the annular ligament and a simultaneous radial head fracture in an adolescent. In the present case, the radiographic findings were a radial head fracture with anterior dislocation and lack of the anterior fat pad sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly demonstrated anterior dislocation of the fractured radial head through the torn annular ligament. The anterior joint capsule and proximal portion of the annular ligament were interposed between the radial head and capitellum, preventing closed reduction of the radial head. Familiarity with this condition and imaging findings will aid clinicians to make a proper diagnosis and fast decision to perform an open reduction. PMID:27502623

  3. Image data rate converter having a drum with a fixed head and a rotatable head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingsley, F. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A data-rate converter is disclosed comprising a rotatable data-storing drum with at least one fixed read/record head and a rotatable read/record head. The latter is rotatable in a circular path about the drum axis of rotation. The drum is positionable in any one of a plurality of axial positions with respect to the heads, so that at least one drum track is aligned with the fixed head in one drum position and with the rotatable head in another drum position. When a track is aligned with the fixed head, data may be recorded therin or read out therefrom at a rate which is a function of drum rotation, while when aligned with the rotatable head, data may be recorded or read out at a rate which is a function of the rates and directions of rotation of both the drum and the head.

  4. An evaluation of flight path formats head-up and head-down

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexton, George A.; Moody, Laura E.; Evans, Joanne; Williams, Kenneth E.

    1988-01-01

    Flight path primary flight display formats were incorporated on head-up and head-down electronic displays and integrated into an Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator. Objective and subjective data were collected while ten airline pilots evaluated the formats by flying an approach and landing task under various ceiling, visibility and wind conditions. Deviations from referenced/commanded airspeed, horizontal track, vertical track and touchdown point were smaller using the head-up display (HUD) format than the head-down display (HDD) format, but not significantly smaller. Subjectively, the pilots overwhelmingly preferred (1) flight path formats over attitude formats used in current aircraft, and (2) the head-up presentation over the head-down, primarily because it eliminated the head-down to head-up transition during low visibility landing approaches. This report describes the simulator, the flight displays, the format evaluation, and the results of the objective and subjective data.

  5. Where Is Health Care Headed?

    PubMed

    Bland, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    Looking at the trends, developments, and discoveries points us toward the future, but it is only when we consider these in the context of our understanding about the origins of disease that we can truly gain a clearer view of where health care is headed. This is the view that moves us from a focus on the diagnosis and treatment of a disease to an understanding of the origin of the alteration in function in the individual. This change in both perspective and understanding of the origin of disease is what will lead us to a systems approach to health care that delivers personalized and precision care that is based on the inherent rehabilitative power that resides within the genome. PMID:27547161

  6. Early management of head injury.

    PubMed

    Cunitz, G

    1997-01-01

    Patients with head injury need effective help. The restoration of disturbed ventilation and an impaired general circulation is important. Concomitant injuries, which occur in about 40% of cases, should be recognized. Priority must be given to treating large lesions of vital organs. Hypoxia and hypotension should be avoided because they produce secondary brain damage. Unconscious patients are intubated and ventilated. In a few cases a laryngeal mask could be applied. Intravenous hypnotics, narcotics and benzodiazepines are used. Inhalational anesthetics, among them N2O, are harmful and should be avoided in these cases. The patients are given normal volumes of colloid fluids or water electrolyte solutions. A long-lasting muscle relaxation will impede clinical assessment. Cerebral protection and effective drug treatment of the lesions is still under debate: Nimodepine in traumatic SAH and glucosteroids in local lesions with BBB rupture, however, seem to be effective.

  7. Natural head position: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Meiyappan, N.; Tamizharasi, S.; Senthilkumar, K. P.; Janardhanan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Cephalometrics has given us a different perspective of interpreting various skeletal problems in the dentofacial complex. Natural head position (NHP) is a reproducible, physiologically determined aspect of function. To determine NHP, a horizontal or vertical reference line outside the crania was used, but preference was given generally to the horizontal. Various intra and extracranial cephalometric horizontal reference planes have been used to formulate diagnosis and plan individualized treatment for an integrated correction of the malocclusion cephalometrics is constantly undergoing refinements in its techniques and analyses to improve the clinical applications. Even though various methods for establishing NHP have been proposed, still it remains a challenge to the clinicians to implement the concept of NHP thoroughly in all the stages of treatment because of practical difficulties in the clinical scenario. PMID:26538891

  8. Natural head position: An overview.

    PubMed

    Meiyappan, N; Tamizharasi, S; Senthilkumar, K P; Janardhanan, K

    2015-08-01

    Cephalometrics has given us a different perspective of interpreting various skeletal problems in the dentofacial complex. Natural head position (NHP) is a reproducible, physiologically determined aspect of function. To determine NHP, a horizontal or vertical reference line outside the crania was used, but preference was given generally to the horizontal. Various intra and extracranial cephalometric horizontal reference planes have been used to formulate diagnosis and plan individualized treatment for an integrated correction of the malocclusion cephalometrics is constantly undergoing refinements in its techniques and analyses to improve the clinical applications. Even though various methods for establishing NHP have been proposed, still it remains a challenge to the clinicians to implement the concept of NHP thoroughly in all the stages of treatment because of practical difficulties in the clinical scenario.

  9. [Head and neck adaptive radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Graff, P; Huger, S; Kirby, N; Pouliot, J

    2013-10-01

    Onboard volumetric imaging systems can provide accurate data of the patient's anatomy during a course of head and neck radiotherapy making it possible to assess the actual delivered dose and to evaluate the dosimetric impact of complex daily positioning variations and gradual anatomic changes such as geometric variations of tumors and normal tissues or shrinkage of external contours. Adaptive radiotherapy is defined as the correction of a patient's treatment planning to adapt for individual variations observed during treatment. Strategies are developed to selectively identify patients that require replanning because of an intolerable dosimetric drift. Automated tools are designed to limit time consumption. Deformable image registration algorithms are the cornerstones of these strategies, but a better understanding of their limits of validity is required before adaptive radiotherapy can be safely introduced to daily practice. Moreover, strict evaluation of the clinical benefits is yet to be proven.

  10. Reactor vessel lower head integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, A.M.

    1997-02-01

    On March 28, 1979, the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant underwent a prolonged small break loss-of-coolant accident that resulted in severe damage to the reactor core. Post-accident examinations of the TMI-2 reactor core and lower plenum found that approximately 19,000 kg (19 metric tons) of molten material had relocated onto the lower head of the reactor vessel. Results of the OECD TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project concluded that a localized hot spot of approximately 1 meter diameter had existed on the lower head. The maximum temperature on the inner surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in this region reached 1100{degrees}C and remained at that temperature for approximately 30 minutes before cooling occurred. Even under the combined loads of high temperature and high primary system pressure, the TMI-2 RPV did not fail. (i.e. The pressure varied from about 8.5 to 15 MPa during the four-hour period following the relocation of melt to the lower plenum.) Analyses of RPV failure under these conditions, using state-of-the-art computer codes, predicted that the RPV should have failed via local or global creep rupture. However, the vessel did not fail; and it has been hypothesized that rapid cooling of the debris and the vessel wall by water that was present in the lower plenum played an important role in maintaining RPV integrity during the accident. Although the exact mechanism(s) of how such cooling occurs is not known, it has been speculated that cooling in a small gap between the RPV wall and the crust, and/or in cracks within the debris itself, could result in sufficient cooling to maintain RPV integrity. Experimental data are needed to provide the basis to better understand these phenomena and improve models of RPV failure in severe accident codes.

  11. Eye-Head Coordination Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Simon; Würmle, Othmar; Razavi, Nadja; Müri, René M.; Altorfer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background Eye-movement abnormalities in schizophrenia are a well-established phenomenon that has been observed in many studies. In such studies, visual targets are usually presented in the center of the visual field, and the subject's head remains fixed. However, in every-day life, targets may also appear in the periphery. This study is among the first to investigate eye and head movements in schizophrenia by presenting targets in the periphery of the visual field. Methodology/Principal Findings Two different visual recognition tasks, color recognition and Landolt orientation tasks, were presented at the periphery (at a visual angle of 55° from the center of the field of view). Each subject viewed 96 trials, and all eye and head movements were simultaneously recorded using video-based oculography and magnetic motion tracking of the head. Data from 14 patients with schizophrenia and 14 controls were considered. The patients had similar saccadic latencies in both tasks, whereas controls had shorter saccadic latencies in the Landolt task. Patients performed more head movements, and had increased eye-head offsets during combined eye-head shifts than controls. Conclusions/Significance Patients with schizophrenia may not be able to adapt to the two different tasks to the same extent as controls, as seen by the former's task-specific saccadic latency pattern. This can be interpreted as a specific oculomotoric attentional dysfunction and may support the hypothesis that schizophrenia patients have difficulties determining the relevance of stimuli. Patients may also show an uneconomic over-performance of head-movements, which is possibly caused by alterations in frontal executive function that impair the inhibition of head shifts. In addition, a model was created explaining 93% of the variance of the response times as a function of eye and head amplitude, which was only observed in the controls, indicating abnormal eye-head coordination in patients with schizophrenia. PMID

  12. Head Start 2010: Fulfilling the Promise. Report of the Head Start 2010 National Advisory Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Head Start Association, Alexandria, VA.

    In anticipation of the 35th anniversary of Project Head Start, the National Head Start Association (NHSA) launched a national initiative to discover how Head Start can best serve children and families in the new millennium. A series of hearings and open forums were conducted throughout the country in 1999, along with a special session featuring…

  13. National Head Start Association Position Paper: A Vision for Head Start and State Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Joel; Allen, Ben

    Based on the view that coordinated efforts among Head Start programs, child care programs and other prekindergarten programs, and states can be enhanced without devolving Head Start and its high quality standards to the states, this position paper draws on a Bush Administration report and the Head Start Program Performance Standards to demonstrate…

  14. Training Head Start Coordinators for Workplace Preparedness. NCCU Head Start Monograph, October 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Central Univ., Durham.

    This monograph summarizes results from academic capstone activities of graduate students and faculty advisors regarding issues consistent with Head Start national priorities and practice needs. The following theses are summarized: (1) "Multicultural Education in Head Start Programs in North Carolina" (S.K. Gant); (2) "The Impact of Head Start on…

  15. "Starfish" Heater Head For Stirling Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitale, N.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed "starfish" heater head for Stirling engine enables safe use of liquid sodium as heat-transfer fluid. Sodium makes direct contact with heater head but does not come in contact with any structural welds. Design concept minimizes number of, and simplifies nonstructural thermal welds and facilitates inspection of such welds.

  16. Real-time head motion detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, Kenji; Watanabe, Yasuhiko; Suenaga, Yasuhito

    1990-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional head motion detection system called a realtime headreader. This headreader analyzes the head motion picture sequences taken by a TV-camera, and extracts the motion parameters in realtime, i.e. 3-d rotations and translations. We used a simple but very fast algorithm, which exploits the contrast of hair and face to recognize face orientation. The system extracts the head and face area, then estimates the head motion parameters from the change in position of each area's centroids. The head motion is computed at nearly 10 frames per second on a SUN4 workstation and the motion parameters are sent to an IRIS workstation at a 2.5 Kbps. The IRIS generates a head motion sequence that duplicates the original head motion. The entire motion detection program is written in C language. No special image processing hardware is used, except for a video digitizer. Our head motion detection system will enhance man-machine interactions by providing a new visual eue. An operator will be able to point to a target by just looking at it thus a mouse or 3-d tracking device is not needed. The eventual goal of this research is to build an intelligent video communication system that codes the information in terms of high level language rather than compressed video signals.

  17. Newborns' Head Orientation toward Sounds Within Hemifields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenwick, Kimberley; And Others

    This experiment examined the accuracy with which newborn infants orient their heads toward a sound positioned off midline within hemifields. The study also evaluated newborns' ability to update the angle of their head turn to match a change in localization of an ongoing sound. Alert newborns were held in a supine position and presented a sound at…

  18. Modified Head-Shake Computerized Dynamic Posturography

    PubMed Central

    Honaker, Julie A.; Converse, Connie M.; Shepard, Neil T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Recent research on Head-shake Posturography has demonstrated a modest increase in sensitivity to identifying peripheral vestibular system asymmetry when horizontal head-movements were added to portions of the standard Sensory Organization (SOT) test battery. However, limitations with respect to the head-shake protocol were outlined and usable data for assessing performance could not be established. The purpose of this study was to test a change in protocol for use of head-shake SOT to address the noted limitations. Method Forty subjects ranging in age from 20-79 years with no history of dizziness completed conditions 2 and 5 of the SOT portion of Computerized Dynamic Posturography on EquiTest ™ equipment while maintaining head still, as well as four horizontal head movement velocity tasks. Results Slope of a linear regression fit to six performance points was used to characterize each subject. Spearman’s ranked correlation (r) indicated a significant relationship between the slope of the line representing a decline in performance with age (r = −0.52; p = 0.0006). Conclusions The head-shake modification shows a trend in increasing the separation of normal individuals across age and eliminated the limitations addressed in earlier research. Future research will investigate the head-shake modification for identifying vestibular peripheral system asymmetries. PMID:19949235

  19. Using Music with Head Start Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Louise

    This pamphlet describes the function of music in Head Start programs. Suggestions are made to help children sense motion and develop their self-concepts and motor coordination skills through rhythmic songs and activities. The construction and use of rhythm instruments are suggested as a means of involving mothers in Head Start programs. Certain…

  20. Head Start Impact Study. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael; Bell, Stephen; Cook, Ronna; Heid, Camilla; Shapiro, Gary; Broene, Pam; Jenkins, Frank; Fletcher, Philip; Quinn, Liz; Friedman, Janet; Ciarico, Janet; Rohacek, Monica; Adams, Gina; Spier, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This Technical Report is designed to provide technical detail to support the analysis and findings presented in the "Head Start Impact Study Final Report" (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, January 2010). Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Head Start Impact Study and its findings. Chapter 2 provides technical information on the…

  1. Head Start Impact Study. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael; Bell, Stephen; Cook, Ronna; Heid, Camilla; Shapiro, Gary; Broene, Pam; Jenkins, Frank; Fletcher, Philip; Quinn, Liz; Friedman, Janet; Ciarico, Janet; Rohacek, Monica; Adams, Gina; Spier, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This report addresses the following four questions by reporting on the impacts of Head Start on children and families during the children's preschool, kindergarten, and 1st grade years: (1) What difference does Head Start make to key outcomes of development and learning (and in particular, the multiple domains of school readiness) for low-income…

  2. Administration for Children and Families: Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Head Start program. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act), $1 billion will be provided to the Office of Head Start to promote the school readiness of low-income children, including children on federally-recognized reservations and children of migratory farm workers, by enhancing…

  3. Clinical features of the exploding head syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, J M

    1989-01-01

    Fifty patients suffering from the "exploding head syndrome" are described. This hitherto unreported syndrome is characterised by a sense of an explosive noise in the head usually in the twilight stage of sleep. The associated symptoms are varied, but the benign nature of the condition is emphasised and neither extensive investigation nor treatment are indicated. PMID:2769286

  4. Vertical File Subject Headings KWIK List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Em Claire; And Others

    A subject heading keyword-in-context (KWIK) list for the vertical files at the University of California, Davis, is presented. It is noted that the KWIK list was prepared to assist library users in locating more subject headings for available materials in the various pamphlet collections and that the list is computerized to enable frequent…

  5. 21 CFR 868.1930 - Stethoscope head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stethoscope head. 868.1930 Section 868.1930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1930 Stethoscope head. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 868.1930 - Stethoscope head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stethoscope head. 868.1930 Section 868.1930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1930 Stethoscope head. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 868.1930 - Stethoscope head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stethoscope head. 868.1930 Section 868.1930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1930 Stethoscope head. (a) Identification....

  8. 21 CFR 868.1930 - Stethoscope head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stethoscope head. 868.1930 Section 868.1930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1930 Stethoscope head. (a) Identification....

  9. 21 CFR 868.1930 - Stethoscope head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stethoscope head. 868.1930 Section 868.1930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1930 Stethoscope head. (a) Identification....

  10. 49 CFR 572.82 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head. 572.82 Section 572.82 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child § 572.82 Head. The...

  11. 49 CFR 572.82 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head. 572.82 Section 572.82 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child § 572.82 Head. The...

  12. 49 CFR 572.82 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head. 572.82 Section 572.82 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child § 572.82 Head. The...

  13. 49 CFR 572.82 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head. 572.82 Section 572.82 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child § 572.82 Head. The...

  14. 49 CFR 572.82 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head. 572.82 Section 572.82 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child § 572.82 Head. The...

  15. The Texas Head Start Metro Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Mary Tom, Ed.; Flores, Alfredo R., Ed.

    The Texas Metro Network (TMN) is an informal group of Head Start Directors and Executive Directors organized for the purposes of improving the delivery of training and technical assistance and for assisting communication between large scale Head Start programs in the metropolitan areas of Texas. In pursuit of these aims, each member unit of the…

  16. Head Start's Broken Promise. On the Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besharov, Douglas J.

    2005-01-01

    In this short essay, Douglas J. Besharov argues that Congress should mandate an honest assessment of Head Start's strengths and weaknesses to enable the program to more effectively enhance early childhood education. He discusses evidence of Head Start's limited effectiveness and proposes that it begin operating based on research.

  17. Marshall Space Flight Center head development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrer, Jim

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the candidate head evaluation for the new long-life magnetic head per the SOW of Contract No. NAS8-39407, MSFC Head Development Program. The original program plans were to test a candidate head, fabricate a new head, then qualify the new head. These activities were scheduled to be carried out between March 1993 and March 1994. The program was halted after the evaluation of the candidate head by NAS8-39407 Amendment No. 4. MSFC has provided and authorized the use the MARS-2000 SRB QUAL Recorder PN 10400-0677-801 - Serial Number 200004 (Datatape PN 591000 - Serial Number 1004), Reproduce Amplifier Module (RAM) Datatape PN 533040 - Serial Number 2006, associated cables, and magnetic tape on special SRB/DFI tapered reels to Datatape for this program. All the testing that has been done for the candidate head evaluation was done at Datatape's facility in Pasadena,CA. The testing was performed in a Class 100,000 particle counts clean room at ambient temperature, except for the thermal testing which was conducted in a different area at Datatape. The Performance Verification Test Procedure PVT-11004-4 (PVT) and Acceptance Test Procedure ATP-11004-09 (ATP) procedures were used when tests were conducted on the recorder.

  18. Head Start. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    "Head Start" is a national, federally funded program that provides services to promote school readiness for children from birth to age 5 from predominantly low-income families. Based on a review of the research, the WWC found "Head Start" to have potentially positive effects on general reading achievement and no discernible…

  19. The Role of the Primary School Head.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Lester

    1987-01-01

    This study uses Henry Mintzberg's structural observation method to examine British primary school head teachers' work patterns and determine the nature of their role. Head teachers' days were characterized by brevity, variety, and fragmentation similar to those discussed in findings of other empirical managerial studies. Leadership roles stressed…

  20. Head Lice - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arabic) قمل الرأس - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Head Lice Vaške - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Head Lice 头虱 - 简体中文 (Chinese - ...

  1. Historical Perspectives on Project Head Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaughter, Diana T.

    Historical changes in the emphasis and focus of Project Head Start from 1965 to the present are briefly reviewed in this paper. Head Start was conceived of as primary prevention designed to enable children from lower income families to obtain educational prerequisites to formal schooling. The early years of the project were also characterized by…

  2. Heading Tuning in Macaque Area V6

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Reuben H.; Liu, Sheng; DeAngelis, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical areas, such as the dorsal subdivision of the medial superior temporal area (MSTd) and the ventral intraparietal area (VIP), have been shown to integrate visual and vestibular self-motion signals. Area V6 is interconnected with areas MSTd and VIP, allowing for the possibility that V6 also integrates visual and vestibular self-motion cues. An alternative hypothesis in the literature is that V6 does not use these sensory signals to compute heading but instead discounts self-motion signals to represent object motion. However, the responses of V6 neurons to visual and vestibular self-motion cues have never been studied, thus leaving the functional roles of V6 unclear. We used a virtual reality system to examine the 3D heading tuning of macaque V6 neurons in response to optic flow and inertial motion stimuli. We found that the majority of V6 neurons are selective for heading defined by optic flow. However, unlike areas MSTd and VIP, V6 neurons are almost universally unresponsive to inertial motion in the absence of optic flow. We also explored the spatial reference frames of heading signals in V6 by measuring heading tuning for different eye positions, and we found that the visual heading tuning of most V6 cells was eye-centered. Similar to areas MSTd and VIP, the population of V6 neurons was best able to discriminate small variations in heading around forward and backward headings. Our findings support the idea that V6 is involved primarily in processing visual motion signals and does not appear to play a role in visual–vestibular integration for self-motion perception. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT To understand how we successfully navigate our world, it is important to understand which parts of the brain process cues used to perceive our direction of self-motion (i.e., heading). Cortical area V6 has been implicated in heading computations based on human neuroimaging data, but direct measurements of heading selectivity in individual V6 neurons have been lacking. We

  3. Visual perception of axes of head rotation

    PubMed Central

    Arnoldussen, D. M.; Goossens, J.; van den Berg, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    Registration of ego-motion is important to accurately navigate through space. Movements of the head and eye relative to space are registered through the vestibular system and optical flow, respectively. Here, we address three questions concerning the visual registration of self-rotation. (1) Eye-in-head movements provide a link between the motion signals received by sensors in the moving eye and sensors in the moving head. How are these signals combined into an ego-rotation percept? We combined optic flow of simulated forward and rotational motion of the eye with different levels of eye-in-head rotation for a stationary head. We dissociated simulated gaze rotation and head rotation by different levels of eye-in-head pursuit. We found that perceived rotation matches simulated head- not gaze-rotation. This rejects a model for perceived self-rotation that relies on the rotation of the gaze line. Rather, eye-in-head signals serve to transform the optic flow's rotation information, that specifies rotation of the scene relative to the eye, into a rotation relative to the head. This suggests that transformed visual self-rotation signals may combine with vestibular signals. (2) Do transformed visual self-rotation signals reflect the arrangement of the semi-circular canals (SCC)? Previously, we found sub-regions within MST and V6+ that respond to the speed of the simulated head rotation. Here, we re-analyzed those Blood oxygenated level-dependent (BOLD) signals for the presence of a spatial dissociation related to the axes of visually simulated head rotation, such as have been found in sub-cortical regions of various animals. Contrary, we found a rather uniform BOLD response to simulated rotation along the three SCC axes. (3) We investigated if subject's sensitivity to the direction of the head rotation axis shows SCC axes specifcity. We found that sensitivity to head rotation is rather uniformly distributed, suggesting that in human cortex, visuo-vestibular integration is

  4. Head orientation prediction: delta quaternions versus quaternions.

    PubMed

    Himberg, Henry; Motai, Yuichi

    2009-12-01

    Display lag in simulation environments with helmet-mounted displays causes a loss of immersion that degrades the value of virtual/augmented reality training simulators. Simulators use predictive tracking to compensate for display lag, preparing display updates based on the anticipated head motion. This paper proposes a new method for predicting head orientation using a delta quaternion (DQ)-based extended Kalman filter (EKF) and compares the performance to a quaternion EKF. The proposed framework operates on the change in quaternion between consecutive data frames (the DQ), which avoids the heavy computational burden of the quaternion motion equation. Head velocity is estimated from the DQ by an EKF and then used to predict future head orientation. We have tested the new framework with captured head motion data and compared it with the computationally expensive quaternion filter. Experimental results indicate that the proposed DQ method provides the accuracy of the quaternion method without the heavy computational burden.

  5. Modular ulnar head decoupling force: case report.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Sanjiv H; Radin, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Cobalt-chrome modular distal ulnar head replacement arthroplasty is a surgical option to restore stability to the distal radioulnar joint rendered unstable by hemi-resection arthroplasty or a total resection arthroplasty. However, the revision of dislocated modular cobalt-chrome ulnar head implants may pose an important intraoperative challenge. The Morse-taper disassembly force of modular ulnar head implants is not available in the current published literature. We present a case in which tremendous difficulty was encountered while revising a dislocated modular cobalt-chrome distal ulnar head implant. The mean Morse-taper disassembly force of the retrieved modular cobalt-chrome implant was 2958 N +/- 1272. At nearly 4.5 times the average body weight, the modular ulnar head Morse-taper disassembly strength presented a formidable force to overcome intraoperatively.

  6. Seeking one's heading through eye movements.

    PubMed

    Cutting, J E; Alliprandini, P M; Wang, R F

    2000-09-01

    A study of eye movements during simulated travel toward a grove of four stationary trees revealed that observers looked most at pairs of trees that converged or decelerated apart. Such pairs specify that one's direction of travel, called heading, is to the outside of the near member of the pair. Observers looked at these trees more than those that accelerated apart; such pairs do not offer trustworthy heading information. Observers also looked at gaps between trees less often when they converged or diverged apart, and heading can never be between such pairs. Heading responses were in accord with eye movements. In general, if observers responded accurately, they had looked at trees that converged or decelerated apart; if they were inaccurate, they had not. Results support the notion that observers seek out their heading through eye movements, saccading to and fixating on the most informative locations in the field of view.

  7. Management of head injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Conchie, Henry; Palmer, Sarah; Fernando, Katalin; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-07-01

    Head injury is the most common cause of injury-related death and permanent disability in children. Minor head trauma is common in childhood and does not require any medical treatment. Although deficits can occur even after mild to moderate head injury, they are markedly greater and become clinically evident following severe head injury. It is important that emergency department clinicians are aware of the signs and symptoms that indicate severe traumatic brain injury and triage for urgent intervention in those children who present with these signs and symptoms. Clinicians also need to know when children can be sent home with reassurance and information, and when they require admission or transfer to a neurosurgical unit. This article examines the literature on head injuries in children, describes assessment, management and treatment, and provides a simple management algorithm. PMID:27384805

  8. Head Start Impact Study: First Year Findings. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael; Bell, Stephen; Cook, Ronna; Heid, Camilla; Lopez, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Congressionally-mandated Head Start Impact Study is being conducted across 84 nationally representative grantee/delegate agencies. Approximately 5,000 newly entering 3- and 4-year-old children applying for Head Start were randomly assigned to either a Head Start group that had access to Head Start program services or to a non-Head Start group…

  9. Immunotherapy With MK-3475 in Surgically Resectable Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Cancer of Head and Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Head and Neck

  10. Minor and repetitive head injury.

    PubMed

    Buki, Andras; Kovacs, Noemi; Czeiter, Endre; Schmid, Kara; Berger, Rachel P; Kobeissy, Firas; Italiano, Domenico; Hayes, Ronald L; Tortella, Frank C; Mezosi, Emese; Schwarcz, Attila; Toth, Arnold; Nemes, Orsolya; Mondello, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in the young, active population and expected to be the third leading cause of death in the whole world until 2020. The disease is frequently referred to as the silent epidemic, and many authors highlight the "unmet medical need" associated with TBI.The term traumatically evoked brain injury covers a heterogeneous group ranging from mild/minor/minimal to severe/non-salvageable damages. Severe TBI has long been recognized to be a major socioeconomical health-care issue as saving young lives and sometimes entirely restituting health with a timely intervention can indeed be extremely cost efficient.Recently it has been recognized that mild or minor TBI should be considered similarly important because of the magnitude of the patient population affected. Other reasons behind this recognition are the association of mild head injury with transient cognitive disturbances as well as long-term sequelae primarily linked to repeat (sport-related) injuries.The incidence of TBI in developed countries can be as high as 2-300/100,000 inhabitants; however, if we consider the injury pyramid, it turns out that severe and moderate TBI represents only 25-30 % of all cases, while the overwhelming majority of TBI cases consists of mild head injury. On top of that, or at the base of the pyramid, are the cases that never show up at the ER - the unreported injuries.Special attention is turned to mild TBI as in recent military conflicts it is recognized as "signature injury."This chapter aims to summarize the most important features of mild and repetitive traumatic brain injury providing definitions, stratifications, and triage options while also focusing on contemporary knowledge gathered by imaging and biomarker research.Mild traumatic brain injury is an enigmatic lesion; the classification, significance, and its consequences are all far less defined and explored than in more severe forms of brain injury

  11. Sword-Like Trauma to the Shoulder with Open Head-Splitting Fracture of the Head

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Konstantinos; Iliopoulos, Ilias; Seferlis, Ioannis; Kokkalis, Zinon

    2016-01-01

    Head-splitting fractures occur as a result of violent compression of the head against the glenoid; the head splits and the tuberosities may remain attached to the fragments or split and separate. Isolated humeral head-splitting fractures are rare injuries. Favorable results with osteosynthesis can be difficult to achieve because of the very proximal location of the head fracture and associated poor vascularity. We present a case of a 67-year-old man who sustained a severe, sword-like trauma to his left shoulder after a road traffic accident with associated isolated open Gustilo-Anderson IIIA humeral head-splitting fracture. Bony union was achieved with minimal internal fixation but the clinical outcome deteriorated due to accompanying axillary nerve apraxia. To our knowledge, this type of sword-like injury with associated humeral head-split fracture has not previously been reported. PMID:27478665

  12. Sword-Like Trauma to the Shoulder with Open Head-Splitting Fracture of the Head.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Andreas; Pantazis, Konstantinos; Iliopoulos, Ilias; Seferlis, Ioannis; Kokkalis, Zinon

    2016-01-01

    Head-splitting fractures occur as a result of violent compression of the head against the glenoid; the head splits and the tuberosities may remain attached to the fragments or split and separate. Isolated humeral head-splitting fractures are rare injuries. Favorable results with osteosynthesis can be difficult to achieve because of the very proximal location of the head fracture and associated poor vascularity. We present a case of a 67-year-old man who sustained a severe, sword-like trauma to his left shoulder after a road traffic accident with associated isolated open Gustilo-Anderson IIIA humeral head-splitting fracture. Bony union was achieved with minimal internal fixation but the clinical outcome deteriorated due to accompanying axillary nerve apraxia. To our knowledge, this type of sword-like injury with associated humeral head-split fracture has not previously been reported. PMID:27478665

  13. Head louse and other common infections in schools: head teachers' use of an information pack.

    PubMed

    Sampanthar, V; Rattigan, Christine; Fraser, Judith; Aston, Robert

    2002-01-01

    A descriptive study examined head teachers' use of an information pack about common childhood infections and its usefulness, particularly for head louse infection. The survey covered all 122 schools in one borough in the North West of England. Overall response was 73% and 83.3% of head teachers considered the pack helpful for teachers and parents. The study highlights schools' wish for information and help with common infections, especially head louse infections, from the public health and community health services. The authors recommend providing such information regularly each term or year for teachers and parents, putting head louse infection in context with other common childhood infections. Regular education sessions are recommended for head teachers and community health professionals involved with head louse infections. These measures should help ensure a consistent, evidence-based and up-to-date approach.

  14. Heading in the right direction? An innovative approach toward proper patient head positioning

    SciTech Connect

    Grush, William H.; Steffen, Gary A

    2002-12-31

    An in-house-manufactured modification of the standard A-F foam rubber head-neck supports (aka. Timo Supports) was designed to eliminate clinical setup problems with head immobilization and instability during treatment, thus providing for a more comfortable head rest for the patient. The custom design of this head holder seeks to eliminate superior-to-inferior shift, and minimize the lateral right-to-left rotational movement of the head when coupled with an AquaPlast casting system. By focusing attention to the seating of the occipital portion of the head and contour of the patient's neck, the aforementioned problems of movement were addressed, while adhering to the interests of patient comfort in this modified head support system.

  15. An Experimental Device to Record Infant Head Movements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jouen, Francois

    1981-01-01

    Analyzes methods used to record infant head position and the limits of these methods. An experimental device is proposed which records infant head turning and head righting when the vestibular system is stimulated. (Author/DB)

  16. [Primary radial head arthroplasty in trauma : Complications].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Horlohé, K; Buschbeck, S; Wincheringer, D; Weißenberger, M; Hoffmann, R

    2016-10-01

    Radial head fractures are common injuries in elbow trauma. Non-displaced fractures are best treated conservatively. Simple but displaced fractures require anatomic reduction and fixation, typically using screws. The treatment course for complex fractures with multiple fragments is still being debated, as results are less predictable. Radial head resection is not advised if concomitant injuries of the coronoid process or the collateral ligaments with instability are present. Favorable outcomes following open reduction and fixation using plates were reported recently. However, complication rates are very high. Radial head replacement is a valuable tool in treating complex fractures of the radial head with predominantly good and excellent results. Patients who suffer radial head fractures are typically of a younger age, resulting in high functional demands. Certainly, unspecific and specific complications related to radial head arthroplasty were reported in up to 40 % of cases in an acute fracture setting. This article highlights common complications in radial head arthroplasty and aims to present strategies to avoid them. PMID:27600571

  17. Resonance of human brain under head acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Laksari, Kaveh; Wu, Lyndia C.; Kurt, Mehmet; Kuo, Calvin; Camarillo, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Although safety standards have reduced fatal head trauma due to single severe head impacts, mild trauma from repeated head exposures may carry risks of long-term chronic changes in the brain's function and structure. To study the physical sensitivities of the brain to mild head impacts, we developed the first dynamic model of the skull–brain based on in vivo MRI data. We showed that the motion of the brain can be described by a rigid-body with constrained kinematics. We further demonstrated that skull–brain dynamics can be approximated by an under-damped system with a low-frequency resonance at around 15 Hz. Furthermore, from our previous field measurements, we found that head motions in a variety of activities, including contact sports, show a primary frequency of less than 20 Hz. This implies that typical head exposures may drive the brain dangerously close to its mechanical resonance and lead to amplified brain–skull relative motions. Our results suggest a possible cause for mild brain trauma, which could occur due to repetitive low-acceleration head oscillations in a variety of recreational and occupational activities. PMID:26063824

  18. Resonance of human brain under head acceleration.

    PubMed

    Laksari, Kaveh; Wu, Lyndia C; Kurt, Mehmet; Kuo, Calvin; Camarillo, David C

    2015-07-01

    Although safety standards have reduced fatal head trauma due to single severe head impacts, mild trauma from repeated head exposures may carry risks of long-term chronic changes in the brain's function and structure. To study the physical sensitivities of the brain to mild head impacts, we developed the first dynamic model of the skull-brain based on in vivo MRI data. We showed that the motion of the brain can be described by a rigid-body with constrained kinematics. We further demonstrated that skull-brain dynamics can be approximated by an under-damped system with a low-frequency resonance at around 15 Hz. Furthermore, from our previous field measurements, we found that head motions in a variety of activities, including contact sports, show a primary frequency of less than 20 Hz. This implies that typical head exposures may drive the brain dangerously close to its mechanical resonance and lead to amplified brain-skull relative motions. Our results suggest a possible cause for mild brain trauma, which could occur due to repetitive low-acceleration head oscillations in a variety of recreational and occupational activities.

  19. Radial head fractures--an update.

    PubMed

    Pike, Jeffrey M; Athwal, George S; Faber, Kenneth J; King, Graham J W

    2009-03-01

    Radial head fractures are the most common fractures occurring around the elbow. Although radial head fractures can occur in isolation, associated fractures and ligament injuries are common. Assembling the clinical presentation, physical examination, and imaging into an effective treatment plan can be challenging. The characteristics of the radial head fracture influence the technique used to optimize the outcome. Fragment number, displacement, impaction, and bone quality are considered when deciding between early motion, fragment excision, and radial head excision, repair, or replacement. Isolated, minimally displaced fractures without evidence of mechanical block can be treated nonsurgically with early active range of motion (ROM). Partial, displaced radial head fractures without evidence of mechanical block can be treated either nonsurgically or with open reduction internal fixation (ORIF), as current evidence does not prove superiority of either strategy. For displaced fractures with greater than 3 fragments, radial head replacement is recommended. Radial head arthroplasty may be preferred over tenuous fracture fixation in the setting of associated ligament injuries when maintenance of joint stability could be compromised by ineffective fracture fixation. PMID:19258159

  20. Compact organic vapor jet printing print head

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen; McGraw, Gregory

    2016-02-02

    A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print head further includes a first layer further comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

  1. Compact organic vapor jet printing print head

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stepehen R; McGraw, Gregory

    2015-01-27

    A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print head further includes a first layer further comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

  2. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  3. Head Lice: Malathion Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs of infestation. Does malathion kill head lice eggs? Yes. The malathion lotion (Ovide*) available by prescription in the United States can kill some lice eggs. Back To Top *Use of trade names is ...

  4. Ultrasound, normal fetus - head measurements (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Many health care providers like to have fetal measurements to verify the size of the fetus and ... any abnormalities. This ultrasound is of a head measurement, indicated by the cross hairs and dotted lines.

  5. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    SciTech Connect

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  6. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    SciTech Connect

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  7. [Minor Head Injury – a Silent Epidemic].

    PubMed

    Stocker, Reto; Letta, Claudio

    2016-05-11

    The vast majority out of the 20 000 patients annually hospitalized after sustaining a head injury belong to the minor head injury/cerebral concussion continuum. Fortunately, most of the patients show full recovery after days to weeks. However, about 15 % of these patients suffer from prolonged up to permanent sequels potentially impairing their quality of life to a considerable extent. This especially holds true for those who suffer from recurrent minor head injuries (i.e. victims from contact sport accidents). Unfortunately, many of these patients are never diagnosed in an appropriate way and therefore looked at as hypochondriacs or simulants. This prevents adequate rehabilitation and support. This review aims to present current knowledge about pathophysiology and clinical features of minor head injuries and to give some information about diagnostics and treatment according to current guidelines. PMID:27167479

  8. Compressional head waves in attenuative formations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Q.H.; Chang, C.

    1994-12-31

    The attenuation of compressional head waves in a fluid-filled borehole is studied with the branch-cut integration method. The borehole fluid and solid formation are both assumed lossy with quality factors Q{sub f}({omega}) for the fluid, and Q{sub c}({omega}) and Q{sub s}({omega}) for the compressional and shear waves in the solid, respectively. The branch-cut integration method used in this work is an extension of that for a lossless medium. With this branch-cut integration method, the authors can isolate the groups of individual arrivals such as the compressional head waves and shear head waves, and study the attenuation of those particular wavefields in lossy media. This study, coupled with experimental work to be performed, may result in an effective way of measuring compressional head wave attenuation in the field.

  9. Heater head for a Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Darooka, D.K.

    1988-09-06

    A heater head is described for a compound Stirling engine modules, each including a displacer cylinder coaxially aligned with the displacer cylinder of the other of the engine modules, a displacer piston mounted for reciprocation in the displacer cylinder.

  10. Vacuum compatible miniature CCD camera head

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.

    2000-01-01

    A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera head which can replace film for digital imaging of visible light, ultraviolet radiation, and soft to penetrating x-rays, such as within a target chamber where laser produced plasmas are studied. The camera head is small, capable of operating both in and out of a vacuum environment, and is versatile. The CCD camera head uses PC boards with an internal heat sink connected to the chassis for heat dissipation, which allows for close(0.04" for example) stacking of the PC boards. Integration of this CCD camera head into existing instrumentation provides a substantial enhancement of diagnostic capabilities for studying high energy density plasmas, for a variety of military industrial, and medical imaging applications.

  11. Evolution: Five Heads Are Better Than One.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Patrick C

    2016-04-01

    Three newly discovered species of fig-living nematodes display remarkable diversity in head morphology depending on their local environment. This shows that a great deal of ecological diversity can be maintained in the absence of substantial genetic variation.

  12. Musculocutaneous flaps in head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, A. G.

    1989-01-01

    The introduction of musculocutaneous flaps to head and neck reconstructive surgery is described. The flaps available are listed, and the most important ones described and illustrated. Both the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major flaps are felt to have a role in head and neck reconstruction, though they have largely been superseded by microvascular free flaps such as the radial forearm flap. Images fig. 1 fig. 2 fig. 3 fig. 4 fig. 5 fig. 6 fig. 7 fig. 8 PMID:2686511

  13. Delayed facial palsy after head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Puvanendran, K; Vitharana, M; Wong, P K

    1977-01-01

    Where facial palsy follows head injury after many days, the mechanism is not clear, and there has been no detailed study on this condition. In this prospective study, an attempt is made to estimate this complication of head injury, and to study its pathogenesis, natural history, prognosis, and sequelae which differ markedly from Bell's palsy. It has a much worse prognosis and so surgical decompression should be considered early in this condition. Images PMID:301556

  14. Head Impact Exposure in Collegiate Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Crisco, Joseph J.; Wilcox, Bethany J.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Chu, Jeffrey J.; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Rowson, Steve; Duma, Stefan M.; Maerlender, Arthur C.; McAllister, Thomas W.; Greenwald, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    In American football, impacts to the helmet and the resulting head accelerations are the primary cause of concussion injury and potentially chronic brain injury. The purpose of this study was to quantify exposures to impacts to the head (frequency, location and magnitude) for individual collegiate football players and to investigate differences in head impact exposure by player position. A total of 314 players were enrolled at three institutions and 286,636 head impacts were recorded over three seasons. The 95th percentile peak linear and rotational acceleration and HITsp (a composite severity measure) were 62.7g, 4378 rad/s2, and 32.6, respectively. These exposure measures as well as the frequency of impacts varied significantly by player position and by helmet impact location. Running backs (RB) and quarter backs (QB) received the greatest magnitude head impacts, while defensive line (DL), offensive line (OL) and line backers (LB) received the most frequent head impacts (more than twice as many than any other position). Impacts to the top of the helmet had the lowest peak rotational acceleration (2387 rad/s2), but the greatest peak linear acceleration (72.4 g), and were the least frequent of all locations (13.7%) among all positions. OL and QB had the highest (49.2%) and the lowest (23%.7%) frequency, respectively, of front impacts. QB received the greatest magnitude (70.8g and 5428 rad/s2) and the most frequent (44% and 38.9%) impacts to the back of the helmet. This study quantified head impact exposure in collegiate football, providing data that is critical to advancing the understanding of the biomechanics of concussive injuries and sub-concussive head impacts. PMID:21872862

  15. Intrathecal bupivacaine for head and neck pain.

    PubMed

    Belverud, Shawn A; Mogilner, Alon Y; Schulder, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Direct central nervous system (CNS) analgesic delivery is a useful option when more traditional means of dealing with chronic pain fail. Solutions containing local anesthetic have been effective in certain disease states, particularly in patients suffering from intractable head and neck pain. This review discusses historical aspects of CNS drug delivery and the role of intrathecal bupivacaine-containing solutions in refractory head and neck pain patients. PMID:22915879

  16. Can imaginary head tilt shorten postrotatory nystagmus?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gianna-Poulin, C. C.; Voelker, C. C.; Erickson, B.; Black, F. O.

    2001-01-01

    In healthy subjects, head tilt upon cessation of a constant-velocity yaw head rotation shortens the duration of postrotatory nystagmus. The presumed mechanism for this effect is that the velocity storage of horizontal semicircular canal inputs is being discharged by otolith organ inputs which signal a constant yaw head position when the head longitudinal axis is no longer earth-vertical. In the present study, normal subjects were rotated head upright in the dark on a vertical-axis rotational chair at 60 degrees/s for 75 s and were required to perform a specific task as soon as the chair stopped. Horizontal position of the right eye was recorded with an infra-red video camera. The average eye velocity (AEV) was measured over a 30-s interval following chair acceleration/deceleration. The ratios (postrotatory AEV/perrotatory AEV) were 1.1 (SD 0.112) when subjects (N=10) kept their head erect, 0.414 (SD 0.083) when subjects tilted their head forward, 1.003 (SD 0.108) when subjects imagined watching a TV show, 1.012 (SD 0.074) when subjects imagined looking at a painting on a wall, and 0.995 (SD 0.074) when subjects imagined floating in a prone position on a lake. Thus, while actual head tilt reduced postrotatory nystagmus, the imagination tasks did not have a statistically significant effect on postrotatory nystagmus. Therefore, velocity storage does not appear to be under the influence of cortical neural signals when subjects imagine that they are floating in a prone orientation.

  17. Head impact exposure in collegiate football players.

    PubMed

    Crisco, Joseph J; Wilcox, Bethany J; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Chu, Jeffrey J; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M; Maerlender, Arthur C; McAllister, Thomas W; Greenwald, Richard M

    2011-10-13

    In American football, impacts to the helmet and the resulting head accelerations are the primary cause of concussion injury and potentially chronic brain injury. The purpose of this study was to quantify exposures to impacts to the head (frequency, location and magnitude) for individual collegiate football players and to investigate differences in head impact exposure by player position. A total of 314 players were enrolled at three institutions and 286,636 head impacts were recorded over three seasons. The 95th percentile peak linear and rotational acceleration and HITsp (a composite severity measure) were 62.7g, 4378rad/s(2) and 32.6, respectively. These exposure measures as well as the frequency of impacts varied significantly by player position and by helmet impact location. Running backs (RB) and quarter backs (QB) received the greatest magnitude head impacts, while defensive line (DL), offensive line (OL) and line backers (LB) received the most frequent head impacts (more than twice as many than any other position). Impacts to the top of the helmet had the lowest peak rotational acceleration (2387rad/s(2)), but the greatest peak linear acceleration (72.4g), and were the least frequent of all locations (13.7%) among all positions. OL and QB had the highest (49.2%) and the lowest (23.7%) frequency, respectively, of front impacts. QB received the greatest magnitude (70.8g and 5428rad/s(2)) and the most frequent (44% and 38.9%) impacts to the back of the helmet. This study quantified head impact exposure in collegiate football, providing data that is critical to advancing the understanding of the biomechanics of concussive injuries and sub-concussive head impacts.

  18. Relative femoral head size in early hominids.

    PubMed

    Corruccini, R S; McHenry, H M

    1978-07-01

    Relative growth of the human femur head is studied by a logarithmic principal components method. Growth rates differ according to the population sampled and the other body dimensions being compared, and especially according to sex. The results do not support biomechanical assumptions of strongly positive allometry of the femur head, which have been used to argue that the australopithecine hip joint was not relatively small. PMID:98052

  19. [The head-body index used to access femoral head size].

    PubMed

    Kruczyński, Jacek; Wierusz-Kozłowska, Małgorzata

    2003-01-01

    Basing on an analysis of 260 X-rays of healthy hip joints in children and adults the authors present a head-body index (according to Kruczyński), used to assess femoral head size. The index is defined as the ratio of the circumference of circle drawn around the femoral head to the body width of the femur (measured below the minor trochanter). In patients less than 17 years old the index was 170 (SD-14.6). PMID:14564800

  20. Modulation of Head Movement Control During Walking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Verstraete, Mary C.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Paloski, William H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the coordination of the head relative to the trunk within a gait cycle during gaze fixation. Nine normal subjects walked on a motorized treadmill driven at 1.79 m/sec (20 s trials) while fixing their gaze on a centrally located earth-fixed target positioned at a distance of 2m from their eyes. The relative motion of the head and the net torque acting on it relative to the trunk during the gait cycle were used as measures of coordination. It was found that the net torque applied to the head counteracts the destabilizing forces acting on the upper body during locomotion. The average net torque impulse was significantly different (p less than 0.05) between the heel strike and swing phases and were found to be symmetrical between the right and left leg events of the gait cycle. However, the average net displacement of the head relative to the trunk was maintained uniform (p greater than 0.05) throughout the gait cycle. Thus, the coordination of the motion of the head relative to the trunk during walking is dynamically modulated depending on the behavioral events occurring in the gait cycle. This modulation may serve to aid stabilization of the head by counteracting the force variations acting on the upper body that may aid in the visual fixing of targets during walking.

  1. Cold head maintenance with minimal service interruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovinsky, A. L.; Michael, P. C.; Zhukovsky, A.; Forton, E.; Paradis, Y.; Nuttens, V.; Minervini, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    Turn-key superconducting magnet systems are increasingly conduction-cooled by cryogenerators. Gifford-McMahon systems are reliable and cost effective, but require annual maintenance. A usual method of servicing is replacing the cold head of the cryocooler. It requires a complicated design with a vacuum chamber separate from the main vacuum of the cryostat, as well as detachable thermal contacts, which add to the thermal resistance of the cooling heat path and reduce the reliability of the system. We present a rapid warm-up scheme to bring the cold head body, which remains rigidly affixed to the cold mass, to room temperature, while the cold mass remains at cryogenic temperature. Electric heaters thermally attached to the cold head stations are used to warm them up, which permits conventional cold head maintenance with no danger of contaminating the inside of the cold head body. This scheme increases the efficiency of the cooling system, facilitates annual maintenance of the cold head and returning the magnet to operation in a short time.

  2. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, T.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Woods, G.K.

    1999-08-17

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers. 6 figs.

  3. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Thomas M.; Davidson, James R.; Woods, Gregory K.

    1999-01-01

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers.

  4. Effect of heading perception on microsaccade dynamics.

    PubMed

    Piras, Alessandro; Raffi, Milena; Persiani, Michela; Perazzolo, Monica; Squatrito, Salvatore

    2016-10-01

    The present study shows the relationship between microsaccades and heading perception. Recent research demonstrates that microsaccades during fixation are necessary to overcome loss of vision due to continuous stimulation of the retinal receptors, even at the potential cost of a decrease in visual acuity. The goal of oculomotor fixational mechanisms might be not retinal stabilization, but controlled image motion adjusted to be optimal for visual processing. Thus, patterns of microsaccades may be exploited to help to understand the oculomotor system, aspects of visual perception, and the dynamics of visual attention. We presented an expansion optic flow in which the dot speed simulated a heading directed to the left or to the right of the subject, who had to signal the perceived heading by making a saccade toward the perceived direction. We recorded microsaccades during the optic flow stimulation to investigate their characteristics before and after the response. The time spent on heading perception was similar between right and left direction, and response latency was shorter during correct than incorrect responses. Furthermore, we observed that correct heading perception is associated with longer, larger and faster microsaccade characteristics. The time-course of microsaccade rate shows a modulation across the perception process similar to that seen for other local perception tasks, while the main direction is oriented toward the opposite side with respect to the perceived heading. Microsaccades enhance visual perception and, therefore, represent a fundamental motor process, with a specific effect for the build-up of global visual perception of space. PMID:27327105

  5. Protection of the side of the head.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, A; Mills, N J

    1996-07-01

    The side of the head is a frequent impact site for pedal cyclists, motorcyclists, and industrial workers. It is vulnerable to impact, yet many helmet standards do not have impact tests at the side of the helmet. Laboratory impact tests should reproduce the phenomena in real impacts, but usually they do not allow the headform to rotate, or ignore the effect of the neck on the motion of the head. The authors designed a linkage, simulating the flexibility of the neck, for use with anthropomorphic dummies in helmet testing. Impacts at the side of the helmet, normal to the helmet surface, were made with flat and hemispherical strikers. Head rotation during impacts caused the impact site to move, in some cases to below the level protected by the helmet. The peak angular head acceleration correlated with the peak linear accelerations. Neck flexibility means that helmets can protect the head from higher kinetic energy impacts than those specified in standards using immovable headforms or impact anvils. The load spreading efficiency of polypropylene foam, used in soft shell bicycle helmets, is better than that of polystyrene foam. The authors conclude that the side of the head can be protected by a suitable helmet design.

  6. Thailand's head-on approach.

    PubMed

    Ismartono, Y

    1989-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) education in Thailand takes place in such unlikely places as bars and prisons. A gay activist and founder of the Fraternity for AIDS Cessation in Thailand (FACT) informs bar patrons and the homosexual community in Thailand on AIDS and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). 5 brightly dressed male dancers perform with this activist whose name is Natee Teerarojanapong. They visit gay bars and bath houses in Bangkok and will now go to the provinces. The Thai government realizes the seriousness of the AIDS problem. Recently it began a 3-year program and set up an AIDS Prevention and Control Center headed by the Ministry of Public Health. It has started an intensive information campaign. Plans to distribute 30 million condoms are underway. This year's AIDS budget has been increased. The government has called upon nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and the private sector to help. With FACT, groups like Empower, a sister organization of prostitutes, the Duang Prateep Foundation of the Klong Toey slums, Population and Development Association (PDA), the Red Cross and Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand (PPAT) have begun their own AIDS prevention and control programs. Public Health Ministry officials say only 18 persons are showing full-blown AIDS symptoms. But, more than 7500 tested positive for HIV antibodies. 84% of current seropositives are intravenous drug users; there are an estimated 500,000 heroin addicts in Thailand. The main activities of the AIDS programs has been concerned with heroin addiction. 400,000 of the 1/2 million heroin addicts are in Bangkok. In Klong Toey, the biggest slum area in Bangkok, the AIDS problem is compounded by extreme poverty. The Thai Red Cross is very active in the AIDS program. Officials at Bangkok's Klong Prem prison are being trained by PPAT. They are taught about AIDS control and prevention. Among the 400 prison inmates, those infected with AIDS are mostly intravenous drug users; some

  7. What are Head Cavities? - A History of Studies on Vertebrate Head Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Adachi, Noritaka

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by the discovery of segmental epithelial coeloms, or "head cavities," in elasmobranch embryos toward the end of the 19th century, the debate over the presence of mesodermal segments in the vertebrate head became a central problem in comparative embryology. The classical segmental view assumed only one type of metamerism in the vertebrate head, in which each metamere was thought to contain one head somite and one pharyngeal arch, innervated by a set of cranial nerves serially homologous to dorsal and ventral roots of spinal nerves. The non-segmental view, on the other hand, rejected the somite-like properties of head cavities. A series of small mesodermal cysts in early Torpedo embryos, which were thought to represent true somite homologs, provided a third possible view on the nature of the vertebrate head. Recent molecular developmental data have shed new light on the vertebrate head problem, explaining that head mesoderm evolved, not by the modification of rostral somites of an amphioxus-like ancestor, but through the polarization of unspecified paraxial mesoderm into head mesoderm anteriorly and trunk somites posteriorly. PMID:27268975

  8. Development of age-specific Japanese head phantoms for dose evaluation in paediatric head CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Fujii, K; Akahane, K; Yamauchi, M; Narai, K; Aoyama, T; Katsu, T; Obara, S; Imai, K; Ikeda, M

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the authors developed age-specific physical head phantoms simulating the physique of Japanese children for dose evaluation in paediatric head computed tomography (CT) examinations. Anatomical structures at 99 places in 0-, 0.5-, 1- and 3-y-old Japanese patients were measured using DICOM viewer software from CT images, and the head phantom of each age was designed. For trial manufacture, a 3-y-old head phantom consisting of acrylic resin and gypsum was produced by machine processing. Radiation doses for the head phantom were measured with radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeters and Si-pin photodiode dosemeters. To investigate whether the phantom shape was suitable for dose evaluation, organ doses in the same scan protocol were compared between the 3-y-old head and commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms having approximately the same head size. The doses of organs in both phantoms were equivalent. The authors' designed paediatric head phantom will be useful for dose evaluation in paediatric head CT examinations.

  9. Predictors of Positive Head CT Scan and Neurosurgical Procedures After Minor Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kisat, Mehreen; Zafar, Syed Nabeel; Latif, Asad; Villegas, Cassandra V.; Efron, David T.; Stevens, Kent A.; Haut, Elliott R; Schneider, Eric B.; Zafar, Hasnain; Haider, Adil H.

    2012-01-01

    Background There continues to be an ongoing debate regarding the utility of Head CT scans in patients with a normal Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) after minor head injury. The objective of this study is to determine patient and injury characteristics that predict a positive head CT scan or need for a Neurosurgical Procedure (NSP) among patients with blunt head injury and a normal GCS. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of adult patients in the National Trauma Data Bank who presented to the ED with a history of blunt head injury and a normal GCS of 15. The primary outcomes were a positive head CT scan or a NSP. Multivariate logistic regression controlling for patient and injury characteristics was used to determine predictors of each outcome. Results Out of a total of 83,566 patients, 24,414 (29.2%) had a positive head CT scan and 3,476 (4.2%) underwent a NSP. Older patients and patients with a history of fall (as compared to a motor vehicle crash) were more likely to have a positive finding on a head CT scan. Male patients, African-Americans (as compared to Caucasians) and those who presented with a fall were more likely to have a NSP. Conclusions Older age, male gender, ethnicity and mechanism of injury are significant predictors of a positive finding on head CT scans and the need for neurosurgical procedures. This study highlights patient and injury specific characteristics that may help in identifying patients with supposedly minor head injury who will benefit from a head CT scan. PMID:21872271

  10. 21 CFR 892.1920 - Radiographic head holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiographic head holder. 892.1920 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1920 Radiographic head holder. (a) Identification. A radiographic head holder is a device intended to position the patient's head during...

  11. 49 CFR 179.220-8 - Tank heads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tank heads. 179.220-8 Section 179.220-8...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-8 Tank heads. (a) Tank heads of the inner... dished or ellipsoidal for pressure on concave side. (b) Flanged and dished heads must have main...

  12. 5 CFR 185.139 - Appeal to authority head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appeal to authority head. 185.139 Section... FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.139 Appeal to authority head. (a) Any defendant who has filed a timely answer... such decision to the authority head by filing a notice of appeal with the authority head in...

  13. 28 CFR 71.39 - Appeal to authority head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appeal to authority head. 71.39 Section... Justice § 71.39 Appeal to authority head. (a) Any defendant who has filed a timely answer and who is... the authority head by filing a notice of appeal with the authority head in accordance with...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1920 - Radiographic head holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic head holder. 892.1920 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1920 Radiographic head holder. (a) Identification. A radiographic head holder is a device intended to position the patient's head during...

  15. 34 CFR 33.39 - Appeal to Department head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Appeal to Department head. 33.39 Section 33.39... to Department head. (a) Any defendant who has filed a timely answer and who is determined in an... head by filing a notice of appeal with the Department head in accordance with this section. (b)(1)...

  16. 31 CFR 7.3 - Responsibilities of heads of offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Responsibilities of heads of offices... INVENTIONS § 7.3 Responsibilities of heads of offices. (a) Heads of bureaus or offices in the Department... part. (b) Heads of bureaus or offices are responsible for obtaining from the employee the...

  17. 22 CFR 35.39 - Appeal to authority head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Appeal to authority head. 35.39 Section 35.39... Appeal to authority head. (a) Any defendant who has filed a timely answer and who is determined in an... head by filing a notice of appeal with the authority head in accordance with this section. (b)(1)...

  18. 5 CFR 185.139 - Appeal to authority head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appeal to authority head. 185.139 Section... FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.139 Appeal to authority head. (a) Any defendant who has filed a timely answer... such decision to the authority head by filing a notice of appeal with the authority head in...

  19. 49 CFR 572.142 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly and test procedure. 572.142 Section...-year-Old Child Crash Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.142 Head assembly and test procedure. (a) The head assembly (refer to § 572.140(a)(1)(i)) for this test consists of the head (drawing 210-1000), adapter...

  20. 45 CFR 79.39 - Appeal to authority head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Appeal to authority head. 79.39 Section 79.39... REMEDIES § 79.39 Appeal to authority head. (a) Any defendant who has filed a timely answer and who is... the authority head by filing a notice of appeal with the authority head in accordance with...